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Sample records for alphavirus rna synthesis

  1. Alphavirus RNA synthesis and non-structural protein functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Jonathan C; Sokoloski, Kevin J; Gebhart, Natasha N; Hardy, Richard W

    2015-09-01

    The members of the genus Alphavirus are positive-sense RNA viruses, which are predominantly transmitted to vertebrates by a mosquito vector. Alphavirus disease in humans can be severely debilitating, and depending on the particular viral species, infection may result in encephalitis and possibly death. In recent years, alphaviruses have received significant attention from public health authorities as a consequence of the dramatic emergence of chikungunya virus in the Indian Ocean islands and the Caribbean. Currently, no safe, approved or effective vaccine or antiviral intervention exists for human alphavirus infection. The molecular biology of alphavirus RNA synthesis has been well studied in a few species of the genus and represents a general target for antiviral drug development. This review describes what is currently understood about the regulation of alphavirus RNA synthesis, the roles of the viral non-structural proteins in this process and the functions of cis-acting RNA elements in replication, and points to open questions within the field. PMID:26219641

  2. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines

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    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication-proficient particles. Moreover, in vitro transcribed RNA, as well as layered DNA vectors have been applied for immunization. A large number of highly immunogenic viral structural proteins expressed from alphavirus vectors have elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in multispecies animal models. Furthermore, immunization studies have demonstrated robust protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus in rodents and primates. Similarly, vaccination with alphavirus vectors expressing tumor antigens resulted in prophylactic protection against challenges with tumor-inducing cancerous cells. As certain alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus, have been associated with epidemics in animals and humans, attention has also been paid to the development of vaccines against alphaviruses themselves. Recent progress in alphavirus vector development and vaccine technology has allowed conducting clinical trials in humans.

  3. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors based on Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus have been widely applied for vaccine development. Naked RNA replicons, recombinant viral particles, and layered DNA vectors have been subjected to immunization in preclinical animal models with antigens for viral targets and tumor antigens. Moreover, a limited number of clinical trials have been conducted in humans. Vaccination with alphavirus vectors has demonstrated efficient immune responses and has showed protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus and tumor cells, respectively. Moreover, vaccines have been developed against alphaviruses causing epidemics such as Chikungunya virus. PMID:27076308

  4. Suppression of RNA interference increases alphavirus replication and virus-associated mortality in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

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    Geiss Brian J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses can persistently infect and cause limited damage to mosquito vectors. RNA interference (RNAi is a mosquito antiviral response important in restricting RNA virus replication and has been shown to be active against some arboviruses. The goal of this study was to use a recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae; genus Alphavirus that expresses B2 protein of Flock House virus (FHV; family Nodaviridae; genus Alphanodavirus, a protein that inhibits RNAi, to determine the effects of linking arbovirus infection with RNAi inhibition. Results B2 protein expression from SINV (TE/3'2J inhibited the accumulation of non-specific small RNAs in Aedes aegypti mosquito cell culture and virus-specific small RNAs both in infected cell culture and Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. More viral genomic and subgenomic RNA accumulated in cells and mosquitoes infected with TE/3'2J virus expressing B2 (TE/3'2J/B2 compared to TE/3'2J and TE/3'2J virus expressing GFP. TE/3'2J/B2 exhibited increased infection rates, dissemination rates, and infectious virus titers in mosquitoes following oral bloodmeal. Following infectious oral bloodmeal, significantly more mosquitoes died when TE/3'2J/B2 was ingested. The virus was 100% lethal following intrathoracic inoculation of multiple mosquito species and lethality was dose-dependent in Ae. aegypti. Conclusion We show that RNAi is active in Ae. aegypti cell culture and that B2 protein inhibits RNAi in mosquito cells when expressed by a recombinant SINV. Also, SINV more efficiently replicates in mosquito cells when RNAi is inhibited. Finally, TE/3'2J/B2 kills mosquitoes in a dose-dependent manner independent of infection route and mosquito species.

  5. Synthesis of cellulose nanocrystals carrying tyrosine sulfate mimetic ligands and inhibition of alphavirus infection.

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    Zoppe, Justin O; Ruottinen, Ville; Ruotsalainen, Janne; Rönkkö, Seppo; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Hinkkanen, Ari; Järvinen, Kristiina; Seppälä, Jukka

    2014-04-14

    We present two facile approaches for introducing multivalent displays of tyrosine sulfate mimetic ligands on the surface of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) for application as viral inhibitors. We tested the efficacy of cellulose nanocrystals, prepared either from cotton fibers or Whatman filter paper, to inhibit alphavirus infectivity in Vero (B) cells. Cellulose nanocrystals were produced by sulfuric acid hydrolysis leading to nanocrystal surfaces decorated with anionic sulfate groups. When the fluorescent marker expressing Semliki Forest virus vector, VA7-EGFP, was incubated with CNCs, strong inhibition of virus infectivity was achieved, up to 100 and 88% for cotton and Whatman CNCs, respectively. When surface sulfate groups of CNCs were exchanged for tyrosine sulfate mimetic groups (i.e. phenyl sulfonates), improved viral inhibition was attained. Our observations suggest that the conjugation of target-specific functionalities to CNC surfaces provides a means to control their antiviral activity. Multivalent CNCs did not cause observable in vitro cytotoxicity to Vero (B) cells or human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells, even within the 100% virus-inhibitory concentrations. Based on the similar chemistry of known polyanionic inhibitors, our results suggest the potential application of CNCs as inhibitors of other viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex viruses. PMID:24628489

  6. BST2/Tetherin Inhibition of Alphavirus Exit

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    Yaw Shin Ooi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses such as chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Semliki Forest virus (SFV are small enveloped RNA viruses that bud from the plasma membrane. Tetherin/BST2 is an interferon-induced host membrane protein that inhibits the release of many enveloped viruses via direct tethering of budded particles to the cell surface. Alphaviruses have highly organized structures and exclude host membrane proteins from the site of budding, suggesting that their release might be insensitive to tetherin inhibition. Here, we demonstrated that exogenously-expressed tetherin efficiently inhibited the release of SFV and CHIKV particles from host cells without affecting virus entry and infection. Alphavirus release was also inhibited by the endogenous levels of tetherin in HeLa cells. While rubella virus (RuV and dengue virus (DENV have structural similarities to alphaviruses, tetherin inhibited the release of RuV but not DENV. We found that two recently identified tetherin isoforms differing in length at the N-terminus exhibited distinct capabilities in restricting alphavirus release. SFV exit was efficiently inhibited by the long isoform but not the short isoform of tetherin, while both isoforms inhibited vesicular stomatitis virus exit. Thus, in spite of the organized structure of the virus particle, tetherin specifically blocks alphavirus release and shows an interesting isoform requirement.

  7. Catalysis and prebiotic RNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The essential role of catalysis for the origins of life is discussed. The status of the prebiotic synthesis of 2',5'- and 3'5'-linked oligomers of RNA is reviewed. Examples of the role of metal ion and mineral catalysis in RNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  8. Replication of Alphaviruses: A Review on the Entry Process of Alphaviruses into Cells

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    Jason Yat-Sing Leung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are small, enveloped viruses, ~70 nm in diameter, containing a single-stranded, positive-sense, RNA genome. Viruses belonging to this genus are predominantly arthropod-borne viruses, known to cause disease in humans. Their potential threat to human health was most recently exemplified by the 2005 Chikungunya virus outbreak in La Reunion, highlighting the necessity to understand events in the life-cycle of these medically important human pathogens. The replication and propagation of viruses is dependent on entry into permissive cells. Viral entry is initiated by attachment of virions to cells, leading to internalization, and uncoating to release genetic material for replication and propagation. Studies on alphaviruses have revealed entry via a receptor-mediated, endocytic pathway. In this paper, the different stages of alphavirus entry are examined, with examples from Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, Chikungunya virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus described.

  9. RNA structures regulating nidovirus RNA synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Born, Erwin van den

    2006-01-01

    Viruses depend on their host cell for the production of their progeny. The genetic information that is required to regulate this process is contained in the viral genome. In the case of plus-stranded RNA viruses, like nidoviruses, the RNA genome is directly involved in translation (resulting in the

  10. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies novel host proteins required for alphavirus entry.

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    Yaw Shin Ooi

    Full Text Available The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ, a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy.

  11. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the “Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)” conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5–6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to...

  12. Virus-specific thermostability and heat inactivation profiles of alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Lee; Huang, Yan-Jang S; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Hettenbach, Susan M; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2016-08-01

    Serological diagnosis is a critical component for disease surveillance and is important to address the increase in incidence and disease burden of alphaviruses, such as the chikungunya (CHIKV) and Ross River (RRV) viruses. The gold standard for serological diagnosis is the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), which demonstrates the neutralizing capacity of serum samples after the removal of complement activity and adventitious viruses. This procedure is normally performed following inactivation of the virus at 56°C for 30min. Although this protocol has been widely accepted for the inactivation of envelope RNA viruses, recent studies have demonstrated that prolonged heat inactivation is required to completely inactivate two alphaviruses, Western equine encephalitis virus and CHIKV. Incomplete inactivation of viruses poses a laboratory biosafety risk and can also lead to spurious test results. Despite its importance in ensuring the safety of laboratory personnel as well as test integrity, systematic investigation on the thermostability of alphaviruses has not been performed. In this study, the temperature tolerance and heat inactivation profiles of RRV, Barmah Forest, and o'nyong-nyong viruses were determined. Variations in thermostability were observed within the Semliki forest serocomplex. Therefore, evidence-based heat inactivation procedures for alphaviruses are recommended. PMID:27079828

  13. Discovery of berberine, abamectin and ivermectin as antivirals against chikungunya and other alphaviruses.

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    Varghese, Finny S; Kaukinen, Pasi; Gläsker, Sabine; Bespalov, Maxim; Hanski, Leena; Wennerberg, Krister; Kümmerer, Beate M; Ahola, Tero

    2016-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic arbovirus of the Alphavirus genus, which has infected millions of people after its re-emergence in the last decade. In this study, a BHK cell line containing a stable CHIKV replicon with a luciferase reporter was used in a high-throughput platform to screen approximately 3000 compounds. Following initial validation, 25 compounds were chosen as primary hits for secondary validation with wild type and reporter CHIKV infection, which identified three promising compounds. Abamectin (EC50 = 1.5 μM) and ivermectin (EC50 = 0.6 μM) are fermentation products generated by a soil dwelling actinomycete, Streptomyces avermitilis, whereas berberine (EC50 = 1.8 μM) is a plant-derived isoquinoline alkaloid. They inhibited CHIKV replication in a dose-dependent manner and had broad antiviral activity against other alphaviruses--Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus. Abamectin and ivermectin were also active against yellow fever virus, a flavivirus. These compounds caused reduced synthesis of CHIKV genomic and antigenomic viral RNA as well as downregulation of viral protein expression. Time of addition experiments also suggested that they act on the replication phase of the viral infectious cycle. PMID:26752081

  14. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

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    Sohan Jheeta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the “Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA” conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5–6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to recognize the significance of RNA in LUCA. We believe that the prebiotic RNA synthesis from its monomers must have been a simple process. As a first step, it may have required activation of the 5'-end of the mononucleotide with a leaving group, e.g., imidazole in our model reaction (Figure 1. Wide ranges of activating groups are produced from HCN under plausible prebiotic Earth conditions. The final step is clay mineral catalysis in the presence of mineral salts to facilitate selective production of functional RNA. Both the clay minerals and mineral salts would have been abundant on early Earth. We have demonstrated that while montmorillonite (pH 7 produced only dimers from its monomers in water, addition of sodium chloride (1 M enhanced the chain length multifold, as detected by HPLC. The effect of monovalent cations on RNA synthesis was of the following order: Li+ > Na+ > K+. A similar effect was observed with the anions, enhancing catalysis in the following order: Cl− > Br− > I−. The montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis was not affected by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. We thus show that prebiotic synthesis of RNA from its monomers was a simple process requiring only clay minerals and a small amount of salt.

  15. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jheeta, Sohan; Joshi, Prakash C.

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the "Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)" conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5-6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to recognize the significance of RNA in LUCA. We believe that the prebiotic RNA synthesis from its monomers must have been a simple process. As a first step, it may have required activation of the 5'-end of the mononucleotide with a leaving group, e.g., imidazole in our model reaction (Figure 1). Wide ranges of activating groups are produced from HCN under plausible prebiotic Earth conditions. The final step is clay mineral catalysis in the presence of mineral salts to facilitate selective production of functional RNA. Both the clay minerals and mineral salts would have been abundant on early Earth. We have demonstrated that while montmorillonite (pH 7) produced only dimers from its monomers in water, addition of sodium chloride (1 M) enhanced the chain length multifold, as detected by HPLC. The effect of monovalent cations on RNA synthesis was of the following order: Li+ > Na+ > K+. A similar effect was observed with the anions, enhancing catalysis in the following order: Cl- > Br- > I-. The montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis was not affected by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. We thus show that prebiotic synthesis of RNA from its monomers was a simple process requiring only clay minerals and a small amount of salt.

  16. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortín, Juan, E-mail: jortin@cnb.csic.es [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC) and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (ISCIII), Madrid (Spain); Martín-Benito, Jaime, E-mail: jmartinb@cnb.csic.es [Department of Macromolecular Structures, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  17. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes

  18. Mechanistic analysis of RNA synthesis by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from two promoters reveals similarities to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Adkins, S; Stawicki, S S; Faurote, G; Siegel, R W; Kao, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    The brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) directs template-specific synthesis of (-)-strand genomic and (+)-strand subgenomic RNAs in vitro. Although the requirements for (-)-strand RNA synthesis have been characterized previously, the mechanism of subgenomic RNA synthesis has not. Mutational analysis of the subgenomic promoter revealed that the +1 cytidylate and the +2 adenylate are important for RNA synthesis. Unlike (-)-strand RNA synthesis, which required only a hig...

  19. Alphavirus mutator variants present host-specific defects and attenuation in mammalian and insect models.

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    Kathryn Rozen-Gagnon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arboviruses cycle through both vertebrates and invertebrates, which requires them to adapt to disparate hosts while maintaining genetic integrity during genome replication. To study the genetic mechanisms and determinants of these processes, we use chikungunya virus (CHIKV, a re-emerging human pathogen transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. We previously isolated a high fidelity (or antimutator polymerase variant, C483Y, which had decreased fitness in both mammalian and mosquito hosts, suggesting this residue may be a key molecular determinant. To further investigate effects of position 483 on RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp fidelity, we substituted every amino acid at this position. We isolated novel mutators with decreased replication fidelity and higher mutation frequencies, allowing us to examine the fitness of error-prone arbovirus variants. Although CHIKV mutators displayed no major replication defects in mammalian cell culture, they had reduced specific infectivity and were attenuated in vivo. Unexpectedly, mutator phenotypes were suppressed in mosquito cells and the variants exhibited significant defects in RNA synthesis. Consequently, these replication defects resulted in strong selection for reversion during infection of mosquitoes. Since residue 483 is conserved among alphaviruses, we examined the analogous mutations in Sindbis virus (SINV, which also reduced polymerase fidelity and generated replication defects in mosquito cells. However, replication defects were mosquito cell-specific and were not observed in Drosophila S2 cells, allowing us to evaluate the potential attenuation of mutators in insect models where pressure for reversion was absent. Indeed, the SINV mutator variant was attenuated in fruit flies. These findings confirm that residue 483 is a determinant regulating alphavirus polymerase fidelity and demonstrate proof of principle that arboviruses can be attenuated in mammalian and insect hosts by reducing fidelity.

  20. Viral RNA polymerase scanning and the gymnastics of Sendai virus RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    mRNA synthesis from nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus (NNV) genomes is unique in that the genome RNA is embedded in an N protein assembly (the nucleocapsid) and the viral RNA polymerase does not dissociate from the template after release of each mRNA, but rather scans the genome RNA for the next gene-start site. A revised model for NNV RNA synthesis is presented, in which RNA polymerase scanning plays a prominent role. Polymerase scanning of the template is known to occur as the viral transcriptase negotiates gene junctions without falling off the template

  1. Alphavirus Restriction by IFITM Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Stuart; Czieso, Stephanie; White, Ian J; Smith, Sarah E; Wash, Rachael S; Diaz-Soria, Carmen; Kellam, Paul; Marsh, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) are broad-spectrum antiviral factors. In cell culture the entry of many enveloped viruses, including orthomyxo-, flavi-, and filoviruses, is inhibited by IFITMs, though the mechanism(s) involved remain unclear and may vary between viruses. We demonstrate that Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), which both use endocytosis and acid-induced membrane fusion in early endosomes to infect cells, are restricted by the early endosomal IFITM3. The late endosomal IFITM2 is less restrictive and the plasma membrane IFITM1 does not inhibit normal infection by either virus. IFITM3 inhibits release of the SFV capsid into the cytosol, without inhibiting binding, internalization, trafficking to endosomes or low pH-induced conformational changes in the envelope glycoprotein. Infection by SFV fusion at the cell surface was inhibited by IFITM1, but was equally inhibited by IFITM3. Furthermore, an IFITM3 mutant (Y20A) that is localized to the plasma membrane inhibited infection by cell surface fusion more potently than IFITM1. Together, these results indicate that IFITMs, in particular IFITM3, can restrict alphavirus infection by inhibiting viral fusion with cellular membranes. That IFITM3 can restrict SFV infection by fusion at the cell surface equivalently to IFITM1 suggests that IFITM3 has greater antiviral potency against SFV. PMID:27219333

  2. Requirement of RNA synthesis for bud morphogenesis in hydra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibition of RNA synthesis in hydra resulted in complete suppression of bud morphogenesis. A partial inhibition allowed the bud formation, but affected the development of nematocysts, gland cells and interstitial cells. These results indicate that bud morphogenesis in hydra is associated with new DNA-dependent RNA synthesis. (author)

  3. Structural changes of envelope proteins during alphavirus fusion

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    Li, Long; Jose, Joyce; Xiang, Ye; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue)

    2010-12-08

    Alphaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have a diameter of about 700 {angstrom} and can be lethal human pathogens. Entry of virus into host cells by endocytosis is controlled by two envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2. The E2-E1 heterodimers form 80 trimeric spikes on the icosahedral virus surface, 60 with quasi-three-fold symmetry and 20 coincident with the icosahedral three-fold axes arranged with T = 4 quasi-symmetry. The E1 glycoprotein has a hydrophobic fusion loop at one end and is responsible for membrane fusion. The E2 protein is responsible for receptor binding and protects the fusion loop at neutral pH. The lower pH in the endosome induces the virions to undergo an irreversible conformational change in which E2 and E1 dissociate and E1 forms homotrimers, triggering fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane and then releasing the viral genome into the cytoplasm. Here we report the structure of an alphavirus spike, crystallized at low pH, representing an intermediate in the fusion process and clarifying the maturation process. The trimer of E2-E1 in the crystal structure is similar to the spikes in the neutral pH virus except that the E2 middle region is disordered, exposing the fusion loop. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of E2 each form immunoglobulin-like folds, consistent with the receptor attachment properties of E2.

  4. Flaviviral Replication Complex: Coordination between RNA Synthesis and 5’-RNA Capping

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    Valerie J. Klema

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome replication in flavivirus requires (— strand RNA synthesis, (+ strand RNA synthesis, and 5’-RNA capping and methylation. To carry out viral genome replication, flavivirus assembles a replication complex, consisting of both viral and host proteins, on the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane. Two major components of the replication complex are the viral non-structural (NS proteins NS3 and NS5. Together they possess all the enzymatic activities required for genome replication, yet how these activities are coordinated during genome replication is not clear. We provide an overview of the flaviviral genome replication process, the membrane-bound replication complex, and recent crystal structures of full-length NS5. We propose a model of how NS3 and NS5 coordinate their activities in the individual steps of (— RNA synthesis, (+ RNA synthesis, and 5’-RNA capping and methylation.

  5. Next-generation salmonid alphavirus vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aquaculture is essential to meet the current and future demands for seafood to feed the world population. Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout are two of the most cultured aquaculture species. A pathogen that threatens these species is salmonid alphavirus (SAV). A current inactivated virus vac

  6. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

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    Leena Pohjala

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2, obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs. The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV, their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate

  7. RNA synthesis in newly isolated and cultivated mesophyll protoplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszkowski, J.; Kleczkowski, K.

    1979-01-01

    Tobacco leaf mesophyll protoplasts exhibit low incorporation of (3H)uridine and 32P into RNA, up to 12 h of cultivation, irrespective of the presence of phytohormones. After 24 h of cultivation a dramatic increase in RNA synthesis is observed. The protoplasts cultivated in the absence of phytohormones show lower incorporation of precursors.

  8. In vitro RNA synthesis by infectious pancreatic necrosis virus-associated RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, P P; Jamieson, P B; Dobos, P

    1982-03-01

    The presence of an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was demonstrated in purified infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). The enzyme was active in vitro without any pretreatment of the virus. Optimum activity was shown at 30 degrees C, pH 8 and in the presence of 6 mM-magnesium ions. Approx. 50% of the polymerase product remained associated with the dsRNA template of the virions. The remainder was found as extravirion ssRNA broken down to 5S to 7S fragments by virus-associated RNase(s). Although the addition of bentonite considerably reduced the amount of RNA synthesized, it protected the ssRNA product from degradation. This, in turn, permitted the synthesis of small amounts of ssRNA, which when analysed by sucrose gradient centrifugation or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis behaved identically to the 24S single-stranded virus mRNA produced in infected cells. The virion polymerase was not stimulated by S-adenosyl-L-methionine or the addition of cellular or capped reovirus ssRNA. Several other modifications of the assay system were tried in an attempt to increase 24S RNA synthesis, but with little success. When [3H]uridine-labelled virus was used in the polymerase reaction, some labelled 24S ssRNA was obtained, indicating that in vitro transcription may proceed by a semi-conservative (displacement) mechanism. PMID:6175731

  9. IFIT1 Differentially Interferes with Translation and Replication of Alphavirus Genomes and Promotes Induction of Type I Interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Josephine M; Kim, Dal Young; Atasheva, Svetlana; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; White, James P; Diamond, Michael S; Weaver, Scott C; Frolova, Elena I; Frolov, Ilya

    2015-04-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of widely distributed human and animal pathogens. It is well established that their replication is sensitive to type I IFN treatment, but the mechanism of IFN inhibitory function remains poorly understood. Using a new experimental system, we demonstrate that in the presence of IFN-β, activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) does not interfere with either attachment of alphavirus virions to the cells, or their entry and nucleocapsid disassembly. However, it strongly affects translation of the virion-delivered virus-specific RNAs. One of the ISG products, IFIT1 protein, plays a major role in this translation block, although an IFIT1-independent mechanism is also involved. The 5'UTRs of the alphavirus genomes were found to differ significantly in their ability to drive translation in the presence of increased concentration of IFIT1. Prior studies have shown that adaptation of naturally circulating alphaviruses to replication in tissue culture results in accumulation of mutations in the 5'UTR, which increase the efficiency of the promoter located in the 5'end of the genome. Here, we show that these mutations also decrease resistance of viral RNA to IFIT1-induced translation inhibition. In the presence of higher levels of IFIT1, alphaviruses with wt 5'UTRs became potent inducers of type I IFN, suggesting a new mechanism of type I IFN induction. We applied this knowledge of IFIT1 interaction with alphaviruses to develop new attenuated variants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses that are more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFIT1, and thus could serve as novel vaccine candidates. PMID:25927359

  10. Guanosine tetraphosphate as a global regulator of bacterial RNA synthesis: a model involving RNA polymerase pausing and queuing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, H; Ehrenberg, M

    1995-05-17

    A recently reported comparison of stable RNA (rRNA, tRNA) and mRNA synthesis rates in ppGpp-synthesizing and ppGpp-deficient (delta relA delta spoT) bacteria has suggested that ppGpp inhibits transcription initiation from stable RNA promoters, as well as synthesis of (bulk) mRNA. Inhibition of stable RNA synthesis occurs mainly during slow growth of bacteria when cytoplasmic levels of ppGpp are high. In contrast, inhibition of mRNA occurs mainly during fast growth when ppGpp levels are low, and it is associated with a partial inactivation of RNA polymerase. To explain these observations it has been proposed that ppGpp causes transcriptional pausing and queuing during the synthesis of mRNA. Polymerase queuing requires high rates of transcription initiation in addition to polymerase pausing, and therefore high concentrations of free RNA polymerase. These conditions are found in fast growing bacteria. Furthermore, the RNA polymerase queues lead to a promoter blocking when RNA polymerase molecules stack up from the pause site back to the (mRNA) promoter. This occurs most frequently at pause sites close to the promoter. Blocking of mRNA promoters diverts RNA polymerase to stable RNA promoters. In this manner ppGpp could indirectly stimulate synthesis of stable RNA at high growth rates. In the present work a mathematical analysis, based on the theory of queuing, is presented and applied to the global control of transcription in bacteria. This model predicts the in vivo distribution of RNA polymerase over stable RNA and mRNA genes for both ppGpp-synthesizing and ppGpp-deficient bacteria in response to different environmental conditions. It also shows how small changes in basal ppGpp concentrations can produce large changes in the rate of stable RNA synthesis. PMID:7539631

  11. Discovery of frameshifting in Alphavirus 6K resolves a 20-year enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleeton Marina N

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Alphavirus includes several potentially lethal human viruses. Additionally, species such as Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus are important vectors for gene therapy, vaccination and cancer research, and important models for virion assembly and structural analyses. The genome encodes nine known proteins, including the small '6K' protein. 6K appears to be involved in envelope protein processing, membrane permeabilization, virion assembly and virus budding. In protein gels, 6K migrates as a doublet – a result that, to date, has been attributed to differing degrees of acylation. Nonetheless, despite many years of research, its role is still relatively poorly understood. Results We report that ribosomal -1 frameshifting, with an estimated efficiency of ~10–18%, occurs at a conserved UUUUUUA motif within the sequence encoding 6K, resulting in the synthesis of an additional protein, termed TF (TransFrame protein; ~8 kDa, in which the C-terminal amino acids are encoded by the -1 frame. The presence of TF in the Semliki Forest virion was confirmed by mass spectrometry. The expression patterns of TF and 6K were studied by pulse-chase labelling, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, using both wild-type virus and a TF knockout mutant. We show that it is predominantly TF that is incorporated into the virion, not 6K as previously believed. Investigation of the 3' stimulatory signals responsible for efficient frameshifting at the UUUUUUA motif revealed a remarkable diversity of signals between different alphavirus species. Conclusion Our results provide a surprising new explanation for the 6K doublet, demand a fundamental reinterpretation of existing data on the alphavirus 6K protein, and open the way for future progress in the further characterization of the 6K and TF proteins. The results have implications for alphavirus biology, virion structure, viroporins, ribosomal frameshifting, and bioinformatic

  12. Gliotoxin: inhibitor of poliovirus RNA synthesis that blocks the viral RNA polymerase 3Dpol.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, P L; Carrasco, L.

