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Sample records for alphavirus rna synthesis

  1. Self-replicating alphavirus RNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Karl; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant nucleic acids are considered as promising next-generation vaccines. These vaccines express the native antigen upon delivery into tissue, thus mimicking live attenuated vaccines without having the risk of reversion to pathogenicity. They also stimulate the innate immune system, thus potentiating responses. Nucleic acid vaccines are easy to produce at reasonable cost and are stable. During the past years, focus has been on the use of plasmid DNA for vaccination. Now mRNA and replicon vaccines have come into focus as promising technology platforms for vaccine development. This review discusses self-replicating RNA vaccines developed from alphavirus expression vectors. These replicon vaccines can be delivered as RNA, DNA or as recombinant virus particles. All three platforms have been pre-clinically evaluated as vaccines against a number of infectious diseases and cancer. Results have been very encouraging and propelled the first human clinical trials, the results of which have been promising.

  2. A novel system for the launch of alphavirus RNA synthesis reveals a role for the Imd pathway in arthropod antiviral response.

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    Vasanthi Avadhanula

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are RNA viruses transmitted between vertebrate hosts by arthropod vectors, primarily mosquitoes. How arthropods counteract alphaviruses or viruses per se is not very well understood. Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying innate immunity against bacterial and fungal infections. In this study we report the use of a novel system to analyze replication of Sindbis virus (type species of the alphavirus genus RNA following expression of a Sindbis virus replicon RNA from the fly genome. We demonstrate deficits in the immune deficiency (Imd pathway enhance viral replication while mutations in the Toll pathway fail to affect replication. Similar results were observed with intrathoracic injections of whole virus and confirmed in cultured mosquito cells. These findings show that the Imd pathway mediates an antiviral response to Sindbis virus replication. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of an antiviral role for the Imd pathway in insects.

  3. Subgenomic reporter RNA system for detection of alphavirus infection in mosquitoes.

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    J Jordan Steel

    Full Text Available Current methods for detecting real-time alphavirus (Family Togaviridae infection in mosquitoes require the use of recombinant viruses engineered to express a visibly detectable reporter protein. These altered viruses expressing fluorescent proteins, usually from a duplicated viral subgenomic reporter, are effective at marking infection but tend to be attenuated due to the modification of the genome. Additionally, field strains of viruses cannot be visualized using this approach unless infectious clones can be developed to insert a reporter protein. To circumvent these issues, we have developed an insect cell-based system for detecting wild-type sindbis virus infection that uses a virus inducible promoter to express a fluorescent reporter gene only upon active virus infection. We have developed an insect expression system that produces sindbis virus minigenomes containing a subgenomic promoter sequence, which produces a translatable RNA species only when infectious virus is present and providing viral replication proteins. This subgenomic reporter RNA system is able to detect wild-type Sindbis infection in cultured mosquito cells. The detection system is relatively species specific and only detects closely related viruses, but can detect low levels of alphavirus specific replication early during infection. A chikungunya virus detection system was also developed that specifically detects chikungunya virus infection. Transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquito families were established that constitutively express the sindbis virus reporter RNA and were found to only express fluorescent proteins during virus infection. This virus inducible reporter system demonstrates a novel approach for detecting non-recombinant virus infection in mosquito cell culture and in live transgenic mosquitoes.

  4. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines

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    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication-proficient particles. Moreover, in vitro transcribed RNA, as well as layered DNA vectors have been applied for immunization. A large number of highly immunogenic viral structural proteins expressed from alphavirus vectors have elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in multispecies animal models. Furthermore, immunization studies have demonstrated robust protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus in rodents and primates. Similarly, vaccination with alphavirus vectors expressing tumor antigens resulted in prophylactic protection against challenges with tumor-inducing cancerous cells. As certain alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus, have been associated with epidemics in animals and humans, attention has also been paid to the development of vaccines against alphaviruses themselves. Recent progress in alphavirus vector development and vaccine technology has allowed conducting clinical trials in humans.

  5. Suppression of RNA interference increases alphavirus replication and virus-associated mortality in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

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    Geiss Brian J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses can persistently infect and cause limited damage to mosquito vectors. RNA interference (RNAi is a mosquito antiviral response important in restricting RNA virus replication and has been shown to be active against some arboviruses. The goal of this study was to use a recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae; genus Alphavirus that expresses B2 protein of Flock House virus (FHV; family Nodaviridae; genus Alphanodavirus, a protein that inhibits RNAi, to determine the effects of linking arbovirus infection with RNAi inhibition. Results B2 protein expression from SINV (TE/3'2J inhibited the accumulation of non-specific small RNAs in Aedes aegypti mosquito cell culture and virus-specific small RNAs both in infected cell culture and Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. More viral genomic and subgenomic RNA accumulated in cells and mosquitoes infected with TE/3'2J virus expressing B2 (TE/3'2J/B2 compared to TE/3'2J and TE/3'2J virus expressing GFP. TE/3'2J/B2 exhibited increased infection rates, dissemination rates, and infectious virus titers in mosquitoes following oral bloodmeal. Following infectious oral bloodmeal, significantly more mosquitoes died when TE/3'2J/B2 was ingested. The virus was 100% lethal following intrathoracic inoculation of multiple mosquito species and lethality was dose-dependent in Ae. aegypti. Conclusion We show that RNAi is active in Ae. aegypti cell culture and that B2 protein inhibits RNAi in mosquito cells when expressed by a recombinant SINV. Also, SINV more efficiently replicates in mosquito cells when RNAi is inhibited. Finally, TE/3'2J/B2 kills mosquitoes in a dose-dependent manner independent of infection route and mosquito species.

  6. Alphavirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fros, Jelke J.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2016-01-01

    Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to t

  7. Synthesis of cellulose nanocrystals carrying tyrosine sulfate mimetic ligands and inhibition of alphavirus infection.

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    Zoppe, Justin O; Ruottinen, Ville; Ruotsalainen, Janne; Rönkkö, Seppo; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Hinkkanen, Ari; Järvinen, Kristiina; Seppälä, Jukka

    2014-04-14

    We present two facile approaches for introducing multivalent displays of tyrosine sulfate mimetic ligands on the surface of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) for application as viral inhibitors. We tested the efficacy of cellulose nanocrystals, prepared either from cotton fibers or Whatman filter paper, to inhibit alphavirus infectivity in Vero (B) cells. Cellulose nanocrystals were produced by sulfuric acid hydrolysis leading to nanocrystal surfaces decorated with anionic sulfate groups. When the fluorescent marker expressing Semliki Forest virus vector, VA7-EGFP, was incubated with CNCs, strong inhibition of virus infectivity was achieved, up to 100 and 88% for cotton and Whatman CNCs, respectively. When surface sulfate groups of CNCs were exchanged for tyrosine sulfate mimetic groups (i.e. phenyl sulfonates), improved viral inhibition was attained. Our observations suggest that the conjugation of target-specific functionalities to CNC surfaces provides a means to control their antiviral activity. Multivalent CNCs did not cause observable in vitro cytotoxicity to Vero (B) cells or human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells, even within the 100% virus-inhibitory concentrations. Based on the similar chemistry of known polyanionic inhibitors, our results suggest the potential application of CNCs as inhibitors of other viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex viruses. PMID:24628489

  8. BST2/Tetherin Inhibition of Alphavirus Exit

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    Yaw Shin Ooi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses such as chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Semliki Forest virus (SFV are small enveloped RNA viruses that bud from the plasma membrane. Tetherin/BST2 is an interferon-induced host membrane protein that inhibits the release of many enveloped viruses via direct tethering of budded particles to the cell surface. Alphaviruses have highly organized structures and exclude host membrane proteins from the site of budding, suggesting that their release might be insensitive to tetherin inhibition. Here, we demonstrated that exogenously-expressed tetherin efficiently inhibited the release of SFV and CHIKV particles from host cells without affecting virus entry and infection. Alphavirus release was also inhibited by the endogenous levels of tetherin in HeLa cells. While rubella virus (RuV and dengue virus (DENV have structural similarities to alphaviruses, tetherin inhibited the release of RuV but not DENV. We found that two recently identified tetherin isoforms differing in length at the N-terminus exhibited distinct capabilities in restricting alphavirus release. SFV exit was efficiently inhibited by the long isoform but not the short isoform of tetherin, while both isoforms inhibited vesicular stomatitis virus exit. Thus, in spite of the organized structure of the virus particle, tetherin specifically blocks alphavirus release and shows an interesting isoform requirement.

  9. Catalysis and prebiotic RNA synthesis

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    Ferris, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The essential role of catalysis for the origins of life is discussed. The status of the prebiotic synthesis of 2',5'- and 3'5'-linked oligomers of RNA is reviewed. Examples of the role of metal ion and mineral catalysis in RNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  10. Replication of Alphaviruses: A Review on the Entry Process of Alphaviruses into Cells

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    Jason Yat-Sing Leung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are small, enveloped viruses, ~70 nm in diameter, containing a single-stranded, positive-sense, RNA genome. Viruses belonging to this genus are predominantly arthropod-borne viruses, known to cause disease in humans. Their potential threat to human health was most recently exemplified by the 2005 Chikungunya virus outbreak in La Reunion, highlighting the necessity to understand events in the life-cycle of these medically important human pathogens. The replication and propagation of viruses is dependent on entry into permissive cells. Viral entry is initiated by attachment of virions to cells, leading to internalization, and uncoating to release genetic material for replication and propagation. Studies on alphaviruses have revealed entry via a receptor-mediated, endocytic pathway. In this paper, the different stages of alphavirus entry are examined, with examples from Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, Chikungunya virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus described.

  11. RNA structures regulating nidovirus RNA synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Born, Erwin van den

    2006-01-01

    Viruses depend on their host cell for the production of their progeny. The genetic information that is required to regulate this process is contained in the viral genome. In the case of plus-stranded RNA viruses, like nidoviruses, the RNA genome is directly involved in translation (resulting in the

  12. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the “Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)” conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5–6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to...

  13. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies novel host proteins required for alphavirus entry.

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    Yaw Shin Ooi

    Full Text Available The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ, a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy.

  14. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

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    Sohan Jheeta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the “Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA” conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5–6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to recognize the significance of RNA in LUCA. We believe that the prebiotic RNA synthesis from its monomers must have been a simple process. As a first step, it may have required activation of the 5'-end of the mononucleotide with a leaving group, e.g., imidazole in our model reaction (Figure 1. Wide ranges of activating groups are produced from HCN under plausible prebiotic Earth conditions. The final step is clay mineral catalysis in the presence of mineral salts to facilitate selective production of functional RNA. Both the clay minerals and mineral salts would have been abundant on early Earth. We have demonstrated that while montmorillonite (pH 7 produced only dimers from its monomers in water, addition of sodium chloride (1 M enhanced the chain length multifold, as detected by HPLC. The effect of monovalent cations on RNA synthesis was of the following order: Li+ > Na+ > K+. A similar effect was observed with the anions, enhancing catalysis in the following order: Cl− > Br− > I−. The montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis was not affected by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. We thus show that prebiotic synthesis of RNA from its monomers was a simple process requiring only clay minerals and a small amount of salt.

  15. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

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    Jheeta, Sohan; Joshi, Prakash C.

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the "Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)" conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5-6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to recognize the significance of RNA in LUCA. We believe that the prebiotic RNA synthesis from its monomers must have been a simple process. As a first step, it may have required activation of the 5'-end of the mononucleotide with a leaving group, e.g., imidazole in our model reaction (Figure 1). Wide ranges of activating groups are produced from HCN under plausible prebiotic Earth conditions. The final step is clay mineral catalysis in the presence of mineral salts to facilitate selective production of functional RNA. Both the clay minerals and mineral salts would have been abundant on early Earth. We have demonstrated that while montmorillonite (pH 7) produced only dimers from its monomers in water, addition of sodium chloride (1 M) enhanced the chain length multifold, as detected by HPLC. The effect of monovalent cations on RNA synthesis was of the following order: Li+ > Na+ > K+. A similar effect was observed with the anions, enhancing catalysis in the following order: Cl- > Br- > I-. The montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis was not affected by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. We thus show that prebiotic synthesis of RNA from its monomers was a simple process requiring only clay minerals and a small amount of salt.

  16. Discovery of berberine, abamectin and ivermectin as antivirals against chikungunya and other alphaviruses.

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    Varghese, Finny S; Kaukinen, Pasi; Gläsker, Sabine; Bespalov, Maxim; Hanski, Leena; Wennerberg, Krister; Kümmerer, Beate M; Ahola, Tero

    2016-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic arbovirus of the Alphavirus genus, which has infected millions of people after its re-emergence in the last decade. In this study, a BHK cell line containing a stable CHIKV replicon with a luciferase reporter was used in a high-throughput platform to screen approximately 3000 compounds. Following initial validation, 25 compounds were chosen as primary hits for secondary validation with wild type and reporter CHIKV infection, which identified three promising compounds. Abamectin (EC50 = 1.5 μM) and ivermectin (EC50 = 0.6 μM) are fermentation products generated by a soil dwelling actinomycete, Streptomyces avermitilis, whereas berberine (EC50 = 1.8 μM) is a plant-derived isoquinoline alkaloid. They inhibited CHIKV replication in a dose-dependent manner and had broad antiviral activity against other alphaviruses--Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus. Abamectin and ivermectin were also active against yellow fever virus, a flavivirus. These compounds caused reduced synthesis of CHIKV genomic and antigenomic viral RNA as well as downregulation of viral protein expression. Time of addition experiments also suggested that they act on the replication phase of the viral infectious cycle.

  17. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortín, Juan, E-mail: jortin@cnb.csic.es [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC) and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (ISCIII), Madrid (Spain); Martín-Benito, Jaime, E-mail: jmartinb@cnb.csic.es [Department of Macromolecular Structures, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  18. Mechanistic analysis of RNA synthesis by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from two promoters reveals similarities to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Adkins, S; Stawicki, S S; Faurote, G; Siegel, R W; Kao, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    The brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) directs template-specific synthesis of (-)-strand genomic and (+)-strand subgenomic RNAs in vitro. Although the requirements for (-)-strand RNA synthesis have been characterized previously, the mechanism of subgenomic RNA synthesis has not. Mutational analysis of the subgenomic promoter revealed that the +1 cytidylate and the +2 adenylate are important for RNA synthesis. Unlike (-)-strand RNA synthesis, which required only a hig...

  19. RNA synthesis during cleavage of the Lymnaea egg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biggelaar, J.A.M. van den

    1971-01-01

    In eggs of Lymnaea RNA synthesis can be detected autoradiographically from the 8- to the 16-cell stage. From the 16- to the 24-cell stage distinct nucleoli reappear which are immediately engaged in RNA synthesis.

  20. Alphavirus mutator variants present host-specific defects and attenuation in mammalian and insect models.

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    Kathryn Rozen-Gagnon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arboviruses cycle through both vertebrates and invertebrates, which requires them to adapt to disparate hosts while maintaining genetic integrity during genome replication. To study the genetic mechanisms and determinants of these processes, we use chikungunya virus (CHIKV, a re-emerging human pathogen transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. We previously isolated a high fidelity (or antimutator polymerase variant, C483Y, which had decreased fitness in both mammalian and mosquito hosts, suggesting this residue may be a key molecular determinant. To further investigate effects of position 483 on RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp fidelity, we substituted every amino acid at this position. We isolated novel mutators with decreased replication fidelity and higher mutation frequencies, allowing us to examine the fitness of error-prone arbovirus variants. Although CHIKV mutators displayed no major replication defects in mammalian cell culture, they had reduced specific infectivity and were attenuated in vivo. Unexpectedly, mutator phenotypes were suppressed in mosquito cells and the variants exhibited significant defects in RNA synthesis. Consequently, these replication defects resulted in strong selection for reversion during infection of mosquitoes. Since residue 483 is conserved among alphaviruses, we examined the analogous mutations in Sindbis virus (SINV, which also reduced polymerase fidelity and generated replication defects in mosquito cells. However, replication defects were mosquito cell-specific and were not observed in Drosophila S2 cells, allowing us to evaluate the potential attenuation of mutators in insect models where pressure for reversion was absent. Indeed, the SINV mutator variant was attenuated in fruit flies. These findings confirm that residue 483 is a determinant regulating alphavirus polymerase fidelity and demonstrate proof of principle that arboviruses can be attenuated in mammalian and insect hosts by reducing fidelity.

  1. Alphavirus Restriction by IFITM Proteins.

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    Weston, Stuart; Czieso, Stephanie; White, Ian J; Smith, Sarah E; Wash, Rachael S; Diaz-Soria, Carmen; Kellam, Paul; Marsh, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) are broad-spectrum antiviral factors. In cell culture the entry of many enveloped viruses, including orthomyxo-, flavi-, and filoviruses, is inhibited by IFITMs, though the mechanism(s) involved remain unclear and may vary between viruses. We demonstrate that Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), which both use endocytosis and acid-induced membrane fusion in early endosomes to infect cells, are restricted by the early endosomal IFITM3. The late endosomal IFITM2 is less restrictive and the plasma membrane IFITM1 does not inhibit normal infection by either virus. IFITM3 inhibits release of the SFV capsid into the cytosol, without inhibiting binding, internalization, trafficking to endosomes or low pH-induced conformational changes in the envelope glycoprotein. Infection by SFV fusion at the cell surface was inhibited by IFITM1, but was equally inhibited by IFITM3. Furthermore, an IFITM3 mutant (Y20A) that is localized to the plasma membrane inhibited infection by cell surface fusion more potently than IFITM1. Together, these results indicate that IFITMs, in particular IFITM3, can restrict alphavirus infection by inhibiting viral fusion with cellular membranes. That IFITM3 can restrict SFV infection by fusion at the cell surface equivalently to IFITM1 suggests that IFITM3 has greater antiviral potency against SFV. PMID:27219333

  2. Flaviviral Replication Complex: Coordination between RNA Synthesis and 5'-RNA Capping.

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    Klema, Valerie J; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Choi, Kyung H

    2015-08-13

    Genome replication in flavivirus requires (-) strand RNA synthesis, (+) strand RNA synthesis, and 51-RNA capping and methylation. To carry out viral genome replication, flavivirus assembles a replication complex, consisting of both viral and host proteins, on the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Two major components of the replication complex are the viral non-structural (NS) proteins NS3 and NS5. Together they possess all the enzymatic activities required for genome replication, yet how these activities are coordinated during genome replication is not clear. We provide an overview of the flaviviral genome replication process, the membrane-bound replication complex, and recent crystal structures of full-length NS5. We propose a model of how NS3 and NS5 coordinate their activities in the individual steps of (-) RNA synthesis, (+) RNA synthesis, and 51-RNA capping and methylation.

  3. Next-generation salmonid alphavirus vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aquaculture is essential to meet the current and future demands for seafood to feed the world population. Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout are two of the most cultured aquaculture species. A pathogen that threatens these species is salmonid alphavirus (SAV). A current inactivated virus vac

  4. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

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    Leena Pohjala

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2, obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs. The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV, their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate

  5. Inhibition of DNA-dependent RNA synthesis by 8-methoxypsoralen.

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    Gniazdowski, M; Czyz, M; Wilmańska, D; Studzian, K; Frasunek, M; Płucienniczak, A; Szmigiero, L

    1988-09-01

    The effect of the photobinding of 8-methoxypsoralen to phage T7 DNA on different steps of RNA synthesis in vitro was assayed. Total RNA synthesis is reduced to a few percent and the transcript size is decreased, as shown by means of gel filtration on a Sepharose 4B column when DNA of the adduct content of six drug molecules per 10(3) nucleotides is used. The initiation of RNA chains seems to be less affected, as inferred from an abortive initiation assay. Synthesis of pppApU on DNA of the same adduct content is inhibited to 34% of the corresponding controls, while the overall RNA synthesis is inhibited to 6%. The amount of the enzyme needed for maximal retention of DNA, the kinetics of its binding and the decay of the polymerase-DNA complex at high ionic strength (or on decrease of the temperature) are similar with DNA either irradiated in the absence of the drug or DNA bearing six 8-methoxypsoralen molecules per 10(3) nucleotides. It is concluded from this study that 8-methoxypsoralen partially inhibits initiation and blocks movement of RNA polymerase along the template, inducing premature termination. It does not appear to influence the binding of the enzyme to DNA. PMID:3048406

  6. 甲病毒载体的研究进展%Review on Alphavirus-based Vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚文芝; 刘灿; 张东东; 宁宜宝

    2015-01-01

    Alphaviruses belong to the family of Togaviridae, which are encapsulated by a capsid protein and possess single strand plus RNA. In recent years, the domestic and foreign research on alphavirus-based vectors is active and the alphavirus-based vectors have been used for vaccine research, gene therapy and molecular biology research. Based on the structural principle, the alphavirus vectors are classified into three main types:replication-competent vector, replication-deficient vectors and DNA-layered vector. In this review, the transformation, characteristics and application of three different alphavirus-based vectors are discussed in order to provide references for the development of safer, more effective alphavirus-based vectors.%甲病毒属于披膜病毒科,是一类有包膜的单股正链RNA病毒。近些年来,国内外有关甲病毒载体的研究非常活跃,其已被用于疫苗研究、基因治疗以及分子生物学等研究领域。基于甲病毒载体的构造原理,将其分为三类,分别为复制完全型载体、复制缺陷型载体和DNA/RNA载体。就这三类载体的改造过程进行了探讨,并对这三类载体的特点及其应用研究进展等方面进行了阐述,以期为开发出更安全、更有效的甲病毒载体提供参考。

  7. Guanosine tetraphosphate as a global regulator of bacterial RNA synthesis: a model involving RNA polymerase pausing and queuing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, H; Ehrenberg, M

    1995-05-17

    A recently reported comparison of stable RNA (rRNA, tRNA) and mRNA synthesis rates in ppGpp-synthesizing and ppGpp-deficient (delta relA delta spoT) bacteria has suggested that ppGpp inhibits transcription initiation from stable RNA promoters, as well as synthesis of (bulk) mRNA. Inhibition of stable RNA synthesis occurs mainly during slow growth of bacteria when cytoplasmic levels of ppGpp are high. In contrast, inhibition of mRNA occurs mainly during fast growth when ppGpp levels are low, and it is associated with a partial inactivation of RNA polymerase. To explain these observations it has been proposed that ppGpp causes transcriptional pausing and queuing during the synthesis of mRNA. Polymerase queuing requires high rates of transcription initiation in addition to polymerase pausing, and therefore high concentrations of free RNA polymerase. These conditions are found in fast growing bacteria. Furthermore, the RNA polymerase queues lead to a promoter blocking when RNA polymerase molecules stack up from the pause site back to the (mRNA) promoter. This occurs most frequently at pause sites close to the promoter. Blocking of mRNA promoters diverts RNA polymerase to stable RNA promoters. In this manner ppGpp could indirectly stimulate synthesis of stable RNA at high growth rates. In the present work a mathematical analysis, based on the theory of queuing, is presented and applied to the global control of transcription in bacteria. This model predicts the in vivo distribution of RNA polymerase over stable RNA and mRNA genes for both ppGpp-synthesizing and ppGpp-deficient bacteria in response to different environmental conditions. It also shows how small changes in basal ppGpp concentrations can produce large changes in the rate of stable RNA synthesis. PMID:7539631

  8. DNA and RNA induced enantioselectivity in chemical synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfes, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of DNA and RNA structures is their elegant chirality. Using these chiral structures to induce enantioselectivity in chemical synthesis is as enticing as it is challenging. In recent years, three general approaches have been developed to achieve this, including chirality transfer

  9. Gliotoxin: inhibitor of poliovirus RNA synthesis that blocks the viral RNA polymerase 3Dpol.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, P L; Carrasco, L.

    1992-01-01

    The mode of action of gliotoxin against poliovirus has been analyzed in detail. This fungal metabolite inhibits the appearance of poliovirus proteins when present from the beginning of infection but has no effect on viral translation when added at late times. In agreement with previous findings, this toxin potently inhibited the incorporation of [3H]uridine into poliovirus RNA soon after its addition to the culture medium. Analysis of the synthesis of poliovirus plus- or minus-stranded RNA in...

  10. The 5' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 1 is involved in negative-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlot, A Corina; Bol, John F

    2003-10-01

    The three genomic RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus each contain a unique 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). Replacement of the 5' UTR of RNA 1 by that of RNA 2 or 3 yielded infectious replicons. The sequence of a putative 5' stem-loop structure in RNA 1 was found to be required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. A similar putative 5' stem-loop structure is present in RNA 2 but not in RNA 3. PMID:14512577

  11. Global emergence of Alphaviruses that cause arthritis in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Wesula Lwande

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses may cause severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to human and animal health in the world today. These infectious diseases range from mild febrile illnesses, arthritis, and encephalitis to haemorrhagic fevers. It is postulated that certain environmental factors, vector competence, and host susceptibility have a major impact on the ecology of arboviral diseases. Presently, there is a great interest in the emergence of Alphaviruses because these viruses, including Chikungunya virus, O'nyong'nyong virus, Sindbis virus, Ross River virus, and Mayaro virus, have caused outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and America. Some of these viruses are more common in the tropics, whereas others are also found in temperate regions, but the actual factors driving Alphavirus emergence and re-emergence remain unresolved. Furthermore, little is known about the transmission dynamics, pathophysiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of circulating viral strains. In addition, the clinical presentation of Alphaviruses may be similar to other diseases such as dengue, malaria, and typhoid, hence leading to misdiagnosis. However, the typical presence of arthritis may distinguish between Alphaviruses and other differential diagnoses. The absence of validated diagnostic kits for Alphaviruses makes even routine surveillance less feasible. For that purpose, this review describes the occurrence, genetic diversity, clinical characteristics, and the mechanisms involving Alphaviruses causing arthritis in humans. This information may serve as a basis for better awareness and detection of Alphavirus-caused diseases during outbreaks and in establishing appropriate prevention and control measures.

  12. Synthesis of plus- and minus-strand RNA in rotavirus-infected cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Stacy-Phipps, S; Patton, J T

    1987-01-01

    The genomes of the rotaviruses consist of 11 segments of double-stranded RNA. During RNA replication, the viral plus-strand RNA serves as the template for minus-strand RNA synthesis. To characterize the kinetics of RNA replication, the synthesis and steady-state levels of viral plus- and minus-strand RNA and double-stranded RNA in simian rotavirus SA11-infected MA104 cells were analyzed by electrophoresis on 1.75% agarose gels containing 6 M urea (pH 3.0). Synthesis of viral plus-strand and m...

  13. Improved cell-free RNA and protein synthesis system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available Cell-free RNA and protein synthesis (CFPS is becoming increasingly used for protein production as yields increase and costs decrease. Advances in reconstituted CFPS systems such as the Protein synthesis Using Recombinant Elements (PURE system offer new opportunities to tailor the reactions for specialized applications including in vitro protein evolution, protein microarrays, isotopic labeling, and incorporating unnatural amino acids. In this study, using firefly luciferase synthesis as a reporter system, we improved PURE system productivity up to 5 fold by adding or adjusting a variety of factors that affect transcription and translation, including Elongation factors (EF-Ts, EF-Tu, EF-G, and EF4, ribosome recycling factor (RRF, release factors (RF1, RF2, RF3, chaperones (GroEL/ES, BSA and tRNAs. The work provides a more efficient defined in vitro transcription and translation system and a deeper understanding of the factors that limit the whole system efficiency.

  14. New World and Old World Alphaviruses Have Evolved to Exploit Different Components of Stress Granules, FXR and G3BP Proteins, for Assembly of Viral Replication Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dal Young; Reynaud, Josephine M.; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; Akhrymuk, Ivan; Mobley, James A.; Frolov, Ilya; Frolova, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    The positive-strand RNA viruses initiate their amplification in the cell from a single genome delivered by virion. This single RNA molecule needs to become involved in replication process before it is recognized and degraded by cellular machinery. In this study, we show that distantly related New World and Old World alphaviruses have independently evolved to utilize different cellular stress granule-related proteins for assembly of complexes, which recruit viral genomic RNA and facilitate formation of viral replication complexes (vRCs). Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) utilizes all members of the Fragile X syndrome (FXR) family, while chikungunya and Sindbis viruses exploit both members of the G3BP family. Despite being in different families, these proteins share common characteristics, which determine their role in alphavirus replication, namely, the abilities for RNA-binding and for self-assembly into large structures. Both FXR and G3BP proteins interact with virus-specific, repeating amino acid sequences located in the C-termini of hypervariable, intrinsically disordered domains (HVDs) of viral nonstructural protein nsP3. We demonstrate that these host factors orchestrate assembly of vRCs and play key roles in RNA and virus replication. Only knockout of all of the homologs results in either pronounced or complete inhibition of replication of different alphaviruses. The use of multiple homologous proteins with redundant functions mediates highly efficient recruitment of viral RNA into the replication process. This independently evolved acquisition of different families of cellular proteins by the disordered protein fragment to support alphavirus replication suggests that other RNA viruses may utilize a similar mechanism of host factor recruitment for vRC assembly. The use of different host factors by alphavirus species may be one of the important determinants of their pathogenesis. PMID:27509095

  15. Synthesis of Glu-tRNA(Gln) by engineered and natural aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Bhaskaran, Hari; Hadd, Andrew; Perona, John J

    2010-08-10

    A protein engineering approach to delineating which distinct elements of homologous tRNA synthetase architectures are responsible for divergent RNA-amino acid pairing specificities is described. Previously, we constructed a hybrid enzyme in which 23 amino acids from the catalytic domain of Escherichia coli glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) were replaced with the corresponding residues of human glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS). The engineered hybrid (GlnRS S1/L1/L2) synthesizes Glu-tRNA(Gln) more than 10(4)-fold more efficiently than GlnRS. Detailed comparison of kinetic parameters between GlnRS S1/L1/L2 and the naturally occurring Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus GluRS(ND), which is also capable of Glu-tRNA(Gln) synthesis, now shows that both k(cat) and K(m) for glutamate are recapitulated in the engineered enzyme, but that K(m) for tRNA is 200-fold higher. Thus, the simultaneous optimization of paired amino acid and tRNA binding sites found in a naturally occurring enzyme is not recapitulated in a hybrid that is successfully engineered for amino acid complementarity. We infer that the GlnRS architecture has differentiated to match only cognate amino acid-RNA pairs, and that the substrate selection functions do not operate independently of each other. Design and characterization of four additional hybrids identify further residues involved in improving complementarity for glutamate and in communicating between amino acid and tRNA binding sites. The robust catalytic function demonstrated in this engineered system offers a novel platform for exploring the stereochemical origins of coding as a property of the ancient Rossmann fold.

  16. Localization of foot-and-mouth disease - RNA synthesis on newly formed cellular smooth membranous vacuoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viral RNA synthesis in foot-and-mouth disease infected bovine kidney cell cultures was associated throughout the infectious period with newly formed smooth membranous vacuoles. Membrane formation was measured by choline uptake. The site of RNA synthesis was determined by electron microscopic examination of autoradiograms of incorporated [3H] uridine. Both membrane formation and RNA synthesis became signifcant at 2.5 hours postinfection, but membrane formation increased steadily to 4.5 hours while RNA synthesis peaked at 3.5 hours. Percent density distributions of developed silver grains on autoradiograms showed that almost all RNA synthesis was concentrated on the smooth vacuoles of infected cells. Histogram analysis of grain density distributions established that the site of RNA synthesis was the vacuolar membrane. The newly formed smooth membrane-bound vacuoles were not seen to coalesce into the large vacuolated areas typical of poliovirus cytopathogenicity. (Author)

  17. Inhibition of RNA synthesis in vitro by 9-aminoacridine carboxamide antitumor agents. Effects on overall RNA synthesis and synthesis of the initiating dinucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piestrzeniewicz, M K; Czyz, M; Denny, W A; Gniazdowski, M

    1990-01-01

    A series of 9-aminoacridine carboxamide derivatives of systematically varied structure was assayed in an RNA synthesis in vitro system. Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and DNA derived from phage T7 or calf thymus were used to measure the effect of the drugs on overall RNA and the initiating dinucleotide (pppApU) syntheses. By means of multiple linear regression analysis it was shown that the inhibition of these reactions depends both on the drug equilibrium binding constant and kinetic parameters of dissociation of drug-DNA complexes. PMID:1705740

  18. Flow cytometric analysis of RNA synthesis by detection of bromouridine incorporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J K; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Larsen, J

    2001-01-01

    RNA synthesis has traditionally been investigated by a laborious and time-consuming radiographic method involving incorporation of tritiated uridine. Now a faster non-radioactive alternative has emerged, based on immunocytochemical detection. This method utilizes the brominated RNA precursor...

  19. Recombinant alphaviruses as vectors for anti-tumour and anti-microbial immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos-Brilman, A; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; Huckriede, A; Wischut, J; Daemen, T

    2006-01-01

    Background: Vectors derived from alphaviruses are gaining interest for their high transfection potency and strong immunogenicity. Objectives: After a brief introduction on alphaviruses and their vectors, an overview is given on current preclinical immunotherapy studies using vector systems based on

  20. RNA polymerase motors on DNA track: effects of traffic congestion on RNA synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Tripti

    2007-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is an enzyme that synthesizes a messenger RNA (mRNA) strand which is complementary to a single-stranded DNA template. From the perspective of physicists, an RNAP is a molecular motor that utilizes chemical energy input to move along the track formed by a ssDNA. In some circumstances, which are described in this paper, a large number of RNAPs move simultaneously along the same track. We refer to such collective movements of the RNAPs as RNAP traffic because of the similarities between the collective dynamics of the RNAPs on ssDNA track and that of vehicles in highway traffic. In this paper we develop a theoretical model for RNAP traffic by incorporating the steric interactions between RNAPs as well as the mechano-chemical cycle of individual RNAPs during the elongation of the mRNA. By a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we calculate the rates of mRNA synthesis and the average density profile of the RNAPs on the ssDNA track. We also suggest novel experiments for testing o...

  1. [Exotic viral arthritis: role of alphavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeandel, P; Josse, R; Durand, J P

    2004-01-01

    Only six of the many alphavirus known to affect humans can cause articular manifestations. They are the Ross River and Barmah Forest viruses from the South Pacific, the Chikungunya, O'Nyong Nyong and Sindbis viruses from tropical Africa, and the Mayaro virus from South America. In most cases, articular manifestations involve arthralgia or transient arthritis and are usually minor. However in some cases especially involving Ross River virus acute polyarthritis may be the most prominent clinical feature and even develop before fever. Although these joint symptoms may be severe and persist for weeks or months in a subacute mode with slightly inflammatory episodes that can be relieved using analgesics, they never cause permanent damage. Differential diagnosis of alphavirsus-related polyarthritis is simple to diagnosis especially in epidemic outbreaks as is frequently the case for Ross River virus epidemics in Australia. Imported cases should be suspected in patients presenting acute or subacute polyarthritis after a recent stay of any length of time in a tropical country and can be confirmed by ordering serology from a specialized reference laboratory. PMID:15224565

  2. Stochastic mRNA synthesis in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Arjun; Peskin, Charles S; Tranchina, Daniel; Vargas, Diana Y; Tyagi, Sanjay

    2006-10-01

    Individual cells in genetically homogeneous populations have been found to express different numbers of molecules of specific proteins. We investigated the origins of these variations in mammalian cells by counting individual molecules of mRNA produced from a reporter gene that was stably integrated into the cell's genome. We found that there are massive variations in the number of mRNA molecules present in each cell. These variations occur because mRNAs are synthesized in short but intense bursts of transcription beginning when the gene transitions from an inactive to an active state and ending when they transition back to the inactive state. We show that these transitions are intrinsically random and not due to global, extrinsic factors such as the levels of transcriptional activators. Moreover, the gene activation causes burst-like expression of all genes within a wider genomic locus. We further found that bursts are also exhibited in the synthesis of natural genes. The bursts of mRNA expression can be buffered at the protein level by slow protein degradation rates. A stochastic model of gene activation and inactivation was developed to explain the statistical properties of the bursts. The model showed that increasing the level of transcription factors increases the average size of the bursts rather than their frequency. These results demonstrate that gene expression in mammalian cells is subject to large, intrinsically random fluctuations and raise questions about how cells are able to function in the face of such noise. PMID:17048983

  3. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yan, E-mail: yzheng15@students.kgi.edu; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  4. Myelin basic protein synthesis is regulated by small non-coding RNA 715.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nina M; Moos, Christina; van Horssen, Jack; Witte, Maarten; van der Valk, Paul; Altenhein, Benjamin; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2012-09-01

    Oligodendroglial Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) synthesis is essential for myelin formation in the central nervous system. During oligodendrocyte differentiation, MBP mRNA is kept in a translationally silenced state while intracellularly transported, until neuron-derived signals initiate localized MBP translation. Here we identify the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715) as an inhibitor of MBP translation. SncRNA715 localizes to cytoplasmic granular structures and associates with MBP mRNA transport granule components. We also detect increased levels of sncRNA715 in demyelinated chronic human multiple sclerosis lesions, which contain MBP mRNA but lack MBP protein.

  5. Interacting RNA polymerase motors on DNA track: effects of traffic congestion and intrinsic noise on RNA synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Tripti

    2007-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is an enzyme that synthesizes a messenger RNA (mRNA) strand which is complementary to a single-stranded DNA template. From the perspective of physicists, an RNAP is a molecular motor that utilizes chemical energy input to move along the track formed by a DNA. In many circumstances, which are described in this paper, a large number of RNAPs move simultaneously along the same track; we refer to such collective movements of the RNAPs as RNAP traffic. Here we develop a theoretical model for RNAP traffic by incorporating the steric interactions between RNAPs as well as the mechano-chemical cycle of individual RNAPs during the elongation of the mRNA. By a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we calculate the rates of mRNA synthesis and the average density profile of the RNAPs on the DNA track. We also introduce, and compute, two new measures of {\\it fluctuations} in the synthesis of RNA. Analyzing these fluctuations, we show how the level of intrinsic noise in mRNA synthesis dep...

  6. Increase in RNA and protein synthesis by mitochondria irradiated with helium-neon laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greco, M.; Guida, G.; Perlino, E.; Marra, E.; Quagliariello, E. (Centro di Studio sui Mitocondri e Metabolismo Energetico, C.N.R. Bari (Italy))

    1989-09-29

    To gain further insight into the mechanism of cell photostimulation by laser light, both RNA and protein synthesis were measured in mitochondria irradiated with the low power continuous wave He-Ne laser (Energy dose: 5 Joules/cm{sup 2}). Following mitochondrial irradiation, both the rate and amount of incorporation of alpha-({sup 32}P)UTP and L-({sup 35}S)methionine, used to monitor RNA and protein synthesis respectively, proved to increase. Electrophoretic analysis made of the synthesis products clearly shows that He-Ne laser irradiation stimulates the synthesis of all mitochondrial transcription and translation products.

  7. Increase in RNA and protein synthesis by mitochondria irradiated with helium-neon laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To gain further insight into the mechanism of cell photostimulation by laser light, both RNA and protein synthesis were measured in mitochondria irradiated with the low power continuous wave He-Ne laser (Energy dose: 5 Joules/cm2). Following mitochondrial irradiation, both the rate and amount of incorporation of alpha-[32P]UTP and L-[35S]methionine, used to monitor RNA and protein synthesis respectively, proved to increase. Electrophoretic analysis made of the synthesis products clearly shows that He-Ne laser irradiation stimulates the synthesis of all mitochondrial transcription and translation products

  8. Synthesis of infectious poliovirus RNA by purified T7 RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Werf, S.; Bradley, J; Wimmer, E; Studier, F W; Dunn, J J

    1986-01-01

    Plasmids containing the entire cDNA sequence of poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain) under control of a promoter for T7 RNA polymerase have been constructed. Purified T7 RNA polymerase efficiently transcribes the entire poliovirus cDNA in either direction to produce full-length poliovirus RNA [(+)RNA] or its complement [(-)RNA]. The (+)RNA produced initially had 60 nucleotides on the 5' side of the poliovirus RNA sequence, including a string of 18 consecutive guanine residues generated in the o...

  9. Definition of the minimal viral components required for the initiation of unprimed RNA synthesis by influenza virus RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M T Michael; Bishop, Konrad; Medcalf, Liz; Elton, Debra; Digard, Paul; Tiley, Laurence

    2002-01-15

    The first 11 nt at the 5' end of influenza virus genomic RNA were shown to be both necessary and sufficient for specific binding by the influenza virus polymerase. A novel in vitro transcription assay, in which the polymerase was bound to paramagnetic beads via a biotinylated 5'-vRNA oligonucleotide, was used to study the activities of different forms of the polymerase. Complexes composed of co-expressed PB1/PB2/PA proteins and a sub-complex composed of PB1/PA bound to the 5'-vRNA oligonucleotide, whereas PB1 expressed alone did not. The enriched 5'-vRNA/PB1/PB2/PA complex was highly active for ApG and globin mRNA primed transcription on a model 3'-vRNA template. RNA synthesis in the absence of added primers produced products with 5'-terminal tri- or diphosphate groups, indicating that genuine unprimed initiation of transcription also occurred. No transcriptase activity was detected for the PB1/PA complex. These results demonstrate a role for PA in the enhancement of 5' end binding activity of PB1, a role for PB2 in the assembly of a polymerase complex able to perform both cap-dependent and -independent synthesis and that NP is not required for the initiation of replicative transcription.

  10. Possible involvement of eEF1A in Tomato spotted wilt virus RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoda, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Kawamura-Nagaya, Kazue; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2014-11-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is a negative-strand RNA virus in the family Bunyaviridae and propagates in both insects and plants. Although TSWV can infect a wide range of plant species, host factors involved in viral RNA synthesis of TSWV in plants have not been characterized. In this report, we demonstrate that the cell-free extract derived from one of the host plants can activate mRNA transcriptional activity of TSWV. Based on activity-guided fractionation of the cell-free extract, we identified eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF) 1A as a possible host factor facilitating TSWV transcription and replication. The RNA synthesis-supporting activity decreased in the presence of an eEF1A inhibitor, suggesting that eEF1A plays an important role in RNA synthesis of TSWV. PMID:25151062

  11. Studies on the control of ribosomal RNA synthesis in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterton, C J; Coupar, B E; Butterworth, P H; Green, M H

    1975-09-01

    In many eucaryotic systems protein synthesis is coupled to ribosomal RNA synthesis such that shut-down of the former causes inhibition of the latter. We have investigated this stringency phenomenon in HeLa cells. The protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and puromycin cause inactivation of both processes but valine starvation totally inhibits only the processing of 45-S RNA. DNA-dependent RNA polymerases from A, B and C (or I, II and III respectively) were extracted, separated partially by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and their activity levels determined. These do not decrease significantly during inhibition of protein synthesis. To find out whether or not form A is bound to its template under these conditions, proteins were removed from chromatin with the detergent sarkosyl. This does not affect bound RNA polymerase. Inhibition of protein synthesis caused up to 50% reduction in endogenous alpha-amanitin-insensitive chromatin-RNA-synthesising activity. This reduced level of activity was not affected by sarkosyl treatment. Levels in normal cells were stimulated. This result indicates that the form A RNA polymerase is not bound to its template when protein synthesis is inhibited.

  12. Determination of the synthesis site of the infections flacherie virus-RNA by light microscopy-autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The site of the RNA synthesis of the infectious flacherie virus in the midgut epithelial cells of the silkworm, Bombyx mori L., 1758 (Lep., Bombycidae), has been investigated using both autoradiography and light microscopy techniques. The density or ratio between silver grain and the respective cell structure (silver grain/μm2) has been used as criteria to identify the site of the viral RNA synthesis. Actinomycin D selectively blocked about 60% of the cell RNA synthesis without affecting the virus RNA synthesis. The obtained data indicated that the viral RNA synthesis occurs in the nucleus of the midgut epithelial cells of the silkworm larvae. Some evidence about the viral RNA translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm and inhibition of the synthesis of normal RNA by the virus were observed. (Author)

  13. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M Sánchez-Puig

    Full Text Available Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  14. The 3'-terminal 55 nucleotides of bovine coronavirus defective interfering RNA harbor cis-acting elements required for both negative- and positive-strand RNA synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yu Liao

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the negative-strand [(--strand] complement of the ∼30 kilobase, positive-strand [(+-strand] coronaviral genome is a necessary early step for genome replication. The identification of cis-acting elements required for (--strand RNA synthesis in coronaviruses, however, has been hampered due to insufficiencies in the techniques used to detect the (--strand RNA species. Here, we employed a method of head-to-tail ligation and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR to detect and quantitate the synthesis of bovine coronavirus (BCoV defective interfering (DI RNA (- strands. Furthermore, using the aforementioned techniques along with Northern blot assay, we specifically defined the cis-acting RNA elements within the 3'-terminal 55 nucleotides (nts which function in the synthesis of (-- or (+-strand BCoV DI RNA. The major findings are as follows: (i nts from -5 to -39 within the 3'-terminal 55 nts are the cis-acting elements responsible for (--strand BCoV DI RNA synthesis, (ii nts from -3 to -34 within the 3'-terminal 55 nts are cis-acting elements required for (+-strand BCoV DI RNA synthesis, and (iii the nucleotide species at the 3'-most position (-1 is important, but not critical, for both (-- and (+-strand BCoV DI RNA synthesis. These results demonstrate that the 3'-terminal 55 nts in BCoV DI RNA harbor cis-acting RNA elements required for both (-- and (+-strand DI RNA synthesis and extend our knowledge on the mechanisms of coronavirus replication. The method of head-to-tail ligation and qRT-PCR employed in the study may also be applied to identify other cis-acting elements required for (--strand RNA synthesis in coronaviruses.

  15. Effective suppression of fibronectin synthesis by retrovirus delivered shRNA in rat cardiac fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Di; HONG; Quan; CHEN; Xiangmei; FU; Bo; LI; Aipingi; LIU

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular matrix overexpression is a common final pathway that leads to ventricular remodeling.Fibronectin plays a pivotal role in this progress.In the work presented here,we explored the possibility of direct inhibition of fibronectin synthesis in rat cardiac fibroblasts by small interference RNA(siRNA).We found that siRNA could successfully suppress the fibronectin overexpression stimulated by angiotensin Ⅱ.To overcome the limitations of plasmid-based siRNA,we subcloned the H1 promoter into pLXIN,a commercially available retroviral vector.We found that H1 promoter worked very well to form the small hairpin RNA(shRNA)on the retroviral vector,and the fibronectin expression was dramatically down regulated by shRNA.We think the retroviral shRNA delivery system that we have constructed may have potential roles in treating ventricular remodeling.

  16. Identification of the cis-acting signal for minus-strand RNA synthesis of a murine coronavirus: implications for the role of minus-strand RNA in RNA replication and transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Y J; Liao, C. L.; Lai, M M

    1994-01-01

    Minus-strand RNA is the first RNA species made by plus-strand RNA viruses, such as mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), and serves as a template for subsequent RNA replication and transcription. The regulation of minus-strand RNA synthesis has been difficult to study because of the paucity of minus-strand RNA. We have optimized a ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay which enabled the detection of minus-strand RNA synthesis from nonreplicating RNAs, thus clearly separating minus-strand from plus-stra...

  17. Cysteinyl-tRNA deacylation can be uncoupled from protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre David

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs are critical components of protein translation, providing ribosomes with aminoacyl-tRNAs. In return, ribosomes release uncharged tRNAs as ARS substrates. Here, we show that tRNA deacylation can be uncoupled from protein synthesis in an amino acid specific manner. While tRNAs coupled to radiolabeled Met, Leu Lys, or Ser are stable in cells following translation inhibition with arsenite, radiolabeled Cys is released from tRNA at a high rate. We discuss possible translation independent functions for tRNA(Cys.

  18. Synthesis of capped RNA using a DMT group as a purification handle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliath, Elizabeth; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A

    2014-01-01

    We report a new method for synthesis of capped RNA or 2'-OMe RNA that uses a N(2-)4,4'-dimethoxytrityl (DMT) group as a lipophilic purification handle to allow convenient isolation and purification of the capped RNA. The DMT group is easily removed under mild conditions without degradation of the cap. We have used this approach to prepare capped 10- and 20-mers. This method is compatible with the many condensation reactions that have been reported for preparation of capped RNA or cap analogues.

  19. The C-terminal domain of chikungunya virus nsP2 independently governs viral RNA replication, cytopathicity, and inhibition of interferon signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fros, J.J.; Maten, van der E.; Vlak, J.M.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2013-01-01

    Alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) has pivotal roles in viral RNA replication, host cell shutoff, and inhibition of antiviral responses. Mutations that individually rendered other alphaviruses noncytopathic were introduced into chikungunya virus nsP2. Results show that (i) nsP2 mutation P718S

  20. The background of the total synthesis of yeast alanine transfer RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI GuoRong

    2010-01-01

    @@ The research findings concerning the total synthesis of yeast alanine transfer RNA (yeast alanine tRNA) were successively published in Chinese Science Bulletin (1982) and Science in China (1983) [1].The research work started in 1968 and was finished in November 1981.It was the first artificial synthesis of a nucleic acid molecule, which followed the first artificial synthesis of protein, crystalline bovine insulin, in China in 1965, both scientific milestones occurring in China.The composition, sequence and biological functions of the synthesized nucleic acid were identical to those of the natural yeast alanine tRNA.The research lasted for 13 years.From 1982 to 1984, one of the investigators in charge of the research Prof.

  1. Emerging alphaviruses in the Americas: Chikungunya and Mayaro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Luis Garcia de Figueiredo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Mayaro virus (MAYV are emergent arthropod-borne viruses that produce outbreaks of acute febrile illness with arthropathy. Despite their different continental origins, CHIKV and MAYV are closely related and are components of the Semliki Forest Complex of the Alphavirus (Togaviridae. MAYV and, more recently, CHIKV, which are both transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, have resulted in severe public health problems in the Americas, including Brazil. In this review, we present aspects of the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment of febrile illnesses produced by CHIKV and MAYV. We also discuss the epidemiological aspects and effects related to the prophylaxis of infections by both viruses.

  2. Influenza virus RNA polymerase: insights into the mechanisms of viral RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Velthuis, Aartjan J W; Fodor, Ervin

    2016-08-01

    The genomes of influenza viruses consist of multiple segments of single-stranded negative-sense RNA. Each of these segments is bound by the heterotrimeric viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and multiple copies of nucleoprotein, which form viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes. It is in the context of these vRNPs that the viral RNA polymerase carries out transcription of viral genes and replication of the viral RNA genome. In this Review, we discuss our current knowledge of the structure of the influenza virus RNA polymerase, and insights that have been gained into the molecular mechanisms of viral transcription and replication, and their regulation by viral and host factors. Furthermore, we discuss how advances in our understanding of the structure and function of polymerases could help in identifying new antiviral targets. PMID:27396566

  3. Flow cytometric measurement of RNA synthesis using bromouridine labelling and bromodeoxyuridine antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J; Christiansen, J;

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear RNA synthesis can be analysed by flow cytometry of cells labelled with 5-bromouridine (BrUrd) and stained with anti-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) antibody and FITC-conjugated secondary antibody. A panel of 5 different commercially available anti-BrdUrd antibodies was tested on cells of a HL-...... the variation of RNA synthesis during the cell cycle. The BrUrd incorporation was high in the S and G2 phase, variable in G1, and negligible in mitosis. Similar results were obtained using other cell types....

  4. Nonenzymatic template-directed RNA synthesis inside model protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Szostak, Jack W

    2013-11-29

    Efforts to recreate a prebiotically plausible protocell, in which RNA replication occurs within a fatty acid vesicle, have been stalled by the destabilizing effect of Mg(2+) on fatty acid membranes. Here we report that the presence of citrate protects fatty acid membranes from the disruptive effects of high Mg(2+) ion concentrations while allowing RNA copying to proceed, while also protecting single-stranded RNA from Mg(2+)-catalyzed degradation. This combination of properties has allowed us to demonstrate the chemical copying of RNA templates inside fatty acid vesicles, which in turn allows for an increase in copying efficiency by bathing the vesicles in a continuously refreshed solution of activated nucleotides. PMID:24288333

  5. RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in human cells reveals requirements for de novo initiation and protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Tragesser, Brady; Xu, Zhili; Stein, Barry; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Kao, C Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a model positive-strand RNA virus whose replication has been studied in a number of surrogate hosts. In transiently transfected human cells, the BMV polymerase 2a activated signaling by the innate immune receptor RIG-I, which recognizes de novo-initiated non-self-RNAs. Active-site mutations in 2a abolished RIG-I activation, and coexpression of the BMV 1a protein stimulated 2a activity. Mutations previously shown to abolish 1a and 2a interaction prevented the 1a-dependent enhancement of 2a activity. New insights into 1a-2a interaction include the findings that helicase active site of 1a is required to enhance 2a polymerase activity and that negatively charged amino acid residues between positions 110 and 120 of 2a contribute to interaction with the 1a helicase-like domain but not to the intrinsic polymerase activity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the BMV 1a and 2a colocalized to perinuclear region in human cells. However, no perinuclear spherule-like structures were detected in human cells by immunoelectron microscopy. Sequencing of the RNAs coimmunoprecipitated with RIG-I revealed that the 2a-synthesized short RNAs are derived from the message used to translate 2a. That is, 2a exhibits a strong cis preference for BMV RNA2. Strikingly, the 2a RNA products had initiation sequences (5'-GUAAA-3') identical to those from the 5' sequence of the BMV genomic RNA2 and RNA3. These results show that the BMV 2a polymerase does not require other BMV proteins to initiate RNA synthesis but that the 1a helicase domain, and likely helicase activity, can affect RNA synthesis by 2a.

  6. A Co-Opted DEAD-Box RNA helicase enhances tombusvirus plus-strand synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kovalev

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on recruited host factors that aid several critical steps during replication. In this paper, we show that an essential translation factor, Ded1p DEAD-box RNA helicase of yeast, directly affects replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV. To separate the role of Ded1p in viral protein translation from its putative replication function, we utilized a cell-free TBSV replication assay and recombinant Ded1p. The in vitro data show that Ded1p plays a role in enhancing plus-strand synthesis by the viral replicase. We also find that Ded1p is a component of the tombusvirus replicase complex and Ded1p binds to the 3'-end of the viral minus-stranded RNA. The data obtained with wt and ATPase deficient Ded1p mutants support the model that Ded1p unwinds local structures at the 3'-end of the TBSV (-RNA, rendering the RNA compatible for initiation of (+-strand synthesis. Interestingly, we find that Ded1p and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, which is another host factor for TBSV, play non-overlapping functions to enhance (+-strand synthesis. Altogether, the two host factors enhance TBSV replication synergistically by interacting with the viral (-RNA and the replication proteins. In addition, we have developed an in vitro assay for Flock house virus (FHV, a small RNA virus of insects, that also demonstrated positive effect on FHV replicase activity by the added Ded1p helicase. Thus, two small RNA viruses, which do not code for their own helicases, seems to recruit a host RNA helicase to aid their replication in infected cells.

  7. Autoradiographic detection of HPRT variants of human lymphocytes resistant to RNA synthesis inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, I.M.; Zetterberg, G.; Strout, C.L.; Carrano, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of using RNA synthesis in freshly isolated, human peripheral blood lymphocytes to detect 6-thioguanine (TG)- and 8-azaguanine (AG)-resistant variants in an autoradiographic assay similar to that of Strauss and Albertini (1979) has been evaluated. In phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated cultures RNA synthesis and HPRT activity began well in advance of DNA synthesis and increased in parallel during the first 44 h of culture. Introduction of TG or AG with PHA at the beginning of culture completely inhibited DNA synthesis during the first 44 h and reduced RNA synthesis to low levels within 24 h. When TG or AG was added after cells had been in culture for 38 h, DNA synthesis was reduced quickly while RNA synthesis was inhibited more slowly. An autoradiographic assay is described in which freshly isolated lymphocytes are cultured with PHA for 24 h, with or without TG or AG, then labeled with (/sup 3/H)uridine for 1 h. TG-resistant and AG-resistant variant frequencies for 2 normal individuals and a Lesch-Nyhan individual were determined with this assay. The variant frequencies for the normal individuals ranged from 0.46 to 10.6 x 10/sup -5/ depending upon the selective conditions used. All the Lesch-Nyhan cells were resistant to 0.2 ..mu..M-2 mM AG; some were sensitive to 0.2 mM TG and most were sensitive to 2.0 mM TG. 24 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  8. Inhibition of RNA synthesis in vitro by acridines--relation between structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piestrzeniewicz, M K; Wilmańska, D; Studzian, K; Szemraj, J; Czyz, M; Denny, W A; Gniazdowski, M

    1998-01-01

    The effects of acridine derivatives (proflavine and 2,7-dialkyl derivatives, diacridines and triacridines, 9-aminoacridine carboxamides, and 9-anilinoacridine, amsacrine and its congeners) on overall RNA synthesis in vitro, on synthesis of initiating oligonucleotides and the binding of the enzyme to DNA were studied. The primary mechanism of action is related to inhibition of the enzyme binding to DNA. The acridines (intercalating or non-intercalating and bis-intercalating ligands) assayed here differ in the properties of their complexes with DNA. Correlation is generally observed between inhibition of RNA synthesis in vitro and cytotoxicity in cell cultures for di- and triacridines and 9-aminoacridine carboxamide derivatives. No relationship was found between the effect on RNA polymerase system and biological effects for amsacrine and its derivatives in contrast to the other series of acridines studied here. The aniline ring seems to decrease the inhibitory potency of a ligand. The discrepancy between the biological effect and RNA synthesis inhibition may be due to a different mechanism of cytotoxicity action of amsacrine which is a potent topoisomerase II poison. PMID:9679327

  9. Quality control in aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis its role in translational fidelity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadavalli, Srujana S; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Accurate translation of mRNA into protein is vital for maintenance of cellular integrity. Translational fidelity is achieved by two key events: synthesis of correctly paired aminoacyl-tRNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and stringent selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) by the ribosome....... AaRSs define the genetic code by catalyzing the formation of precise aminoacyl ester-linked tRNAs via a two-step reaction. AaRSs ensure faithful aa-tRNA synthesis via high substrate selectivity and/or by proofreading (editing) of noncognate products. About half of the aaRSs rely on proofreading...

  10. Synthesis of double-stranded RNA in a virus-enriched fraction from Agaricus bisporus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sriskantha, A.; Wach, P.; Schlagnhaufer, B.; Romaine, C.P.

    1986-03-01

    Partially purified virus preparations from sporophores of Agaricus bisporus affected with LaFrance disease had up to a 15-fold-higher RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity than did comparable preparations from health sporophores. Enzyme activity was dependent upon the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ and the four nucleoside triphosphates and was insensitive to actinomycin D, ..cap alpha..-amanitin, and rifampin. The /sup 3/H-labeled enzyme reaction products were double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as indicated by CF-11 cellulose column chromatography and by their ionic-strength-dependent sensitivity to hydrolysis by RNase A. The principal dsRNA products had estimated molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ and 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 6/. Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ equilibrium centrifugation of the virus preparation resolved a single peak of RNA polymerase activity that banded with a 35-nm spherical virus particle containing dsRNAs with molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ and 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 6/. The data suggest that the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with the 35-nm spherical virus is a replicase which catalyzes the synthesis of the genomic dsRNAs.