    1992-01-01

    The mode of action of gliotoxin against poliovirus has been analyzed in detail. This fungal metabolite inhibits the appearance of poliovirus proteins when present from the beginning of infection but has no effect on viral translation when added at late times. In agreement with previous findings, this toxin potently inhibited the incorporation of [3H]uridine into poliovirus RNA soon after its addition to the culture medium. Analysis of the synthesis of poliovirus plus- or minus-stranded RNA in...

  13. Global emergence of Alphaviruses that cause arthritis in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Obanda, Vincent; Bucht, Göran; Mosomtai, Gladys; Otieno, Viola; Ahlm, Clas; Evander, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) may cause severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to human and animal health in the world today. These infectious diseases range from mild febrile illnesses, arthritis, and encephalitis to haemorrhagic fevers. It is postulated that certain environmental factors, vector competence, and host susceptibility have a major impact on the ecology of arboviral diseases. Presently, there is a great interest in the emergence of Alphaviruses because these viruses, including Chikungunya virus, O'nyong'nyong virus, Sindbis virus, Ross River virus, and Mayaro virus, have caused outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and America. Some of these viruses are more common in the tropics, whereas others are also found in temperate regions, but the actual factors driving Alphavirus emergence and re-emergence remain unresolved. Furthermore, little is known about the transmission dynamics, pathophysiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of circulating viral strains. In addition, the clinical presentation of Alphaviruses may be similar to other diseases such as dengue, malaria, and typhoid, hence leading to misdiagnosis. However, the typical presence of arthritis may distinguish between Alphaviruses and other differential diagnoses. The absence of validated diagnostic kits for Alphaviruses makes even routine surveillance less feasible. For that purpose, this review describes the occurrence, genetic diversity, clinical characteristics, and the mechanisms involving Alphaviruses causing arthritis in humans. This information may serve as a basis for better awareness and detection of Alphavirus-caused diseases during outbreaks and in establishing appropriate prevention and control measures. PMID:26689654

  14. DNA and RNA induced enantioselectivity in chemical synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfes, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of DNA and RNA structures is their elegant chirality. Using these chiral structures to induce enantioselectivity in chemical synthesis is as enticing as it is challenging. In recent years, three general approaches have been developed to achieve this, including chirality transfer

  15. The 5' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 1 is involved in negative-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlot, A Corina; Bol, John F

    2003-10-01

    The three genomic RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus each contain a unique 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). Replacement of the 5' UTR of RNA 1 by that of RNA 2 or 3 yielded infectious replicons. The sequence of a putative 5' stem-loop structure in RNA 1 was found to be required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. A similar putative 5' stem-loop structure is present in RNA 2 but not in RNA 3. PMID:14512577

  16. The synthesis of vinylphosphonate-linked RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Collis, Alana E.C.

    2008-01-01

    An introductory chapter discusses the steric block, RNase H and RNA interference antisense mechanisms and the application of antisense nucleic acids as therapeutic agents. Examples of existing chemical modifications of the sugar and backbone regions of nucleic acids are given, followed by the introduction of the vinylphosphonate modification. The vinylphosphonate has previously been examined in DNA and has been synthesised by either Pd(0) catalysed cross-coupling of an H-phosphonate with a ...

  17. Enhancement of RNA synthesis by promoter duplication in tombusviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replication of tombusviruses, small plus-strand RNA viruses of plants, is regulated by cis-acting elements present in the viral RNA. The role of cis-acting elements can be studied in vitro by using a partially purified RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) preparation obtained from tombusvirus-infected plants , Virology 276, 279- 288). Here, we demonstrate that the minus-strand RNA of tombusviruses contains, in addition to the 3'-terminal minimal plus-strand initiation promoter, a second cis-acting element, termed the promoter proximal enhancer (PPE). The PPE element enhanced RNA synthesis by almost threefold from the adjacent minimal promoter in the in vitro assay. The sequence of the PPE element is 70% similar to the minimal promoter, suggesting that sequence duplication of the minimal promoter may have been the mechanism leading to the generation of the PPE. Consistent with this proposal, replacement of the PPE element with the minimal promoter, which resulted in a perfectly duplicated promoter region, preserved its enhancer-like function. In contrast, mutagenesis of the PPE element or its replacement with an artificial G/C-rich sequence abolished its stimulative effect on initiation of RNA synthesis in vitro. In vivo experiments are also consistent with the role of the PPE element in enhancement of tombusvirus replication. Sequence comparison of several tombusviruses and related carmoviruses further supports the finding that duplication of minimal promoter sequences may have been an important mechanism during the evolution of cis-acting elements in tombusviruses and related RNA viruses

  18. Synthesis of plus- and minus-strand RNA in rotavirus-infected cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Stacy-Phipps, S; Patton, J T

    1987-01-01

    The genomes of the rotaviruses consist of 11 segments of double-stranded RNA. During RNA replication, the viral plus-strand RNA serves as the template for minus-strand RNA synthesis. To characterize the kinetics of RNA replication, the synthesis and steady-state levels of viral plus- and minus-strand RNA and double-stranded RNA in simian rotavirus SA11-infected MA104 cells were analyzed by electrophoresis on 1.75% agarose gels containing 6 M urea (pH 3.0). Synthesis of viral plus-strand and m...

  19. RNA synthesis in isolated rat osteoclasts: inhibitory effect of calcitonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M H; Papadimitriou, J M; Nicholson, G C

    1991-01-01

    The metabolism of RNA has not been studied in the osteoclast (OC) because these bone-resorbing cells are only available in small numbers and cultures are always contaminated with other cells. Using two single-cell assay techniques, tritiated uridine (3H-UdR) autoradiography and gallocyanin quantitative cytophotometry, we have examined RNA synthesis in OCs isolated from neonatal rats. Oligo-nuclear OCs showed greater nuclear uptake of 3H-UdR than cells with many nuclei, and the variance of nuclear labeling within polykarya was greater in the latter, possibly because they contain nuclei of various ages. Salmon calcitonin (sCT) was a potent (ED50 approximately 5 x 10(-12) M) and rapid (40% reduction in 2 h, 75% reduction in 6 h) inhibitor of 3H-UdR uptake, and also reduced cytochemical total cellular RNA by 22% within 4 h. Forskolin (10(-5) M) inhibited nuclear uptake of 3H-UdR, suggesting that the sCT response may be mediated by cyclic AMP. Following a short (30 min) exposure to sCT, there was a progressive decline in labeling, followed by complete recovery by 4.5 h, a response possibly related to the phenomenon of calcitonin-induced persistent activation of adenylate cyclase. Inhibition of OC RNA synthesis may be an important component of its anti-resorptive action. PMID:1723609

  20. [Exotic viral arthritis: role of alphavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeandel, P; Josse, R; Durand, J P

    2004-01-01

    Only six of the many alphavirus known to affect humans can cause articular manifestations. They are the Ross River and Barmah Forest viruses from the South Pacific, the Chikungunya, O'Nyong Nyong and Sindbis viruses from tropical Africa, and the Mayaro virus from South America. In most cases, articular manifestations involve arthralgia or transient arthritis and are usually minor. However in some cases especially involving Ross River virus acute polyarthritis may be the most prominent clinical feature and even develop before fever. Although these joint symptoms may be severe and persist for weeks or months in a subacute mode with slightly inflammatory episodes that can be relieved using analgesics, they never cause permanent damage. Differential diagnosis of alphavirsus-related polyarthritis is simple to diagnosis especially in epidemic outbreaks as is frequently the case for Ross River virus epidemics in Australia. Imported cases should be suspected in patients presenting acute or subacute polyarthritis after a recent stay of any length of time in a tropical country and can be confirmed by ordering serology from a specialized reference laboratory. PMID:15224565

  1. Localization of foot-and-mouth disease - RNA synthesis on newly formed cellular smooth membranous vacuoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viral RNA synthesis in foot-and-mouth disease infected bovine kidney cell cultures was associated throughout the infectious period with newly formed smooth membranous vacuoles. Membrane formation was measured by choline uptake. The site of RNA synthesis was determined by electron microscopic examination of autoradiograms of incorporated [3H] uridine. Both membrane formation and RNA synthesis became signifcant at 2.5 hours postinfection, but membrane formation increased steadily to 4.5 hours while RNA synthesis peaked at 3.5 hours. Percent density distributions of developed silver grains on autoradiograms showed that almost all RNA synthesis was concentrated on the smooth vacuoles of infected cells. Histogram analysis of grain density distributions established that the site of RNA synthesis was the vacuolar membrane. The newly formed smooth membrane-bound vacuoles were not seen to coalesce into the large vacuolated areas typical of poliovirus cytopathogenicity. (Author)

  2. Gene expression studies of host response to Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 experimental infections in Atlantic salmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Cheng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonid alphavirus subtype-3 (SAV-3 infection in Atlantic salmon is exclusively found in Norway. The salmonid alphaviruses have been well characterized at the genome level but there is limited information about the host-pathogen interaction phenomena. This study was undertaken to characterize the replication and spread of SAV-3 in internal organs of experimentally infected Atlantic salmon and the subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, suitability of a cohabitation challenge model for this virus was also examined. Groups of fish were infected by intramuscular injection (IM, cohabited (CO or kept uninfected in a separate tank. Samples of pancreas, kidney, spleen, heart and skeletal muscles were collected at 2, 4 and 8 weeks post infection (wpi. Pathological changes were assessed by histology concurrently with viral loads and mRNA expression of immune genes by real time RT-PCR. Pathological changes were only observed in the pancreas and heart (target organs of both IM and CO groups, with changes appearing first in the pancreas (2 wpi in the former. Lesions with increasing severity over time coincided with high viral loads despite significant induction of IFN-α, Mx and ISG15. IFN-γ and MHC-I were expressed in all tissues examined and their induction appeared in parallel with that of IL-10. Inflammatory genes TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-8 were only induced in the heart during pathology while T cell-related genes CD3ε, CD4, CD8, TCR-α and MHC-II were expressed in target organs at 8 wpi. These findings suggest that the onset of innate responses came too late to limit virus replication. Furthermore, SAV-3 infections in Atlantic salmon induce Th1/cytotoxic responses in common with other alphaviruses infecting higher vertebrates. Our findings demonstrate that SAV-3 can be transmitted via the water making it suitable for a cohabitation challenge model.

  3. RNA polymerase motors on DNA track: effects of traffic congestion on RNA synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Tripti

    2007-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is an enzyme that synthesizes a messenger RNA (mRNA) strand which is complementary to a single-stranded DNA template. From the perspective of physicists, an RNAP is a molecular motor that utilizes chemical energy input to move along the track formed by a ssDNA. In some circumstances, which are described in this paper, a large number of RNAPs move simultaneously along the same track. We refer to such collective movements of the RNAPs as RNAP traffic because of the similarities between the collective dynamics of the RNAPs on ssDNA track and that of vehicles in highway traffic. In this paper we develop a theoretical model for RNAP traffic by incorporating the steric interactions between RNAPs as well as the mechano-chemical cycle of individual RNAPs during the elongation of the mRNA. By a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we calculate the rates of mRNA synthesis and the average density profile of the RNAPs on the ssDNA track. We also suggest novel experiments for testing o...

  4. Mechanism of Stimulation of Plus-Strand Synthesis by an RNA Replication Enhancer in a Tombusvirus†

    OpenAIRE

    Panavas, Tadas; Nagy, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Replication of RNA viruses is regulated by cis-acting RNA elements, including promoters, replication silencers, and replication enhancers (REN). To dissect the function of an REN element involved in plus-strand RNA synthesis, we developed an in vitro trans-replication assay for tombusviruses, which are small plus-strand RNA viruses. In this assay, two RNA strands were tethered together via short complementary regions with the REN present in the nontemplate RNA, whereas the promoter was locate...

  5. Characteristics of alpha/beta interferon induction after infection of murine fibroblasts with wild-type and mutant alphaviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the characteristics of interferon alpha/beta (IFN-α/β) induction after alphavirus or control Sendai virus (SeV) infection of murine fibroblasts (MEFs). As expected, SeV infection of wild-type (wt) MEFs resulted in strong dimerization of IRF3 and the production of high levels of IFN-α/β. In contrast, infection of MEFs with multiple alphaviruses failed to elicit detectable IFN-α/β. In more detailed studies, Sindbis virus (SINV) infection caused dimerization and nuclear migration of IRF3, but minimal IFN-β promoter activity, although surprisingly, the infected cells were competent for IFN production by other stimuli early after infection. A SINV mutant defective in host macromolecular synthesis shutoff induced IFN-α/β in the MEF cultures dependent upon the activities of the TBK1 IRF3 activating kinase and host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) PKR and MDA5 but not RIG-I. These results suggest that wild-type alphaviruses antagonize IFN induction after IRF3 activation but also may avoid detection by host PRRs early after infection.

  6. Stochastic mRNA synthesis in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Arjun; Peskin, Charles S; Tranchina, Daniel; Vargas, Diana Y; Tyagi, Sanjay

    2006-10-01

    Individual cells in genetically homogeneous populations have been found to express different numbers of molecules of specific proteins. We investigated the origins of these variations in mammalian cells by counting individual molecules of mRNA produced from a reporter gene that was stably integrated into the cell's genome. We found that there are massive variations in the number of mRNA molecules present in each cell. These variations occur because mRNAs are synthesized in short but intense bursts of transcription beginning when the gene transitions from an inactive to an active state and ending when they transition back to the inactive state. We show that these transitions are intrinsically random and not due to global, extrinsic factors such as the levels of transcriptional activators. Moreover, the gene activation causes burst-like expression of all genes within a wider genomic locus. We further found that bursts are also exhibited in the synthesis of natural genes. The bursts of mRNA expression can be buffered at the protein level by slow protein degradation rates. A stochastic model of gene activation and inactivation was developed to explain the statistical properties of the bursts. The model showed that increasing the level of transcription factors increases the average size of the bursts rather than their frequency. These results demonstrate that gene expression in mammalian cells is subject to large, intrinsically random fluctuations and raise questions about how cells are able to function in the face of such noise. PMID:17048983

  7. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yan, E-mail: yzheng15@students.kgi.edu; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  8. N protein alone satisfies the requirement for protein synthesis during RNA replication of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Patton, J T; Davis, N L; Wertz, G W

    1984-01-01

    Genomic replication of the negative-strand RNA viruses is dependent upon protein synthesis. To examine the requirement for protein synthesis in replication, we developed an in vitro system that supports the genome replication of defective interfering particles of the negative-strand rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), as a function of protein synthesis (Wertz, J. Virol. 46:513-522, 1983). The system consists of defective interfering nucleocapsid templates and an mRNA-dependent retic...

  9. Interacting RNA polymerase motors on DNA track: effects of traffic congestion and intrinsic noise on RNA synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Tripti

    2007-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is an enzyme that synthesizes a messenger RNA (mRNA) strand which is complementary to a single-stranded DNA template. From the perspective of physicists, an RNAP is a molecular motor that utilizes chemical energy input to move along the track formed by a DNA. In many circumstances, which are described in this paper, a large number of RNAPs move simultaneously along the same track; we refer to such collective movements of the RNAPs as RNAP traffic. Here we develop a theoretical model for RNAP traffic by incorporating the steric interactions between RNAPs as well as the mechano-chemical cycle of individual RNAPs during the elongation of the mRNA. By a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we calculate the rates of mRNA synthesis and the average density profile of the RNAPs on the DNA track. We also introduce, and compute, two new measures of {\\it fluctuations} in the synthesis of RNA. Analyzing these fluctuations, we show how the level of intrinsic noise in mRNA synthesis dep...

  10. Increase in RNA and protein synthesis by mitochondria irradiated with helium-neon laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greco, M.; Guida, G.; Perlino, E.; Marra, E.; Quagliariello, E. (Centro di Studio sui Mitocondri e Metabolismo Energetico, C.N.R. Bari (Italy))

    1989-09-29

    To gain further insight into the mechanism of cell photostimulation by laser light, both RNA and protein synthesis were measured in mitochondria irradiated with the low power continuous wave He-Ne laser (Energy dose: 5 Joules/cm{sup 2}). Following mitochondrial irradiation, both the rate and amount of incorporation of alpha-({sup 32}P)UTP and L-({sup 35}S)methionine, used to monitor RNA and protein synthesis respectively, proved to increase. Electrophoretic analysis made of the synthesis products clearly shows that He-Ne laser irradiation stimulates the synthesis of all mitochondrial transcription and translation products.

  11. Increase in RNA and protein synthesis by mitochondria irradiated with helium-neon laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To gain further insight into the mechanism of cell photostimulation by laser light, both RNA and protein synthesis were measured in mitochondria irradiated with the low power continuous wave He-Ne laser (Energy dose: 5 Joules/cm2). Following mitochondrial irradiation, both the rate and amount of incorporation of alpha-[32P]UTP and L-[35S]methionine, used to monitor RNA and protein synthesis respectively, proved to increase. Electrophoretic analysis made of the synthesis products clearly shows that He-Ne laser irradiation stimulates the synthesis of all mitochondrial transcription and translation products

  12. Translational requirement for La Crosse virus S-mRNA synthesis: a possible mechanism.

    OpenAIRE

    Bellocq, C; Kolakofsky, D

    1987-01-01

    Ongoing protein synthesis is required for La Crosse S-mRNA synthesis in vivo, and complete S-mRNA can be made in vitro only in the presence of an active rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Using in vitro systems based on the polymerase activity of purified virions, we further support the notion that it is translation of the nascent mRNA that is required for complete transcription. Since replacement of guanosine with inosine in the nascent mRNA substitutes for the translational requirement, it appears...

  13. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M Sánchez-Puig

    Full Text Available Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  14. Synthesis of infectious poliovirus RNA by purified T7 RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Werf, S.; Bradley, J; Wimmer, E; Studier, F W; Dunn, J J

    1986-01-01

    Plasmids containing the entire cDNA sequence of poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain) under control of a promoter for T7 RNA polymerase have been constructed. Purified T7 RNA polymerase efficiently transcribes the entire poliovirus cDNA in either direction to produce full-length poliovirus RNA [(+)RNA] or its complement [(-)RNA]. The (+)RNA produced initially had 60 nucleotides on the 5' side of the poliovirus RNA sequence, including a string of 18 consecutive guanine residues generated in the o...

  15. Monitoring Protein Synthesis in Living Cells with Fluorescent Labeled tRNA FRET Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoom, Sima; Farrel, Ian; Dahary, Dvir; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Cooperman, Barry S.; Elroy-Stein, Orna; Smilansky, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    We introduce Protein Synthesis Monitoring (PSM) – a technique to monitor protein synthesis in live cells. In PSM, we transfect cells with tRNA labeled as FRET donors and acceptors. A FRET signal is generated only when a donor- and an acceptor-labeled tRNA come in close contact (< 7nM), as they do on the ribosome during elongation. The intensity of the FRET signal correlates with the number of ribosomes engaged in protein synthesis, providing a real-time, live-cell assay for measuring rates of protein synthesis. PSM can be used to monitor the rate of either total protein synthesis (overall PSM), using bulk tRNAs, or of the synthesis of a specific protein (specific PSM), using specific pairs of tRNA to mark the protein of interest. PSM has sub-micron spatial and sub-second temporal resolutions. Cells continue to live and grow normally, and the synthesized proteins are unchanged since the labeling is on the tRNA itself and not on the amino acid. We have demonstrated specific PSM for monitoring synthesis of a viral protein during viral infection using Isoleucine tRNA, and for monitoring synthesis of collagen during fibrosis in mouse fibroblasts using tRNA-Gly and tRNA-Pro, as collagen is distinguished by many repeats of Gly-Pro dipeptides. We will discuss these results as well as additional applications of PSM in basic research, drug discovery, cell sorting, neurobiology, cancer, biomanufacturing, viral infections, and various protein-synthesis specific diseases.

  16. Possible involvement of eEF1A in Tomato spotted wilt virus RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoda, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Kawamura-Nagaya, Kazue; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2014-11-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is a negative-strand RNA virus in the family Bunyaviridae and propagates in both insects and plants. Although TSWV can infect a wide range of plant species, host factors involved in viral RNA synthesis of TSWV in plants have not been characterized. In this report, we demonstrate that the cell-free extract derived from one of the host plants can activate mRNA transcriptional activity of TSWV. Based on activity-guided fractionation of the cell-free extract, we identified eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF) 1A as a possible host factor facilitating TSWV transcription and replication. The RNA synthesis-supporting activity decreased in the presence of an eEF1A inhibitor, suggesting that eEF1A plays an important role in RNA synthesis of TSWV. PMID:25151062

  17. Determination of the synthesis site of the infections flacherie virus-RNA by light microscopy-autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The site of the RNA synthesis of the infectious flacherie virus in the midgut epithelial cells of the silkworm, Bombyx mori L., 1758 (Lep., Bombycidae), has been investigated using both autoradiography and light microscopy techniques. The density or ratio between silver grain and the respective cell structure (silver grain/μm2) has been used as criteria to identify the site of the viral RNA synthesis. Actinomycin D selectively blocked about 60% of the cell RNA synthesis without affecting the virus RNA synthesis. The obtained data indicated that the viral RNA synthesis occurs in the nucleus of the midgut epithelial cells of the silkworm larvae. Some evidence about the viral RNA translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm and inhibition of the synthesis of normal RNA by the virus were observed. (Author)

  18. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein K interacts with Sindbis virus nonstructural proteins and viral subgenomic mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alphaviruses are a group of arthropod-borne human and animal pathogens that can cause epidemics of significant public health and economic consequence. Alphavirus RNA synthesis requires four virally encoded nonstructural proteins and probably a number of cellular proteins. Using comparative two-dimensional electrophoresis we were able to identify proteins enriched in cytoplasmic membrane fractions containing viral RNA synthetic complexes following infection with Sindbis virus. Our studies demonstrated the following: (i) the host protein hnRNP K is enriched in cytoplasmic membrane fractions following Sindbis virus infection, (ii) viral nonstructural proteins co-immunoprecipitate with hnRNP K, (iii) nsP2 and hnRNP K co-localize in the cytoplasm of Sindbis virus infected cells, (iv) Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA, but not genomic RNA co-immunoprecipitates with hnRNP K, (v) viral RNA does not appear to be required for the interaction of hnRNP K with the nonstructural proteins. Potential functions of hnRNP K during virus replication are discussed

  19. Flow cytometric analysis of RNA synthesis by detection of bromouridine incorporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J K; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Larsen, J

    2001-01-01

    RNA synthesis has traditionally been investigated by a laborious and time-consuming radiographic method involving incorporation of tritiated uridine. Now a faster non-radioactive alternative has emerged, based on immunocytochemical detection. This method utilizes the brominated RNA precursor...... bromouridine, which is taken into a cell, phosphorylated, and incorporated into nascent RNA. The BrU-substituted RNA is detected by permeabilizing the cells and staining with certain anti-BrdU antibodies. This dynamic approach yields information complementing that provided by cellular RNA content analysis at a...