  11. A comparative study of marine salmonid alphavirus subtypes 1-6 using an experimental cohabitation challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D A; Frost, P; McLaughlin, K; Rowley, H M; Gabestad, I; Gordon, A; McLoughlin, M F

    2011-04-01

    A comparative challenge study of six marine isolates representing subtypes 1-6 of salmonid alphavirus (salmon pancreas disease virus, Genus Alphavirus, Family Togaviridae) was conducted in Atlantic salmon in a fresh water cohabitation trial. Histopathological lesions typical of pancreas disease were observed with all subtypes, and virus was re-isolated from serum of cohabitant fish in each case. Using a virus neutralization (VN) test neutralizing salmonid alphavirus (SAV) subtype 1 strain F93-125, VN antibodies were detected in all challenge groups, consistent with serological cross-reactivity between these subtypes. Using real-time RT-PCR, SAV RNA was detected in heart tissue from 2 to 3 weeks post-challenge (wpc) in all cohabitant groups excluding controls. The results obtained suggested differences in the dynamics of infection between strains of SAV and potentially between subtypes. Results for SAV subtypes 1 and 3 suggested essentially synchronous infection of cohabitant fish. These two study groups also had the highest virus load in heart tissue as measured by quantitative RT-PCR and also had the most extensive histopathological changes. In contrast, results for SAV subtypes 2 and 6 strains were consistent with asynchronous infection in the cohabitant fish and were characterized by slow spread, low virus loads and mild histopathological changes. The SAV subtype 4 and 5 strains occupied an intermediate position in this regard. Despite the use of concentration procedures, it was not possible to detect SAV RNA in water samples from selected study tanks. However, testing of faeces from the SAV subtypes 1, 3 and 6 challenge groups found positive signals in each beginning at 1-3 wpc and remaining detectable for a further 2-3 weeks. Parallel testing of mucus samples found these became positive at 2-3 wpc and remained positive for a further 1-3 weeks. These results demonstrate for the first time that shedding and transmission of virus may occur by both these routes

  12. Buggy Creek virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus) upregulates expression of pattern recognition receptors and interferons in House Sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbinder-Orth, Carol A; Barak, Virginia A; Rainwater, Ellecia L; Altrichter, Ashley M

    2014-06-01

    Birds serve as reservoirs for at least 10 arthropod-borne viruses, yet specific immune responses of birds to arboviral infections are relatively unknown. Here, adult House Sparrows were inoculated with an arboviral alphavirus, Buggy Creek virus (BCRV), or saline, and euthanized between 1 and 3 days postinoculation. Virological dynamics and gene expression dynamics were investigated. Birds did not develop viremia postinoculation, but cytopathic virus was found in the skeletal muscle and spleen of birds 1 and 3 days postinoculation (DPI). Viral RNA was detected in the blood of BCRV-infected birds 1 and 2 DPI, in oral swabs 1-3 DPI, and in brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and spleen 1-3 DPI. Multiple genes were significantly upregulated following BCRV infection, including pattern recognition receptors (TLR7, TLR15, RIG-1), type I interferon (IFN-α), and type II interferon (IFN-γ). This is the first study to report avian immunological gene expression profiles following an arboviral infection.

  13. microRNA as a new agent for regulating neuronal glutathione synthesis and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisato Kinoshita

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available microRNA (miRNA is a small non-coding RNA molecule that plays a role in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Recent evidence shows that miRNAs are involved in various diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases (NDs such as: Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosisand multiple system atrophy (MSA. The initiation and progression of NDs is generally considered to be induced by oxidative stress arising from an imbalance of oxidants and antioxidants. One of the most important antioxidants against oxidative stress is glutathione (GSH, which is a tripeptide composed of cysteine, glutamate and glycine. Among these precursor amino acids, cysteine is the determinant of neuronal GSH synthesis. Cysteine uptake in the neurons is mostly mediated by excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1, a member of the sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters. Interestingly, it has been reported that one miRNA, miR-96-5p, regulates the neuroprotective effect of GSH by directly regulating EAAC1 expression. Furthermore, the expressions of miR-96-5p and its target EAAC1 are specifically deregulated in the brains of patients with MSA, suggesting that deregulated miR-96-5p induces MSA via EAAC1 down-regulation. Since miR-96-5p regulation of EAAC1 expression and GSH level is indicated to be under circadian control, a greater understanding of rhythmic miRNA regulation could lead to the use of miRNA in chronotherapy for ND. In this review, we focus on the role of miRNA in the mechanism of GSH synthesis and metabolism; particularly with respect to a critical transport system of its rate-limiting substrate via EAAC1, as well as on the implications and chronotherapeutic potential of miRNA for NDs.

  14. Karyopherin alpha2 is essential for rRNA transcription and protein synthesis in proliferative keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Umegaki-Arao

    Full Text Available Karyopherin proteins mediate nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and are critical for protein and RNA subcellular localization. Recent studies suggest KPNA2 expression is induced in tumor cells and is strongly associated with prognosis, although the precise roles and mechanisms of KPNA2 overexpression in proliferative disorders have not been defined. We found that KPNA2 expression is induced in various proliferative disorders of the skin such as psoriasis, Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma, Paget's disease, Merkel cell carcinoma, and mycosis fungoides. siRNA-mediated KPNA suppression revealed that KPNA2 is essential for significant suppression of HaCaT proliferation under starvation conditions. Ribosomal RNA transcription and protein synthesis were suppressed by starvation combined with knockdown of KPNA (including KPNA2 expression. KPNA2 localized to the nucleolus and interacted with proteins associated with mRNA processing, ribonucleoprotein complex biogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcription, as demonstrated by tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry. KPNA2 may be an important promoter of ribosomal RNA and protein synthesis in tumor cells.

  15. Heat shock represses rRNA synthesis by inactivation of TIF-IA and lncRNA-dependent changes in nucleosome positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongliang; Dammert, Marcel A; Hoppe, Sven; Bierhoff, Holger; Grummt, Ingrid

    2016-09-30

    Attenuation of ribosome biogenesis in suboptimal growth environments is crucial for cellular homeostasis and genetic integrity. Here, we show that shutdown of rRNA synthesis in response to elevated temperature is brought about by mechanisms that target both the RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription machinery and the epigenetic signature of the rDNA promoter. Upon heat shock, the basal transcription factor TIF-IA is inactivated by inhibition of CK2-dependent phosphorylations at Ser170/172. Attenuation of pre-rRNA synthesis in response to heat stress is accompanied by upregulation of PAPAS, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that is transcribed in antisense orientation to pre-rRNA. PAPAS interacts with CHD4, the adenosine triphosphatase subunit of NuRD, leading to deacetylation of histones and movement of the promoter-bound nucleosome into a position that is refractory to transcription initiation. The results exemplify how stress-induced inactivation of TIF-IA and lncRNA-dependent changes of chromatin structure ensure repression of rRNA synthesis in response to thermo-stress.

  16. DNA polymerase-α regulates type I interferon activation through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C.; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K.; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R.; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations disrupting nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts expression of POLA1, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency results in increased type I interferon production. This enzyme is necessary for RNA:DNA primer synthesis during DNA replication and strikingly, POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Altogether, this work identified POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  17. Structure of acridines and their effect on RNA synthesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmigiero, L; Slaska, K; Ciesielska, E; Jaros-Kamińska, B; Gniazdowski, M

    1977-01-01

    1. Ledakrin (C-283), a 1-nitro-9-aminopropylacridine derivative, inhibits RNA synthesis in vitro if the complex with DNA is formed in the presence of thiol. 2. Using several analogues of Ledakrin, it has been found that the 1-nitro group is essential for enhancement of the inhibition by thiol; the length of 9-aminoalkyl side chain also plays a role in the reaction between DNA and the dye. 3. It is suggested that the low inhibitory effect of Ledakrin in the absence of thiol compounds is due to a steric hindrance between neighbouring 1-nitro and 9-aminoalkyl groups. This hypothesis has been confirmed by assaying inhibition of RNA synthesis by several analogues of Ledakrin. PMID:868436

  18. [Electron-microscopic autoradiography of RNA synthesis in the myocardium after damage to it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galankin, V N; Pal'tsyn, A A; Badikova, A K

    1977-06-01

    Thermic burn of the wall of the left cardiac ventricle was inflicted to new born rats. Twenty-four hours after the injury the RNA synthesis of the myocardial cells remote from the site of burn were investigated by electron-microscopic autoradiography. Tissue samples were fixed 2 and 6 hours after the 3H-uridine injections. As compared with the control, experimental animals displayed a reduction of silver grains density over the nucleus and the cytoplasm of cardiomyocytes. PMID:884310

  19. Synthesis and degradation of the mRNA of the Tn21 mer operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambill, B D; Summers, A O

    1992-05-20

    The mercury resistance locus encoded by Tn21 on the monocopy IncFII plasmid R100 (merTn21) consists of a metal-responsive activator/repressor, merR, which controls initiation of a polycistronic message that includes genes for the uptake (merTPC) and reduction (merA) of Hg2+ and merD, which may also play a minor regulatory role. Comparison of the relative abundance of the 5' and 3' ends of the merTPCAD transcript revealed a strong transcriptional gradient in the operon, consistent with previous observations of lower relative abundance of the more promoter-distal gene products. In vivo mRNA degradation rates varied only slightly for the different genes: however, the rates of mRNA synthesis varied considerably from the beginning to the end of the operon. Specifically, mRNA corresponding to the promoter-proximal genes, merTPC, achieved a maximum in vivo synthesis rate between 60 and 120 seconds after induction; this rate was maintained for approximately ten minutes. In contrast, the synthesis rates of mRNA corresponding to the promoter-distal genes merA and merD, were initially fivefold lower than the rates of the promoter-proximal genes for the first five minutes after induction, and then rose gradually to approximately 50% of the merTPC synthesis rates. These data suggested that early after induction only 20% of the transcripts initiating at merT proceed beyond merC. At later times after induction approximately 50% of the transcripts proceed beyond merC. Nuclease end mapping did not reveal any discrete termination events in the merPCA region, thus, premature termination may occur at many sites.

  20. Impaired rRNA synthesis triggers homeostatic responses in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eKiryk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Decreased rRNA synthesis and nucleolar disruption, known as nucleolar stress, are primary signs of cellular stress associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Silencing of rDNA occurs during early stages of Alzheimer´s disease (AD and may play a role in dementia. Moreover aberrant regulation of the protein synthesis machinery is present in the brain of suicide victims and implicates the epigenetic modulation of rRNA. Recently, we developed unique mouse models characterized by nucleolar stress in neurons. We inhibited RNA polymerase I by genetic ablation of the basal transcription factor TIF-IA in adult hippocampal neurons. Nucleolar stress resulted in progressive neurodegeneration, although with a differential vulnerability within the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus. Here, we investigate the consequences of nucleolar stress on learning and memory. The mutant mice show normal performance in the Morris water maze and in other behavioral tests, suggesting the activation of adaptive mechanisms. In fact, we observe a significantly enhanced learning and re-learning corresponding to the initial inhibition of rRNA transcription. This phenomenon is accompanied by aberrant synaptic plasticity. By the analysis of nucleolar function and integrity, we find that the synthesis of rRNA is later restored. Gene expression profiling shows that thirty-six transcripts are differentially expressed in comparison to the control group in absence of neurodegeneration. Additionally, we observe a significant enrichment of the putative serum response factor (SRF binding sites in the promoters of the genes with changed expression, indicating potential adaptive mechanisms mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In the dentate gyrus a neurogenetic response might compensate the initial molecular deficits. These results underscore the role of nucleolar stress in neuronal homeostasis and open a new ground for therapeutic strategies aiming at preserving

  1. The prebiotic synthesis of modified purines and their potential role in the RNA world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Modified purines are found in all organisms in the tRNA, rRNA, and even DNA, raising the possibility of an early role for these compounds in the evolution of life. These include N6-methyladenine, 1-methyladenine, N6,N6-dimethyladenine, 1-methylhypoxanthine, 1-methylguanine, and N2-methylguanine. We find that these bases as well as a number of nonbiological modified purines can be synthesized from adenine and guanine by the simple reaction of an amine or an amino group with adenine and guanine under the concentrated conditions of the drying-lagoon or drying-beach model of prebiotic synthesis with yields as high as 50%. These compounds are therefore as prebiotic as adenine and guanine and could have played an important role in the RNA world by providing additional functional groups in ribozymes, especially for the construction of hydrophobic binding pockets.

  2. The effect of trichloroethylene and acrylonitrile on RNA and ribosome synthesis and ribosome content in Saccharomyces cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochmann, E R; Ehrlich, W; Mangir, M

    1984-04-01

    The effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and acrylonitrile (ACN) on growth, RNA synthesis, ribosome synthesis, and ribosome content were tested in yeast cells. TCE causes a delay of the growth of a cell culture (prolongation of the lag phase), but does not cause inhibition. Cells exposed to increasing concentrations of ACN show increasing damage, so that, at a certain point of the growth curve, cell division stops altogether. Similar results were obtained when RNA synthesis was investigated: After treatment with TCE, the maximum RNA synthesis of the cell culture was retarded, but subsequently reached the same level as the untreated control cells. In the presence of ACN, however, the rate of RNA synthesis was lowered with increasing ACN concentrations. The same effect was observed upon investigation of ribosome synthesis: Whereas TCE produces only a slight effect, treatment with increasing concentrations of ACN leads to a substantial decrease in ribosome synthesis, and finally to total inhibition. Parallel to this, the content of free and membrane-bound ribosomes is diminished. Obviously, the decrease in ribosome content is caused not only by an inhibition of ribosome synthesis, but also by a degradation of existing ribosomes, as well as by induction of a ribosome-associated RNase. PMID:6714140

  3. Full inactivation of alphaviruses in single particle and crystallized forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Robert M; Zook, James D; Hogue, Brenda G

    2016-10-01

    Inherent in the study of viruses is the risk of pathogenic exposure, which necessitates appropriate levels of biosafety containment. Unfortunately, this also limits the availability of useful research instruments that are located at facilities not equipped to handle infectious pathogens. Abrogation of viral infectivity can be accomplished without severely disrupting the physical structure of the virus particle. Virus samples that are verifiably intact but not infectious may be enabled for study at research facilities where they would otherwise not be allowed. Inactivated viruses are also used in the development of vaccines, where immunogenicity is sought in the absence of active infection. We demonstrate the inactivation of Sindbis alphavirus particles in solution, as well as in crystallized form. Inactivation was accomplished by two different approaches: crosslinking of proteins by glutaraldehyde treatment, and crosslinking of nucleic acids by UV irradiation. Biophysical characterization methods, including dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, were used to demonstrate that the glutaraldehyde and UV inactivated Sindbis virus particles remain intact structurally. SDS-PAGE was also used to show evidence of the protein crosslinking that was expected with glutaraldehyde treatment, but also observed with UV irradiation. PMID:27465218

  4. Single-gene dual-color reporter cell line to analyze RNA synthesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palangat, Murali; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    RNA synthesis occurs through the multi-step process of transcription which consists of initiation, elongation, termination, and cleavage of the nascent RNA. In recent years, post-initiation events have attracted considerable attention as regulatory steps in gene expression. In particular, changes in elongation rate have been proposed to alter RNA fate either through changes in RNA secondary structure or recruitment of trans-acting factors, but systematic approaches for perturbing and measuring elongation rate are currently lacking. Here, we describe a system for precisely measuring elongation dynamics for single nascent transcripts at a single gene locus in human cell lines. The system is based on observing the production of fluorescently labeled RNA stem loops which flank a region of interest. The region of interest can be altered using flp recombinases, thus allowing one to study the effects of cis-acting sequences on transcription rate. The dual-color RNAs which are made during this process are exported and translated, thus enabling visualization of each step in gene expression.

  5. Recovery from ultraviolet light-induced depression of ribosomal RNA synthesis in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum and cockayne syndrome cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis was analyzed at different times after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells. In normal cells, the rate of rRNA synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of 3H-uridine into 18S and 28S rRNAs, decreased immediately after UV irradiation to about half of that of unirradiated cells, and then recovered significantly at 24h after UV. However, the rate of synthesis continued to decrease during post-UV incubation in XP cells belonging to groups A, D, E, F and G, as well as in CS cells of groups A and B. In contrast, group C XP cells showed a slight recovery at 24h after UV, suggesting that they have the capacity to repair UV lesions in rRNA genes. (author)

  6. LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-ribosomal RNA synthesis under uridine downregulated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fakeng; Jin, Rui; Liu, Xiuju; Huang, Henry; Wilkinson, Scott C; Zhong, Diansheng; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian; Marcus, Adam; He, Yulong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-19

    We analyzed the mechanism underlying 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) mediated apoptosis in LKB1-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Metabolic profile analysis revealed depletion of the intracellular pyrimidine pool after AICAR treatment, but uridine was the only nucleotide precursor capable of rescuing this apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of RNA metabolism. Because half of RNA transcription in cancer is for pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, which is suppressed by over 90% after AICAR treatment, we evaluated the role of TIF-IA-mediated rRNA synthesis. While the depletion of TIF-IA by RNAi alone promoted apoptosis in LKB1-null cells, the overexpression of a wild-type or a S636A TIF-IA mutant, but not a S636D mutant, attenuated AICAR-induced apoptosis. In LKB1-null H157 cells, pre-rRNA synthesis was not suppressed by AICAR when wild-type LKB1 was present, and cellular fractionation analysis indicated that TIF-IA quickly accumulated in the nucleus in the presence of a wild-type LKB1 but not a kinase-dead mutant. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LKB1 was capable of attenuating AICAR-induced death in AMPK-null cells. Because LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-rRNA synthesis, this discovery suggested that targeted depletion of uridine related metabolites may be exploited in the clinic to eliminate LKB1-null cancer cells.

  7. 8-Methoxypsoralen DNA interstrand cross-linking of the ribosomal RNA genes in Tetrahymena thermophila. Distribution, repair and effect on rRNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fengquin, X; Nielsen, Henrik; Zhen, W;

    1993-01-01

    between three domains (terminal spacer, transcribed region and central spacer) as defined by restriction enzyme analysis (BamHI and ClaI). It is furthermore shown that a dosage resulting in approximately one cross-link per rDNA molecule (21 kbp, two genes) is sufficient to block RNA synthesis. Finally...

  8. Primer-dependent and primer-independent initiation of double stranded RNA synthesis by purified arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR2 and RDR6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maina Huguette Joséphine;

    2015-01-01

    RNA) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer......-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer-independent and...... primer-dependent RNA polymerase activities with different efficiencies. We further show that RDR2 and RDR6 can initiate dsRNA synthesis either by elongation of 21- to 24- nucleotides RNAs hybridized to complementary RNA template or by elongation of self-primed RNA template. These findings provide new...

  9. Group size and nest spacing affect Buggy Creek virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus infection in nestling house sparrows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A O'Brien

    Full Text Available The transmission of parasites and pathogens among vertebrates often depends on host population size, host species diversity, and the extent of crowding among potential hosts, but little is known about how these variables apply to most vector-borne pathogens such as the arboviruses (arthropod-borne viruses. Buggy Creek virus (BCRV; Togaviridae: Alphavirus is an RNA arbovirus transmitted by the swallow bug (Oeciacus vicarius to the cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota and the introduced house sparrow (Passer domesticus that has recently invaded swallow nesting colonies. The virus has little impact on cliff swallows, but house sparrows are seriously affected by BCRV. For house sparrows occupying swallow nesting colonies in western Nebraska, USA, the prevalence of BCRV in nestling sparrows increased with sparrow colony size at a site but decreased with the number of cliff swallows present. If one nestling in a nest was infected with the virus, there was a greater likelihood that one or more of its nest-mates would also be infected than nestlings chosen at random. The closer a nest was to another nest containing infected nestlings, the greater the likelihood that some of the nestlings in the focal nest would be BCRV-positive. These results illustrate that BCRV represents a cost of coloniality for a vertebrate host (the house sparrow, perhaps the first such demonstration for an arbovirus, and that virus infection is spatially clustered within nests and within colonies. The decreased incidence of BCRV in sparrows as cliff swallows at a site increased reflects the "dilution effect," in which virus transmission is reduced when a vector switches to feeding on a less competent vertebrate host.

  10. Group size and nest spacing affect Buggy Creek virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus) infection in nestling house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Valerie A; Brown, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    The transmission of parasites and pathogens among vertebrates often depends on host population size, host species diversity, and the extent of crowding among potential hosts, but little is known about how these variables apply to most vector-borne pathogens such as the arboviruses (arthropod-borne viruses). Buggy Creek virus (BCRV; Togaviridae: Alphavirus) is an RNA arbovirus transmitted by the swallow bug (Oeciacus vicarius) to the cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and the introduced house sparrow (Passer domesticus) that has recently invaded swallow nesting colonies. The virus has little impact on cliff swallows, but house sparrows are seriously affected by BCRV. For house sparrows occupying swallow nesting colonies in western Nebraska, USA, the prevalence of BCRV in nestling sparrows increased with sparrow colony size at a site but decreased with the number of cliff swallows present. If one nestling in a nest was infected with the virus, there was a greater likelihood that one or more of its nest-mates would also be infected than nestlings chosen at random. The closer a nest was to another nest containing infected nestlings, the greater the likelihood that some of the nestlings in the focal nest would be BCRV-positive. These results illustrate that BCRV represents a cost of coloniality for a vertebrate host (the house sparrow), perhaps the first such demonstration for an arbovirus, and that virus infection is spatially clustered within nests and within colonies. The decreased incidence of BCRV in sparrows as cliff swallows at a site increased reflects the "dilution effect," in which virus transmission is reduced when a vector switches to feeding on a less competent vertebrate host.

  11. Effect of 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid and vanillin on chlorophyll, protein and RNA synthesis in detached cucumber cotyledons, and chlorophyll degradation in senescing leaf discs of kale

    OpenAIRE

    J. S. Knypl

    2015-01-01

    N6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and KC1 stimulated growth in detached greening cucumber cotyledons; BAP enhanced RNA synthesis whereas KCl strikingly accelerated leucine-14C incorporation into proteins. Vanillin (0.01 M) inhibited greening and protein synthesis, and nullified the stimulatory effects of KC1. a-chloroethylphosphonic acid (CEPA, 0.01 M) inhibited greening without any effect on protein synthesis when it was applied alone; CEPA decreased RNA synthesis, completely nullified the...

  12. Sequences more than 500 base pairs upstream of the human U3 small nuclear RNA gene stimulate the synthesis of U3 RNA in frog oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes contain strong promoters capable of initiating transcription once every 4 s. Studies on the human U1 snRNA gene, carried out in other laboratories, showed that sequences within 400 bp of the 5' flanking region are sufficient for maximal levels of transcription both in vivo and in frog oocytes [reviewed in Dahlberg and Lund (1988)]. The authors studied the expression of a human U3 snRNA gene by injecting 5' deletion mutants into frog oocytes. The results show that sequences more than 500 bp upstream of the U3 snRNA gene have a 2-3-fold stimulatory effect on the U3 snRNA synthesis. These results indicate that the human U3 snRNA gene is different from human U1 snRNA gene in containing regulatory elements more than 500 bp upstream. The U3 snRNA gene upstream sequences contain an AluI homologous sequence in the -1,200 region; these AluI sequences were transcribed in vitro and in frog oocytes but were not detectable in Hela cells

  13. Thiol-dependent inhibition of RNA synthesis in vitro by acridines: structure-inhibition relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniazdowski, M; Szmigiero, L; Wilmańska, D

    1982-01-01

    In the presence of sulfhydryl compounds an anticancer drug, 1-nitro-9-aminoalkylacridine derivative, forms with DNA irreversible, probably covalent, complexes of decreased template properties. Five 9-substituted 1-nitro-9-aminoacridine derivatives of cytostatic activity show irreversible thiol-dependent inhibitory effects on the RNA synthesis in vitro system while equal inhibition is observed both in the presence and in the absence of dithiothreitol with biologically inactive analogues of nitrocrine. In the absence of sulfhydryl compounds the inhibition depends on the planarity of the acridine ring. Hence, both 1-nitro-9-aminoalkylacridine and tetrahydroacridine derivatives show low inhibitory effect. PMID:6174208

  14. Translational pauses during the synthesis of proteins and mRNA structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zama, M

    1997-01-01

    Translational pauses are observed during a spider fibroin synthesis (1,2). The spider major ampullate (dragline) silk of the spider Nephila clavipes is composed of multiple proteins. The amino acid sequences of the partial cDNA clones for the two major dragline silk fibroin components (Spidroin 1 and 2) exhibit repetitive motifs (3,4). Our detailed inspection of the nucleotide sequences of the repetitive motifs revealed highly selective site-specific codon usage patterns within a motif, suggesting that the secondary structure of the spider fibroin mRNA is optimized by the nucleotide sequence of the fibroin gene. The results, combined with our preceding results on silk fibroin from Bombyx mori (5) suggest that translational pauses of spider silk are interpreted in terms of the mRNA secondary structure.

  15. CNP2 mRNA directs synthesis of both CNP1 and CNP2 polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, R C; Minuk, J; Cox, M E; Braun, P E; Gravel, M

    1997-10-15

    The ribosome scanning model for translational initiation predicts that eukaryotic mRNAs should, as a rule, be monocistronic. However, cases have recently been described of eukaryotic mRNAs producing more than one protein through alternative translational initiation at several different AUG codons. The present work reports the occurrence of two translational start sites on the mRNA encoding isoform 2 of the myelin marker enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) in rat and mouse. We show that the CNP2 mRNA is able to direct synthesis of not only CNP2, but also CNP1 polypeptide. Immunoprecipitation experiments using a polyclonal antibody directed against CNP detect both CNP isoforms in tissues or cell lines expressing only the CNP2 transcript. Thus, the synthesis of CNP1 and CNP2 polypeptides must be encoded by the CNP2 transcript. In vitro translation of synthetic CNP2 mRNA demonstrates that both CNP isoforms are synthesized by initiation at different AUG codons. Furthermore, by introducing mutations to "switch off" translation from the second in-frame AUG codon in the CNP2 cDNA, and transfecting 293T cells with those constructs, we are able to correlate the production of CNP1 and CNP2 with different translational start sites. These results lead us to conclude that the CNP2 mRNA is able to produce both CNP1 and CNP2 polypeptides. This investigation has altered our understanding of the temporal expression of the CNP protein isoforms during development of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:9373034

  16. Genomic plus-strand RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replicase requires a sequence that is complementary to the binding site of the BMV helicase-like protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, K; Kao, C C

    2000-11-01

    Summary Initiation of genomic plus-strand RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus (BMV) replicase in vitro requires a 26-nucleotide (nt) RNA sequence at the 3' end of the minus-strand RNA and a nontemplated nucleotide 3' of the initiation cytidylate [Sivakumaran, K. and Kao, C.C. (1999)J. Virol.64, 6415-6423]. At the 5' end of this RNA is a 9-nt sequence called the cB box, the complement of the previously defined B box. The cB box can not be functionally replaced by the B box and has specific positional and sequence requirements. The portion of the cB box that is required for RNA synthesis in vitro is well-conserved in species in the Bromoviridae family. An equivalent RNA from Cucumber mosaic virus was unable to direct efficient RNA synthesis by the BMV replicase until the cB box was positioned at the same site relative to the BMV RNA and guanylates were present at positions +6 and +7 from the initiation cytidylate. These results further define the elements required for the recognition and initiation of viral genomic plus-strand RNA synthesis and suggest that a sequence important for minus-strand RNA synthesis is also required for plus-strand RNA synthesis.

  17. Cdk7 mediates RPB1-driven mRNA synthesis in Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Abhijit S.; Mitra, Pallabi; Maruthi, Mulaka

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 in conjunction with CyclinH and Mat1 activates cell cycle CDKs and is a part of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Role of Cdk7 is well characterized in model eukaryotes however its relevance in protozoan parasites has not been investigated. This important regulator of key processes warrants closer examination particularly in this parasite given its unique cell cycle progression and flexible mode of replication. We report functional characterization of TgCdk7 and its partners TgCyclinH and TgMat1. Recombinant Cdk7 displays kinase activity upon binding its cyclin partner and this activity is further enhanced in presence of Mat1. The activated kinase phosphorylates C-terminal domain of TgRPB1 suggesting its role in parasite transcription. Therefore, the function of Cdk7 in CTD phosphorylation and RPB1 mediated transcription was investigated using Cdk7 inhibitor. Unphosphorylated CTD binds promoter DNA while phosphorylation by Cdk7 triggers its dissociation from DNA with implications for transcription initiation. Inhibition of Cdk7 in the parasite led to strong reduction in Serine 5 phosphorylation of TgRPB1-CTD at the promoters of constitutively expressed actin1 and sag1 genes with concomitant reduction of both nascent RNA synthesis and 5′-capped transcripts. Therefore, we provide compelling evidence for crucial role of TgCdk7 kinase activity in mRNA synthesis. PMID:27759017

  18. Identification of a human mitochondrial RNA that promotes tropomyosin synthesis and myocardial differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses-Arms, Ashley; Kochegarov, Andrei; Arms, Jedidiah; Burlbaw, Shane; Lian, Will; Meyer, Jessica; Lemanski, Larry F

    2015-03-01

    Heart disease is the number one killer in the USA, making cardiogenesis and its related pathways a relevant area of study for improving health and life expectancy. The Mexican salamander (axolotl), Ambystoma mexicanum, provides an excellent vertebrate animal model for studying myofibrillogenesis due to its naturally occurring cardiac nonfunction mutation. Homozygous recessive embryos do not develop normal hearts due to a lack of myofibril formation. In previous studies, myofibril-inducing ribonucleic acid (MIR) from the normal wild-type axolotl genome was found to rescue mutant nonfunctioning hearts through restoration of tropomyosin levels followed by normal myofibril formation. Our purpose in this study is to identify and characterize functional homologs for the MIR from human fetal heart ribonucleic acid (RNA). After randomized cloning of human fetal heart RNA, 396 clones were analyzed for rescuing ability by using mutant heart rescue bioassays and confocal microscopy. By these analyses, we discovered a functional homolog of MIR from human fetal heart RNA, which is associated with the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II gene. This RNA came from our clone #30 and induces tropomyosin synthesis and myofibrillogenesis in mutant axolotl hearts which ordinarily do not synthesize tropomyosin or form organized myofibrils. Clone #30, a mitochondrial RNA molecule associated with human cytochrome c oxidase, serves as a functional homolog of MIR, leading to tropomyosin production, organized myofibrils, and beating cardiac tissue in mutant hearts. These findings hold great potential for the treatment and repair of damaged hearts in patients who have suffered from myocardial infarctions and other heart diseases. PMID:25408381

  19. Enzymatic synthesis of RNAs capped with nucleotide analogues reveals the molecular basis for substrate selectivity of RNA capping enzyme: impacts on RNA metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheshwarnath Issur

    Full Text Available RNA cap binding proteins have evolved to specifically bind to the N7-methyl guanosine cap structure found at the 5' ends of eukaryotic mRNAs. The specificity of RNA capping enzymes towards GTP for the synthesis of this structure is therefore crucial for mRNA metabolism. The fact that ribavirin triphosphate was described as a substrate of a viral RNA capping enzyme, raised the possibility that RNAs capped with nucleotide analogues could be generated in cellulo. Owing to the fact that this prospect potentially has wide pharmacological implications, we decided to investigate whether the active site of the model Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1 RNA capping enzyme was flexible enough to accommodate various purine analogues. Using this approach, we identified several key structural determinants at each step of the RNA capping reaction and generated RNAs harboring various different cap analogues. Moreover, we monitored the binding affinity of these novel capped RNAs to the eIF4E protein and evaluated their translational properties in cellulo. Overall, this study establishes a molecular rationale for the specific selection of GTP over other NTPs by RNA capping enzyme It also demonstrates that RNAs can be enzymatically capped with certain purine nucleotide analogs, and it also describes the impacts of modified RNA caps on specific steps involved in mRNA metabolism. For instance, our results indicate that the N7-methyl group of the classical N7-methyl guanosine cap is not always indispensable for binding to eIF4E and subsequently for translation when compensatory modifications are present on the capped residue. Overall, these findings have important implications for our understanding of the molecular determinants involved in both RNA capping and RNA metabolism.

  20. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Julie M.; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A.; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Fong, Rachel H.; Kahle, Kristen M.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Crowe, James E.; Fremont, Daved H.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphav

  1. Role of regulatory T-cells in immunization strategies involving a recombinant alphavirus vector system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczak, Mateusz; Regts, Joke; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Boon, Louis; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T-cells (Treg) hamper immune responses elicited by cancer vaccines. Therefore, depletion of Treg is being used to improve the outcome of vaccinations. Methods: We studied whether an alphavirus vector-based immunotherapeutic vaccine changes the number and/or activity of Treg an

  2. Salmonid alphavirus replication in mosquito cells: towards a novel vaccine production system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, M.C.; Verest, M.; Vlak, J.M.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) causes pancreas disease and sleeping disease in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and confers a major burden to the aquaculture industry. A commercial inactivated whole virus vaccine propagated in a salmon cell line at low temperature pro

  3. Alphavirus Infection: Host Cell Shut-Off and Inhibition of Antiviral Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelke J. Fros

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to the re-emergence and dramatic expansion of chikungunya virus in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. As a consequence, alphavirus–host interactions are now understood in much more molecular detail, and important novel mechanisms have been elucidated. It has become clear that alphaviruses not only cause a general host shut-off in infected vertebrate cells, but also specifically suppress different host antiviral pathways using their viral nonstructural proteins, nsP2 and nsP3. Here we review the current state of the art of alphavirus host cell shut-off of viral transcription and translation, and describe recent insights in viral subversion of interferon induction and signaling, the unfolded protein response, and stress granule assembly.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of salmonid alphavirus (SAV subtype 3 in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Mona D

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreas disease (PD is a viral fish disease which in recent years has significantly affected Norwegian salmonid aquaculture. In Norway, the aetiological agent salmonid alphavirus (SAV has been found to be represented by the subtype 3 only. SAV subtype 3 has in previous analyses been found to show a lower genetic divergence than the subtypes found to cause PD in Ireland and Scotland. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nucleotide (nt and amino acid divergence and the phylogenetic relationship of 33 recent SAV subtype 3 sequences. The samples from which the sequences were obtained originated from both PD endemic and non-endemic regions in an attempt to investigate agent origin/spread. Multiple samples throughout the seawater production phase from several salmonid populations were included to investigate genetic variation during an outbreak. The analyses were mainly based on partial sequences from the E2 gene. For some samples, additional partial 6 K and nsP3 gene sequences were available. Results The nucleotide divergence for all gene fragments ranged from total identity (0.0% divergence to 0.45% (1103 nt fragment of E2, 1.11% (451 nt fragment of E2, 0.94% (6 K and 0.28% (nsP3. This low nucleotide divergence corresponded well to previous reports on SAV 3 sequences; however the observed divergence for the short E2 fragment was higher than that previously reported. When compared to SAVH20/03 (AY604235, amino acid substitutions were detected in all assessed gene fragments however the in vivo significance of these on for example disease outbreak mortality could not be concluded on. The phylogenetic tree based on the 451 nt E2 fragment showed that the sequences divided into two clusters with low genetic divergence, representing only a single SAV subtype. Conclusions The analysed sequences represented two clusters of a single SAV subtype; however some of the observed sequence divergence was higher than that previously reported

  5. Inhibition of RNA synthesis in vitro and cell growth by anthracycline antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studzian, K; Wasowska, M; Piestrzeniewicz, M K; Wilmańska, D; Szmigiero, L; Oszczapowicz, I; Gniazdowski, M

    2001-01-01

    New derivatives of doxorubicin and daunorubicin with amidine group bonded to daunosamine at C-3' atom and bearing the morpholine ring attached to the amidine group have been recently synthesized. Their cytotoxic activities and effects on RNA synthesis in vitro were assayed. The drug concentrations inhibiting mouse leukaemia L1210 cell growth to 50% were about two- and three fold higher for the derivatives compared to doxorubicin and daunorubicin respectively. Inhibition of phage T7 RNA polymerase by the non-covalently interacting derivatives was also slightly lower than that by the parent compounds. As doxorubicin and daunorubicin, their amidine derivatives in the presence of dithiothreitol and Fe(III) ions are activated and covalently bind to DNA. The adducts formed affect RNA polymerase activity. Several bands corresponding to prematurely terminated RNA chains are observed by means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The patterns of bands are virtually identical for all the anthracyclines studied here and are similar to the terminations induced by actinomycin D. This observation is consistent with a notion that the adducts are formed at guanine in GpC sequences which are also binding sites of actinomycin D. A substantial difference between daunorubicin and its amidine derivative is shown by means of high performance liquid chromatography. The derivative undergoes rapid rearrangements in the presence of dithiothreitol and Fe(III) ions, while daunorubicin is stable for several hours under these conditions. The results presented here indicate that the amidine derivatives despite bulky morpholine substitution exhibit biological activity in the systems used here. PMID:11845988

  6. Circular RNA oligonucleotides. Synthesis, nucleic acid binding properties, and a comparison with circular DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Kool, E T

    1994-06-25

    We report the synthesis and nucleic acid binding properties of two cyclic RNA oligonucleotides designed to bind single-stranded nucleic acids by pyr.pur.pyr-type triple helix formation. The circular RNAs are 34 nucleotides in size and were cyclized using a template-directed nonenzymatic ligation. To ensure isomeric 3'-5' purity in the ligation reaction, one nucleotide at the ligation site is a 2'-deoxyribose. One circle (1) is complementary to the sequence 5'-A12, and the second (2) is complementary to 5'-AAGAAAGAAAAG. Results of thermal denaturation experiments and mixing studies show that both circles bind complementary single-stranded DNA or RNA substrates by triple helix formation, in which two domains in a pyrimidine-rich circle sandwich a central purine-rich substrate. The affinities of these circles with their purine complements are much higher than the affinities of either the linear precursors or simple Watson-Crick DNA complements. For example, circle 1 binds rA12 (pH 7.0, 10 mM MgCl2, 100 mM NaCl) with a Tm of 48 degrees C and a Kd (37 degrees C) of 4.1 x 10(-9) M, while the linear precursor of the circle binds with a Tm of 34 degrees C and a Kd of 1.2 x 10(-6) M. The complexes of circle 2 are pH-dependent, as expected for triple helical complexes involving C(+)G.C triads, and mixing plots for both circles reveal one-to-one stoichiometry of binding either to RNA or DNA substrates. Comparison of circular RNAs with previously synthesized circular DNA oligonucleotides of the same sequence reveals similar behavior in the binding of DNA, but strikingly different behavior in the binding of RNA. The cyclic DNAs show high DNA-binding selectivity, giving relatively weaker duplex-type binding with complementary RNAs. The relative order of thermodynamic stability for the four types of triplex studied here is found to be DDD > RRR > RDR > DRD. The results are discussed in the context of recent reports of strong triplex dependence on RNA versus DNA backbones. Triplex

  7. The Yeast Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase and Transcription Factor Complex Catalyzes Efficient Priming of DNA Synthesis on Single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Nandakumar, Divya; Deshpande, Aishwarya P; Lucas, Thomas P; R-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Tang, Guo-Qing; Raney, Kevin; Yin, Y Whitney; Patel, Smita S

    2016-08-01

    Primases use single-stranded (ss) DNAs as templates to synthesize short oligoribonucleotide primers that initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis or reprime DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse, but the origin of this activity in the mitochondria remains unclear. Herein, we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41) and its transcription factor (Mtf1) is an efficient primase that initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA coated with the yeast mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein, Rim1. Both Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 can synthesize short and long RNAs on ssDNA template and prime DNA synthesis by the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase Mip1. However, the ssDNA-binding protein Rim1 severely inhibits the RNA synthesis activity of Rpo41, but not the Rpo41-Mtf1 complex, which continues to prime DNA synthesis efficiently in the presence of Rim1. We show that RNAs as short as 10-12 nt serve as primers for DNA synthesis. Characterization of the RNA-DNA products shows that Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 have slightly different priming specificity. However, both prefer to initiate with ATP from short priming sequences such as 3'-TCC, TTC, and TTT, and the consensus sequence is 3'-Pu(Py)2-3 Based on our studies, we propose that Rpo41-Mtf1 is an attractive candidate for serving as the primase to initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis during normal replication and/or to restart stalled replication from downstream ssDNA. PMID:27311715

  8. Synthesis and structural characterization of piperazino-modified DNA that favours hybridization towards DNA over RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Joan; Bryld, Torsten; Lindegaard, Dorthe;

    2011-01-01

    We report the synthesis of two C4'-modified DNA analogues and characterize their structural impact on dsDNA duplexes. The 4'-C-piperazinomethyl modification stabilizes dsDNA by up to 5°C per incorporation. Extension of the modification with a butanoyl-linked pyrene increases the dsDNA stabilization...... multiple sites in intermediate exchange on the NMR timescale, resulting in broad lines in NMR spectra. We identified two intercalation sites with NOE data showing that the pyrene prefers to intercalate one base pair away from the modified nucleotide with its linker curled up in the minor groove. Both...... modifications are tolerated in DNA:RNA hybrids but leave their melting temperatures virtually unaffected. Fluorescence data indicate that the pyrene moiety is residing outside the helix. The available data suggest that the DNA discrimination is due to (i) the positive charge of the piperazino ring having a...

  9. Application of Escherichia coli phage K1E DNA-dependent RNA polymerase for in vitro RNA synthesis and in vivo protein production in Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammen, Simon; Schuller, Franziska; Dietrich, Sylvia; Gamer, Martin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Jahn, Dieter

    2010-09-01

    Gene "7" of Escherichia coli phage K1E was proposed to encode a novel DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP). The corresponding protein was produced recombinantly, purified to apparent homogeneity via affinity chromatography, and successfully employed for in vitro RNA synthesis. Optimal assay conditions (pH 8, 37 degrees C, 10 mM magnesium chloride and 1.3 mM spermidine) were established. The corresponding promoter regions were identified on the phage genome and summarized in a sequence logo. Surprisingly, next to K1E promoters, the SP6 promoter was also recognized efficiently in vitro by K1E RNAP, while the T7 RNAP promoter was not recognized at all. Based on these results, a system for high-yield in vitro RNA synthesis using K1E RNAP was established. The template plasmid is a pUC18 derivative, which enables blue/white screening for positive cloning of the target DNA. Production of more than 5 microg of purified RNA per microgram plasmid DNA was achieved. Finally, in vivo protein production systems for Bacillus megaterium were established based on K1E and SP6 phage RNAP transcription. Up to 61.4 mg g (CDW) (-1) (K1E RNAP) of the reporter protein Gfp was produced in shaking flask cultures of B. megaterium. PMID:20596705

  10. Traffic of interacting ribosomes on mRNA during protein synthesis: effects of chemo-mechanics of individual ribosomes

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, A; Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2006-01-01

    Many {\\it ribosomes} simultaneously move on the same messenger RNA (mRNA), each synthesizing a protein. In contrast to the earlier models, here {\\it we develope a ``unified'' theoretical model} that not only incorporates the {\\it mutual exclusions} of the interacting ribosomes, but also describes explicitly the mechano-chemistry of each of these individual cyclic machines during protein synthesis. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, we analyze the rates of protein synthesis and the spatio-temporal oraganization of the ribosomes in this model. We also predict how these properties would change with the changes in the rates of the various chemo-mechanical processes in each ribosome. Finally, we illustrate the power of this model by making experimentally testable predictions on the rates of protein synthesis and the density profiles of the ribosomes on some mRNAs in {\\it E-coli}.

  11. Serine Metabolism Supports the Methionine Cycle and DNA/RNA Methylation through De Novo ATP Synthesis in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Oliver D K; Labuschagne, Christiaan F; Adams, Peter D; Vousden, Karen H

    2016-01-21

    Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under methionine-depleted conditions, unexpectedly, we found that serine supported the methionine cycle in the presence and absence of methionine through de novo ATP synthesis. Serine starvation increased the methionine/S-adenosyl methionine ratio, decreasing the transfer of methyl groups to DNA and RNA. While serine starvation dramatically decreased ATP levels, this was accompanied by lower AMP and did not activate AMPK. This work highlights the difference between ATP turnover and new ATP synthesis and defines a vital function of nucleotide synthesis beyond making nucleic acids.

  12. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS5B Nonnucleoside Inhibitors Specifically Block Single-Stranded Viral RNA Synthesis Catalyzed by HCV Replication Complexes In Vitro▿

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wengang; Sun, Yongnian; Phadke, Avinash; Deshpande, Milind; Huang, Mingjun

    2006-01-01

    Replication complexes of hepatitis C virus synthesized two major species of viral RNA in vitro, double stranded and single stranded. NS5B nonnucleoside inhibitors inhibited dose dependently the synthesis of single-stranded RNA but not double-stranded RNA. Moreover, replication complexes carrying a mutation resistant to a nonnucleoside inhibitor lost their susceptibilities to the inhibitor.

  13. Establishment and identification of the cell lines for the detection of mosquito-borne alphaviruses%甲病毒检测细胞株的构建及其功能鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张克佩; 尉研; 王焕琴; 吴萌; 张凤娟; 梁国栋; 王小平; 朱武洋

    2015-01-01

    Objective To construct and identify the cell line for detecting Alphaviruses.Methods We used the lentiviral vector pCDH to construct the expressing plasmid pCDH-XJ-EGFP containing enhanced green fluscent protein (EGFP) reporter gene,which was flanked into the defective eukaryotic cassette from a defective replicon system pVaXJ-EGFP-△NSP4.To obtain lentivirus,we transfected the lentiviral expression plasmid pCDH-XJ-EGFP together with the pPACKF1 packaging plasmids into HEK293T cells by liposomes.Then,the target cells BHK-21 were infected with the lentivirus particles.Puromycin-resistant cell colonies were detached from the 6 well plate and sub-cloned by use of 96 well plate.Finally,we selected the packaging cell lines that could express the defective replicons stably,named BHK-Alphavirus cells.Results The BHK-Alphavirus cells infected with SINV XJ-160 could express EGFP at 48 hours postinfection,demonstrating that the selected cells based on the defective replicon expression systems could be used to detect alphaviruses infection.Several alphaviruses and other single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus were used to analyze the specificity of the BHK-Alphavirus cells.EGFP expression assays indicated that BHK-Alphavirus cells expressing the defective replicon stably produced green fluorescence,when were infected with alphaviruses,including two Sindbis virus (SINV,XJ-160,YN87448),Chikungunya virus (CHIKV,SD08Pan) and Getah virus (GETAV,HB0234).While no green fluorescence was observed after the BHK-Alphavirus cells were infection with the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV,P3),Dengue virus (DENV,P4) or Tahyna virus (TAHV,XJ0625).Conclusion Theses results indicated that the BHK-Alphavirus cells based on the defective replicon expression systems were specific and effective to detect alphaviruses from tissue culture.%目的 构建和鉴定可用于甲病毒快速检测的工程细胞株.方法 以辛德毕斯病毒缺陷型复制子载体系统pVaXJ-EGFP-△NSP4为基础,利

  14. Seroprevalence of alphavirus antibodies in a cross-sectional study in southwestern Tanzania suggests endemic circulation of chikungunya.

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    Nina Weller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, Alphavirus infections and their most prominent member, chikungunya fever, a viral disease which first became apparent in Tanzania in 1953, have been very little investigated in regions without epidemic occurrence. Few data exist on burden of disease and socio-economic and environmental covariates disposing to infection. METHODS: A cross-sectional seroprevalence study was undertaken in 1,215 persons from Mbeya region, South-Western Tanzania, to determine the seroprevalence of anti-Alphavirus IgG antibodies, and to investigate associated risk factors. RESULTS: 18% of 1,215 samples were positive for Alphavirus IgG. Seropositivity was associated with participant age, low to intermediate elevation, flat terrain and with IgG positivity for Rift Valley fever, Flaviviridae, and rickettsiae of the spotted fever group. When comparing the geographical distribution of Alphavirus seropositivity to that of Rift Valley fever, it was obvious that Alphaviruses had spread more widely throughout the study area, while Rift Valley fever was concentrated along the shore of Lake Malawi. CONCLUSION: Alphavirus infections may contribute significantly to the febrile disease burden in the study area, and are associated with several arthropod-borne infections. Their spread seems only limited by factors affecting mosquitoes, and seems less restricted than that of Rift Valley fever.

  15. A Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy in Cattle to Prevent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Using a "Single-Cycle" Alphavirus Vector and Empty Capsid Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette;

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most economically important infectious diseases of production animals globally. Vaccination can successfully control this disease, however, current vaccines are imperfect. They are made using chemically inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) that is produced...... in large-scale mammalian cell culture under high containment conditions. Here, we have expressed the FMDV capsid protein precursor (P1-2A) of strain O1 Manisa alone or with the FMDV 3C protease (3Cpro) using a "single cycle" packaged alphavirus self-replicating RNA based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). When...... observed was decreased in level and duration. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector and then boosted with FMDV...

  16. Open reading frames 1a and 1b of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) collaboratively initiate viral minus-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Fang, Qiong-Qiong; Liu, Ji-Ting; Wang, Tong-Yun; Wang, Yu; Tao, Ye; Liu, Yong-Gang; Cai, Xue-Hui

    2016-09-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes a persistent threat to the swine industry, especially when highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) emerges. Previous studies have indicated that PRRSV RNA synthesis was correlated with HP-PRRSV virulence. PRRSV RNA synthesis includes genomic RNA and sub-genomic mRNA, and these processes require minus-strand RNA as a template. However, the mechanisms involved in PRRSV minus-strand RNA synthesis are not fully understood. A mini-genome system can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms and to evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replicase activities. In this study, we developed a mini-genome system that uses firefly luciferase as a reporter. Based on this system, we found that PRRSV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase nsp9 alone failed to activate virus minus-strand RNA synthesis. We also demonstrated that combinations of open reading frames 1a (ORF1a) and ORF1b are necessary for viral minus-strand RNA synthesis. PMID:27378424

  17. Infectious RNA transcripts from Ross River virus cDNA clones and the construction and characterization of defined chimeras with Sindbis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, R J; Niesters, H G; Hong, Z; Strauss, J H

    1991-06-01

    We have constructed a full-length cDNA clone of the virulent T48 strain of Ross River virus, a member of the alphavirus genus. Infectious RNA can be transcribed from this clone using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerase. The rescued virus has properties indistinguishable from those of the T48 strain of Ross River virus. We have used this clone, together with a full-length cDNA clone of Sindbis virus, to construct chimeric plasmids in which the 5' and the 3' nontranslated regions of the Sindbis and Ross River genomes were exchanged. The nontranslated regions of the two viral genomes differ in both size and sequence although they maintain specific conserved sequence elements. Virus was recovered from all four chimeras. Chimeras containing heterologous 3' nontranslated regions had replicative efficiencies equal to those of the parents. In contrast, the chimeras containing heterologous 5' nontranslated regions were defective in RNA synthesis and virus production, and the severity of the defect was dependent upon the host. Replication of a virus containing a heterologous 5' nontranslated region may be inefficient due to the formation of defective protein-RNA complexes, whereas, the presumptive complexes formed between host or virus proteins and the 3' nontranslated region to promote RNA synthesis appear to function normally in the chimeras.

  18. Targeting membrane-bound viral RNA synthesis reveals potent inhibition of diverse coronaviruses including the middle East respiratory syndrome virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lundin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs, a hallmark of coronavirus replication, was greatly impaired upon K22 treatment accompanied by near-complete inhibition of viral RNA synthesis. K22-resistant viruses contained substitutions in non-structural protein 6 (nsp6, a membrane-spanning integral component of the viral replication complex implicated in DMV formation, corroborating that K22 targets membrane bound viral RNA synthesis. Besides K22 resistance, the nsp6 mutants induced a reduced number of DMVs, displayed decreased specific infectivity, while RNA synthesis was not affected. Importantly, K22 inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV, and efficient inhibition was achieved in primary human epithelia cultures representing the entry port of human coronavirus infection. Collectively, this study proposes an evolutionary conserved step in the life cycle of positive-stranded RNA viruses, the recruitment of cellular membranes for viral replication, as vulnerable and, most importantly, druggable target for antiviral intervention. We expect this mode of action to serve as a paradigm for the development of potent antiviral drugs to combat many animal and human virus infections.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Pathogenesis of Alphavirus-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iranaia Assunção-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV, Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, Sindbis virus (SINV, Mayaro virus (MAYV, O'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV, and Barmah Forest virus (BFV, cause incapacitating and long lasting articular disease/myalgia. Outbreaks of viral arthritis and the global distribution of these diseases point to the emergence of arthritogenic alphaviruses as an important public health problem. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms involved in alphavirus-induced arthritis, exploring the recent data obtained with in vitro systems and in vivo studies using animal models and samples from patients. The factors associated to the extension and persistence of symptoms are highlighted, focusing on (a virus replication in target cells, and tissues, including macrophages and muscle cells; (b the inflammatory and immune responses with recruitment and activation of macrophage, NK cells and T lymphocytes to the lesion focus and the increase of inflammatory mediators levels; and (c the persistence of virus or viral products in joint and muscle tissues. We also discuss the importance of the establishment of novel animal models to test new molecular targets and to develop more efficient and selective drugs to treat these diseases.

  20. MicroRNA-133 inhibits behavioral aggregation by controlling dopamine synthesis in locusts.

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    Meiling Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is ubiquitous and primarily controlled by interactions between environmental and genetic factors. The migratory locust, a worldwide pest, exhibits pronounced phenotypic plasticity, which is a population density-dependent transition that occurs between the gregarious and solitary phases. Genes involved in dopamine synthesis have been shown to regulate the phase transition of locusts. However, the function of microRNAs in this process remains unknown. In this study, we report the participation of miR-133 in dopamine production and the behavioral transition by negatively regulating two critical genes, henna and pale, in the dopamine pathway. miR-133 participated in the post-transcriptional regulation of henna and pale by binding to their coding region and 3' untranslated region, respectively. miR-133 displayed cellular co-localization with henna/pale in the protocerebrum, and its expression in the protocerebrum was negatively correlated with henna and pale expression. Moreover, miR-133 agomir delivery suppressed henna and pale expression, which consequently decreased dopamine production, thus resulting in the behavioral shift of the locusts from the gregarious phase to the solitary phase. Increasing the dopamine content could rescue the solitary phenotype, which was induced by miR-133 agomir delivery. Conversely, miR-133 inhibition increased the expression of henna and pale, resulting in the gregarious-like behavior of solitary locusts; this gregarious phenotype could be rescued by RNA interference of henna and pale. This study shows the novel function and modulation pattern of a miRNA in phenotypic plasticity and provides insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of the phase transition of locusts.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of sideroblastic anemias: from defective heme synthesis to abnormal RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Mario; Malcovati, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is caused by germline mutations in ALAS2. Hemizygous males have a hypochromic microcytic anemia, which is generally mild to moderate and is caused by defective heme synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. XLSA is a typical iron-loading anemia; although most patients are responsive to pyridoxine, treatment of iron overload is also important in the management of these patients. Autosomal recessive sideroblastic anemia attributable to mutations in SLC25A38, a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, is a severe disease: patients present in infancy with microcytic anemia, which soon becomes transfusion dependent. Conservative therapy includes regular red cell transfusion and iron chelation, whereas allogenic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative treatment. Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized mainly by anemia attributable to ineffective erythropoiesis. The clinical course of RARS is generally indolent, but there is a tendency to worsening of anemia over time, so that most patients become transfusion dependent in the long run. More than 90% of these patients carry somatic mutations in SF3B1, a gene encoding a core component of the RNA splicing machinery. These mutations cause misrecognition of 3' splice sites in downstream genes, resulting in truncated gene products and/or decreased expression attributable to nonsense-mediated RNA decay; this explains the multifactorial pathogenesis of RARS. Variants of RARS include refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts, and RARS associated with marked thrombocytosis; these variants involve additional genetic lesions. Inhibitors of molecules of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily have been shown recently to target ineffective

  2. Ssrp1a controls organogenesis by promoting cell cycle progression and RNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltowska, Katarzyna; Apitz, Holger; Stamataki, Despina; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Verkade, Heather; Salecker, Iris; Ober, Elke A.

    2013-01-01

    Tightly controlled DNA replication and RNA transcription are essential for differentiation and tissue growth in multicellular organisms. Histone chaperones, including the FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) complex, are central for these processes and act by mediating DNA access through nucleosome reorganisation. However, their roles in vertebrate organogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of zebrafish mutants for the gene encoding Structure specific recognition protein 1a (Ssrp1a), which, together with Spt16, forms the FACT heterodimer. Focussing on the liver and eye, we show that zygotic Ssrp1a is essential for proliferation and differentiation during organogenesis. Specifically, gene expression indicative of progressive organ differentiation is disrupted and RNA transcription is globally reduced. Ssrp1a-deficient embryos exhibit DNA synthesis defects and prolonged S phase, uncovering a role distinct from that of Spt16, which promotes G1 phase progression. Gene deletion/replacement experiments in Drosophila show that Ssrp1b, Ssrp1a and N-terminal Ssrp1a, equivalent to the yeast homologue Pob3, can substitute Drosophila Ssrp function. These data suggest that (1) Ssrp1b does not compensate for Ssrp1a loss in the zebrafish embryo, probably owing to insufficient expression levels, and (2) despite fundamental structural differences, the mechanisms mediating DNA accessibility by FACT are conserved between yeast and metazoans. We propose that the essential functions of Ssrp1a in DNA replication and gene transcription, together with its dynamic spatiotemporal expression, ensure organ-specific differentiation and proportional growth, which are crucial for the forming embryo. PMID:23515471

  3. The adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicons is enhanced by incorporating the microbial molecule flagellin into the replicon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Ligands of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs including Toll-like receptors (TLRs stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses and are considered as potent adjuvants. Combinations of ligands might act in synergy to induce stronger and broader immune responses compared to stand-alone ligands. Alphaviruses stimulate endosomal TLRs 3, 7 and 8 as well as the cytoplasmic PRR MDA-5, resulting in induction of a strong type I interferon (IFN response. Bacterial flagellin stimulates TLR5 and when delivered intracellularly the cytosolic PRR NLRC4, leading to secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Both alphaviruses and flagellin have independently been shown to act as adjuvants for antigen-specific antibody responses. Here, we hypothesized that alphavirus and flagellin would act in synergy when combined. We therefore cloned the Salmonella Typhimurium flagellin (FliC gene into an alphavirus replicon and assessed its adjuvant activity on the antibody response against co-administered antigen. In mice immunized with recombinant alphavirus, antibody responses were greatly enhanced compared to soluble FliC or control alphavirus. Both IgG1 and IgG2a/c responses were increased, indicating an enhancement of both Th1 and Th2 type responses. The adjuvant activity of FliC-expressing alphavirus was diminished but not abolished in the absence of TLR5 or type I IFN signaling, suggesting the contribution of several signaling pathways and some synergistic and redundant activity of its components. Thus, we have created a recombinant adjuvant that stimulates multiple signaling pathways of innate immunity resulting in a strong and broad antibody response.

  4. Double subgenomic alphaviruses expressing multiple fluorescent proteins using a Rhopalosiphum padi virus internal ribosome entry site element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Wiley

    Full Text Available Double subgenomic Sindbis virus (dsSINV vectors are widely used for the expression of proteins, peptides, and RNA sequences. These recombinant RNA viruses permit high level expression of a heterologous sequence in a wide range of animals, tissues, and cells. However, the alphavirus genome structure and replication strategy is not readily amenable to the expression of more than one heterologous sequence. The Rhopalosiphum padi virus (RhPV genome contains two internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements that mediate cap-independent translation of the virus nonstructural and structural proteins. Most IRES elements that have been characterized function only in mammalian cells but previous work has shown that the IRES element present in the 5' untranslated region (UTR of the RhPV genome functions efficiently in mammalian, insect, and plant systems. To determine if the 5' RhPV IRES element could be used to express more than one heterologous sequence from a dsSINV vector, RhPV 5' IRES sequences were placed between genes for two different fluorescent marker proteins in the dsSINV, TE/3'2J/mcs. While mammalian and insect cells infected with recombinant viruses containing the RhPV sequences expressed both fluorescent marker proteins, only single marker proteins were routinely observed in cells infected with dsSINV vectors in which the RhPV IRES had been replaced by a luciferase fragment, an antisense RhPV IRES, or no intergenic sequence. Thus, we report development of a versatile tool for the expression of multiple sequences in diverse cell types.

  5. DNA polymerase-α regulates the activation of type I interferons through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations that disrupt nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts the expression of POLA1, which encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency resulted in increased production of type I interferons. This enzyme is necessary for the synthesis of RNA:DNA primers during DNA replication and, strikingly, we found that POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Together this work identifies POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response.

  6. CRM1 and its ribosome export adaptor NMD3 localize to the nucleolus and affect rRNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Baoyan; Moore, Henna M; Laiho, Marikki

    2013-01-01

    CRM1 is an export factor that together with its adaptor NMD3 transports numerous cargo molecules from the nucleus to cytoplasm through the nuclear pore. Previous studies have suggested that CRM1 and NMD3 are detected in the nucleolus. However, their localization with subnucleolar domains or participation in the activities of the nucleolus are unclear. We demonstrate here biochemically and using imaging analyses that CRM1 and NMD3 co-localize with nucleolar marker proteins in the nucleolus. In particular, their nucleolar localization is markedly increased by inhibition of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription by actinomycin D or by silencing Pol I catalytic subunit, RPA194. We show that CRM1 nucleolar localization is dependent on its activity and the expression of NMD3, whereas NMD3 nucleolar localization is independent of CRM1. This suggests that NMD3 provides nucleolar tethering of CRM1. While inhibition of CRM1 by leptomycin B inhibited processing of 28S ribosomal (r) RNA, depletion of NMD3 did not, suggesting that their effects on 28S rRNA processing are distinct. Markedly, depletion of NMD3 and inhibition of CRM1 reduced the rate of pre-47S rRNA synthesis. However, their inactivation did not lead to nucleolar disintegration, a hallmark of Pol I transcription stress, suggesting that they do not directly regulate transcription. These results indicate that CRM1 and NMD3 have complex functions in pathways that couple rRNA synthetic and processing engines and that the rRNA synthesis rate may be adjusted according to proficiency in rRNA processing and export.

  7. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  8. Inhibition of viral RNA synthesis in canine distemper virus infection by proanthocyanidin A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Laura; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Galligioni, Viola; Bombardelli, Ezio; Scagliarini, Alessandra

    2011-12-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a contagious and multisystemic viral disease that affects domestic and wild canines as well as other terrestrial and aquatic carnivores. The disease in dogs is often fatal and no specific antiviral therapy is currently available. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro antiviral activity against CDV of proanthocyanidin A2 (PA2), a phenolic dimer belonging to the class of condensed tannins present in plants. Our results showed that PA2 exerted in vitro antiviral activity against CDV with a higher selectivity index compared to ribavirin, included in our study for the previously tested anti-CDV activity. The time of addition assay led us to observe that PA2 was able to decrease the viral RNA synthesis and to reduce progeny virus liberation, at different times post infection suggesting multiple mechanisms of action including inhibition of viral replicative complex and modulation of the redox milieu. These data suggest that PA2, isolated from the bark of Aesculus hippocastanum, has potential usefulness as an anti-CDV compound inhibiting viral replication. PMID:22020306

  9. Short ROSE-like RNA thermometers control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

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    Stefanie S Krajewski

    Full Text Available The bacterial small heat shock protein IbpA protects client proteins from aggregation. Due to redundancy in the cellular chaperone network, deletion of the ibpA gene often leads to only a mild or no phenotypic defect. In this study, we show that a Pseudomonas putida ibpA deletion mutant has a severe growth defect under heat stress conditions and reduced survival during recovery revealing a critical role of IbpA in heat tolerance. Transcription of the ibpA gene depends on the alternative heat shock sigma factor σ(32. Production of IbpA protein only at heat shock temperatures suggested additional translational control. We conducted a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of the 5' untranslated regions of the ibpA genes from P. putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both contain a ROSE-type RNA thermometer that is substantially shorter and simpler than previously reported ROSE elements. Comprised of two hairpin structures only, they inhibit translation at low temperature and permit translation initiation after a temperature upshift. Both elements regulate reporter gene expression in Escherichia coli and ribosome binding in vitro in a temperature-dependent manner. Structure probing revealed local melting of the second hairpin whereas the first hairpin remained unaffected. High sequence and structure conservation of pseudomonal ibpA untranslated regions and their ability to confer thermoregulation in vivo suggest that short ROSE-like thermometers are commonly used to control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

  10. Targeting Membrane-Bound Viral RNA Synthesis Reveals Potent Inhibition of Diverse Coronaviruses Including the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Lundin; Ronald Dijkman; Tomas Bergström; Nina Kann; Beata Adamiak; Charles Hannoun; Eveline Kindler; Jónsdóttir, Hulda R; Doreen Muth; Joeri Kint; Maria Forlenza; Müller, Marcel A.; Christian Drosten; Volker Thiel; Edward Trybala

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs), a hall...

  11. Discovery of Novel Oral Protein Synthesis Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis That Target Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencia, Andrés; Li, Xianfeng; Bu, Wei; Choi, Wai; Ding, Charles Z.; Easom, Eric E.; Feng, Lisa; Hernandez, Vincent; Houston, Paul; Liu, Liang; Meewan, Maliwan; Mohan, Manisha; Rock, Fernando L.; Sexton, Holly; Zhang, Suoming; Zhou, Yasheen; Wan, Baojie; Wang, Yuehong; Franzblau, Scott G.; Woolhiser, Lisa; Gruppo, Veronica; Lenaerts, Anne J.; O'Malley, Theresa; Parish, Tanya; Cooper, Christopher B.; Waters, M. Gerard; Ma, Zhenkun; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.; Rullas, Joaquín; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Mendoza, Alfonso; Barros, David; Cusack, Stephen; Plattner, Jacob J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent development and spread of extensively drug-resistant and totally drug-resistant resistant (TDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis highlight the need for new antitubercular drugs. Protein synthesis inhibitors have played an important role in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) starting with the inclusion of streptomycin in the first combination therapies. Although parenteral aminoglycosides are a key component of therapy for multidrug-resistant TB, the oxazolidinone linezolid is the only orally available protein synthesis inhibitor that is effective against TB. Here, we show that small-molecule inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs), which are known to be excellent antibacterial protein synthesis targets, are orally bioavailable and effective against M. tuberculosis in TB mouse infection models. We applied the oxaborole tRNA-trapping (OBORT) mechanism, which was first developed to target fungal cytoplasmic leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), to M. tuberculosis LeuRS. X-ray crystallography was used to guide the design of LeuRS inhibitors that have good biochemical potency and excellent whole-cell activity against M. tuberculosis. Importantly, their good oral bioavailability translates into in vivo efficacy in both the acute and chronic mouse models of TB with potency comparable to that of the frontline drug isoniazid. PMID:27503647

  12. Liquid-Phase Synthesis of 2'-Methyl-RNA on a Homostar Support through Organic-Solvent Nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Piers R J; Kim, Jeong F; Valtcheva, Irina B; Williams, Glynn D; Anson, Mike S; Buswell, Andrew M; Livingston, Andrew G

    2015-06-22

    Due to the discovery of RNAi, oligonucleotides (oligos) have re-emerged as a major pharmaceutical target that may soon be required in ton quantities. However, it is questionable whether solid-phase oligo synthesis (SPOS) methods can provide a scalable synthesis. Liquid-phase oligo synthesis (LPOS) is intrinsically scalable and amenable to standard industrial batch synthesis techniques. However, most reported LPOS strategies rely upon at least one precipitation per chain extension cycle to separate the growing oligonucleotide from reaction debris. Precipitation can be difficult to develop and control on an industrial scale and, because many precipitations would be required to prepare a therapeutic oligonucleotide, we contend that this approach is not viable for large-scale industrial preparation. We are developing an LPOS synthetic strategy for 2'-methyl RNA phosphorothioate that is more amenable to standard batch production techniques, using organic solvent nanofiltration (OSN) as the critical scalable separation technology. We report the first LPOS-OSN preparation of a 2'-Me RNA phosphorothioate 9-mer, using commercial phosphoramidite monomers, and monitoring all reactions by HPLC, (31)P NMR spectroscopy and MS.

  13. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Mueller, Claudius [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Roberts, Brian [Leidos Health Life Sciences, 5202 Presidents Court, Suite 110, Frederick, MD (United States); Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Petricoin, Emanuel [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Narayanan, Aarthi, E-mail: anaraya1@gmu.edu [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells.

  14. The juxtamembrane sequence of the Hepatitis C virus polymerase can affect RNA synthesis and inhibition by allosteric polymerase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Y; Lin, X; Fan, B; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Kao, C C

    2015-08-01

    The Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B), is anchored in the membrane through a C-terminal helix. A sequence of ca. 12 residues that connects the catalytically competent portion of the RdRp and the C-terminal helix, the juxtamembrane sequence (JMS), has a poorly defined role in RdRp function in a large part since it is translated from a cis-acting RNA element (CRE) that is essential for HCV replication. Using a HCV replicon that transposed a second copy of CRE to the 3' UTR of the HCV replicon, we demonstrate that amino acid substitutions in the JMS were detrimental for HCV replicon replication. Substitutions in the JMS also resulted in a defect in de novo-initiated RNAs synthesis in vitro and in a cell-based reporter assay. A nonnucleoside inhibitor of the NS5B that binds to the catalytic pocket was less potent in inhibiting NS5B in the presence of JMS mutations. The JMS mutants exhibit reduced stability in thermodenaturation assays, suggesting that the JMS helps confer a more stable conformation to NS5B that could impact RNA synthesis. PMID:25895103

  15. Synthesis of a bifunctional cytidine derivative and its conjugation to RNA for in vitro selection of a cytidine deaminase ribozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Rublack

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 20 years, the generation of functional RNAs by in vitro selection has become a standard technique. Apart from aptamers for simple binding of defined ligands, also RNAs for catalysis of chemical reactions have been selected. In the latter case, a key step often is the conjugation of one of the two reactants to the library, requiring suitable strategies for terminal or internal RNA functionalization. With the aim of selecting a ribozyme for deamination of cytidine, we have set up a selection scheme involving the attachment of the cytidine acting as deamination substrate to the 3'-terminus of the RNAs in the library, and library immobilization. Here, we report the synthesis of a bifunctional cytidine derivative suitable for conjugation to RNA and linkage of the conjugated library to a streptavidine-coated surface. Successful conjugation of the cytidine derivative to the 3'-terminus of a model RNA is demonstrated.

  16. Failure of RNA synthesis to recover after UV irradiation: an early defect in cells from individuals with Cockayne's syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work has shown that in cells from the ultraviolet-sensitive genetic disorder, Cockayne's syndrome, DNA synthesis fails to recover after ultraviolet irradiation, despite the fact that these cells have no detectable defect in either excision or daughter-strand repair pathways. We now show that Cockayne cells, as well as cells from a number of patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, are sensitive to the lethal effects of UV irradiation in stationary phase under conditions in which no DNA is synthesized after irradiation. Furthermore, in normal and defective human fibroblasts, RNA synthesis is depressed after UV irradiation. In normal (dividing) cells, RNA synthesis recovers very rapidly, but this recovery does not occur in Cockayne cells, and it is reduced or absent in xeroderma pigmentosum cells from different complementation groups. Qualitatively, similar results are obtained with cells in stationary phase. The recovery of RNA synthesis in the various defective cell strains is not correlated with the overall extent of excision repair, but there is some correlation between recovery of RNA synthesis and cell survival after ultraviolet irradiation. These results implicate recovery of RNA synthesis as an important early response to ultraviolet irradiation

  17. Cooperative Action of Cdk1/cyclin B and SIRT1 Is Required for Mitotic Repression of rRNA Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Renate; Seiler, Jeanette; Grummt, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic repression of rRNA synthesis requires inactivation of the RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-specific transcription factor SL1 by Cdk1/cyclin B-dependent phosphorylation of TAFI110 (TBP-associated factor 110) at a single threonine residue (T852). Upon exit from mitosis, T852 is dephosphorylated by Cdc14B, which is sequestered in nucleoli during interphase and is activated upon release from nucleoli at prometaphase. Mitotic repression of Pol I transcription correlates with transient nucleolar enrichment of the NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1, which deacetylates another subunit of SL1, TAFI68. Hypoacetylation of TAFI68 destabilizes SL1 binding to the rDNA promoter, thereby impairing transcription complex assembly. Inhibition of SIRT1 activity alleviates mitotic repression of Pol I transcription if phosphorylation of TAFI110 is prevented. The results demonstrate that reversible phosphorylation of TAFI110 and acetylation of TAFI68 are key modifications that regulate SL1 activity and mediate fluctuations of pre-rRNA synthesis during cell cycle progression. PMID:26023773

  18. Production of virus-derived ping-pong-dependent piRNA-like small RNAs in the mosquito soma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M Morazzani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural maintenance cycles of many mosquito-borne pathogens require establishment of persistent non-lethal infections in the invertebrate host. The mechanism by which this occurs is not well understood, but we have previously shown that an antiviral response directed by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs is important in modulating the pathogenesis of alphavirus infections in the mosquito. However, we report here that infection of mosquitoes with an alphavirus also triggers the production of another class of virus-derived small RNAs that exhibit many similarities to ping-pong-dependent piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs. However, unlike ping-pong-dependent piRNAs that have been described previously from repetitive elements or piRNA clusters, our work suggests production in the soma. We also present evidence that suggests virus-derived piRNA-like small RNAs are capable of modulating the pathogenesis of alphavirus infections in dicer-2 null mutant mosquito cell lines defective in viral siRNA production. Overall, our results suggest that a non-canonical piRNA pathway is present in the soma of vector mosquitoes and may be acting redundantly to the siRNA pathway to target alphavirus replication.

  19. Synthesis of poly(A)-containing RNA by isolated spinach chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolf, M; Price, C A

    1979-05-01

    Chloroplasts were isolated from spinach leaves and the intact chloroplasts separated by centrifugation on gradients of silica sol. Chloroplasts prepared in this way were almost completely free of cytoplasmic rRNA. The purified chloroplasts were incubated with 32PO4 in the light. The nucleic acids were then extracted and the RNA was fractionated into poly(A)-lacking RNA and poly(A)-containing RNA (poly(A)-RNA) via oligo(dT)-cellulose chromatography. The poly(A)-RNA had a mean size of approximately 18--20 S as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The poly(A)-RNA was digested with RNase A and RNase T1, and the resulting poly(A) segments were subjected to electrophoresis on a 10% w/v polyacrylamide gel 98% v/v formamide). Radioactivity was incorporated into both poly(A)-RNA and poly(A)-lacking RNA and into the poly(A) segments themselves. The poly(A) segments were between 10 and 45 residues long and alkaline hydrolysis of poly(A) segments followed by descending paper chromatography showed that they were composed primarily of adenine residues. There was no 32PO4 incorporation into acid-insoluble material in the dark. We conclude that isolated chloroplasts are capable of synthesizing poly(A)-RNA. PMID:435477

  20. Synthesis and applications of selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Lewis, H.; Cai, Z.; Tinoci, I. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Spectral overlap is a substantial problem in NMR studies of RNA molecules >30 nucleotides. To overcome this difficulty, we synthesized selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs and adapted several isotope-edited two- and three-dimensional NMR experiments originally developed for protein studies. We optimized protocols for synthesis of multi-gram quantities of CTP, UTp, ATP, and GTP using a combination of synthetic organic and enzymatic methods. Uracil is prepared in 40 to 50% yield from {sup 13}C-cyanide in two steps. Using acetyl- tribenzoyl-ribose and standard chemistry uracil is then attached to the sugar (90% yield). The tribenzoyl-uridine intermediate is converted into uridine or cytidine quantitatively, depending on the deblocking protocol. Labeled purines are synthesized using simple pyrimidine precursors and reacting with {sup 13}C-formic acid (80% yield). Purine nucleosides are then synthesized using uridine phosphorylase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase. The nucleosides were converted to NMPs by treatment with POC1{sub 3} in triethylphosphate. We converted NMPs to NTPs by standard enzymatic methods. Selectively labeled RNAs were synthesized by run-off transcription using {sup 13}C-labeled NTPs. Several different strategies help solve over-lap problems in larger RNAs. Isotope-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments such as {omega}1-1/2 X-filtered NOESY simplify NMR spectra by dividing the normal NOESY spectrum into two subspectra-one involving NOEs from protons bound to {sup 12}C and one from protons bound to {sup 13}C. For example, we labeled A and U residues of a 34-nucleotide pseudoknot, and the {sup 12}C subspectrum of the 1/2 X-filtered NOESY contained NOEs only from G and C residues (along with adenine 2H); the {sup 13}C subspectrum contained NOEs only from A and U residues. Each subspectrum has less overlap than the NOESY of an unlabeled sample; the editing strategy allows each resonance to be identified by residue type (A, C, G, or U).

  1. Cockayne syndrome: report of a Brazilian family with confirmation of impaired RNA synthesis after UV-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Simone M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dwarfism, growth deficiency, neurological deterioration, skin photosensitivity and a characteristic progressive facial appearance. In the present study we report the first Brazilian CS family in which diagnosis was confirmed by the demonstration of decreased RNA synthesis in cultured fibroblasts exposed to UV-C radiation. Despite the progressive course of the disease and the unavailability of an effective treatment, diagnosis may be very important for the benefits to be gained by the afflicted family from genetic counseling and/or prenatal diagnosis.

  2. Hamowanie syntezy chlorofilu i RNA w izolowanych liścieniach ogórka przez N-hydroksymocznik [Inhibition of chlorophyll and RNA synthesis by N-hydroxyurea in detached cucumber cotyledons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rennert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available N-hydroxyurea (HU at the concentration of 5 x 10-4 M decreased the content of chlorophyll in detached cucumber cotyledons; at this concentration it has no inhibitory effect on growth. Benzylaminopurine, gibberelic acid and KCl partially reversed the inhibitory effect of HU on chlorophyll synthesis. HU stimulated yellowing of barley first leaf sections. The compound had little effect on leucine-14C incorporation to protein, and markedly inhibited uracil-14C incorporation in to RNA of the greening cucumber cotyledons. It is suggested that the inhibition of RNA and chlorophyll synthesis in HU-treated cucumber cotyledons follows the HU-dependent inhibition of DNA replication.

  3. Non-enzymatic template-directed RNA synthesis inside model protocells

    OpenAIRE

    Adamala, Katarzyna; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to recreate a prebiotically plausible protocell, in which RNA replication occurs within a fatty acid vesicle, have been stalled by the destabilizing effect of Mg2+ on fatty acid membranes. Here, we report that the presence of citrate protects fatty acid membranes from the disruptive effects of high Mg2+ ion concentrations while allowing RNA copying to proceed, while also protecting single-stranded RNA from Mg2+-catalyzed degradation. This combination of properties has allowed us to de...

  4. Salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein E2 requires low temperature and E1 for virion formation and induction of protective immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, M.C.; Braaen, S.; Villoing, S.; Hodneland, K.; Geertsema, C.; Verhagen, L.; Frost, P.; Vlak, J.M.; Rimstad, E.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV; also known as Salmon pancreas disease virus; family Togaviridae) causes pancreas disease and sleeping disease in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout, respectively, and poses a major burden to the aquaculture industry. SAV infection in vivo is temperature-restricted and progen

  5. Increase in cell viability by polyamines through stimulation of the synthesis of ppGpp regulatory protein and ω protein of RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terui, Yusuke; Akiyama, Mariko; Sakamoto, Akihiko; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    It is known that polyamines increase cell growth through stimulation of the synthesis of several kinds of proteins encoded by the so-called "polyamine modulon". We recently reported that polyamines also increase cell viability at the stationary phase of cell growth through stimulation of the synthesis of ribosome modulation factor, a component of the polyamine modulon. Accordingly, we looked for other proteins involved in cell viability whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines. It was found that the synthesis of ppGpp regulatory protein (SpoT) and ω protein of RNA polymerase (RpoZ) was stimulated by polyamines at the level of translation. Stimulation of the synthesis of SpoT and RpoZ by polyamines was due to an inefficient initiation codon UUG in spoT mRNA and an unusual location of a Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence in rpoZ mRNA. Accordingly, the spoT and rpoZ genes are components of the polyamine modulon involved in cell viability. Reduced cell viability caused by polyamine deficiency was prevented by modified spoT and rpoZ genes whose synthesis was not influenced by polyamines. Under these conditions, the level of ppGpp increased in parallel with increase of SpoT protein. The results indicate that polyamine stimulation of synthesis of SpoT and RpoZ plays important roles for cell viability through stimulation of ppGpp synthesis by SpoT and modulation of RNA synthesis by ppGpp-RpoZ complex.

  6. SncRNA715 Inhibits Schwann Cell Myelin Basic Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina; Hochhaus, Nina M; Fontana, Xavier; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Myelin basic proteins (MBP) are major constituents of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In the CNS Mbp translation occurs locally at the axon-glial contact site in a neuronal activity-dependent manner. Recently we identified the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715) as a key inhibitor of Mbp translation during transport in oligodendrocytes. Mbp mRNA localization in Schwann cells has been observed, but has not been investigated in much detail. Here we could confirm translational repression of Mbp mRNA in Schwann cells. We show that sncRNA715 is expressed and its levels correlate inversely with MBP in cultured Schwann cells and in the sciatic nerve in vivo. Furthermore we could reduce MBP protein levels in cultured Schwann cells by increasing the levels of the inhibitory sncRNA715. Our findings suggest similarities in sncRNA715-mediated translational repression of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells.

  7. Cockayne's syndrome: correlation of clinical features with cellular sensitivity of RNA synthesis to UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, A.R.; Thompson, A.F.; Harcourt, S.A. (Medical Research Council, Brighton (United Kingdom). Cell Mutation Unit); Stefanini, Miria (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia (Italy). Ist. di Genetica Biochimica ed Evoluzionistica); Norris, P.G. (Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1993-08-01

    Cockayne's syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with dwarfism, mental retardation, and otherwise clinically heterogeneous features. In cultured CS fibroblasts, the failure of RNA synthesis to recover to normal rates after UV-C irradiation provides a useful and relatively simple diagnostic test. We have measured post-UV-C RNA synthesis in 52 patients for whom a clinical diagnosis of CS was considered a possibility. Twenty-nine patients showed the defect characteristic of CS cells, and 23 had a normal response. We have attempted to correlate the cellular diagnosis with the different clinical features of the disorder. Clinical details of the patients were obtained from referring clinicians in the form of a questionnaire. Our results show that, apart from the cardinal features of dwarfism and mental retardation, sun sensitivity correlated best with a positive cellular diagnosis. Pigmentary retinopathy, gait defects, and dental caries were also good positive indicators, although several patients with a positive cellular diagnosis did not have these features. (Author).

  8. Predicted class-I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-like proteins in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies point to a great diversity of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis systems with major roles in amino acid and co-factor biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and post-translational modifications of proteins by peptide tags. The least studied of these systems are those utilizing tRNAs or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AAtRS in non-ribosomal peptide ligation. Results Here we describe novel examples of AAtRS related proteins that are likely to be involved in the synthesis of widely distributed peptide-derived metabolites. Using sensitive sequence profile methods we show that the cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs are members of the HUP class of Rossmannoid domains and are likely to be highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domains. We also identify the first eukaryotic CDPSs in fungi and in animals; they might be involved in immune response in the latter organisms. We also identify a paralogous version of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase, which is widespread in bacteria, and present evidence using contextual information that it might function independently of protein synthesis as a peptide ligase in the formation of a peptide- derived secondary metabolite. This metabolite is likely to be heavily modified through multiple reactions catalyzed by a metal-binding cupin domain and a lysine N6 monooxygenase that are strictly associated with this paralogous methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MtRS. We further identify an analogous system wherein the MtRS has been replaced by more typical peptide ligases with the ATP-grasp or modular condensation-domains. Conclusions The prevalence of these predicted biosynthetic pathways in phylogenetically distant, pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria suggests that metabolites synthesized by them might participate in interactions with the host. More generally, these findings point to a complete spectrum of recruitment of AAtRS to various non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways, ranging from the

  9. Presence and synthesis of histone mRNA in rice embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of lysine-rich histone by the 17,000 x g supernatant fraction prepared from the dry embryos of rice seeds showed that histone messengers are conserved. The synthesis of mRNAs during the early phase of germination is mitomycin sensitive, thereby indicating that histone mRNAs are synthesised during the early phase of germination. [14C]lysine, [2H]thymidine and [32P]orthophosphate were used in the study. (author)

  10. Mutation of genes controlling mRNA metabolism and protein synthesis predisposes to neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, Francesca; Anderson, Jihan; McCaig, Colin; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Müller, Berndt

    2015-12-01

    Brain development is a tightly controlled process that depends upon differentiation and function of neurons to allow for the formation of functional neural networks. Mutation of genes encoding structural proteins is well recognized as causal for neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Recent studies have shown that aberrant gene expression can also lead to disorders of neural development. Here we summarize recent evidence implicating in the aetiology of NDDs mutation of factors acting at the level of mRNA splicing, mRNA nuclear export, translation and mRNA degradation. This highlights the importance of these fundamental processes for human health and affords new strategies and targets for therapeutic intervention.

  11. Non-enzymatic template-directed RNA synthesis inside model protocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Szostak, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to recreate a prebiotically plausible protocell, in which RNA replication occurs within a fatty acid vesicle, have been stalled by the destabilizing effect of Mg2+ on fatty acid membranes. Here, we report that the presence of citrate protects fatty acid membranes from the disruptive effects of high Mg2+ ion concentrations while allowing RNA copying to proceed, while also protecting single-stranded RNA from Mg2+-catalyzed degradation. This combination of properties has allowed us to demonstrate the chemical copying of RNA templates inside fatty acid vesicles, which in turn allows for an increase in copying efficiency by bathing the vesicles in a continuously refreshed solution of activated nucleotides. PMID:24288333

  12. PNA containing isocytidine nucleobase: synthesis and recognition of double helical RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Zengeya, Thomas; Li, Ming; Rozners, Eriks

    2011-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA1) containing a 5-methylisocytidine (iC) nucleobase has been synthesized. Triple helix formation between PNA1 and RNA hairpins having variable base pairs interacting with iC was studied using isothermal titration calorimetry. The iC nucleobase recognized the proposed target, C-G inversion in polypurine tract of RNA, with slightly higher affinity than the natural nucleobases, though the sequence selectivity of recognition was low. Compared to non-modified PNA, PNA1 had...

  13. A model for mis-sense error in protein synthesis: mis-charged cognate tRNA versus mis-reading of codon

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Annwesha

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of amino acid monomers in the primary structure of protein is decided by the corresponding sequence of codons (triplets of nucleic acid monomers) on the template messenger RNA (mRNA). The polymerization of a protein, by incorporation of the successive amino acid monomers, is carried out by a molecular machine called ribosome. Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, each species of which is "charged" with a specific amino acid, enters the ribosome and participates in the reading of the codon by the ribosome. Both mis-reading of mRNA codon and prior mis-charging of a tRNA can lead to "mis-sense" error, i.e,. erroneous substitution of a correct amino acid monomer by an incorrect one during the synthesis of a protein. We develop a theoretical model of protein synthesis that allows for both types of contributions to the "mis-sense" error. We report exact analytical formulae for several quantities that characterize the interplay of mis-charging of tRNA and mis-reading of mRNA. The average rate of elongation of ...

  14. Stone Lakes Virus (Family Togaviridae, Genus Alphavirus), a Variant of Fort Morgan Virus Isolated From Swallow Bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) West of the Continental Divide

    OpenAIRE

    Brault, Aaron C; Armijos, M. Veronica; Wheeler, Sarah; Wright, Stan; Fang, Ying; Langevin, Stanley; Reisen, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple isolates of an alphaviruses within the western equine encephalomyelitis-serocomplex that were related closely to Ft. Morgan and its variant Buggy Creek virus were made from swallow bugs, Oeciacus vicarius Horvath (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), collected from cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) nests at the Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Sacramento County, CA, during the summers of 2005 and 2006. This virus (hereafter Stone Lakes virus, family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus, STLV)...

  15. Characterization of a Novel Human-Specific STING Agonist that Elicits Antiviral Activity Against Emerging Alphaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina M Sali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacologic stimulation of innate immune processes represents an attractive strategy to achieve multiple therapeutic outcomes including inhibition of virus replication, boosting antitumor immunity, and enhancing vaccine immunogenicity. In light of this we sought to identify small molecules capable of activating the type I interferon (IFN response by way of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3. A high throughput in vitro screen yielded 4-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl-N-(furan-2-ylmethyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (referred to herein as G10, which was found to trigger IRF3/IFN-associated transcription in human fibroblasts. Further examination of the cellular response to this molecule revealed expression of multiple IRF3-dependent antiviral effector genes as well as type I and III IFN subtypes. This led to the establishment of a cellular state that prevented replication of emerging Alphavirus species including Chikungunya virus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus, and Sindbis virus. To define cellular proteins essential to elicitation of the antiviral activity by the compound we employed a reverse genetics approach that utilized genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 technology. This allowed the identification of IRF3, the IRF3-activating adaptor molecule STING, and the IFN-associated transcription factor STAT1 as required for observed gene induction and antiviral effects. Biochemical analysis indicates that G10 does not bind to STING directly, however. Thus the compound may represent the first synthetic small molecule characterized as an indirect activator of human STING-dependent phenotypes. In vivo stimulation of STING-dependent activity by an unrelated small molecule in a mouse model of Chikungunya virus infection blocked viremia demonstrating that pharmacologic activation of this signaling pathway may represent a feasible strategy for combating emerging Alphaviruses.

  16. IGS Minisatellites Useful for Race Differentiation in Colletotrichum lentis and a Likely Site of Small RNA Synthesis Affecting Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Durkin

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum lentis is a fungal pathogen of lentil in Canada but rarely reported elsewhere. Two races, Ct0 and Ct1, have been identified using differential lines. Our objective was to develop a PCR-probe differentiating these races. Sequences of the translation elongation factor 1α (tef1α, RNA polymerase II subunit B2 (rpb2, ATP citrate lyase subunit A (acla, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions were monomorphic, while the intergenic spacer (IGS region showed length polymorphisms at two minisatellites of 23 and 39 nucleotides (nt. A PCR-probe (39F/R amplifying the 39 nt minisatellite was developed which subsequently revealed 1-5 minisatellites with 1-12 repeats in C. lentis. The probe differentiated race Ct1 isolates having 7, 9 or 7+9 repeats from race Ct0 having primarily 2 or 4 repeats, occasionally 5, 6, or 8, but never 7 or 9 repeats. These isolates were collected between 1991 and 1999. In a 2012 survey isolates with 2 and 4 repeats increased from 34% to 67%, while isolated with 7 or 9 repeats decreased from 40 to 4%, likely because Ct1 resistant lentil varieties had been grown. The 39 nt repeat was identified in C. gloeosporioides, C. trifolii, Ascochyta lentis, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea. Thus, the 39F/R PCR probe is not species specific, but can differentiate isolates based on repeat number. The 23 nt minisatellite in C. lentis exists as three length variants with ten sequence variations differentiating race Ct0 having 14 or 19 repeats from race Ct1 having 17 repeats, except for one isolate. RNA-translation of 23 nt repeats forms hairpins and has the appropriate length to suggest that IGS could be a site of small RNA synthesis, a hypothesis that warrants further investigation. Small RNA from fungal plant pathogens able to silence genes either in the host or pathogen thereby aiding infection have been reported.

  17. Modulatory effect of rRNA synthesis and ppUL83 nucleolar compartmentalization on human cytomegalovirus gene expression in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Rodighiero, Isabella; De Conto, Flora; Gatti, Rita; Orlandini, Guido; Ferraglia, Francesca; Motta, Federica; Covan, Silvia; Razin, Sergey V; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo

    2009-10-01

    The nucleolus is a nuclear domain involved in the biogenesis of ribosomes, as well as in many other important cellular regulatory activities, such as cell cycle control and mRNA processing. Many viruses, including herpesviruses, are known to exploit the nucleolar compartment during their replication cycle. In a previous study, we demonstrated the preferential targeting and accumulation of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL83 phosphoprotein (pp65) to the nucleolar compartment and, in particular, to the nucleolar matrix of lytically infected fibroblasts; such targeting was already evident at very early times after infection. Here we have investigated the possible effects of rRNA synthesis inhibition upon the development of HCMV lytic infection, by using either actinomycin D or cisplatin at low concentrations, that are known to selectively inhibit RNA polymerase I activity, whilst leaving RNA polymerase II function unaffected. Following the inhibition of rRNA synthesis by either of the agents used, we observed a significant redistribution of nucleolar proteins within the nucleoplasm and a simultaneous depletion of viral pp65 from the nucleolus; this effect was highly evident in both unextracted cells and in nuclear matrices in situ. Of particular interest, even a brief suppression of rRNA synthesis resulted in a very strong inhibition of the progression of HCMV infection, as was concluded from the absence of accumulation of HCMV major immediate-early proteins within the nucleus of infected cells. These data suggest that a functional relationship might exist between rRNA synthesis, pp65 localization to the nucleolar matrix and the normal development of HCMV lytic infection. PMID:19585527

  18. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  19. RNA:protein ratio of the unicellular organism as a characteristic of phosphorous and nitrogen stoichiometry and of the cellular requirement of ribosomes for protein synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sams Carl E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mean phosphorous:nitrogen (P:N ratios and relationships of P:N ratios with the growth rate of organisms indicate a surprising similarity among and within microbial species, plants, and insect herbivores. To reveal the cellular mechanisms underling this similarity, the macromolecular composition of seven microorganisms and the effect of specific growth rate (SGR on RNA:protein ratio, the number of ribosomes, and peptide elongation rate (PER were analyzed under different conditions of exponential growth. Results It was found that P:N ratios calculated from RNA and protein contents in these particular organisms were in the same range as the mean ratios reported for diverse organisms and had similar positive relationships with growth rate, consistent with the growth-rate hypothesis. The efficiency of protein synthesis in microorganisms is estimated as the number of active ribosomes required for the incorporation of one amino acid into the synthesized protein. This parameter is calculated as the SGR:PER ratio. Experimental and theoretical evidence indicated that the requirement of ribosomes for protein synthesis is proportional to the RNA:protein ratio. The constant of proportionality had the same values for all organisms, and was derived mechanistically from the characteristics of the protein-synthesis machinery of the cell (the number of nucleotides per ribosome, the average masses of nucleotides and amino acids, the fraction of ribosomal RNA in the total RNA, and the fraction of active ribosomes. Impairment of the growth conditions decreased the RNA:protein ratio and increased the overall efficiency of protein synthesis in the microorganisms. Conclusion Our results suggest that the decrease in RNA:protein and estimated P:N ratios with decrease in the growth rate of the microorganism is a consequence of an increased overall efficiency of protein synthesis in the cell resulting from activation of the general stress response and

  20. Genetic Diversity of Venezuelan Alphaviruses and Circulation of a Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Subtype IAB Strain During an Interepizootic Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Gladys; Garzaro, Domingo J.; Barrios, Miguel; Auguste, Albert J.; Weaver, Scott C.; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    Several species of alphaviruses have been previously described in the Americas, some of which are associated with encephalitis and others are associated with arthralgia. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) are endemic to Venezuela, with the former being responsible for major outbreaks of severe and often fatal disease in animals and humans. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity of Venezuelan alphaviruses isolated during two decades (1973–1999) of surveillance in northern Venezuela. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the circulation of a VEEV subtype IAB strain 8 years after the last reported outbreak. Thirteen strains within two subclades of South American lineage III of EEEV were also found in Venezuela. Considerable genetic variability was observed among Venezuelan Una virus strains, which were widely distributed among the clades. The first Venezuelan Mayaro sequence was also characterized. PMID:25940191

  1. Identification and characterization of alphavirus M1 as a selective oncolytic virus targeting ZAP-defective human cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Haipeng; Liang, Jiankai; Kai LI; Zhu, Wenbo; FU, LIWU; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Xiaoke; Shi, Huijuan; Wu, Sihan; Xiao, Xiao; Chen, Lijun; TANG, LIPENG; Yan, Min; Yang, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Although oncolytic virotherapy is showing great promise in clinical trials, not all patients are benefiting. Identifying predictors of therapeutic effectiveness for each oncolytic virus would provide a good chance to increase response rate. Here, we describe an alphavirus (M1) that possesses selective and potent antitumor activity through intravenous infusion, whereas its replication is controlled by the zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP) gene. A survey of cancer tissue banks reveals that ZA...

  2. Class II fusion protein of alphaviruses drives membrane fusion through the same pathway as class I proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitseva, Elena; Mittal, Aditya; Griffin, Diane E.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2005-01-01

    Viral fusion proteins of classes I and II differ radically in their initial structures but refold toward similar conformations upon activation. Do fusion pathways mediated by alphavirus E1 and influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) that exemplify classes II and I differ to reflect the difference in their initial conformations, or concur to reflect the similarity in the final conformations? Here, we dissected the pathway of low pH–triggered E1-mediated cell–cell fusion by reducing the numbers of a...

  3. Inhibition of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus RNA Synthesis by Thiosemicarbazone Derived from 5,6-Dimethoxy-1-Indanone▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eliana F.; Fabian, Lucas E.; Caputto, María E.; Gagey, Dolores; Finkielsztein, Liliana M.; Moltrasio, Graciela Y.; Moglioni, Albertina G.; Campos, Rodolfo H.; Cavallaro, Lucía V.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we described the activity of the thiosemicarbazone derived from 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone (TSC), which we previously characterized as a new compound that inhibits bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection. We showed that TSC acts at a point of time that coincides with the onset of viral RNA synthesis and that it inhibits the activity of BVDV replication complexes (RCs). Moreover, we have selected five BVDV mutants that turned out to be highly resistant to TSC but still susceptible to ribavirin (RBV). Four of these resistant mutants carried an N264D mutation in the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The remaining mutant showed an A392E mutation within the same protein. Some of these mutants replicated slower than the wild-type (wt) virus in the absence of TSC, whereas others showed a partial reversion to the wt phenotype over several passages in the absence of the compound. The docking of TSC in the crystal structure of the BVDV RdRp revealed a close contact between the indane ring of the compound and several residues within the fingers domain of the enzyme, some hydrophobic contacts, and hydrogen bonds with the thiosemicarbazone group. Finally, in the mutated RdRp from resistant BVDV, these interactions with TSC could not be achieved. Interestingly, TSC inhibited BVDV replication in cell culture synergistically with RBV. In conclusion, TSC emerges as a new nonnucleoside inhibitor of BVDV RdRp that is synergistic with RBV, a feature that turns it into a potential compound to be evaluated against hepatitis C virus (HCV). PMID:21430053

  4. Rickettsia prowazekii Transports UMP and GMP, but Not CMP, as Building Blocks for RNA Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, Herbert H.; Daugherty, Robin; Hu, Fuquan

    1999-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii, the etiological agent of epidemic typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium and is apparently unable to synthesize ribonucleotides de novo. Here, we show that as an alternative, isolated, purified R. prowazekii organisms transported exogenous uridyl- and guanylribonucleotides and incorporated these labeled precursors into their RNA in a rifampin-sensitive manner. Transport systems for nucleotides, which we have shown previously and show here are present in ricketts...

  5. 一种 gRNA 快速合成及检测方法的建立%Establishment of a rapid method for synthesis and detection of gRNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜建勇; 邓然; 高虹; 雍伟东

    2015-01-01

    目的:建立一种gRNA快速合成及检测的方法。方法设计引物并利用PCR技术迅速扩增gRNA的DNA模板片段,然后通过体外转录纯化得到gRNA;最后通过体外反应迅速对gRNA和Cas9酶切效率及特异性进行检测。结果体外合成的gRNA特异性强,活性高,在靶点上成功切开DNA双链。结论成功建立gRNA快速合成及检测的方法,为后续转染或显微注射筛选有活性gRNA节约了时间。%Objective The purpose of this study was to establish a rapid method for synthesis and detection of guild RNA (gRNA) which is an essential component in CRISPR/Cas9 knockout technology .Methods First, the Nkp46 gRNA core fragment was synthesized as amplification template .Second , the forward and reversed primers of the matched gRNA were designed using the Nkp46 gene as reference sequence .Third, the DNA fragment of Nkp46 gRNA was amplified by PCR technology using the synthesized gRNA core fragment as template .The gRNA was reversely transcribed in vitro u-sing amplified DNA fragment as template .The efficiency and specificity of gRNA and its interaction with Cas 9 were detec-ted in vitro.Results The specificity and activity of Nkp46 gRNA were high .The obtained gRNA interacted with Cas 9 en-zyme and successfully cut the target double-stranded DNA at the designed site .Conclusions The method for synthesis and detection of gRNA established in this study is faster than the original method , and the created gRNA is fully functional .

  6. Genetic effect of CysLTR2 polymorphisms on its mRNA synthesis and stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Il

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and haplotypes were associated with aspirin hypersensitivity in asthmatics. We investigated the genetic effects of the SNPs and haplotypes on the expression of the CysLTR2 gene. Methods We measured CysLTR2 protein and mRNA expression in EB virus-infected B cell lines from asthmatics having ht1+/+ and ht2+/+. A gel retardation assay was used to identify nuclear protein binding to the c.-819 promoter site. The function of promoter and 3'-UTR were assessed using pGL3 luciferase and pEGFP reporter system, respectively. Results We found that the expression of CysLTR2 protein was higher in B cell lines of asthmatics having ht2+/+ than in those having ht1+/+. PMA/ionomycin induced higher mRNA expression of CysLTR2 in B cell lines from ht2+/+ asthmatics than those from ht1+/+ asthmatics. A nuclear protein from the B cell lines showed stronger DNA binding affinity with a probe containing c.-819T than one containing c.-819G. The luciferase activity of the c.-819T type of CysLTR2 promoter was higher than that of the c.-819G type. EGFP expression was higher in the EGFP-c.2078T 3'-UTR fusion construct than in the c.2078C construct. Conclusion The sequence variants of CysLTR2 may affect its transcription and the stability of its mRNA, resulting in altered expression of CysLTR2 protein, which in turn causes some asthmatics to be susceptible to aspirin hypersensitivity.

  7. The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase ERK induces tRNA synthesis by phosphorylating TFIIIB

    OpenAIRE

    Felton-Edkins, Zoe A.; Fairley, Jennifer A.; Graham, Emma L.; Johnston, Imogen M.; White, Robert J.; Scott, Pamela H.

    2003-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription increases within minutes of serum addition to growth-arrested fibroblasts. We show that ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases regulate pol III output by directly binding and phosphorylating the BRF1 subunit of transcription factor TFIIIB. Blocking the ERK signalling cascade inhibits TFIIIB binding to pol III and to transcription factor TFIIIC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that the association of BRF1 and pol III with tRNALeu genes in cells decrea...

  8. In- silico exploration of thirty alphavirus genomes for analysis of the simple sequence repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Mashhood Alam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The compilation of simple sequence repeats (SSRs in viruses and its analysis with reference to incidence, distribution and variation would be instrumental in understanding the functional and evolutionary aspects of repeat sequences. Present study encompasses the analysis of SSRs across 30 species of alphaviruses. The full length genome sequences, assessed from NCBI were used for extraction and analysis of repeat sequences using IMEx software. The repeats of different motif sizes (mono- to penta-nucleotide observed therein exhibited variable incidence across the species. Expectedly, mononucleotide A/T was the most prevalent followed by dinucleotide AG/GA and trinucleotide AAG/GAA in these genomes. The conversion of SSRs to imperfect microsatellite or compound microsatellite (cSSR is low. cSSR, primarily constituted by variant motifs accounted for up to 12.5% of the SSRs. Interestingly, seven species lacked cSSR in their genomes. However, the SSR and cSSR are predominantly localized to the coding region ORFs for non structural protein and structural proteins. The relative frequencies of different classes of simple and compound microsatellites within and across genomes have been highlighted.

  9. Rickettsia prowazekii transports UMP and GMP, but not CMP, as building blocks for RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, H H; Daugherty, R; Hu, F

    1999-05-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii, the etiological agent of epidemic typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium and is apparently unable to synthesize ribonucleotides de novo. Here, we show that as an alternative, isolated, purified R. prowazekii organisms transported exogenous uridyl- and guanylribonucleotides and incorporated these labeled precursors into their RNA in a rifampin-sensitive manner. Transport systems for nucleotides, which we have shown previously and show here are present in rickettsiae, have never been reported in free-living bacteria, and the usual nucleobase and nucleoside transport systems are absent in rickettsiae. There was a clear preference for the monophosphate form of ribonucleotides as the transported substrate. In contrast, rickettsiae did not transport cytidylribonucleotides. The source of rickettsial CTP appears to be the transport of UMP followed by its phosphorylation and the amination of intrarickettsial UTP to CTP by CTP synthetase. A complete schema of nucleotide metabolism in rickettsiae is presented that is based on a combination of biochemical, physiological, and genetic information. PMID:10322027

  10. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Novel Zwitterionic Lipids for Drug and siRNA Delivery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Colin L.

    Lipid-based nanoparticles have long been used to deliver biologically active molecules such as drugs, proteins, peptides, DNA, and siRNA in vivo. Liposomes and lipoplexes alter the biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and cellular uptake of their encapsulated or associated cargo. This can increase drug efficacy while reducing toxicity, resulting in an increased therapeutic index and better clinical outcomes. Unlike small molecule drugs, which passively diffuse through lipid membranes, nucleic acids and proteins require an active, carrier mediated escape mechanism to reach their site of action. As such, the therapeutic application and drug properties dictate the required biophysical characteristics of the lipid nanoparticle. These carrier properties depend on the structure and biophysical characteristics of the lipids and other components used to formulate them. This dissertation presents a series of studies related to the development of novel synthetic lipids for use in drug delivery systems. First, we developed a novel class of zwitterionic lipids with head groups containing a cationic amine and anionic carboxylate and ester-linked oleic acid tails. These lipids exhibit structure-dependent, pH-responsive biophysical properties, and may be useful components for next-generation drug delivery systems. Second, we extended the idea of amine/carboxylate containing zwitterionic head groups and synthesized a series of acetate terminated diacyl lipids containing a quaternary amine. These lipids have an inverted headgroup orientation compared to naturally occurring zwitterionic lipids, and show interesting salt-dependent biophysical properties. Third, we synthesized and characterized a focused library of ionizable lysine-based lipids, which contain a lysine head group linked to a long-chain dialkylamine. A focused library was synthesized to determine the impact of hydrophobic fluidity, lipid net charge, and lipid pKa on the biophysical and siRNA transfection characteristics

  11. DNA binding, cytotoxicity and inhibitory effect on RNA synthesis of two new 1-nitro-9-aminoacridine dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovits, J; Wilmańska, D; Lescot, E; Studzian, K; Szmigiero, L; Gniazdowski, M

    1989-01-01

    Two 1-nitro-9-aminoacridine dimers were prepared: one bearing a spermine flexible linking chain, compound 4, the other a rigid dipiperidine-type linker, compound 7. Both dimers elicited a higher affinity constant for DNA than the parent monomeric drug nitracrine 2. This affinity was several orders lower than what was found for other dimeric compounds having the same linkers and no nitro group on the acridine ring (3, 5, 6 and 8). Bisintercalation was evidenced for compound 4 by viscosimetric measurements. In the absence of dithiothreitol, an inhibitory effect of RNA synthesis in vitro was observed for all the tested compounds except 2 and 7. In the presence of dithiothreitol, 4 and 7 formed irreversible complexes with DNA of decreased template properties. The level of the dimers binding was lower than that of the parent compound 2. Cross-links were detected by means of hydroxylapatite chromatography in a complex of the dimer bearing a flexible linking chain, compound 4 with DNA, while the compound 7-DNA complex eluted in the single-stranded DNA region. The extent of cytotoxicity of the two 1-nitro-9-aminoacridine dimers against L1210 cultured cells was different. PMID:2472225

  12. Residues in human respiratory syncytial virus P protein that are essential for its activity on RNA viral synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Ana; Mendieta, Jesús; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Villanueva, Nieves

    2008-03-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) P protein, 241 amino acid long, is a structural homotetrameric phosphoprotein. Viral transcription and replication processes are dependent on functional P protein interactions inside viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs). Binding capacity to RNPs proteins and transcription and replication complementation analyses, using inactive P protein variants, have identified residues essential for functional interactions with itself, L, N and M2-1 proteins. P protein may establish some of these interactions as monomer, but efficient viral transcription and replication requires P protein oligomerization through the central region of the molecule. A structurally stable three-dimensional model has been generated in silico for this region (residues 98-158). Our analysis has indicated that P protein residues L135, D139, E140 and L142 are involved in homotetramerization. Additionally, the residues D136, S156, T160 and E179 appear to be essential for P protein activity on viral RNA synthesis and very high turnover phosphorylation at S143, T160 and T210 could regulate it. Thus, compounds targeted to those of these residues, located in the modeled three-dimensional structure, could have specific anti-HRSV effect.

  13. A Facile Three-Component One-Pot Synthesis of Structurally Constrained Tetrahydrofurans, Which Are t-RNA Synthetase Inhibitor Analogues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU,Chong-Dao; CHEN,Zhi-Yong; HU,Wen-Hao; MI,Ai-Qiao

    2004-01-01

    @@ A one-pot procedure for the efficient synthesis of a small library of t-RNA inhibitor analogues was developed. Thus,Rh2(OAc)4 catalyzed three-component 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of carbonyl ylides derived from diazoindan-1,3-dione and aldehydes with other dipolarophiles in 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane at 80 ℃ gave ring fused tetrahydrofurans having three stereocenters in good yield.

  14. Template-directed synthesis using the heterogeneous templates produced by montmorillonite catalysis. A possible bridge between the prebiotic and RNA worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of oligoguanylates [oligo(G)s] is catalyzed by a template of oligocytidylates [oligo(C)s] containing 2',5'- and 3',5'-linked phosphodiester bonds with and without incorporated C5'ppC groupings. An oligo(C) template containing exclusively 2',5'-phosphodiester bonds also serves as a template for the synthesis of complementary oligo(G)s. The oligo(C) template was prepared by the condensation of the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of cytidine on montmorillonite clay. These studies establish that RNA oligomers prepared by mineral catalysis, or other routes on the primitive earth, did not have to be exclusively 3',5'-linked to catalyze template-directed synthesis, since oligo(C)s containing a variety of linkage isomers serve as templates for the formation of complementary oligo(G)s. These findings support the postulate that origin of the RNA world was initiated by the RNA oligomers produced by polymerization of activated monomers formed by prebiotic processes.

  15. MicroRNA-26a/b and their host genes synergistically regulate triacylglycerol synthesis by targeting the INSIG1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Tianying; Tian, Huibin; Ma, Yue; Xu, Huifen; Yao, Dawei; Loor, Juan J

    2016-05-01

    The microRNA-26 (miR-26) family is known to control adipogenesis in non-ruminants. The genomic loci of miR-26a and miR-26b have been localized in the introns of genes encoding for the proteins of the C-terminal domain RNA polymerase II polypeptide A small phosphatase (CTDSP) family. Insulin-induced gene 1 (INSIG1) encodes a protein with a key role in the regulation of lipogenesis in rodent liver. In the present study, we investigated the synergistic function of the miR-26 family and their host genes in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC). Downregulation of miR-26a/b and their host genes in GMEC decreased the expression of genes relate to fatty acid synthesis (PPARG, LXRA, SREBF1, FASN, ACACA, GPAM, LPIN1, DGAT1 and SCD1), triacylglycerol accumulation and unsaturated fatty acid synthesis. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed INSIG1 as a direct target of miR-26a/b. Furthermore, inhibition of the CTDSP family also downregulated the expression of INSIG1. Taken together, our findings highlight a functional association of miR-26a/b, their host genes and INSIG1, and provide new insights into the regulatory network controlling milk fat synthesis in GMEC. The data indicate that targeting this network via nutrition might be important for regulating milk fat synthesis in ruminants. PMID:27002347

  16. Thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase fusion proteins and their use in cDNA synthesis and next-generation RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Sabine; Ghanem, Eman; Smith, Whitney; Sheeter, Dennis; Qin, Yidan; King, Olga; Polioudakis, Damon; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Swamy, Sajani; Kuersten, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2013-07-01

    Mobile group II introns encode reverse transcriptases (RTs) that function in intron mobility ("retrohoming") by a process that requires reverse transcription of a highly structured, 2-2.5-kb intron RNA with high processivity and fidelity. Although the latter properties are potentially useful for applications in cDNA synthesis and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), group II intron RTs have been difficult to purify free of the intron RNA, and their utility as research tools has not been investigated systematically. Here, we developed general methods for the high-level expression and purification of group II intron-encoded RTs as fusion proteins with a rigidly linked, noncleavable solubility tag, and we applied them to group II intron RTs from bacterial thermophiles. We thus obtained thermostable group II intron RT fusion proteins that have higher processivity, fidelity, and thermostability than retroviral RTs, synthesize cDNAs at temperatures up to 81°C, and have significant advantages for qRT-PCR, capillary electrophoresis for RNA-structure mapping, and next-generation RNA sequencing. Further, we find that group II intron RTs differ from the retroviral enzymes in template switching with minimal base-pairing to the 3' ends of new RNA templates, making it possible to efficiently and seamlessly link adaptors containing PCR-primer binding sites to cDNA ends without an RNA ligase step. This novel template-switching activity enables facile and less biased cloning of nonpolyadenylated RNAs, such as miRNAs or protein-bound RNA fragments. Our findings demonstrate novel biochemical activities and inherent advantages of group II intron RTs for research, biotechnological, and diagnostic methods, with potentially wide applications. PMID:23697550

  17. Herbal compound 861 regulates mRNA expression of collagen synthesis- and degradation-related genes in human hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Wang; Bao-En Wang; Jian Wang; Pei-Gen Xiao; Xue-Hai Tan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To identify the role of herbal compound 861 (Cpd 861) in the regulation of mRNA expression of collagen synthesis- and degradation-related genes in human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs).METHODS: mRNA levels of collagen types I and III, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-βi) in cultured-activated HSCs treated with Cpd 861 or interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were determined by real-time PCR.RESULTS: Both Cpd 861 and IFN-γ reduced the mRNA levels of collagen type Ⅲ, MMP-2 and TGF-βl. Moreover, Cpd 861 significantly enhanced the MMP-1 mRNA levels while down-regulated the TIMP-1 mRNA expression, increasing the ratio of MMP-1 to TIMP-1 to (6.3 + 0.3)-fold compared to the control group.CONCLUSION: The anti-fibrosis function of Cpd 861 may be mediated by both decreased interstitial collagen sythesis by inhibiting the transcription of collagen type in and TGF-pi and increased degradation of these collagens by up-regulating MMP-1 and down-regulating TIMP-1 mRNA levels.

  18. Molecular detection of flaviviruses and alphaviruses in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) from coastal ecosystems in the Colombian Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Suaza-Vasco, Juan; Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo; Uribe, Sandra; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses belonging to the genera Flavivirus and Alphavirus were detected in mosquitoes in a rural area of San Bernardo del Viento (Córdoba, Colombia). A total of 22,180 mosquitoes were collected, sorted into 2,102 pools, and tested by generic/nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, dengue virus, West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, yellow fever virus, and Culex flavivirus were detected and identified by sequencing. The detection of arboviral pathogens in this zone represents possible circulation and indicates a human health risk, demonstrating the importance of virological surveillance activities. PMID:27706377

  19. Hunting in the rainforest and mayaro virus infection: An emerging alphavirus in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo O Izurieta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives of this report were to document the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and to examine potential risk factors for Mayaro virus infection among the personnel of a military garrison in the Amazonian rainforest. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of the personnel of a garrison located in the Ecuadorian Amazonian rainforest. The cross-sectional study employed interviews and seroepidemiological methods. Humoral immune response to Mayaro virus infection was assessed by evaluating IgM- and IgG-specific antibodies using ELISA. Results: Of 338 subjects studied, 174 were from the Coastal zone of Ecuador, 73 from Andean zone, and 91 were native to the Amazonian rainforest. Seroprevalence of Mayaro virus infection was more than 20 times higher among Amazonian natives (46% than among subjects born in other areas (2%. Conclusions: Age and hunting in the rainforest were significant predictors of Mayaro virus infection overall and among Amazonian natives. The results provide the first demonstration of the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and a systematic evaluation of risk factors for the transmission of this alphavirus. The large difference in prevalence rates between Amazonian natives and other groups and between older and younger natives suggest that Mayaro virus is endemic and enzootic in the rainforest, with sporadic outbreaks that determine differences in risk between birth cohorts of natives. Deep forest hunting may selectively expose native men, descendants of the Shuar and Huaronai ethnic groups, to the arthropod vectors of Mayaro virus in areas close to primate reservoirs.