  20. The 3'-terminal 55 nucleotides of bovine coronavirus defective interfering RNA harbor cis-acting elements required for both negative- and positive-strand RNA synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yu Liao

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the negative-strand [(--strand] complement of the ∼30 kilobase, positive-strand [(+-strand] coronaviral genome is a necessary early step for genome replication. The identification of cis-acting elements required for (--strand RNA synthesis in coronaviruses, however, has been hampered due to insufficiencies in the techniques used to detect the (--strand RNA species. Here, we employed a method of head-to-tail ligation and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR to detect and quantitate the synthesis of bovine coronavirus (BCoV defective interfering (DI RNA (- strands. Furthermore, using the aforementioned techniques along with Northern blot assay, we specifically defined the cis-acting RNA elements within the 3'-terminal 55 nucleotides (nts which function in the synthesis of (-- or (+-strand BCoV DI RNA. The major findings are as follows: (i nts from -5 to -39 within the 3'-terminal 55 nts are the cis-acting elements responsible for (--strand BCoV DI RNA synthesis, (ii nts from -3 to -34 within the 3'-terminal 55 nts are cis-acting elements required for (+-strand BCoV DI RNA synthesis, and (iii the nucleotide species at the 3'-most position (-1 is important, but not critical, for both (-- and (+-strand BCoV DI RNA synthesis. These results demonstrate that the 3'-terminal 55 nts in BCoV DI RNA harbor cis-acting RNA elements required for both (-- and (+-strand DI RNA synthesis and extend our knowledge on the mechanisms of coronavirus replication. The method of head-to-tail ligation and qRT-PCR employed in the study may also be applied to identify other cis-acting elements required for (--strand RNA synthesis in coronaviruses.

  1. Monitoring Protein Synthesis in Living Cells with Fluorescent Labeled tRNA FRET Pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Barhoom, Sima; Farrel, Ian; Dahary, Dvir; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Cooperman, Barry S.; Elroy-Stein, Orna; Smilansky, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    We introduce Protein Synthesis Monitoring (PSM) – a technique to monitor protein synthesis in live cells. In PSM, we transfect cells with tRNA labeled as FRET donors and acceptors. A FRET signal is generated only when a donor- and an acceptor-labeled tRNA come in close contact (< 7nM), as they do on the ribosome during elongation. The intensity of the FRET signal correlates with the number of ribosomes engaged in protein synthesis, providing a real-time, live-cell assay for measuring rates of...

  2. Effective suppression of fibronectin synthesis by retrovirus delivered shRNA in rat cardiac fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Di; HONG; Quan; CHEN; Xiangmei; FU; Bo; LI; Aipingi; LIU

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular matrix overexpression is a common final pathway that leads to ventricular remodeling.Fibronectin plays a pivotal role in this progress.In the work presented here,we explored the possibility of direct inhibition of fibronectin synthesis in rat cardiac fibroblasts by small interference RNA(siRNA).We found that siRNA could successfully suppress the fibronectin overexpression stimulated by angiotensin Ⅱ.To overcome the limitations of plasmid-based siRNA,we subcloned the H1 promoter into pLXIN,a commercially available retroviral vector.We found that H1 promoter worked very well to form the small hairpin RNA(shRNA)on the retroviral vector,and the fibronectin expression was dramatically down regulated by shRNA.We think the retroviral shRNA delivery system that we have constructed may have potential roles in treating ventricular remodeling.

  3. Synthesis of coronavirus mRNAs: kinetics of inactivation of infectious bronchitis virus RNA synthesis by UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection of cells with the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus results in the synthesis of five major subgenomic RNAs. These RNAs and the viral genome form a 3' coterminal nested set. We found that the rates of inactivation of synthesis of the RNAs by UV light were different and increased with the length of the transcript. These results show that each RNA is transcribed from a unique promoter and that extensive processing of the primary transcripts probably does not occur

  4. Identification of the cis-acting signal for minus-strand RNA synthesis of a murine coronavirus: implications for the role of minus-strand RNA in RNA replication and transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Y J; Liao, C. L.; Lai, M M

    1994-01-01

    Minus-strand RNA is the first RNA species made by plus-strand RNA viruses, such as mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), and serves as a template for subsequent RNA replication and transcription. The regulation of minus-strand RNA synthesis has been difficult to study because of the paucity of minus-strand RNA. We have optimized a ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay which enabled the detection of minus-strand RNA synthesis from nonreplicating RNAs, thus clearly separating minus-strand from plus-stra...

  5. Emerging alphaviruses in the Americas: Chikungunya and Mayaro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Luis Garcia de Figueiredo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Mayaro virus (MAYV are emergent arthropod-borne viruses that produce outbreaks of acute febrile illness with arthropathy. Despite their different continental origins, CHIKV and MAYV are closely related and are components of the Semliki Forest Complex of the Alphavirus (Togaviridae. MAYV and, more recently, CHIKV, which are both transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, have resulted in severe public health problems in the Americas, including Brazil. In this review, we present aspects of the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment of febrile illnesses produced by CHIKV and MAYV. We also discuss the epidemiological aspects and effects related to the prophylaxis of infections by both viruses.

  6. Selection of single-chain antibodies that specifically interact with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) nucleocapsid and inhibit viral RNA synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cortay, Jean-Claude; Gerlier, Denis; Iseni, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    The RNA genome of non-segmented negative-strand RNA viruses is completely covered by the nucleoprotein (N) forming a ribonucleoprotein complex, the nucleocapsid. The nucleocapsid functions as the template for viral RNA synthesis that is mediated by a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. It is postulated that the selection of molecules that would specifically target the nucleocapsid and thus inhibit the viral polymerase activity could represent a common approach to block negative-strand RNA vir...

  7. Quantitative single cell monitoring of protein synthesis at subcellular resolution using fluorescently labeled tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoom, Sima; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cooperman, Barry S; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Smilansky, Zeev; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a novel technique of using fluorescent tRNA for translation monitoring (FtTM). FtTM enables the identification and monitoring of active protein synthesis sites within live cells at submicron resolution through quantitative microscopy of transfected bulk uncharged tRNA, fluorescently labeled in the D-loop (fl-tRNA). The localization of fl-tRNA to active translation sites was confirmed through its co-localization with cellular factors and its dynamic alterations upon inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals, generated when fl-tRNAs, separately labeled as a FRET pair occupy adjacent sites on the ribosome, quantitatively reflect levels of protein synthesis in defined cellular regions. In addition, FRET signals enable detection of intra-populational variability in protein synthesis activity. We demonstrate that FtTM allows quantitative comparison of protein synthesis between different cell types, monitoring effects of antibiotics and stress agents, and characterization of changes in spatial compartmentalization of protein synthesis upon viral infection. PMID:21795382

  8. Quantitative single cell monitoring of protein synthesis at subcellular resolution using fluorescently labeled tRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Barhoom, Sima; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cooperman, Barry S.; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Smilansky, Zeev; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique of using fluorescent tRNA for translation monitoring (FtTM). FtTM enables the identification and monitoring of active protein synthesis sites within live cells at submicron resolution through quantitative microscopy of transfected bulk uncharged tRNA, fluorescently labeled in the D-loop (fl-tRNA). The localization of fl-tRNA to active translation sites was confirmed through its co-localization with cellular factors and its dynamic alterations upon inhibitio...

  9. Influenza virus RNA polymerase: insights into the mechanisms of viral RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Velthuis, Aartjan J W; Fodor, Ervin

    2016-08-01

    The genomes of influenza viruses consist of multiple segments of single-stranded negative-sense RNA. Each of these segments is bound by the heterotrimeric viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and multiple copies of nucleoprotein, which form viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes. It is in the context of these vRNPs that the viral RNA polymerase carries out transcription of viral genes and replication of the viral RNA genome. In this Review, we discuss our current knowledge of the structure of the influenza virus RNA polymerase, and insights that have been gained into the molecular mechanisms of viral transcription and replication, and their regulation by viral and host factors. Furthermore, we discuss how advances in our understanding of the structure and function of polymerases could help in identifying new antiviral targets. PMID:27396566

  10. Nonenzymatic template-directed RNA synthesis inside model protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Szostak, Jack W

    2013-11-29

    Efforts to recreate a prebiotically plausible protocell, in which RNA replication occurs within a fatty acid vesicle, have been stalled by the destabilizing effect of Mg(2+) on fatty acid membranes. Here we report that the presence of citrate protects fatty acid membranes from the disruptive effects of high Mg(2+) ion concentrations while allowing RNA copying to proceed, while also protecting single-stranded RNA from Mg(2+)-catalyzed degradation. This combination of properties has allowed us to demonstrate the chemical copying of RNA templates inside fatty acid vesicles, which in turn allows for an increase in copying efficiency by bathing the vesicles in a continuously refreshed solution of activated nucleotides. PMID:24288333

  11. A Co-Opted DEAD-Box RNA helicase enhances tombusvirus plus-strand synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kovalev

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on recruited host factors that aid several critical steps during replication. In this paper, we show that an essential translation factor, Ded1p DEAD-box RNA helicase of yeast, directly affects replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV. To separate the role of Ded1p in viral protein translation from its putative replication function, we utilized a cell-free TBSV replication assay and recombinant Ded1p. The in vitro data show that Ded1p plays a role in enhancing plus-strand synthesis by the viral replicase. We also find that Ded1p is a component of the tombusvirus replicase complex and Ded1p binds to the 3'-end of the viral minus-stranded RNA. The data obtained with wt and ATPase deficient Ded1p mutants support the model that Ded1p unwinds local structures at the 3'-end of the TBSV (-RNA, rendering the RNA compatible for initiation of (+-strand synthesis. Interestingly, we find that Ded1p and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, which is another host factor for TBSV, play non-overlapping functions to enhance (+-strand synthesis. Altogether, the two host factors enhance TBSV replication synergistically by interacting with the viral (-RNA and the replication proteins. In addition, we have developed an in vitro assay for Flock house virus (FHV, a small RNA virus of insects, that also demonstrated positive effect on FHV replicase activity by the added Ded1p helicase. Thus, two small RNA viruses, which do not code for their own helicases, seems to recruit a host RNA helicase to aid their replication in infected cells.

  12. Autoradiographic detection of HPRT variants of human lymphocytes resistant to RNA synthesis inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, I.M.; Zetterberg, G.; Strout, C.L.; Carrano, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of using RNA synthesis in freshly isolated, human peripheral blood lymphocytes to detect 6-thioguanine (TG)- and 8-azaguanine (AG)-resistant variants in an autoradiographic assay similar to that of Strauss and Albertini (1979) has been evaluated. In phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated cultures RNA synthesis and HPRT activity began well in advance of DNA synthesis and increased in parallel during the first 44 h of culture. Introduction of TG or AG with PHA at the beginning of culture completely inhibited DNA synthesis during the first 44 h and reduced RNA synthesis to low levels within 24 h. When TG or AG was added after cells had been in culture for 38 h, DNA synthesis was reduced quickly while RNA synthesis was inhibited more slowly. An autoradiographic assay is described in which freshly isolated lymphocytes are cultured with PHA for 24 h, with or without TG or AG, then labeled with (/sup 3/H)uridine for 1 h. TG-resistant and AG-resistant variant frequencies for 2 normal individuals and a Lesch-Nyhan individual were determined with this assay. The variant frequencies for the normal individuals ranged from 0.46 to 10.6 x 10/sup -5/ depending upon the selective conditions used. All the Lesch-Nyhan cells were resistant to 0.2 ..mu..M-2 mM AG; some were sensitive to 0.2 mM TG and most were sensitive to 2.0 mM TG. 24 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  13. RNA synthesis in Bacillus subtilis Cgr4 mutant during the stationary phase of growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied RNA synthesis in Bacillus subtilis Cgr4 cultured in the mineral sporulation medium enriched with glucose up to 2% and amino acids up to 1%. For the study of mRNA synthesis they used a method of transfering the 3H-uridine pulse-labeled culture to the supernatant of the physiologically identical unlabeled culture with subsequent continuation of incubation, during which they measured the amount of label both in the cells and in the supernatant, and they also analyzed the RNA by electrophoresis and the distribution of the label over the fractions. They have shown that the mRNA synthesized at the logarithmic phase at the second hour of growth is broken down to the extent of up to 12% in 10 min; the mRNA synthesized at the stationary phase at the seventh hour of growth is stable and no degradation occurs for 2-3 h. The beginning of breakdown coincides in time with the second induction of the synthesis of serine proteinases, and with the onset of a sharp decrease in the incorporation of 3H-uridine in RNA and with the induction of spore morphogenesis. The electrophoretic analysis of the pulse-labeled RNA showed that before the transfer the labeled uridine was incorporated and after, it was retained for 2-3 h in the fraction. In its electrophoretic mobility in polyacrylamide gel, this fraction corresponded to the mRNA. They conclude that the mRNAs synthesized at the stationary phase and used for the translation of the serine proteinase secreted are stable

  14. Pathogenesis of experimental salmonid alphavirus infection in vivo: an ultrastructural insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Tharangani K; Ferguson, Hugh W; Weidmann, Manfred W; Bron, James E; Thompson, Kimberly D; Adams, Alexandra; Muir, Katherine F; Richards, Randolph H

    2016-01-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is an enveloped, single-stranded, positive sense RNA virus belonging to the family Togaviridae. It causes economically devastating disease in cultured salmonids. The characteristic features of SAV infection include severe histopathological changes in the heart, pancreas and skeletal muscles of diseased fish. Although the presence of virus has been reported in a wider range of tissues, the mechanisms responsible for viral tissue tropism and for lesion development during the disease are not clearly described or understood. Previously, we have described membrane-dependent morphogenesis of SAV and associated apoptosis-mediated cell death in vitro. The aims of the present study were to explore ultrastructural changes associated with SAV infection in vivo. Cytolytic changes were observed in heart, but not in gill and head-kidney of virus-infected fish, although they still exhibited signs of SAV morphogenesis. Ultrastructural changes associated with virus replication were also noted in leukocytes in the head kidney of virus-infected fish. These results further describe the presence of degenerative lesions in the heart as expected, but not in the gills and in the kidney. PMID:26743442

  15. Quality control in aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis its role in translational fidelity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadavalli, Srujana S; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    . AaRSs define the genetic code by catalyzing the formation of precise aminoacyl ester-linked tRNAs via a two-step reaction. AaRSs ensure faithful aa-tRNA synthesis via high substrate selectivity and/or by proofreading (editing) of noncognate products. About half of the aaRSs rely on proofreading......Accurate translation of mRNA into protein is vital for maintenance of cellular integrity. Translational fidelity is achieved by two key events: synthesis of correctly paired aminoacyl-tRNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and stringent selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) by the ribosome...

  16. A Phylogenomic Study of the Genus Alphavirus Employing Whole Genome Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Campanella

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetics of the genus Alphavirus have historically been characterized using partial gene, single gene or partial proteomic data. We have mined cDNA and amino acid sequences from GenBank for all fully sequenced and some partially sequenced alphaviruses and generated phylogenomic analyses of the genus Alphavirus genus, employing capsid encoding structural regions, non-structural coding regions and complete viral genomes. Our studies support the presence of the previously reported recombination event that produced the Western Equine Encephalitis clade, and confirm many of the patterns of geographic radiation and divergence of the multiple species. Our data suggest that the Salmon Pancreatic Disease Virus and Sleeping Disease Virus are sufficiently divergent to form a separate clade from the other alphaviruses. Also, unlike previously reported studies employing limited sequence data for correlation of phylogeny, our results indicate that the Barmah Forest Virus and Middelburg Virus appear to be members of the Semliki Forest clade. Additionally, our analysis indicates that the Southern Elephant Seal Virus is part of the Semliki Forest clade, although still phylogenetically distant from all known members of the genus Alphavirus. Finally, we demonstrate that the whole Rubella viral genome provides an ideal outgroup for phylogenomic studies of the genus Alphavirus.

  17. Synthesis of double-stranded RNA in a virus-enriched fraction from Agaricus bisporus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sriskantha, A.; Wach, P.; Schlagnhaufer, B.; Romaine, C.P.

    1986-03-01

    Partially purified virus preparations from sporophores of Agaricus bisporus affected with LaFrance disease had up to a 15-fold-higher RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity than did comparable preparations from health sporophores. Enzyme activity was dependent upon the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ and the four nucleoside triphosphates and was insensitive to actinomycin D, ..cap alpha..-amanitin, and rifampin. The /sup 3/H-labeled enzyme reaction products were double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as indicated by CF-11 cellulose column chromatography and by their ionic-strength-dependent sensitivity to hydrolysis by RNase A. The principal dsRNA products had estimated molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ and 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 6/. Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ equilibrium centrifugation of the virus preparation resolved a single peak of RNA polymerase activity that banded with a 35-nm spherical virus particle containing dsRNAs with molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ and 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 6/. The data suggest that the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with the 35-nm spherical virus is a replicase which catalyzes the synthesis of the genomic dsRNAs.

  18. Preferential synthesis of low-molecular-weight RNA in uv-irradiated plasma of Physarum polycephalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, P.A.V.; Nair, V.R.

    1981-10-01

    Mitotically synchronous surface plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum were irradiated during the G2 phase with a Philips 15-W germicidal lamp. At different intervals after irradiation, the plasmodia were pulse-labeled with (/sup 3/H)uridine, and RNA was extracted and analyzed on linear sucrose gradients. The radioactivity profiles of the RNA showed that irradiated plasmodia synthesize preferentially low-molecular-weight RNA types, including 4 SRNA, during the delay period prior to the first postirradiation mitosis and during the following short mitotic cycle. Double-labeling experiments, employing (/sup 14/C)uridine-prelabeled plasmodia which were pulse-labeled with (/sup 3/H)uridine after irradiation, confirmed this finding. It is also seen that there is an overall reduction in the rate of synthesis of rRNA in the irradiated plasmodia.

  19. Radioautographic studies of in vitro RNA synthesis in the course of Oogenesis in Parascaris equorum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical elaboration of in vitro incubation of Parascaris equorum gonads with 3H-uridine has permitted, for the first time, the study of RNA synthesis during oogenesis along the whole gonadic tube. In germ cells, oocytes in diakinesis (oviduct) and in division of maturation (uterus) show no label. On the contrary oogonia and growing oocytes in ovary are labelled. RNA snthesis is always detected in all parietal cells but is more active in oviduct and uterus where the gonadic wall is particularly developed

  20. Autoradiographic detection of RNA and glycoprotein synthesis in epithelial cells of the oviduct in ovulated heifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifers (n=9) of the Black-Pied Holstein-Friesian breed were slaughtered on the 3rd, 6th and 9th day of the synchronized cycle, respectively (heat=day 0). Tissue samples from the ampullar part of the oviduct were collected immediately after slaughter and treated for histoautoradiographic (ARG) analyses. Investigated autoradiograms revealed an intensive synthesis of RNA in both cilliated as well as in secretory cells of the oviduct epithelium. The intensity of RNA synthesis remains comparable during the early luteal phase from the 3rd to the 9th day of the cycle. The glycoproteins, synthesized first in the Golgi apparatus in the supranuclear region, were seen to move to the apical region of the epithelial cells later on. The most intensive autoradiographic reaction of newly synthesized glycoproteins was detected on the 3rd day of the cycle without an evident change on the 6th day but decreasing on the 9th day

  1. Flow cytometric measurement of RNA synthesis using bromouridine labelling and bromodeoxyuridine antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J; Christiansen, J;

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear RNA synthesis can be analysed by flow cytometry of cells labelled with 5-bromouridine (BrUrd) and stained with anti-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) antibody and FITC-conjugated secondary antibody. A panel of 5 different commercially available anti-BrdUrd antibodies was tested on cells of a HL-60...... human leukemia cell line, stained as a methanol-fixed nuclear suspension. The BrUrd-induced fluorescence signals were highest with the antibody ABDM (Partec), moderate but reproducible with B-44 (Becton Dickinson), variable or low with BR-3 and IU-4 (Caltag), and not detectable with Bu20a (DAKO...... variation of RNA synthesis during the cell cycle. The BrUrd incorporation was high in the S and G2 phase, variable in G1, and negligible in mitosis. Similar results were obtained using other cell types....

  2. [Electron-microscopic autoradiography of RNA synthesis in the myocardium after damage to it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galankin, V N; Pal'tsyn, A A; Badikova, A K

    1977-06-01

    Thermic burn of the wall of the left cardiac ventricle was inflicted to new born rats. Twenty-four hours after the injury the RNA synthesis of the myocardial cells remote from the site of burn were investigated by electron-microscopic autoradiography. Tissue samples were fixed 2 and 6 hours after the 3H-uridine injections. As compared with the control, experimental animals displayed a reduction of silver grains density over the nucleus and the cytoplasm of cardiomyocytes. PMID:884310

  3. Impaired rRNA synthesis triggers homeostatic responses in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eKiryk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Decreased rRNA synthesis and nucleolar disruption, known as nucleolar stress, are primary signs of cellular stress associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Silencing of rDNA occurs during early stages of Alzheimer´s disease (AD and may play a role in dementia. Moreover aberrant regulation of the protein synthesis machinery is present in the brain of suicide victims and implicates the epigenetic modulation of rRNA. Recently, we developed unique mouse models characterized by nucleolar stress in neurons. We inhibited RNA polymerase I by genetic ablation of the basal transcription factor TIF-IA in adult hippocampal neurons. Nucleolar stress resulted in progressive neurodegeneration, although with a differential vulnerability within the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus. Here, we investigate the consequences of nucleolar stress on learning and memory. The mutant mice show normal performance in the Morris water maze and in other behavioral tests, suggesting the activation of adaptive mechanisms. In fact, we observe a significantly enhanced learning and re-learning corresponding to the initial inhibition of rRNA transcription. This phenomenon is accompanied by aberrant synaptic plasticity. By the analysis of nucleolar function and integrity, we find that the synthesis of rRNA is later restored. Gene expression profiling shows that thirty-six transcripts are differentially expressed in comparison to the control group in absence of neurodegeneration. Additionally, we observe a significant enrichment of the putative serum response factor (SRF binding sites in the promoters of the genes with changed expression, indicating potential adaptive mechanisms mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In the dentate gyrus a neurogenetic response might compensate the initial molecular deficits. These results underscore the role of nucleolar stress in neuronal homeostasis and open a new ground for therapeutic strategies aiming at preserving

  4. Alphavirus production is inhibited in neurofibromin 1-deficient cells through activated RAS signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virus-host interactions essential for alphavirus pathogenesis are poorly understood. To address this shortcoming, we coupled retrovirus insertional mutagenesis and a cell survival selection strategy to generate clonal cell lines broadly resistant to Sindbis virus (SINV) and other alphaviruses. Resistant cells had significantly impaired SINV production relative to wild-type (WT) cells, although virus binding and fusion events were similar in both sets of cells. Analysis of the retroviral integration sites identified the neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene as disrupted in alphavirus-resistant cell lines. Subsequent analysis indicated that expression of NF1 was significantly reduced in alphavirus-resistant cells. Importantly, independent down-regulation of NF1 expression in WT HEK 293 cells decreased virus production and increased cell viability during SINV infection, relative to infected WT cells. Additionally, we observed hyperactive RAS signalling in the resistant HEK 293 cells, which was anticipated because NF1 is a negative regulator of RAS. Expression of constitutively active RAS (HRAS-G12V) in a WT HEK 293 cell line resulted in a marked delay in virus production, compared with infected cells transfected with parental plasmid or dominant-negative RAS (HRAS-S17N). This work highlights novel host cell determinants required for alphavirus pathogenesis and suggests that RAS signalling may play an important role in neuronal susceptibility to SINV infection

  5. Alphavirus Infection: Host Cell Shut-Off and Inhibition of Antiviral Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fros, Jelke J; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2016-01-01

    Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to the re-emergence and dramatic expansion of chikungunya virus in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. As a consequence, alphavirus-host interactions are now understood in much more molecular detail, and important novel mechanisms have been elucidated. It has become clear that alphaviruses not only cause a general host shut-off in infected vertebrate cells, but also specifically suppress different host antiviral pathways using their viral nonstructural proteins, nsP2 and nsP3. Here we review the current state of the art of alphavirus host cell shut-off of viral transcription and translation, and describe recent insights in viral subversion of interferon induction and signaling, the unfolded protein response, and stress granule assembly. PMID:27294951

  6. Allosteric vs. spontaneous exit-site (E-site) tRNA dissociation early in protein synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2011-01-01

    During protein synthesis, deacylated transfer RNAs leave the ribosome via an exit (E) site after mRNA translocation. How the ribosome regulates tRNA dissociation and whether functional linkages between the aminoacyl (A) and E sites modulate the dynamics of protein synthesis have long been debated. Using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments, we find that, during early cycles of protein elongation, tRNAs are often held in the E site until being allosterically relea...

  7. The prebiotic synthesis of modified purines and their potential role in the RNA world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Modified purines are found in all organisms in the tRNA, rRNA, and even DNA, raising the possibility of an early role for these compounds in the evolution of life. These include N6-methyladenine, 1-methyladenine, N6,N6-dimethyladenine, 1-methylhypoxanthine, 1-methylguanine, and N2-methylguanine. We find that these bases as well as a number of nonbiological modified purines can be synthesized from adenine and guanine by the simple reaction of an amine or an amino group with adenine and guanine under the concentrated conditions of the drying-lagoon or drying-beach model of prebiotic synthesis with yields as high as 50%. These compounds are therefore as prebiotic as adenine and guanine and could have played an important role in the RNA world by providing additional functional groups in ribozymes, especially for the construction of hydrophobic binding pockets.

  8. Mechanism of Concerted RNA-DNA Primer Synthesis by the Human Primosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranovskiy, Andrey G; Babayeva, Nigar D; Zhang, Yinbo; Gu, Jianyou; Suwa, Yoshiaki; Pavlov, Youri I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2016-05-01

    The human primosome, a 340-kilodalton complex of primase and DNA polymerase α (Polα), synthesizes chimeric RNA-DNA primers to be extended by replicative DNA polymerases δ and ϵ. The intricate mechanism of concerted primer synthesis by two catalytic centers was an enigma for over three decades. Here we report the crystal structures of two key complexes, the human primosome and the C-terminal domain of the primase large subunit (p58C) with bound DNA/RNA duplex. These structures, along with analysis of primase/polymerase activities, provide a plausible mechanism for all transactions of the primosome including initiation, elongation, accurate counting of RNA primer length, primer transfer to Polα, and concerted autoregulation of alternate activation/inhibition of the catalytic centers. Our findings reveal a central role of p58C in the coordinated actions of two catalytic domains in the primosome and ultimately could impact the design of anticancer drugs. PMID:26975377

  9. The effect of trichloroethylene and acrylonitrile on RNA and ribosome synthesis and ribosome content in Saccharomyces cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochmann, E R; Ehrlich, W; Mangir, M

    1984-04-01

    The effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and acrylonitrile (ACN) on growth, RNA synthesis, ribosome synthesis, and ribosome content were tested in yeast cells. TCE causes a delay of the growth of a cell culture (prolongation of the lag phase), but does not cause inhibition. Cells exposed to increasing concentrations of ACN show increasing damage, so that, at a certain point of the growth curve, cell division stops altogether. Similar results were obtained when RNA synthesis was investigated: After treatment with TCE, the maximum RNA synthesis of the cell culture was retarded, but subsequently reached the same level as the untreated control cells. In the presence of ACN, however, the rate of RNA synthesis was lowered with increasing ACN concentrations. The same effect was observed upon investigation of ribosome synthesis: Whereas TCE produces only a slight effect, treatment with increasing concentrations of ACN leads to a substantial decrease in ribosome synthesis, and finally to total inhibition. Parallel to this, the content of free and membrane-bound ribosomes is diminished. Obviously, the decrease in ribosome content is caused not only by an inhibition of ribosome synthesis, but also by a degradation of existing ribosomes, as well as by induction of a ribosome-associated RNase. PMID:6714140

  10. Gene activity during germination of spores of the fern, Onoclea sensibilis: RNA and protein synthesis and the role of stored mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, V.

    1991-01-01

    Pattern of 3H-uridine incorporation into RNA of spores of Onoclea sensibilis imbibed in complete darkness (non-germinating conditions) and induced to germinate in red light was followed by oligo-dT cellulose chromatography, gel electrophoresis coupled with fluorography and autoradiography. In dark-imbibed spores, RNA synthesis was initiated about 24 h after sowing, with most of the label accumulating in the high mol. wt. poly(A) -RNA fraction. There was no incorporation of the label into poly(A) +RNA until 48 h after sowing. In contrast, photo-induced spores began to synthesize all fractions of RNA within 12 h after sowing and by 24 h, incorporation of 3H-uridine into RNA of irradiated spores was nearly 70-fold higher than that into dark-imbibed spores. Protein synthesis, as monitored by 3H-arginine incorporation into the acid-insoluble fraction and by autoradiography, was initiated in spores within 1-2 h after sowing under both conditions. Autoradiographic experiments also showed that onset of protein synthesis in the cytoplasm of the germinating spore is independent of the transport of newly synthesized nuclear RNA. One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 35S-methionine-labelled proteins revealed a good correspondence between proteins synthesized in a cell-free translation system directed by poly(A) +RNA of dormant spores and those synthesized in vivo by dark-imbibed and photo-induced spores. These results indicate that stored mRNAs of O. sensibilis spores are functionally competent and provide templates for the synthesis of proteins during dark-imbibition and germination.

  11. Recovery from ultraviolet light-induced depression of ribosomal RNA synthesis in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum and cockayne syndrome cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis was analyzed at different times after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells. In normal cells, the rate of rRNA synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of 3H-uridine into 18S and 28S rRNAs, decreased immediately after UV irradiation to about half of that of unirradiated cells, and then recovered significantly at 24h after UV. However, the rate of synthesis continued to decrease during post-UV incubation in XP cells belonging to groups A, D, E, F and G, as well as in CS cells of groups A and B. In contrast, group C XP cells showed a slight recovery at 24h after UV, suggesting that they have the capacity to repair UV lesions in rRNA genes. (author)

  12. Primer-dependent and primer-independent initiation of double stranded RNA synthesis by purified arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR2 and RDR6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maina Huguette Joséphine;

    2015-01-01

    RNA) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer......-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer-independent and...... primer-dependent RNA polymerase activities with different efficiencies. We further show that RDR2 and RDR6 can initiate dsRNA synthesis either by elongation of 21- to 24- nucleotides RNAs hybridized to complementary RNA template or by elongation of self-primed RNA template. These findings provide new...

  13. Interaction between Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein (N) and RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRp) Mutants Reveals the Requirement of an N-RdRp Interaction for Viral RNA Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Erdong; Wang, Zekun; Mir, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    Viral ribonucleocapsids harboring the viral genomic RNA are used as the template for viral mRNA synthesis and replication of the viral genome by viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Here we show that hantavirus nucleocapsid protein (N protein) interacts with RdRp in virus-infected cells. We mapped the RdRp binding domain at the N terminus of N protein. Similarly, the N protein binding pocket is located at the C terminus of RdRp. We demonstrate that an N protein-RdRp interaction is requi...

  14. Sequences more than 500 base pairs upstream of the human U3 small nuclear RNA gene stimulate the synthesis of U3 RNA in frog oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes contain strong promoters capable of initiating transcription once every 4 s. Studies on the human U1 snRNA gene, carried out in other laboratories, showed that sequences within 400 bp of the 5' flanking region are sufficient for maximal levels of transcription both in vivo and in frog oocytes [reviewed in Dahlberg and Lund (1988)]. The authors studied the expression of a human U3 snRNA gene by injecting 5' deletion mutants into frog oocytes. The results show that sequences more than 500 bp upstream of the U3 snRNA gene have a 2-3-fold stimulatory effect on the U3 snRNA synthesis. These results indicate that the human U3 snRNA gene is different from human U1 snRNA gene in containing regulatory elements more than 500 bp upstream. The U3 snRNA gene upstream sequences contain an AluI homologous sequence in the -1,200 region; these AluI sequences were transcribed in vitro and in frog oocytes but were not detectable in Hela cells

  15. Temporal aspects of DNA and RNA synthesis during human immunodeficiency virus infection: Evidence for differential gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of retroviral DNA and RNA synthesis are parameters vital to understanding viral growth, especially for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which encodes several of its own regulatory genes. The authors have established a single-cycle growth condition for HIV in H9 cells, a human CD4+ lymphocyte line. The full-length viral linear DNA is first detectable by 4 h postinfection. During a one-step growth of HIV, amounts of viral DNA gradually increase until 8 to 12 h postinfection and then decrease. The copy number of unintegrated viral DNA is not extraordinarily high even at its peak. Most strikingly, there is a temporal program of RNA accumulation: the earliest RNA is greatly enriched in the 2-kilobase subgenomic mRNA species, while the level of 9.2-kilobase RNA which is both genomic RNA and mRNA remains low until after 24 h of infection. Virus production begins at about 24 h postinfection. Thus, viral DNA synthesis is as rapid as for other retroviruses, but viral RNA synthesis involves temporal alteration in the species that accumulate, presumably as a consequence of viral regulatory genes

  16. Effect of 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid and vanillin on chlorophyll, protein and RNA synthesis in detached cucumber cotyledons, and chlorophyll degradation in senescing leaf discs of kale

    OpenAIRE

    J. S. Knypl

    2015-01-01

    N6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and KC1 stimulated growth in detached greening cucumber cotyledons; BAP enhanced RNA synthesis whereas KCl strikingly accelerated leucine-14C incorporation into proteins. Vanillin (0.01 M) inhibited greening and protein synthesis, and nullified the stimulatory effects of KC1. a-chloroethylphosphonic acid (CEPA, 0.01 M) inhibited greening without any effect on protein synthesis when it was applied alone; CEPA decreased RNA synthesis, completely nullified the...

  17. Nitrogen uptake, RNA and protein synthesis in high protein genotype of rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three genetically high protein cultivars of rice have been investigated in order to identify the factors that contribute to the accumulation of greater amount of proteins in their kernels in comparison to those of a medium protein cultiver IR-8. In vitro incorporation of 3H uridine and 14C amino acids revealed increased rate of RNA and protein synthesis in the developing kernels of the high protein genotypes. Nitrogen as percent of dry matter in the leaves at the time of flowering was the same in medium and high protein genotypes, but later high protein genotypes translocated more N to the developing kernels. (author)

  18. Effects of seed irradiation on the early development and mitochondrial RNA synthesis of 'Impala' barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of fractionated γ-irradiation on barley seeds was investigated under outdoor and hothouse conditions. The doses were 250, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 rad. The resulting radiation effects were investigated from the point of view of molecular biology, i.e. studying the RNA synthesis of the mitochondria after 14C-labelling of uridine. The radiation influence on the length of the coleoptiles was another criterion. The irradiation findings are discussed in connection with the cultivation of better and more resistant plants for agriculture. (GSE/AK)

  19. Significance of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis catalyzed by montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prakash C; Aldersley, Michael F

    2013-06-01

    The montmorillonite-catalyzed reactions of the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of adenosine used as a model generated RNA type oligomers. These reactions were found to be dependent on the presence of mineral salts. Whereas montmorillonite (pH 7) produced only dimers and traces of trimer in water, addition of sodium chloride (0.1-2.0 M) enhanced the chain length of oligomers to 10-mers as detected by HPLC. Maximum catalytic activity was observed with sodium chloride at a concentration between 0.8 and 1.2 M. This concentration of sodium chloride resembled its abundance in the ancient oceans (0.9-1.2 M). Magnesium chloride produced a similar effect but its joint action with sodium chloride did not produce any difference in the oligomer chain length. Therefore, Mg(2+) was not deemed necessary for generating longer oligomers. The effect of monovalent cations upon RNA chain length was: Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+). A similar effect was observed with the anions with enhanced oligomer length in the following order: Cl(-) > Br(-) > I(-). Thus, the smaller ions facilitated the formation of the longest oligomers. Inorganic salts that tend to salt out organic compounds from water and salts which show salt-in effects had no influence on the oligomerization process indicating that the montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis is not affected by either of these hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. A 2.3-fold decrease in the yield of cyclic dimer was observed upon increasing the sodium chloride concentration from 0.2 to 2.0 M. Inhibition of cyclic dimer formation is vital for increasing the yield of linear dimers and longer oligomers. In summary, sodium chloride is likely to have played an essential role in any clay mineral-catalyzed prebiotic RNA synthesis. PMID:23775061

  20. CNP2 mRNA directs synthesis of both CNP1 and CNP2 polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, R C; Minuk, J; Cox, M E; Braun, P E; Gravel, M

    1997-10-15

    The ribosome scanning model for translational initiation predicts that eukaryotic mRNAs should, as a rule, be monocistronic. However, cases have recently been described of eukaryotic mRNAs producing more than one protein through alternative translational initiation at several different AUG codons. The present work reports the occurrence of two translational start sites on the mRNA encoding isoform 2 of the myelin marker enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) in rat and mouse. We show that the CNP2 mRNA is able to direct synthesis of not only CNP2, but also CNP1 polypeptide. Immunoprecipitation experiments using a polyclonal antibody directed against CNP detect both CNP isoforms in tissues or cell lines expressing only the CNP2 transcript. Thus, the synthesis of CNP1 and CNP2 polypeptides must be encoded by the CNP2 transcript. In vitro translation of synthetic CNP2 mRNA demonstrates that both CNP isoforms are synthesized by initiation at different AUG codons. Furthermore, by introducing mutations to "switch off" translation from the second in-frame AUG codon in the CNP2 cDNA, and transfecting 293T cells with those constructs, we are able to correlate the production of CNP1 and CNP2 with different translational start sites. These results lead us to conclude that the CNP2 mRNA is able to produce both CNP1 and CNP2 polypeptides. This investigation has altered our understanding of the temporal expression of the CNP protein isoforms during development of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:9373034

  1. Cyclophilin inhibitors block arterivirus replication by interfering with viral RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wilde, Adriaan H; Li, Yanhua; van der Meer, Yvonne; Vuagniaux, Grégoire; Lysek, Robert; Fang, Ying; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J

    2013-02-01

    Virus replication strongly depends on cellular factors, in particular, on host proteins. Here we report that the replication of the arteriviruses equine arteritis virus (EAV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is strongly affected by low-micromolar concentrations of cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of members of the cyclophilin (Cyp) family. In infected cells, the expression of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene inserted into the PRRSV genome was inhibited with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 5.2 μM, whereas the GFP expression of an EAV-GFP reporter virus was inhibited with an IC(50) of 0.95 μM. Debio-064, a CsA analog that lacks its undesirable immunosuppressive properties, inhibited EAV replication with an IC(50) that was 3-fold lower than that of CsA, whereas PRRSV-GFP replication was inhibited with an IC(50) similar to that of CsA. The addition of 4 μM CsA after infection prevented viral RNA and protein synthesis in EAV-infected cells, and CsA treatment resulted in a 2.5- to 4-log-unit reduction of PRRSV or EAV infectious progeny. A complete block of EAV RNA synthesis was also observed in an in vitro assay using isolated viral replication structures. The small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Cyp family members revealed that EAV replication strongly depends on the expression of CypA but not CypB. Furthermore, upon fractionation of intracellular membranes in density gradients, CypA was found to cosediment with membranous EAV replication structures, which could be prevented by CsA treatment. This suggests that CypA is an essential component of the viral RNA-synthesizing machinery. PMID:23152531

  2. Role of regulatory T-cells in immunization strategies involving a recombinant alphavirus vector system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczak, Mateusz; Regts, Joke; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Boon, Louis; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T-cells (Treg) hamper immune responses elicited by cancer vaccines. Therefore, depletion of Treg is being used to improve the outcome of vaccinations. Methods: We studied whether an alphavirus vector-based immunotherapeutic vaccine changes the number and/or activity of Treg an

  3. Chemical synthesis of the 5-taurinomethyl(-2-thio)uridine modified anticodon arm of the human mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) and tRNA(Lys).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczynska, Grazyna; Leonczak, Piotr; Wozniak, Karolina; Malkiewicz, Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    5-Taurinomethyluridine (τm(5)U) and 5-taurinomethyl-2-thiouridine (τm(5)s(2)U) are located at the wobble position of human mitochondrial (hmt) tRNA(Leu(UUR)) and tRNA(Lys), respectively. Both hypermodified units restrict decoding of the third codon letter to A and G. Pathogenic mutations in the genes encoding hmt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)) and hmt-tRNA(Lys) are responsible for the loss of the discussed modifications and, as a consequence, for the occurrence of severe mitochondrial dysfunctions (MELAS, MERRF). Synthetic oligoribonucleotides bearing modified nucleosides are a versatile tool for studying mechanisms of genetic message translation and accompanying pathologies at nucleoside resolution. In this paper, we present site-specific chemical incorporation of τm(5)U and τm(5)s(2)U into 17-mers related to the sequence of the anticodon arms hmt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)) and hmt-tRNA(Lys), respectively employing phosphoramidite chemistry on CPG support. Selected protecting groups for the sulfonic acid (4-(tert-butyldiphenylsilanyloxy)-2,2-dimethylbutyl) and the exoamine function (-C(O)CF3) are compatible with the blockage of the canonical monomeric units. The synthesis of τm(5)s(2)U-modified RNA fragment was performed under conditions eliminating the formation of side products of 2-thiocarbonyl group oxidation and/or oxidative desulphurization. The structure of the final oligomers was confirmed by mass spectroscopy and enzymatic cleavage data. PMID:24757169

  4. A Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy in Cattle to Prevent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Using a "Single-Cycle" Alphavirus Vector and Empty Capsid Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette;

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most economically important infectious diseases of production animals globally. Vaccination can successfully control this disease, however, current vaccines are imperfect. They are made using chemically inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) that is produced...... in large-scale mammalian cell culture under high containment conditions. Here, we have expressed the FMDV capsid protein precursor (P1-2A) of strain O1 Manisa alone or with the FMDV 3C protease (3Cpro) using a "single cycle" packaged alphavirus self-replicating RNA based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). When...... the FMDV P1-2A was expressed with 3Cpro then processing of the FMDV capsid precursor protein is observed within cells and the proteins assemble into empty capsid particles. The products interact with anti-FMDV antibodies in an ELISA and bind to the integrin αvβ6 (a cellular receptor for FMDV). In cattle...

  5. Circular RNA oligonucleotides. Synthesis, nucleic acid binding properties, and a comparison with circular DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Kool, E T

    1994-06-25

    We report the synthesis and nucleic acid binding properties of two cyclic RNA oligonucleotides designed to bind single-stranded nucleic acids by pyr.pur.pyr-type triple helix formation. The circular RNAs are 34 nucleotides in size and were cyclized using a template-directed nonenzymatic ligation. To ensure isomeric 3'-5' purity in the ligation reaction, one nucleotide at the ligation site is a 2'-deoxyribose. One circle (1) is complementary to the sequence 5'-A12, and the second (2) is complementary to 5'-AAGAAAGAAAAG. Results of thermal denaturation experiments and mixing studies show that both circles bind complementary single-stranded DNA or RNA substrates by triple helix formation, in which two domains in a pyrimidine-rich circle sandwich a central purine-rich substrate. The affinities of these circles with their purine complements are much higher than the affinities of either the linear precursors or simple Watson-Crick DNA complements. For example, circle 1 binds rA12 (pH 7.0, 10 mM MgCl2, 100 mM NaCl) with a Tm of 48 degrees C and a Kd (37 degrees C) of 4.1 x 10(-9) M, while the linear precursor of the circle binds with a Tm of 34 degrees C and a Kd of 1.2 x 10(-6) M. The complexes of circle 2 are pH-dependent, as expected for triple helical complexes involving C(+)G.C triads, and mixing plots for both circles reveal one-to-one stoichiometry of binding either to RNA or DNA substrates. Comparison of circular RNAs with previously synthesized circular DNA oligonucleotides of the same sequence reveals similar behavior in the binding of DNA, but strikingly different behavior in the binding of RNA. The cyclic DNAs show high DNA-binding selectivity, giving relatively weaker duplex-type binding with complementary RNAs. The relative order of thermodynamic stability for the four types of triplex studied here is found to be DDD > RRR > RDR > DRD. The results are discussed in the context of recent reports of strong triplex dependence on RNA versus DNA backbones. Triplex

  6. The Yeast Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase and Transcription Factor Complex Catalyzes Efficient Priming of DNA Synthesis on Single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Nandakumar, Divya; Deshpande, Aishwarya P; Lucas, Thomas P; R-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Tang, Guo-Qing; Raney, Kevin; Yin, Y Whitney; Patel, Smita S

    2016-08-01

    Primases use single-stranded (ss) DNAs as templates to synthesize short oligoribonucleotide primers that initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis or reprime DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse, but the origin of this activity in the mitochondria remains unclear. Herein, we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41) and its transcription factor (Mtf1) is an efficient primase that initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA coated with the yeast mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein, Rim1. Both Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 can synthesize short and long RNAs on ssDNA template and prime DNA synthesis by the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase Mip1. However, the ssDNA-binding protein Rim1 severely inhibits the RNA synthesis activity of Rpo41, but not the Rpo41-Mtf1 complex, which continues to prime DNA synthesis efficiently in the presence of Rim1. We show that RNAs as short as 10-12 nt serve as primers for DNA synthesis. Characterization of the RNA-DNA products shows that Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 have slightly different priming specificity. However, both prefer to initiate with ATP from short priming sequences such as 3'-TCC, TTC, and TTT, and the consensus sequence is 3'-Pu(Py)2-3 Based on our studies, we propose that Rpo41-Mtf1 is an attractive candidate for serving as the primase to initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis during normal replication and/or to restart stalled replication from downstream ssDNA. PMID:27311715

  7. Synthesis and structural characterization of piperazino-modified DNA that favours hybridization towards DNA over RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Joan; Bryld, Torsten; Lindegaard, Dorthe;

    2011-01-01

    We report the synthesis of two C4'-modified DNA analogues and characterize their structural impact on dsDNA duplexes. The 4'-C-piperazinomethyl modification stabilizes dsDNA by up to 5°C per incorporation. Extension of the modification with a butanoyl-linked pyrene increases the dsDNA stabilization...... multiple sites in intermediate exchange on the NMR timescale, resulting in broad lines in NMR spectra. We identified two intercalation sites with NOE data showing that the pyrene prefers to intercalate one base pair away from the modified nucleotide with its linker curled up in the minor groove. Both...... modifications are tolerated in DNA:RNA hybrids but leave their melting temperatures virtually unaffected. Fluorescence data indicate that the pyrene moiety is residing outside the helix. The available data suggest that the DNA discrimination is due to (i) the positive charge of the piperazino ring having a...

  8. Application of Escherichia coli phage K1E DNA-dependent RNA polymerase for in vitro RNA synthesis and in vivo protein production in Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammen, Simon; Schuller, Franziska; Dietrich, Sylvia; Gamer, Martin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Jahn, Dieter

    2010-09-01

    Gene "7" of Escherichia coli phage K1E was proposed to encode a novel DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP). The corresponding protein was produced recombinantly, purified to apparent homogeneity via affinity chromatography, and successfully employed for in vitro RNA synthesis. Optimal assay conditions (pH 8, 37 degrees C, 10 mM magnesium chloride and 1.3 mM spermidine) were established. The corresponding promoter regions were identified on the phage genome and summarized in a sequence logo. Surprisingly, next to K1E promoters, the SP6 promoter was also recognized efficiently in vitro by K1E RNAP, while the T7 RNAP promoter was not recognized at all. Based on these results, a system for high-yield in vitro RNA synthesis using K1E RNAP was established. The template plasmid is a pUC18 derivative, which enables blue/white screening for positive cloning of the target DNA. Production of more than 5 microg of purified RNA per microgram plasmid DNA was achieved. Finally, in vivo protein production systems for Bacillus megaterium were established based on K1E and SP6 phage RNAP transcription. Up to 61.4 mg g (CDW) (-1) (K1E RNAP) of the reporter protein Gfp was produced in shaking flask cultures of B. megaterium. PMID:20596705

  9. Developmental changes in translatable RNA species and protein synthesis during sporulation in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein synthesis during sporulation in Blastocladiella emersonii is developmentally regulated as revealed using (35S)methionine pulse labeling and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A large increase in the synthesis of several proteins is associated with particular stages. A large number of basic proteins are synthesized exclusively during late sporulation. Changes in translatable mRNA species were also detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the polypeptides produced in a cell-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate primed with RNA prepared at different stages of sporulation. The synthesis of several proteins during sporulation seems to be transcriptionally controlled. Most of the sporulation-specific messages are not present in the mature zoospores. (Author)

  10. Early gene expression in bacteriophage T7. I. In vivo synthesis, inactivation, and translational utilization of early mRNA's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercules, K; Jovanovich, S; Sauerbrier, W

    1976-02-01

    In vivo decay rates for the individual T7 early mRNA species were determined. The physical half-lives, measured at 37 C, range from 1.1 min for gene 0.7 RNA to 4.5 min for gene 0.3 RNA. Physical half-lives, as observed after rifampin inhibition of RNA synthesis and polyacylamide electrophoresis of RNAs, are approximately 30% longer than functional half-lives, as observed by 14C-labeled amino acid uptake into individual T7 early proteins. The different RNA species are synthesized at grossly different rates, 0.3 RNA at four times the rate of 1.0 RNA, 0.7 RNA at twice the rate, and 1.1 and 1.3 RNAs at about the same or a slightly lower rate than 1.0 RNA. Rho-factor-mediated termination of transcription behind genes 0.3, 0.7, and perhaps behind 1.0 is inferred from these data. The in vivo translational utilization of the individual T7 early-message species was found to vary by not more than a factor of 2. PMID:1255850

  11. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS5B Nonnucleoside Inhibitors Specifically Block Single-Stranded Viral RNA Synthesis Catalyzed by HCV Replication Complexes In Vitro▿

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wengang; Sun, Yongnian; Phadke, Avinash; Deshpande, Milind; Huang, Mingjun

    2006-01-01

    Replication complexes of hepatitis C virus synthesized two major species of viral RNA in vitro, double stranded and single stranded. NS5B nonnucleoside inhibitors inhibited dose dependently the synthesis of single-stranded RNA but not double-stranded RNA. Moreover, replication complexes carrying a mutation resistant to a nonnucleoside inhibitor lost their susceptibilities to the inhibitor.

  12. Have organic interstellar grains redox-catalyzed RNA and other synthesis from cometary precursors ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, F. R.; Kissel, J.; Werther, W.; Schmid, E. R.

    The recent in-situ investigations of cosmic dust clearly show, that the only building blocks of life therein are nucleobases. All the other building blocks are just found as precursors in cometary dust. They themselves must be formed from precursors by hydrolysis in liquid water, like phosphates from phosphides, sugars (stabilized at mineralic surfaces) may be from polyines, and amino and lipidic acids from nitriles. Nevertheless, the self-organized synthesis of polymers like RNA's and peptides needs, i.a., additional redox-catalysis. These catalysts act in stabilizing and transmitting single electrons and/or holes in chemical reactions. At mineralic surfaces transition metals like FeII/III may take the task. However, once life has emancipated itself from minerals redox catalysts should be furtheron present yet organically without prior encoding for synthesis - as the code itself must have been evolved already before the encoded enzymes can act. However, there may be another solution for this enigma: Except archeae, all stems of life make use of quinone-type co-enzymes of the PQQ (pyrrolo-quinoline-quinone) type of redox catalysts. Interstellar dust reaching the interior of the solar system consists at least of homologuous polymers which may convert to PQQ types in liquid water, after being decelerated in the upper atmosphere. Due to their enormous radiation stability, these types are the natural end-products after long interstellar trips. They can withstand the collision processes with atmospheric molecules, then being washed out.