  20. Natural minus-strand RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus as in vitro templates for viral RNA polymerase. 3'-Terminal non-coded guanosine and coat protein are insufficient factors for full-size plus-strand synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, C.J.; Huis in 't Veld, M.; Zuidema, D.; Graaff, de M.; Jaspars, E.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Replication complexes of alfalfa mosaic virus produce in vivo large quantities of plus-strand RNAs, but this production is fully dependent on the presence of coat protein. In order to study this process of RNA-dependent and coat protein-regulated RNA synthesis we have isolated the three natural minu

  1. Direct relationship between the level of p53 stabilization induced by rRNA synthesis-inhibiting drugs and the cell ribosome biogenesis rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, F; Brighenti, E; Govoni, M; Imbrogno, E; Fornari, F; Treré, D; Montanaro, L; Derenzini, M

    2016-02-25

    Many drugs currently used in chemotherapy work by hindering the process of ribosome biogenesis. In tumors with functional p53, the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis may contribute to the efficacy of this treatment by inducing p53 stabilization. As the level of stabilized p53 is critical for the induction of cytotoxic effects, it seems useful to highlight those cancer cell characteristics that can predict the degree of p53 stabilization following the treatment with inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis. In the present study we exposed a series of p53 wild-type human cancer cell lines to drugs such as actinomycin D (ActD), doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and CX-5461, which hinder ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis. We found that the amount of stabilized p53 was directly related to the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells before the drug treatment. This was due to different levels of inactivation of the ribosomal proteins-MDM2 pathway of p53 digestion. Inhibition of rRNA synthesis always caused cell cycle arrest, independent of the ribosome biogenesis rate of the cells, whereas apoptosis occurred only in cells with a high rDNA transcription rate. The level of p53 stabilization induced by drugs acting in different ways from the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis, such as hydroxyurea (HU) and nutlin-3, was independent of the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells and always lower than that occurring after the inhibition of rRNA synthesis. Interestingly, in cells with a low ribosome biogenesis rate, the combined treatment with ActD and HU exerted an additive effect on p53 stabilization. These results indicated that (i) drugs inhibiting ribosome biogenesis may be highly effective in p53 wild-type cancers with a high ribosome biogenesis rate, as they induce apoptotic cell death, and (ii) the combination of drugs capable of stabilizing p53 through different mechanisms may be useful for treating cancers with a low ribosome biogenesis rate. PMID:25961931

  2. 应用SMARTercDNA合成技术扩增落地生根叶片的总RNA%Total RNA Amplification from Leaves of Kalanchoe daigremontiana Using SMARTer cDNA Synthesis Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟天秀; 曾会明

    2011-01-01

    以落地生根(Kalanchoe daigremontiana)未长芽和长芽的叶片为材料,提取落地生根的总RNA,采用SMARTer cDNA合成技术合成cDNA第1链,优化扩增第2链,通过设置梯度PCR扩增循环数,电泳分析后鉴定cDNA质量.结果表明:未长芽和长芽的材料各1μg总RNA分别成功扩增质量较高的双链cDNA.此方法的应用解决了研究材料有限的问题,可由微量的总RNA扩增出足够多的高质量双链cDNA,为进一步从基因水平研究落地生根奠定基础.%Total RNA was extracted from Kalanchoe daigremontiana leaves with or without bulbiferous spurs. The first-strand of cDNA synthesis and the double-strands cDNA amplification were performed u-sing super SMARTer cDNA synthesis technology. The quality of cDNA was evaluated through the gradient of PCR amplification cycles and electrophoresis. High quality double-strands cDNA were obtained from 1 ug total RNA. This method can solve the problem of limited research materials as sufficient high-quality double-strands cDNA are obtained from small amounts of total RNA. This technique allows further research of Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

  3. Multiple interferon stimulated genes synergize with the zinc finger antiviral protein to mediate anti-alphavirus activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophiya Karki

    Full Text Available The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP is a host factor that mediates inhibition of viruses in the Filoviridae, Retroviridae and Togaviridae families. We previously demonstrated that ZAP blocks replication of Sindbis virus (SINV, the prototype Alphavirus in the Togaviridae family at an early step prior to translation of the incoming genome and that synergy between ZAP and one or more interferon stimulated genes (ISGs resulted in maximal inhibitory activity. The present study aimed to identify those ISGs that synergize with ZAP to mediate Alphavirus inhibition. Using a library of lentiviruses individually expressing more than 350 ISGs, we screened for inhibitory activity in interferon defective cells with or without ZAP overexpression. Confirmatory tests of the 23 ISGs demonstrating the largest infection reduction in combination with ZAP revealed that 16 were synergistic. Confirmatory tests of all potentially synergistic ISGs revealed 15 additional ISGs with a statistically significant synergistic effect in combination with ZAP. These 31 ISGs are candidates for further mechanistic studies. The number and diversity of the identified ZAP-synergistic ISGs lead us to speculate that ZAP may play an important role in priming the cell for optimal ISG function.

  4. A Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy in Cattle to Prevent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Using a “Single-Cycle” Alphavirus Vector and Empty Capsid Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette; McInerney, Gerald M.; Burman, Alison; Jackson, Terry; Polacek, Charlotta

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most economically important infectious diseases of production animals globally. Vaccination can successfully control this disease, however, current vaccines are imperfect. They are made using chemically inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) that is produced in large-scale mammalian cell culture under high containment conditions. Here, we have expressed the FMDV capsid protein precursor (P1-2A) of strain O1 Manisa alone or with the FMDV 3C protease (3Cpro) using a “single cycle” packaged alphavirus self-replicating RNA based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). When the FMDV P1-2A was expressed with 3Cpro then processing of the FMDV capsid precursor protein is observed within cells and the proteins assemble into empty capsid particles. The products interact with anti-FMDV antibodies in an ELISA and bind to the integrin αvβ6 (a cellular receptor for FMDV). In cattle vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, anti-FMDV antibodies were elicited but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, the prior vaccination with these vectors resulted in a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge and the viremia observed was decreased in level and duration. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector and then boosted with FMDV empty capsids showed a strong anti-FMDV antibody response prior to challenge, they were protected against disease and no FMDV RNA was detected in their sera post-challenge. Initial inoculation with empty capsids followed by the rSFV-FMDV was much less effective at combating the FMDV challenge and a large post-challenge boost to the level of anti-FMDV antibodies was observed. This prime-boost system, using reagents that can be generated outside of high

  5. A Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy in Cattle to Prevent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Using a "Single-Cycle" Alphavirus Vector and Empty Capsid Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette; McInerney, Gerald M; Burman, Alison; Jackson, Terry; Polacek, Charlotta; Belsham, Graham J

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most economically important infectious diseases of production animals globally. Vaccination can successfully control this disease, however, current vaccines are imperfect. They are made using chemically inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) that is produced in large-scale mammalian cell culture under high containment conditions. Here, we have expressed the FMDV capsid protein precursor (P1-2A) of strain O1 Manisa alone or with the FMDV 3C protease (3Cpro) using a "single cycle" packaged alphavirus self-replicating RNA based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). When the FMDV P1-2A was expressed with 3Cpro then processing of the FMDV capsid precursor protein is observed within cells and the proteins assemble into empty capsid particles. The products interact with anti-FMDV antibodies in an ELISA and bind to the integrin αvβ6 (a cellular receptor for FMDV). In cattle vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, anti-FMDV antibodies were elicited but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, the prior vaccination with these vectors resulted in a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge and the viremia observed was decreased in level and duration. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector and then boosted with FMDV empty capsids showed a strong anti-FMDV antibody response prior to challenge, they were protected against disease and no FMDV RNA was detected in their sera post-challenge. Initial inoculation with empty capsids followed by the rSFV-FMDV was much less effective at combating the FMDV challenge and a large post-challenge boost to the level of anti-FMDV antibodies was observed. This prime-boost system, using reagents that can be generated outside of high-containment facilities

  6. No influence of oxygen levels on pathogenesis and virus shedding in Salmonid alphavirus (SAV-challenged Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Linda

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For more than three decades, diseases caused by salmonid alphaviruses (SAV have become a major problem of increasing economic importance in the European fish-farming industry. However, experimental infection trials with SAV result in low or no mortality i.e very different from most field outbreaks of pancreas disease (PD. This probably reflects the difficulties in reproducing complex biotic and abiotic field conditions in the laboratory. In this study we looked at the relationship between SAV-infection in salmon and sub-lethal environmental hypoxia as a result of reduced flow-through in tank systems. Results The experiment demonstrated that constant reduced oxygen levels (60-65% oxygen saturation: 6.5-7.0 mg/L did not significantly increase the severity or the progress of pancreas disease (PD. These conclusions are based upon assessments of a semi-quantitative histopathological lesion score system, morbidities/mortalities, and levels of SAV RNA in tissues and water (measured by 1 MDS electropositive virus filters and downstream real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the fish population shed detectable levels of the virus into the surrounding water during viraemia; 4-13 days after i.p. infection, and prior to appearance of severe lesions in heart (21-35 dpi. After this period, viral RNA from SAV could not be detected in water samples although still present in tissues (gills and hearts at lasting low levels. Lesions could be seen in exocrine pancreas at 7-21 days post infection, but no muscle lesions were seen. Conclusions In our study, experimentally induced hypoxia failed to explain the discrepancy between the severities reported from field outbreaks of SAV-disease and experimental infections. Reduction of oxygen levels to constant suboptimal levels had no effect on the severity of lesions caused by SAV-infection or the progress of the disease. Furthermore, we present a modified VIRADEL method which can be used to

  7. A key role for the mRNA leader structure in translational control of ribosomal protein S1 synthesis in γ-proteobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Tchufistova, Ludmila S.; Komarova, Anastassia V.; Boni, Irina V.

    2003-01-01

    The translation initiation region (TIR) of the Escherichia coli rpsA mRNA coding for ribosomal protein S1 is characterized by a remarkable efficiency in driving protein synthesis despite the absence of the canonical Shine–Dalgarno element, and by a strong and specific autogenous repression in the presence of free S1 in trans. The efficient and autoregulated E.coli rpsA TIR comprises not less than 90 nt upstream of the translation start and can be unambiguously folded into three irregular hair...

  8. Profiling of Epstein-Barr virus latent RNA expression in clinical specimens by gene-specific multiprimed cDNA synthesis and PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Servi J C; Brink, Antoinette A T P; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2005-01-01

    We describe a two-step RT-PCR method for simultaneous detection of EBNA-1 (QK and Y3K splice variants), EBNA-2, LMP-1, LMP-2a and -2b, ZEBRA, and BARTs RNA encoded by Epstein-Barr virus. As a control for RNA integrity, the low-copy-number transcript derived from U1A snRNP, a cellular housekeeping gene, is coamplified. Copy DNA (cDNA) for these nine targets is simultaneously synthesized in a gene-specific, multiprimed cDNA reaction, which strongly reduces the amount of required clinical specimen and allows more sensitive detection than random hexamer or oligo-dT priming. For amplification, cDNA synthesis is followed by nine separate PCRs for the mentioned targets. Primers were designed either as intron-flanking, to avoid background DNA amplification, or in different exons, allowing identification of differentially spliced RNA molecules. To increase specificity, PCR products are detected by autoradiography after hybridization with radiolabeled internal oligonucleotide probes. The method described is highly suitable for profiling EBV latent RNA expression in tissue biopsies, cultured or isolated cells, and unfractionated whole blood and for definition of EBV latency type I, II, or III gene expression in these samples.

  9. Synthesis, restriction analysis, and molecular cloning of near full length DNA complementary to bovine parathyroid hormone mRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, D. F.; Kemper, B

    1980-01-01

    DNA complementary (cDNA) to a partially purified preparation of bovine parathyroid hormone mRNA was synthesized using avian myeloblastosis viral reverse transcriptase. The PTH cDNA contained about 750 bases and was greater than 95% sensitive to digestion by S1 nuclease. Analysis of the mRNA preparation by excess RNA hybridization to the PTH cDNA revealed one rapidly hybridizing component consisting of 50% of the PTH cDNA. Sequential incubation of the PTH mRNA with reverse transcriptase and E....

  10. The rnc Gene Promotes Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Represses the vicRKX Gene Expressions via MicroRNA-Size Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ming; Li, Ke-Zeng; Lei, Lei; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Tao, Xiang; Yin, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Ru; Ma, Xin-Rong; Hu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent disease that largely relies on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to synthesize exopolysaccharides. Although the rnc gene is suggested to be involved in virulence mechanisms in many other bacteria, the information regarding it in S. mutans is very limited. Here, using deletion or overexpression mutant assay, we demonstrated that rnc in S. mutans significantly positively regulated exopolysaccharide synthesis and further altered biofilm formation. Meanwhile, the cariogenecity of S. mutans was decreased by deletion of rnc in a specific pathogen-free (SPF) rat model. Interestingly, analyzing the expression at mRNA level, we found the downstream vic locus was repressed by rnc in S. mutans. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, for the first time, three putative microRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) targeting vicRKX were predicted in S. mutans. The expression levels of these msRNAs were negatively correlated with vicRKX but positively correlated with rnc, indicating rnc probably repressed vicRKX expression through msRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In all, the results present that rnc has a potential role in the regulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and can affect vicRKX expressions via post-transcriptional repression in S. mutans. This study provides an alternative avenue for further research aimed at preventing caries. PMID:27242713

  11. Deuterated nucleotides as chemical probes of RNA structure: a detailed protocol for the enzymatic synthesis of a complete set of nucleotides specifically deuterated at ribose carbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N. Azad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a detailed protocol for the synthesis of ribonucleotides specifically deuterated at each ribose carbon atom. We synthesized 20 specifically deuterated ribonucleotides: ATP, CTP, GTP, and UTP, each of which contained one of five deuterated riboses (either 1′-D, 2″-D, 3′-D, 4′-D, or 5′,5″-D2. Our synthetic approach is inspired by the pioneering work of Tolbert and Williamson, who developed a method for the convenient one-pot enzymatic synthesis of nucleotides (Tolbert, T. J. and Williamson, J. R. (1996 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118, 7929–7940. Our protocol consists of a comprehensive list of required chemical and enzymatic reagents and equipment, detailed procedures for enzymatic assays and nucleotide synthesis, and chromatographic procedures for purification of deuterated nucleotides. As an example of the utility of specifically deuterated nucleotides, we used them to synthesize specifically deuterated sarcin/ricin loop (SRL RNA and measured the deuterium kinetic isotope effect on hydroxyl radical cleavage of the SRL.

  12. Conserved CPEs in the p53 3' untranslated region influence mRNA stability and protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken W; Vinther, Jeppe; Mittler, Gerhard;

    2008-01-01

    CaT skin and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were established. Quantitative PCR and an enzymatic assay were used to quantify the reporter mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Proteins binding to the CPEs were identified by RNA-immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectroscopy. RESULTS: The wild...... irradiation. Several proteins (including GAPDH, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) D and A/B) were identified from the MCF-7 cytoplasmic extracts that bound specifically to the CPEs. CONCLUSION: Two conserved CPEs in the p53 3'UTR regulate stability and translation of a reporter mRNA in non...

  13. The influence of the ratio of protein energy to total energy in the feed on the activity of protein synthesis in vitro, the level of ribosomal RNA and the RNA-DNA ratio in white trunk muscle of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lied, E; Rosenlund, G

    1984-01-01

    Cod (Gadus morhua) were fed diets containing protein energy to total energy levels (PE/TE) of 10.0, 20.6, 29.6, 38.4, 56.2 and 74.1% for 21 days. Ribosomes were isolated from the white trunk muscle tissue, the capacity for protein synthesis in vitro determined and related to muscle tissue wet weight rRNA and DNA. Protein concentrations of less than 47.4% PE/TE in the diets reduce the ribosomal capacity for protein synthesis per g wet weight and per mg DNA, and the tissue contents of rRNA and ratio of rRNA/DNA. The capacity for muscle protein synthesis in vitro is a significant and sensitive parameter of protein inadequacy in fish diets.

  14. Disease-Associated Human Telomerase RNA Variants Show Loss of Function for Telomere Synthesis without Dominant-Negative Interference▿

    OpenAIRE

    Errington, Timothy M.; Fu, Dragony; Wong, Judy M. Y.; Collins, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase adds simple-sequence repeats to chromosome ends to offset the terminal sequence loss inherent in each cycle of genome replication. Inherited mutations in genes encoding subunits of the human telomerase holoenzyme give rise to disease phenotypes including hematopoietic failure and pulmonary fibrosis. Disease-associated variants of the human telomerase RNA are expressed in heterozygous combination with wild-type telomerase RNA. Here, we exploit a sensitized human primary cell assay s...

  15. 2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase: a novel RNA-binding protein that inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Michel; Robert, Francis; Kottis, Vicky; Gallouzi, Imed-Eddine; Pelletier, Jerry; Braun, Peter E

    2009-04-01

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) is one of the earliest myelin-related proteins to be specifically expressed in differentiating oligodendrocytes (ODCs) in the central nervous system (CNS) and is implicated in myelin biogenesis. CNP possesses an in vitro enzymatic activity, whose in vivo relevance remains to be defined, because substrates with 2',3,-cyclic termini have not yet been identified. To characterize CNP function better, we previously determined the structure of the CNP catalytic domain by NMR. Interestingly, the structure is remarkably similar to the plant cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (CPDase) from A. thaliana and the bacterial 2'-5' RNA ligase from T. thermophilus, which are known to play roles in RNA metabolism. Here we show that CNP is an RNA-binding protein. Furthermore, by using precipitation analyses, we demonstrate that CNP associates with poly(A)(+) mRNAs in vivo and suppresses translation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. With SELEX, we isolated RNA aptamers that can suppress the inhibitory effect of CNP on translation. We also demonstrate that CNP1 can bridge an association between tubulin and RNA. These results suggest that CNP1 may regulate expression of mRNAs in ODCs of the CNS. PMID:19021295

  16. Virus-specific mRNA capping enzyme encoded by hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magden, J; Takeda, N; Li, T; Auvinen, P; Ahola, T; Miyamura, T; Merits, A; Kääriäinen, L

    2001-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a positive-strand RNA virus, is an important causative agent of waterborne hepatitis. Expression of cDNA (encoding amino acids 1 to 979 of HEV nonstructural open reading frame 1) in insect cells resulted in synthesis of a 110-kDa protein (P110), a fraction of which was proteolytically processed to an 80-kDa protein. P110 was tightly bound to cytoplasmic membranes, from which it could be released by detergents. Immunopurified P110 catalyzed transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to GTP and GDP to yield m(7)GTP or m(7)GDP. GMP, GpppG, and GpppA were poor substrates for the P110 methyltransferase. There was no evidence for further methylation of m(7)GTP when it was used as a substrate for the methyltransferase. P110 was also a guanylyltransferase, which formed a covalent complex, P110-m(7)GMP, in the presence of AdoMet and GTP, because radioactivity from both [alpha-(32)P]GTP and [(3)H-methyl]AdoMet was found in the covalent guanylate complex. Since both methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase reactions are strictly virus specific, they should offer optimal targets for development of antiviral drugs. Cap analogs such as m(7)GTP, m(7)GDP, et(2)m(7)GMP, and m(2)et(7)GMP inhibited the methyltransferase reaction. HEV P110 capping enzyme has similar properties to the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase of alphavirus nsP1, tobacco mosaic virus P126, brome mosaic virus replicase protein 1a, and bamboo mosaic virus (a potexvirus) nonstructural protein, indicating there is a common evolutionary origin of these distantly related plant and animal virus families. PMID:11413290

  17. Specific Cleavages by RNase H Facilitate Initiation of Plus-Strand RNA Synthesis by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Sharon J.; Zhang, Miaohua; Champoux, James J.

    2003-01-01

    Successful generation, extension, and removal of the plus-strand primer is integral to reverse transcription. For Moloney murine leukemia virus, primer removal at the RNA/DNA junction leaves the 3′ terminus of the plus-strand primer abutting the downstream plus-strand DNA, but this 3′ terminus is not efficiently reutilized for another round of extension. The RNase H cleavage to create the plus-strand primer might similarly result in the 3′ terminus of this primer abutting downstream RNA, yet ...

  18. Mechanism of activation of phenylalanine and synthesis of P1, P4-bis(5'-adenosyl) tetraphosphate by yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, S P; Lowe, G; Tansley, G

    1985-06-01

    The activation of L-phenylalanine by yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase using adenosine 5'-[(S)-alpha-17O,alpha,alpha-18O2]triphosphate is shown to proceed with inversion of configuration at P alpha of ATP. This observation taken together with the lack of positional isotope exchange when adenosine 5'-[beta,beta-18O2]triphosphate is incubated with the enzyme in the absence of phenylalanine and in the presence of the competitive inhibitor phenylalaninol indicates that activation of phenylalanine occurs by a direct "in-line" adenylyl-transfer reaction. In the presence of Zn2+, yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase also catalyzes the phenylalanine-dependent hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and the synthesis of P1,P4-bis(5'-adenosyl) tetraphosphate (Ap4A). With adenosine 5'-[(S)-alpha-17O,alpha,alpha-18O2]triphosphate, the formation of AMP and Ap4A is shown to occur with inversion and retention of configuration, respectively. It is concluded that phenylalanyl adenylate is an intermediate in both processes, Zn2+ promoting AMP formation by hydrolytic cleavage of the C-O bond and Ap4A formation by displacement at phosphorus of phenylalanine by ATP. PMID:3893531

  19. RNase HI overproduction is required for efficient full-length RNA synthesis in the absence of topoisomerase I in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, Imad; Hraiky, Chadi; Rallu, Fabien; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Drolet, Marc

    2004-10-01

    It has long been known that Escherichia coli cells deprived of topoisomerase I (topA null mutants) do not grow. Because mutations reducing DNA gyrase activity and, as a consequence, negative supercoiling, occur to compensate for the loss of topA function, it has been assumed that excessive negative supercoiling is somehow involved in the growth inhibition of topA null mutants. However, how excess negative supercoiling inhibits growth is still unknown. We have previously shown that the overproduction of RNase HI, an enzyme that degrades the RNA portion of an R-loop, can partially compensate for the growth defects because of the absence of topoisomerase I. In this article, we have studied the effects of gyrase reactivation on the physiology of actively growing topA null cells. We found that growth immediately and almost completely ceases upon gyrase reactivation, unless RNase HI is overproduced. Northern blot analysis shows that the cells have a significantly reduced ability to accumulate full-length mRNAs when RNase HI is not overproduced. Interestingly, similar phenotypes, although less severe, are also seen when bacterial cells lacking RNase HI activity are grown and treated in the same way. All together, our results suggest that excess negative supercoiling promotes the formation of R-loops, which, in turn, inhibit RNA synthesis. PMID:15458416

  20. Serine Metabolism Supports the Methionine Cycle and DNA/RNA Methylation through De Novo ATP Synthesis in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Maddocks, Oliver D. K.; Labuschagne, Christiaan F.; Adams, Peter D; Vousden, Karen H

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under ...

  1. Activity and mRNA Levels of Enzymes Involved in Hepatic Fatty Acid Synthesis in Rats Fed Naringenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Toru; Ide, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the physiological activity of naringenin in affecting hepatic lipogenesis and serum and liver lipid levels in rats. Rats were fed diets containing 0, 1, or 2.5 g/kg naringenin for 15 d. Naringenin at a dietary level of 2.5 g/kg significantly decreased the activities and the mRNA levels of various lipogenic enzymes and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) mRNA level. The activities and the mRNA levels were also 9-22% and 12-38% lower, respectively, in rats fed a 1 g/kg naringenin diet than in the animals fed a naringenin-free diet, although the differences were not significant in many cases. Naringenin at 2.5 g/kg significantly lowered serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol, and phospholipid and hepatic triacylglycerol and cholesterol. This flavonoid at 1.0 g/kg also significantly lowered these parameters except for serum triacylglycerol. Naringenin levels in serum and liver dose-dependently increased, and hepatic concentrations reached levels that can affect various signaling pathways.

  2. A Polyprotein-Expressing Salmonid Alphavirus Replicon Induces Modest Protection in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar Against Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azila Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is an important strategy for the control and prevention of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar in the post-smolt stage in sea-water. In this study, a heterologous gene expression system, based on a replicon construct of salmonid alphavirus (SAV, was used for in vitro and in vivo expression of IPN virus proteins. The large open reading frame of segment A, encoding the polyprotein NH2-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH, as well as pVP2, were cloned and expressed by the SAV replicon in Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214 and epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC cells. The replicon constructs pSAV/polyprotein (pSAV/PP and pSAV/pVP2 were used to immunize Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar by a single intramuscular injection and tested in a subsequent IPN virus (IPNV challenge trial. A low to moderate protection against IPN was observed in fish immunized with the replicon vaccine that encoded the pSAV/PP, while the pSAV/pVP2 construct was not found to induce protection.

  3. Occurrence of salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) infections in wild sea trout Salmo trutta in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhun, Abdullah Sami; Isachsen, Cecilie Helen; Omdal, Linn Maren; Bårdsgjære Einen, Ann Cathrine; Bjørn, Pål Arne; Nilsen, Rune; Karlsbakk, Egil

    2016-07-01

    Viral diseases represent a serious problem in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) farming in Norway. Pancreas disease (PD) caused by salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) caused by piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) are among the most frequently diagnosed viral diseases in recent years. The possible spread of viruses from salmon farms to wild fish is a major public concern. Sea trout S. trutta collected from the major farming areas along the Norwegian coast are likely to have been exposed to SAV and PRV from farms with disease outbreaks. We examined 843 sea trout from 4 counties in Norway for SAV and PRV infections. We did not detect SAV in any of the tested fish, although significant numbers of the trout were caught in areas with frequent PD outbreaks. Low levels of PRV were detected in 1.3% of the sea trout. PRV-infected sea trout were caught in both salmon farming and non-farming areas, so the occurrence of infections was not associated with farming intensity or HSMI cases. Our results suggest that SAV and PRV infections are uncommon in wild sea trout. Hence, we found no evidence that sea trout are at risk from SAV or PRV released from salmon farms. PMID:27409234

  4. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Craig S.; Short, Kevin R.; Bigelow, Maureen L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Sreekumaran Nair, K.

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32-42%) in healthy humans (P oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle along with synthesis of gene transcripts and mitochondrial protein in human subjects. Skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients has a reduced capacity to increase ATP production with high insulin levels. cytochrome c oxidase | NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV | amino acids | citrate synthase

  5. The rluC gene of Escherichia coli codes for a pseudouridine synthase that is solely responsible for synthesis of pseudouridine at positions 955, 2504, and 2580 in 23 S ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, J; Sun, D; Englund, N; Ofengand, J

    1998-07-17

    Escherichia coli ribosomal RNA contains 10 pseudouridines, one in the 16 S RNA and nine in the 23 S RNA. Previously, the gene for the synthase responsible for the 16 S RNA pseudouridine was identified and cloned, as was a gene for a synthase that makes a single pseudouridine in 23 S RNA. The yceC open reading frame of E. coli is one of a set of genes homologous to these previously identified ribosomal RNA pseudouridine synthases. In this work, the gene was cloned, overexpressed, and shown to code for a pseudouridine synthase able to react with in vitro transcripts of 23 S ribosomal RNA. Deletion of the gene and analysis of the 23 S RNA from the deletion strain for the presence of pseudouridine at its nine known sites revealed that this synthase is solely responsible in vivo for the synthesis of three of the nine pseudouridine residues, at positions 955, 2504, and 2580. Therefore, this gene has been renamed rluC. Despite the absence of one-third of the normal complement of pseudouridines, there was no change in the exponential growth rate in either LB or M-9 medium at temperatures ranging from 24 to 42 degrees C. From this work and our previous studies, we have now identified three synthases that account for 50% of the pseudouridines in the E. coli ribosome.

  6. tRNA thiolated pyrimidines as targets for near-ultraviolet-induced synthesis of guanosine tetraphosphate in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.; Thiam, K.; Favre, A.

    1981-10-01

    Illumination with near-ultraviolet light triggers synthesis of ppGpp (guanosine 3'-diphosphate 5'-diphosphate) not only in growing Escherichia coli cells containing the putative chromophore 4-thiouridine in their tRNAs but also in nuv/sup -/ cells which lack 4-thiouridine. The burst of ppGpp in nuv/sup -/ cells is, however, induced exclusively by light of wavelenghts shorter than 350 nm. Its maximum level is half that obtained in the parental strain. This ppGpp synthesis is also under the control of the relA gene, indicating that it is due to the accumulation of uncharged tRNAs. A candidate likely to trigger this effect is a 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouracil residues present in the first position of the anticodon loop of tRNAsup(Glu), tRNAsup(Lys) and one tRNAsup(Glu) isoacceptor. In conditions in vitro, this base is highly photoreactive at wavelenghts shorter than 350 nm. Furthermore, near-ultraviolet-photomodified tRNAsup(Glu) and tRNAsup(Lys) become poor substrates of their acylation enzyme.

  7. Prebiotic synthesis of 5-substituted uracils: a bridge between the RNA world and the DNA-protein world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, M. P.; Miller, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    Under prebiotic conditions, formaldehyde adds to uracil at the C-5 position to produce 5-hydroxymethyluracil with favorable rates and equilibria. Hydroxymethyluracil adds a variety of nucleophiles, such as ammonia, glycine, guanidine, hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen cyanide, imidazole, indole, and phenol, to give 5-substituted uracils with the side chains of most of the 20 amino acids in proteins. These reactions are sufficiently robust that, if uracil had been present on the primitive Earth, then these substituted uracils would also have been present. The ribozymes of the RNA world would have included many of the functional groups found in proteins today, and their catalytic activities may have been considerably greater than presently assumed.

  8. Small interfering RNA against transcription factor STAT6 leads to increased cholesterol synthesis in lung cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Dubey

    Full Text Available STAT6 transcription factor has become a potential molecule for therapeutic intervention because it regulates broad range of cellular processes in a large variety of cell types. Although some target genes and interacting partners of STAT6 have been identified, its exact mechanism of action needs to be elucidated. In this study, we sought to further characterize the molecular interactions, networks, and functions of STAT6 by profiling the mRNA expression of STAT6 silenced human lung cells (NCI-H460 using microarrays. Our analysis revealed 273 differentially expressed genes after STAT6 silencing. Analysis of the gene expression data with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA software revealed Gene expression, Cell death, Lipid metabolism as the functions associated with highest rated network. Cholesterol biosynthesis was among the most enriched pathways in IPA as well as in PANTHER analysis. These results have been validated by real-time PCR and cholesterol assay using scrambled siRNA as a negative control. Similar findings were also observed with human type II pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells, A549. In the present study we have, for the first time, shown the inverse relationship of STAT6 with the cholesterol biosynthesis in lung cancer cells. The present findings are potentially significant to advance the understanding and design of therapeutics for the pathological conditions where both STAT6 and cholesterol biosynthesis are implicated viz. asthma, atherosclerosis etc.

  9. A rapid and simple pipeline for synthesis of mRNA-ribosome-V(H)H complexes used in single-domain antibody ribosome display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencurova, Elena; Pulzova, Lucia; Flachbartova, Zuzana; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    The single-domain antibody (VHH) is a promising building block for a number of antibody-based applications. Ribosome display can successfully be used in the production of VHH. However, the construction of the expression cassette, confirmation of the translation and proper folding of the nascent chain, and the purification of the ribosome complexes, remain cumbersome tasks. Additionally, selection of the most suitable expression system can be challenging. We have designed primers that will amplify virtually all Camelidae VHH. With the help of a double-overlap extension (OE) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) we have fused VHH with the F1 fragment (T7 promoter and species-independent translation sequence) and the F2 fragment (mCherry, Myc-tag, tether, SecM arrest sequence and 3' stem loop) to generate a full-length DNA cassette. OE-PCR generated fragments were incubated directly with cell-free lysates (Leishmania torentolae, rabbit reticulocyte or E. coli) for the synthesis of mRNA-VHH-mCherry-ribosome complexes in vitro. Alternatively, the cassette was ligated in pQE-30 vector and transformed into E. coli to produce ribosome complexes in vivo. The results showed that the same expression cassette could be used to synthesize ribosome complexes with different expression systems. mCherry reporter served to confirm the synthesis and proper folding of the nascent chain, Myc-tag was useful in the rapid purification of ribosome complexes, and combination of the SecM sequence and 3' stem loop made the cassette universal, both for cells-free and E. coli in vivo. This rapid and universal pipeline can effectively be used in antibody ribosome display and VHH production. PMID:25902394

  10. Immunoprotective activity of a Salmonid Alphavirus Vaccine: comparison of the immune responses induced by inactivated whole virus antigen formulations based on CpG class B oligonucleotides and poly I:C alone or combined with an oil adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thim, Hanna L; Iliev, Dimitar B; Christie, Karen E; Villoing, Stéphane; McLoughlin, Marian F; Strandskog, Guro; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2012-07-01

    CpG oligonucleotides and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) are toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists that mimic the immunostimulatory properties of bacterial DNA and double-stranded viral RNA respectively, and which have exhibited potential to serve as vaccine adjuvants in previous experiments. Here, a combination of CpGs and poly I:C together with water- or oil-formulated Salmonid Alphavirus (SAV) antigen preparations has been used for a vaccine in Atlantic salmon and tested for protection in SAV challenge trial. The results demonstrate that vaccination with a high dose of the SAV antigen induced protection against challenge with SAV which correlated with production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). As the high antigen dose alone induced full protection, no beneficial effect from the addition of CpG and poly I:C could be observed. Nevertheless, these TLR ligands significantly enhanced the levels of NAbs in serum of vaccinated fish. Interestingly, gene expression analysis demonstrated that while addition of oil suppressed the CpG/poly I:C-induced expression of IFN-γ, the upregulation of IFNa1 was substantially enhanced. A low dose of the SAV antigen combined with oil did not induce any detectable levels of NAbs either with or without TLR ligands present, however the addition of CpG and poly I:C to the low SAV antigen dose formulation significantly enhanced the protection against SAV suggesting that CpG/poly I:C may have enhanced a cytotoxic response - a process which is dependent on the up-regulation of type I IFN. These results highlight the immunostimulatory properties of the tested TLR ligands and will serve as a ground for further, more detailed studies aimed to investigate their capacity to serve as adjuvants in vaccine formulations for Atlantic salmon. PMID:22634299

  11. Alphavirus replicon particles expressing TRP-2 provide potent therapeutic effect on melanoma through activation of humoral and cellular immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Avogadri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is refractory to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore alternative approaches to treat this disease, such as immunotherapy, are needed. Melanoma vaccine design has mainly focused on targeting CD8+ T cells. Activation of effector CD8+ T cells has been achieved in patients, but provided limited clinical benefit, due to immune-escape mechanisms established by advanced tumors. We have previously shown that alphavirus-based virus-like replicon particles (VRP simultaneously activate strong cellular and humoral immunity against the weakly immunogenic melanoma differentiation antigen (MDA tyrosinase. Here we further investigate the antitumor effect and the immune mechanisms of VRP encoding different MDAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VRP encoding different MDAs were screened for their ability to prevent the growth of the B16 mouse transplantable melanoma. The immunologic mechanisms of efficacy were investigated for the most effective vaccine identified, focusing on CD8+ T cells and humoral responses. To this end, ex vivo immune assays and transgenic mice lacking specific immune effector functions were used. The studies identified a potent therapeutic VRP vaccine, encoding tyrosinase related protein 2 (TRP-2, which provided a durable anti-tumor effect. The efficacy of VRP-TRP2 relies on a novel immune mechanism of action requiring the activation of both IgG and CD8+ T cell effector responses, and depends on signaling through activating Fcγ receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies a VRP-based vaccine able to elicit humoral immunity against TRP-2, which plays a role in melanoma immunotherapy and synergizes with tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. These findings will aid in the rational design of future immunotherapy clinical trials.

  12. Effect of triethylamine on the recovery of selected South American alphaviruses, flaviviruses, and bunyaviruses from mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Guinn, Monica L; Turell, Michael J

    2002-09-01

    We evaluated the effect of triethylamine (TEA) on the recovery of infectious virus from pools of mosquitoes for two South American alphaviruses (eastern equine encephalomyelitis and Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis subtypes IIIC and ID), one flavivirus (Ilheus) and two bunyaviruses (Mirim [Guama group] and Itaqui [group C]). Mosquitoes were inoculated intrathoracically with virus, held for 7-10 d at 26 degrees C, and handled under one of four regimens before testing for the presence of virus by plaque assay. Mosquitoes were killed by freezing at - 70 degrees C for 3 min and tested immediately for the presence of virus; killed by freezing at -70 degrees C for 3 min and then held at room temperature for 1 h before testing for the presence of virus; anesthetized with TEA and assayed immediately for the presence of virus; or anesthetized with TEA and then held at room temperature for 1 h before being assayed for the presence of virus. For each of the viruses tested, viral titers in mosquitoes anesthetized with TEA were similar to those in mosquitoes killed by freezing at-70 degrees C. Likewise, there was no significant difference in viral titers in mosquitoes anesthetized with TEA and held at room temperature for 1 h or in mosquitoes frozen at -70 degrees C and held at room temperature for 1 h before being processed for virus by isolation. Triethylamine is advantageous for the handling of mosquitoes in a field environment. The elimination of the need for a cold chain, without compromising virus recovery, increases the feasibility of conducting research projects requiring the isolation of live virus from mosquitoes in remote tropical environments.

  13. Single base mutation in the proα2(I) collagen gene that causes efficient splicing of RNA from exon 27 to exon 29 and synthesis of a shortened but in-frame proα2(I) chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous observations demonstrated that a lethal variant of osteogenesis imperfecta had two altered alleles for proα2(I) chains of type I procollagen. One mutation produced a nonfunctioning allele in that there was synthesis of mRNA but no detectable synthesis of proα2(I) chains from the allele. The mutation in the other allele caused synthesis of shortened proα2(I) chains that lacked most or all of the 18 amino acids encoded by exon 28. Subclones of the proα2(I) gene were prepared from the proband's DNA and the DNA sequence was determined for a 582-base-pair (bp) region that extended from the last 30 bp of intervening sequence 26 to the first 26 bp of intervening sequence 29. Data from six independent subclones demonstrated that all had the same sequence as a previously isolated normal clone for the proα2(I) gene except that four subclones had a single base mutation at the 3' end of intervening sequence 27. The mutation was a substitution of guanine for adenine that changed the universal consensus sequence for the 3' splicing site of RNA from -AG- to -GG-. S1 nuclease experiments demonstrated that about half the proα2(I) mRNA in the proband's fibroblasts was abnormally spliced and that the major species of abnormal proα2(I) mRNA was completely spliced from the last codon of exon 27 to the first codon of exon 29. The mutation is apparently unique among RNA splicing mutations of mammalian systems in producing a shortened polypeptide chain that is in-frame in terms of coding sequences, that is used in the subunit assembly of a protein, and that contributes to a lethal phenotype

  14. Stone Lakes virus (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus), a variant of Fort Morgan virus isolated from swallow bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) west of the Continental Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Aaron C; Armijos, M Veronica; Wheeler, Sarah; Wright, Stan; Fang, Ying; Langevin, Stanley; Reisen, William K

    2009-09-01

    Multiple isolates of an alphaviruses within the western equine encephalomyelitis-serocomplex that were related closely to Ft. Morgan and its variant Buggy Creek virus were made from swallow bugs, Oeciacus vicarius Horvath (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), collected from cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) nests at the Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Sacramento County, CA, during the summers of 2005 and 2006. This virus (hereafter Stone Lakes virus, family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus, STLV) was the first record of this viral group west of the Continental Divide. STLV replicated well in Vero and other vertebrate cell cultures but failed to replicate in C6/36 cells or infect Culex tarsalis Coquillett mosquitoes. STLV failed to produce elevated viremias in adult chickens or house sparrows and was weakly immunogenic. In addition, STLV was not isolated from cliff swallow nestlings nor was antibody detected in adults collected at mist nets. We suggest that STL and related swallow bug viruses may be primarily infections of cimicids that are maintained and amplified either by vertical or nonviremic transmission and that cliff swallows may primarily be important as a bloodmeal source for the bugs rather than as an amplification host for the viruses. PMID:19769055

  15. Perspectives of antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway of insects with special reference to mosquito in the context of dengue infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Probal Basu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference is a post-transcriptional sequence selective gene control mechanism. Antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway is one of the most momentous constituents of the insect innate immune system that can stymie versatile range of RNA virus like flavivirus. It has been demonstrated that RNA production by alphavirus replication is higher in proportion compared to flavivirus replication in mosquito cells. Studies demonstrated that infection by virus from Togaviridae and Bunyaviridae family of arbovirus to mosquito cells causes defect in RNAi response in-vitro but interestingly, it has also been stated that Dengue virus (DENV could be actively inhibited by RNA interference (RNAi. This article is an endeavor to review the perspectives of the functional significance of antiviral RNA interference as a potent agent of controlling dengue infection in the vector.

  16. Arabidopsis RRP6L1 and RRP6L2 function in FLOWERING LOCUS C silencing via regulation of antisense RNA synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hye Shin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The exosome complex functions in RNA metabolism and transcriptional gene silencing. Here, we report that mutations of two Arabidopsis genes encoding nuclear exosome components AtRRP6L1 and AtRRP6L2, cause de-repression of the main flowering repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and thus delay flowering in early-flowering Arabidopsis ecotypes. AtRRP6L mutations affect the expression of known FLC regulatory antisense (AS RNAs AS I and II, and cause an increase in Histone3 K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3 at FLC. AtRRP6L1 and AtRRP6L2 function redundantly in regulation of FLC and also act independently of the exosome core complex. Moreover, we discovered a novel, long non-coding, non-polyadenylated antisense transcript (ASL, for Antisense Long originating from the FLC locus in wild type plants. The AtRRP6L proteins function as the main regulators of ASL synthesis, as these mutants show little or no ASL transcript. Unlike ASI/II, ASL associates with H3K27me3 regions of FLC, suggesting that it could function in the maintenance of H3K27 trimethylation during vegetative growth. AtRRP6L mutations also affect H3K27me3 levels and nucleosome density at the FLC locus. Furthermore, AtRRP6L1 physically associates with the ASL transcript and directly interacts with the FLC locus. We propose that AtRRP6L proteins participate in the maintenance of H3K27me3 at FLC via regulating ASL. Furthermore, AtRRP6Ls might participate in multiple FLC silencing pathways by regulating diverse antisense RNAs derived from the FLC locus.

  17. Insulin/IGF1-PI3K-dependent nucleolar localization of a glycolytic enzyme--phosphoglycerate mutase 2, is necessary for proper structure of nucleolus and RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizak, Agnieszka; Grenda, Marcin; Mamczur, Piotr; Wisniewski, Janusz; Sucharski, Filip; Silberring, Jerzy; McCubrey, James A; Wisniewski, Jacek R; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-07-10

    Phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM), a conserved, glycolytic enzyme has been found in nucleoli of cancer cells. Here, we present evidence that accumulation of PGAM in the nucleolus is a universal phenomenon concerning not only neoplastically transformed but also non-malignant cells. Nucleolar localization of the enzyme is dependent on the presence of the PGAM2 (muscle) subunit and is regulated by insulin/IGF-1-PI3K signaling pathway as well as drugs influencing ribosomal biogenesis. We document that PGAM interacts with several 40S and 60S ribosomal proteins and that silencing of PGAM2 expression results in disturbance of nucleolar structure, inhibition of RNA synthesis and decrease of the mitotic index of squamous cell carcinoma cells. We conclude that presence of PGAM in the nucleolus is a prerequisite for synthesis and initial assembly of new pre-ribosome subunits.

  18. Single valproic acid treatment inhibits glycogen and RNA ribose turnover while disrupting glucose-derived cholesterol synthesis in liver as revealed by the [U-C(6)]-d-glucose tracer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Richard D; Hansen, Deborah K; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Cross, Brandie M; Fatollahi, Javad J; Lagunero, F Tracy; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Boros, Laszlo G

    2009-09-01

    Previous genetic and proteomic studies identified altered activity of various enzymes such as those of fatty acid metabolism and glycogen synthesis after a single toxic dose of valproic acid (VPA) in rats. In this study, we demonstrate the effect of VPA on metabolite synthesis flux rates and the possible use of abnormal (13)C labeled glucose-derived metabolites in plasma or urine as early markers of toxicity. Female CD-1 mice were injected subcutaneously with saline or 600 mg/kg) VPA. Twelve hours later, the mice were injected with an intraperitoneal load of 1 g/kg [U-(13)C]-d-glucose. (13)C isotopomers of glycogen glucose and RNA ribose in liver, kidney and brain tissue, as well as glucose disposal via cholesterol and glucose in the plasma and urine were determined. The levels of all of the positional (13)C isotopomers of glucose were similar in plasma, suggesting that a single VPA dose does not disturb glucose absorption, uptake or hepatic glucose metabolism. Three-hour urine samples showed an increase in the injected tracer indicating a decreased glucose re-absorption via kidney tubules. (13)C labeled glucose deposited as liver glycogen or as ribose of RNA were decreased by VPA treatment; incorporation of (13)C via acetyl-CoA into plasma cholesterol was significantly lower at 60 min. The severe decreases in glucose-derived carbon flux into plasma and kidney-bound cholesterol, liver glycogen and RNA ribose synthesis, as well as decreased glucose re-absorption and an increased disposal via urine all serve as early flux markers of VPA-induced adverse metabolic effects in the host.

  19. Prevalence of antibodies to alphaviruses and flaviviruses in free-ranging game animals and nonhuman primates in the greater Congo basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kading, Rebekah C; Borland, Erin M; Cranfield, Mike; Powers, Ann M

    2013-07-01

    Vector-borne and zoonotic pathogens have comprised a significant proportion of the emerging infectious diseases in humans in recent decades. The role of many wildlife species as reservoirs for arthropod-borne viral pathogens is poorly understood. We investigated the exposure history of various African wildlife species from the Congo basin to mosquito-borne flaviviruses and alphaviruses by testing archived serum samples. Sera from 24 African forest buffalo (Syncerus caffer nanus), 34 African elephants (Loxodonta africana), 40 duikers (Cephalophus and Philantomba spp.), 25 mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx), 32 mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei), five Grauer's gorillas (Gorilla beringei graueri), two L'Hoest's monkeys (Cercopithecus lhoesti), two golden monkeys (Cercopithecus kandti), and three chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) sampled between 1991 and 2009 were tested for antibodies against chikungunya virus (CHIKV), o'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV), West Nile virus (WNV), dengue 2 virus (DENV-2), and yellow fever virus (YFV) by plaque reduction neutralization test. Specific neutralizing antibodies against ONNV were found in African forest buffalo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Gabon, duikers in the DRC, and mandrills in Gabon, providing novel evidence of enzootic circulation of ONNV in these countries. African forest buffalo in the DRC and Gabon also demonstrated evidence of exposure to CHIKV, WNV, and DENV-2, while mandrills in Gabon were antibody positive for CHIKV, DENV-2, WNV, and YFV. All of the elephants tested had a strong neutralizing antibody response to WNV. We also document results from a survey of gorillas for arboviruses, of which 4/32 (13%) had antibody to an alphavirus or flavivirus. Overall, our results demonstrate a high prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against multiple arboviruses in wildlife in equatorial Africa. PMID:23778608

  20. relA-dependent RNA polymerase activity in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryals, J; Bremer, H

    1982-01-01

    Parameters relating to RNA synthesis were measured after a temperature shift from 30 to 42 degrees C, in a relA+ and relA- isogenic pair of Escherichia coli strains containing a temperature-sensitive valyl tRNA synthetase. The following results were obtained: (i) the rRNA chain growth rate increased 2-fold in both strains; (ii) newly synthesized rRNA became unstable in both strains; (iii) the stable RNA gene activity (rRNA and tRNA, measured as stable RNA synthesis rate relative to the total ...

  1. Characterization of the in vitro activity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with the ribonucleoproteins of rice hoja blanca tenuivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M; Ramirez, B C; Goldbach, R; Haenni, A L

    1997-04-01

    An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity associated with the ribonucleoproteins of rice hoja blanca tenuivirus (RHBV) was detected and analyzed. Conditions for in vitro RNA synthesis and for coupled RNA synthesis-translation of RHBV were established. In both cases, synthesis of the viral and viral complementary genomic and subgenomic RNA3 and RNA4 were observed, demonstrating that both transcription and replication occurred. Though coupling of RNA synthesis to translation allowed efficient translation of the newly synthesized subgenomic RNAs, studies of the effect of various inhibitors of protein synthesis revealed that RNA synthesis was independent of translation. Primer extension experiments demonstrated that in the presence of capped exogenous RNAs, a stretch of 10 to 16 nonviral nucleotides was added to the 5' end of a population of newly synthesized viral complementary RNA4. It appears that in addition to RdRp activity, RHBV-associated protein(s) also possessed cap-snatching capacity. PMID:9060614

  2. Aedes aegypti uses RNA interference in defense against Sindbis virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilusz Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is an important anti-viral defense mechanism. The Aedes aegypti genome encodes RNAi component orthologs, however, most populations of this mosquito are readily infected by, and subsequently transmit flaviviruses and alphaviruses. The goal of this study was to use Ae. aegypti as a model system to determine how the mosquito's anti-viral RNAi pathway interacts with recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus. Results SINV (TR339-eGFP (+ strand RNA, infectious virus titers and infection rates transiently increased in mosquitoes following dsRNA injection to cognate Ago2, Dcr2, or TSN mRNAs. Detection of SINV RNA-derived small RNAs at 2 and 7 days post-infection in non-silenced mosquitoes provided important confirmation of RNAi pathway activity. Two different recombinant SINV viruses (MRE16-eGFP and TR339-eGFP with significant differences in infection kinetics were used to delineate vector/virus interactions in the midgut. We show virus-dependent effects on RNAi component transcript and protein levels during infection. Monitoring midgut Ago2, Dcr2, and TSN transcript levels during infection revealed that only TSN transcripts were significantly increased in midguts over blood-fed controls. Ago2 protein levels were depleted immediately following a non-infectious bloodmeal and varied during SINV infection in a virus-dependent manner. Conclusion We show that silencing RNAi components in Ae. aegypti results in transient increases in SINV replication. Furthermore, Ae. aegypti RNAi is active during SINV infection as indicated by production of virus-specific siRNAs. Lastly, the RNAi response varies in a virus-dependent manner. These data define important features of RNAi anti-viral defense in Ae. aegypti.

  3. The capsid-coding region hairpin element (cHP) is a critical determinant of dengue virus and West Nile virus RNA synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Clyde, Karen; Barrera, Julio; Harris, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are members of the Flavivirus genus of positive-strand RNA viruses. RNA sequences and structures, primarily in the untranslated regions, have been shown to modulate flaviviral gene expression and genome replication. Previously, we demonstrated that a structure in the DENV coding region (cHP) enhances translation start codon selection and is required for viral replication. Here we further characterize the role of the cHP in the DENV life cycle. We ...

  4. Effects of aging on insulin synthesis and secretion. Differential effects on preproinsulin messenger RNA levels, proinsulin biosynthesis, and secretion of newly made and preformed insulin in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, S Y; Halban, P A; Rowe, J W

    1988-01-01

    Aging in men and rodents is associated with a marked decline in glucose stimulated insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cells (B cells). Secreted insulin is the end result of a series of steps along the biosynthetic protein-secretion pathway, including insulin gene transcription, processing of transcripts to preproinsulin mRNA, translation of mRNA, segregation and processing of newly made proinsulin in secretory vesicles, proinsulin to insulin conversion, transport of vesicles to the plasma m...

  5. Analogies between the tRNA methylating enzymes and tRNA's in embryonic and tumor tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of research, role of tRNA in protein synthesis and as a carrier of amino acids; histidine pathway in Salmonella typhimurium; role of tRNA in regulation of translation; ribosomal binding reactions; role of tRNA in hemoglobin synthesis; population of tRNA's in mutant of Drosophila; methylation of tRNA and DNA by dimethylnitrosamine; purification of DNA methylase from HeLa cell nuclei; effects of age on levels of excretion of tRNA breakdown products in cancer patients; and tyrosyl tRNA's in embryonic and adult liver and in hepatomas. (HLW)

  6. Synthesis of a new intercalating nucleic acid analogue with pyrenol insertions and the thermal stability of the resulting oligonucleotides towards DNA over RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osman, Amany M. A.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2010-01-01

    A new intercalating nucleic acid monomer Y was obtained via alkylation of pyren-1-ol with (S)-(?)-2-(2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)ethanol under Mitsunobu conditions followed by hydrolysis with 80% aqueous acetic acid to give a diol which was tritylated with 4,40-dimethoxytrityl chloride followed...... nearly identical hybridization properties with those of intercalating nucleic acid (INA) where neighboring oxygen and carbon atoms are interchanged in the linker. The synthesis of monomer Y avoids the use of allergic intermediates which are a problem in the synthesis of INA....

  7. Design and synthesis of á,á-trehalose derivatives bearing guanidino groups as inhibitors for the Tat Protein-TAR RNA interaction of HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Min; Xu Zhidong; Tu Pengfei; Xiao Sulong; Yu Xiaolin; Yang Ming

    2004-01-01

    Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires specific interactions of Tat protein with the transactivation responsive region (TAR) RNA. Disruption of Tat-TAR RNA interaction could inhibit HIV-1 replication. Here four target compounds were designed and synthesized to bind to TAR RNA for blocking the interaction of Tat-TAR RNA. The core molecule 6,6′-diamino-6,6′ -dideoxy-á,á-trehalose was obtained from selective bromination of a,a-trehalose at C-6,6′, followed by acetylation, azide displacement, deacetylation and reduction.Coupling of the core molecule with the protected amino acid, then deprotection and guanidinylation generated 6,6′-bis(L-arginylamino)-6,6′-dideoxy-á,á-trehalose,6,6′-bisguanidino-6,6′-dideoxy-á ,á-trehalose, 6,6′-bis [((a)-guanidinobutyryl)amino]-6,6′-dideoxy-á,á-trehalose and 6,6′-bis(guanidinoacetylamino)-6,6′-dideoxy-á,á-trehalose, respectively.Their abilities to inhibit Tat-TAR RNA interaction were determined by a Tat-dependent HIV-1LTR-driven CAT assays.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of rabies virus glycoprotein-tagged amphiphilic cyclodextrins for siRNA delivery in human glioblastoma cells: in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; McCarthy, David J; Godinho, Bruno M D C; Cryan, John F; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2015-04-25

    In man brain cancer is an aggressive, malignant form of tumour, it is highly infiltrative in nature, is associated with cellular heterogeneity and affects cerebral hemispheres of the brain. Current drug therapies are inadequate and an unmet clinical need exists to develop new improved therapeutics. The ability to silence genes associated with disease progression by using short interfering RNA (siRNA) presents the potential to develop safe and effective therapies. In this work, in order to protect the siRNA from degradation, promote cell specific uptake and enhance gene silencing efficiency, a PEGylated cyclodextrin (CD)-based nanoparticle, tagged with a CNS-targeting peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) was formulated and characterized. The modified cyclodextrin derivatives were synthesized and co-formulated to form nanoparticles containing siRNA which were analysed for size, surface charge, stability, cellular uptake and gene-knockdown in brain cancer cells. The results identified an optimised co-formulation prototype at a molar ratio of 1:1.5:0.5 (cationic cyclodextrin:PEGylated cyclodextrin:RVG-tagged PEGylated cyclodextrin) with a size of 281 ± 39.72 nm, a surface charge of 26.73 ± 3 mV, with efficient cellular uptake and a 27% gene-knockdown ability. This CD-based formulation represents a potential nanocomplex for systemic delivery of siRNA targeting brain cancer. PMID:25703259

  9. Data on synthesis and characterization of chitosan nanoparticles for in vivo delivery of siRNA-Npr3: Targeting NPR-C expression in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Balaji; Tumala, Anusha; Subramanian, Vimala; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2016-09-01

    This data article contains the data related to the research article 'Transient silencing of Npr3 gene expression improved the circulatory levels of atrial natriuretic peptides and attenuated β-adrenoceptor activation-induced cardiac hypertrophic growth in experimental rats' (Venkatesan et al., 2016 [1]). The siRNA-Npr3 loaded chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized using ionotropic gelation method, where the positive charge of the chitosan interacts with the negative charge of STPP and siRNA-Npr3. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized siRNA-Npr3 loaded chitosan nanoparticles were studied by dynamic light scattering, FE-SEM and HR-TEM analysis. In addition, the loading efficiency and stability of the nanoparticles were also studied. Further, the gene silencing efficacy, hemocompatibility and biocompatibility were studied using Wistar rats (in vivo), isolated red blood cells and H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells, respectively. PMID:27366782

  10. The sRNA RyhB regulates the synthesis of the Escherichia coli methionine sulfoxide reductase MsrB but not MsrA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bos

    Full Text Available Controlling iron homeostasis is crucial for all aerobically grown living cells that are exposed to oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS, as free iron increases the production of ROS. Methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr are key enzymes in repairing ROS-mediated damage to proteins, as they reduce oxidized methionine (MetSO residues to methionine. E. coli synthesizes two Msr, A and B, which exhibit substrate diastereospecificity. The bacterial iron-responsive small RNA (sRNA RyhB controls iron metabolism by modulating intracellular iron usage. We show in this paper that RyhB is a direct regulator of the msrB gene that encodes the MsrB enzyme. RyhB down-regulates msrB transcripts along with Hfq and RNaseE proteins since mutations in the ryhB, fur, hfq, or RNaseE-encoded genes resulted in iron-insensitive expression of msrB. Our results show that RyhB binds to two sequences within the short 5'UTR of msrB mRNA as identified by reverse transcriptase and RNase and lead (II protection assays. Toeprinting analysis shows that RyhB pairing to msrB mRNA prevents efficient ribosome binding and thereby inhibits translation initiation. In vivo site directed-mutagenesis experiments in the msrB 5'UTR region indicate that both RyhB-pairing sites are required to decrease msrB expression. Thus, this study suggests a novel mechanism of translational regulation where a same sRNA can basepair to two different locations within the same mRNA species. In contrast, expression of msrA is not influenced by changes in iron levels.

  11. The sRNA RyhB regulates the synthesis of the Escherichia coli methionine sulfoxide reductase MsrB but not MsrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Julia; Duverger, Yohann; Thouvenot, Benoît; Chiaruttini, Claude; Branlant, Christiane; Springer, Mathias; Charpentier, Bruno; Barras, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Controlling iron homeostasis is crucial for all aerobically grown living cells that are exposed to oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS), as free iron increases the production of ROS. Methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr) are key enzymes in repairing ROS-mediated damage to proteins, as they reduce oxidized methionine (MetSO) residues to methionine. E. coli synthesizes two Msr, A and B, which exhibit substrate diastereospecificity. The bacterial iron-responsive small RNA (sRNA) RyhB controls iron metabolism by modulating intracellular iron usage. We show in this paper that RyhB is a direct regulator of the msrB gene that encodes the MsrB enzyme. RyhB down-regulates msrB transcripts along with Hfq and RNaseE proteins since mutations in the ryhB, fur, hfq, or RNaseE-encoded genes resulted in iron-insensitive expression of msrB. Our results show that RyhB binds to two sequences within the short 5'UTR of msrB mRNA as identified by reverse transcriptase and RNase and lead (II) protection assays. Toeprinting analysis shows that RyhB pairing to msrB mRNA prevents efficient ribosome binding and thereby inhibits translation initiation. In vivo site directed-mutagenesis experiments in the msrB 5'UTR region indicate that both RyhB-pairing sites are required to decrease msrB expression. Thus, this study suggests a novel mechanism of translational regulation where a same sRNA can basepair to two different locations within the same mRNA species. In contrast, expression of msrA is not influenced by changes in iron levels.