  13. Changes in the synthesis of DNA, RNA and protein during somatic embryogenesis in wheat (triticum aestivum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus formed from immature embryo of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in N6B5MS medium I supplemented with 2,4-D 2 mg/L, KT 0.5 mg/L, LH300 mg/L, sucrose 3% were sub-cultured and transferred respectively to N6B5MS medium II (2,4-D was decreased to 0.5 mg/L and 4 mol/L proline was added). Somatic embryos obtained from embryogenic callus, and plantlet formed from non-embryogenic callus through organogenesis respectively. By incorporation of 3H-thymidine, 3H-uridine and 3H-leucine into DNA, RNA and protein respectively, the rate of synthesis of DNA, RNA and protein during somatic embryogenesis were measured. A large amount of RNA and protein synthesized during the early somatic embryogenesis. The activities of RNA and protein synthesis reached the peak on the 4th and the 8th day respectively, then decreased a little, but kept a high level. The synthesis of DNA increased apparently during the early stage. No apparent change occurred when the embryogenic cell masses formed. The synthesis rate of RNA and protein in non-embryogenic callus were much less than that in embryogenic callus. Actinomycin and cycloheximide inhibited not only the synthesis of nucleic acid and protein, but also the growth of embryogenic callus and somatic embryogenesis. The earlier the inhibitors were added, the greater the influence was caused. The results indicate that the active expression of corresponding genes of wheat is the molecular base of somatic embryogenesis

  14. Open reading frames 1a and 1b of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) collaboratively initiate viral minus-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Fang, Qiong-Qiong; Liu, Ji-Ting; Wang, Tong-Yun; Wang, Yu; Tao, Ye; Liu, Yong-Gang; Cai, Xue-Hui

    2016-09-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes a persistent threat to the swine industry, especially when highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) emerges. Previous studies have indicated that PRRSV RNA synthesis was correlated with HP-PRRSV virulence. PRRSV RNA synthesis includes genomic RNA and sub-genomic mRNA, and these processes require minus-strand RNA as a template. However, the mechanisms involved in PRRSV minus-strand RNA synthesis are not fully understood. A mini-genome system can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms and to evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replicase activities. In this study, we developed a mini-genome system that uses firefly luciferase as a reporter. Based on this system, we found that PRRSV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase nsp9 alone failed to activate virus minus-strand RNA synthesis. We also demonstrated that combinations of open reading frames 1a (ORF1a) and ORF1b are necessary for viral minus-strand RNA synthesis. PMID:27378424

  15. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Julie M; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Fong, Rachel H; Kahle, Kristen M; Smit, Jolanda M; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J; Crowe, James E; Fremont, Daved H; Rossmann, Michael G; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-11-19

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphaviruses. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis, loss-of-function recombinant proteins and viruses, and multiple functional assays, we determined that broadly neutralizing MAbs block multiple steps in the viral lifecycle, including entry and egress, and bind to a conserved epitope on the B domain of the E2 glycoprotein. A 16 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of a Fab fragment bound to CHIKV E2 B domain provided an explanation for its neutralizing activity. Binding to the B domain was associated with repositioning of the A domain of E2 that enabled cross-linking of neighboring spikes. Our results suggest that B domain antigenic determinants could be targeted for vaccine or antibody therapeutic development against multiple alphaviruses of global concern. PMID:26553503

  16. Allosteric vs. spontaneous exit-site (E-site) tRNA dissociation early in protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2011-10-11

    During protein synthesis, deacylated transfer RNAs leave the ribosome via an exit (E) site after mRNA translocation. How the ribosome regulates tRNA dissociation and whether functional linkages between the aminoacyl (A) and E sites modulate the dynamics of protein synthesis have long been debated. Using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments, we find that, during early cycles of protein elongation, tRNAs are often held in the E site until being allosterically released when the next aminoacyl tRNA binds to the A site. This process is regulated by the length and sequence of the nascent peptide and by the conformational state, detected by tRNA proximity, prior to translocation. In later cycles, E-site tRNA dissociates spontaneously. Our results suggest that the distribution of pretranslocation tRNA states and posttranslocation pathways are correlated within each elongation cycle via communication between distant subdomains in the ribosome, but that this correlation between elongation cycle intermediates does not persist into succeeding cycles. PMID:21969541

  17. The adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicons is enhanced by incorporating the microbial molecule flagellin into the replicon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Ligands of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs including Toll-like receptors (TLRs stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses and are considered as potent adjuvants. Combinations of ligands might act in synergy to induce stronger and broader immune responses compared to stand-alone ligands. Alphaviruses stimulate endosomal TLRs 3, 7 and 8 as well as the cytoplasmic PRR MDA-5, resulting in induction of a strong type I interferon (IFN response. Bacterial flagellin stimulates TLR5 and when delivered intracellularly the cytosolic PRR NLRC4, leading to secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Both alphaviruses and flagellin have independently been shown to act as adjuvants for antigen-specific antibody responses. Here, we hypothesized that alphavirus and flagellin would act in synergy when combined. We therefore cloned the Salmonella Typhimurium flagellin (FliC gene into an alphavirus replicon and assessed its adjuvant activity on the antibody response against co-administered antigen. In mice immunized with recombinant alphavirus, antibody responses were greatly enhanced compared to soluble FliC or control alphavirus. Both IgG1 and IgG2a/c responses were increased, indicating an enhancement of both Th1 and Th2 type responses. The adjuvant activity of FliC-expressing alphavirus was diminished but not abolished in the absence of TLR5 or type I IFN signaling, suggesting the contribution of several signaling pathways and some synergistic and redundant activity of its components. Thus, we have created a recombinant adjuvant that stimulates multiple signaling pathways of innate immunity resulting in a strong and broad antibody response.

  18. Double subgenomic alphaviruses expressing multiple fluorescent proteins using a Rhopalosiphum padi virus internal ribosome entry site element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Wiley

    Full Text Available Double subgenomic Sindbis virus (dsSINV vectors are widely used for the expression of proteins, peptides, and RNA sequences. These recombinant RNA viruses permit high level expression of a heterologous sequence in a wide range of animals, tissues, and cells. However, the alphavirus genome structure and replication strategy is not readily amenable to the expression of more than one heterologous sequence. The Rhopalosiphum padi virus (RhPV genome contains two internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements that mediate cap-independent translation of the virus nonstructural and structural proteins. Most IRES elements that have been characterized function only in mammalian cells but previous work has shown that the IRES element present in the 5' untranslated region (UTR of the RhPV genome functions efficiently in mammalian, insect, and plant systems. To determine if the 5' RhPV IRES element could be used to express more than one heterologous sequence from a dsSINV vector, RhPV 5' IRES sequences were placed between genes for two different fluorescent marker proteins in the dsSINV, TE/3'2J/mcs. While mammalian and insect cells infected with recombinant viruses containing the RhPV sequences expressed both fluorescent marker proteins, only single marker proteins were routinely observed in cells infected with dsSINV vectors in which the RhPV IRES had been replaced by a luciferase fragment, an antisense RhPV IRES, or no intergenic sequence. Thus, we report development of a versatile tool for the expression of multiple sequences in diverse cell types.

  19. Dual mechanisms of translation initiation of the full-length HIV-1 mRNA contribute to gag synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monette, Anne; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Rivero, Matias; Cohen, Éric A; Lopez-Lastra, Marcelo; Mouland, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    The precursor group-specific antigen (pr55(Gag)) is central to HIV-1 assembly. Its expression alone is sufficient to assemble into virus-like particles. It also selects the genomic RNA for encapsidation and is involved in several important virus-host interactions for viral assembly and restriction, making its synthesis essential for aspects of viral replication. Here, we show that the initiation of translation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA is mediated through both a cap-dependent and an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated mechanisms. In support of this notion, pr55(Gag) synthesis was maintained at 70% when cap-dependent translation initiation was blocked by the expression of eIF4G- and PABP targeting viral proteases in two in vitro systems and in HIV-1-expressing cells directly infected with poliovirus. While our data reveal that IRES-dependent translation of the viral genomic RNA ensures pr55(Gag) expression, the synthesis of other HIV-1 proteins, including that of pr160(Gag/Pol), Vpr and Tat is suppressed early during progressive poliovirus infection. The data presented herein implies that the unspliced HIV-1 genomic RNA utilizes both cap-dependent and IRES-dependent translation initiation to supply pr55(Gag) for virus assembly and production. PMID:23861855

  20. Targeting membrane-bound viral RNA synthesis reveals potent inhibition of diverse coronaviruses including the middle East respiratory syndrome virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lundin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs, a hallmark of coronavirus replication, was greatly impaired upon K22 treatment accompanied by near-complete inhibition of viral RNA synthesis. K22-resistant viruses contained substitutions in non-structural protein 6 (nsp6, a membrane-spanning integral component of the viral replication complex implicated in DMV formation, corroborating that K22 targets membrane bound viral RNA synthesis. Besides K22 resistance, the nsp6 mutants induced a reduced number of DMVs, displayed decreased specific infectivity, while RNA synthesis was not affected. Importantly, K22 inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV, and efficient inhibition was achieved in primary human epithelia cultures representing the entry port of human coronavirus infection. Collectively, this study proposes an evolutionary conserved step in the life cycle of positive-stranded RNA viruses, the recruitment of cellular membranes for viral replication, as vulnerable and, most importantly, druggable target for antiviral intervention. We expect this mode of action to serve as a paradigm for the development of potent antiviral drugs to combat many animal and human virus infections.

  1. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Mueller, Claudius [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Roberts, Brian [Leidos Health Life Sciences, 5202 Presidents Court, Suite 110, Frederick, MD (United States); Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Petricoin, Emanuel [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Narayanan, Aarthi, E-mail: anaraya1@gmu.edu [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells.

  2. DNA polymerase-α regulates the activation of type I interferons through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations that disrupt nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts the expression of POLA1, which encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency resulted in increased production of type I interferons. This enzyme is necessary for the synthesis of RNA:DNA primers during DNA replication and, strikingly, we found that POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Together this work identifies POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  3. Targeting Membrane-Bound Viral RNA Synthesis Reveals Potent Inhibition of Diverse Coronaviruses Including the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Lundin; Ronald Dijkman; Tomas Bergström; Nina Kann; Beata Adamiak; Charles Hannoun; Eveline Kindler; Jónsdóttir, Hulda R; Doreen Muth; Joeri Kint; Maria Forlenza; Müller, Marcel A.; Christian Drosten; Volker Thiel; Edward Trybala

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs), a hall...

  4. Short ROSE-like RNA thermometers control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie S Krajewski

    Full Text Available The bacterial small heat shock protein IbpA protects client proteins from aggregation. Due to redundancy in the cellular chaperone network, deletion of the ibpA gene often leads to only a mild or no phenotypic defect. In this study, we show that a Pseudomonas putida ibpA deletion mutant has a severe growth defect under heat stress conditions and reduced survival during recovery revealing a critical role of IbpA in heat tolerance. Transcription of the ibpA gene depends on the alternative heat shock sigma factor σ(32. Production of IbpA protein only at heat shock temperatures suggested additional translational control. We conducted a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of the 5' untranslated regions of the ibpA genes from P. putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both contain a ROSE-type RNA thermometer that is substantially shorter and simpler than previously reported ROSE elements. Comprised of two hairpin structures only, they inhibit translation at low temperature and permit translation initiation after a temperature upshift. Both elements regulate reporter gene expression in Escherichia coli and ribosome binding in vitro in a temperature-dependent manner. Structure probing revealed local melting of the second hairpin whereas the first hairpin remained unaffected. High sequence and structure conservation of pseudomonal ibpA untranslated regions and their ability to confer thermoregulation in vivo suggest that short ROSE-like thermometers are commonly used to control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

  5. Inhibition of viral RNA synthesis in canine distemper virus infection by proanthocyanidin A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Laura; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Galligioni, Viola; Bombardelli, Ezio; Scagliarini, Alessandra

    2011-12-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a contagious and multisystemic viral disease that affects domestic and wild canines as well as other terrestrial and aquatic carnivores. The disease in dogs is often fatal and no specific antiviral therapy is currently available. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro antiviral activity against CDV of proanthocyanidin A2 (PA2), a phenolic dimer belonging to the class of condensed tannins present in plants. Our results showed that PA2 exerted in vitro antiviral activity against CDV with a higher selectivity index compared to ribavirin, included in our study for the previously tested anti-CDV activity. The time of addition assay led us to observe that PA2 was able to decrease the viral RNA synthesis and to reduce progeny virus liberation, at different times post infection suggesting multiple mechanisms of action including inhibition of viral replicative complex and modulation of the redox milieu. These data suggest that PA2, isolated from the bark of Aesculus hippocastanum, has potential usefulness as an anti-CDV compound inhibiting viral replication. PMID:22020306

  6. De novo Synthesis and Assembly of rRNA into Ribosomal Subunits during Cold Acclimation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersimoni, Lolita; Giangrossi, Mara; Marchi, Paolo; Brandi, Anna; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Pon, Cynthia L

    2016-04-24

    During the cold adaptation that follows a cold stress, bacterial cells undergo many physiological changes and extensive reprogramming of their gene expression pattern. Bulk gene expression is drastically reduced, while a set of cold shock genes is selectively and transiently expressed. The initial stage of cold acclimation is characterized by the establishment of a stoichiometric imbalance of the translation initiation factors (IFs)/ribosomes ratio that contributes to the preferential translation of cold shock transcripts. Whereas de novo synthesis of the IFs following cold stress has been documented, nothing was known concerning the activity of the rrn operons during the cold acclimation period. In this work, we focus on the expression of the rrn operons and the fate of rRNA after temperature downshift. We demonstrate that in Escherichia coli, rRNA synthesis does not stop during the cold acclimation phase, but continues with greater contribution of the P2 compared to the P1 promoter and all seven rrn operons are active, although their expression levels change with respect to pre-stress conditions. Eight hours after the 37°→10°C temperature downshift, the newly transcribed rRNA represents up to 20% of total rRNA and is preferentially found in the polysomes. However, with respect to the de novo synthesis of the IFs, both rRNA transcription and maturation are slowed down drastically by cold stress, thereby accounting in part for the stoichiometric imbalance of the IFs/ribosomes. Overall, our data indicate that new ribosomes, which are possibly suitable to function at low temperature, are slowly assembled during cold acclimation. PMID:26953262

  7. Liquid-Phase Synthesis of 2'-Methyl-RNA on a Homostar Support through Organic-Solvent Nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Piers R J; Kim, Jeong F; Valtcheva, Irina B; Williams, Glynn D; Anson, Mike S; Buswell, Andrew M; Livingston, Andrew G

    2015-06-22

    Due to the discovery of RNAi, oligonucleotides (oligos) have re-emerged as a major pharmaceutical target that may soon be required in ton quantities. However, it is questionable whether solid-phase oligo synthesis (SPOS) methods can provide a scalable synthesis. Liquid-phase oligo synthesis (LPOS) is intrinsically scalable and amenable to standard industrial batch synthesis techniques. However, most reported LPOS strategies rely upon at least one precipitation per chain extension cycle to separate the growing oligonucleotide from reaction debris. Precipitation can be difficult to develop and control on an industrial scale and, because many precipitations would be required to prepare a therapeutic oligonucleotide, we contend that this approach is not viable for large-scale industrial preparation. We are developing an LPOS synthetic strategy for 2'-methyl RNA phosphorothioate that is more amenable to standard batch production techniques, using organic solvent nanofiltration (OSN) as the critical scalable separation technology. We report the first LPOS-OSN preparation of a 2'-Me RNA phosphorothioate 9-mer, using commercial phosphoramidite monomers, and monitoring all reactions by HPLC, (31)P NMR spectroscopy and MS. PMID:26012874

  8. The juxtamembrane sequence of the Hepatitis C virus polymerase can affect RNA synthesis and inhibition by allosteric polymerase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Y; Lin, X; Fan, B; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Kao, C C

    2015-08-01

    The Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B), is anchored in the membrane through a C-terminal helix. A sequence of ca. 12 residues that connects the catalytically competent portion of the RdRp and the C-terminal helix, the juxtamembrane sequence (JMS), has a poorly defined role in RdRp function in a large part since it is translated from a cis-acting RNA element (CRE) that is essential for HCV replication. Using a HCV replicon that transposed a second copy of CRE to the 3' UTR of the HCV replicon, we demonstrate that amino acid substitutions in the JMS were detrimental for HCV replicon replication. Substitutions in the JMS also resulted in a defect in de novo-initiated RNAs synthesis in vitro and in a cell-based reporter assay. A nonnucleoside inhibitor of the NS5B that binds to the catalytic pocket was less potent in inhibiting NS5B in the presence of JMS mutations. The JMS mutants exhibit reduced stability in thermodenaturation assays, suggesting that the JMS helps confer a more stable conformation to NS5B that could impact RNA synthesis. PMID:25895103

  9. Synthesis of a bifunctional cytidine derivative and its conjugation to RNA for in vitro selection of a cytidine deaminase ribozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Rublack

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 20 years, the generation of functional RNAs by in vitro selection has become a standard technique. Apart from aptamers for simple binding of defined ligands, also RNAs for catalysis of chemical reactions have been selected. In the latter case, a key step often is the conjugation of one of the two reactants to the library, requiring suitable strategies for terminal or internal RNA functionalization. With the aim of selecting a ribozyme for deamination of cytidine, we have set up a selection scheme involving the attachment of the cytidine acting as deamination substrate to the 3'-terminus of the RNAs in the library, and library immobilization. Here, we report the synthesis of a bifunctional cytidine derivative suitable for conjugation to RNA and linkage of the conjugated library to a streptavidine-coated surface. Successful conjugation of the cytidine derivative to the 3'-terminus of a model RNA is demonstrated.

  10. Isolation of mRNA and a cell free protein synthesizing system for the synthesis of amidating enzyme from the nuclei of gamma irradiated potato buds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    mRNA required for the synthesis of amidating enzyme in the nuclear fraction of γ-irradiated potato buds, has been isolated using poly (U) sepharose 4B affinity chromatography, and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. A cell-free protein synthesizing system has been obtained from the irradiated potato bud nuclei, capable of in vitro synthesis of this enzyme protein in the presence of mRNA. Unirradiated bud tissue nuclei does not contain the mRNA for this protein. mRNA isolated can also be translated with wheat germ system to give the amidating enzyme. Separation of this mRNA on 5-20% sucrose density gradient shows that mRNA amidating enzyme is 9S type. (auth.)

  11. Production of virus-derived ping-pong-dependent piRNA-like small RNAs in the mosquito soma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M Morazzani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural maintenance cycles of many mosquito-borne pathogens require establishment of persistent non-lethal infections in the invertebrate host. The mechanism by which this occurs is not well understood, but we have previously shown that an antiviral response directed by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs is important in modulating the pathogenesis of alphavirus infections in the mosquito. However, we report here that infection of mosquitoes with an alphavirus also triggers the production of another class of virus-derived small RNAs that exhibit many similarities to ping-pong-dependent piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs. However, unlike ping-pong-dependent piRNAs that have been described previously from repetitive elements or piRNA clusters, our work suggests production in the soma. We also present evidence that suggests virus-derived piRNA-like small RNAs are capable of modulating the pathogenesis of alphavirus infections in dicer-2 null mutant mosquito cell lines defective in viral siRNA production. Overall, our results suggest that a non-canonical piRNA pathway is present in the soma of vector mosquitoes and may be acting redundantly to the siRNA pathway to target alphavirus replication.

  12. Failure of RNA synthesis to recover after UV irradiation: an early defect in cells from individuals with Cockayne's syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work has shown that in cells from the ultraviolet-sensitive genetic disorder, Cockayne's syndrome, DNA synthesis fails to recover after ultraviolet irradiation, despite the fact that these cells have no detectable defect in either excision or daughter-strand repair pathways. We now show that Cockayne cells, as well as cells from a number of patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, are sensitive to the lethal effects of UV irradiation in stationary phase under conditions in which no DNA is synthesized after irradiation. Furthermore, in normal and defective human fibroblasts, RNA synthesis is depressed after UV irradiation. In normal (dividing) cells, RNA synthesis recovers very rapidly, but this recovery does not occur in Cockayne cells, and it is reduced or absent in xeroderma pigmentosum cells from different complementation groups. Qualitatively, similar results are obtained with cells in stationary phase. The recovery of RNA synthesis in the various defective cell strains is not correlated with the overall extent of excision repair, but there is some correlation between recovery of RNA synthesis and cell survival after ultraviolet irradiation. These results implicate recovery of RNA synthesis as an important early response to ultraviolet irradiation

  13. Use of a 1-hydroxybenzotriazole activated phosphorylating reagent towards the synthesis of short RNA fragments in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vroom, E; Fidder, A; Marugg, J E; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H

    1986-01-01

    Evidence will be presented to show that the reagents 3a-c (X = O) obtained by the reaction of 2-chlorophenylphosphorodichloridate with 1-hydroxybenzotriazole or 1-hydroxy-6-trifluoromethyl (6-nitro) benzotriazoles, respectively, do not give, under normal coupling conditions, phosphorylation of the lactam functions in uracil or guanine. Reagent 3b (X = O) proved to be very convenient for the in situ formation of 3'-5'-phosphotriester linkage. The latter will be illustrated by the synthesis of several RNA fragments. PMID:2426660

  14. Hamowanie syntezy chlorofilu i RNA w izolowanych liścieniach ogórka przez N-hydroksymocznik [Inhibition of chlorophyll and RNA synthesis by N-hydroxyurea in detached cucumber cotyledons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rennert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available N-hydroxyurea (HU at the concentration of 5 x 10-4 M decreased the content of chlorophyll in detached cucumber cotyledons; at this concentration it has no inhibitory effect on growth. Benzylaminopurine, gibberelic acid and KCl partially reversed the inhibitory effect of HU on chlorophyll synthesis. HU stimulated yellowing of barley first leaf sections. The compound had little effect on leucine-14C incorporation to protein, and markedly inhibited uracil-14C incorporation in to RNA of the greening cucumber cotyledons. It is suggested that the inhibition of RNA and chlorophyll synthesis in HU-treated cucumber cotyledons follows the HU-dependent inhibition of DNA replication.

  15. Synthesis and applications of selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Lewis, H.; Cai, Z.; Tinoci, I. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Spectral overlap is a substantial problem in NMR studies of RNA molecules >30 nucleotides. To overcome this difficulty, we synthesized selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs and adapted several isotope-edited two- and three-dimensional NMR experiments originally developed for protein studies. We optimized protocols for synthesis of multi-gram quantities of CTP, UTp, ATP, and GTP using a combination of synthetic organic and enzymatic methods. Uracil is prepared in 40 to 50% yield from {sup 13}C-cyanide in two steps. Using acetyl- tribenzoyl-ribose and standard chemistry uracil is then attached to the sugar (90% yield). The tribenzoyl-uridine intermediate is converted into uridine or cytidine quantitatively, depending on the deblocking protocol. Labeled purines are synthesized using simple pyrimidine precursors and reacting with {sup 13}C-formic acid (80% yield). Purine nucleosides are then synthesized using uridine phosphorylase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase. The nucleosides were converted to NMPs by treatment with POC1{sub 3} in triethylphosphate. We converted NMPs to NTPs by standard enzymatic methods. Selectively labeled RNAs were synthesized by run-off transcription using {sup 13}C-labeled NTPs. Several different strategies help solve over-lap problems in larger RNAs. Isotope-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments such as {omega}1-1/2 X-filtered NOESY simplify NMR spectra by dividing the normal NOESY spectrum into two subspectra-one involving NOEs from protons bound to {sup 12}C and one from protons bound to {sup 13}C. For example, we labeled A and U residues of a 34-nucleotide pseudoknot, and the {sup 12}C subspectrum of the 1/2 X-filtered NOESY contained NOEs only from G and C residues (along with adenine 2H); the {sup 13}C subspectrum contained NOEs only from A and U residues. Each subspectrum has less overlap than the NOESY of an unlabeled sample; the editing strategy allows each resonance to be identified by residue type (A, C, G, or U).

  16. RNA synthesis during meiosis and spermiogenesis in Tylototriton verrucosus anderson - an annual testicular cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA synthetic activity during various stages of meiosis and spermiogenesis in Tylotatriton verrucosus has been studied throughout the testicular cycle by autoradiographic technique. Meiocytes are 'hot' during breeding months while spermatids as well as spermatozoa has shown RNA synthetic activity during breeding and non breeding months. Continuation of RNA synthetic activity in spermatozoa suggests continued transcription necessary for sperm preservation of this seasonal breeder. (author). 8 refs., 1 tab

  17. Non-enzymatic template-directed RNA synthesis inside model protocells

    OpenAIRE

    Adamala, Katarzyna; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to recreate a prebiotically plausible protocell, in which RNA replication occurs within a fatty acid vesicle, have been stalled by the destabilizing effect of Mg2+ on fatty acid membranes. Here, we report that the presence of citrate protects fatty acid membranes from the disruptive effects of high Mg2+ ion concentrations while allowing RNA copying to proceed, while also protecting single-stranded RNA from Mg2+-catalyzed degradation. This combination of properties has allowed us to de...

  18. Monitoring collagen synthesis in fibroblasts using fluorescently labeled tRNA pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaqi; Pampillo, Macarena; Guo, Fen; Liu, Shangxi; Cooperman, Barry S; Farrell, Ian; Dahary, Dvir; Gan, Bing S; O'Gorman, David B; Smilansky, Zeev; Babwah, Andy V; Leask, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    There is a critical need for techniques that directly monitor protein synthesis within cells isolated from normal and diseased tissue. Fibrotic disease, for which there is no drug treatment, is characterized by the overexpression of collagens. Here, we use a bioinformatics approach to identify a pair of glycine and proline isoacceptor tRNAs as being specific for the decoding of collagen mRNAs, leading to development of a FRET-based approach, dicodon monitoring of protein synthesis (DiCoMPS), that directly monitors the synthesis of collagen. DiCoMPS aimed at detecting collagen synthesis will be helpful in identifying novel anti-fibrotic compounds in cells derived from patients with fibrosis of any etiology, and, suitably adapted, should be widely applicable in monitoring the synthesis of other proteins in cells. PMID:24676899

  19. The reverse genetics applied to fish RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Biacchesi Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aquaculture has expanded rapidly to become a major economic and food-producing sector worldwide these last 30 years. In parallel, viral diseases have emerged and rapidly spread from farm to farm causing enormous economic losses. The most problematic viruses encountered in the field are mainly, but not exclusively, RNA viruses belonging to the Novirhabdovirus, Aquabirnavirus, Alphavirus and Betanodavirus genera. The recent establishment of reverse genetics systems to recover infectiou...

  20. SncRNA715 Inhibits Schwann Cell Myelin Basic Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina; Hochhaus, Nina M; Fontana, Xavier; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Myelin basic proteins (MBP) are major constituents of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In the CNS Mbp translation occurs locally at the axon-glial contact site in a neuronal activity-dependent manner. Recently we identified the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715) as a key inhibitor of Mbp translation during transport in oligodendrocytes. Mbp mRNA localization in Schwann cells has been observed, but has not been investigated in much detail. Here we could confirm translational repression of Mbp mRNA in Schwann cells. We show that sncRNA715 is expressed and its levels correlate inversely with MBP in cultured Schwann cells and in the sciatic nerve in vivo. Furthermore we could reduce MBP protein levels in cultured Schwann cells by increasing the levels of the inhibitory sncRNA715. Our findings suggest similarities in sncRNA715-mediated translational repression of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. PMID:26317513

  1. SncRNA715 Inhibits Schwann Cell Myelin Basic Protein Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Müller

    Full Text Available Myelin basic proteins (MBP are major constituents of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral nervous system (PNS. In the CNS Mbp translation occurs locally at the axon-glial contact site in a neuronal activity-dependent manner. Recently we identified the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715 as a key inhibitor of Mbp translation during transport in oligodendrocytes. Mbp mRNA localization in Schwann cells has been observed, but has not been investigated in much detail. Here we could confirm translational repression of Mbp mRNA in Schwann cells. We show that sncRNA715 is expressed and its levels correlate inversely with MBP in cultured Schwann cells and in the sciatic nerve in vivo. Furthermore we could reduce MBP protein levels in cultured Schwann cells by increasing the levels of the inhibitory sncRNA715. Our findings suggest similarities in sncRNA715-mediated translational repression of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells.

  2. Characterization of a Novel Human-Specific STING Agonist that Elicits Antiviral Activity Against Emerging Alphaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina M Sali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacologic stimulation of innate immune processes represents an attractive strategy to achieve multiple therapeutic outcomes including inhibition of virus replication, boosting antitumor immunity, and enhancing vaccine immunogenicity. In light of this we sought to identify small molecules capable of activating the type I interferon (IFN response by way of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3. A high throughput in vitro screen yielded 4-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl-N-(furan-2-ylmethyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (referred to herein as G10, which was found to trigger IRF3/IFN-associated transcription in human fibroblasts. Further examination of the cellular response to this molecule revealed expression of multiple IRF3-dependent antiviral effector genes as well as type I and III IFN subtypes. This led to the establishment of a cellular state that prevented replication of emerging Alphavirus species including Chikungunya virus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus, and Sindbis virus. To define cellular proteins essential to elicitation of the antiviral activity by the compound we employed a reverse genetics approach that utilized genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 technology. This allowed the identification of IRF3, the IRF3-activating adaptor molecule STING, and the IFN-associated transcription factor STAT1 as required for observed gene induction and antiviral effects. Biochemical analysis indicates that G10 does not bind to STING directly, however. Thus the compound may represent the first synthetic small molecule characterized as an indirect activator of human STING-dependent phenotypes. In vivo stimulation of STING-dependent activity by an unrelated small molecule in a mouse model of Chikungunya virus infection blocked viremia demonstrating that pharmacologic activation of this signaling pathway may represent a feasible strategy for combating emerging Alphaviruses.

  3. Characterization of a Novel Human-Specific STING Agonist that Elicits Antiviral Activity Against Emerging Alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sali, Tina M; Pryke, Kara M; Abraham, Jinu; Liu, Andrew; Archer, Iris; Broeckel, Rebecca; Staverosky, Julia A; Smith, Jessica L; Al-Shammari, Ahmed; Amsler, Lisi; Sheridan, Kayla; Nilsen, Aaron; Streblow, Daniel N; DeFilippis, Victor R

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacologic stimulation of innate immune processes represents an attractive strategy to achieve multiple therapeutic outcomes including inhibition of virus replication, boosting antitumor immunity, and enhancing vaccine immunogenicity. In light of this we sought to identify small molecules capable of activating the type I interferon (IFN) response by way of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). A high throughput in vitro screen yielded 4-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl)-N-(furan-2-ylmethyl)-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (referred to herein as G10), which was found to trigger IRF3/IFN-associated transcription in human fibroblasts. Further examination of the cellular response to this molecule revealed expression of multiple IRF3-dependent antiviral effector genes as well as type I and III IFN subtypes. This led to the establishment of a cellular state that prevented replication of emerging Alphavirus species including Chikungunya virus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus, and Sindbis virus. To define cellular proteins essential to elicitation of the antiviral activity by the compound we employed a reverse genetics approach that utilized genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 technology. This allowed the identification of IRF3, the IRF3-activating adaptor molecule STING, and the IFN-associated transcription factor STAT1 as required for observed gene induction and antiviral effects. Biochemical analysis indicates that G10 does not bind to STING directly, however. Thus the compound may represent the first synthetic small molecule characterized as an indirect activator of human STING-dependent phenotypes. In vivo stimulation of STING-dependent activity by an unrelated small molecule in a mouse model of Chikungunya virus infection blocked viremia demonstrating that pharmacologic activation of this signaling pathway may represent a feasible strategy for combating emerging Alphaviruses. PMID:26646986

  4. Predicted class-I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-like proteins in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies point to a great diversity of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis systems with major roles in amino acid and co-factor biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and post-translational modifications of proteins by peptide tags. The least studied of these systems are those utilizing tRNAs or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AAtRS in non-ribosomal peptide ligation. Results Here we describe novel examples of AAtRS related proteins that are likely to be involved in the synthesis of widely distributed peptide-derived metabolites. Using sensitive sequence profile methods we show that the cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs are members of the HUP class of Rossmannoid domains and are likely to be highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domains. We also identify the first eukaryotic CDPSs in fungi and in animals; they might be involved in immune response in the latter organisms. We also identify a paralogous version of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase, which is widespread in bacteria, and present evidence using contextual information that it might function independently of protein synthesis as a peptide ligase in the formation of a peptide- derived secondary metabolite. This metabolite is likely to be heavily modified through multiple reactions catalyzed by a metal-binding cupin domain and a lysine N6 monooxygenase that are strictly associated with this paralogous methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MtRS. We further identify an analogous system wherein the MtRS has been replaced by more typical peptide ligases with the ATP-grasp or modular condensation-domains. Conclusions The prevalence of these predicted biosynthetic pathways in phylogenetically distant, pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria suggests that metabolites synthesized by them might participate in interactions with the host. More generally, these findings point to a complete spectrum of recruitment of AAtRS to various non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways, ranging from the

  5. Stone Lakes Virus (Family Togaviridae, Genus Alphavirus), a Variant of Fort Morgan Virus Isolated From Swallow Bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) West of the Continental Divide

    OpenAIRE

    Brault, Aaron C; Armijos, M. Veronica; Wheeler, Sarah; Wright, Stan; Fang, Ying; Langevin, Stanley; Reisen, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple isolates of an alphaviruses within the western equine encephalomyelitis-serocomplex that were related closely to Ft. Morgan and its variant Buggy Creek virus were made from swallow bugs, Oeciacus vicarius Horvath (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), collected from cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) nests at the Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Sacramento County, CA, during the summers of 2005 and 2006. This virus (hereafter Stone Lakes virus, family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus, STLV)...

  6. Presence and synthesis of histone mRNA in rice embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of lysine-rich histone by the 17,000 x g supernatant fraction prepared from the dry embryos of rice seeds showed that histone messengers are conserved. The synthesis of mRNAs during the early phase of germination is mitomycin sensitive, thereby indicating that histone mRNAs are synthesised during the early phase of germination. [14C]lysine, [2H]thymidine and [32P]orthophosphate were used in the study. (author)

  7. Flow cytometric measurement of RNA synthesis based on bromouridine labelling and combined with measurement of DNA content or cell surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J; Larsen, J K

    1993-01-01

    RNA synthesis can be analysed in nuclei or cells labelled with 5-bromouridine (BrUrd) and stained using cross-reacting anti-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) antibody. Flow cytometric dual parameter analysis of BrUrd incorporation and DNA content in nuclear suspensions of human blood lymphocytes showed ...... synthesis in HL-60 and K-562 cells was measured simultaneous with CD13 expression....

  8. Alphavirus capsid proteins self-assemble into core-like particles in insect cells: A promising platform for nanoparticle vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikke, Mia C; Geertsema, Corinne; Wu, Vincen; Metz, Stefan W; van Lent, Jan W; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2016-02-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes arthritic diseases in humans, whereas the aquatic salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is associated with high mortality in aquaculture of salmon and trout. Using modern biotechnological approaches, promising vaccine candidates based upon highly immunogenic, enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs) have been developed. However, the eVLP structure (core, lipid membrane, surface glycoproteins) is more complex than that of non-enveloped, protein-only VLPs, which are structurally and morphologically 'simple'. In order to develop an alternative to alphavirus eVLPs, in this paper we engineered recombinant baculovirus vectors to produce high levels of alphavirus core-like particles (CLPs) in insect cells by expression of the CHIKV and SAV capsid proteins. The CLPs localize in dense nuclear bodies within the infected cell nucleus and are purified through a rapid and scalable protocol involving cell lysis, sonication and low-speed centrifugation steps. Furthermore, an immunogenic epitope from the alphavirus E2 glycoprotein can be successfully fused to the N-terminus of the capsid protein without disrupting the CLP self-assembling properties. We propose that immunogenic epitope-tagged alphavirus CLPs produced in insect cells present a simple and perhaps more stable alternative to alphavirus eVLPs. PMID:26287127

  9. A model for mis-sense error in protein synthesis: mis-charged cognate tRNA versus mis-reading of codon

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Annwesha

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of amino acid monomers in the primary structure of protein is decided by the corresponding sequence of codons (triplets of nucleic acid monomers) on the template messenger RNA (mRNA). The polymerization of a protein, by incorporation of the successive amino acid monomers, is carried out by a molecular machine called ribosome. Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, each species of which is "charged" with a specific amino acid, enters the ribosome and participates in the reading of the codon by the ribosome. Both mis-reading of mRNA codon and prior mis-charging of a tRNA can lead to "mis-sense" error, i.e,. erroneous substitution of a correct amino acid monomer by an incorrect one during the synthesis of a protein. We develop a theoretical model of protein synthesis that allows for both types of contributions to the "mis-sense" error. We report exact analytical formulae for several quantities that characterize the interplay of mis-charging of tRNA and mis-reading of mRNA. The average rate of elongation of ...

  10. Non-enzymatic template-directed RNA synthesis inside model protocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Szostak, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to recreate a prebiotically plausible protocell, in which RNA replication occurs within a fatty acid vesicle, have been stalled by the destabilizing effect of Mg2+ on fatty acid membranes. Here, we report that the presence of citrate protects fatty acid membranes from the disruptive effects of high Mg2+ ion concentrations while allowing RNA copying to proceed, while also protecting single-stranded RNA from Mg2+-catalyzed degradation. This combination of properties has allowed us to demonstrate the chemical copying of RNA templates inside fatty acid vesicles, which in turn allows for an increase in copying efficiency by bathing the vesicles in a continuously refreshed solution of activated nucleotides. PMID:24288333

  11. PNA containing isocytidine nucleobase: synthesis and recognition of double helical RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Zengeya, Thomas; Li, Ming; Rozners, Eriks

    2011-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA1) containing a 5-methylisocytidine (iC) nucleobase has been synthesized. Triple helix formation between PNA1 and RNA hairpins having variable base pairs interacting with iC was studied using isothermal titration calorimetry. The iC nucleobase recognized the proposed target, C-G inversion in polypurine tract of RNA, with slightly higher affinity than the natural nucleobases, though the sequence selectivity of recognition was low. Compared to non-modified PNA, PNA1 had...

  12. In vitro RNA synthesis with UV-irradiated phage lambda DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of phage lambda DNA with UV light at a dose of 10 Jm-2 leads to a 40% decrease in DNA template activity and at a dose of 100 Jm-2 - to its complete suppression. This is apparently due to the transcription-terminating effect mainly of pyrimidine dimers. Electrophoretic analysis of RNA shows that RNA chains, homogeneous on their molecular weight but shorter, are produced in vitro with 10 Jm-2 UV-irradiated DNA. (author)

  13. Regulation of elastin synthesis in developing sheep nuchal ligament by elastin mRNA levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levels of elastin production in explant culture of fetal sheep nuchal ligament and corresponding levels of translatable elastin mRNA were determined in parallel studies during a period of rapid growth of the embryo. The identity of the explant culture and cell-free proucts was confirmed by peptide mapping, immunoprecipitation, and the characteristic lack of histidine and methionine. Elastin production was quantitated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and radioimmune precipitation. The translation products could be labeled with methionine only when NH2-terminally donated as f-Met-tRNA/sup Met//sub f/. Explant cultures showed a large rise in elastin production from 70 days after conception to 150 days after conception. Cell free translation of RNA demonstrated a parallel in elastin mRNA levels and in elastin mRNA per cell. It appears, therefore, that the marked emphasis the differentiating muchal ligament places on elastin production is modulated, at least in part, by the quantities of available elastin in mRNA

  14. Effects of inhibitors of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis on frequencies and types of premature chromosome condensation from x-ray induced micronuclei. [Cytosine arabinoside, azathioprine, thymidine, trenimon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madle, S.; Nowak, J.; Obe, G.

    1976-10-28

    Cells containing x-ray induced micronuclei were treated for a few hours before fixation with inhibitors of DNA synthesis (cytosine arabinoside; azathioprine; thymidine; trenimon), of RNA synthesis (actinomycin D; ethidium bromide), and of protein synthesis (puromycin). Only the inhibitors of DNA synthesis lead to a significant suppression of the frequencies of mitoses with micronucleus derived premature chromosome condensation (PCC). We tend to interpret the result as follows: Micronuclei that are in the G1 phase of their cell cycles are accumulated at the G1/S border or in the early S phase of their cell cycles under the influence of the inhibitors of the DNA synthesis. Micronuclei blocked in this way cannot be induced to undergo PCC and seem to disappear from the cells.

  15. One-pot synthesis of pH-responsive hybrid nanogel particles for the intracellular delivery of small interfering RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Sm Z; Cevenini, Armando; Yazdi, Iman K; Parodi, Alessandro; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Corbo, Claudia; Scaria, Shilpa; Hu, Ye; Haddix, Seth G; Corradetti, Bruna; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-05-01

    This report describes a novel, one-pot synthesis of hybrid nanoparticles formed by a nanostructured inorganic silica core and an organic pH-responsive hydrogel shell. This easy-to-perform, oil-in-water emulsion process synthesizes fluorescently-doped silica nanoparticles wrapped within a tunable coating of cationic poly(2-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) hydrogel in one step. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis demonstrated that the hydrogel-coated nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in the aqueous phase. The formation of covalent chemical bonds between the silica and the polymer increases the stability of the organic phase around the inorganic core as demonstrated by thermogravimetric analysis. The cationic nature of the hydrogel is responsible for the pH buffering properties of the nanostructured system and was evaluated by titration experiments. Zeta-potential analysis demonstrated that the charge of the system was reversed when transitioned from acidic to basic pH and vice versa. Consequently, small interfering RNA (siRNA) can be loaded and released in an acidic pH environment thereby enabling the hybrid particles and their payload to avoid endosomal sequestration and enzymatic degradation. These nanoparticles, loaded with specific siRNA molecules directed towards the transcript of the membrane receptor CXCR4, significantly decreased the expression of this protein in a human breast cancer cell line (i.e., MDA-MB-231). Moreover, intravenous administration of siRNA-loaded nanoparticles demonstrated a preferential accumulation at the tumor site that resulted in a reduction of CXCR4 expression. PMID:26901429

  16. IGS Minisatellites Useful for Race Differentiation in Colletotrichum lentis and a Likely Site of Small RNA Synthesis Affecting Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Jonathan; Bissett, John; Pahlavani, Mohammadhadi; Mooney, Brent; Buchwaldt, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Colletotrichum lentis is a fungal pathogen of lentil in Canada but rarely reported elsewhere. Two races, Ct0 and Ct1, have been identified using differential lines. Our objective was to develop a PCR-probe differentiating these races. Sequences of the translation elongation factor 1α (tef1α), RNA polymerase II subunit B2 (rpb2), ATP citrate lyase subunit A (acla), and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions were monomorphic, while the intergenic spacer (IGS) region showed length polymorphisms at two minisatellites of 23 and 39 nucleotides (nt). A PCR-probe (39F/R) amplifying the 39 nt minisatellite was developed which subsequently revealed 1-5 minisatellites with 1-12 repeats in C. lentis. The probe differentiated race Ct1 isolates having 7, 9 or 7+9 repeats from race Ct0 having primarily 2 or 4 repeats, occasionally 5, 6, or 8, but never 7 or 9 repeats. These isolates were collected between 1991 and 1999. In a 2012 survey isolates with 2 and 4 repeats increased from 34% to 67%, while isolated with 7 or 9 repeats decreased from 40 to 4%, likely because Ct1 resistant lentil varieties had been grown. The 39 nt repeat was identified in C. gloeosporioides, C. trifolii, Ascochyta lentis, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea. Thus, the 39F/R PCR probe is not species specific, but can differentiate isolates based on repeat number. The 23 nt minisatellite in C. lentis exists as three length variants with ten sequence variations differentiating race Ct0 having 14 or 19 repeats from race Ct1 having 17 repeats, except for one isolate. RNA-translation of 23 nt repeats forms hairpins and has the appropriate length to suggest that IGS could be a site of small RNA synthesis, a hypothesis that warrants further investigation. Small RNA from fungal plant pathogens able to silence genes either in the host or pathogen thereby aiding infection have been reported. PMID:26340001

  17. IGS Minisatellites Useful for Race Differentiation in Colletotrichum lentis and a Likely Site of Small RNA Synthesis Affecting Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Durkin

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum lentis is a fungal pathogen of lentil in Canada but rarely reported elsewhere. Two races, Ct0 and Ct1, have been identified using differential lines. Our objective was to develop a PCR-probe differentiating these races. Sequences of the translation elongation factor 1α (tef1α, RNA polymerase II subunit B2 (rpb2, ATP citrate lyase subunit A (acla, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions were monomorphic, while the intergenic spacer (IGS region showed length polymorphisms at two minisatellites of 23 and 39 nucleotides (nt. A PCR-probe (39F/R amplifying the 39 nt minisatellite was developed which subsequently revealed 1-5 minisatellites with 1-12 repeats in C. lentis. The probe differentiated race Ct1 isolates having 7, 9 or 7+9 repeats from race Ct0 having primarily 2 or 4 repeats, occasionally 5, 6, or 8, but never 7 or 9 repeats. These isolates were collected between 1991 and 1999. In a 2012 survey isolates with 2 and 4 repeats increased from 34% to 67%, while isolated with 7 or 9 repeats decreased from 40 to 4%, likely because Ct1 resistant lentil varieties had been grown. The 39 nt repeat was identified in C. gloeosporioides, C. trifolii, Ascochyta lentis, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea. Thus, the 39F/R PCR probe is not species specific, but can differentiate isolates based on repeat number. The 23 nt minisatellite in C. lentis exists as three length variants with ten sequence variations differentiating race Ct0 having 14 or 19 repeats from race Ct1 having 17 repeats, except for one isolate. RNA-translation of 23 nt repeats forms hairpins and has the appropriate length to suggest that IGS could be a site of small RNA synthesis, a hypothesis that warrants further investigation. Small RNA from fungal plant pathogens able to silence genes either in the host or pathogen thereby aiding infection have been reported.

  18. Identification and characterization of alphavirus M1 as a selective oncolytic virus targeting ZAP-defective human cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Haipeng; Liang, Jiankai; Kai LI; Zhu, Wenbo; FU, LIWU; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Xiaoke; Shi, Huijuan; Wu, Sihan; Xiao, Xiao; Chen, Lijun; TANG, LIPENG; Yan, Min; Yang, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Although oncolytic virotherapy is showing great promise in clinical trials, not all patients are benefiting. Identifying predictors of therapeutic effectiveness for each oncolytic virus would provide a good chance to increase response rate. Here, we describe an alphavirus (M1) that possesses selective and potent antitumor activity through intravenous infusion, whereas its replication is controlled by the zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP) gene. A survey of cancer tissue banks reveals that ZA...

  19. Class II fusion protein of alphaviruses drives membrane fusion through the same pathway as class I proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitseva, Elena; Mittal, Aditya; Griffin, Diane E.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2005-01-01

    Viral fusion proteins of classes I and II differ radically in their initial structures but refold toward similar conformations upon activation. Do fusion pathways mediated by alphavirus E1 and influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) that exemplify classes II and I differ to reflect the difference in their initial conformations, or concur to reflect the similarity in the final conformations? Here, we dissected the pathway of low pH–triggered E1-mediated cell–cell fusion by reducing the numbers of a...

  20. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  1. An alternative strategy for bacterial ribosome synthesis: Bacillus subtilis rRNA transcription regulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krásný, Libor; Gourse, Richard. L.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 22 (2004), s. 4473-4483. ISSN 0261-4189 Grant ostatní: National Institutes of Health(US) RO1 GM37048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : B. subtilis , GTP concentrations, rRNA transcription Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 10.492, year: 2004

  2. Inhibition of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus RNA Synthesis by Thiosemicarbazone Derived from 5,6-Dimethoxy-1-Indanone▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eliana F.; Fabian, Lucas E.; Caputto, María E.; Gagey, Dolores; Finkielsztein, Liliana M.; Moltrasio, Graciela Y.; Moglioni, Albertina G.; Campos, Rodolfo H.; Cavallaro, Lucía V.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we described the activity of the thiosemicarbazone derived from 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone (TSC), which we previously characterized as a new compound that inhibits bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection. We showed that TSC acts at a point of time that coincides with the onset of viral RNA synthesis and that it inhibits the activity of BVDV replication complexes (RCs). Moreover, we have selected five BVDV mutants that turned out to be highly resistant to TSC but still susceptible to ribavirin (RBV). Four of these resistant mutants carried an N264D mutation in the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The remaining mutant showed an A392E mutation within the same protein. Some of these mutants replicated slower than the wild-type (wt) virus in the absence of TSC, whereas others showed a partial reversion to the wt phenotype over several passages in the absence of the compound. The docking of TSC in the crystal structure of the BVDV RdRp revealed a close contact between the indane ring of the compound and several residues within the fingers domain of the enzyme, some hydrophobic contacts, and hydrogen bonds with the thiosemicarbazone group. Finally, in the mutated RdRp from resistant BVDV, these interactions with TSC could not be achieved. Interestingly, TSC inhibited BVDV replication in cell culture synergistically with RBV. In conclusion, TSC emerges as a new nonnucleoside inhibitor of BVDV RdRp that is synergistic with RBV, a feature that turns it into a potential compound to be evaluated against hepatitis C virus (HCV). PMID:21430053

  3. 一种 gRNA 快速合成及检测方法的建立%Establishment of a rapid method for synthesis and detection of gRNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜建勇; 邓然; 高虹; 雍伟东

    2015-01-01

    目的:建立一种gRNA快速合成及检测的方法。方法设计引物并利用PCR技术迅速扩增gRNA的DNA模板片段,然后通过体外转录纯化得到gRNA;最后通过体外反应迅速对gRNA和Cas9酶切效率及特异性进行检测。结果体外合成的gRNA特异性强,活性高,在靶点上成功切开DNA双链。结论成功建立gRNA快速合成及检测的方法,为后续转染或显微注射筛选有活性gRNA节约了时间。%Objective The purpose of this study was to establish a rapid method for synthesis and detection of guild RNA (gRNA) which is an essential component in CRISPR/Cas9 knockout technology .Methods First, the Nkp46 gRNA core fragment was synthesized as amplification template .Second , the forward and reversed primers of the matched gRNA were designed using the Nkp46 gene as reference sequence .Third, the DNA fragment of Nkp46 gRNA was amplified by PCR technology using the synthesized gRNA core fragment as template .The gRNA was reversely transcribed in vitro u-sing amplified DNA fragment as template .The efficiency and specificity of gRNA and its interaction with Cas 9 were detec-ted in vitro.Results The specificity and activity of Nkp46 gRNA were high .The obtained gRNA interacted with Cas 9 en-zyme and successfully cut the target double-stranded DNA at the designed site .Conclusions The method for synthesis and detection of gRNA established in this study is faster than the original method , and the created gRNA is fully functional .