  12. Alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein bridges RNA and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Vienna L; Choi, Mehee; Petrillo, Jessica E; Gehrke, Lee

    2007-07-20

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNA replication requires the viral coat protein (CP). AMV CP is an integral component of the viral replicase; moreover, it binds to the viral RNA 3'-termini and induces the formation of multiple new base pairs that organize the RNA conformation. The results described here suggest that AMV coat protein binding defines template selection by organizing the 3'-terminal RNA conformation and by positioning the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) at the initiation site for minus strand synthesis. RNA-protein interactions were analyzed by using a modified Northwestern blotting protocol that included both viral coat protein and labeled RNA in the probe solution ("far-Northwestern blotting"). We observed that labeled RNA alone bound the replicase proteins poorly; however, complex formation was enhanced significantly in the presence of AMV CP. The RNA-replicase bridging function of the AMV CP may represent a mechanism for accurate de novo initiation in the absence of canonical 3' transfer RNA signals. PMID:17400272

  13. ALFALFA MOSAIC VIRUS COAT PROTEIN BRIDGES RNA AND RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Vienna L.; Choi, Mehee; Petrillo, Jessica E.; Gehrke, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNA replication requires the viral coat protein (CP). AMV CP is an integral component of the viral replicase; moreover, it binds to the viral RNA 3' termini and induces the formation of multiple new base pairs that organize the RNA conformation. The results described here suggest that AMV coat protein binding defines template selection by organizing the 3'-terminal RNA conformation and by positioning the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) at the initiation site for minus strand synthesis. RNA-protein interactions were analyzed by using a modified northwestern blotting protocol that included both viral coat protein and labeled RNA in the probe solution (“far-northwestern blotting”). We observed that labeled RNA alone bound the replicase proteins poorly; however, complex formation was enhanced significantly in the presence of AMV CP. The RNA-replicase bridging function of the AMV CP may represent a mechanism for accurate de novo initiation in the absence of canonical 3' transfer RNA signals. PMID:17400272

  14. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  15. Enhanced immunity against classical swine fever in pigs induced by prime-boost immunization using an alphavirus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine and a recombinant adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Na; Li, Hong-Yu; Li, Miao; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2010-09-15

    Classical swine fever (CSF) - caused by the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) - is a fatal disease of pigs that is responsible for extensive losses to the swine industry worldwide. We had demonstrated previously that a prime-boost vaccination strategy using an alphavirus (Semliki Forest virus, SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine (pSFV1CS-E2) and a recombinant adenovirus (rAdV-E2) expressing the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV induced enhanced immune responses in a mouse model. In this study, we evaluated further the efficacy of the heterologous prime-boost immunization approach in pigs, the natural host of CSFV. The results showed that the pigs (n=5) receiving pSFV1CS-E2/rAdV-E2 heterologous prime-boost immunization developed significantly higher titers of CSFV-specific neutralizing antibodies and comparable CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation, compared to the pigs receiving double immunizations with rAdV-E2 alone. When challenged with virulent CSFV Shimen strain, the pigs of the heterologous prime-boost group did not show clinical symptoms or viremia, which were observed in one of the 5 pigs immunized with rAdV-E2 alone and all the 5 control pigs immunized with an empty adenovirus. The results demonstrate that the heterologous DNA prime and recombinant adenovirus boost strategy can induce solid protective immunity.

  16. Mortality and weight loss of Atlantic salmon, Salmon salar L., experimentally infected with salmonid alphavirus subtype 2 and subtype 3 isolates from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taksdal, T; Jensen, B Bang; Böckerman, I; McLoughlin, M F; Hjortaas, M J; Ramstad, A; Sindre, H

    2015-12-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) caused by salmonid alphavirus (SAV) has a significant negative economic impact in the salmonid fish farming industry in northern Europe. Until recently, only SAV subtype 3 was present in Norwegian fish farms. However, in 2011, a marine SAV 2 subtype was detected in a fish farm outside the PD-endemic zone. This subtype has spread rapidly among fish farms in mid-Norway. The PD mortality in several farms has been lower than expected, although high mortality has also been reported. In this situation, the industry and the authorities needed scientific-based information about the virulence of the marine SAV 2 strain in Norway to decide how to handle this new situation. Atlantic salmon post-smolts were experimentally infected with SAV 2 and SAV 3 strains from six different PD cases in Norway. SAV 3-infected fish showed higher mortality than SAV 2-infected fish. Among the SAV 3 isolates, two isolates gave higher mortality than the third one. At the end of the experiment, fish in all SAV-infected groups had significantly lower weight than the uninfected control fish. This is the first published paper on PD to document that waterborne infection produced significantly higher mortality than intraperitoneal injection. PMID:25322679

  17. Structural and functional characterization of the coxsackievirus B3 CRE(2C): role of CRE(2C) in negative- and positive-strand RNA synthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooij, M.J. van; Vogt, D.A.; Paul, A.; Castro, C.; Kuijpers, J.M.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Cameron, C.E.; Wimmer, E.; Andino, R.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2006-01-01

    A stem-loop element located within the 2C-coding region of the coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) genome has been proposed to function as a cis-acting replication element (CRE). It is shown here that disruption of this structure indeed interfered with viral RNA replication in vivo and abolished uridylylation

  18. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  19. [Analysis of the Localization of Fibrillarin and Sites of Pre-rRNA Synthesis in the Nucleolus-Like Bodies of Mouse GV Oocytes after Mild Treatment with Proteinase K].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishova, K V; Khodarovich, Yu M; Lavrentyeva, E A; Zatsepina, O V

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal development of mammalian oocytes is accompanied by functional and structural remodeling of the nucleolar apparatus: the final stage of this process is the formation of large objects (up to 10 μm in diameter) termed nucleolus-like bodies (NLBs) in preovulatory GV oocytes. N LB material was shown to be essential for early embryonic development, but its composition is still uncharacterized. In the present study, the protein-binding dye fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) was used to show that proteins characterized by a high local concentration are essential NLB components in mouse GV oocytes. One of these proteins was able to be identified for the first time using a mild treatment of oocytes with proteinase K; the protein identified was fibrillarin, a factor of early pre-rRNA processing. Fibrillarin is present in the inner NLB mass of all oocytes capable of synthesizing rRNA; however, it is not colocalized with BrUTP microinjected into oocytes in order to identify transcribed ribosomal genes, in contrast to the "surface" fibrillarin. These observations imply the accumulation of nucleolar proteins not involved in ribosome biogenesis inside the NLB. All NLBs present in an individual nucleus of an NSN-type GV oocyte contain fibrillarin and are associated with active ribosomal genes. The results obtained in the present work demonstrate that proteinase K treatment of GV mouse oocytes allows for: (1) identification of "cryptic" proteins inside the densely packed NLB material and (2) the enhancement of oocyte image quality during BrUTP-based identification of rRNA synthesis sites but (3) not for the detection of active ribosomal genes in the inner mass of the NLB. The fluorescent dye FITC can be recommended for assessment of intracellular protein localization in the oocytes of all mammalian species.

  20. Aberrant splicing of androgenic receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G.G.J.M.; Faber, P.W.; van Rooij, H.C.J.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J.; Brinkmann, A.O. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Schweikert, H.U. (Univ. of Bonn (Germany)); Zegers, N.D. (Medical Biological Laboratory-Organization for Applied Scientific Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Hodgins, M.B. (Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1990-10-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symtpoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. The authors report a G {r arrow} T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46, XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely abolishes normal RNA splicing at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary and results in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site in exon 4, which leads to the deletion of 123 nucleotides from the mRNA. Translation of the mutant mRNA results in an androgen receptor protein {approx}5 kDa smaller than the wild type. This mutated androgen receptor protein was unable to bind androgens and unable to activate transcription of an androgen-regulated reporter gene construct. This mutation in the human androgen receptor gene demonstrates the importance of an intact steroid-binding domain for proper androgen receptor functioning in vivo.

  1. Aberrant splicing of androgenic receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symtpoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. The authors report a G → T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46, XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely abolishes normal RNA splicing at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary and results in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site in exon 4, which leads to the deletion of 123 nucleotides from the mRNA. Translation of the mutant mRNA results in an androgen receptor protein ∼5 kDa smaller than the wild type. This mutated androgen receptor protein was unable to bind androgens and unable to activate transcription of an androgen-regulated reporter gene construct. This mutation in the human androgen receptor gene demonstrates the importance of an intact steroid-binding domain for proper androgen receptor functioning in vivo

  2. Induction of DNA and RNA synthesis in murine B lymphocytes does not correlate with early changes in cytosolic free calcium concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to ascertain if early changes in cytosolic free calcium concentration [Ca2+] are correlated with either activation, as defined by 3H-uridine incorporation or increase in cell size, or induction of DNA synthesis, 3H-thymidine incorporation, murine B lymphocytes were stimulated with preparations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), rabbit anti-mouse Fab (RAMFab), and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). LPS, although a potent inducer of 3H-thymidine incorporation does not cause an increase in [Ca2+]. F(ab')2RAMFab at 50 μs ml causes a 6X increase in 3H-thymidine incorporation as opposed to a 2-3X increase at 10 μg/ml. IgG-RAMFab at concentrations up to 50 μg/ml neither induces DNA synthesis nor activates cells by any criteria, including 3H-uridine incorporation, increase in cell size, and increase in I-A expression. Both RAMFab causes increases in [Ca2+] that saturate at 10 μg/ml. Minimally proliferative doses of TPA inhibit the increase in [Ca2+] caused by both preparations of RAMFab. However, B cells pretreated with TPA and then stimulated with 2 or 10 μg/ml of either preparation of RAMFab showed increases of 10 X in 3H-uridine and 100X in 3H-thymidine incorporation. These data demonstrate that there appears to be no correlation between early changes in [Ca2+] and either activation or induction of DNA synthesis in murine B cells

  3. Advances in imaging RNA in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nynne Meyn; Oparka, Karl J.; Tilsner, Jens

    2010-01-01

    targeting allows local protein synthesis and the asymmetric distribution of transcripts during cell polarisation. In plants, intercellular RNA trafficking also plays an additional role in plant development and pathogen defence. Methods that allow the visualisation of RNA sequences within a cellular context......, and preferably at subcellular resolution, can help to answer important questions in plant cell and developmental biology. Here, we summarise the approaches currently available for localising RNA in vivo and address the specific limitations inherent with plant systems....

  4. In vitro and in vivo application of RNA interference for targeting genes involved in peritrophic matrix synthesis in a lepidopteran system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Umut Toprak; Doug Baldwin; Martin Erlandson; Cedric Gillott; Stephanie Harris; Dwayne D.Hegedus

    2013-01-01

    The midgut of most insects is lined with a semipermeable acellular tube,the peritrophic matrix(PM),composed of chitin and proteins.Although various genes encoding PM proteins have been characterized,our understanding of their roles in PM structure and function is very limited.One promising approach for obtaining functional information is RNA interference,which has been used to reduce the levels of specific mRNAs using double-stranded RNAs administered to larvae by either injection or feeding.Although this method is well documented in dipterans and coleopterans,reports of its success in lepidopterans are varied.In the current study,the silencing midgut genes encoding PM proteins(insect intestinal mucin 1,insect intestinal mucin 4,PM protein l)and the chitin biosynthetic or modifying enzymes(chitin synthase-B and chitin deacetylase 1)in a noctuid lepidopteran,Mamestra configurata,was examined in vitro and in vivo.In vitro studies in primary midgut epithelial cell preparations revealed an acute and rapid silencing(by 24 h)for the gene encoding chitin deacetylase 1 and a slower rate of silencing(by 72 h)for the gene encoding PM protein 1.Genes encoding insect intestinal mucins were slightly silenced by 72 h,whereas no silencing was detected for the gene encoding chitin synthase-B.In vivo experiments focused on chitin deacetylase 1,as the gene was silenced to the greatest extent in vitro.Continuous feeding of neonates and fourth instar larvae with double-stranded RNA resulted in silencing of chitin deacetylase 1 by 24 and 36 h,respectively.Feeding a single dose to neonates also resulted in silencing by 24 h.The current study demonstrates that genes encoding PM proteins can be silenced and outlines conditions for RNA interference by per os feeding in lepidopterans.

  5. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.;

    2015-01-01

    RNA modification has attracted increasing interest as it is realized that epitranscriptomics is important in disease development. In type 2 diabetes we have suggested that high urinary excretion of 8-oxo-2'-Guanosine (8oxoGuo), as a measure of global RNA oxidation, is associated with poor survival.......9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...... diabetes. In agreement with our previous finding, DNA oxidation did not show any prognostic value. RNA oxidation represents oxidative stress intracellularly, presumably predominantly in the cytosol. The mechanism of RNA oxidation is not clear, but hypothesized to result from mitochondrial dysfunction...

  6. Characterization of RNA-Like Oligomers from Lipid-Assisted Nonenzymatic Synthesis: Implications for Origin of Informational Molecules on Early Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya V. Mungi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prebiotic polymerization had to be a nonenzymatic, chemically driven process. These processes would have been particularly favored in scenarios which push reaction regimes far from equilibrium. Dehydration-rehydration (DH-RH cycles are one such regime thought to have been prevalent on prebiotic Earth in niches like volcanic geothermal pools. The present study defines the optimum DH-RH reaction conditions for lipid-assisted polymerization of nucleotides. The resultant products were characterized to understand their chemical makeup. Primarily, our study demonstrates that the resultant RNA-like oligomers have abasic sites, which means these oligomers lack information-carrying capability because of losing most of their bases during the reaction process. This results from low pH and high temperature conditions, which, importantly, also allows the formation of sugar-phosphate oligomers when ribose 5'-monophosphates are used as the starting monomers instead. Formation of such oligomers would have permitted sampling of a large variety of bases on a preformed polymer backbone, resulting in “prebiotic phosphodiester polymers” prior to the emergence of modern RNA-like molecules. This suggests that primitive genetic polymers could have utilized bases that conferred greater N-glycosyl bond stability, a feature crucial for information propagation in low pH and high temperature regimes of early Earth.

  7. Interactome of Two Diverse RNA Granules Links mRNA Localization to Translational Repression in Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Fritzsche

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Transport of RNAs to dendrites occurs in neuronal RNA granules, which allows local synthesis of specific proteins at active synapses on demand, thereby contributing to learning and memory. To gain insight into the machinery controlling dendritic mRNA localization and translation, we established a stringent protocol to biochemically purify RNA granules from rat brain. Here, we identified a specific set of interactors for two RNA-binding proteins that are known components of neuronal RNA granules, Barentsz and Staufen2. First, neuronal RNA granules are much more heterogeneous than previously anticipated, sharing only a third of the identified proteins. Second, dendritically localized mRNAs, e.g., Arc and CaMKIIα, associate selectively with distinct RNA granules. Third, our work identifies a series of factors with known roles in RNA localization, translational control, and RNA quality control that are likely to keep localized transcripts in a translationally repressed state, often in distinct types of RNPs.

  8. Technologies for the Synthesis of mRNA-Encoding Libraries and Discovery of Bioactive Natural Product-Inspired Non-Traditional Macrocyclic Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Suga

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss emerging technologies for drug discovery, which yields novel molecular scaffolds based on natural product-inspired non-traditional peptides expressed using the translation machinery. Unlike natural products, these technologies allow for constructing mRNA-encoding libraries of macrocyclic peptides containing non-canonical sidechains and N-methyl-modified backbones. The complexity of sequence space in such libraries reaches as high as a trillion (>1012, affording initial hits of high affinity ligands against protein targets. Although this article comprehensively covers several related technologies, we discuss in greater detail the technical development and advantages of the Random non-standard Peptide Integration Discovery (RaPID system, including the recent identification of inhibitors against various therapeutic targets.

  9. Methylated nucleosides in tRNA and tRNA methyltransferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eHori

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To date, more than 90 modified nucleosides have been found in tRNA and the biosynthetic pathways of the majority of tRNA modifications include a methylation step(s. Recent studies of the biosynthetic pathways have demonstrated that the availability of methyl group donors for the methylation in tRNA is important for correct and efficient protein synthesis. In this review, I focus on the methylated nucleosides and tRNA methyltransferases. The primary functions of tRNA methylations are linked to the different steps of protein synthesis, such as the stabilization of tRNA structure, reinforcement of the codon–anticodon interaction, regulation of wobble base pairing, and prevention of frameshift errors. However, beyond these basic functions, recent studies have demonstrated that tRNA methylations are also involved in the RNA quality control system and regulation of tRNA localization in the cell. In a thermophilic eubacterium, tRNA modifications and the modification enzymes form a network that responses to temperature changes. Furthermore, several modifications are involved in genetic diseases, infections, and the immune response. Moreover, structural, biochemical, and bioinformatics studies of tRNA methyltransferases have been clarifying the details of tRNA methyltransferases and have enabled these enzymes to be classified. In the final section, the evolution of modification enzymes is discussed.

  10. Investigation of the Prebiotic Synthesis of Amino Acids and RNA Bases from CO2 using FeS/H2S as a Reducing Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Anthony D.; Miller, Stanley L.; McDonald, Gene; Bada, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    An autotrophic theory of the origin of metabolism and life has been proposed in which carbon dioxide is reduced by ferrous sulfide and hydrogen sulfide by means of a reversed citric acid cycle, leading to the production of amino acids. Similar processes have been proposed for purine synthesis. Ferrous sulfide is a strong reducing agent in the presence of hydrogen sulfide and can produce hydrogen as well as reduce alkenes, alkynes, and thiols to saturated hydrocarbons and reduce ketones to thiols. However, the reduction of carbon dioxide has not been demonstrated. We show here that no amino acids, purines, or pyrimidines are produced from carbon dioxide with the ferrous sulfide and hydrogen sulfide system. Furthermore, this system does not produce amino acids from carboxylic acids by reductive amination and carboxylation. Thus, the proposed autotrophic theory, using carbon dioxide, ferrous sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide, lacks the robustness needed to be a geological process and is, therefore, unlikely to have played a role in the origin of metabolism or the origin of life.

  11. Sphingosine kinase 1 serves as a pro-viral factor by regulating viral RNA synthesis and nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein complex upon influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jin Seo

    Full Text Available Influenza continues to pose a threat to humans by causing significant morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is imperative to investigate mechanisms by which influenza virus manipulates the function of host factors and cellular signal pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that influenza virus increases the expression and activation of sphingosine kinase (SK 1, which in turn regulates diverse cellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of SK suppressed virus-induced NF-κB activation and markedly reduced the synthesis of viral RNAs and proteins. Further, SK blockade interfered with activation of Ran-binding protein 3 (RanBP3, a cofactor of chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1, to inhibit CRM1-mediated nuclear export of the influenza viral ribonucleoprotein complex. In support of this observation, SK inhibition altered the phosphorylation of ERK, p90RSK, and AKT, which is the upstream signal of RanBP3/CRM1 activation. Collectively, these results indicate that SK is a key pro-viral factor regulating multiple cellular signal pathways triggered by influenza virus infection.

  12. Self-assembled RNA interference microsponges for efficient siRNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee; Bonner, Daniel K.; Poon, Zhiyong; Hammond, Paula T.

    2012-04-01

    The encapsulation and delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) has been realized using lipid nanoparticles, cationic complexes, inorganic nanoparticles, RNA nanoparticles and dendrimers. Still, the instability of RNA and the relatively ineffectual encapsulation process of siRNA remain critical issues towards the clinical translation of RNA as a therapeutic. Here we report the synthesis of a delivery vehicle that combines carrier and cargo: RNA interference (RNAi) polymers that self-assemble into nanoscale pleated sheets of hairpin RNA, which in turn form sponge-like microspheres. The RNAi-microsponges consist entirely of cleavable RNA strands, and are processed by the cell’s RNA machinery to convert the stable hairpin RNA to siRNA only after cellular uptake, thus inherently providing protection for siRNA during delivery and transport to the cytoplasm. More than half a million copies of siRNA can be delivered to a cell with the uptake of a single RNAi-microsponge. The approach could lead to novel therapeutic routes for siRNA delivery.

  13. Self-assembled RNA interference microsponges for efficient siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee; Bonner, Daniel K; Poon, Zhiyong; Hammond, Paula T

    2012-04-01

    The encapsulation and delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) has been realized using lipid nanoparticles, cationic complexes, inorganic nanoparticles, RNA nanoparticles and dendrimers. Still, the instability of RNA and the relatively ineffectual encapsulation process of siRNA remain critical issues towards the clinical translation of RNA as a therapeutic. Here we report the synthesis of a delivery vehicle that combines carrier and cargo: RNA interference (RNAi) polymers that self-assemble into nanoscale pleated sheets of hairpin RNA, which in turn form sponge-like microspheres. The RNAi-microsponges consist entirely of cleavable RNA strands, and are processed by the cell's RNA machinery to convert the stable hairpin RNA to siRNA only after cellular uptake, thus inherently providing protection for siRNA during delivery and transport to the cytoplasm. More than half a million copies of siRNA can be delivered to a cell with the uptake of a single RNAi-microsponge. The approach could lead to novel therapeutic routes for siRNA delivery.

  14. Predicting RNA-RNA Interactions Using RNAstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiChiacchio, Laura; Mathews, David H

    2016-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is a required step for many regulatory and catalytic processes in the cell. Identifying RNA-RNA hybridization sites is challenging because of the competition between intramolecular and intermolecular structure formation. A complete picture of RNA-RNA binding includes an understanding of single-stranded folding and binding site accessibility, and is strongly concentration-dependent. This chapter provides guidance for using RNAstructure to predict RNA-RNA binding sites and RNA-RNA structures, utilizing free energy minimization and partition function calculations. RNAstructure is freely available at http://rna.urmc.rochester.edu/RNAstructure.html . PMID:27665592

  15. Cloning and sequencing of hfq (host factor required for synthesis of bacteriophage Q beta RNA gene of Salmonella Typhimurium isolated from poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthasarathi Behera

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to clone and sequence hfq gene of Salmonella Typhimurium strain PM-45 and compare its sequence with hfq gene of other serovar of Salmonella. Materials and Methods: Salmonella Typhimurium strain PM-45 was procured from the G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, India. The genomic DNA was isolated from Salmonella Typhimurium. Hfq gene was polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplified from the DNA using specific primers, which was subsequently cloned into pET32a vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 pLys cells. The recombinant plasmid was isolated and subjected to restriction enzyme digestion as well as PCR. The clone was then sequenced. The sequence was analyzed and submitted in GenBank. Results: PCR produced an amplicon of 309 bp. Restriction digestion of the recombinant plasmid released the desired insert. The hfq sequence shows 100% homology with similar sequences from other Salmonella Typhimurium isolates. Both nucleotide and amino acid sequences are highly conserved. The submitted sequence is having Genbank accession no KM998764. Conclusion: Hfq, the hexameric RNA binding protein is one of the most important post-transcriptional regulator of bacteria. The sequence of hfq gene of Salmonella Typhimurium is highly conserved within and between Salmonella enterica serovars. This gene sequence is probably under heavy selection pressure to maintain the conformational integrity of its product in spite of its being not a survival gene.

  16. 227 Views of RNA: Is RNA Unique in Its Chemical Isomer Space?

    OpenAIRE

    Cleaves, H. James; Meringer, Markus; Goodwin, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is one of the two nucleic acids used by extant biochemistry and plays a central role as the intermediary carrier of genetic information in transcription and translation. If RNA was involved in the origin of life, it should have a facile prebiotic synthesis. A wide variety of such syntheses have been explored. However, to date no one-pot reaction has been shown capable of yielding RNA monomers from likely prebiotically abundant starting materials, though this do...

  17. RNA-DNA Differences Are Generated in Human Cells within Seconds after RNA Exits Polymerase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel X. Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA sequences are expected to be identical to their corresponding DNA sequences. Here, we found all 12 types of RNA-DNA sequence differences (RDDs in nascent RNA. Our results show that RDDs begin to occur in RNA chains ∼55 nt from the RNA polymerase II (Pol II active site. These RDDs occur so soon after transcription that they are incompatible with known deaminase-mediated RNA-editing mechanisms. Moreover, the 55 nt delay in appearance indicates that they do not arise during RNA synthesis by Pol II or as a direct consequence of modified base incorporation. Preliminary data suggest that RDD and R-loop formations may be coupled. These findings identify sequence substitution as an early step in cotranscriptional RNA processing.

  18. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Riddhi; Kumar, Deepak; Sultana, Asma; Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress.

  19. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  20. RNA polymerase activity of Ustilago maydis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yie, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ustilago maydis virus has an RNA polymerase enzyme which is associated with virion capsids. In the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion and ribonucleotide triphosphate, the enzyme catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of mRNA by using dsRNA as a template. The products of the UmV RNA polymerase were both ssRNA and dsRNA. The dsRNA was determined by characteristic mobilities in gel electrophoresis, lack of sensitivity to RNase, and specific hybridization tests. The ssRNAs were identified by elution from a CF-11 column and by their RNase sensitivity. On the basis of the size of ssRNAs, it was concluded that partial transcripts were produced from H dsRNA segments, and full length transcripts were produced from M and L dsRNA segments. The following observations indicates that transcription occurs by strand displacement; (1) Only the positive strand of M2 dsRNA was labeled by the in vitro reaction. (2) The M2 dsRNA which had been labeled with /sup 32/''P-UTP in vitro could be chased from dsRNA with unlabeled UTP. The transcription products of three UmV strains were compared, and the overall pattern of transcription was very similar among them.

  1. Advances in Lipid Nanoparticles for siRNA Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Sam Chen; Yuen Yi C. Tam; Cullis, Pieter R.

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances in both siRNA (small interfering RNA) and whole genome sequencing have demonstrated great potential in translating genetic information into siRNA-based drugs to halt the synthesis of most disease-causing proteins. Despite its powerful promises as a drug, siRNA requires a sophisticated delivery vehicle because of its rapid degradation in the circulation, inefficient accumulation in target tissues and inability to cross cell membranes to access the cytoplasm where it func...

  2. Human telomerase contains two cooperating telomerase RNA molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Wenz, Christian; Enenkel, Barbara; Amacker, Mario; Kelleher, Colleen; Damm, Klaus; Lingner, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Telomerase uses a short stretch of its intrinsic RNA molecule as template for telomere repeat synthesis. Reverse transcription of the RNA template is catalyzed by the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein subunit. We demonstrate that human telomerase reconstituted from recombinant TERT and telomerase RNA runs as a dimer on a gel filtration column and that it contains two telomerase RNA molecules. Significantly, a telomerase heterodimer reconstituted from wild-type and mutant telomer...

  3. Inhibition of Interjacent Ribonucleic Acid (26S) Synthesis in Cells Infected by Sindbis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Christina M.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1969-01-01

    The interrelationship of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein synthesis in cells infected by Sindbis virus was investigated. When cultures were treated with puromycin early in the course of infection, the synthesis of interjacent RNA (26S) was preferentially inhibited. A similar result was obtained by shifting cells infected by one temperature-sensitive mutant defective in RNA synthesis from the permissive (29 C) to the nonpermissive (41.5 C) temperature. Under both conditions, the viral RNA produced appeared to be fully active biologically. Once underway, the synthesis of viral RNA in wild-type Sindbis infections did not require concomitant protein synthesis. PMID:5817400

  4. Phosphorylation of Single Stranded RNA Virus Proteins and Potential for Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forrest Keck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Post translational modification of proteins is a critical requirement that regulates function. Among the diverse kinds of protein post translational modifications, phosphorylation plays essential roles in protein folding, protein:protein interactions, signal transduction, intracellular localization, transcription regulation, cell cycle progression, survival and apoptosis. Protein phosphorylation is also essential for many intracellular pathogens to establish a productive infection cycle. Preservation of protein phosphorylation moieties in pathogens in a manner that mirrors the host components underscores the co-evolutionary trajectory of pathogens and hosts, and sheds light on how successful pathogens have usurped, either in part or as a whole, the host enzymatic machinery. Phosphorylation of viral proteins for many acute RNA viruses including Flaviviruses and Alphaviruses has been demonstrated to be critical for protein functionality. This review focuses on phosphorylation modifications that have been documented to occur on viral proteins with emphasis on acutely infectious, single stranded RNA viruses. The review additionally explores the possibility of repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved inhibitors as antivirals for the treatment of acute RNA viral infections.

  5. Gonadotropin-dependent oocyte maturational competence requires activation of the protein kinase A pathway and synthesis of RNA and protein in ovarian follicles of Nibe, Nibea mitsukurii (Teleostei, Sciaenidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, G.; Shusa, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Patino, R.

    2002-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone- (LH)-dependent ovarian follicle maturation has been recently described in two stages for teleost fishes. The oocyte's ability to respond to the steroidal maturation-inducing hormone (MIH), also known as oocyte maturational competence (OMC), is acquired during the first stage; whereas the MIH-dependent resumption of meiosis occurs during the second stage. However, studies directly addressing OMC have been performed with a limited number of species and therefore the general relevance of the two-stage model and its mechanisms remain uncertain. In this study, we examined the hormonal regulation of OMC and its basic transduction mechanisms in ovarian follicles of the sciaenid teleost, Nibe (Nibea mitsukurii). Exposure to MIH [17,20??-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one or 17,20??,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one] stimulated germinal vesicle breakdown (index of meiotic resumption) in full-grown follicles primed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, an LH-like gonadotropin) but not in those pre-cultured in plain incubation medium. The induction of OMC by HCG was mimicked by protein kinase A (PKA) activators (forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP), and blocked by specific inhibitors of PKA (H89 and H8) as well as inhibitors of RNA (actinomycin D) and protein (cycloheximide) synthesis. Forskolin-induced OMC was also inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. A strong activator of protein kinase C, PMA, inhibited HCG-dependent OMC. In conclusion, OMC in Nibe ovarian follicles is gonadotropin-dependent and requires activation of the PKA pathway followed by gene transcription and translation events. These observations are consistent with the two-stage model of ovarian follicle maturation proposed for other teleosts, and suggest that Nibe can be used as new model species for mechanistic studies of ovarian follicle differentiation and maturation in fishes.

  6. THE LIFETIME OF BACTERIAL MESSENGER RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, V.; Calvin, M.

    1963-12-01

    Puromycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, appears to act as an inhibitor at additional sites during the induction of {beta}-galactosidase synthesis. No inhibition of the reactions proceeding during the first 20 seconds of induction was observed, but puromycin seems to prevent the accumulation of messenger RNA during the period between 20 seconds and the first appearance of enzyme activity after 3 minutes. When cells from a stationary culture are placed in fresh medium containing inducer for {beta}-galactosidase, growth, as represented by increase in turbidity and by total protein synthesis, starts within 30 seconds. By contrast, {beta}-galactosidase synthesis is greatly delayed compared with induction during exponential growth. Two other inducible enzymes show similar lags, but malic dehydrogenase, which requires no external inducer, shows no lag. The lags are not due to catabolite repression phenomena. They cannot be reduced by pretreatment of the culture with inducer, or by supplementing the fresh medium with amino acids or nucleotides. The lag is also demonstrated by an i{sup -} mutant constitutive for {beta}-galactosidase synthesis. An inhibitor of RNA synthesis, 6-azauracil, preferentially inhibits {beta}-galactosidase synthesis compared with growth in both inducible and constitutive strains. It is suggested that these observations, together with many reports in the literature that inducible enzyme synthesis is more sensitive than total growth to some inhibitors and adverse growth conditions, can be explained by supposing that messenger RNA for normally inducible enzymes is biologically more labile than that for normally constitutive proteins. The implications of this hypothesis for the achievement of cell differentiation by genetic regulation of enzyme synthesis are briefly discussed.

  7. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan-Mi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV NS5 is a viral nonstructural protein that carries both methyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp domains. It is a key component of the viral RNA replicase complex that presumably includes other viral nonstructural and cellular proteins. The biochemical properties of JEV NS5 have not been characterized due to the lack of a robust in vitro RdRp assay system, and the molecular mechanisms for the initiation of RNA synthesis by JEV NS5 remain to be elucidated. Results To characterize the biochemical properties of JEV RdRp, we expressed in Escherichia coli and purified an enzymatically active full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein with a hexahistidine tag at the N-terminus. The purified NS5 protein, but not the mutant NS5 protein with an Ala substitution at the first Asp of the RdRp-conserved GDD motif, exhibited template- and primer-dependent RNA synthesis activity using a poly(A RNA template. The NS5 protein was able to use both plus- and minus-strand 3'-untranslated regions of the JEV genome as templates in the absence of a primer, with the latter RNA being a better template. Analysis of the RNA synthesis initiation site using the 3'-end 83 nucleotides of the JEV genome as a minimal RNA template revealed that the NS5 protein specifically initiates RNA synthesis from an internal site, U81, at the two nucleotides upstream of the 3'-end of the template. Conclusion As a first step toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms for JEV RNA replication and ultimately for the in vitro reconstitution of viral RNA replicase complex, we for the first time established an in vitro JEV RdRp assay system with a functional full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein and characterized the mechanisms of RNA synthesis from nonviral and viral RNA templates. The full-length recombinant JEV NS5 will be useful for the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of this enzyme and for the

  8. Effects of chronic renal failure on protein synthesis and albumin messenger ribonucleic acid in rat liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Zern, M A; Yap, S.H.; Strair, R K; Kaysen, G A; Shafritz, D A

    1984-01-01

    Previously we reported that chronic renal failure in rats leads to preferential disaggregation of liver membrane-bound polysomes associated with a decrease in albumin synthesis. To determine whether reduced albumin synthesis results from reduced cellular levels of albumin messenger RNA (mRNA) or some other molecular mechanism, we have employed mRNA-DNA hybridization in conjunction with cell-free protein synthesis to determine albumin mRNA sequence content and biological activity in subcellula...

  9. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA.

  10. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide ‘cap’ on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IR...

  11. The structural basis of tRNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M.; Costantino, David A.; Hammond, John A.; Ruehle, Grant M.; Nix, Jay C.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. This multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states1. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. Examples to address this gap are found in single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3′ end of the Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic RNA (gRNA)2-4, but also interacts with other structures in the gRNA's 3′ untranslated region5, contains the promoter for negative strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes6. This TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is ‘two-faced’: one ‘face’ closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other ‘face’ diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  12. Forms and Functions of Telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathleen

    Telomerase adds single-stranded telomeric DNA repeats to chromosome ends. Unlike other polymerases involved in genome replication, telomerase synthe¬sizes DNA without use of a DNA template. Instead, the enzyme active site copies a template carried within the integral RNA subunit of the telomerase ribonucleo-protein (RNP) complex. In addition to providing a template, telomerase RNA has non-template motifs with critical functions in the catalytic cycle of repeat synthesis. In its complexity of structure and function, telomerase RNA resembles the non-coding RNAs of RNP machines like the ribosome and spliceosome that evolved from catalytic RNAs of the RNA World. However, unlike these RNPs, telomerase evolved its RNP identity after advent of the Protein World. Insights about telomer-ase have broad significance for understanding non-coding RNA biology as well as chromosome end maintenance and human disease.

  13. Transfer RNA pseudouridine synthases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, T; Olsson, M

    1990-05-25

    A transfer RNA lacking modified nucleosides was produced by transcription in vitro of a cloned gene that encodes a Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycine tRNA. At least three different uridines (in nucleotide positions 13, 32, and 55) of this transcript tRNA are modified to pseudouridine by an extract of S. cerevisiae. Variants of the RNA substrate were also constructed that each had only one of these sites, thus allowing specific monitoring of pseudouridylation at different nucleotide positions. Using such RNAs to assay pseudouridine synthesis, enzymes producing this nucleoside were purified from an extract of S. cerevisiae. The activities corresponding to positions 13, 32, and 55 in the tRNA substrate could all be separated chromatographically, indicating that there is a separate enzyme for each of these sites. The enzyme specific for position 55 (denoted pseudouridine synthase 55) was purified approximately 4000-fold using a combination of DEAE-Sepharose, heparin-Sepharose, and hydroxylapatite.

  14. Effect of acitretin on collagen synthesis and mRNA expression in cultured systemic sclerosis fibroblasts%阿维A对系统性硬皮病成纤维细胞胶原合成及I型前胶原mRNA表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶冰; 张彩萍; 季江; 崔盘根

    2014-01-01

    目的:明确阿维 A 对系统性硬皮病成纤维细胞胶原合成及 I 型前胶原 mRNA 表达的影响。方法:原代培养系统性硬皮病(SSc)患者皮肤成纤维细胞(FB),使用不同浓度的阿维 A(10-5、10-6、10-7、10-8 mol/ L)作用48 h,用羟脯氨酸法测定胶原的质量浓度,RT-PCR 法 I 型前胶原 mRNA 的表达。结果:阿维 A 实验组 FB 胶原合成及 I 型前胶原 mRNA 的表达较对照组减少,且均与阿维 A 呈浓度依赖性关系。结论:阿维 A 可能通过抑制 FB I 型前胶原基因的表达减少胶原合成。%To determine the effect of acitretin on the collagen synthesis and the mRNA expression of proα1 (I) collagen in cultured systemic sclerosis fibroblasts(SSCFB). Methods: SSCFB were incubated with acitretin (10-5、10-6、10-7、10-8 mol/ L) for 48 hours. Hydroproline and RT-PCR were used to measure the content of collagen and the mRNA expression of proα1 (I) collagen. Results: The content of collagen and the mRNA expression of proα1 (I) collagen were lower than in acitretin group than in the control group, which were in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion: Collagen synthesis can be inhibited by acitretin through suppressing proα1 (I) collagen mRNA expression of SSc Fb.

  15. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, G P

    2016-01-01

    On August 9-11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below. PMID:27099780

  16. Mutational Analysis of the Influenza Virus cRNA Promoter and Identification of Nucleotides Critical for Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, Mandy; Deng, Tao; Addley, Mark; Brownlee, George G.

    2004-01-01

    Replication of the influenza A virus virion RNA (vRNA) requires the synthesis of full-length cRNA, which in turn is used as a template for the synthesis of more vRNA. A “corkscrew” secondary-structure model of the cRNA promoter has been proposed recently. However the data in support of that model were indirect, since they were derived from measurement, by use of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter in 293T cells, of mRNA levels from a modified cRNA promoter rather than the authe...

  17. Quality control of chemically damaged RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Carrie L; Zaher, Hani S

    2016-10-01

    The "central dogma" of molecular biology describes how information contained in DNA is transformed into RNA and finally into proteins. In order for proteins to maintain their functionality in both the parent cell and subsequent generations, it is essential that the information encoded in DNA and RNA remains unaltered. DNA and RNA are constantly exposed to damaging agents, which can modify nucleic acids and change the information they encode. While much is known about how cells respond to damaged DNA, the importance of protecting RNA has only become appreciated over the past decade. Modification of the nucleobase through oxidation and alkylation has long been known to affect its base-pairing properties during DNA replication. Similarly, recent studies have begun to highlight some of the unwanted consequences of chemical damage on mRNA decoding during translation. Oxidation and alkylation of mRNA appear to have drastic effects on the speed and fidelity of protein synthesis. As some mRNAs can persist for days in certain tissues, it is not surprising that it has recently emerged that mRNA-surveillance and RNA-repair pathways have evolved to clear or correct damaged mRNA. PMID:27155660

  18. RNA catalysis, thermodynamics and the origin of life

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, William G.; Abraham Szöke; Josh Blaustein; Sara M O'Rourke; Robertson, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    The RNA World Hypothesis posits that the first self-replicating molecules were RNAs. RNA self-replicases are, in general, assumed to have employed nucleotide 5'-polyphosphates (or their analogues) as substrates for RNA polymerization. The mechanism by which these substrates might be synthesized with sufficient abundance to supply a growing and evolving population of RNAs is problematic for evolutionary hypotheses because non-enzymatic synthesis and assembly of nucleotide 5'-triphosphates (or ...

  19. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Xia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA helicases and chaperones are the two major classes of RNA remodeling proteins, which function to remodel RNA structures and/or RNA-protein interactions, and are required for all aspects of RNA metabolism. Although some virus-encoded RNA helicases/chaperones have been predicted or identified, their RNA remodeling activities in vitro and functions in the viral life cycle remain largely elusive. Enteroviruses are a large group of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family, which includes numerous important human pathogens. Herein, we report that the nonstructural protein 2CATPase of enterovirus 71 (EV71, which is the major causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has been regarded as the most important neurotropic enterovirus after poliovirus eradication, functions not only as an RNA helicase that 3'-to-5' unwinds RNA helices in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent manner, but also as an RNA chaperone that destabilizes helices bidirectionally and facilitates strand annealing and complex RNA structure formation independently of ATP. We also determined that the helicase activity is based on the EV71 2CATPase middle domain, whereas the C-terminus is indispensable for its RNA chaperoning activity. By promoting RNA template recycling, 2CATPase facilitated EV71 RNA synthesis in vitro; when 2CATPase helicase activity was impaired, EV71 RNA replication and virion production were mostly abolished in cells, indicating that 2CATPase-mediated RNA remodeling plays a critical role in the enteroviral life cycle. Furthermore, the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities of 2CATPase are also conserved in coxsackie A virus 16 (CAV16, another important enterovirus. Altogether, our findings are the first to demonstrate the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities associated with enterovirus 2CATPase, and our study provides both in vitro and cellular evidence for their potential roles during viral RNA replication. These findings

  20. The structural basis of transfer RNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M; Costantino, David A; Hammond, John A; Ruehle, Grant M; Nix, Jay C; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-17

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles, and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. Such multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. To address this gap it is useful to study examples from single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3' end of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic (g)RNA, but also interacts with other structures in the 3' untranslated region of the gRNA, contains the promoter for negative-strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes. TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is 'two faced': one face closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other face diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  1. Disruption of Specific RNA-RNA Interactions in a Double-Stranded RNA Virus Inhibits Genome Packaging and Virus Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Teodoro; Sung, Po-Yu; Roy, Polly

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes hemorrhagic disease in economically important livestock. The BTV genome is organized into ten discrete double-stranded RNA molecules (S1-S10) which have been suggested to follow a sequential packaging pathway from smallest to largest segment during virus capsid assembly. To substantiate and extend these studies, we have investigated the RNA sorting and packaging mechanisms with a new experimental approach using inhibitory oligonucleotides. Putative packaging signals present in the 3'untranslated regions of BTV segments were targeted by a number of nuclease resistant oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) and their effects on virus replication in cell culture were assessed. ORNs complementary to the 3' UTR of BTV RNAs significantly inhibited virus replication without affecting protein synthesis. Same ORNs were found to inhibit complex formation when added to a novel RNA-RNA interaction assay which measured the formation of supramolecular complexes between and among different RNA segments. ORNs targeting the 3'UTR of BTV segment 10, the smallest RNA segment, were shown to be the most potent and deletions or substitution mutations of the targeted sequences diminished the RNA complexes and abolished the recovery of viable viruses using reverse genetics. Cell-free capsid assembly/RNA packaging assay also confirmed that the inhibitory ORNs could interfere with RNA packaging and further substitution mutations within the putative RNA packaging sequence have identified the recognition sequence concerned. Exchange of 3'UTR between segments have further demonstrated that RNA recognition was segment specific, most likely acting as part of the secondary structure of the entire genomic segment. Our data confirm that genome packaging in this segmented dsRNA virus occurs via the formation of supramolecular complexes formed by the interaction of specific sequences located in the 3' UTRs. Additionally, the inhibition of packaging in-trans with inhibitory ORNs

  2. DBR1 siRNA inhibition of HIV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu Yathi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 and all retroviruses are related to retroelements of simpler organisms such as the yeast Ty elements. Recent work has suggested that the yeast retroelement Ty1 replicates via an unexpected RNA lariat intermediate in cDNA synthesis. The putative genomic RNA lariat intermediate is formed by a 2'-5' phosphodiester bond, like that found in pre-mRNA intron lariats and it facilitates the minus-strand template switch during cDNA synthesis. We hypothesized that HIV-1 might also form a genomic RNA lariat and therefore that siRNA-mediated inhibition of expression of the human RNA lariat de-branching enzyme (DBR1 expression would specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Results We designed three short interfering RNA (siRNA molecules targeting DBR1, which were capable of reducing DBR1 mRNA expression by 80% and did not significantly affect cell viability. We assessed HIV-1 replication in the presence of DBR1 siRNA and found that DBR1 knockdown led to decreases in viral cDNA and protein production. These effects could be reversed by cotransfection of a DBR1 cDNA indicating that the inhibition of HIV-1 replication was a specific effect of DBR1 underexpression. Conclusion These data suggest that DBR1 function may be needed to debranch a putative HIV-1 genomic RNA lariat prior to completion of reverse transcription.

  3. Inhibition of luciferase expression in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by Sindbis virus expression of antisense luciferase RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B W; Olson, K E; Allen-Miura, T; Rayms-Keller, A; Carlson, J O; Coates, C J; Jasinskiene, N; James, A A; Beaty, B J; Higgs, S

    1999-11-01

    A rapid and reproducible method of inhibiting the expression of specific genes in mosquitoes should further our understanding of gene function and may lead to the identification of mosquito genes that determine vector competence or are involved in pathogen transmission. We hypothesized that the virus expression system based on the mosquito-borne Alphavirus, Sindbis (Togaviridae), may efficiently transcribe effector RNAs that inhibit expression of a targeted mosquito gene. To test this hypothesis, germ-line-transformed Aedes aegypti that express luciferase (LUC) from the mosquito Apyrase promoter were intrathoracically inoculated with a double subgenomic Sindbis (dsSIN) virus TE/3'2J/anti-luc (Anti-luc) that transcribes RNA complementary to the 5' end of the LUC mRNA. LUC activity was monitored in mosquitoes infected with either Anti-luc or control dsSIN viruses expressing unrelated antisense RNAs. Mosquitoes infected with Anti-luc virus exhibited 90% reduction in LUC compared with uninfected and control dsSIN-infected mosquitoes at 5 and 9 days postinoculation. We demonstrate that a gene expressed from the mosquito genome can be inhibited by using an antisense strategy. The dsSIN antisense RNA expression system is an important tool for studying gene function in vivo. PMID:10557332

  4. Extracellular RNA Communication (ExRNA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Until recently, scientists believed RNA worked mostly inside the cell that produced it. Some types of RNA help translate genes into proteins that are necessary for...

  5. Modeling sRNA-regulated Plasmid Maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Chen Chris

    2016-01-01

    We study a theoretical model for the toxin-antitoxin (hok/sok) mechanism for plasmid maintenance in bacteria. Toxin-antitoxin systems enforce the maintenance of a plasmid through post-segregational killing of cells that have lost the plasmid. Key to their function is the tight regulation of expression of a protein toxin by an sRNA antitoxin. Here, we focus on the nonlinear nature of the regulatory circuit dynamics of the toxin-antitoxin mechanism. The mechanism relies on a transient increase in protein concentration rather than on the steady state of the genetic circuit. Through a systematic analysis of the parameter dependence of this transient increase, we confirm some known design features of this system and identify new ones: for an efficient toxin-antitoxin mechanism, the synthesis rate of the toxin's mRNA template should be lower that of the sRNA antitoxin, the mRNA template should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin, and the mRNA-sRNA complex should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin. Moreover, ...

  6. Depletion of pre-16S rRNA in starved Escherichia coli cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Cangelosi, G A; Brabant, W H

    1997-01-01

    Specific hybridization assays for intermediates in rRNA synthesis (pre-rRNA) may become useful for monitoring the growth activity of individual microbial species in complex natural systems. This possibility depends upon the assumption that rRNA processing in microbial cells continues after growth and pre-rRNA synthesis cease, resulting in drainage of the pre-rRNA pool. This is not the case in many eukaryotic cells, but less is known about the situation in bacteria. Therefore, we used DNA prob...

  7. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure...

  8. Selection of tRNA charging quality control mechanisms that increase mistranslation of the genetic code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadavalli, Srujana S; Ibba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mistranslation can follow two events during protein synthesis: production of non-cognate amino acid:transfer RNA (tRNA) pairs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and inaccurate selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs by the ribosome. Many aaRSs actively edit non-cognate amino acids, but editing mechanisms...

  9. Redox status affects the catalytic activity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Assaf; Banerjee, Rajat; de Armas, Merly;

    2010-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases (GluRS) provide Glu-tRNA for different processes including protein synthesis, glutamine transamidation and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. Many organisms contain multiple GluRSs, but whether these duplications solely broaden tRNA specificity or also play additional roles...

  10. RNA interference of avian influenza virus H5N1 by directly inhibiting mRNA with siRNA expression plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Avian influenza virus H5N1 causes widespread infection in the birds and human respiratory tract, but existing vaccines and drug therapy are of limited value. Here we show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for conserved regions of the viral genome can potently inhibit influenza virus production in cell lines, embryonated chicken eggs and BALB/c mice. SiRNA expression plasmid pBabe-Super was chosen in the study, which directed the synthesis of small interfering RNA in cells. The inhibition depended on the presence of a functional antisense strand in the small interfering RNA duplex, suggesting that viral mRNA is the target of RNA interference. Among three small interfering RNA expression plasmids we designed, we found that small interfering RNA for nucleocapsid protein (NP) had a specific effect in inhibiting the accumulation of RNA in infected cells because of a critical requirement for newly synthesized nucleocapsid proteins in avian influenza viral RNA transcription and replication. The findings reveal that newly synthesized nucleocapsid, polymerase A (PA) and polymerase B1 (PB1) proteins are required for avian influenza virus transcription and replication and provide a basis for the development of small interfering RNA as prophylaxis and therapy for avian influenza infection in birds and humans. (author)

  11. Nuclear transport factor directs localization of protein synthesis during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den; Meinema, Anne C.; Krasnikov, Viktor; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Poolman, Bert

    2009-01-01

    Export of messenger RNA from the transcription site in the nucleus and mRNA targeting to the translation site in the cytoplasm are key regulatory processes in protein synthesis. In yeast, the mRNA-binding proteins Nab2p and Nab4p/Hrp1p accompany transcripts to their translation site, where the karyo

  12. How amino acids and peptides shaped the RNA world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gulik, Peter T S; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The "RNA world" hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a "pure RNA ribosome" evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems "RNA only", we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the "RNA world" view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  13. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I;

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle....... The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results...... in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III...

  14. Transcription of the major neurospora crassa microRNA-like small RNAs relies on RNA polymerase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuying Yang

    Full Text Available Most plant and animal microRNAs (miRNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We previously discovered miRNA-like small RNAs (milRNAs in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and uncovered at least four different pathways for milRNA production. To understand the evolutionary origin of milRNAs, we determined the roles of polymerases II and III (Pol II and Pol III in milRNA transcription. Our results show that Pol III is responsible for the transcription of the major milRNAs produced in this organism. The inhibition of Pol III activity by an inhibitor or by gene silencing abolishes the production of most abundant milRNAs and pri-milRNAs. In addition, Pol III associates with these milRNA producing loci. Even though silencing of Pol II does not affect the synthesis of the most abundant milRNAs, Pol II or both Pol II and Pol III are associated with some milRNA-producing loci, suggesting a regulatory interaction between the two polymerases for some milRNA transcription. Furthermore, we show that one of the Pol III-transcribed milRNAs is derived from a tRNA precursor, and its biogenesis requires RNase Z, which cleaves the tRNA moiety to generate pre-milRNA. Our study identifies the transcriptional machinery responsible for the synthesis of fungal milRNAs and sheds light on the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic small RNAs.

  15. Hyponatremia in rats induces downregulation of vasopressin synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, A G; Roberts, M. M.; Evron, W A; Verbalis, J G; Sherman, T G

    1990-01-01

    Hyponatremia due to inappropriate secretion of vasopressin is a common disorder in human pathophysiology, but vasopressin synthesis during hypoosmolality has not been investigated. We used a new method to quantitate synthesis of vasopressin in rats after 3, 7, and 14 d of hyponatremia induced by administering dDAVP (a vasopressin agonist) and a liquid diet. Vasopressin synthesis was completely turned off by 7 d. Vasopressin mRNA levels in the hypothalamus paralleled the reduction in synthesis...

  16. Effects of ionizing radiation on RNA metabolism in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell growth respone of cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, line CHO, to 800 rads of X irradiation involves a period of division delay, followed by a period of resumed division which terminates in a plateau phase. Over 95% of the cells die eventually. No direct effects on RNA or protein metabolism are evident during the delay period. During the resumed division and beginning of plateau phases, however, a specific and relatively constant reduction in mRNA synthesis relative to messenger-like RNA and heterogeneous nuclear RNA synthesis is evidenced. The ratio of mRNA to messenger-like RNA synthesis ranges from 0.8 to 0.65 during these phases. The effect is not due to altered cell-cycle distribution, and evidence is presented to indicate that it is probably not a compensatory response to the unbalanced growth that occurs during the division delay period

  17. Transfer RNA: From pioneering crystallographic studies to contemporary tRNA biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Schelcher, Cédric; Chihade, Joseph; Masquida, Benoît; Giegé, Philippe; Sauter, Claude

    2016-07-15

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) play a key role in protein synthesis as adaptor molecules between messenger RNA and protein sequences on the ribosome. Their discovery in the early sixties provoked a worldwide infatuation with the study of their architecture and their function in the decoding of genetic information. tRNAs are also emblematic molecules in crystallography: the determination of the first tRNA crystal structures represented a milestone in structural biology and tRNAs were for a long period the sole source of information on RNA folding, architecture, and post-transcriptional modifications. Crystallographic data on tRNAs in complex with aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) also provided the first insight into protein:RNA interactions. Beyond the translation process and the history of structural investigations on tRNA, this review also illustrates the renewal of tRNA biology with the discovery of a growing number of tRNA partners in the cell, the involvement of tRNAs in a variety of regulatory and metabolic pathways, and emerging applications in biotechnology and synthetic biology. PMID:26968773

  18. Expression of plasmid-based shRNA against the E1 and nsP1 genes effectively silenced Chikungunya virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Lam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a re-emerging alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever and persistent arthralgia in humans. Currently, there is no effective vaccine or antiviral against CHIKV infection. Therefore, this study evaluates whether RNA interference which targets at viral genomic level may be a novel antiviral strategy to inhibit the medically important CHIKV infection. METHODS: Plasmid-based small hairpin RNA (shRNA was investigated for its efficacy in inhibiting CHIKV replication. Three shRNAs designed against CHIKV Capsid, E1 and nsP1 genes were transfected to establish stable shRNA-expressing cell clones. Following infection of stable shRNA cells clones with CHIKV at M.O.I. 1, viral plaque assay, Western blotting and transmission electron microscopy were performed. The in vivo efficacy of shRNA against CHIKV replication was also evaluated in a suckling murine model of CHIKV infection. RESULTS: Cell clones expressing shRNAs against CHIKV E1 and nsP1 genes displayed significant inhibition of infectious CHIKV production, while shRNA Capsid demonstrated a modest inhibitory effect as compared to scrambled shRNA cell clones and non-transfected cell controls. Western blot analysis of CHIKV E2 protein expression and transmission electron microscopy of shRNA E1 and nsP1 cell clones collectively demonstrated similar inhibitory trends against CHIKV replication. shRNA E1 showed non cell-type specific anti-CHIKV effects and broad-spectrum silencing against different geographical strains of CHIKV. Furthermore, shRNA E1 clones did not exert any inhibition against Dengue virus and Sindbis virus replication, thus indicating the high specificity of shRNA against CHIKV replication. Moreover, no shRNA-resistant CHIKV mutant was generated after 50 passages of CHIKV in the stable cell clones. More importantly, strong and sustained anti-CHIKV protection was conferred in suckling mice pre-treated with shRNA E1. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these

  19. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper;

    2012-01-01

    other RNA molecules show virtually no oxidation. The iron-storage disease hemochromatosis exhibits the most prominent general increase in RNA oxidation ever observed. Oxidation of RNA primarily leads to strand breaks and to oxidative base modifications. Oxidized mRNA is recognized by the ribosomes...... type 2 diabetics; this demonstrates the clinical relevance of RNA oxidation. Taken collectively the available data suggest that RNA oxidation is a contributing factor in several diseases such as diabetes, hemochromatosis, heart failure, and ß-cell destruction. The mechanism involves free iron...

  20. RNA-binding proteins in plants: the tip of an iceberg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoroff, Nina V.; Federoff, N. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins, which are involved in the synthesis, processing, transport, translation, and degradation of RNA, are emerging as important, often multifunctional, cellular regulatory proteins. Although relatively few RNA-binding proteins have been studied in plants, they are being identified with increasing frequency, both genetically and biochemically. RNA-binding proteins that regulate chloroplast mRNA stability and translation in response to light and that have been elegantly analyzed in Clamydomonas reinhardtii have counterparts with similar functions in higher plants. Several recent reports describe mutations in genes encoding RNA-binding proteins that affect plant development and hormone signaling.

  1. The mouse telomerase RNA 5"-end lies just upstream of the telomerase template sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Hinkley, C S; Blasco, M A; Funk, W D; Feng, J; Villeponteau, B; Greider, C W; Herr, W.

    1998-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme with an essential RNA component. Embedded within the telomerase RNA is a template sequence for telomere synthesis. We have characterized the structure of the 5' regions of the human and mouse telomerase-RNA genes, and have found a striking difference in the location of the template sequence: Whereas the 5'-end of the human telomerase RNA lies 45 nt from the telomerase-RNA template sequence, the 5'-end of the mouse telomerase RNA lies just 2 nt from the...

  2. Who Regulates Whom? An Overview of RNA Granules and Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Poblete-Durán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After viral infection, host cells respond by mounting an anti-viral stress response in order to create a hostile atmosphere for viral replication, leading to the shut-off of mRNA translation (protein synthesis and the assembly of RNA granules. Two of these RNA granules have been well characterized in yeast and mammalian cells, stress granules (SGs, which are translationally silent sites of RNA triage and processing bodies (PBs, which are involved in mRNA degradation. This review discusses the role of these RNA granules in the evasion of anti-viral stress responses through virus-induced remodeling of cellular ribonucleoproteins (RNPs.