  4. In- silico exploration of thirty alphavirus genomes for analysis of the simple sequence repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Mashhood Alam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The compilation of simple sequence repeats (SSRs in viruses and its analysis with reference to incidence, distribution and variation would be instrumental in understanding the functional and evolutionary aspects of repeat sequences. Present study encompasses the analysis of SSRs across 30 species of alphaviruses. The full length genome sequences, assessed from NCBI were used for extraction and analysis of repeat sequences using IMEx software. The repeats of different motif sizes (mono- to penta-nucleotide observed therein exhibited variable incidence across the species. Expectedly, mononucleotide A/T was the most prevalent followed by dinucleotide AG/GA and trinucleotide AAG/GAA in these genomes. The conversion of SSRs to imperfect microsatellite or compound microsatellite (cSSR is low. cSSR, primarily constituted by variant motifs accounted for up to 12.5% of the SSRs. Interestingly, seven species lacked cSSR in their genomes. However, the SSR and cSSR are predominantly localized to the coding region ORFs for non structural protein and structural proteins. The relative frequencies of different classes of simple and compound microsatellites within and across genomes have been highlighted.

  5. Structural Properties of the C Terminus of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus N Protein Dictate N-RNA Complex Assembly, Encapsidation, and RNA Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrich, Bianca S.; Morin, Benjamin; Rahmeh, Amal A.; Whelan, Sean P. J.

    2012-01-01

    The vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) nucleoprotein (N) associates tightly with the viral genomic RNA. This N-RNA complex constitutes the template for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L, which engages the nucleocapsid via its phosphoprotein cofactor P. While N and P proteins play important roles in regulating viral gene expression, the molecular basis of this regulation remains incompletely understood. Here we show that mutations in the extreme C terminus of N cause defects in viral gene expre...

  6. Hamowanie syntezy chlorofilu i RNA w izolowanych liścieniach ogórka przez N-hydroksymocznik [Inhibition of chlorophyll and RNA synthesis by N-hydroxyurea in detached cucumber cotyledons

    OpenAIRE

    A. Rennert; J. S. Knypl

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxyurea (HU) at the concentration of 5 x 10-4 M decreased the content of chlorophyll in detached cucumber cotyledons; at this concentration it has no inhibitory effect on growth. Benzylaminopurine, gibberelic acid and KCl partially reversed the inhibitory effect of HU on chlorophyll synthesis. HU stimulated yellowing of barley first leaf sections. The compound had little effect on leucine-14C incorporation to protein, and markedly inhibited uracil-14C incorporation in to RNA of the gree...

  7. Genetic effect of CysLTR2 polymorphisms on its mRNA synthesis and stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Il

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and haplotypes were associated with aspirin hypersensitivity in asthmatics. We investigated the genetic effects of the SNPs and haplotypes on the expression of the CysLTR2 gene. Methods We measured CysLTR2 protein and mRNA expression in EB virus-infected B cell lines from asthmatics having ht1+/+ and ht2+/+. A gel retardation assay was used to identify nuclear protein binding to the c.-819 promoter site. The function of promoter and 3'-UTR were assessed using pGL3 luciferase and pEGFP reporter system, respectively. Results We found that the expression of CysLTR2 protein was higher in B cell lines of asthmatics having ht2+/+ than in those having ht1+/+. PMA/ionomycin induced higher mRNA expression of CysLTR2 in B cell lines from ht2+/+ asthmatics than those from ht1+/+ asthmatics. A nuclear protein from the B cell lines showed stronger DNA binding affinity with a probe containing c.-819T than one containing c.-819G. The luciferase activity of the c.-819T type of CysLTR2 promoter was higher than that of the c.-819G type. EGFP expression was higher in the EGFP-c.2078T 3'-UTR fusion construct than in the c.2078C construct. Conclusion The sequence variants of CysLTR2 may affect its transcription and the stability of its mRNA, resulting in altered expression of CysLTR2 protein, which in turn causes some asthmatics to be susceptible to aspirin hypersensitivity.

  8. The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase ERK induces tRNA synthesis by phosphorylating TFIIIB

    OpenAIRE

    Felton-Edkins, Zoe A.; Fairley, Jennifer A.; Graham, Emma L.; Johnston, Imogen M.; White, Robert J.; Scott, Pamela H.

    2003-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription increases within minutes of serum addition to growth-arrested fibroblasts. We show that ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases regulate pol III output by directly binding and phosphorylating the BRF1 subunit of transcription factor TFIIIB. Blocking the ERK signalling cascade inhibits TFIIIB binding to pol III and to transcription factor TFIIIC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that the association of BRF1 and pol III with tRNALeu genes in cells decrea...

  9. Hunting in the rainforest and mayaro virus infection: An emerging alphavirus in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo O Izurieta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives of this report were to document the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and to examine potential risk factors for Mayaro virus infection among the personnel of a military garrison in the Amazonian rainforest. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of the personnel of a garrison located in the Ecuadorian Amazonian rainforest. The cross-sectional study employed interviews and seroepidemiological methods. Humoral immune response to Mayaro virus infection was assessed by evaluating IgM- and IgG-specific antibodies using ELISA. Results: Of 338 subjects studied, 174 were from the Coastal zone of Ecuador, 73 from Andean zone, and 91 were native to the Amazonian rainforest. Seroprevalence of Mayaro virus infection was more than 20 times higher among Amazonian natives (46% than among subjects born in other areas (2%. Conclusions: Age and hunting in the rainforest were significant predictors of Mayaro virus infection overall and among Amazonian natives. The results provide the first demonstration of the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and a systematic evaluation of risk factors for the transmission of this alphavirus. The large difference in prevalence rates between Amazonian natives and other groups and between older and younger natives suggest that Mayaro virus is endemic and enzootic in the rainforest, with sporadic outbreaks that determine differences in risk between birth cohorts of natives. Deep forest hunting may selectively expose native men, descendants of the Shuar and Huaronai ethnic groups, to the arthropod vectors of Mayaro virus in areas close to primate reservoirs.

  10. Slowed transcription and rapid messenger RNA turnover contribute to a decline in synthesis of ovine trophoblast protein-1 during in vitro culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovine trophoblast protein-1 (oTP-1) is produced in massive amounts by conceptuses during the Day-12-20-period of early pregnancy. The rate of production of oTP-1 declines during culture of conceptuses, however, suggesting a role for critical intrauterine factors for continued production. The present study was conducted to define the mechanism responsible for the in vitro decline in oTP-1 synthesis. Over 24 h culture, synthesis of oTP-1 was initially rapid but then declined such that there was little increase in either the protein or its antiviral activity after 12 h. By contrast, the release of total protein into the medium continued at an approximately linear rate for the entire 24-h period of culture. By using in situ hybridization to tissue sections and dot-blot analysis of tissue extracts with labeled cDNA probes, it was shown that the quantity of oTP-1 mRNA fell 3- to 5-fold during culture, whereas the amount of actin mRNA remained relatively constant. To determine whether this selective fall in levels of oTP-1 mRNA resulted from decreased transcription rate and/or high turnover rate of existing mRNA, conceptuses were either provided continuously with [3H]uridine for 24 h or labeled for 9 h and then exposed to medium enriched in unlabeled uridine and cytidine for a further 15 h. Specific incorporation of 3H into oTP-1 mRNA was assessed by hybridization to excess oTP-1 cDNA immobilized on nitrocellulose membranes. In the continuous labeling study, 3H in total RNA increased at an approximately linear rate for at least 18 h, whereas the content of 3H in oTP-1 mRNA peaked at 9 h and declined about 10-fold by 24 h

  11. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Novel Zwitterionic Lipids for Drug and siRNA Delivery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Colin L.

    Lipid-based nanoparticles have long been used to deliver biologically active molecules such as drugs, proteins, peptides, DNA, and siRNA in vivo. Liposomes and lipoplexes alter the biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and cellular uptake of their encapsulated or associated cargo. This can increase drug efficacy while reducing toxicity, resulting in an increased therapeutic index and better clinical outcomes. Unlike small molecule drugs, which passively diffuse through lipid membranes, nucleic acids and proteins require an active, carrier mediated escape mechanism to reach their site of action. As such, the therapeutic application and drug properties dictate the required biophysical characteristics of the lipid nanoparticle. These carrier properties depend on the structure and biophysical characteristics of the lipids and other components used to formulate them. This dissertation presents a series of studies related to the development of novel synthetic lipids for use in drug delivery systems. First, we developed a novel class of zwitterionic lipids with head groups containing a cationic amine and anionic carboxylate and ester-linked oleic acid tails. These lipids exhibit structure-dependent, pH-responsive biophysical properties, and may be useful components for next-generation drug delivery systems. Second, we extended the idea of amine/carboxylate containing zwitterionic head groups and synthesized a series of acetate terminated diacyl lipids containing a quaternary amine. These lipids have an inverted headgroup orientation compared to naturally occurring zwitterionic lipids, and show interesting salt-dependent biophysical properties. Third, we synthesized and characterized a focused library of ionizable lysine-based lipids, which contain a lysine head group linked to a long-chain dialkylamine. A focused library was synthesized to determine the impact of hydrophobic fluidity, lipid net charge, and lipid pKa on the biophysical and siRNA transfection characteristics

  12. Interplay of two cis-acting mRNA regions in translational control of sigma 32 synthesis during the heat shock response of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, H; Yuzawa, H; Yura, T

    1991-01-01

    When Escherichia coli cells are transferred from 30 degrees C to 42 degrees C, transcription from specific promoters recognized by RNA polymerase containing sigma 32 (the rpoH gene product) is transiently activated, resulting in induction of heat shock proteins. Transcription from heat shock promoters is activated by an increased cellular concentration of sigma 32 due to enhanced synthesis and stabilization. We have constructed and examined the expression of mutant derivatives (deletions and ...

  13. Template-directed synthesis using the heterogeneous templates produced by montmorillonite catalysis. A possible bridge between the prebiotic and RNA worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of oligoguanylates [oligo(G)s] is catalyzed by a template of oligocytidylates [oligo(C)s] containing 2',5'- and 3',5'-linked phosphodiester bonds with and without incorporated C5'ppC groupings. An oligo(C) template containing exclusively 2',5'-phosphodiester bonds also serves as a template for the synthesis of complementary oligo(G)s. The oligo(C) template was prepared by the condensation of the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of cytidine on montmorillonite clay. These studies establish that RNA oligomers prepared by mineral catalysis, or other routes on the primitive earth, did not have to be exclusively 3',5'-linked to catalyze template-directed synthesis, since oligo(C)s containing a variety of linkage isomers serve as templates for the formation of complementary oligo(G)s. These findings support the postulate that origin of the RNA world was initiated by the RNA oligomers produced by polymerization of activated monomers formed by prebiotic processes.

  14. Thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase fusion proteins and their use in cDNA synthesis and next-generation RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Sabine; Ghanem, Eman; Smith, Whitney; Sheeter, Dennis; Qin, Yidan; King, Olga; Polioudakis, Damon; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Swamy, Sajani; Kuersten, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2013-07-01

    Mobile group II introns encode reverse transcriptases (RTs) that function in intron mobility ("retrohoming") by a process that requires reverse transcription of a highly structured, 2-2.5-kb intron RNA with high processivity and fidelity. Although the latter properties are potentially useful for applications in cDNA synthesis and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), group II intron RTs have been difficult to purify free of the intron RNA, and their utility as research tools has not been investigated systematically. Here, we developed general methods for the high-level expression and purification of group II intron-encoded RTs as fusion proteins with a rigidly linked, noncleavable solubility tag, and we applied them to group II intron RTs from bacterial thermophiles. We thus obtained thermostable group II intron RT fusion proteins that have higher processivity, fidelity, and thermostability than retroviral RTs, synthesize cDNAs at temperatures up to 81°C, and have significant advantages for qRT-PCR, capillary electrophoresis for RNA-structure mapping, and next-generation RNA sequencing. Further, we find that group II intron RTs differ from the retroviral enzymes in template switching with minimal base-pairing to the 3' ends of new RNA templates, making it possible to efficiently and seamlessly link adaptors containing PCR-primer binding sites to cDNA ends without an RNA ligase step. This novel template-switching activity enables facile and less biased cloning of nonpolyadenylated RNAs, such as miRNAs or protein-bound RNA fragments. Our findings demonstrate novel biochemical activities and inherent advantages of group II intron RTs for research, biotechnological, and diagnostic methods, with potentially wide applications. PMID:23697550

  15. MicroRNA-26a/b and their host genes synergistically regulate triacylglycerol synthesis by targeting the INSIG1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Tianying; Tian, Huibin; Ma, Yue; Xu, Huifen; Yao, Dawei; Loor, Juan J

    2016-05-01

    The microRNA-26 (miR-26) family is known to control adipogenesis in non-ruminants. The genomic loci of miR-26a and miR-26b have been localized in the introns of genes encoding for the proteins of the C-terminal domain RNA polymerase II polypeptide A small phosphatase (CTDSP) family. Insulin-induced gene 1 (INSIG1) encodes a protein with a key role in the regulation of lipogenesis in rodent liver. In the present study, we investigated the synergistic function of the miR-26 family and their host genes in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC). Downregulation of miR-26a/b and their host genes in GMEC decreased the expression of genes relate to fatty acid synthesis (PPARG, LXRA, SREBF1, FASN, ACACA, GPAM, LPIN1, DGAT1 and SCD1), triacylglycerol accumulation and unsaturated fatty acid synthesis. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed INSIG1 as a direct target of miR-26a/b. Furthermore, inhibition of the CTDSP family also downregulated the expression of INSIG1. Taken together, our findings highlight a functional association of miR-26a/b, their host genes and INSIG1, and provide new insights into the regulatory network controlling milk fat synthesis in GMEC. The data indicate that targeting this network via nutrition might be important for regulating milk fat synthesis in ruminants. PMID:27002347

  16. Herbal compound 861 regulates mRNA expression of collagen synthesis- and degradation-related genes in human hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Wang; Bao-En Wang; Jian Wang; Pei-Gen Xiao; Xue-Hai Tan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To identify the role of herbal compound 861 (Cpd 861) in the regulation of mRNA expression of collagen synthesis- and degradation-related genes in human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs).METHODS: mRNA levels of collagen types I and III, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-βi) in cultured-activated HSCs treated with Cpd 861 or interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were determined by real-time PCR.RESULTS: Both Cpd 861 and IFN-γ reduced the mRNA levels of collagen type Ⅲ, MMP-2 and TGF-βl. Moreover, Cpd 861 significantly enhanced the MMP-1 mRNA levels while down-regulated the TIMP-1 mRNA expression, increasing the ratio of MMP-1 to TIMP-1 to (6.3 + 0.3)-fold compared to the control group.CONCLUSION: The anti-fibrosis function of Cpd 861 may be mediated by both decreased interstitial collagen sythesis by inhibiting the transcription of collagen type in and TGF-pi and increased degradation of these collagens by up-regulating MMP-1 and down-regulating TIMP-1 mRNA levels.

  17. Multiple interferon stimulated genes synergize with the zinc finger antiviral protein to mediate anti-alphavirus activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophiya Karki

    Full Text Available The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP is a host factor that mediates inhibition of viruses in the Filoviridae, Retroviridae and Togaviridae families. We previously demonstrated that ZAP blocks replication of Sindbis virus (SINV, the prototype Alphavirus in the Togaviridae family at an early step prior to translation of the incoming genome and that synergy between ZAP and one or more interferon stimulated genes (ISGs resulted in maximal inhibitory activity. The present study aimed to identify those ISGs that synergize with ZAP to mediate Alphavirus inhibition. Using a library of lentiviruses individually expressing more than 350 ISGs, we screened for inhibitory activity in interferon defective cells with or without ZAP overexpression. Confirmatory tests of the 23 ISGs demonstrating the largest infection reduction in combination with ZAP revealed that 16 were synergistic. Confirmatory tests of all potentially synergistic ISGs revealed 15 additional ISGs with a statistically significant synergistic effect in combination with ZAP. These 31 ISGs are candidates for further mechanistic studies. The number and diversity of the identified ZAP-synergistic ISGs lead us to speculate that ZAP may play an important role in priming the cell for optimal ISG function.

  18. Natural minus-strand RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus as in vitro templates for viral RNA polymerase. 3'-Terminal non-coded guanosine and coat protein are insufficient factors for full-size plus-strand synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, C.J.; Huis in 't Veld, M.; Zuidema, D.; Graaff, de M.; Jaspars, E.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Replication complexes of alfalfa mosaic virus produce in vivo large quantities of plus-strand RNAs, but this production is fully dependent on the presence of coat protein. In order to study this process of RNA-dependent and coat protein-regulated RNA synthesis we have isolated the three natural minu

  19. Direct relationship between the level of p53 stabilization induced by rRNA synthesis-inhibiting drugs and the cell ribosome biogenesis rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, F; Brighenti, E; Govoni, M; Imbrogno, E; Fornari, F; Treré, D; Montanaro, L; Derenzini, M

    2016-02-25

    Many drugs currently used in chemotherapy work by hindering the process of ribosome biogenesis. In tumors with functional p53, the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis may contribute to the efficacy of this treatment by inducing p53 stabilization. As the level of stabilized p53 is critical for the induction of cytotoxic effects, it seems useful to highlight those cancer cell characteristics that can predict the degree of p53 stabilization following the treatment with inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis. In the present study we exposed a series of p53 wild-type human cancer cell lines to drugs such as actinomycin D (ActD), doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and CX-5461, which hinder ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis. We found that the amount of stabilized p53 was directly related to the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells before the drug treatment. This was due to different levels of inactivation of the ribosomal proteins-MDM2 pathway of p53 digestion. Inhibition of rRNA synthesis always caused cell cycle arrest, independent of the ribosome biogenesis rate of the cells, whereas apoptosis occurred only in cells with a high rDNA transcription rate. The level of p53 stabilization induced by drugs acting in different ways from the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis, such as hydroxyurea (HU) and nutlin-3, was independent of the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells and always lower than that occurring after the inhibition of rRNA synthesis. Interestingly, in cells with a low ribosome biogenesis rate, the combined treatment with ActD and HU exerted an additive effect on p53 stabilization. These results indicated that (i) drugs inhibiting ribosome biogenesis may be highly effective in p53 wild-type cancers with a high ribosome biogenesis rate, as they induce apoptotic cell death, and (ii) the combination of drugs capable of stabilizing p53 through different mechanisms may be useful for treating cancers with a low ribosome biogenesis rate. PMID:25961931

  20. A Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy in Cattle to Prevent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Using a “Single-Cycle” Alphavirus Vector and Empty Capsid Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette; McInerney, Gerald M.; Burman, Alison; Jackson, Terry; Polacek, Charlotta

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most economically important infectious diseases of production animals globally. Vaccination can successfully control this disease, however, current vaccines are imperfect. They are made using chemically inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) that is produced in large-scale mammalian cell culture under high containment conditions. Here, we have expressed the FMDV capsid protein precursor (P1-2A) of strain O1 Manisa alone or with the FMDV 3C protease (3Cpro) using a “single cycle” packaged alphavirus self-replicating RNA based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). When the FMDV P1-2A was expressed with 3Cpro then processing of the FMDV capsid precursor protein is observed within cells and the proteins assemble into empty capsid particles. The products interact with anti-FMDV antibodies in an ELISA and bind to the integrin αvβ6 (a cellular receptor for FMDV). In cattle vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, anti-FMDV antibodies were elicited but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, the prior vaccination with these vectors resulted in a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge and the viremia observed was decreased in level and duration. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector and then boosted with FMDV empty capsids showed a strong anti-FMDV antibody response prior to challenge, they were protected against disease and no FMDV RNA was detected in their sera post-challenge. Initial inoculation with empty capsids followed by the rSFV-FMDV was much less effective at combating the FMDV challenge and a large post-challenge boost to the level of anti-FMDV antibodies was observed. This prime-boost system, using reagents that can be generated outside of high

  1. A Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy in Cattle to Prevent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Using a "Single-Cycle" Alphavirus Vector and Empty Capsid Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette; McInerney, Gerald M; Burman, Alison; Jackson, Terry; Polacek, Charlotta; Belsham, Graham J

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most economically important infectious diseases of production animals globally. Vaccination can successfully control this disease, however, current vaccines are imperfect. They are made using chemically inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) that is produced in large-scale mammalian cell culture under high containment conditions. Here, we have expressed the FMDV capsid protein precursor (P1-2A) of strain O1 Manisa alone or with the FMDV 3C protease (3Cpro) using a "single cycle" packaged alphavirus self-replicating RNA based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). When the FMDV P1-2A was expressed with 3Cpro then processing of the FMDV capsid precursor protein is observed within cells and the proteins assemble into empty capsid particles. The products interact with anti-FMDV antibodies in an ELISA and bind to the integrin αvβ6 (a cellular receptor for FMDV). In cattle vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, anti-FMDV antibodies were elicited but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, the prior vaccination with these vectors resulted in a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge and the viremia observed was decreased in level and duration. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector and then boosted with FMDV empty capsids showed a strong anti-FMDV antibody response prior to challenge, they were protected against disease and no FMDV RNA was detected in their sera post-challenge. Initial inoculation with empty capsids followed by the rSFV-FMDV was much less effective at combating the FMDV challenge and a large post-challenge boost to the level of anti-FMDV antibodies was observed. This prime-boost system, using reagents that can be generated outside of high-containment facilities

  2. No influence of oxygen levels on pathogenesis and virus shedding in Salmonid alphavirus (SAV-challenged Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Linda

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For more than three decades, diseases caused by salmonid alphaviruses (SAV have become a major problem of increasing economic importance in the European fish-farming industry. However, experimental infection trials with SAV result in low or no mortality i.e very different from most field outbreaks of pancreas disease (PD. This probably reflects the difficulties in reproducing complex biotic and abiotic field conditions in the laboratory. In this study we looked at the relationship between SAV-infection in salmon and sub-lethal environmental hypoxia as a result of reduced flow-through in tank systems. Results The experiment demonstrated that constant reduced oxygen levels (60-65% oxygen saturation: 6.5-7.0 mg/L did not significantly increase the severity or the progress of pancreas disease (PD. These conclusions are based upon assessments of a semi-quantitative histopathological lesion score system, morbidities/mortalities, and levels of SAV RNA in tissues and water (measured by 1 MDS electropositive virus filters and downstream real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the fish population shed detectable levels of the virus into the surrounding water during viraemia; 4-13 days after i.p. infection, and prior to appearance of severe lesions in heart (21-35 dpi. After this period, viral RNA from SAV could not be detected in water samples although still present in tissues (gills and hearts at lasting low levels. Lesions could be seen in exocrine pancreas at 7-21 days post infection, but no muscle lesions were seen. Conclusions In our study, experimentally induced hypoxia failed to explain the discrepancy between the severities reported from field outbreaks of SAV-disease and experimental infections. Reduction of oxygen levels to constant suboptimal levels had no effect on the severity of lesions caused by SAV-infection or the progress of the disease. Furthermore, we present a modified VIRADEL method which can be used to

  3. 应用SMARTercDNA合成技术扩增落地生根叶片的总RNA%Total RNA Amplification from Leaves of Kalanchoe daigremontiana Using SMARTer cDNA Synthesis Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟天秀; 曾会明

    2011-01-01

    以落地生根(Kalanchoe daigremontiana)未长芽和长芽的叶片为材料,提取落地生根的总RNA,采用SMARTer cDNA合成技术合成cDNA第1链,优化扩增第2链,通过设置梯度PCR扩增循环数,电泳分析后鉴定cDNA质量.结果表明:未长芽和长芽的材料各1μg总RNA分别成功扩增质量较高的双链cDNA.此方法的应用解决了研究材料有限的问题,可由微量的总RNA扩增出足够多的高质量双链cDNA,为进一步从基因水平研究落地生根奠定基础.%Total RNA was extracted from Kalanchoe daigremontiana leaves with or without bulbiferous spurs. The first-strand of cDNA synthesis and the double-strands cDNA amplification were performed u-sing super SMARTer cDNA synthesis technology. The quality of cDNA was evaluated through the gradient of PCR amplification cycles and electrophoresis. High quality double-strands cDNA were obtained from 1 ug total RNA. This method can solve the problem of limited research materials as sufficient high-quality double-strands cDNA are obtained from small amounts of total RNA. This technique allows further research of Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

  4. 8-Methoxypsoralen DNA interstrand cross-linking of the ribosomal RNA genes in Tetrahymena thermophila. Distribution, repair and effect on rRNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fengquin, X; Nielsen, Henrik; Zhen, W;

    1993-01-01

    The distribution and repair of 8-methoxypsoralen-DNA interstrand cross-links in the ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) in Tetrahymena thermophila have been studied in vivo by Southern blot analysis. It is found that the cross-links at a density of < or = 1/2 x 10(4) base pairs (bp) are distributed equall...