  3. tRNA-mRNA mimicry drives translation initiation from a viral IRES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, David A; Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Rambo, Robert P; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs initiate protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells by a noncanonical cap-independent mechanism. IRESes are critical for many pathogenic viruses, but efforts to understand their function are complicated by the diversity of IRES sequences as well as by limited high-resolution structural information. The intergenic region (IGR) IRESes of the Dicistroviridae viruses are powerful model systems to begin to understand IRES function. Here we present the crystal structure of a Dicistroviridae IGR IRES domain that interacts with the ribosome's decoding groove. We find that this RNA domain precisely mimics the transfer RNA anticodon-messenger RNA codon interaction, and its modeled orientation on the ribosome helps explain translocation without peptide bond formation. When combined with a previous structure, this work completes the first high-resolution description of an IRES RNA and provides insight into how RNAs can manipulate complex biological machines. PMID:18157151

  4. MicroRNA immunobiology: when microRNA chemists meet immunologists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhai H Chen

    2011-01-01

    Although interdisciplinary research has been heralded as the engine of basic discovery for decades,many in the immunology community have been taken back by the recent marriage between microRNA (miRNA) and immunology.MicroRNAs were first discovered by Ambros and colleagues in 1993.1 They are small untranslated RNAs,highly conserved between different eukaryotic species.2-5 They are encoded by specific genes in the genome,which are controlled at the transcriptional level in a manner similar to protein-encoding genes.2 Following the synthesis of the primary miRNA by RNA polymerase Ⅱ or Ⅲ,nuclear processing by the enzyme Drosha produces a primary miRNA transcript which can be shuttled into the cytoplasm 2 Final production of the mature miRNA species requires further cytoplasmic processing by an RNase Ⅲ enzyme called Dicer,producing a 19- to 24-base pair product,capable of being incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complex.The RNA-induced silencing complex,in turn,is able to use the 'seed sequence' of the miRNA to recognize complementary mRNA transcripts for degradation or translational silencing.To date,more than 800 human miRNAs have been identified,regulating an estimated 50% of all human genes.Each miRNA appears to regulate the expression of tens to hundreds of genes,thereby functioning as 'master-switches' that regulate and coordinate multiple cellular pathways in important processes such as embryonic development and oncogenesis,as well as cellular growth and proliferation.

  5. Cellular Fractionation and Isolation of Chromatin-Associated RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Thomas; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the synthesis, processing, and functions of RNA molecules are confined to distinct subcellular compartments. Biochemical fractionation of cells prior to RNA isolation thus enables the analysis of distinct steps in the lifetime of individual RNA molecules that would be masked in bulk RNA preparations from whole cells. Here, we describe a simple two-step differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of cytoplasmic, nucleoplasmic, and chromatin-associated RNA that can be used in downstream applications such as qPCR or deep sequencing. We discuss various aspects of this fractionation protocol, which can be readily applied to many mammalian cell types. For the study of long noncoding RNAs and enhancer RNAs in regulation of transcription especially the preparation of chromatin-associated RNA can contribute significantly to further developments.

  6. Cellular Fractionation and Isolation of Chromatin-Associated RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Thomas; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the synthesis, processing, and functions of RNA molecules are confined to distinct subcellular compartments. Biochemical fractionation of cells prior to RNA isolation thus enables the analysis of distinct steps in the lifetime of individual RNA molecules that would be masked in bulk RNA preparations from whole cells. Here, we describe a simple two-step differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of cytoplasmic, nucleoplasmic, and chromatin-associated RNA that can be used in downstream applications such as qPCR or deep sequencing. We discuss various aspects of this fractionation protocol, which can be readily applied to many mammalian cell types. For the study of long noncoding RNAs and enhancer RNAs in regulation of transcription especially the preparation of chromatin-associated RNA can contribute significantly to further developments. PMID:27662865

  7. RNA Catalysis, Thermodynamics and the Origin of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Scott

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The RNA World Hypothesis posits that the first self-replicating molecules were RNAs. RNA self-replicases are, in general, assumed to have employed nucleotide 5ʹ-polyphosphates (or their analogues as substrates for RNA polymerization. The mechanism by which these substrates might be synthesized with sufficient abundance to supply a growing and evolving population of RNAs is problematic for evolutionary hypotheses because non-enzymatic synthesis and assembly of nucleotide 5ʹ-triphosphates (or other analogously activated phosphodiester species is inherently difficult. However, nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates are also phosphodiesters, and are the natural and abundant products of RNA degradation. These have previously been dismissed as viable substrates for prebiotic RNA synthesis. We propose that the arguments for their dismissal are based on a flawed assumption, and that nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates in fact possess several significant, advantageous properties that indeed make them particularly viable substrates for prebiotic RNA synthesis. An RNA World hypothesis based upon the polymerization of nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates possesses additional explanatory power in that it accounts for the observed ribozyme “fossil record”, suggests a viable mechanism for substrate transport across lipid vesicle boundaries of primordial proto-cells, circumvents the problems of substrate scarcity and implausible synthetic pathways, provides for a primitive but effective RNA replicase editing mechanism, and definitively explains why RNA, rather than DNA, must have been the original catalyst. Finally, our analysis compels us to propose that a fundamental and universal property that drives the evolution of living systems, as well as pre-biotic replicating molecules (be they composed of RNA or protein, is that they exploit chemical reactions that already possess competing kinetically-preferred and thermodynamically-preferred pathways in a

  8. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-06-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide 'cap' on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IRES RNAs and IRES-ribosome complexes are revealing the structural basis of viral IRES' 'hijacking' of the protein-making machinery. It now seems that there are fundamental differences in the 3D structures used by different IRESs, although there are some common features in how they interact with ribosomes. PMID:18468443

  9. SnapShot-Seq: a method for extracting genome-wide, in vivo mRNA dynamics from a single total RNA sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Gray

    Full Text Available mRNA synthesis, processing, and destruction involve a complex series of molecular steps that are incompletely understood. Because the RNA intermediates in each of these steps have finite lifetimes, extensive mechanistic and dynamical information is encoded in total cellular RNA. Here we report the development of SnapShot-Seq, a set of computational methods that allow the determination of in vivo rates of pre-mRNA synthesis, splicing, intron degradation, and mRNA decay from a single RNA-Seq snapshot of total cellular RNA. SnapShot-Seq can detect in vivo changes in the rates of specific steps of splicing, and it provides genome-wide estimates of pre-mRNA synthesis rates comparable to those obtained via labeling of newly synthesized RNA. We used SnapShot-Seq to investigate the origins of the intrinsic bimodality of metazoan gene expression levels, and our results suggest that this bimodality is partly due to spillover of transcriptional activation from highly expressed genes to their poorly expressed neighbors. SnapShot-Seq dramatically expands the information obtainable from a standard RNA-Seq experiment.

  10. Towards a structural understanding of IRES RNA function

    OpenAIRE

    Filbin, Megan E.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Protein synthesis of an RNA template can initiate by two different known mechanisms: cap-dependent translation initiation and cap-independent translation initiation. The latter is driven by RNA sequences called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that are found in both viral RNAs and cellular mRNAs. The diverse mechanisms used by IRESs are reflected in their structural diversity, and this structural diversity challenges us to develop a cohesive model linking IRES function to structure. With...

  11. Irreducibility in RNA structures

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Emma Y.; Reidys, Christian M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study irreducibility in RNA structures. By RNA structure we mean RNA secondary as well as RNA pseudoknot structures. In our analysis we shall contrast random and minimum free energy (mfe) configurations. We compute various distributions: of the numbers of irreducible substructures, their locations and sizes, parameterized in terms of the maximal number of mutually crossing arcs, $k-1$, and the minimal size of stacks $\\sigma$. In particular, we analyze the size of the largest ...

  12. RNA Localization in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    of 18S ribosomal RNA and the Rab13, Pkp4, Ankrd25, and Inpp1 mRNAs in astrocyte protrusions. The Boyden chamber isolated RNA from both primary astrocytes and C8S cells was analyzed by next generation sequencing (NGS), which revealed that >250 polyadenylated (polyA) RNA species accumulated in the cell...

  13. Working with RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Working with RNA is not a special discipline in molecular biology. However, RNA is chemically and structurally different from DNA and a few simple work rules have to be implemented to maintain the integrity of the RNA. Alkaline pH, high temperatures, and heavy metal ions should be avoided when po...

  14. RNA self-assembly and RNA nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabow, Wade W; Jaeger, Luc

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Nanotechnology's central goal involves the direct control of matter at the molecular nanometer scale to build nanofactories, nanomachines, and other devices for potential applications including electronics, alternative fuels, and medicine. In this regard, the nascent use of nucleic acids as a material to coordinate the precise arrangements of specific molecules marked an important milestone in the relatively recent history of nanotechnology. While DNA served as the pioneer building material in nucleic acid nanotechnology, RNA continues to emerge as viable alternative material with its own distinct advantages for nanoconstruction. Several complementary assembly strategies have been used to build a diverse set of RNA nanostructures having unique structural attributes and the ability to self-assemble in a highly programmable and controlled manner. Of the different strategies, the architectonics approach uniquely endeavors to understand integrated structural RNA architectures through the arrangement of their characteristic structural building blocks. Viewed through this lens, it becomes apparent that nature routinely uses thermodynamically stable, recurrent modular motifs from natural RNA molecules to generate unique and more complex programmable structures. With the design principles found in natural structures, a number of synthetic RNAs have been constructed. The synthetic nanostructures constructed to date have provided, in addition to affording essential insights into RNA design, important platforms to characterize and validate the structural self-folding and assembly properties of RNA modules or building blocks. Furthermore, RNA nanoparticles have shown great promise for applications in nanomedicine and RNA-based therapeutics. Nevertheless, the synthetic RNA architectures achieved thus far consist largely of static, rigid particles that are still far from matching the structural and functional complexity of natural responsive structural elements such

  15. Phospholipid Synthesis in Sindbis Virus-Infected Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Marilynn R. F.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    We investigated the metabolic requirements for the decrease in phospholipid synthesis previously observed by Pfefferkorn and Hunter in primary cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts infected with Sindbis virus. The incorporation of 32PO4 into all classes of phospholipids was found to decline at the same rate and to the same extent; thus, incorporation of 14C-choline into acid-precipitable form provided a convenient measure of phospholipid synthesis that was used in subsequent experiments. Experiments with temperature-sensitive mutants suggested that some viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was essential for the inhibition of choline incorporation, but that functional viral structural proteins were not required. The reduction in phospholipid synthesis was probably a secondary effect of infection resulting from viral inhibition of the cellular RNA and protein synthesis. All three inhibitory effects required about the same amount of viral RNA synthesis; the inhibition of host RNA and protein synthesis began sooner than the decline in phospholipid synthesis; and both actinomycin D and cycloheximide inhibited 14C-choline incorporation in uninfected cells. In contrast, incorporation of 14C-choline into BHK-21 cells was not decreased by 10 hr of exposure to actinomycin D and declined only slowly after cycloheximide treatment. Growth of Sindbis virus in BHK cells did not cause the marked stimulation of phospholipid synthesis seen in picornavirus infections of other mammalian cells; however, inhibition was seen only late in infection. PMID:5530011

  16. Identification of host factors that regulate the influenza virus RNA polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, F; Handa, H; Nagata, K

    1996-01-01

    Transcription and replication of the influenza virus RNA genome take place in the nuclei of infected cells. Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes consisting of viral RNA, RNA polymerase, and nucleocapsid protein (NP) are proven to be the catalytic unit for RNA synthesis, while it has been indicated that the viral RNA polymerase activity is modulated by host-derived nuclear factors. Here we have identified such host factors present in nuclear extracts prepared from uninfected HeLa cells with biochemical complementation assays using the in vitro RNA synthesis system. The stimulatory activity was not absorbed to phosphocellulose but was tightly bound to Q-Sepharose. The eluate recovered from Q-Sepharose was able to stimulate the RNA synthesis catalyzed by both RNP complexes and purified RNA polymerase and NP. The stimulatory activity was further separated into two distinct fractions, designated RAF-1 (RNA polymerase activating factor-1) and RAF-2 fractions, through phenyl-Sepharose column chromatography. When these fractions were fractionated through a gel filtration column, RAF-1 and RAF-2 activities were recovered in fractions corresponding to the molecular mass of 350 kDa and 60 kDa, respectively. Furthermore, the RAF-2 fraction was shown to contain an inhibitory activity, tentatively designated RIF-1 (RNA polymerase inhibitory factor-1). RIF-1 sedimented as fast as bovine serum albumin in glycerol density gradient centrifugation. Roles of these host factors are discussed in the context of viral RNA transcription and replication.

  17. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Thomas J X

    2010-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called ``zig-zag'' configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including their generating function, singularity analysis as well as explicit recurrence relations. In particular, our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures.

  18. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-02-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including their generating function, singularity analysis as well as explicit recurrence relations. In particular, our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures.

  19. Raman crystallography of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bo; Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chase, Elaine; Chadalavada, Durga M; Golden, Barbara L; Carey, Paul R; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2009-10-01

    Raman crystallography is the application of Raman spectroscopy to single crystals. This technique has been applied to a variety of protein molecules where it has provided unique information about biopolymer folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here, we describe the application of Raman crystallography to functional RNA molecules. RNA represents unique opportunities and challenges for Raman crystallography. One issue that confounds studies of RNA is its tendency to adopt multiple non-functional folds. Raman crystallography has the advantage that it isolates a single state of the RNA within the crystal and can evaluate its fold, metal ion binding properties (ligand identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), proton binding properties (identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), and catalytic potential. In particular, base-specific stretches can be identified and then associated with the binding of metal ions and protons. Because measurements are carried out in the hanging drop at ambient, rather than cryo, conditions and because RNA crystals tend to be approximately 70% solvent, RNA dynamics and conformational changes become experimentally accessible. This review focuses on experimental setup and procedures, acquisition and interpretation of Raman data, and determination of physicochemical properties of the RNA. Raman crystallographic and solution biochemical experiments on the HDV RNA enzyme are summarized and found to be in excellent agreement. Remarkably, characterization of the crystalline state has proven to help rather than hinder functional characterization of functional RNA, most likely because the tendency of RNA to fold heterogeneously is limited in a crystalline environment. Future applications of Raman crystallography to RNA are briefly discussed.

  20. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  1. Methods for RNA Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Signe

    While increasing evidence appoints diverse types of RNA as key players in the regulatory networks underlying cellular differentiation and metabolism, the potential functions of thousands of conserved RNA structures encoded in mammalian genomes remain to be determined. Since the functions of most...... RNAs rely on interactions with proteins, the establishment of protein-binding profiles is essential for the characterization of RNAs. Aiming to facilitate RNA analysis, this thesis introduces proteomics- as well as transcriptomics-based methods for the functional characterization of RNA. First, RNA......-protein pulldown combined with mass spectrometry analysis is applied for in vivo as well as in vitro identification of RNA-binding proteins, the latter succeeding in verifying known RNA-protein interactions. Secondly, acknowledging the significance of flexible promoter usage for the diversification...

  2. An in vitro Flaviviridae replicase system capable of authentic RNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have established an in vitro replication system for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a surrogate for the closely-related hepatitis C virus. In an in vitro reaction, BVDV replication complexes synthesize vRNA and replicative form (RF) and replicative intermediate (RI) RNAs. Kinetic and heparin trapping experiments demonstrate the recycling of RF and RI products and the initiation of vRNA synthesis in this system. Consistent with this, quantitative hybridization reveals the asymmetric synthesis of positive and negative strand RNA products. These findings support the notion that RF serves as a template and RI as a precursor in the synthesis of vRNA. Furthermore, the antiviral activity of an NS5B inhibitor was similar in BVDV replicase and infectivity assays. Together, these results indicate that the in vitro activity of BVDV replicase complexes recapitulates RNA replication that occurs in infected cells, providing a system in which to study both mechanisms and inhibitors of Flaviviridae replication

  3. Small noncoding RNA modulates japanese encephalitis virus replication and translation in trans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yi-Hsin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence and structural elements in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV are known to regulate translation and replication. We previously reported an abundant accumulation of small subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA which is collinear with the highly conserved regions of the 3'-UTR in JEV-infected cells. However, function of the sfRNA in JEV life cycle remains unknown. Results Northern blot and real-time RT-PCR analyses indicated that the sfRNA becomes apparent at the time point at which minus-strand RNA (antigenome reaches a plateau suggesting a role for sfRNA in the regulation of antigenome synthesis. Transfection of minus-sense sfRNA into JEV-infected cells, in order to counter the effects of plus-sense sfRNA, resulted in higher levels of antigenome suggesting that the presence of the sfRNA inhibits antigenome synthesis. Trans-acting effect of sfRNA on JEV translation was studied using a reporter mRNA containing the luciferase gene fused to partial coding regions of JEV and flanked by the respective JEV UTRs. In vivo and in vitro translation revealed that sfRNA inhibited JEV translation. Conclusions Our results indicate that sfRNA modulates viral translation and replication in trans.

  4. Sublethal RNA Oxidation as a Mechanism for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular RNA is subjected to the same oxidative insults as DNA and other cellular macromolecules, oxidative damage to RNA has not been a major focus in investigations of the biological consequences of free radical damage. In fact, because it is largely single-stranded and its bases lack the protection of hydrogen bonding and binding by specific proteins, RNA may be more susceptible to oxidative insults than is DNA. Oxidative damage to protein-coding RNA or non-coding RNA will, in turn, potentially cause errors in proteins and/or dysregulation of gene expression. While less lethal than mutations in the genome, such sublethal insults to cells might be associated with underlying mechanisms of several chronic diseases, including neurodegenerative disease. Recently, oxidative RNA damage has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and prion diseases. Of particular interest, oxidative RNA damage can be demonstrated in vulnerable neurons early in disease, suggesting that RNA oxidation may actively contribute to the onset of the disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that, mechanistically speaking, the detrimental effects of oxidative RNA damage to protein synthesis are attenuated, at least in part, by the existence of protective mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of the damaged ribonucleotides into the translational machinery. Further investigations aimed at understanding the processing mechanisms related to oxidative RNA damage and its consequences may provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other degenerative diseases and lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  5. Translocation and rotation of tRNA during template-independent RNA polymerization by tRNA nucleotidyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Seisuke; Takeshita, Daijiro; Tomita, Kozo

    2014-02-01

    The 3'-terminal CCA (CCA-3' at positions 74-76) of tRNA is synthesized by CCA-adding enzyme using CTP and ATP as substrates, without a nucleic acid template. In Aquifex aeolicus, CC-adding and A-adding enzymes collaboratively synthesize the CCA-3'. The mechanism of CCA-3' synthesis by these two enzymes remained obscure. We now present crystal structures representing CC addition onto tRNA by A. aeolicus CC-adding enzyme. After C₇₄ addition in an enclosed active pocket and pyrophosphate release, the tRNA translocates and rotates relative to the enzyme, and C₇₅ addition occurs in the same active pocket as C₇₄ addition. At both the C₇₄-adding and C₇₅-adding stages, CTP is selected by Watson-Crick-like hydrogen bonds between the cytosine of CTP and conserved Asp and Arg residues in the pocket. After C₇₄C₇₅ addition and pyrophosphate release, the tRNA translocates further and drops off the enzyme, and the CC-adding enzyme terminates RNA polymerization. PMID:24389024

  6. Multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses using an oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Grubaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne viruses are important emerging pathogens world-wide. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, infect hundreds of millions of people and animals each year. Global surveillance of these viruses in mosquito vectors using molecular based assays is critical for prevention and control of the associated diseases. Here, we report an oligonucleotide DNA microarray design, termed ArboChip5.1, for multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses from the genera Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae, Alphavirus (Togaviridae, Orthobunyavirus (Bunyaviridae, and Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assay utilizes targeted PCR amplification of three genes from each virus genus for electrochemical detection on a portable, field-tested microarray platform. Fifty-two viruses propagated in cell-culture were used to evaluate the specificity of the PCR primer sets and the ArboChip5.1 microarray capture probes. The microarray detected all of the tested viruses and differentiated between many closely related viruses such as members of the dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Semliki Forest virus clades. Laboratory infected mosquitoes were used to simulate field samples and to determine the limits of detection. Additionally, we identified dengue virus type 3, Japanese encephalitis virus, Tembusu virus, Culex flavivirus, and a Quang Binh-like virus from mosquitoes collected in Thailand in 2011 and 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that the described assay can be utilized in a comprehensive field surveillance program by the broad-range amplification and specific identification of arboviruses from infected mosquitoes. Furthermore, the microarray platform can be deployed in the field and viral RNA extraction to data analysis can occur in as little as 12 h. The information derived from the ArboChip5.1 microarray can help to establish

  7. An alanine tRNA gene cluster from Nephila clavipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, E; Candelas, G C

    1996-06-01

    We report the sequence of a 2.3-kb genomic DNA fragment from the orb-web spider, Nephila clavipes (Nc). The fragment contains four regions of high homology to tRNA(Ala). The members of this irregularly spaced cluster of genes are oriented in the same direction and have the same anticodon (GCA), but their sequence differs at several positions. Initiation and termination signals, as well as consensus intragenic promoter sequences characteristic of tRNA genes, have been identified in all genes. tRNA(Ala) are involved in the regulation of the fibroin synthesis in the large ampullate Nc glands.

  8. Reprogramming, Circular Reasoning and Self versus Non-self: One-Stop Shopping with RNA Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Yiannis A.; Rezaei, Ali; St. Laurent, Georges; Reenan, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription of genetic information from archival DNA into RNA molecule working copies is vital for proper cellular function and is highly accurate. In turn, RNAs serve structural, enzymatic, and regulatory roles, as well as being informational templates for the ribosomal translation of proteins. Following RNA synthesis, maturing of RNA molecules occurs through various RNA processing events. One component of the collection of processes involving RNA species, broadly defined as RNA metabolism, is the RNA-editing pathway and is found in all animals. Acting specifically on RNA substrates with double-stranded character, RNA editing has been shown to regulate a plethora of genomic outputs, including gene recoding, RNA splicing, biogenesis and targeting actions of microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, and global gene expression. Recent evidence suggests that RNA modifications mediated via RNA editing influence the biogenesis of circular RNAs and safeguard against aberrant innate immune responses generated to endogenous RNA sources. These novel roles have the potential to contribute new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis mediated by mishandling of double-stranded RNA. Here, we discuss recent advances in the field, which highlight novel roles associated with the RNA-editing process and emphasize their importance during cellular RNA metabolism. In addition, we highlight the relevance of these newly discovered roles in the context of neurological disorders and the more general concept of innate recognition of self versus non-self. PMID:27458478

  9. Semiautomated improvement of RNA alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Knudsen, Bjarne;

    2007-01-01

    : the mir-399 RNA, vertebrate telomase RNA (vert-TR), bacterial transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), and the signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA. The general use of the method is illustrated by the ability to accommodate pseudoknots and handle even large and divergent RNA families. The open architecture...

  10. iRNA-seq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jesper Grud Skat; Schmidt, Søren Fisker; Larsen, Bjørk Ditlev;

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq is a sensitive and accurate technique to compare steady-state levels of RNA between different cellular states. However, as it does not provide an account of transcriptional activity per se, other technologies are needed to more precisely determine acute transcriptional responses. Here, we...... have developed an easy, sensitive and accurate novel computational method, IRNA-SEQ: , for genome-wide assessment of transcriptional activity based on analysis of intron coverage from total RNA-seq data. Comparison of the results derived from iRNA-seq analyses with parallel results derived using...... current methods for genome-wide determination of transcriptional activity, i.e. global run-on (GRO)-seq and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) ChIP-seq, demonstrate that iRNA-seq provides similar results in terms of number of regulated genes and their fold change. However, unlike the current methods that are all...

  11. RNA-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2003-02-01

    A bewildering number of post-transcriptional modifications are introduced into cellular RNAs by enzymes that are often conserved among archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. The modifications range from those with well-understood functions, such as tRNA aminoacylation, to widespread but more mysterious ones, such as pseudouridylation. Recent structure determinations have included two types of RNA nucleobase modifying enzyme: pseudouridine synthases and tRNA guanine transglycosylases.

  12. Vaccine Adjuvants in Fish Vaccines Make a Difference: Comparing Three Adjuvants (Montanide ISA763A Oil, CpG/Poly I:C Combo and VHSV Glycoprotein) Alone or in Combination Formulated with an Inactivated Whole Salmonid Alphavirus Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thim, Hanna L; Villoing, Stéphane; McLoughlin, Marian; Christie, Karen Elina; Grove, Søren; Frost, Petter; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2014-01-01

    Most commercial vaccines offered to the aquaculture industry include inactivated antigens (Ag) formulated in oil adjuvants. Safety concerns are related to the use of oil adjuvants in multivalent vaccines for fish, since adverse side effects (e.g., adhesions) can appear. Therefore, there is a request for vaccine formulations for which protection will be maintained or improved, while the risk of side effects is reduced. Here, by using an inactivated salmonid alphavirus (SAV) as the test Ag, the combined use of two Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand adjuvants, CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) and poly I:C, as well as a genetic adjuvant consisting of a DNA plasmid vector expressing the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) glycoprotein (G) was explored. VHSV-G DNA vaccine was intramuscularly injected in combination with intraperitoneal injection of either SAV Ag alone or combined with the oil adjuvant, Montanide ISA763, or the CpG/polyI:C combo. Adjuvant formulations were evaluated for their ability to boost immune responses and induce protection against SAV in Atlantic salmon, following cohabitation challenge. It was observed that CpG/polyI:C-based formulations generated the highest neutralizing antibody titres (nAbs) before challenge, which endured post challenge. nAb responses for VHSV G-DNA- and oil-adjuvanted formulations were marginal compared to the CpG/poly I:C treatment. Interestingly, heat-inactivated sera showed reduced nAb titres compared to their non-heated counterparts, which suggests a role of complement-mediated neutralization against SAV. Consistently elevated levels of innate antiviral immune genes in the CpG/polyI:C injected groups suggested a role of IFN-mediated responses. Co-delivery of the VHSV-G DNA construct with either CpG/polyI:C or oil-adjuvanted SAV vaccine generated higher CD4 responses in head kidney at 48 h compared to injection of this vector or SAV Ag alone. The results demonstrate that a combination of pattern recognizing receptor (PRR

  13. Vaccine Adjuvants in Fish Vaccines Make a Difference: Comparing Three Adjuvants (Montanide ISA763A Oil, CpG/Poly I:C Combo and VHSV Glycoprotein Alone or in Combination Formulated with an Inactivated Whole Salmonid Alphavirus Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna L. Thim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Most commercial vaccines offered to the aquaculture industry include inactivated antigens (Ag formulated in oil adjuvants. Safety concerns are related to the use of oil adjuvants in multivalent vaccines for fish, since adverse side effects (e.g., adhesions can appear. Therefore, there is a request for vaccine formulations for which protection will be maintained or improved, while the risk of side effects is reduced. Here, by using an inactivated salmonid alphavirus (SAV as the test Ag, the combined use of two Toll-like receptor (TLR ligand adjuvants, CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs and poly I:C, as well as a genetic adjuvant consisting of a DNA plasmid vector expressing the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV glycoprotein (G was explored. VHSV-G DNA vaccine was intramuscularly injected in combination with intraperitoneal injection of either SAV Ag alone or combined with the oil adjuvant, Montanide ISA763, or the CpG/polyI:C combo. Adjuvant formulations were evaluated for their ability to boost immune responses and induce protection against SAV in Atlantic salmon, following cohabitation challenge. It was observed that CpG/polyI:C-based formulations generated the highest neutralizing antibody titres (nAbs before challenge, which endured post challenge. nAb responses for VHSV G-DNA- and oil-adjuvanted formulations were marginal compared to the CpG/poly I:C treatment. Interestingly, heat-inactivated sera showed reduced nAb titres compared to their non-heated counterparts, which suggests a role of complement-mediated neutralization against SAV. Consistently elevated levels of innate antiviral immune genes in the CpG/polyI:C injected groups suggested a role of IFN-mediated responses. Co-delivery of the VHSV-G DNA construct with either CpG/polyI:C or oil-adjuvanted SAV vaccine generated higher CD4 responses in head kidney at 48 h compared to injection of this vector or SAV Ag alone. The results demonstrate that a combination of pattern recognizing

  14. RNA synthetic biology inspired from bacteria: construction of transcription attenuators under antisense regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among all biopolymers, ribonucleic acids or RNA have unique functional versatility, which led to the early suggestion that RNA alone (or a closely related biopolymer) might have once sustained a primitive form of life based on a single type of biopolymer. This has been supported by the demonstration of processive RNA-based replication and the discovery of 'riboswitches' or RNA switches, which directly sense their metabolic environment. In this paper, we further explore the plausibility of this 'RNA world' scenario and show, through synthetic molecular design guided by advanced RNA simulations, that RNA can also perform elementary regulation tasks on its own. We demonstrate that RNA synthetic regulatory modules directly inspired from bacterial transcription attenuators can efficiently activate or repress the expression of other RNA by merely controlling their folding paths 'on the fly' during transcription through simple RNA–RNA antisense interaction. Factors, such as NTP concentration and RNA synthesis rate, affecting the efficiency of this kinetic regulation mechanism are also studied and discussed in the light of evolutionary constraints. Overall, this suggests that direct coupling among synthesis, folding and regulation of RNAs may have enabled the early emergence of autonomous RNA-based regulation networks in absence of both DNA and protein partners

  15. A Contemporary, Laboratory-Intensive Course on Messenger RNA Transcription and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Sue; Miller, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) plays a pivotal role in the central dogma of molecular biology. Importantly, molecular events occurring during and after mRNA synthesis have the potential to create multiple proteins from one gene, leading to some of the remarkable protein diversity that genomes hold. The North Carolina State University…

  16. Attenuation of Sindbis virus neurovirulence by using defined mutations in nontranslated regions of the genome RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, R J; Griffin, D E; Zhang, H; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Strauss, J H

    1992-01-01

    We examined a panel of Sindbis virus mutants containing defined mutations in the 5' nontranslated region of the genome RNA, in the 3' nontranslated region, or in both for their growth in cultured cells and virulence in newborn mice. In cultured cells, these viruses all had defects in RNA synthesis a

  17. In situ localization of chalcone synthase mRNA in pea root nodule development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, W.C.; Canter Cremers, H.C.J.; Hogendijk, P.; Katinakis, P.; Wijffelman, C.A.; Franssen, H.J.; Kammen, van A.; Bisseling, T.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper studies on the role of flavonoids in pea root nodule development are reported. Flavonoid synthesis was followed by localizing chalcone synthase (CHS) mRNA in infected pea roots and in root nodules. In a nodule primordium, CHS mRNA is present in all cells of the primordium. Therefore it

  18. Controlling translation elongation efficiency: tRNA regulation of ribosome flux on the mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgoni, Barbara; Marshall, Elizabeth; McFarland, Matthew R; Romano, M Carmen; Stansfield, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Gene expression can be regulated by a wide variety of mechanisms. One example concerns the growing body of evidence that the protein-production rate can be regulated at the level of translation elongation by controlling ribosome flux across the mRNA. Variations in the abundance of tRNA molecules cause different rates of translation of their counterpart codons. This, in turn, produces a variable landscape of translational rate across each and every mRNA, with the dynamic formation and deformation of ribosomal queues being regulated by both tRNA availability and the rates of translation initiation and termination. In the present article, a range of examples of tRNA control of gene expression are reviewed, and the use of mathematical modelling to develop a predictive understanding of the consequences of that regulation is discussed and explained. These findings encourage a view that predicting the protein-synthesis rate of each mRNA requires a holistic understanding of how each stage of translation, including elongation, contributes to the overall protein-production rate. PMID:24450645

  19. Structural and mechanistic characterization of 6S RNA from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Karen; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Lechner, Marcus; Damm, Katrin; Hoch, Philipp G; Salas, Margarita; Hartmann, Roland K

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial 6S RNAs competitively inhibit binding of RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzymes to DNA promoters, thereby globally regulating transcription. RNAP uses 6S RNA itself as a template to synthesize short transcripts, termed pRNAs (product RNAs). Longer pRNAs (approx. ≥ 10 nt) rearrange the 6S RNA structure and thereby disrupt the 6S RNA:RNAP complex, which enables the enzyme to resume transcription at DNA promoters. We studied 6S RNA of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, representing the thermodynamically most stable 6S RNA known so far. Applying structure probing and NMR, we show that the RNA adopts the canonical rod-shaped 6S RNA architecture with little structure formation in the central bulge (CB) even at moderate temperatures (≤37 °C). 6S RNA:pRNA complex formation triggers an internal structure rearrangement of 6S RNA, i.e. formation of a so-called central bulge collapse (CBC) helix. The persistence of several characteristic NMR imino proton resonances upon pRNA annealing demonstrates that defined helical segments on both sides of the CB are retained in the pRNA-bound state, thus representing a basic framework of the RNA's architecture. RNA-seq analyses revealed pRNA synthesis from 6S RNA in A. aeolicus, identifying 9 to ∼17-mers as the major length species. A. aeolicus 6S RNA can also serve as a template for in vitro pRNA synthesis by RNAP from the mesophile Bacillus subtilis. Binding of a synthetic pRNA to A. aeolicus 6S RNA blocks formation of 6S RNA:RNAP complexes. Our findings indicate that A. aeolicus 6S RNA function in its hyperthermophilic host is mechanistically identical to that of other bacterial 6S RNAs. The use of artificial pRNA variants, designed to disrupt helix P2 from the 3'-CB instead of the 5'-CB but preventing formation of the CBC helix, indicated that the mechanism of pRNA-induced RNAP release has been evolutionarily optimized for transcriptional pRNA initiation in the 5'-CB. PMID:25771336

  20. Interstrain Variation in Amylase Gene Copy Number and mRNA Abundance in Three Mouse Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Meisler, Miriam H.; Antonucci, Tammy K.; Treisman, Laurelee O.; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Samuelson, Linda C.

    1986-01-01

    Amylase expression in strain YBR differs in several respects from the standard mouse phenotype. The synthesis of salivary amylase is elevated twofold in YBR mice and the synthesis of pancreatic amylase is reduced to one-half the normal rate. We have compared the concentrations of amylase mRNA in the parotid, liver and pancreas of YBR mice with those in strains A/J and C3H. We observed differences in amylase mRNA abundance which can account for the levels of amylase protein synthesis in the pa...

  1. Determinants in mammalian telomerase RNA that mediate enzyme processivity and cross-species incompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jiunn-Liang; Greider, Carol W

    2003-01-01

    Telomerase contains two essential components: an RNA molecule that templates telomeric repeat synthesis and a catalytic protein component. Human telomerase is processive, while the mouse enzyme has much lower processivity. We have identified nucleotide determinants in the telomerase RNA that are responsible for this difference in processivity. Mutations adjacent to the template region of human and mouse telomerase RNA significantly altered telomerase processivity both in vitro and in vivo. We...

  2. Analysis of energy-based algorithms for RNA secondary structure prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Hajiaghayi Monir; Condon Anne; Hoos Holger H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background RNA molecules play critical roles in the cells of organisms, including roles in gene regulation, catalysis, and synthesis of proteins. Since RNA function depends in large part on its folded structures, much effort has been invested in developing accurate methods for prediction of RNA secondary structure from the base sequence. Minimum free energy (MFE) predictions are widely used, based on nearest neighbor thermodynamic parameters of Mathews, Turner et al. or those of Andr...

  3. RNA decay by messenger RNA interferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Overgaard, Martin; Winther, Kristoffer Skovbo;

    2008-01-01

    Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mR...

  4. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Huang, Fenix Wenda; Penner, Robert;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist...

  5. Selection of random RNA fragments as method for searching for a site of regulation of translation of E. coli streptomycin mRNA by ribosomal protein S7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdina, A V; Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Spiridonova, V A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, A M

    2008-06-01

    In E. coli cells ribosomal small subunit biogenesis is regulated by RNA-protein interactions involving protein S7. S7 initiates the subunit assembly interacting with 16S rRNA. During shift-down of rRNA synthesis level, free S7 inhibits self-translation by interacting with 96 nucleotides long specific region of streptomycin (str) mRNA between cistrons S12 and S7 (intercistron). Many bacteria do not have the extended intercistron challenging development of specific approaches for searching putative mRNA regulatory regions, which are able to interact with proteins. The paper describes application of SERF approach (Selection of Random RNA Fragments) to reveal regulatory regions of str mRNA. Set of random DNA fragments has been generated from str operon by random hydrolysis and then transcribed into RNA; the fragments being able to bind protein S7 (serfamers) have been selected by iterative rounds. S7 binds to single serfamer, 109 nucleotide long (RNA109), derived from the intercistron. After multiple copying and selection, the intercistronic mutant (RNA109) has been isolated; it has enhanced affinity to S7. RNA109 binds to the protein better than authentic intercistronic str mRNA; apparent dissociation constants are 26 +/- 5 and 60 +/- 8 nM, respectively. Location of S7 binding site on the mRNA, as well as putative mode of regulation of coupled translation of S12 and S7 cistrons have been hypothesized.

  6. The ribosomal RNA transcription unit of Entamoeba invadens: accumulation of unprocessed pre-rRNA and a long non coding RNA during encystation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Sandeep; Singh, Nishant; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA genes in Entamoeba spp. are located on extrachromosomal circular molecules. Unlike model organisms where rRNA transcription stops during growth stress, Entamoeba histolytica continues transcription; but unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during stress, along with a novel class of circular transcripts from the 5'-external transcribed spacer (ETS). To determine the fate of rRNA transcription during stage conversion between trophozoite to cyst we analyzed Entamoeba invadens, a model system for differentiation studies in Entamoeba. We characterized the complete rDNA transcription unit by mapping the ends of pre-rRNA and mature rRNAs. The 3' end of mature 28S rRNA was located 321 nt downstream of the end predicted by sequence homology with E. histolytica. The major processing sites were mapped in external and internal transcribed spacers. The promoter located within 146 nt upstream of 5' ETS was used to transcribe the pre-rRNA. On the other hand, a second promoter located at the 3' end of 28S rDNA was used to transcribe almost the entire intergenic spacer into a long non coding (nc) RNA (>10 kb). Interestingly we found that the levels of pre-rRNA and long ncRNA, measured by northern hybridization, decreased initially in cells shifted to encystation medium, after which they began to increase and reached high levels by 72 h when mature cysts were formed. Unlike E. histolytica, no circular transcripts were found in E. invadens. E. histolytica and E. invadens express fundamentally different ncRNAs from the rDNA locus, which may reflect their adaptation to different hosts (human and reptiles, respectively). This is the first description of rDNA organization and transcription in E. invadens, and provides the framework for further studies on regulation of rRNA synthesis during cyst formation.

  7. Factors Required for the Uridylylation of the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus 3B1, 3B2, and 3B3 Peptides by the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (3Dpol) In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Arabinda; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Belsham, Graham J.

    2005-01-01

    The 5′ terminus of picornavirus genomic RNA is covalently linked to the virus-encoded peptide 3B (VPg). Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is unique in encoding and using 3 distinct forms of this peptide. These peptides each act as primers for RNA synthesis by the virus-encoded RNA polymerase 3Dpol. To act as the primer for positive-strand RNA synthesis, the 3B peptides have to be uridylylated to form VPgpU(pU). For certain picornaviruses, it has been shown that this reaction is achieved by ...

  8. ppGpp: magic beyond RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Swanson, Michele S

    2012-02-16

    During stress, bacteria undergo extensive physiological transformations, many of which are coordinated by ppGpp. Although ppGpp is best known for enhancing cellular resilience by redirecting the RNA polymerase (RNAP) to certain genes, it also acts as a signal in many other cellular processes in bacteria. After a brief overview of ppGpp biosynthesis and its impact on promoter selection by RNAP, we discuss how bacteria exploit ppGpp to modulate the synthesis, stability or activity of proteins or regulatory RNAs that are crucial in challenging environments, using mechanisms beyond the direct regulation of RNAP activity.

  9. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  10. Hypernegative Supercoiling Inhibits Growth by Causing RNA Degradation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, Imad; Usongo, Valentine; Nolent, Flora; Sanscartier, Patrick; Hraiky, Chadi; Drlica, Karl; Drolet, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Transcription-induced hypernegative supercoiling is a hallmark of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (topA) mutants. However, its physiological significance has remained unclear. Temperature downshift of a mutant yielded transient growth arrest and a parallel increase in hypernegative supercoiling that was more severe with lower temperature. Both properties were alleviated by overexpression of RNase HI. While ribosomes in extracts showed normal activity when obtained during growth arrest, mRNA on ribosomes was reduced for fis and shorter for crp, polysomes were much less abundant relative to monosomes, and protein synthesis rate dropped, as did the ratio of large to small proteins. Altered processing and degradation of lacA and fis mRNA was also observed. These data are consistent with truncation of mRNA during growth arrest. These effects were not affected by a mutation in the gene encoding RNase E, indicating that this endonuclease is not involved in the abnormal mRNA processing. They were also unaffected by spectinomycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, which argued against induction of RNase activity. In vitro transcription revealed that R-loop formation is more extensive on hypernegatively supercoiled templates. These results allow us, for the first time, to present a model by which hypernegative supercoiling inhibits growth. In this model, the introduction of hypernegative supercoiling by gyrase facilitates degradation of nascent RNA; overproduction of RNase HI limits the accumulation of hypernegative supercoiling, thereby preventing extensive RNA degradation. PMID:18790862

  11. Hypernegative supercoiling inhibits growth by causing RNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, Imad; Usongo, Valentine; Nolent, Flora; Sanscartier, Patrick; Hraiky, Chadi; Drlica, Karl; Drolet, Marc

    2008-11-01

    Transcription-induced hypernegative supercoiling is a hallmark of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (topA) mutants. However, its physiological significance has remained unclear. Temperature downshift of a mutant yielded transient growth arrest and a parallel increase in hypernegative supercoiling that was more severe with lower temperature. Both properties were alleviated by overexpression of RNase HI. While ribosomes in extracts showed normal activity when obtained during growth arrest, mRNA on ribosomes was reduced for fis and shorter for crp, polysomes were much less abundant relative to monosomes, and protein synthesis rate dropped, as did the ratio of large to small proteins. Altered processing and degradation of lacA and fis mRNA was also observed. These data are consistent with truncation of mRNA during growth arrest. These effects were not affected by a mutation in the gene encoding RNase E, indicating that this endonuclease is not involved in the abnormal mRNA processing. They were also unaffected by spectinomycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, which argued against induction of RNase activity. In vitro transcription revealed that R-loop formation is more extensive on hypernegatively supercoiled templates. These results allow us, for the first time, to present a model by which hypernegative supercoiling inhibits growth. In this model, the introduction of hypernegative supercoiling by gyrase facilitates degradation of nascent RNA; overproduction of RNase HI limits the accumulation of hypernegative supercoiling, thereby preventing extensive RNA degradation. PMID:18790862

  12. RNA aptamers for an essential prebiotic molecule: adenine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meli, M.; Vergne, J.; Josse, T.; Décout, J.-L.; Maurel, M.-C.

    2001-08-01

    Among all known bio-organic molecules within the living cells, RNA molecules are the only ones storing genetic information and performing catalysis. The RNA world hypthesis assumes that livings on earth are derived from an RNA molecular ancestor where RNA both stored the genetic information and catalyzed the first metabolic reactions. Among diverse RNA worlds proposed, it is thought that the invention of translation and encoded peptide synthesis took place with a "breakthrough organism", then giving rise to a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) world. Finally, modern biochemistry arose with the invention of DNA and the birth of modern molecular biology where the information flows from DNA to RNA which directs protein synthesis. Considering modern metabolism, it is possible to assign biochemical traits to the last common ancestor by simple parsimony rules, and assumptions about earlier metabolisms are possible using chemical criteria. According to this point of view, modern metabolism is considered as a palimpsest that has to be read and deciphered in ordered to understand its origin and evolution.

  13. The first two nucleotides of the respiratory syncytial virus antigenome RNA replication product can be selected independently of the promoter terminus

    OpenAIRE

    Noton, Sarah L.; Fearns, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which unsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses initiate genome replication is poorly understood. Using respiratory syncytial virus as an example, this paper shows that RSV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase can correctly initiate antigenome synthesis even if the first two nucleotides of the template are deleted. The nontemplated addition of the nucleotides suggests a model for how the RSV polymerase initiates antigenome synthesis.

  14. Kinetic Analysis of tRNA Methylfransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ya-Ming; Masuda, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules contain many chemical modifications that are introduced after transcription. A major form of these modifications is methyl transfer to bases and backbone groups, using S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet) as the methyl donor. Each methylation confers a specific advantage to tRNA in structure or in function. A remarkable methylation is to the G37 base on the 3' side of the anticodon to generate m1G37-tRNA, which suppresses frameshift errors during protein synthesis and is therefore essential for cell growth in all three domains of life. This methylation is catalyzed by TrmD in bacteria and by Trm5 in eukaryotes and archaea. Although TrmD and Trm5 catalyze the same methylation reaction, kinetic analysis reveal that these two enzymes are unrelated to each other and are distinct in their reaction mechanism. This chapter summarizes the kinetic assays that are used to reveal the distinction between TrmD and Trm5. Three types of assays are described, the steady-state, the pre-steady-state, and the single turnover assays, which collectively provide the basis for mechanistic investigation of AdoMet-dependent methyl transfer reactions. PMID:26253967

  15. Signature motifs of GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, a non-segmented negative strand RNA viral mRNA capping enzyme, domain in the L protein are required for covalent enzyme-pRNA intermediate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Julie; Ogino, Minako; Green, Todd J; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional mRNA capping enzyme (GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, PRNTase; block V) domain in RNA polymerase L proteins of non-segmented negative strand (NNS) RNA viruses (e.g. rabies, measles, Ebola) contains five collinear sequence elements, Rx(3)Wx(3-8)ΦxGxζx(P/A) (motif A; Φ, hydrophobic; ζ, hydrophilic), (Y/W)ΦGSxT (motif B), W (motif C), HR (motif D) and ζxxΦx(F/Y)QxxΦ (motif E). We performed site-directed mutagenesis of the L protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a prototypic NNS RNA virus) to examine participation of these motifs in mRNA capping. Similar to the catalytic residues in motif D, G1100 in motif A, T1157 in motif B, W1188 in motif C, and F1269 and Q1270 in motif E were found to be essential or important for the PRNTase activity in the step of the covalent L-pRNA intermediate formation, but not for the GTPase activity that generates GDP (pRNA acceptor). Cap defective mutations in these residues induced termination of mRNA synthesis at position +40 followed by aberrant stop-start transcription, and abolished virus gene expression in host cells. These results suggest that the conserved motifs constitute the active site of the PRNTase domain and the L-pRNA intermediate formation followed by the cap formation is essential for successful synthesis of full-length mRNAs.

  16. A karyopherin acts in localized protein synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Meinema, Anne C.; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms are in place to regulate adequate synthesis of proteins, ranging from ways to ensure sequence fidelity, polypeptide folding and protein modification, to control of amounts and subcellular localization of the molecules. Some of these mechanisms act at the level of mRNA export and

  17. Ab initio RNA folding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding. (topical review)

  18. Long Noncoding RNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in the Thyroid Gland of Two Phenotypically Extreme Pig Breeds Using Ribo-Zero RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yifei; Mao, Haiguang; Huang, Minjie; Chen, Lixing; Chen, Jiucheng; Cai, Zhaowei; Wang, Ying; Xu, Ningying

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid gland is an important endocrine organ modulating development, growth, and metabolism, mainly by controlling the synthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones (THs). However, little is known about the pig thyroid transcriptome. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate gene expression and play critical roles in many cellular processes. Yorkshire pigs have a higher growth rate but lower fat deposition than that of Jinhua pigs, and thus, these species are ideal models for studying growth and lipid metabolism. This study revealed higher levels of THs in the serum of Yorkshire pigs than in the serum of Jinhua pigs. By using Ribo-zero RNA sequencing-which can capture both polyA and non-polyA transcripts-the thyroid transcriptome of both breeds were analyzed and 22,435 known mRNAs were found to be expressed in the pig thyroid. In addition, 1189 novel mRNAs and 1018 candidate lncRNA transcripts were detected. Multiple TH-synthesis-related genes were identified among the 455 differentially-expressed known mRNAs, 37 novel mRNAs, and 52 lncRNA transcripts. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that differentially-expressed genes were enriched in the microtubule-based process, which contributes to THs secretion. Moreover, integrating analysis predicted 13 potential lncRNA-mRNA gene pairs. These data expanded the repertoire of porcine lncRNAs and mRNAs and contribute to understanding the possible molecular mechanisms involved in animal growth and lipid metabolism.

  19. HUMAN MITOCHONDRIAL tRNA MUTATIONS IN MATERNALLY INHERITED DEAFNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jing; GONG Sha-sha; TANG Xiao-wen; ZHU Yi; GUAN Min-xin

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes have been shown to be associated with maternally inherited syn-dromic and non-syndromic deafness. Among those, mutations such as tRNALeu(UUR) 3243A>G associated with syndromic deafness are often present in heteroplasmy, and the non-syndromic deafness-associated tRNA mu-tations including tRNASer(UCN) 7445A>G are often in homoplasmy or in high levels of heteroplasmy. These tRNA mutations are the primary factors underlying the development of hearing loss. However, other tRNA mutations such as tRNAThr 15927G>A and tRNASer(UCN) 7444G>A are insufficient to produce a deafness phe-notype, but always act in synergy with the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations, and can modulate their phenotypic manifestation. These tRNA mutations may alter the structure and function of the corresponding mitochondrial tRNAs and cause failures in tRNAs metabolism. Thereby, the impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis and subsequent defects in respiration caused by these tRNA mutations, results in mitochon-drial dysfunctions and eventually leads to the development of hearing loss. Here, we summarized the deaf-ness-associated mitochondrial tRNA mutations and discussed the pathophysiology of these mitochondrial tRNA mutations, and we hope these data will provide a foundation for the early diagnosis, management, and treatment of maternally inherited deafness.

  20. Synergism and Mutualism in Non-Enzymatic RNA Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Kaddour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The link between non-enzymatic RNA polymerization and RNA self-replication is a key step towards the “RNA world” and still far from being solved, despite extensive research. Clay minerals, lipids and, more recently, peptides were found to catalyze the non-enzymatic synthesis of RNA oligomers. Herein, a review of the main models for the formation of the first RNA polymers is presented in such a way as to emphasize the cooperation between life’s building blocks in their emergence and evolution. A logical outcome of the previous results is a combination of these models, in which RNA polymerization might have been catalyzed cooperatively by clays, lipids and peptides in one multi-component prebiotic soup. The resulting RNAs and oligopeptides might have mutualistically evolved towards functional RNAs and catalytic peptides, preceding the first RNA replication, thus supporting an RNA-peptide world. The investigation of such a system is a formidable challenge, given its complexity deriving from a tremendously large number of reactants and innumerable products. A rudimentary experimental design is outlined, which could be used in an initial attempt to study a quaternary component system.

  1. Parental RNA is Significantly Degraded During Arabidopsis Seed Germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Li; Jian-Xun Feng; Pei Han; Yu-Xian Zhu

    2006-01-01

    Germination is the first and maybe the foremost growth stage in the life cycle of a plant. Herein, we report that initiation of germination in the Arabidopsis Columbia ecotype was accompanied by a sharp decrease in the amount of extractable total RNA. At the beginning of our germination experiment, we were usually able to obtain 35-40 μg total RNA from 100 mg dry seeds. However, after 3 d of cold stratification, we could only obtain less than 5 μg total RNA from the same amount of starting material. Young seedlings contained approximately 100 μg total RNA per 100 mg fresh tissue. Further studies showed that inhibition of de novo RNA synthesis by actinomycin D prevented the degradation of parental RNA and, in the meantime, significantly delayed the germination process. Several ribonuclease-like genes that were highly expressed in dry seeds, and especially during the cold stratification period, were discovered. We propose that these enzymes are involved in the regulation of parental RNA degradation. These results indicate that parental RNA metabolism may be an important process for Arabidopsis seed germination.

  2. Pol II-directed short RNAs suppress the nuclear export of mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V; Schwartz, Anton M; Frolova, Olga Y; Zvereva, Anna S; Gleba, Yuri Y; Citovsky, Vitaly; Dorokhov, Yuri L

    2010-12-01

    The synthesis and subsequent nuclear export of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) directed by RNA polymerase (Pol) II is very sensitive to abiotic and biotic external stimuli including pathogen challenges. To assess whether stress-induced ncRNAs may suppress the nuclear export of mRNA, we exploited the ability of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to co-deliver Pol I, II and III promoter-based vectors for the transcription of short (s) ncRNAs, GFP mRNA or genomic RNA of plant viruses (Tobacco mosaic virus, TMV; or Potato virus X, PVX) into the nucleus of Nicotiana benthamiana cells. We showed that, in contrast to Pol I- and Pol III-derived sncRNAs, all tested Pol II-derived sncRNAs (U6 RNA, tRNA or artificial RNAs) resulted in decreased expression of GFP and host mRNA. The level of this inhibitory effect depended on the non-coding transcript length and promoter strength. Short coding RNA (scRNA) can also compete with mRNA for nuclear export. We showed that scRNA, an artificial 117-nt short sequence encoding Elastin-Like peptide element tandems with FLAG sequence (ELF) and the 318-nt N. benthamiana antimicrobial peptide thionin (defensin) gene efficiently decreased GFP expression. The stress-induced export of Pol II-derived sncRNA and scRNA into the cytoplasm via the mRNA export pathway may block nucleocytoplasmic traffic including the export of mRNA responsible for antivirus protection. Consistent with this model, we observed that Pol II-derived sncRNAs as well as scRNA, thionin and ELF strongly enhanced the cytoplasmic reproduction of TMV and PVX RNA. PMID:20953971

  3. Chum-RNA allows preparation of a high-quality cDNA library from a single-cell quantity of mRNA without PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougan, Takahiro; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    Linear RNA amplification using T7 RNA polymerase is useful in genome-wide analysis of gene expression using DNA microarrays, but exponential amplification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is still required for cDNA library preparation from single-cell quantities of RNA. We have designed a small RNA molecule called chum-RNA that has enabled us to prepare a single-cell cDNA library after four rounds of T7-based linear amplification, without using PCR amplification. Chum-RNA drove cDNA synthesis from only 0.49 femtograms of mRNA (730 mRNA molecules) as a substrate, a quantity that corresponds to a minor population of mRNA molecules in a single mammalian cell. Analysis of the independent cDNA clone of this library (6.6 x 10(5) cfu) suggests that 30-fold RNA amplification occurred in each round of the amplification process. The size distribution and representation of mRNAs in the resulting one-cell cDNA library retained its similarity to that of the million-cell cDNA library. The use of chum-RNA might also facilitate reactions involving other DNA/RNA modifying enzymes whose Michaelis constant (K(m)) values are around 1 mM, allowing them to be activated in the presence of only small quantities of substrate. PMID:18603591

  4. Generation of siRNA Nanosheets for Efficient RNA Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-04-01

    After the discovery of small interference RNA (siRNA), nanostructured siRNA delivery systems have been introduced to achieve an efficient regulation of the target gene expression. Here we report a new siRNA-generating two dimensional nanostructure in a formation of nanosized sheet. Inspired by tunable mechanical and functional properties of the previously reported RNA membrane, siRNA nanosized sheets (siRNA-NS) with multiple Dicer cleavage sites were prepared. The siRNA-NS has two dimensional structure, providing a large surface area for Dicer to cleave the siRNA-NS for the generation of functional siRNAs. Furthermore, downregulation of the cellular target gene expression was achieved by delivery of siRNA-NS without chemical modification of RNA strands or conjugation to other substances.

  5. The onset of hemoglobin synthesis in spleens of irradiated mice after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) for globin was isolated from spleens of irradiated mice in which erythroid differentiation was induced by a bone marrow graft. The globin mRNA was isolated either by means of sucrose gradients of reticulocyte polysomal RNA or by affinity chromatography of total spleen RNA on poly (U)-sepharose. The globin mRNA was tested in a wheat embryo cell-free system. The appearance of mRNA in the spleen erythroid colonies was correlated with other parameters of erythroid differentiation such as globin synthesis, activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthetase and iron uptake. Poly(A) containing mRNA did appear already on the 3rd day after grafting. However, significant translational activity of globin mRNA could be demonstrated only one day later together with increase in globin synthesis and delta-aminolevulinic acid synthetase and enhanced iron uptake. In the second part of this study mouse spleen cells rich in erythroid elements were incubated with a specific heme synthesis inhibitor (isonicotinic acid hydrazide, INH) and the synthesis of 9 S RNA was estimated. It was found that a 40-minute incubation with INH reduced uridine incorporation into 9 S RNA fraction by about 40%. (author)

  6. Synthetic mRNA with Superior Properties that Mimics the Intracellular Fates of Natural Histone mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Slevin, Michael K; Marzluff, William F; Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Since DNA and histone levels must be closely balanced for cell survival, histone expressions are highly regulated. The regulation of replication-dependent histone expression is mainly achieved at the mRNA level, as the mRNAs are rapidly removed when DNA replication is inhibited during S-phase. Histone mRNA degradation initiates with addition of multiple uridines (oligouridylation) following the 3' stem-loop (SL) catalyzed by terminal uridyltransferase (TUTase). Previous studies showed that histone mRNA degradation occurs through both 5' → 3' and 3' → 5' processes, but the relative contributions are difficult to dissect due to lack of established protocols. The translational efficiency and stability of synthetic mRNA in both cultured cells and whole animals can be improved by structural modifications at the both 5' and 3' termini. In this chapter, we present methods of utilizing modified cap dinucleotide analogs to block 5' → 3' degradation of a reporter mRNA containing canonical histone mRNA 3' SL and monitoring how oligouridylation and 3' → 5' degradation occur. Protocols are presented for synthesis of reporter mRNA containing the histone 3' SL and modified cap analogs, monitoring mRNA stability and unidirectional degradation either from 5' or 3' termini, and detection of oligo(U) tracts from degradation products by either traditional or deep sequencing. PMID:27236794

  7. Inhibition of RNA recruitment and replication of an RNA virus by acridine derivatives with known anti-prion activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Sasvari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small molecule inhibitors of RNA virus replication are potent antiviral drugs and useful to dissect selected steps in the replication process. To identify antiviral compounds against Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV, a model positive stranded RNA virus, we tested acridine derivatives, such as chlorpromazine (CPZ and quinacrine (QC, which are active against prion-based diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that CPZ and QC compounds inhibited TBSV RNA accumulation in plants and in protoplasts. In vitro assays revealed that the inhibitory effects of these compounds were manifested at different steps of TBSV replication. QC was shown to have an effect on multiple steps, including: (i inhibition of the selective binding of the p33 replication protein to the viral RNA template, which is required for recruitment of viral RNA for replication; (ii reduction of minus-strand synthesis by the tombusvirus replicase; and (iii inhibition of translation of the uncapped TBSV genomic RNA. In contrast, CPZ was shown to inhibit the in vitro assembly of the TBSV replicase, likely due to binding of CPZ to intracellular membranes, which are important for RNA virus replication. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Since we found that CPZ was also an effective inhibitor of other plant viruses, including Tobacco mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus, it seems likely that CPZ has a broad range of antiviral activity. Thus, these inhibitors constitute effective tools to study similarities in replication strategies of various RNA viruses.

  8. A freeze frame view of vesicular stomatitis virus transcription defines a minimal length of RNA for 5' processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely Tekes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The RNA synthesis machinery of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV comprises the genomic RNA encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein (N and associated with the RNA dependent RNA polymerase, the viral components of which are a large protein (L and an accessory phosphoprotein (P. The 241 kDa L protein contains all the enzymatic activities necessary for synthesis of the viral mRNAs, including capping, cap methylation and polyadenylation. Those RNA processing reactions are intimately coordinated with nucleotide polymerization such that failure to cap results in termination of transcription and failure to methylate can result in hyper polyadenylation. The mRNA processing reactions thus serve as a critical check point in viral RNA synthesis which may control the synthesis of incorrectly modified RNAs. Here, we report the length at which viral transcripts first gain access to the capping machinery during synthesis. By reconstitution of transcription in vitro with highly purified recombinant polymerase and engineered templates in which we omitted sites for incorporation of UTP, we found that transcripts that were 30-nucleotides in length were uncapped, whereas those that were 31-nucleotides in length contained a cap structure. The minimal RNA length required for mRNA cap addition was also sufficient for methylation since the 31-nucleotide long transcripts were methylated at both ribose-2'-O and guanine-N-7 positions. This work provides insights into the spatial relationship between the active sites for the RNA dependent RNA polymerase and polyribonucleotidyltransferase responsible for capping of the viral RNA. We combine the present findings with our recently described electron microscopic structure of the VSV polymerase and propose a model of how the spatial arrangement of the capping activities of L may influence nucleotide polymerization.

  9. Effect of DNA-interacting drugs on phage T7 RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piestrzeniewicz, M; Studzian, K; Wilmańska, D; Płucienniczak, G; Gniazdowski, M

    1998-01-01

    9-Aminoacridine carboxamide derivatives studied here form with DNA intercalative complexes which differ in the kinetics of dissociation. Inhibition of total RNA synthesis catalyzed by phage T7 and Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerases correlates with the formation of slowly dissociating acridine-DNA complex of time constant of 0.4-2.3 s. Their effect on RNA synthesis is compared with other ligands which form with DNA stable complexes of different steric properties. T7 RNA polymerase is more sensitive to distamycin A and netropsin than the E. coli enzyme while less sensitive to actinomycin D. Actinomycin induces terminations in the transcript synthesized by T7 RNA polymerase. Despite low dissociation rates of DNA complexes with acridines and pyrrole antibiotics no drug dependent terminations are observed with these ligands. PMID:9701505

  10. RNA Polymerase III Output Is Functionally Linked to tRNA Dimethyl-G26 Modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneeshkumar G Arimbasseri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of the differential abundance or activity of tRNAs can be important determinants of gene regulation. RNA polymerase (RNAP III synthesizes all tRNAs in eukaryotes and it derepression is associated with cancer. Maf1 is a conserved general repressor of RNAP III under the control of the target of rapamycin (TOR that acts to integrate transcriptional output and protein synthetic demand toward metabolic economy. Studies in budding yeast have indicated that the global tRNA gene activation that occurs with derepression of RNAP III via maf1-deletion is accompanied by a paradoxical loss of tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor activity, manifested as an antisuppression phenotype, by an unknown mechanism. We show that maf1-antisuppression also occurs in the fission yeast S. pombe amidst general activation of RNAP III. We used tRNA-HydroSeq to document that little changes occurred in the relative levels of different tRNAs in maf1Δ cells. By contrast, the efficiency of N2,N2-dimethyl G26 (m(22G26 modification on certain tRNAs was decreased in response to maf1-deletion and associated with antisuppression, and was validated by other methods. Over-expression of Trm1, which produces m(22G26, reversed maf1-antisuppression. A model that emerges is that competition by increased tRNA levels in maf1Δ cells leads to m(22G26 hypomodification due to limiting Trm1, reducing the activity of suppressor-tRNASerUCA and accounting for antisuppression. Consistent with this, we show that RNAP III mutations associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy decrease tRNA transcription, increase m(22G26 efficiency and reverse antisuppression. Extending this more broadly, we show that a decrease in tRNA synthesis by treatment with rapamycin leads to increased m(22G26 modification and that this response is conserved among highly divergent yeasts and human cells.

  11. Single-molecule RNA observation in vivo reveals dynamics of co-transcriptional splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, M. L.; Coulon, A.; de Turris, V.; Palangat, M.; Chow, C. C.; Singer, R. H.; Larson, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of pre-mRNA and the splicing of that pre-mRNA to form completed transcripts requires coordination between two large multi-subunit complexes (the transcription elongation complex and the spliceosome). How this coordination occurs in vivo is unknown. Here we report the first experimental observation of transcription and splicing occurring at the same gene in living cells. By utilizing the PP7/MS2 fluorescent RNA reporter system, we can directly observe two distinct regions of the nascent RNA, allowing us to measure the rise and fall time of the intron and exon of a reporter gene stably integrated into a human cell line. The reporter gene consists of a beta globin gene where we have inserted a 24 RNA hairpin cassette into the intron/exon. Upon synthesis, the RNA hairpins are tightly bound by fluorescently-labeled PP7/MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins. After gene induction, a single locus of active transcription in the nucleus shows fluorescence intensity changes characteristic of the synthesis and excision of the intron/exon. Using fluctuation analysis, we determine the elongation rate to be 1.5 kb/min. From the temporal cross correlation function, we determine that splicing of this gene must be co-transcriptional with a splicing time of ~100 seconds before termination and a ~200 second pause at termination. We propose that dual-color RNA imaging may be extended to investigate other mechanisms of transcription, gene regulation, and RNA processing.

  12. Promoter-wide hypermethylation of the ribosomal RNA gene promoter in the suicide brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick O McGowan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alterations in gene expression in the suicide brain have been reported and for several genes DNA methylation as an epigenetic regulator is thought to play a role. rRNA genes, that encode ribosomal RNA, are the backbone of the protein synthesis machinery and levels of rRNA gene promoter methylation determine rRNA transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We test here by sodium bisulfite mapping of the rRNA promoter and quantitative real-time PCR of rRNA expression the hypothesis that epigenetic differences in critical loci in the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of suicide. Suicide subjects in this study were selected for a history of early childhood neglect/abuse, which is associated with decreased hippocampal volume and cognitive impairments. rRNA was significantly hypermethylated throughout the promoter and 5' regulatory region in the brain of suicide subjects, consistent with reduced rRNA expression in the hippocampus. This difference in rRNA methylation was not evident in the cerebellum and occurred in the absence of genome-wide changes in methylation, as assessed by nearest neighbor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to show aberrant regulation of the protein synthesis machinery in the suicide brain. The data implicate the epigenetic modulation of rRNA in the pathophysiology of suicide.

  13. Shapes of interacting RNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Benjamin Mingming; Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological ...... sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus.......Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological...... genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows to compute the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform...

  14. Search for antisense copies of beta-globin mRNA in anemic mouse spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor John M

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies by Volloch and coworkers have reported that during the expression of high levels of β-globin mRNA in the spleen of anemic mice, they could also detect small but significant levels of an antisense (AS globin RNA species, which they postulated might have somehow arisen by RNA-directed RNA synthesis. For two reasons we undertook to confirm and possibly extend these studies. First, previous studies in our lab have focussed on what is an unequivocal example of host RNA-directed RNA polymerase activity on the RNA genome of human hepatitis delta virus. Second, if AS globin species do exist they could in turn form double-stranded RNA species which might induce post-transcriptional gene silencing, a phenomenon somehow provoked in eukaryotic cells by AS RNA sequences. Results We reexamined critical aspects of the previous globin studies. We used intraperitoneal injections of phenylhydrazine to induce anemia in mice, as demonstrated by the appearance and ultimate disappearance of splenomegaly. While a 30-fold increase in globin mRNA was detected in the spleen, the relative amount of putative AS RNA could be no more than 0.004%. Conclusions Contrary to earlier reports, induction of a major increase in globin transcripts in the mouse spleen was not associated with a detectable level of antisense RNA to globin mRNA.

  15. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism.

  16. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism. PMID:27165283

  17. Studying RNA-protein interactions in vivo by RNA immunoprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selth, Luke A; Close, Pierre; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2011-01-01

    The crucial roles played by RNA-binding proteins in all aspects of RNA metabolism, particularly in the regulation of transcription, have become increasingly evident. Moreover, other factors that do not directly interact with RNA molecules can nevertheless function proximally to RNA polymerases an...

  18. mRNA turnover rate limits siRNA and microRNA efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Erik; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora

    2010-01-01

    What determines how strongly an mRNA responds to a microRNA or an siRNA? We know that properties of the sequence match between the small RNA and the mRNA are crucial. However, large-scale validations of siRNA efficacies have shown that certain transcripts remain recalcitrant to perturbation even after repeated redesign of the siRNA (Krueger et al, 2007). Weak response to RNAi may thus be an inherent property of the mRNA, but the underlying factors have proven difficult to uncover. siRNAs indu...

  19. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Alters the mRNA Translation Processing in L-02 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min HONG; Yan-chun CHE; Gui-zhen TANG; Wei CUN; Xue-mei ZHANG; Long-ding LIU; Qi-han LI

    2008-01-01

    HSV-1 infection-mediated regulation of mRNA translation in host cells is a systematic and complicated process. Investigation of the details of this mechanism will facilitate understanding of biological variations in the viral replication process and host cells. In this study, a comparative proteomics technology platform was applied by two-dimension electrophoresis of HSV-1 infected normal human L-02 cell and control cell lysates. The observed protein spots were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by the PDQuest software package. A number of the different observed protein spots closely associated with cellular protein synthesis were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The expression levels of the RPLP1 protein, which is required for mRNA translation, and KHSRP protein, which is involved in rapid decay of mRNA, were up-regulated, whereas the expression level of RNP H2, which is involved in positive regulation on the mRNA splicing process, was down-regulated. All of these results suggest that HSV-1 infection can influence cellular protein synthesis via modulation of cellular regulatory proteins involved in RNA splicing, translation and decay, resulting in optimisation of viral protein synthesis when cellular protein synthesis is shut off. Although there is need for further investigations regarding the detailed mechanisms of cellular protein control, our studies provide new insight into the targeting of varied virus signaling pathways involved in host cellular protein synthesis.

  20. Discovery of a novel compound with anti-venezuelan equine encephalitis virus activity that targets the nonstructural protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Chung

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses present serious health threats as emerging and re-emerging viruses. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV, a New World alphavirus, can cause encephalitis in humans and horses, but there are no therapeutics for treatment. To date, compounds reported as anti-VEEV or anti-alphavirus inhibitors have shown moderate activity. To discover new classes of anti-VEEV inhibitors with novel viral targets, we used a high-throughput screen based on the measurement of cell protection from live VEEV TC-83-induced cytopathic effect to screen a 340,000 compound library. Of those, we identified five novel anti-VEEV compounds and chose a quinazolinone compound, CID15997213 (IC50 = 0.84 µM, for further characterization. The antiviral effect of CID15997213 was alphavirus-specific, inhibiting VEEV and Western equine encephalitis virus, but not Eastern equine encephalitis virus. In vitro assays confirmed inhibition of viral RNA, protein, and progeny synthesis. No antiviral activity was detected against a select group of RNA viruses. We found mutations conferring the resistance to the compound in the N-terminal domain of nsP2 and confirmed the target residues using a reverse genetic approach. Time of addition studies showed that the compound inhibits the middle stage of replication when viral genome replication is most active. In mice, the compound showed complete protection from lethal VEEV disease at 50 mg/kg/day. Collectively, these results reveal a potent anti-VEEV compound that uniquely targets the viral nsP2 N-terminal domain. While the function of nsP2 has yet to be characterized, our studies suggest that the protein might play a critical role in viral replication, and further, may represent an innovative opportunity to develop therapeutic interventions for alphavirus infection.

  1. Simple Method for Constructing RNA Triangle, Square, Pentagon by Tuning Interior RNA 3WJ Angle from 60° to 90° or 108°.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khisamutdinov, Emil F; Bui, My Nguyen Hoan; Jasinski, Daniel; Zhao, Zhengyi; Cui, Zheng; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Precise shape control of architectures at the nanometer scale is an intriguing but extremely challenging facet. RNA has recently emerged as a unique material and thermostable building block for use in nanoparticle construction. Here, we describe a simple method from design to synthesis of RNA triangle, square, and pentagon by stretching RNA 3WJ native angle from 60° to 90° and 108°, using the three-way junction (3WJ) of the pRNA from bacteriophage phi29 dsDNA packaging motor. These methods for the construction of elegant polygons can be applied to other RNA building blocks including the utilization and application of RNA 4-way, 5-way, and other multi-way junctions. PMID:25967062

  2. RNA structure-based ribosome recruitment: Lessons from the Dicistroviridae intergenic region IRESes

    OpenAIRE

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the canonical process of initiating protein synthesis on an mRNA depends on many large protein factors and the modified nucleotide cap on the 5′ end of the mRNA. However, certain RNA sequences can bypass the need for these proteins and cap, using an RNA structure-based mechanism called internal initiation of translation. These RNAs are called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESes), and the cap-independent initiation pathway they support is critical for successful infection by m...

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcription by triple-helix forming oligonucleotides with viral RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Volkmann, S; Jendis, J; Frauendorf, A; Moelling, K

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral RNA into double-stranded DNA is catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT). A highly conserved polypurine tract (PPT) on the viral RNA serves as primer for plus-strand DNA synthesis and is a possible target for triple-helix formation. Triple-helix formation during reverse transcription involves either single-stranded RNA or an RNA.DNA hybrid. The effect of triple-helix formation on reverse transcription has been analyzed here in vitro using a three-strand-syst...

  4. Simultaneous RNA-DNA FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lan-Tian; Meng, Zhenyu; Shao, Fangwei; Zhang, Li-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A highly useful tool for studying lncRNAs is simultaneous RNA-DNA FISH, which reveals the localization and quantitative information of RNA and DNA in cellular contexts. However, a simple combination of RNA FISH and DNA FISH often generates disappointing results because the fragile RNA signals are often damaged by the harsh conditions used in DNA FISH for denaturing the DNA. Here, we describe a robust and simple RNA-DNA FISH protocol, in which amino-labeled nucleic acid probes are used for RNA FISH. The method is suitable to detect single-RNA molecules simultaneously with DNA.

  5. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  6. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  7. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2016-07-11

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses.

  8. RNA polymerase of the killer virus of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The L/sub A/ and M double-stranded (ds) RNA segments of the cytoplasmically inherited killer virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are encapsidated in virions that contain a DNA-independent transcriptase activity. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of full-length (+) stranded copies of the genomic dsRNA segments, denoted l/sub A/ and m. The L/sub A/ dsRNA segment appears to encode the major capsid protein in which both dsRNA molecules are encapsidated, while M dsRNA encodes products responsible for the two killer phenotypes of toxin production and resistance to toxin. Proteins extracted from transcriptionally active virions fail to cross-react with antibody to yeast DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, suggesting that none of the subunits of the host cell polymerases are active in viral transcription. Sequence analysis of the in vitro transcripts reveals neither to be 3'-terminally polyadenylated, although m contains an apparent internal polyA-like tract. In the presence of any three ribonucleoside triphosphates (0.5 mM), the fourth ribonucleoside triphosphate shows an optimal rate of incorporation into transcript at a concentration of 20 μM. However, in a 3-hour reaction, the yield of a product RNA increases with the concentration of the limiting ribonucleotide up to 0.5 mM. Gel electrophoresis of the reaction products reveals that increasing the substrate concentration accelerates the appearance of radioactivity in full-length l/sub A/ and m transcripts

  9. Identification of a competitive translation determinant in the 3' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, L E; Webb, A C; Cai, J M; Gehrke, L

    1997-01-01

    We report that the competitive translational activity of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA (CP RNA), a nonadenylated mRNA, is determined in part by the 3' untranslated region (UTR). Competitive translation was characterized both in vitro, with cotranslation assays, and in vivo, with microinjected Xenopus laevis oocytes. In wheat germ extracts, coat protein synthesis was constant when a fixed amount of full-length CP RNA was cotranslated with increasing concentrations of competitor globin mRNA. However, translation of CP RNA lacking the 3' UTR decreased significantly under competitive conditions. RNA stabilities were equivalent. In X. laevis oocytes, which are translationally saturated and are an inherently competitive translational environment, full-length CP RNA assembled into large polysomes and coat protein synthesis was readily detectable. Alternatively, CP RNA lacking the 3' UTR sedimented as small polysomes, and little coat protein was detected. Again, RNA stabilities were equivalent. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to localize RNA sequences or structures required for competitive translation. Since the CP RNA 3' UTR has an unusually large number of AUG nucleotide triplets, two AUG-containing sites were altered in full-length RNA prior to oocyte injections. Nucleotide substitutions at the sequence GAUG, 20 nucleotides downstream of the coat protein termination codon, specifically reduced full-length CP RNA translation, while similar substitutions at the next AUG triplet had little effect on translation. The competitive influence of the 3' UTR could be explained by RNA-protein interactions that affect translation initiation or by ribosome reinitiation at downstream AUG codons, which would increase the number of ribosomes committed to coat protein synthesis. PMID:9121448

  10. Yeast nuclear RNA processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jade; Bernstein; Eric; A; Toth

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear RNA processing requires dynamic and intricately regulated machinery composed of multiple enzymes and their cofactors.In this review,we summarize recent experiments using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system that have yielded important insights regarding the conversion of pre-RNAs to functional RNAs,and the elimination of aberrant RNAs and unneeded intermediates from the nuclear RNA pool.Much progress has been made recently in describing the 3D structure of many elements of the nuclear degradation machinery and its cofactors.Similarly,the regulatory mechanisms that govern RNA processing are gradually coming into focus.Such advances invariably generate many new questions,which we highlight in this review.

  11. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzhong Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes.

  12. Hypoxia-Responsive Copolymer for siRNA Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perche, Federico; Biswas, Swati; Patel, Niravkumar R; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of nanomedicine has been designed for cancer therapy. Herein, we describe the synthesis and evaluation of a hypoxia-responsive copolymer for siRNA delivery (Perche et al., Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 53:3362-3366, 2014). The synthesis is achieved using established coupling chemistry and accessible purification procedures. A polyelectrolyte-lipid conjugate (polyethyleneimine 1.8 kDa-dioleyl-phosphatidylinositol, PEI-PE) and polyethylene glycol 2000 (PEG) were assembled via the hypoxia-sensitive azobenzene (Azo) unit to obtain the PEG-Azo-PEI-DOPE copolymer. This copolymer can condense siRNA and shows hypoxia-induced cellular internalization and reporter gene downregulation in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo after parenteral administration (Perche et al., Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 53:3362-3366, 2014). We also detail procedures to evaluate hypoxia-targeted polymers both in monolayer cultures, cancer cell spheroids and in tumor xenografts murine models. PMID:26530922

  13. Evolutionary perspectives of telomerase RNA structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlevsky, Joshua D; Chen, Julian J-L

    2016-08-01

    Telomerase is the eukaryotic solution to the 'end-replication problem' of linear chromosomes by synthesising the highly repetitive DNA constituent of telomeres, the nucleoprotein cap that protects chromosome termini. Functioning as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme, telomerase is minimally composed of the highly conserved catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and essential telomerase RNA (TR) component. Beyond merely providing the template for telomeric DNA synthesis, TR is an innate telomerase component and directly facilitates enzymatic function. TR accomplishes this by having evolved structural elements for stable assembly with the TERT protein and the regulation of the telomerase catalytic cycle. Despite its prominence and prevalence, TR has profoundly diverged in length, sequence, and biogenesis pathway among distinct evolutionary lineages. This diversity has generated numerous structural and mechanistic solutions for ensuring proper RNP formation and high fidelity telomeric DNA synthesis. Telomerase provides unique insights into RNA and protein coevolution within RNP enzymes. PMID:27359343

  14. Sensing of RNA viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    Our knowledge regarding the contribution of the innate immune system in recognizing and subsequently initiating a host response to an invasion of RNA virus has been rapidly growing over the last decade. Descriptions of the receptors involved and the molecular mechanisms they employ to sense viral...... pathogen-associated molecular patterns have emerged in great detail. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge regarding the receptors used to detect RNA virus invasion, the molecular structures these receptors sense, and the involved downstream signaling pathways....

  15. New perspectives on the diversification of the RNA interference system: insights from comparative genomics and small RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, Alexander Maxwell; Ando, Yoshinari; Aravind, L

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the pervasive involvement of small RNAs in regulating diverse biological processes has been greatly augmented by recent application of deep-sequencing technologies to small RNA across diverse eukaryotes. We review the currently known small RNA classes and place them in context of the reconstructed evolutionary history of the RNA interference (RNAi) protein machinery. This synthesis indicates that the earliest versions of eukaryotic RNAi systems likely utilized small RNA processed from three types of precursors: (1) sense-antisense transcriptional products, (2) genome-encoded, imperfectly complementary hairpin sequences, and (3) larger noncoding RNA precursor sequences. Structural dissection of PIWI proteins along with recent discovery of novel families (including Med13 of the Mediator complex) suggest that emergence of a distinct architecture with the N-terminal domains (also occurring separately fused to endoDNases in prokaryotes) formed via duplication of an ancestral unit was key to their recruitment as primary RNAi effectors and use of small RNAs of certain preferred lengths. Prokaryotic PIWI proteins are typically components of several RNA-directed DNA restriction or CRISPR/Cas systems. However, eukaryotic versions appear to have emerged from a subset that evolved RNA-directed RNAi. They were recruited alongside RNaseIII domains and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) domains, also from prokaryotic systems, to form the core eukaryotic RNAi system. Like certain regulatory systems, RNAi diversified into two distinct but linked arms concomitant with eukaryotic nucleocytoplasmic compartmentalization. Subsequent elaboration of RNAi proceeded via diversification of the core protein machinery through lineage-specific expansions and recruitment of new components from prokaryotes (nucleases and small RNA-modifying enzymes), allowing for diversification of associating small RNAs. PMID:24311560

  16. Intersection of the multivesicular body pathway and lipid homeostasis in RNA replication by a positive-strand RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Diaz, Arturo; Hao, Linhui; Gancarz, Brandi; den Boon, Johan A; Ahlquist, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Like many positive-strand RNA viruses, brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replication occurs in membrane-invaginated vesicular compartments. BMV RNA replication compartments show parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose release depends on the cellular multivesicular body (MVB) sorting pathway. BMV RNA replication compartments are not released from their parent membranes, but might depend on MVB functions for membrane invagination. Prior results show that BMV RNA replication is severely inhibited by deletion of the crucial MVB gene DOA4 or BRO1. We report here that involvement of DOA4 and BRO1 in BMV RNA replication is not dependent on the MVB pathway's membrane-shaping functions but rather is due to their roles in recycling ubiquitin from MVB cargos. We show that deleting DOA4 or BRO1 inhibits the ubiquitination- and proteasome-dependent activation of homologous transcription factors Mga2p and Spt23p, which regulate many lipid metabolism genes, including the fatty acid desaturase gene OLE1, which is essential for BMV RNA replication. However, Mga2p processing and BMV RNA replication are restored by supplementing free ubiquitin, which is depleted in doa4Δ and bro1Δ cells. The results identify Mga2p and Spt23p processing and lipid regulation as sensitive targets of ubiquitin depletion and correctly predict multiple effects of modulating additional host genes RFU1, UBP6, and UFD3. Our results also show that BMV RNA replication depends on additional Mga2p-regulated genes likely involved in lipid metabolism beyond OLE1. Among other points, these findings show the potential for blocking viral RNA replication by modulating lipid synthesis at multiple levels.

  17. 227 Views of RNA: Is RNA Unique in Its Chemical Isomer Space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meringer, Markus; Goodwin, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is one of the two nucleic acids used by extant biochemistry and plays a central role as the intermediary carrier of genetic information in transcription and translation. If RNA was involved in the origin of life, it should have a facile prebiotic synthesis. A wide variety of such syntheses have been explored. However, to date no one-pot reaction has been shown capable of yielding RNA monomers from likely prebiotically abundant starting materials, though this does not rule out the possibility that simpler, more easily prebiotically accessible nucleic acids may have preceded RNA. Given structural constraints, such as the ability to form complementary base pairs and a linear covalent polymer, a variety of structural isomers of RNA could potentially function as genetic platforms. By using structure-generation software, all the potential structural isomers of the ribosides (BC5H9O4, where B is nucleobase), as well as a set of simpler minimal analogues derived from them, that can potentially serve as monomeric building blocks of nucleic acid–like molecules are enumerated. Molecules are selected based on their likely stability under biochemically relevant conditions (e.g., moderate pH and temperature) and the presence of at least two functional groups allowing the monomers to be incorporated into linear polymers. The resulting structures are then evaluated by using molecular descriptors typically applied in quantitative structure–property relationship (QSPR) studies and predicted physicochemical properties. Several databases have been queried to determine whether any of the computed isomers had been synthesized previously. Very few of the molecules that emerge from this structure set have been previously described. We conclude that ribonucleosides may have competed with a multitude of alternative structures whose potential proto-biochemical roles and abiotic syntheses remain to be explored. Key Words: Evolution—Chemical evolution

  18. Evidence supporting a premature termination mechanism for subgenomic RNA transcription in Pelargonium line pattern virus: identification of a critical long-range RNA-RNA interaction and functional variants through mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Pérez, Marta; Hernández, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    Pelargonium line pattern virus (PLPV) is a plus-strand RNA virus that has been proposed as type species of a tentative new genus, Pelarspovirus, in the family Tombusviridae. One of the singular traits of members of this prospective genus is the production of a unique subgenomic (sg) mRNA that is structurally and functionally tricistronic. Here, we have aimed to get insights into the mechanism that governs PLPV sg mRNA transcription. A long-range RNA-RNA interaction that is critical for the process has been identified through RNA folding predictions and mutational analysis of the viral genome. Such interaction seems to occur in the plus-strand, likely acts in cis, and specifically mediates the synthesis of sg RNA-sized minus-strand. The accumulation of this RNA species is easily detectable in plants and its generation can be uncoupled from that of the plus-strand sg mRNA. All these data together with the observation that 5' ends of PLPV genomic and sg mRNAs have sequence resemblances (as expected if both act as promoters in the corresponding minus-strand), support that premature termination is the mechanism underlying PLPV sg mRNA formation. PMID:26990209

  19. MDA5 Detects the Double-Stranded RNA Replicative Form in Picornavirus-Infected Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Feng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available RIG-I and MDA5 are cytosolic RNA sensors that play a critical role in innate antiviral responses. Major advances have been made in identifying RIG-I ligands, but our knowledge of the ligands for MDA5 remains restricted to data from transfection experiments mostly using poly(I:C, a synthetic dsRNA mimic. Here, we dissected the IFN-α/β-stimulatory activity of different viral RNA species produced during picornavirus infection, both by RNA transfection and in infected cells in which specific steps of viral RNA replication were inhibited. Our results show that the incoming genomic plus-strand RNA does not activate MDA5, but minus-strand RNA synthesis and production of the 7.5 kbp replicative form trigger a strong IFN-α/β response. IFN-α/β production does not rely on plus-strand RNA synthesis and thus generation of the partially double-stranded replicative intermediate. This study reports MDA5 activation by a natural RNA ligand under physiological conditions.

  20. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  1. Branched RNA: A New Architecture for RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aviñó

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Branched RNAs with two and four strands were synthesized. These structures were used to obtain branched siRNA. The branched siRNA duplexes had similar inhibitory capacity as those of unmodified siRNA duplexes, as deduced from gene silencing experiments of the TNF-α protein. Branched RNAs are considered novel structures for siRNA technology, and they provide an innovative tool for specific gene inhibition. As the method described here is compatible with most RNA modifications described to date, these compounds may be further functionalized to obtain more potent siRNA derivatives and can be attached to suitable delivery systems.

  2. Selective stimulation of translational expression by Alu RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Carol M.; Kimura, Richard H.; Schmid, Carl W.

    2002-01-01

    Human Alu and adenovirus VA1 RNAs each stimulate the translational expression of reporter genes in co-transient transfection assays without affecting either the rate of global protein synthesis or the abundance of the reporter mRNA. This selective, post-transcriptional stimulation of expression, which is observed in human and mouse cell lines and for three reporters, acts through a PKR- independent mechanism. The activity of Alu and VA1 RNAs in this assay is transient, causing a reduction in ...

  3. Organic Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Romea, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Organic Synthesis is a one-semester course of the fourth year of the Chemistry Degree at the Universitat de Barcelona. This course covers the most important transformations in Organic Chemistry, including a short introduction to the Retrosynthetic Analysis. The aim is to provide a solid knowledge of the main reactions and their mechanism, which could later be improved during Master studies.

  4. HCV IRES domain IIb affects the configuration of coding RNA in the 40S subunit's decoding groove

    OpenAIRE

    Filbin, Megan E.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) uses a structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNA to recruit the translation machinery to the viral RNA and begin protein synthesis without the ribosomal scanning process required for canonical translation initiation. Different IRES structural domains are used in this process, which begins with direct binding of the 40S ribosomal subunit to the IRES RNA and involves specific manipulation of the translational machinery. We have found that upon initial 40S subuni...

  5. Ku autoantigen is the regulatory component of a template-associated protein kinase that phosphorylates RNA polymerase II.

    OpenAIRE

    Dvir, A; Peterson, S R; Knuth, M W; Lu, H.; Dynan, W S

    1992-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II contains a tandemly repeated heptapeptide sequence. Previous work has shown that this sequence is phosphorylated at multiple sites by a template-associated protein kinase, in a reaction that is closely associated with the initiation of RNA synthesis. We have purified this kinase to apparent homogeneity from human (HeLa) cells. The purified kinase phosphorylates native RNA polymerase II only in the presence of DNA and the general transcription ...

  6. Shaping tRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priano, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This model-building activity provides a quick, visual, hands-on tool that allows students to examine more carefully the cloverleaf structure of a typical tRNA molecule. When used as a supplement to lessons that involve gene expression, this exercise reinforces several concepts in molecular genetics, including nucleotide base-pairing rules, the…

  7. The RNA interference revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lenz

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of double-stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing has rapidly led to its use as a method of choice for blocking a gene, and has turned it into one of the most discussed topics in cell biology. Although still in its infancy, the field of RNA interference has already produced a vast array of results, mainly in Caenorhabditis elegans, but recently also in mammalian systems. Micro-RNAs are short hairpins of RNA capable of blocking translation, which are transcribed from genomic DNA and are implicated in several aspects from development to cell signaling. The present review discusses the main methods used for gene silencing in cell culture and animal models, including the selection of target sequences, delivery methods and strategies for a successful silencing. Expected developments are briefly discussed, ranging from reverse genetics to therapeutics. Thus, the development of the new paradigm of RNA-mediated gene silencing has produced two important advances: knowledge of a basic cellular mechanism present in the majority of eukaryotic cells and access to a potent and specific new method for gene silencing.

  8. 生长激素和胰岛素样生长因子Ⅰ对奶牛乳蛋白合成关键激酶及调节因子mRNA表达量的影响%Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor Ⅰ : Effects on mRNA Expression Levels of Key Kinases and Regulatory Factors Regulating Milk Protein Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季昀; 庞学燕; 田青; 王梦芝; 王洪荣; 敖长金

    2013-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor Ⅰ (IGF- Ⅰ ) on mRNA expression levels of key kinases and regulatory factors regulating milk protein synthesis in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells in vitro. Four treatments were employed to culture the purified mammary epithelial cells of a Holstein dairy cow and growth medium without serum was used in a control group, and based on the control group, mediums supplemented with GH (100 ng/mL), IGF-Ⅰ (100 ng/mL) and GH (100 ng/mL) +IGF-Ⅰ (100 ng/mL) were used in experimental groups. After cultured for 24 h, the mRNA expression levels of CSN3, key kinases and regulatory factors regulating milk protein synthesis, GHR and IGF- Ⅰ R were determined by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The results showed as follows: there were mRNA expressions of GHR and IGF-Ⅰ R in mammary epithelial cells cultured in vitro, and CSN3 mRNA expression level was significantly enhanced in all experimental groups (P <0. 05) , however, no cumulative effect was found; compared with the control group, the mRNA expression level of E74-like transcription factor 5 (ELF5) tended to be increased in GH group (P <0. 10) , mRNA expression levels of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 ( rpS6K1) were significantly increased in IGF-Ⅰ group (P < 0. 05) , but on augmented effect was found in GH + IGF-Ⅰ group. All results indicate that GH and IGF-Ⅰ may modulate κ-casein synthesis independently through affecting mRNA expressions of key kinases and regulatory factors that regulating milk protein synthesis.%本试验旨在探讨生长激素(GH)和胰岛素样生长因子Ⅰ (IGF-Ⅰ)对体外培养的奶牛乳腺上皮细胞内调控乳蛋白合成的关键激酶及调节因子mRNA表达量的影响.试验对纯化后的荷斯坦奶牛乳腺上皮细胞进行4种处理,对照组采用无血清生长培养基,试验组在对照

  9. Seasonal changes in hepatic progesterone receptor mRNA, estrogen receptor mRNA, and vitellogenin mRNA in the painted turtle, Chrysemys picta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodia-Lora, Noemí; Callard, Ian P

    2002-10-01

    Previous studies using the fresh water turtle Chrysemys picta have demonstrated that progesterone (P) inhibits estradiol (E)-induced vitellogenin (vtg) secretion in this species. Further, there is evidence for the differential expression of the two P receptor isoforms (PRA and PRB) in the liver during the turtle seasonal cycle, correlating with hepatic vitellogenesis. In this study we report changes in the hepatic PR mPNA, ER mRNA, and vitellogenin (vtg) mRNA transcripts during the reproductive cycle of the turtle. Fragments of the turtle hepatic PR and ER cDNAs were cloned and sequenced and a previously cloned turtle vtg cDNA were used as probes in Northern blotting. No 3.7-kb PR mRNA, corresponding to the smaller PR transcript, PRA of other species was found, although, a smaller 1.8-kb transcript (putative PRC mRNA) was present. These observations suggest that the turtle as in the chicken and human, the 4.5-kb PR mRNA transcript encodes both PRA and PRB proteins. Only the larger PR mRNA transcript (4.5-kb), was found to vary significantly during the annual cycle, being highest when vitellogenesis was inhibited in winter and summer. Vtg mRNA could not be detected during the summer or winter, was highest during vitellogenesis in the spring, and reappeared during the fall period of vitellogenesis and ovarian recrudescence. ER mRNA followed a similar pattern, being highest during spring and early fall, when vtg synthesis is high. The data suggest that P/PR, as well as E/ER, may be involved in the seasonal regulation of hepatic vitellogenesis in this species. PMID:12392693

  10. Footprints of a trypanosomatid RNA world: pre-small subunit rRNA processing by spliced leader addition trans-splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Gustavo Mayer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The addition of a capped mini-exon [spliced leader (SL] through trans-splicing is essential for the maturation of RNA polymerase (pol II-transcribed polycistronic pre-mRNAs in all members of the Trypanosomatidae family. This process is an inter-molecular splicing reaction that follows the same basic rules of cis-splicing reactions. In this study, we demonstrated that mini-exons were added to precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA are transcribed by RNA pol I, including the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS region. Additionally, we detected the SL-5'ETS molecule using three distinct methods and located the acceptor site between two known 5'ETS rRNA processing sites (A' and A1 in four different trypanosomatids. Moreover, we detected a polyadenylated 5'ETS upstream of the trans-splicing acceptor site, which also occurs in pre-mRNA trans-splicing. After treatment with an indirect trans-splicing inhibitor (sinefungin, we observed SL-5'ETS decay. However, treatment with 5-fluorouracil (a precursor of RNA synthesis that inhibits the degradation of pre-rRNA led to the accumulation of SL-5'ETS, suggesting that the molecule may play a role in rRNA degradation. The detection of trans-splicing in these molecules may indicate broad RNA-joining properties, regardless of the polymerase used for transcription.

  11. A conformational switch is responsible for the reversal of the 6S RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibition in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, Benedikt; Wagner, Rolf

    2012-12-01

    6S RNA is a bacterial transcriptional regulator,which accumulates during stationary phase and inhibits transcription from many promoters due to stable association with σ 70 -containing RNA polymerase. This inhibitory RNA polymerase ∼ 6S RNA complex dissociates during nutritional upshift, when cells undergo outgrowth from stationary phase, releasing active RNA polymerase ready for transcription. The release reaction depends on a characteristic property of 6S RNAs, namely to act as template for the de novo synthesis of small RNAs, termed pRNAs.Here, we used limited hydrolysis with structure-specific RNases and in-line probing of isolated 6S RNA and 6SRNA ∼ pRNA complexes to investigate the molecular details leading to the release reaction. Our results indicate that pRNA transcription induces the refolding of the 6S RNA secondary structure by disrupting part of the closing stem(conserved sequence regions CRI and CRIV) and formation of a new hairpin (conserved sequence regions CRIII and CRIV). Comparison of the dimethylsulfate modification pattern of 6S RNA in living cells at stationary growth and during outgrowth confirmed the conformational change observed in vitro. Based on our results, a model describing the individual steps of the release reaction is presented. PMID:23667906

  12. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  13. A Grammatical Approach to RNA-RNA Interaction Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuki; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Seki, Hiroyuki

    2007-11-01

    Much attention has been paid to two interacting RNA molecules involved in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. Although there have been a few studies on RNA-RNA interaction prediction based on dynamic programming algorithm, no grammar-based approach has been proposed. The purpose of this paper is to provide a new modeling for RNA-RNA interaction based on multiple context-free grammar (MCFG). We present a polynomial time parsing algorithm for finding the most likely derivation tree for the stochastic version of MCFG, which is applicable to RNA joint secondary structure prediction including kissing hairpin loops. Also, elementary tests on RNA-RNA interaction prediction have shown that the proposed method is comparable to Alkan et al.'s method.

  14. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D;

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translation...... the catalytic efficiency of serine attachment to tRNA, but had no effect on the activity of MtArgRS. Further, the most pronounced improvements in the aminoacylation activity of MtSerRS induced by MtArgRS were observed under conditions of elevated temperature and osmolarity. These data indicate that......, although the precise biological role remains largely unknown. To gain further insights into archaeal MSCs, possible protein-protein interactions with the atypical Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus seryl-tRNA synthetase (MtSerRS) were investigated. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed arginyl-tRNA...

  15. Detection of viral RNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyboh, Kishanda; Ajamian, Lara; Mouland, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    localization using a method like this, abundant information has been gained on both viral and cellular RNA trafficking events. For instance, HIV-1 produces RNA in the nucleus of infected cells but the RNA is only translated in the cytoplasm. When one key viral protein is missing (Rev), FISH of the viral RNA has revealed that the block to viral replication is due to the retention of the HIV-1 genomic RNA in the nucleus. Here, we present the method for visual analysis of viral genomic RNA in situ. The method makes use of a labelled RNA probe. This probe is designed to be complementary to the viral genomic RNA. During the in vitro synthesis of the antisense RNA probe, the ribonucleotide that is modified with digoxigenin (DIG) is included in an in vitro transcription reaction. Once the probe has hybridized to the target mRNA in cells, subsequent antibody labelling steps (Figure 1) will reveal the localization of the mRNA as well as proteins of interest when performing FISH/IF. PMID:22588480

  16. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double strand

  17. Natural RNA circles function as efficient microRNA sponges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Birkballe; Jensen, Trine I; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm;

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so-called comp......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so......-called competing endogenous RNA in humans and target mimicry in plants. We previously identified a highly expressed circular RNA (circRNA) in human and mouse brain. Here we show that this circRNA acts as a miR-7 sponge; we term this circular transcript ciRS-7 (circular RNA sponge for miR-7). ciRS-7 contains more...... sponge, suggesting that miRNA sponge effects achieved by circRNA formation are a general phenomenon. This study serves as the first, to our knowledge, functional analysis of a naturally expressed circRNA....

  18. Diversity of Endonuclease V: From DNA Repair to RNA Editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Kuraoka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Deamination of adenine occurs in DNA, RNA, and their precursors via a hydrolytic reaction and a nitrosative reaction. The generated deaminated products are potentially mutagenic because of their structural similarity to natural bases, which in turn leads to erroneous nucleotide pairing and subsequent disruption of cellular metabolism. Incorporation of deaminated precursors into the nucleic acid strand occurs during nucleotide synthesis by DNA and RNA polymerases or base modification by DNA- and/or RNA-editing enzymes during cellular functions. In such cases, removal of deaminated products from DNA and RNA by a nuclease might be required depending on the cellular function. One such enzyme, endonuclease V, recognizes deoxyinosine and cleaves 3' end of the damaged base in double-stranded DNA through an alternative excision repair mechanism in Escherichia coli, whereas in Homo sapiens, it recognizes and cleaves inosine in single-stranded RNA. However, to explore the role of endonuclease V in vivo, a detailed analysis of cell biology is required. Based on recent reports and developments on endonuclease V, we discuss the potential functions of endonuclease V in DNA repair and RNA metabolism.

  19. Annexin A2 binds RNA and reduces the frameshifting efficiency of infectious bronchitis virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyun Kwak

    Full Text Available Annexin A2 (ANXA2 is a protein implicated in diverse cellular functions, including exocytosis, DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. It was recently proposed to be involved in RNA metabolism because it was shown to associate with some cellular mRNA. Here, we identified ANXA2 as a RNA binding protein (RBP that binds IBV (Infectious Bronchitis Virus pseudoknot RNA. We first confirmed the binding of ANXA2 to IBV pseudoknot RNA by ultraviolet crosslinking and showed its binding to RNA pseudoknot with ANXA2 protein in vitro and in the cells. Since the RNA pseudoknot located in the frameshifting region of IBV was used as bait for cellular RBPs, we tested whether ANXA2 could regulate the frameshfting of IBV pseudoknot RNA by dual luciferase assay. Overexpression of ANXA2 significantly reduced the frameshifting efficiency from IBV pseudoknot RNA and knockdown of the protein strikingly increased the frameshifting efficiency. The results suggest that ANXA2 is a cellular RBP that can modulate the frameshifting efficiency of viral RNA, enabling it to act as an anti-viral cellular protein, and hinting at roles in RNA metabolism for other cellular mRNAs.

  20. The Origin of the RNA World a Kinetic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wattis, J A D; Wattis, Jonathan A. D.; Coveney, Peter V.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to propose, construct and analyse microscopic kinetic models for the emergence of long chains of RNA from monomeric beta-D-ribonucleotide precursors in prebiotic circumstances. Our theory starts out from similar but more general chemical assumptions to those of Eigen, namely that catalytic replication can lead to a large population of long chains. In particular, our models incorporate the possibility of (i) direct chain growth, (ii) template-assisted synthesis and (iii) catalysis by RNA replicase ribozymes, all with varying degrees of efficiency. However, in our models the reaction mechanisms are kept `open'; we do not assume the existence of closed hypercycles which sustain a population of long chains. Rather it is the feasibility of the initial emergence of a self-sustaining set of RNA chains from monomeric nucleotides which is our prime concern. We confront directly the central nonlinear features of the problem, which have often been overlooked in previous studies. Our detailed m...

  1. Toward a structural understanding of IRES RNA function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbin, Megan E; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2009-06-01

    Protein synthesis of an RNA template can start by two different known mechanisms: cap-dependent translation initiation and cap-independent translation initiation. The latter is driven by RNA sequences called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that are found in both viral RNAs and cellular mRNAs. The diverse mechanisms used by IRESs are reflected in their structural diversity, and this structural diversity challenges us to develop a cohesive model linking IRES function to structure. With more direct structural information available for the viral IRESs, data suggest an inverse correlation between the degree to which an IRES RNA can form a stable structure on its own and the number of factors that it requires to function. Lessons learned from the viral IRESs may help understand the cellular IRESs, although more structural data are needed before any strong links can be made. PMID:19362464

  2. An inhibitor of eIF2 activity in the sRNA pool of eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Michael; Porter, David L; McCarthy, Thomas L

    2011-08-15

    Eukaryotic protein synthesis is a multi-step and highly controlled process that includes an early initiation complex containing eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2), GTP, and methionine-charged initiator methionyl-tRNA (met-tRNAi). During studies to reconstruct formation of the ternary complex containing these molecules, we detected a potent inhibitor in low molecular mass RNA (sRNA) preparations of eukaryotic tRNA. The ternary complex inhibitor (TCI) was retained in the total sRNA pool after met-tRNAi was charged by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, co-eluted with sRNA by size exclusion chromatography, but resolved from met-tRNAi by ion exchange chromatography. The adverse effect of TCI was not overcome by high GTP or magnesium omission and was independent of GTP regeneration. Rather, TCI suppressed the rate of ternary complex formation, and disrupted protein synthesis and the accumulation of heavy polymeric ribosomes in reticulocyte lysates in vitro. Lastly, a component or components in ribosome depleted cell lysate significantly reversed TCI activity. Since assembly of the met-tRNAi/eIF2/GTP ternary complex is integral to protein synthesis, awareness of TCI is important to avoid confusion in studies of translation initiation. A clear definition of TCI may also allow a better appreciation of physiologic or pathologic situations, factors, and events that control protein synthesis in vivo. PMID:21640800

  3. What do we know about ribosomal RNA methylation in Escherichia coli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeva, O V; Bogdanov, A A; Sergiev, P V

    2015-10-01

    A ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein that performs the synthesis of proteins. Ribosomal RNA of all organisms includes a number of modified nucleotides, such as base or ribose methylated and pseudouridines. Methylated nucleotides are highly conserved in bacteria and some even universally. In this review we discuss available data on a set of modification sites in the most studied bacteria, Escherichia coli. While most rRNA modification enzymes are known for this organism, the function of the modified nucleotides is rarely identified.

  4. Enhanced RNA Polymerase III-dependent Transcription Is Required for Oncogenic Transformation*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Sandra A. S.; Dubeau, Louis; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2008-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription, responsible for the synthesis of various stable RNAs, including 5 S rRNAs and tRNAs, is regulated by oncogenic proteins and tumor suppressors. Although it is well established that RNA pol III-dependent transcription is deregulated in transformed cells and malignant tumors, it has not been determined whether this represents a cause or consequence of these processes. We show that Rat1a fibroblasts undergoing oncogenic transformatio...

  5. BRF1 mutations alter RNA polymerase III-dependent transcription and cause neurodevelopmental anomalies.

    OpenAIRE

    Borck, G; Hög, F.; Dentici, M.; Tan, P; Sowada, N.; Medeira, A.; Gueneau, L.; Thiele, H; Kousi, M.; Lepri, F.; Wenzeck, L.; Blumenthal, I; Radicioni, A.; Schwarzenberg, T.; Mandriani, B.

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) synthesizes tRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs to regulate protein synthesis. Dysregulation of Pol III transcription has been linked to cancer, and germline mutations in genes encoding Pol III subunits or tRNA processing factors cause neurogenetic disorders in humans, such as hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and pontocerebellar hypoplasia. Here we describe an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and intellectual disability, as well...

  6. tmRNA-SmpB: a journey to the centre of the bacterial ribosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Weis, Félix; Bron, Patrick; Giudice, Emmanuel; Rolland, Jean-Paul; Thomas, Daniel; Felden, Brice; Gillet, Reynald

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Ribosomes mediate protein synthesis by decoding the information carried by messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and catalysing peptide bond formation between amino acids. When bacterial ribosomes stall on incomplete messages, the trans-translation quality control mechanism is activated by the transfer-messenger RNA bound to small protein B (tmRNA-SmpB ribonucleoprotein complex). Trans-translation liberates the stalled ribosomes and triggers degradation of the incomplete proteins. He...

  7. Comparison of Two Methods of RNA Extraction from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Rodrigues Gouveia; Suzete Cleusa Ferreira; Jerenice Esdras Ferreira; Sheila Aparecida Coelho Siqueira; Juliana Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare two different methods of extracting RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We further aimed to identify possible influences of variables—such as tissue size, duration of paraffin block storage, fixative type, primers used for cDNA synthesis, and endogenous genes tested—on the success of amplification from the samples. Both tested protocols used the same commercial kit for RNA extraction (the Recov...

  8. RNA interference in Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terenius, Ole; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Garbutt, Jennie S.;

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive...... public database at http://insectacentral.org/RNAi will continue to gather information on RNAi experiments. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. RNA Interference in livestock

    OpenAIRE

    Merkl, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    RNA Interference (RNAi) allows experimental reduction of gene expression, providing a tool for the investigation of gene function, disease therapy and the generation of animal models for human diseases. RNAi offers an opportunity to carry out precise genetic manipulations in a wide variety of species. This thesis describes the use of RNAi to downregulate two porcine genes, the whey protein Beta-Lactoglobulin (BLG) and the tumor suppressor protein p53. BLG is a major component in porcine and r...

  10. Looking for inhibitors of the dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase using a molecular docking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiano, Vicente; Garcia-Valtanen, Pablo; Micol, Vicente; Encinar, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) contains both an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain. Polymerase activity is responsible for viral RNA synthesis by a de novo initiation mechanism and represents an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The incidence of DENV has grown rapidly and it is now estimated that half of the human population is at risk of becoming infected with this virus. Despite this, there are no effective drugs to treat DENV infections. The present in silico study aimed at finding new inhibitors of the NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the four serotypes of DENV. We used a chemical library comprising 372,792 nonnucleotide compounds (around 325,319 natural compounds) to perform molecular docking experiments against a binding site of the RNA template tunnel of the virus polymerase. Compounds with high negative free energy variation (ΔG <−10.5 kcal/mol) were selected as putative inhibitors. Additional filters for favorable druggability and good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity were applied. Finally, after the screening process was completed, we identified 39 compounds as lead DENV polymerase inhibitor candidates. Potentially, these compounds could act as efficient DENV polymerase inhibitors in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase in Complex with Primer-Template RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosley, Ralph T.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Murakami, Eisuke; Lam, Angela M.; Grice, Rena L.; Du, Jinfa; Sofia, Michael J.; Furman, Philip A.; Otto, Michael J. (Pharmasset); (Emerald)

    2012-08-01

    The replication of the hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is accomplished by the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), for which mechanistic understanding and structure-guided drug design efforts have been hampered by its propensity to crystallize in a closed, polymerization-incompetent state. The removal of an autoinhibitory {beta}-hairpin loop from genotype 2a HCV NS5B increases de novo RNA synthesis by >100-fold, promotes RNA binding, and facilitated the determination of the first crystallographic structures of HCV polymerase in complex with RNA primer-template pairs. These crystal structures demonstrate the structural realignment required for primer-template recognition and elongation, provide new insights into HCV RNA synthesis at the molecular level, and may prove useful in the structure-based design of novel antiviral compounds. Additionally, our approach for obtaining the RNA primer-template-bound structure of HCV polymerase may be generally applicable to solving RNA-bound complexes for other viral RdRps that contain similar regulatory {beta}-hairpin loops, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus.

  12. A miRNA-tRNA mix-up: tRNA origin of proposed miRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopman, Nick C T; Heynen, Stephan; Haasnoot, Joost; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    The rapid release of new data from DNA genome sequencing projects has led to a variety of misannotations in public databases. Our results suggest that next generation sequencing approaches are particularly prone to such misannotations. Two related miRNA candidates did recently enter the miRBase database, miR-1274b and miR-1274a, but they share identical 18-nucleotide stretches with tRNA (Lys3) and tRNA (Lys5) , respectively. The possibility that the small RNA fragments that led to the description of these two miRNAs originated from the two tRNAs was examined. The ratio of the miR-1274b:miR-1274a fragments does closely resemble the known tRNA lys3:lys5 ratio in the cell. Furthermore, the proposed miRNA hairpins have a very low prediction score and the proposed miRNA genes are in fact endogenous retroviral elements. We searched for other miRNA-mimics in the human genome and found more examples of tRNA-miRNA mimicry. We propose that the corresponding miRNAs should be validated in more detail, as the small RNA fragments that led to their description are likely derived from tRNA processing. PMID:20818168

  13. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  14. Capture, unfolding, and detection of individual tRNA molecules using a nanopore device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Smith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNA are the most common RNA molecules in cells and have critical roles as both translators of the genetic code and regulators of protein synthesis. As such, numerous methods have focused on studying tRNA abundance and regulation, with the most widely used methods being RNA-seq and microarrays. Though revolutionary to transcriptomics, these assays are limited by an inability to encode tRNA modifications in the requisite cDNA. These modifications are abundant in tRNA and critical to their function. Here we describe proof-of-concept experiments where individual tRNA molecules are examined as linear strands using a biological nanopore. This method utilizes an enzymatically ligated synthetic DNA adapter to concentrate tRNA at the lipid bilayer of the nanopore device and efficiently denature individual tRNA molecules as they are pulled through the α-hemolysin (α-HL nanopore. Additionally, the DNA adapter provides a loading site for ϕ29 DNA polymerase (ϕ29 DNAP, which acts as a brake on the translocating tRNA. This increases the dwell time of adapted tRNA in the nanopore, allowing us to identify the region of the nanopore signal that is produced by the translocating tRNA itself. Using adapter-modified E. coli tRNAfMet and tRNALys, we show that the nanopore signal during controlled translocation is dependent on the identity of the tRNA. This confirms that adapter-modified tRNA can translocate end-to-end through nanopores and provides the foundation for future work in direct sequencing of individual transfer RNA with a nanopore-based device.

  15. Key steps from the “RNA World” to the “DNA World”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renard B.-L.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the « RNA World » hypothesis of the origin of life, RNAs are assumed to be the central macromolecules able to self-replicate, conserve information and catalyze the reactions necessary for a primitive metabolism and many enzymatic cofactors may be regarded as molecular fossils of the “RNA World”. In the key steps involved in the transition from the RNA World to the DNA World, two main steps can be distinguished: (i the synthesis of 2’-deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides catalyzed nowadays by the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase and (ii the synthesis of thymine, a base specific for DNA, from uracil which is a base specific for RNA, catalyzed today by the enzyme thymidylate synthase. In regard to the chemistry of sulfur used by both enzymes for achieving their respective catalysis, we were interested in the search for simple sulfur reactions able to catalyze such transformations and report here on first results in an approach from thionucleosides to the catalysis involved in the conversion of uracil to thymine. In the RNA World, the recruitment of cofactors was crucial to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA and we also describe interesting preliminary results obtained in the prebiotic synthesis of pyridoxal (vitamin B6 that is the precursor of the key coenzyme pyridoxal phosphate (PLP able to catalyze nowadays seven different enzymatic reactions.

  16. Current preclinical small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based conjugate systems for RNA therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Hyeon; Kang, Yoon Young; Jang, Hyo-Eun; Mok, Hyejung

    2016-09-01

    Recent promising clinical results of RNA therapeutics have drawn big attention of academia and industries to RNA therapeutics and their carrier systems. To improve their feasibility in clinics, systemic evaluations of currently available carrier systems under clinical trials and preclinical studies are needed. In this review, we focus on recent noticeable preclinical studies and clinical results regarding siRNA-based conjugates for clinical translations. Advantages and drawbacks of siRNA-based conjugates are discussed, compared to particle-based delivery systems. Then, representative siRNA-based conjugates with aptamers, peptides, carbohydrates, lipids, polymers, and nanostructured materials are introduced. To improve feasibility of siRNA conjugates in preclinical studies, several considerations for the rational design of siRNA conjugates in terms of cleavability, immune responses, multivalent conjugations, and mechanism of action are also presented. Lastly, we discuss lessons from previous preclinical and clinical studies related to siRNA conjugates and perspectives of their clinical applications. PMID:26514375

  17. Sulfonamide bearing oligonucleotides: Simple synthesis and efficient RNA recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, P.; Chandak, N.; Nielsen, P.;

    2012-01-01

    Four pyrimidine nucleosides wherein a benzensulfonamide group is linked to the C-5 position of the uracil nucleobase through a triazolyl or an alkynyl linker were prepared by Cu(I)-assisted azide-alkyne cycloadditions (CuAAC) or Sonogashira reactions, respectively, and incorporated into oligonucl...

  18. An evolutionary conserved pattern of 18S rRNA sequence complementarity to mRNA 5' UTRs and its implications for eukaryotic gene translation regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pánek, Josef; Kolár, Michal; Vohradský, Jirí; Shivaya Valásek, Leos

    2013-09-01

    There are several key mechanisms regulating eukaryotic gene expression at the level of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the least explored mechanisms of translational control are those that involve the translating ribosome per se, mediated for example via predicted interactions between the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and mRNAs. Here, we took advantage of robustly growing large-scale data sets of mRNA sequences for numerous organisms, solved ribosomal structures and computational power to computationally explore the mRNA-rRNA complementarity that is statistically significant across the species. Our predictions reveal highly specific sequence complementarity of 18S rRNA sequences with mRNA 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) forming a well-defined 3D pattern on the rRNA sequence of the 40S subunit. Broader evolutionary conservation of this pattern may imply that 5' UTRs of eukaryotic mRNAs, which have already emerged from the mRNA-binding channel, may contact several complementary spots on 18S rRNA situated near the exit of the mRNA binding channel and on the middle-to-lower body of the solvent-exposed 40S ribosome including its left foot. We discuss physiological significance of this structurally conserved pattern and, in the context of previously published experimental results, propose that it modulates scanning of the 40S subunit through 5' UTRs of mRNAs.

  19. RNA interference and its current application in mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈维干

    2004-01-01

    Objective The aim of this review was to assess RNA interference (RNAi) and its possibility as a potential and powerful tool to develop highly specific double-stranded RNA( dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA) based gene-silencing therapeutics.Data sources The data used in this review were obtained from the current RNAi-related research reports.Study selection dsRNA-mediated RNAi has recently emerged as a powerful reverse genetic tool to silence gene expression in multiple organisms. The discovery that synthetic duplexes of 21 nucleotides siRNAs trigger gene-specific silencing in mammalian cells has further expanded the utility of RNAi in to the mammalian system.Data extraction The currently published papers reporting the discovery and mechanism of RNAi phenomena and application of RNAi on gene function in mammalian cells were included.Data synthesis Since the recent development of RNAi technology in the mammalian system, investigators have used RNAi to elucidate gene function, and to develop gene-based therapeutics by delivery exogenous siRNA or siRNA expressing vector. The general and sequence-specific inhibitory effects of RNAi that will be selective, long-term, and systemic to modulate gene targets mentioned in similar reports have caused much concern about its effectiveness in mammals and its eventual use as a therapeutic mordality. Conclusions It is certain that the ability of RNAi in mammals to silence specific genes, either when transfected directly as siRNAs or when generated from DNA vectors, will undoubtedly accelerate the study of gene function and might also be used as a potentially useful method to develop highly gene-specific therapeutic methods. It is also expected that RNAi might one day be used to treat human diseases.

  20. Can we estimate bacterial growth rates from ribosomal RNA content?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the quantity of RNA in bacterial cells and their growth rate under laboratory conditions. It may be possible to use this relationship to provide information on the activity of natural bacterial communities, and in particular on growth rate. However, if this approach is to provide reliably interpretable information, the relationship between RNA content and growth rate must be well-understood. In particular, a requisite of such applications is that the relationship must be universal among bacteria, or alternately that the relationship can be determined and measured for specific bacterial taxa. The RNA-growth rate relationship has not been used to evaluate bacterial growth in field studies, although RNA content has been measured in single cells and in bulk extracts of field samples taken from coastal environments. These measurements have been treated as probable indicators of bacterial activity, but have not yet been interpreted as estimators of growth rate. The primary obstacle to such interpretations is a lack of information on biological and environmental factors that affect the RNA-growth rate relationship. In this paper, the available data on the RNA-growth rate relationship in bacteria will be reviewed, including hypotheses regarding the regulation of RNA synthesis and degradation as a function of growth rate and environmental factors; i.e. the basic mechanisms for maintaining RNA content in proportion to growth rate. An assessment of the published laboratory and field data, the current status of this research area, and some of the remaining questions will be presented.

  1. The transcription factor ERG recruits CCR4-NOT to control mRNA decay and mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambout, Xavier; Detiffe, Cécile; Bruyr, Jonathan; Mariavelle, Emeline; Cherkaoui, Majid; Brohée, Sylvain; Demoitié, Pauline; Lebrun, Marielle; Soin, Romuald; Lesage, Bart; Guedri, Katia; Beullens, Monique; Bollen, Mathieu; Farazi, Thalia A; Kettmann, Richard; Struman, Ingrid; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Kruys, Véronique; Simonis, Nicolas; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Dequiedt, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Control of mRNA levels, a fundamental aspect in the regulation of gene expression, is achieved through a balance between mRNA synthesis and decay. E26-related gene (Erg) proteins are canonical transcription factors whose previously described functions are confined to the control of mRNA synthesis. Here, we report that ERG also regulates gene expression by affecting mRNA stability and identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this function in human cells. ERG is recruited to mRNAs via interaction with the RNA-binding protein RBPMS, and it promotes mRNA decay by binding CNOT2, a component of the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex. Transcriptome-wide mRNA stability analysis revealed that ERG controls the degradation of a subset of mRNAs highly connected to Aurora signaling, whose decay during S phase is necessary for mitotic progression. Our data indicate that control of gene expression by mammalian transcription factors may follow a more complex scheme than previously anticipated, integrating mRNA synthesis and degradation. PMID:27273514

  2. In Profile: Models of Ribosome Biogenesis Defects and Regulation of Protein Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, P.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomes are the mediators of protein synthesis in the cell and therefore crucial to proper cell function. In addition, ribosomes are highly abundant, with ribosomal RNA making up 80% of the RNA in the cell. A large amount of resources go into maintaining this pool of ribosomes, so ribosome biogene

  3. Regulatory Roles for Long ncRNA and mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetyan, Armen R.; Buiting, Coen; Kuiper, Renske A.; Coolen, Marcel W., E-mail: M.Coolen@gen.umcn.nl [Department of Human Genetics, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences (NCMLS), Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen 6500 HB (Netherlands)

    2013-04-26

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have identified the transcription of a much larger portion of the genome than previously anticipated. Especially in the context of cancer it has become clear that aberrant transcription of both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are frequent events. The current dogma of RNA function describes mRNA to be responsible for the synthesis of proteins, whereas non-coding RNA can have regulatory or epigenetic functions. However, this distinction between protein coding and regulatory ability of transcripts may not be that strict. Here, we review the increasing body of evidence for the existence of multifunctional RNAs that have both protein-coding and trans-regulatory roles. Moreover, we demonstrate that coding transcripts bind to components of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2) with similar affinities as non-coding transcripts, revealing potential epigenetic regulation by mRNAs. We hypothesize that studies on the regulatory ability of disease-associated mRNAs will form an important new field of research.

  4. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs. However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  5. Isolation of high-quality total RNA from leaves of Myrciaria dubia "CAMU CAMU".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Juan Carlos Castro; Reátegui, Alina Del Carmen Egoavil; Flores, Julián Torres; Saavedra, Roberson Ramírez; Ruiz, Marianela Cobos; Correa, Sixto Alfredo Imán

    2013-01-01

    Myrciaria dubia is a main source of vitamin C for people in the Amazon region. Molecular studies of M. dubia require high-quality total RNA from different tissues. So far, no protocols have been reported for total RNA isolation from leaves of this species. The objective of this research was to develop protocols for extracting high-quality total RNA from leaves of M. dubia. Total RNA was purified following two modified protocols developed for leaves of other species (by Zeng and Yang, and by Reid et al.) and one modified protocol developed for fruits of the studied species (by Silva). Quantity and quality of purified total RNA were assessed by spectrophotometric and electrophoretic analysis. Additionally, quality of total RNA was evaluated with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). With these three modified protocols we were able to isolate high-quality RNA (A260nm/A280nm >1.9 and A260nm/A230nm >2.0). Highest yield was produced with the Zeng and Yang modified protocol (384±46µg ARN/g fresh weight). Furthermore, electrophoretic analysis showed the integrity of isolated RNA and the absence of DNA. Another proof of the high quality of our purified RNA was the successful cDNA synthesis and amplification of a segment of the M. dubia actin 1 gene. We report three modified protocols for isolation total RNA from leaves of M. dubia. The modified protocols are easy, rapid, low in cost, and effective for high-quality and quantity total RNA isolation suitable for cDNA synthesis and polymerase chain reaction. PMID:23742085

  6. Identifying microRNA/mRNA dysregulations in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles Gregory D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs are a class of noncoding RNA molecules that co-regulate the expression of multiple genes via mRNA transcript degradation or translation inhibition. Since they often target entire pathways, they may be better drug targets than genes or proteins. MicroRNAs are known to be dysregulated in many tumours and associated with aggressive or poor prognosis phenotypes. Since they regulate mRNA in a tissue specific manner, their functional mRNA targets are poorly understood. In previous work, we developed a method to identify direct mRNA targets of microRNA using patient matched microRNA/mRNA expression data using an anti-correlation signature. This method, applied to clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC, revealed many new regulatory pathways compromised in ccRCC. In the present paper, we apply this method to identify dysregulated microRNA/mRNA mechanisms in ovarian cancer using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Methods TCGA Microarray data was normalized and samples whose class labels (tumour or normal were ambiguous with respect to consensus ensemble K-Means clustering were removed. Significantly anti-correlated and correlated genes/microRNA differentially expressed between tumour and normal samples were identified. TargetScan was used to identify gene targets of microRNA. Results We identified novel microRNA/mRNA mechanisms in ovarian cancer. For example, the expression level of RAD51AP1 was found to be strongly anti-correlated with the expression of hsa-miR-140-3p, which was significantly down-regulated in the tumour samples. The anti-correlation signature was present separately in the tumour and normal samples, suggesting a direct causal dysregulation of RAD51AP1 by hsa-miR-140-3p in the ovary. Other pairs of potentially biological relevance include: hsa-miR-145/E2F3, hsa-miR-139-5p/TOP2A, and hsa-miR-133a/GCLC. We also identified sets of positively correlated microRNA/mRNA pairs that are most likely result from

  7. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E. [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States); Eghbalnia, Hamid R., E-mail: eghbalhd@uc.edu [University of Cincinnati, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (United States)

    2012-04-15

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation ({sup 1}H-{sup 15}N 2D HMQC) and proton-proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-{sup 1}H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino

  8. Stability of Human Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor mRNA in Stably Transfected Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱长虹; 田红

    2001-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of mRNA degradation on steady state levels of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) mRNA and on regulation of FSHR gene expression, the stability and half-life of FSHR mRNA were determined in transfected cells expressing recombinant FSHR. Time-dependent changes in FSHR mRNA content were determined by nuclease protection-solution hybridization assay (NPA) or by qualitative reverse transcription-competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in cultured hFSHR-YI cells, cell lines stably transfected with a human FSHR cDNA. FSHR mRNA content remained constant during 8 h control incubations of hFSHR-Y1 cells (NPA, 2.9±0.3 μg/mg RNA; RT-PCR, 2.7±0.3 μg/mg RNA). Actinomycin D (ActD, 5 μg/ml) inhibited mRNA synthesis, as assessed by incorporation of [3 H]uridine into total RNA, by 90 % within 1 h in hFSHR-Y1 cells. No effect of ActD on cellular morphology or viability was observed. ActD caused a time-dependent decrease in FSHR mRNA content in hFSHR-Y1 cell lines with a lag time of 1 h. There were no significant differences in the rate of FSHR mRNA degradation between the two methods of mRNA quantification. The half-life of hFSHR mRNA was 3.6±0.2 h by NPA and 3.1±0.1 h by RT-PCR. The results indicated that degradation of mRNA was an important process in maintenance of steady state expression of the FSHR gene in cells stably expressing recombinant receptor.

  9. Analysis of nucleolar pre-rRNA processing sites in pea(Pisum sativum)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG; Hong; (龙; 鸿); ZENG; Xianlu; (曾宪录); JIAO; Mingda; (焦明大); HU; Bo; (胡; 波); SUN; Haijing; (孙海晶); LIU; Zhenlan; (刘振兰); ZHANG; Liyong; (张立勇); HAO; Shui; (郝; 水)

    2003-01-01

    The location of rRNA processing was analyzed by using in situ hybridization with ITS1 probe and immunolabeling of anti-fibrillarin mAb in pea (Pisum sativum) root pole cells. The results showed that rRNA processing sites were in dense fibrillar components (DFCs) and granular components (GCs), but not in fibrillar centers (FCs). Low doses of actinomycin D (AMD) treatment can selectively suppress pre-rRNA synthesis but cannot disturb the processing of preformed pre-rRNAs. With AMD treatment prolonged, the density of labeled signals gradually decreased, indicating the preformed pre-rRNAs were gradually processed.

  10. Promoter Clearance by RNA Polymerase II Is an Extended, Multistep Process Strongly Affected by Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Mahadeb; McKean, David; Luse, Donal S.

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized RNA polymerase II complexes halted from +16 to +49 on two templates which differ in the initial 20 nucleotides (nt) of the transcribed region. On a template with a purine-rich initial transcript, most complexes halted between +20 and +32 become arrested and cannot resume RNA synthesis without the SII elongation factor. These arrested complexes all translocate upstream to the same location, such that about 12 to 13 bases of RNA remain in each of the complexes after SII-me...

  11. The 3′ Untranslated Region of the Andes Hantavirus Small mRNA Functionally Replaces the Poly(A) Tail and Stimulates Cap-Dependent Translation Initiation from the Viral mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In the process of translation of eukaryotic mRNAs, the 5′ cap and the 3′ poly(A) tail interact synergistically to stimulate protein synthesis. Unlike its cellular counterparts, the small mRNA (SmRNA) of Andes hantavirus (ANDV), a member of the Bunyaviridae, lacks a 3′ poly(A) tail. Here we report that the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the ANDV SmRNA functionally replaces a poly(A) tail and synergistically stimulates cap-dependent translation initiation from the viral mRNA. Stimulation of ...

  12. Switching off small RNA regulation with trap-mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Johansen, Jesper; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2009-01-01

    Small non-coding regulatory RNAs in bacteria have been shown predominantly to be tightly regulated at the level of transcription initiation, and sRNAs that function by an antisense mechanism on trans-encoded target mRNAs have been shown or predicted to act stoichiometrically. Here we show that Mic......M, which silences the expression of an outer membrane protein, YbfM under most growth conditions, does not become destabilized by target mRNA overexpression, indicating that the small RNA regulator acts catalytically. Furthermore, our regulatory studies suggested that control of micM expression is unlikely...... to operate at the level of transcription initiation. By employing a highly sensitive genetic screen we uncovered a novel RNA-based regulatory principle in which induction of a trap-mRNA leads to selective degradation of a small regulatory RNA molecule, thereby abolishing the sRNA-based silencing of its...

  13. Role of RNA interference in plant improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Umesh Balkrishna; Gurav, Ranjit Gajanan; Bapat, Vishwas Anant

    2011-06-01

    Research to alter crops for their better performance involving modern technology is underway in numerous plants, and achievements in transgenic plants are impacting crop improvements in unparalleled ways. Striking progress has been made using genetic engineering technology over the past two decades in manipulating genes from diverse and exotic sources, and inserting them into crop plants for inducing desirable characteristics. RNA interference (RNAi) has recently been identified as a natural mechanism for regulation of gene expression in all higher organisms from plants to humans and promises greater accuracy and precision to plant improvement. The expression of any gene can be down-regulated in a highly explicit manner exclusive of affecting the expression of any other gene by using RNAi technologies. Additional research in this field has been focused on a number of other areas including microRNAs, hairpin RNA, and promoter methylation. Manipulating new RNAi pathways, which generate small RNA molecules to amend gene expression in crops, can produce new quality traits and having better potentiality of protection against abiotic and biotic stresses. Nutritional improvement, change in morphology, or enhanced secondary metabolite synthesis are some of the other advantages of RNAi technology. In addition to its roles in regulating gene expression, RNAi is also used as a natural defense mechanism against molecular parasites such as jumping genes and viral genetic elements that affect genome stability. Even though much advancement has been made on the field of RNAi over the preceding few years, the full prospective of RNAi for crop improvement remains to be fully realized. The intricacy of RNAi pathway, the molecular machineries, and how it relates to plant development are still to be explained.

  14. Evolutionary triplet models of structured RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Robert K; Holmes, Ian

    2009-08-01

    The reconstruction and synthesis of ancestral RNAs is a feasible goal for paleogenetics. This will require new bioinformatics methods, including a robust statistical framework for reconstructing histories of substitutions, indels and structural changes. We describe a "transducer composition" algorithm for extending pairwise probabilistic models of RNA structural evolution to models of multiple sequences related by a phylogenetic tree. This algorithm draws on formal models of computational linguistics as well as the 1985 protosequence algorithm of David Sankoff. The output of the composition algorithm is a multiple-sequence stochastic context-free grammar. We describe dynamic programming algorithms, which are robust to null cycles and empty bifurcations, for parsing this grammar. Example applications include structural alignment of non-coding RNAs, propagation of structural information from an experimentally-characterized sequence to its homologs, and inference of the ancestral structure of a set of diverged RNAs. We implemented the above algorithms for a simple model of pairwise RNA structural evolution; in particular, the algorithms for maximum likelihood (ML) alignment of three known RNA structures and a known phylogeny and inference of the common ancestral structure. We compared this ML algorithm to a variety of related, but simpler, techniques, including ML alignment algorithms for simpler models that omitted various aspects of the full model and also a posterior-decoding alignment algorithm for one of the simpler models. In our tests, incorporation of basepair structure was the most important factor for accurate alignment inference; appropriate use of posterior-decoding was next; and fine details of the model were least important. Posterior-decoding heuristics can be substantially faster than exact phylogenetic inference, so this motivates the use of sum-over-pairs heuristics where possible (and approximate sum-over-pairs). For more exact probabilistic

  15. Evolutionary triplet models of structured RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction and synthesis of ancestral RNAs is a feasible goal for paleogenetics. This will require new bioinformatics methods, including a robust statistical framework for reconstructing histories of substitutions, indels and structural changes. We describe a "transducer composition" algorithm for extending pairwise probabilistic models of RNA structural evolution to models of multiple sequences related by a phylogenetic tree. This algorithm draws on formal models of computational linguistics as well as the 1985 protosequence algorithm of David Sankoff. The output of the composition algorithm is a multiple-sequence stochastic context-free grammar. We describe dynamic programming algorithms, which are robust to null cycles and empty bifurcations, for parsing this grammar. Example applications include structural alignment of non-coding RNAs, propagation of structural information from an experimentally-characterized sequence to its homologs, and inference of the ancestral structure of a set of diverged RNAs. We implemented the above algorithms for a simple model of pairwise RNA structural evolution; in particular, the algorithms for maximum likelihood (ML alignment of three known RNA structures and a known phylogeny and inference of the common ancestral structure. We compared this ML algorithm to a variety of related, but simpler, techniques, including ML alignment algorithms for simpler models that omitted various aspects of the full model and also a posterior-decoding alignment algorithm for one of the simpler models. In our tests, incorporation of basepair structure was the most important factor for accurate alignment inference; appropriate use of posterior-decoding was next; and fine details of the model were least important. Posterior-decoding heuristics can be substantially faster than exact phylogenetic inference, so this motivates the use of sum-over-pairs heuristics where possible (and approximate sum-over-pairs. For more exact

  16. Induction of hepatic synthesis of serum amyloid A protein and actin.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, J F; Stearman, R S; Peltzman, C G; Potter, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Major changes in the mRNA population of murine liver occur after administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, an agent that causes increases in the concentrations of acute-phase serum proteins. The mRNA for one of these, serum amyloid A, is increased at least 500-fold compared to the normal level. It becomes one of the most abundant hepatic mRNAs, and serum amyloid A synthesis comprises about 2.5% of total hepatic protein synthesis in the acute-phase response. Its synthesis is tissue-speci...

  17. Quantification of miRNA-mRNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniategui, Ander; Nogales-Cadenas, Rubén; Vázquez, Miguél; Aranguren, Xabier L; Agirre, Xabier; Luttun, Aernout; Prosper, Felipe; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Rubio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    miRNAs are small RNA molecules (' 22nt) that interact with their corresponding target mRNAs inhibiting the translation of the mRNA into proteins and cleaving the target mRNA. This second effect diminishes the overall expression of the target mRNA. Several miRNA-mRNA relationship databases have been deployed, most of them based on sequence complementarities. However, the number of false positives in these databases is large and they do not overlap completely. Recently, it has been proposed to combine expression measurement from both miRNA and mRNA and sequence based predictions to achieve more accurate relationships. In our work, we use LASSO regression with non-positive constraints to integrate both sources of information. LASSO enforces the sparseness of the solution and the non-positive constraints restrict the search of miRNA targets to those with down-regulation effects on the mRNA expression. We named this method TaLasso (miRNA-Target LASSO).We used TaLasso on two public datasets that have paired expression levels of human miRNAs and mRNAs. The top ranked interactions recovered by TaLasso are especially enriched (more than using any other algorithm) in experimentally validated targets. The functions of the genes with mRNA transcripts in the top-ranked interactions are meaningful. This is not the case using other algorithms.TaLasso is available as Matlab or R code. There is also a web-based tool for human miRNAs at http://talasso.cnb.csic.es/.

  18. Effect of single base changes and the absence of modified bases in 16S RNA on the reconstitution and function of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gene coding for E. coli 16S rRNA was placed in pUC19 under the control of the strong class III T7 promoter, phi 10, by ligation of the 1490 bp BclI/BstEII fragment of the rrnB operon with appropriate synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Such constructs allowed efficient in vitro synthesis of full-length transcripts (up to 900 mol RNA/mol template) free of modified bases. The synthetic RNA could be assembled into 30S subunits upon addition of E. coli 30S ribosomal proteins. The particles co-sedimented with authentic 30S particles and were electron microscopically indistinguishable from them. Upon addition of 50S subunits, codon-dependent P-site binding of tRNA and codon-dependent polypeptide synthesis were >80% of 30S reconstituted from natural 16S RNA and >50% of isolated 30S. UV-induced crosslinking of P-site bound AcVal-tRNA to residue C1400 was preserved. Changing C1400 to A had little effect on reconstitution, P-site binding, or polypeptide synthesis. However, the substitution of C1499 by G markedly inhibited assembly. The effect on P-site binding and polypeptide synthesis is under study. These results show (1) none of the modified bases of 16S RNA are essential for protein synthesis, (2) substitution of A for C1400 has little functional effect, and (3) position 1400 may be important for ribosome assembly

  19. Hetero subunit interaction and RNA recognition of yeast tRNA (m7G46) methyltransferase synthesized in a wheat germ cell-free translation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneyoshi, Yuki; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Tomikawa, Chie; Toyooka, Takashi; Ochi, Anna; Masaoka, Takashi; Endo, Yaeta; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    Yeast tRNA (m(7)G46) methyltransferase contains two protein subunits (Trm8 and Trm82). The enzyme catalyzes a methyl-transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N(7) atom of guanine at position 46 in tRNA. We deviced synthesis of active Trm8-Trm82 heterodimer in a wheat germ cell-free translation system. When Trm8 or Trm82 mRNA were used for a synthesis, Trm8 or Trm82 protein could be synthesized. Upon mixing the synthesized Trm8 and Trm82 proteins, no active Trm8-Trm82 heterodimer was produced. Active Trm8-Trm82 heterodimer was only synthesized under conditions, in which both Trm8 and Trm82 mRNAs were co-translated. To address the RNA recognition mechanism of the Trm8-Trm82 complex, we investigated methyl acceptance activities of eight truncated yeast tRNA(Phe) transcripts. In this meeting, we demonstrate that yeast Trm8-Trm82 has stricter recognition requirements for the tRNA molecule as compared to the bacterial enzyme, TrmB.

  20. Recognition determinants for proteins and antibiotics within 23S rRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwalte, S; Voldborg, Bjørn Gunnar Rude; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup;

    1995-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs fold into phylogenetically conserved secondary and tertiary structures that determine their function in protein synthesis. We have investigated Escherichia coli 23S rRNA to identify structural elements that interact with antibiotic and protein ligands. Using a combination of molecu...

  1. An RNA secondary structure bias for non-homologous reverse transcriptase-mediated deletions in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Mogens; Carrasco, Maria L; Jespersen, Thomas;

    2004-01-01

    result from template switching during first-strand cDNA synthesis and that the choice of acceptor sites for non-homologous recombination are guided by non-paired regions. Our results may have implications for recombination events taking place within structured regions of retroviral RNA genomes......, especially in the absence of longer stretches of sequence similarity....

  2. Evaluation of flux synthesis algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flux synthesis algorithm which is the best fit to the numerical solution of the multigroup diffusion equations, was determined. Three different types of synthesis were studied: 1) discontinuous synthesis 2) continuous synthesis 3) pseudo-continuous synthesis. A matrix and a differential formulation were developed for the first two types of synthesis. For pseudo-continuous synthesis only the matrix formulation was used. Some tests were performed and the results allowed us to establish the following order of efficiency for the algorithms: 1) continuous synthesis (matrix formulation) 2) continuous synthesis (differential formulation) 3) pseudo-continuous synthesis 4) discontinuous synthesis (matrix formulation) 5) discontinuous synthesis (differential formulation). (Author)

  3. Alternative methods for the efficient construction of short hairpin RNA expression vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Zhang, Tingting; Guo, Lijun; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-06-01

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated RNA interference has become a basic technique in modern molecular biology and biochemistry for studying gene function and biological pathways. Here, we report two alternative and efficient methods to construct shRNA expression vectors based respectively on multiple-step sequential PCR and primer extension-homologous recombination (PE-HR). Neither method requires synthesizing long oligonucleotides containing hairpin sequences as used in traditional approaches. The hairpin sequences may produce mutations during oligo synthesis, pose problems in annealing, and lead to inefficient cloning. The PE-HR method further provides rapid and economical construction of shRNA expression vectors without needing the ligation procedure. PMID:25794926

  4. Dynamics of human telomerase RNA structure revealed by antisense oligonucleotide technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkova, Daria V; Azhibek, Dulat M; Zatsepin, Timofei S; Naraikina, Yulia V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Zvereva, Maria I; Rubtsova, Maria P

    2013-12-01

    Telomeres are the nucleoprotein complexes that cap the linear chromosome ends. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains telomere length in stem, embryonic and cancer cells. Somatic cells don't contain active telomerase and telomere function as mitotic clock and telomere length determines the number of cell divisions. Telomerase RNA (TER) contains the template for telomere synthesis and serves as a structural scaffold for holoenzyme assembly. We compared different oligonucleotide based methods for telomerase RNA inhibition, such as antisense oligonucleotides, knockdown by transient siRNA transfection and silencing by miRNA derived from short expressed RNA hairpin in HEK293 cells. All of these methods were applied to different TER regions. Our results revealed that CR2/CR3 domain of TER is accessible in vitro and in vivo and could serve as an optimal site for oligonucleotide-based telomerase silencing.

  5. RNA interference and antiviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionally conserved gene silencing mechanism present in a variety of eukaryotic species. RNAi uses short double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to trigger degradation or translation repression of homologous RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner. This system can be induced effectively in vitro and in vivo by direct application of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), or by expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) with non-viral and viral vectors. To date, RNAi has been extensively used as a novel and effective tool for functional genomic studies, and has displayed great potential in treating human diseases, including human genetic and acquired disorders such as cancer and viral infections. In the present review, we focus on the recent development in the use of RNAi in the prevention and treatment of viral infections. The mechanisms,strategies, hurdles and prospects of employing RNAi in the pharmaceutical industry are also discussed.

  6. Regulation of RNA binding proteins in trypanosomatid protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, María Albertina; Cervini, Gabriela; Cassola, Alejandro

    2016-02-26

    Posttranscriptional mechanisms have a critical role in the overall outcome of gene expression. These mechanisms are especially relevant in protozoa from the genus Trypanosoma, which is composed by death threatening parasites affecting people in Sub-saharan Africa or in the Americas. In these parasites the classic view of regulation of transcription initiation to modulate the products of a given gene cannot be applied. This is due to the presence of transcription start sites that give rise to long polycistronic units that need to be processed costranscriptionally by trans-splicing and polyadenylation to give mature monocistronic mRNAs. Posttranscriptional mechanisms such as mRNA degradation and translational repression are responsible for the final synthesis of the required protein products. In this context, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in trypanosomes have a relevant role as modulators of mRNA abundance and translational repression by associating to the 3' untranslated regions in mRNA. Many different RBPs have been proposed to modulate cohorts of mRNAs in trypanosomes. However, the current understanding of their functions lacks a dynamic view on the different steps at which these RBPs are regulated. Here, we discuss different evidences to propose regulatory events for different RBPs in these parasites. These events vary from regulated developmental expression, to biogenesis of cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes in the nucleus, and condensation of RBPs and mRNA into large cytoplasmic granules. Finally, we discuss how newly identified posttranslational modifications of RBPs and mRNA metabolism-related proteins could have an enormous impact on the modulation of mRNA abundance. To understand these modifications is especially relevant in these parasites due to the fact that the enzymes involved could be interesting targets for drug therapy. PMID:26981203

  7. RNA nanoparticles come of age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John J.Rossi

    2011-01-01

    @@ RNA has multiple functions in nature, including informa- tional transfer (mRNA) Ill, adaptor function (tRNAs) [2], guide functions (snRNAs, snoRNAs) [3,4]catalytic func- tion (ribozymes and the large ribosomal RNA) [5-7], and environmental sensing (riboswitehes) [8].In contrast, DNA only serves as an information storage molecule, and proteins serve as structural and enzymatic molecules.

  8. The expanding functions of cellular helicases: the tombusvirus RNA replication enhancer co-opts the plant eIF4AIII-like AtRH2 and the DDX5-like AtRH5 DEAD-box RNA helicases to promote viral asymmetric RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kovalev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on recruited host factors that aid several critical steps during replication. Several of the co-opted host factors bind to the viral RNA, which plays multiple roles, including mRNA function, as an assembly platform for the viral replicase (VRC, template for RNA synthesis, and encapsidation during infection. It is likely that remodeling of the viral RNAs and RNA-protein complexes during the switch from one step to another requires RNA helicases. In this paper, we have discovered a second group of cellular RNA helicases, including the eIF4AIII-like yeast Fal1p and the DDX5-like Dbp3p and the orthologous plant AtRH2 and AtRH5 DEAD box helicases, which are co-opted by tombusviruses. Unlike the previously characterized DDX3-like AtRH20/Ded1p helicases that bind to the 3' terminal promoter region in the viral minus-strand (-RNA, the other class of eIF4AIII-like RNA helicases bind to a different cis-acting element, namely the 5' proximal RIII(- replication enhancer (REN element in the TBSV (-RNA. We show that the binding of AtRH2 and AtRH5 helicases to the TBSV (-RNA could unwind the dsRNA structure within the RIII(- REN. This unique characteristic allows the eIF4AIII-like helicases to perform novel pro-viral functions involving the RIII(- REN in stimulation of plus-strand (+RNA synthesis. We also show that AtRH2 and AtRH5 helicases are components of the tombusvirus VRCs based on co-purification experiments. We propose that eIF4AIII-like helicases destabilize dsRNA replication intermediate within the RIII(- REN that promotes bringing the 5' and 3' terminal (-RNA sequences in close vicinity via long-range RNA-RNA base pairing. This newly formed RNA structure promoted by eIF4AIII helicase together with AtRH20 helicase might facilitate the recycling of the viral replicases for multiple rounds of (+-strand synthesis, thus resulting in asymmetrical viral replication.

  9. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R.; Janowski, Andrew B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  10. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth R Krishnamurthy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent.

  11. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Janowski, Andrew B; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent.

  12. Recognition of HIV-TAR RNA using neomycin-benzimidazole conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Nihar; Kumar, Sunil; Watkins, Derrick; Wang, Deyun; Appella, Daniel H; Arya, Dev P

    2013-10-15

    Synthesis of a novel class of compounds and their biophysical studies with TAR-RNA are presented. The synthesis of these compounds was achieved by conjugating neomycin, an aminoglycoside, with benzimidazoles modeled from a B-DNA minor groove binder, Hoechst 33258. The neomycin-benzimidazole conjugates have varying linkers that connect the benzimidazole and neomycin units. The linkers of varying length (5-23 atoms) in these conjugates contain one to three triazole units. The UV thermal denaturation experiments showed that the conjugates resulted in greater stabilization of the TAR-RNA than either neomycin or benzimidazole used in the synthesis of conjugates. These results were corroborated by the FID displacement and tat-TAR inhibition assays. The binding of ligands to the TAR-RNA is affected by the length and composition of the linker. Our results show that increasing the number of triazole groups and the linker length in these compounds have diminishing effect on the binding to TAR-RNA. Compounds that have shorter linker length and fewer triazole units in the linker displayed increased affinity towards the TAR RNA.

  13. microRNA as a potential vector for the propagation of robustness in protein expression and oscillatory dynamics within a ceRNA network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Gérard

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. miRNAs can induce thresholds in protein synthesis. Such thresholds in protein output can be also achieved by oligomerization of transcription factors (TF for the control of gene expression. First, we propose a minimal model for protein expression regulated by miRNA and by oligomerization of TF. We show that miRNA and oligomerization of TF generate a buffer, which increases the robustness of protein output towards molecular noise as well as towards random variation of kinetics parameters. Next, we extend the model by considering that the same miRNA can bind to multiple messenger RNAs, which accounts for the dynamics of a minimal competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs network. The model shows that, through common miRNA regulation, TF can control the expression of all proteins formed by the ceRNA network, even if it drives the expression of only one gene in the network. The model further suggests that the threshold in protein synthesis mediated by the oligomerization of TF can be propagated to the other genes, which can increase the robustness of the expression of all genes in such ceRNA network. Furthermore, we show that a miRNA could increase the time delay of a "Goodwin-like" oscillator model, which may favor the occurrence of oscillations of large amplitude. This result predicts important roles of miRNAs in the control of the molecular mechanisms leading to the emergence of biological rhythms. Moreover, a model for the latter oscillator embedded in a ceRNA network indicates that the oscillatory behavior can be propagated, via the shared miRNA, to all proteins formed by such ceRNA network. Thus, by means of computational models, we show that miRNAs could act as vectors allowing the propagation of robustness in protein synthesis as well as oscillatory behaviors within ceRNA networks.

  14. A novel RNA binding protein that interacts with NMDA R1 mRNA: regulation by ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2006-05-01

    Excitatory NMDA receptors are an important target of ethanol. Chronic ethanol exposure, in vivo and in vitro, increases polypeptide levels of NR1 subunit, the key subunit of functional NMDA receptors. In vitro, chronic ethanol treatment increases the half-life of NR1 mRNA and this observation is dependent on new protein synthesis. The present study was undertaken to locate cis-acting region(s) within the NR1 3'-untranslated region (UTR) and identify NR1 3'-UTR binding trans-acting proteins expressed in mouse fetal cortical neurons. Utilizing RNA gel shift assays we identified a 156-nt cis-acting region that binds to polysomal trans-acting proteins. This binding was highly specific as inclusion of cyclophilin RNA or tRNA did not interfere with cis-trans interactions. Importantly, the 3'-UTR binding activity was significantly up-regulated in the presence of ethanol. UV cross-link analysis detected three NR1 3'-UTR binding proteins and their molecular mass calculated by Northwestern analysis was approximately 88, 60 and 47 kDa, respectively. Northwestern analysis showed a significant up-regulation of the 88-kDa protein after chronic ethanol treatment. The 88-kDa protein was purified and identified by tandem mass spectrometry as the beta subunit of alpha glucosidase II (GIIbeta). That GIIbeta is indeed a trans-acting protein and binds specifically to 3'-UTR of NR1 mRNA was confirmed by RNA gel mobility supershift assays and immuno RT-PCR. Western blotting data established a significant increase of GIIbeta polypeptide in chronic ethanol-exposed fetal cortical neurons. We hypothesize that the identified cis-acting region and the associated RNA-binding proteins are important regulators of NR1 subunit gene expression.

  15. Decameric SelA•tRNA(Sec) ring structure reveals mechanism of bacterial selenocysteine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Bröcker, Markus J; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Hammond, Gifty; Suetsugu, Shiro; Söll, Dieter; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2013-04-01

    The 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), is synthesized on its cognate transfer RNA (tRNA(Sec)). In bacteria, SelA synthesizes Sec from Ser-tRNA(Sec), whereas in archaea and eukaryotes SepSecS forms Sec from phosphoserine (Sep) acylated to tRNA(Sec). We determined the crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus SelA complexes, which revealed a ring-shaped homodecamer that binds 10 tRNA(Sec) molecules, each interacting with four SelA subunits. The SelA N-terminal domain binds the tRNA(Sec)-specific D-arm structure, thereby discriminating Ser-tRNA(Sec) from Ser-tRNA(Ser). A large cleft is created between two subunits and accommodates the 3'-terminal region of Ser-tRNA(Sec). The SelA structures together with in vivo and in vitro enzyme assays show decamerization to be essential for SelA function. SelA catalyzes pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent Sec formation involving Arg residues nonhomologous to those in SepSecS. Different protein architecture and substrate coordination of the bacterial enzyme provide structural evidence for independent evolution of the two Sec synthesis systems present in nature. PMID:23559248

  16. Influence of microRNA on the Maintenance of Human Iron Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Clarke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient critical for many cellular functions including DNA synthesis, ATP generation, and cellular proliferation. Though essential, excessive iron may contribute to the generation of free radicals capable of damaging cellular lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. As such, the maintenance and control of cellular iron homeostasis is critical to prevent either iron deficiency or iron toxicity conditions. The maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis is largely coordinated by a family of cytosolic RNA binding proteins known as Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRP that function to post-transcriptionally control the translation and/or stability of mRNA encoding proteins required for iron uptake, storage, transport, and utilization. More recently, a class of small non-coding RNA known as microRNA (miRNA has also been implicated in the control of iron metabolism. To date, miRNA have been demonstrated to post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of genes associated with iron acquisition (transferrin receptor and divalent metal transporter, iron export (ferroportin, iron storage (ferritin, iron utilization (ISCU, and coordination of systemic iron homeostasis (HFE and hemojevelin. Given the diversity of miRNA and number of potential mRNA targets, characterizing factors that contribute to alterations in miRNA expression, biogenesis, and processing will enhance our understanding of mechanisms by which cells respond to changes in iron demand and/or iron availability to control cellular iron homeostasis.

  17. Preparation and application of hydroxyapatite(HA) nanoparticles/NR2B-siRNA complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hui; HUANG Dong; ZHU Shai-hong; YAN Xue-bin; GU Yong-hong; YAN Hui; WU Li-xiang

    2008-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite(HA) nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation-hydrothermal synthesis and their exosyndrome was estimated via transmission electron microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis and ultraviolet spectrophotometry were used to evaluate the ability of HA to bind NR2B-siRNA at different pH values and at different HA-NR2B-siRNA ratios. And the stability of the complex in saline was also evaluated. The effect of HA/NR2B-siRNA complex on chronic inflammatory pain was evaluated in vivo in mice. Transmission electron microscopy(TEM) reveals that HA nanoparticles are thin strips or short rod in shape and the one-dimensional particle size of HA nanoparticles is 40-50 nm. Under the acid or neutral condition, the Zeta potential of HA is positive; nanoparticles can completely bind NR2B-siRNA when the HA:NR2B-siRNA ratio is at or larger than 35-1; while under the alkaline condition, the affinity of HA to NR2B-siRNA is rather weak. HA/NR2B-siRNA complex is not dissociated when being resuspended in saline. The nociception of the tonic phase induced by formalin is significantly reduced in the HA/NR2B-siRNA treated mice as compared with the controls. Therefore, HA may be a new siRNA nano-vector material.

  18. Modeling protein synthesis from a physicist's perspective: a toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, A; Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are polymers of amino acids. These macromolecules are synthesized by intracellular machines called {\\it ribosome}. Although, traditionally, the experimental investigation of protein synthesis has been an active area of research in molecular cell biology, important quantitative models of this phenomenon have been reported mostly in the research journals devoted to statistical physics and related interdisciplinary topics. From the perspective of a physicist, protein synthesis is a phenomenon of {\\it classical transport of interacting ribosomes on a messenger RNA (mRNA) template} that dictates the sequence of the amino acids on the protein. Here we bring this frontier area of contemporary research into the classroom by appropriate simplification of the models and methods. In particular, we develope a simple toy model and analyze it by some elementary techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to predict the average rate of protein synthesis and their spatial organization in the steady-state.

  19. The RNA interference pathway affects midgut infection- and escape barriers for Sindbis virus in Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RNA interference (RNAi pathway acts as an innate antiviral immune response in Aedes aegypti, modulating arbovirus infection of mosquitoes. Sindbis virus (SINV; family: Togaviridae, genus: Alphavirus is an arbovirus that infects Ae. aegypti in the laboratory. SINV strain TR339 encounters a midgut escape barrier (MEB during infection of Ae. aegypti. The nature of this barrier is not well understood. To investigate the role of the midgut as the central organ determining vector competence for arboviruses, we generated transgenic mosquitoes in which the RNAi pathway was impaired in midgut tissue of bloodfed females. We used these mosquitoes to reveal effects of RNAi impairment in the midgut on SINV replication, midgut infection and dissemination efficiencies, and mosquito longevity. Results As a novel tool for studying arbovirus-mosquito interactions, we engineered a transgenic mosquito line with an impaired RNAi pathway in the midgut of bloodfed females by silencing expression of the Aa-dcr2 gene. In midgut tissue of the transgenic Carb/dcr16 line, Aa-dcr2 expression was reduced ~50% between 1-7 days post-bloodmeal (pbm when compared to the recipient mosquito strain. After infection with SINV-TR339EGFP, Aa-dcr2 expression levels were enhanced in both mosquito strains. In the RNAi pathway impaired mosquito strain SINV titers and midgut infection rates were significantly higher at 7 days pbm. There was also a strong tendency for increased virus dissemination rates among the transgenic mosquitoes. Between 7-14 days pbm, SINV was diminished in midgut tissue of the transgenic mosquitoes. Transgenic impairment of the RNAi pathway and/or SINV infection did not affect longevity of the mosquitoes. Conclusions We showed that RNAi impaired transgenic mosquitoes are a useful tool for studying arbovirus-mosquito interactions at the molecular level. Following ingestion by Ae. aegypti, the recombinant SINV-TR339EGFP was confronted with both

  20. Concepts and introduction to RNA bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Ruzzo, Walter L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA bioinformatics and computational RNA biology have emerged from implementing methods for predicting the secondary structure of single sequences. The field has evolved to exploit multiple sequences to take evolutionary information into account, such as compensating (and structure preserving) base...... for interactions between RNA and proteins.Here, we introduce the basic concepts of predicting RNA secondary structure relevant to the further analyses of RNA sequences. We also provide pointers to methods addressing various aspects of RNA bioinformatics and computational RNA biology....

  1. MiRNA profiles of prostate carcinoma detected by multi-platform miRNA screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wach, Sven; Nolte, Elke; Szczyrba, Jaroslaw;

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression via posttranscriptional inhibition of protein synthesis. They play a vital role in tumorigenesis. To characterize the diagnostic potential of miRNAs in prostate cancer, a leading cause of cancer mortality, we performed.......6% with an area under the receiver–operator characteristic curve of 0.810. Our data extend the knowledge about the deregulation of miRNAs in prostate cancer. The differential expression of several miRNAs is highly consistent using independent cohorts of tumor samples, different tissue preservation methods...... and different experimental methods. Our results indicate that combinations of miRNAs are promising biomarkers for the diagnosis of prostate cancer....

  2. Growth hormone stimulates the collagen synthesis in human tendon and skeletal muscle without affecting myofibrillar protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doessing, Simon; Heinemeier, Katja; Holm, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    matrix collagen synthesis in skeletal muscle and tendon, but without any effect upon myofibrillar protein synthesis. The results suggest that GH is more important in strengthening the matrix tissue than for muscle cell hypertrophy in adult human musculotendinous tissue.......In skeletal muscle and tendon the extracellular matrix confers important tensile properties and is crucially important for tissue regeneration after injury. Musculoskeletal tissue adaptation is influenced by mechanical loading, which modulates the availability of growth factors, including growth...... young individuals. rhGH administration caused an increase in serum GH, serum IGF-I, and IGF-I mRNA expression in tendon and muscle. Tendon collagen I mRNA expression and tendon collagen protein synthesis increased by 3.9-fold and 1.3-fold, respectively (P muscle collagen I m...

  3. RNA er jo bare matematik!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaavand, Jakob Lindblad

    2011-01-01

    Hvordan kan man kurere sygdomme med matematiske geometriske strukturer? Det kan man i princippet, hvis de geometriske figurer er RNA-molekyler, og sygdommen skyldes syge gener.......Hvordan kan man kurere sygdomme med matematiske geometriske strukturer? Det kan man i princippet, hvis de geometriske figurer er RNA-molekyler, og sygdommen skyldes syge gener....

  4. RNA Structural Alignments, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havgaard, Jakob Hull; Gorodkin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous alignment and secondary structure prediction of RNA sequences is often referred to as "RNA structural alignment." A class of the methods for structural alignment is based on the principles proposed by Sankoff more than 25 years ago. The Sankoff algorithm simultaneously folds and aligns...

  5. Cellular Delivery of RNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlea, Lorena; Puri, Anu; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Bindewald, Eckart; Zakrevsky, Paul; Satterwhite, Emily; Joseph, Kenya; Afonin, Kirill A; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2016-09-12

    RNA nanostructures can be programmed to exhibit defined sizes, shapes and stoichiometries from naturally occurring or de novo designed RNA motifs. These constructs can be used as scaffolds to attach functional moieties, such as ligand binding motifs or gene expression regulators, for nanobiology applications. This review is focused on four areas of importance to RNA nanotechnology: the types of RNAs of particular interest for nanobiology, the assembly of RNA nanoconstructs, the challenges of cellular delivery of RNAs in vivo, and the delivery carriers that aid in the matter. The available strategies for the design of nucleic acid nanostructures, as well as for formulation of their carriers, make RNA nanotechnology an important tool in both basic research and applied biomedical science. PMID:27509068

  6. Epigenetic microRNA Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, Erik Digman

    2011-01-01

    and confirming transcriptional start sites can be difficult. Epigenetics, gene regulatory and DNA modification mechanisms not involving a change to the primary sequence, have been implied in the regulation of a number of miRNA loci. Both epigenetic and miRNA signatures are broadly altered in cancer......, and are thought to play essential roles in cancer etiology and progression. Here, we aimed to identify epigenetic miRNA deregulation in bladder and oral carcinoma, and to develop a robust approach to epigenetic miRNA prediction and detection. In addition, non-canonical epigenetic functions directed by a nuclear...... miRNA were investigated. In summary, we report that the miR-200 family and miR-205 are coordinately epigenetically regulated in a variety of cell lines, tumors and normal tissues. MiR-200c expression is correlated with bladder cancer disease progression, and miR-375 levels in oral rinse can...

  7. Involvement of the 5'-leader sequence in coupling the stability of a human H3 histone mRNA with DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two lines of evidence derived from fusion gene constructs indicate that sequences residing in the 5'-nontranslated region of a cell cycle-dependent human H3 histone mRNA are involved in the selective destabilization that occurs when DNA synthesis is terminated. The experimental approach was to construct chimeric genes in which fragments of the mRNA coding regions of the H3 histone gene were fused with fragments of genes not expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner. After transfection in HeLa S3 cells with the recombinant plasmids, levels of fusion mRNAs were determined by S1 nuclease analysis prior to and following DNA synthesis inhibition. When the first 20 nucleotides of an H3 histone mRNA leader were replaced with 89 nucleotides of the leader from a Drosophila heat-shock (hsp70) mRNA, the fusion transcript remained stable during inhibition of DNA synthesis, in contrast to the rapid destabilization of the endogenous histone mRNA in these cells. In a reciprocal experiment, a histone-globin fusion gene was constructed that produced a transcript with the initial 20 nucleotides of the H3 histone mRNA substituted for the human β-globin mRNA leader. In HeLa cells treated with inhibitors of DNA synthesis and/or protein synthesis, cellular levels of this histone-globin fusion mRNA appeared to be regulated in a manner similar to endogenous histone mRNA levels. These results suggest that the first 20 nucleotides of the leader are sufficient to couple histone mRNA stability with DNA replication

  8. Host range restriction of vaccinia virus in Chinese hamster ovary cells: relationship to shutoff of protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were found to be nonpermissive for vaccinia virus. Although early virus-induced events occurred in these cells (RNA and polypeptide synthesis), subsequent events appeared to be prevented by a very rapid and nonselective shutoff of protein synthesis. Within less than 2 h after infection, both host and viral protein syntheses were arrested. At low multiplicities of infection, inhibition of RNA synthesis with cordycepin resulted in failure of the virus to block protein synthesis. Moreover, infection of the cells in the presence of cycloheximide prevented the immediate onset of shutoff after reversal of cycloheximide. Inactivation of virus particles by uv irradiation also impaired the capacity of the virus to inhibit protein synthesis. These results suggested that an early vaccinia virus-coded product was implicated in the shutoff of protein synthesis. Either the nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary cells were more sensitive to this inhibition than permissive cells, or a regulatory control of the vaccinia shutoff function was defective

  9. Host range restriction of vaccinia virus in Chinese hamster ovary cells: relationship to shutoff of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillien, R; Spehner, D; Kirn, A

    1978-12-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were found to be nonpermissive for vaccinia virus. Although early virus-induced events occurred in these cells (RNA and polypeptide synthesis), subsequent events appeared to be prevented by a very rapid and nonselective shutoff of protein synthesis. Within less than 2 h after infection, both host and viral protein syntheses were arrested. At low multiplicities of infection, inhibition of RNA synthesis with cordycepin resulted in failure of the virus to block protein synthesis. Moreover, infection of the cells in the presence of cycloheximide prevented the immediate onset of shutoff after reversal of cycloheximide. Inactivation of virus particles by UV irradiation also impaired the capacity of the virus to inhibit protein synthesis. These results suggested that an early vaccinia virus-coded product was implicated in the shutoff of protein synthesis. Either the nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary cells were more sensitive to this inhibition than permissive cells, or a regulatory control of the vaccinia shutoff function was defective.

  10. Identifying modifications in RNA by MALDI mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, Stephen; Kirpekar, Finn

    2007-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications on the base or sugar of ribonucleosides generally result in mass increases that can be measured by mass spectrometry. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a direct and accurate means of determining the masses of RNAs. Mass s...... in fundamental processes in protein synthesis as well as methylations that confer resistance to antibiotics. For several rRNA sites, MALDI-MS has served an essential role in the identification of the enzymes that catalyze the modifications....

  11. Chalcone isomerase cDNA cloning and mRNA induction by fungal elicitor, wounding and infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdy, Mona C.; Lamb, Christopher J.

    1987-01-01

    The environmentally regulated synthesis of phenylpropanoid natural products was studied by examining the expression of the gene encoding chalcone isomerase (CHI). This enzyme catalyzes a step common to the synthesis of flavonoid pigments and isoflavonoid phytoalexins. A λgt11 library was constructed using mRNA from cell cultures of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) treated with fungal elicitor. Two positive clones were obtained by screening 105 recombinants with an antiserum to purified bean CHI. ...

  12. Overall Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMIGO is an OECD/NEA international project on the topic of 'Approaches and Methods for Integrating Geological Information in the Safety Case'. The term safety case here refers to the post-closure safety case for a geological repository for long-lived radioactive waste, and is defined as a synthesis of evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate a claim that the repository is safe. Geological or geo-scientific information includes the various types of geophysical, hydrogeological, geochemical and structural information that can contribute to the safety case. The safety case is generally updated periodically throughout the step-wise process of repository siting, planning, construction, operation, as well as prior to closure, and becomes more rigorous over time, as increasing amounts of geological and other data become available, until, for a well-chosen site and design, a point is reached at which the safety case is adequate for repository licensing. AMIGO is structured as a series of workshops. This document summarises the first workshop of the AMIGO series, held at Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland, on 3-5 June 2003, a-nd-hosted The focus of the workshop was on 'building confidence (in analyses and arguments that support the safety case) using multiple lines of evidence', but other themes within the overall scope of AMIGO were also discussed, such as the integration of the work of geo-scientists and safety assessors. The main themes addressed by the workshop, which include the topics covered by the Working Group Sessions, can be stated as follows: the role of the geosphere in disposal concepts; the ways in which geological information is used by waste management programmes, and the way in which usage changes as a programme progresses; the synthesis of wide ranging geo-scientific information into a consistent site description or conceptual model; the development of arguments for the long-term safety of disposal systems; the use of multiple lines of

  13. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W.J. Derks (Kasper); B. Misovic (Branislav); M.C.G.N. van den hout (Mirjam); C. Kockx (Christel); C.P. Gomez (Cesar Payan); R.W.W. Brouwer; H. Vrieling (Harry); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); J. Pothof (Joris)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrent RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a sin

  14. A Simple RNA-DNA Scaffold Templates the Assembly of Monofunctional Virus-Like Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmann, Rees F; Sportsman, Richard; Beren, Christian; Manoharan, Vinothan N; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M

    2015-06-24

    Using the components of a particularly well-studied plant virus, cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), we demonstrate the synthesis of virus-like particles (VLPs) with one end of the packaged RNA extending out of the capsid and into the surrounding solution. This construct breaks the otherwise perfect symmetry of the capsid and provides a straightforward route for monofunctionalizing VLPs using the principles of DNA nanotechnology. It also allows physical manipulation of the packaged RNA, a previously inaccessible part of the viral architecture. Our synthesis does not involve covalent chemistry of any kind; rather, we trigger capsid assembly on a scaffold of viral RNA that is hybridized at one end to a complementary DNA strand. Interaction of CCMV capsid protein with this RNA-DNA template leads to selective packaging of the RNA portion into a well-formed capsid but leaves the hybridized portion poking out of the capsid through a small hole. We show that the nucleic acid protruding from the capsid is capable of binding free DNA strands and DNA-functionalized colloidal particles. Separately, we show that the RNA-DNA scaffold can be used to nucleate virus formation on a DNA-functionalized surface. We believe this self-assembly strategy can be adapted to viruses other than CCMV. PMID:26043403

  15. Selective translation of the measles virus nucleocapsid mRNA by La protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa eInoue

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Measles, caused by measles virus (MeV infection, is the leading cause of death in children because of secondary infections attributable to MeV-induced immune suppression. Recently, we have shown that wild-type MeVs induce the suppression of protein synthesis in host cells (referred to as "shutoff" and that viral mRNAs are preferentially translated under shutoff conditions in infected cells. To determine the mechanism behind the preferential translation of viral mRNA, we focused on the 5 untranslated region (UTR of nucleocapsid (N mRNA. The La/SSB autoantigen (La was found to specifically bind to an N-5UTR probe. Recombinant La enhanced the translation of luciferase mRNA containing the N-5UTR (N-fLuc, and RNA interference of La suppressed N-fLuc translation. Furthermore, recombinant MeV lacking the La-binding motif in the N-5UTR displayed delayed viral protein synthesis and growth kinetics at an early phase of infection. These results suggest that La induced predominant translation of N mRNA via binding to its 5UTR under shutoff conditions. This is the first report on a cellular factor that specifically regulates paramyxovirus mRNA translation.

  16. Development of a RNA extraction method from milk for gene expression study in the mammary gland of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Maria Consuelo; Daga, Cinzia; Bodano, Sara; Paludo, Marta; Luridiana, Sebastiano; Pazzola, Michele; Dettori, Maria Luisa; Vacca, Giuseppe Massimo; Carcangiu, Vincenzo

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a reliable method for the RNA extraction from milk of Sarda sheep breed and to highlight if the extracted RNA can be used for expression study on mammary genes involved in milk fat synthesis using RT-qPCR. The main result is that a sample of 150 ml of milk provides an optimal amount of RNA (73.5 μg/ml). The highest RNA concentration has been found in the samples analysed within 4 h after collection. The RNA extracted was positively correlated to the number of somatic cells (P Ct value, for SREBPF1 gene of 26.8 ± 0.15. This research demonstrated that the high-quality of the RNA obtained is suited to use for studies of mammary genes expression in sheep, avoiding any damage caused by mammary gland biopsy.

  17. The structure of a rigorously conserved RNA element within the SARS virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Robertson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have solved the three-dimensional crystal structure of the stem-loop II motif (s2m RNA element of the SARS virus genome to 2.7-A resolution. SARS and related coronaviruses and astroviruses all possess a motif at the 3' end of their RNA genomes, called the s2m, whose pathogenic importance is inferred from its rigorous sequence conservation in an otherwise rapidly mutable RNA genome. We find that this extreme conservation is clearly explained by the requirement to form a highly structured RNA whose unique tertiary structure includes a sharp 90 degrees kink of the helix axis and several novel longer-range tertiary interactions. The tertiary base interactions create a tunnel that runs perpendicular to the main helical axis whose interior is negatively charged and binds two magnesium ions. These unusual features likely form interaction surfaces with conserved host cell components or other reactive sites required for virus function. Based on its conservation in viral pathogen genomes and its absence in the human genome, we suggest that these unusual structural features in the s2m RNA element are attractive targets for the design of anti-viral therapeutic agents. Structural genomics has sought to deduce protein function based on three-dimensional homology. Here we have extended this approach to RNA by proposing potential functions for a rigorously conserved set of RNA tertiary structural interactions that occur within the SARS RNA genome itself. Based on tertiary structural comparisons, we propose the s2m RNA binds one or more proteins possessing an oligomer-binding-like fold, and we suggest a possible mechanism for SARS viral RNA hijacking of host protein synthesis, both based upon observed s2m RNA macromolecular mimicry of a relevant ribosomal RNA fold.

  18. Evidence from glycine transfer RNA of a frozen accident at the dawn of the genetic code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tate Warren P

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transfer RNA (tRNA is the means by which the cell translates DNA sequence into protein according to the rules of the genetic code. A credible proposition is that tRNA was formed from the duplication of an RNA hairpin half the length of the contemporary tRNA molecule, with the point at which the hairpins were joined marked by the canonical intron insertion position found today within tRNA genes. If these hairpins possessed a 3'-CCA terminus with different combinations of stem nucleotides (the ancestral operational RNA code, specific aminoacylation and perhaps participation in some form of noncoded protein synthesis might have occurred. However, the identity of the first tRNA and the initial steps in the origin of the genetic code remain elusive. Results Here we show evidence that glycine tRNA was the first tRNA, as revealed by a vestigial imprint in the anticodon loop sequences of contemporary descendents. This provides a plausible mechanism for the missing first step in the origin of the genetic code. In 448 of 466 glycine tRNA gene sequences from bacteria, archaea and eukaryote cytoplasm analyzed, CCA occurs immediately upstream of the canonical intron insertion position, suggesting the first anticodon (NCC for glycine has been captured from the 3'-terminal CCA of one of the interacting hairpins as a result of an ancestral ligation. Conclusion That this imprint (including the second and third nucleotides of the glycine tRNA anticodon has been retained through billions of years of evolution suggests Crick's 'frozen accident' hypothesis has validity for at least this very first step at the dawn of the genetic code. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Eugene V. Koonin, Dr Rob Knight and Dr David H Ardell.

  19. Cytoplasmic translocation of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein and its binding to viral RNA during Japanese encephalitis virus infection inhibits virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Bhullar

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV has a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome containing a single open reading frame flanked by the 5'- and 3'-non-coding regions (NCRs. The virus genome replicates via a negative-sense RNA intermediate. The NCRs and their complementary sequences in the negative-sense RNA are the sites for assembly of the RNA replicase complex thereby regulating the RNA synthesis and virus replication. In this study, we show that the 55-kDa polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB interacts in vitro with both the 5'-NCR of the positive-sense genomic RNA--5NCR(+, and its complementary sequence in the negative-sense replication intermediate RNA--3NCR(-. The interaction of viral RNA with PTB was validated in infected cells by JEV RNA co-immunoprecipitation and JEV RNA-PTB colocalization experiments. Interestingly, we observed phosphorylation-coupled translocation of nuclear PTB to cytoplasmic foci that co-localized with JEV RNA early during JEV infection. Our studies employing the PTB silencing and over-expression in cultured cells established an inhibitory role of PTB in JEV replication. Using RNA-protein binding assay we show that PTB competitively inhibits association of JEV 3NCR(- RNA with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5 protein, an event required for the synthesis of the plus-sense genomic RNA. cAMP is known to promote the Protein kinase A (PKA-mediated PTB phosphorylation. We show that cells treated with a cAMP analogue had an enhanced level of phosphorylated PTB in the cytoplasm and a significantly suppressed JEV replication. Data presented here show a novel, cAMP-induced, PTB-mediated, innate host response that could effectively suppress JEV replication in mammalian cells.

  20. Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes: A Functional Genomics Tool for the Study of Positive-strand RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Reverse genetics, an approach to rescue infectious virus entirely from a cloned cDNA, has revolutionized the field of positive-strand RNA viruses, whose genomes have the same polarity as cellular mRNA. The cDNA-based reverse genetics system is a seminal method that enables direct manipulation of the viral genomic RNA, thereby generating recombinant viruses for molecular and genetic studies of both viral RNA elements and gene products in viral replication and pathogenesis. It also provides a valuable platform that allows the development of genetically defined vaccines and viral vectors for the delivery of foreign genes. For many positive-strand RNA viruses such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), however, the cloned cDNAs are unstable, posing a major obstacle to the construction and propagation of the functional cDNA. Here, the present report describes the strategic considerations in creating and amplifying a genetically stable full-length infectious JEV cDNA as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) using the following general experimental procedures: viral RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, cDNA subcloning and modification, assembly of a full-length cDNA, cDNA linearization, in vitro RNA synthesis, and virus recovery. This protocol provides a general methodology applicable to cloning full-length cDNA for a range of positive-strand RNA viruses, particularly those with a genome of >10 kb in length, into a BAC vector, from which infectious RNAs can be transcribed in vitro with a bacteriophage RNA polymerase. PMID:26780115