  5. A key role for the mRNA leader structure in translational control of ribosomal protein S1 synthesis in γ-proteobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Tchufistova, Ludmila S.; Komarova, Anastassia V.; Boni, Irina V.

    2003-01-01

    The translation initiation region (TIR) of the Escherichia coli rpsA mRNA coding for ribosomal protein S1 is characterized by a remarkable efficiency in driving protein synthesis despite the absence of the canonical Shine–Dalgarno element, and by a strong and specific autogenous repression in the presence of free S1 in trans. The efficient and autoregulated E.coli rpsA TIR comprises not less than 90 nt upstream of the translation start and can be unambiguously folded into three irregular hair...

  6. In situ DNA-templated synthesis of silver nanoclusters for ultrasensitive and label-free electrochemical detection of microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cuiyun; Shi, Kai; Dou, Baoting; Xiang, Yun; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2015-01-21

    On the basis of the use of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) in situ synthesized by cytosine (C)-rich loop DNA templates as signal amplification labels, the development of a label-free and highly sensitive method for electrochemical detection of microRNA (miRNA-199a) is described. The target miRNA-199a hybridizes with the partial dsDNA probes to initiate the target-assisted polymerization nicking reaction (TAPNR) amplification to produce massive intermediate sequences, which can be captured on the sensing electrode by the self-assembled DNA secondary probes. These surface-captured intermediate sequences further trigger the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification to form dsDNA polymers with numerous C-rich loop DNA templates on the electrode surface. DNA-templated synthesis of AgNCs can be realized by subsequent incubation of the dsDNA polymer-modified electrode with AgNO3 and sodium borohydride. With this integrated TAPNR and HCR dual amplification strategy, the amount of in situ synthesized AgNCs is dramatically enhanced, leading to substantially amplified current response for highly sensitive detection of miRNA-199a down to 0.64 fM. In addition, the developed method also shows high selectivity toward the target miRNA-199a. Featured with high sensitivity and label-free capability, the proposed sensing scheme can thus offer new opportunities for achieving sensitive, selective, and simple detection of different types of microRNA targets. PMID:25537119

  7. Small ncRNA transcriptome analysis from Aspergillus fumigatus suggests a novel mechanism for regulation of protein synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jöchl, Christoph; Rederstorff, Mathieu; Hertel, Jana; Stadler, Peter F.; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Schrettl, Markus; Haas, Hubertus; Hüttenhofer, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Small non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have systematically been studied in various model organisms from Escherichia coli to Homo sapiens. Here, we analyse the small ncRNA transcriptome from the pathogenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. To that aim, we experimentally screened for ncRNAs, expressed under various growth conditions or during specific developmental stages, by generating a specialized cDNA library from size-selected small RNA species. Our screen revealed 30 novel ncRNA c...

  8. Synthesis, restriction analysis, and molecular cloning of near full length DNA complementary to bovine parathyroid hormone mRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, D. F.; Kemper, B

    1980-01-01

    DNA complementary (cDNA) to a partially purified preparation of bovine parathyroid hormone mRNA was synthesized using avian myeloblastosis viral reverse transcriptase. The PTH cDNA contained about 750 bases and was greater than 95% sensitive to digestion by S1 nuclease. Analysis of the mRNA preparation by excess RNA hybridization to the PTH cDNA revealed one rapidly hybridizing component consisting of 50% of the PTH cDNA. Sequential incubation of the PTH mRNA with reverse transcriptase and E....

  9. Oxygen regulation of uricase and sucrose synthase synthesis in soybean callus tissue is exerted at the mRNA level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Z T; Larsen, K; Jochimsen, B U

    1991-01-01

    The effect of lowering oxygen concentration on the expression of nodulin genes in soybean callus tissue devoid of the microsymbiont has been examined. Poly(A)+ RNA was isolated from tissue cultivated in 4% oxygen and in normal atmosphere. Quantitative mRNA hybridization experiments using nodule...

  10. The rnc Gene Promotes Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Represses the vicRKX Gene Expressions via MicroRNA-Size Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ming; Li, Ke-Zeng; Lei, Lei; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Tao, Xiang; Yin, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Ru; Ma, Xin-Rong; Hu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent disease that largely relies on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to synthesize exopolysaccharides. Although the rnc gene is suggested to be involved in virulence mechanisms in many other bacteria, the information regarding it in S. mutans is very limited. Here, using deletion or overexpression mutant assay, we demonstrated that rnc in S. mutans significantly positively regulated exopolysaccharide synthesis and further altered biofilm formation. Meanwhile, the cariogenecity of S. mutans was decreased by deletion of rnc in a specific pathogen-free (SPF) rat model. Interestingly, analyzing the expression at mRNA level, we found the downstream vic locus was repressed by rnc in S. mutans. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, for the first time, three putative microRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) targeting vicRKX were predicted in S. mutans. The expression levels of these msRNAs were negatively correlated with vicRKX but positively correlated with rnc, indicating rnc probably repressed vicRKX expression through msRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In all, the results present that rnc has a potential role in the regulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and can affect vicRKX expressions via post-transcriptional repression in S. mutans. This study provides an alternative avenue for further research aimed at preventing caries. PMID:27242713

  11. Deuterated nucleotides as chemical probes of RNA structure: a detailed protocol for the enzymatic synthesis of a complete set of nucleotides specifically deuterated at ribose carbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N. Azad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a detailed protocol for the synthesis of ribonucleotides specifically deuterated at each ribose carbon atom. We synthesized 20 specifically deuterated ribonucleotides: ATP, CTP, GTP, and UTP, each of which contained one of five deuterated riboses (either 1′-D, 2″-D, 3′-D, 4′-D, or 5′,5″-D2. Our synthetic approach is inspired by the pioneering work of Tolbert and Williamson, who developed a method for the convenient one-pot enzymatic synthesis of nucleotides (Tolbert, T. J. and Williamson, J. R. (1996 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118, 7929–7940. Our protocol consists of a comprehensive list of required chemical and enzymatic reagents and equipment, detailed procedures for enzymatic assays and nucleotide synthesis, and chromatographic procedures for purification of deuterated nucleotides. As an example of the utility of specifically deuterated nucleotides, we used them to synthesize specifically deuterated sarcin/ricin loop (SRL RNA and measured the deuterium kinetic isotope effect on hydroxyl radical cleavage of the SRL.

  12. The A-rich RNA sequences of HIV-1 pol are important for the synthesis of viral cDNA

    OpenAIRE

    Keating, Cameron P.; Hill, Melissa K.; Hawkes, David J.; Smyth, Redmond P.; Isel, Catherine; Le, Shu-Yun; Palmenberg, Ann C.; Marshall, John A.; Marquet, Roland; Nabel, Gary J.; Mak, Johnson

    2008-01-01

    The bias of A-rich codons in HIV-1 pol is thought to be a record of hypermutations in viral genomes that lack biological functions. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that A-rich sequences are generally associated with minimal local RNA structures. Using codon modifications to reduce the amount of A-rich sequences within HIV-1 genomes, we have reduced the flexibility of RNA sequences in pol to analyze the functional significance of these A-rich ‘structurally poor’ RNA elements in HIV-1 pol. Our...

  13. Disease-Associated Human Telomerase RNA Variants Show Loss of Function for Telomere Synthesis without Dominant-Negative Interference▿

    OpenAIRE

    Errington, Timothy M.; Fu, Dragony; Wong, Judy M. Y.; Collins, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase adds simple-sequence repeats to chromosome ends to offset the terminal sequence loss inherent in each cycle of genome replication. Inherited mutations in genes encoding subunits of the human telomerase holoenzyme give rise to disease phenotypes including hematopoietic failure and pulmonary fibrosis. Disease-associated variants of the human telomerase RNA are expressed in heterozygous combination with wild-type telomerase RNA. Here, we exploit a sensitized human primary cell assay s...

  14. Combinatorial Synthesis, Screening, and Binding Studies of Highly Functionalized Polyamino-amido Oligomers for Binding to Folded RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. Pokorski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Folded RNA molecules have recently emerged as critical regulatory elements in biological pathways, serving not just as carriers of genetic information but also as key components in enzymatic assemblies. In particular, the transactivation response element (TAR of the HIV genome regulates transcriptional elongation by interacting specifically with the Tat protein, initiating the recruitment of the elongation complex. Preventing this interaction from occurring in vivo halts HIV replication, thus making RNA-binding molecules an intriguing pharmaceutical target. Using α-amino acids as starting materials, we have designed and synthesized a new class of polyamino-amido oligomers, called PAAs, specifically for binding to folded RNA structures. The PAA monomers were readily incorporated into a 125-member combinatorial library of PAA trimers. In order to rapidly assess RNA binding, a quantum dot-based fluorescent screen was developed to visualize RNA binding on-resin. The binding affinities of hits were quantified using a terbium footprinting assay, allowing us to identify a ligand (SFF with low micromolar affinity (kd=14 μM for TAR RNA. The work presented herein represents the development of a flexible scaffold that can be easily synthesized, screened, and subsequently modified to provide ligands specific for binding to folded RNAs.

  15. Virus-specific mRNA capping enzyme encoded by hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magden, J; Takeda, N; Li, T; Auvinen, P; Ahola, T; Miyamura, T; Merits, A; Kääriäinen, L

    2001-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a positive-strand RNA virus, is an important causative agent of waterborne hepatitis. Expression of cDNA (encoding amino acids 1 to 979 of HEV nonstructural open reading frame 1) in insect cells resulted in synthesis of a 110-kDa protein (P110), a fraction of which was proteolytically processed to an 80-kDa protein. P110 was tightly bound to cytoplasmic membranes, from which it could be released by detergents. Immunopurified P110 catalyzed transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to GTP and GDP to yield m(7)GTP or m(7)GDP. GMP, GpppG, and GpppA were poor substrates for the P110 methyltransferase. There was no evidence for further methylation of m(7)GTP when it was used as a substrate for the methyltransferase. P110 was also a guanylyltransferase, which formed a covalent complex, P110-m(7)GMP, in the presence of AdoMet and GTP, because radioactivity from both [alpha-(32)P]GTP and [(3)H-methyl]AdoMet was found in the covalent guanylate complex. Since both methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase reactions are strictly virus specific, they should offer optimal targets for development of antiviral drugs. Cap analogs such as m(7)GTP, m(7)GDP, et(2)m(7)GMP, and m(2)et(7)GMP inhibited the methyltransferase reaction. HEV P110 capping enzyme has similar properties to the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase of alphavirus nsP1, tobacco mosaic virus P126, brome mosaic virus replicase protein 1a, and bamboo mosaic virus (a potexvirus) nonstructural protein, indicating there is a common evolutionary origin of these distantly related plant and animal virus families. PMID:11413290

  16. 2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase: a novel RNA-binding protein that inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Michel; Robert, Francis; Kottis, Vicky; Gallouzi, Imed-Eddine; Pelletier, Jerry; Braun, Peter E

    2009-04-01

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) is one of the earliest myelin-related proteins to be specifically expressed in differentiating oligodendrocytes (ODCs) in the central nervous system (CNS) and is implicated in myelin biogenesis. CNP possesses an in vitro enzymatic activity, whose in vivo relevance remains to be defined, because substrates with 2',3,-cyclic termini have not yet been identified. To characterize CNP function better, we previously determined the structure of the CNP catalytic domain by NMR. Interestingly, the structure is remarkably similar to the plant cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (CPDase) from A. thaliana and the bacterial 2'-5' RNA ligase from T. thermophilus, which are known to play roles in RNA metabolism. Here we show that CNP is an RNA-binding protein. Furthermore, by using precipitation analyses, we demonstrate that CNP associates with poly(A)(+) mRNAs in vivo and suppresses translation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. With SELEX, we isolated RNA aptamers that can suppress the inhibitory effect of CNP on translation. We also demonstrate that CNP1 can bridge an association between tubulin and RNA. These results suggest that CNP1 may regulate expression of mRNAs in ODCs of the CNS. PMID:19021295

  17. Specific Cleavages by RNase H Facilitate Initiation of Plus-Strand RNA Synthesis by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Sharon J.; Zhang, Miaohua; Champoux, James J.

    2003-01-01

    Successful generation, extension, and removal of the plus-strand primer is integral to reverse transcription. For Moloney murine leukemia virus, primer removal at the RNA/DNA junction leaves the 3′ terminus of the plus-strand primer abutting the downstream plus-strand DNA, but this 3′ terminus is not efficiently reutilized for another round of extension. The RNase H cleavage to create the plus-strand primer might similarly result in the 3′ terminus of this primer abutting downstream RNA, yet ...

  18. ncRNA-mediated bistability in the synthesis of hundreds of distinct mRNAs and proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2010-02-01

    The kinetics of gene expression can be bistable due to the feedback between the mRNA and protein formation. In eukaryotic cells, the interplay between mRNAs and proteins can be influenced by non-coding RNAs. Some of these RNAs, e.g., microRNAs, may target hundreds of distinct mRNAs. The model presented here shows how a non-coding RNA can be used as a mediator in order to involve numerous mRNAs and proteins into a bistable network.

  19. The effect of parathion on the synthesis of DNA, RNA and protein in the primary erythrocytes, and on the nervous system differentiation in chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the experiments, chick embryos between the primitive streak stage and the 6-somites stage were used. These embryos were cultured in vitro, with the presence of Parathion for 12, 24, 36 hours. The result showed that Parathion has a teratogenic effect on the early stages of embryogenesis. Morphological and histological changes in brain, embryonic axis, heart mesenchyme and erythrocytes were found. Parathion's effect at molecular level quantitatively and qualitatively was studied, using autoradiography and radioactivity measurements after incorporation of 3H thymidine, 3H uridine and 3H delta amino levulinic acid. An inhibitory effect of Parathion on the synthesis of DNA, RNA and hemoglobin was shown. The inhibitory ratio increases with the increase of exposure period to Parathion. These results suggested that Parathion affects other mechanisms which have no relation with acetylcholinesterase activity. This activity was inhibited in a more advanced stages by Parathion. (author)

  20. A Polyprotein-Expressing Salmonid Alphavirus Replicon Induces Modest Protection in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar Against Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azila Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is an important strategy for the control and prevention of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar in the post-smolt stage in sea-water. In this study, a heterologous gene expression system, based on a replicon construct of salmonid alphavirus (SAV, was used for in vitro and in vivo expression of IPN virus proteins. The large open reading frame of segment A, encoding the polyprotein NH2-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH, as well as pVP2, were cloned and expressed by the SAV replicon in Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214 and epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC cells. The replicon constructs pSAV/polyprotein (pSAV/PP and pSAV/pVP2 were used to immunize Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar by a single intramuscular injection and tested in a subsequent IPN virus (IPNV challenge trial. A low to moderate protection against IPN was observed in fish immunized with the replicon vaccine that encoded the pSAV/PP, while the pSAV/pVP2 construct was not found to induce protection.

  1. Occurrence of salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) infections in wild sea trout Salmo trutta in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhun, Abdullah Sami; Isachsen, Cecilie Helen; Omdal, Linn Maren; Bårdsgjære Einen, Ann Cathrine; Bjørn, Pål Arne; Nilsen, Rune; Karlsbakk, Egil

    2016-07-01

    Viral diseases represent a serious problem in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) farming in Norway. Pancreas disease (PD) caused by salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) caused by piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) are among the most frequently diagnosed viral diseases in recent years. The possible spread of viruses from salmon farms to wild fish is a major public concern. Sea trout S. trutta collected from the major farming areas along the Norwegian coast are likely to have been exposed to SAV and PRV from farms with disease outbreaks. We examined 843 sea trout from 4 counties in Norway for SAV and PRV infections. We did not detect SAV in any of the tested fish, although significant numbers of the trout were caught in areas with frequent PD outbreaks. Low levels of PRV were detected in 1.3% of the sea trout. PRV-infected sea trout were caught in both salmon farming and non-farming areas, so the occurrence of infections was not associated with farming intensity or HSMI cases. Our results suggest that SAV and PRV infections are uncommon in wild sea trout. Hence, we found no evidence that sea trout are at risk from SAV or PRV released from salmon farms. PMID:27409234

  2. Conserved CPEs in the p53 3' untranslated region influence mRNA stability and protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken W; Vinther, Jeppe; Mittler, Gerhard;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of p53 mRNA contains two conserved U-rich sequences resembling cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPE). It is not known if these sequences regulate p53 expression by post-transcriptional mechanisms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stable p53 3'UTR reporter Ha......-type p53 3'UTR reduced mRNA steady state levels of the reporter gene and point mutations in the CPEs rescued the mRNA steady state levels in the MCF-7 cells, but not in the HaCaT cells. In both cell lines, the CPEs had a significant effect on translation of the reporter and influenced the effect of UV...... irradiation. Several proteins (including GAPDH, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) D and A/B) were identified from the MCF-7 cytoplasmic extracts that bound specifically to the CPEs. CONCLUSION: Two conserved CPEs in the p53 3'UTR regulate stability and translation of a reporter mRNA in non...

  3. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Craig S.; Short, Kevin R.; Bigelow, Maureen L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Sreekumaran Nair, K.

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32-42%) in healthy humans (P proteins (P muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis, and COX and citrate synthase enzyme activities were increased by insulin (P muscle mitochondrial ATP production for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas matched nondiabetic controls increased 16-26% (P skeletal muscle along with synthesis of gene transcripts and mitochondrial protein in human subjects. Skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients has a reduced capacity to increase ATP production with high insulin levels. cytochrome c oxidase | NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV | amino acids | citrate synthase

  4. RNase HI overproduction is required for efficient full-length RNA synthesis in the absence of topoisomerase I in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, Imad; Hraiky, Chadi; Rallu, Fabien; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Drolet, Marc

    2004-10-01

    It has long been known that Escherichia coli cells deprived of topoisomerase I (topA null mutants) do not grow. Because mutations reducing DNA gyrase activity and, as a consequence, negative supercoiling, occur to compensate for the loss of topA function, it has been assumed that excessive negative supercoiling is somehow involved in the growth inhibition of topA null mutants. However, how excess negative supercoiling inhibits growth is still unknown. We have previously shown that the overproduction of RNase HI, an enzyme that degrades the RNA portion of an R-loop, can partially compensate for the growth defects because of the absence of topoisomerase I. In this article, we have studied the effects of gyrase reactivation on the physiology of actively growing topA null cells. We found that growth immediately and almost completely ceases upon gyrase reactivation, unless RNase HI is overproduced. Northern blot analysis shows that the cells have a significantly reduced ability to accumulate full-length mRNAs when RNase HI is not overproduced. Interestingly, similar phenotypes, although less severe, are also seen when bacterial cells lacking RNase HI activity are grown and treated in the same way. All together, our results suggest that excess negative supercoiling promotes the formation of R-loops, which, in turn, inhibit RNA synthesis. PMID:15458416

  5. Short-hairpin RNA-mediated stable silencing of Grb2 impairs cell growth and DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grb2 is an SH2-SH3 protein adaptor responsible for linking growth factor receptors with intracellular signaling cascades. To study the role of Grb2 in cell growth, we have generated a new COS7 cell line (COS7shGrb2), based on RNAi technology, as null mutations in mammalian Grb2 genes are lethal in early development. This novel cell line continuously expresses a short hairpin RNA that targets endogenous Grb2. Stable COS7shGrb2 cells had the shGrb2 integrated into the genomic DNA and carried on SiL construct (made refractory to the shRNA-mediated interference), but not with an SH2-deficient mutant (R86K). Thus, a viable knock-down and rescue protocol has demonstrated that Grb2 is crucial for cell proliferation

  6. Serine metabolism supports the methionine cycle and DNA/RNA methylation through de novo ATP synthesis in cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Maddocks, Oliver D.K.; Christiaan F Labuschagne; Adams, Peter D; Vousden, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under ...

  7. The reverse genetics applied to fish RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biacchesi Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aquaculture has expanded rapidly to become a major economic and food-producing sector worldwide these last 30 years. In parallel, viral diseases have emerged and rapidly spread from farm to farm causing enormous economic losses. The most problematic viruses encountered in the field are mainly, but not exclusively, RNA viruses belonging to the Novirhabdovirus, Aquabirnavirus, Alphavirus and Betanodavirus genera. The recent establishment of reverse genetics systems to recover infectious fish RNA viruses entirely from cDNA has made possible to genetically manipulate the viral genome. These systems have provided powerful tools to study all aspects of the virus biology and virus-host interactions but also gave the opportunity to use these viruses as live vaccines or as gene vectors. This review provides an overview on the recent breakthroughs achieved by using these reverse genetics systems in terms of viral protein function, virulence and host-specificity factor, vaccine development and vector design.

  8. Immunoprotective activity of a Salmonid Alphavirus Vaccine: comparison of the immune responses induced by inactivated whole virus antigen formulations based on CpG class B oligonucleotides and poly I:C alone or combined with an oil adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thim, Hanna L; Iliev, Dimitar B; Christie, Karen E; Villoing, Stéphane; McLoughlin, Marian F; Strandskog, Guro; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2012-07-01

    CpG oligonucleotides and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) are toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists that mimic the immunostimulatory properties of bacterial DNA and double-stranded viral RNA respectively, and which have exhibited potential to serve as vaccine adjuvants in previous experiments. Here, a combination of CpGs and poly I:C together with water- or oil-formulated Salmonid Alphavirus (SAV) antigen preparations has been used for a vaccine in Atlantic salmon and tested for protection in SAV challenge trial. The results demonstrate that vaccination with a high dose of the SAV antigen induced protection against challenge with SAV which correlated with production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). As the high antigen dose alone induced full protection, no beneficial effect from the addition of CpG and poly I:C could be observed. Nevertheless, these TLR ligands significantly enhanced the levels of NAbs in serum of vaccinated fish. Interestingly, gene expression analysis demonstrated that while addition of oil suppressed the CpG/poly I:C-induced expression of IFN-γ, the upregulation of IFNa1 was substantially enhanced. A low dose of the SAV antigen combined with oil did not induce any detectable levels of NAbs either with or without TLR ligands present, however the addition of CpG and poly I:C to the low SAV antigen dose formulation significantly enhanced the protection against SAV suggesting that CpG/poly I:C may have enhanced a cytotoxic response - a process which is dependent on the up-regulation of type I IFN. These results highlight the immunostimulatory properties of the tested TLR ligands and will serve as a ground for further, more detailed studies aimed to investigate their capacity to serve as adjuvants in vaccine formulations for Atlantic salmon. PMID:22634299

  9. Prebiotic synthesis of 5-substituted uracils: a bridge between the RNA world and the DNA-protein world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, M. P.; Miller, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    Under prebiotic conditions, formaldehyde adds to uracil at the C-5 position to produce 5-hydroxymethyluracil with favorable rates and equilibria. Hydroxymethyluracil adds a variety of nucleophiles, such as ammonia, glycine, guanidine, hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen cyanide, imidazole, indole, and phenol, to give 5-substituted uracils with the side chains of most of the 20 amino acids in proteins. These reactions are sufficiently robust that, if uracil had been present on the primitive Earth, then these substituted uracils would also have been present. The ribozymes of the RNA world would have included many of the functional groups found in proteins today, and their catalytic activities may have been considerably greater than presently assumed.

  10. Self-Assembly of an Alphavirus Core-like Particle Is Distinguished by Strong Intersubunit Association Energy and Structural Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Chen, Chao; Rayaprolu, Vamseedhar; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-09-22

    Weak association energy can lead to uniform nanostructures: defects can anneal due to subunit lability. What happens when strong association energy leads to particles where defects are trapped? Alphaviruses are enveloped viruses whose icosahedral nucleocapsid core can assemble independently. We used a simplest case system to study Ross River virus (RRV) core-like particle (CLP) self-assembly using purified capsid protein and a short DNA oligomer. We find that capsid protein binds the oligomer with high affinity to form an assembly competent unit (U). Subsequently, U assembles with concentration dependence into CLPs. We determined that U-U pairwise interactions are very strong (ca. -6 kcal/mol) compared to other virus assembly systems. Assembled RRV CLPs appeared morphologically uniform and cryo-EM image reconstruction with imposed icosahedral symmetry yielded a T = 4 structure. However, 2D class averages of the CLPs show that virtually every class had disordered regions. These results suggested that irregular cores may be present in RRV virions. To test this hypothesis, we determined 2D class averages of RRV virions using authentic virions or only the core from intact virions isolated by computational masking. Virion-based class averages were symmetrical, geometric, and corresponded well to projections of image reconstructions. In core-based class averages, cores and envelope proteins in many classes were disordered. These results suggest that partly disordered components are common even in ostensibly well-ordered viruses, a biological realization of a patchy particle. Biological advantages of partly disordered complexes may arise from their ease of dissociation and asymmetry. PMID:26275088

  11. A rapid and simple pipeline for synthesis of mRNA-ribosome-V(H)H complexes used in single-domain antibody ribosome display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencurova, Elena; Pulzova, Lucia; Flachbartova, Zuzana; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    The single-domain antibody (VHH) is a promising building block for a number of antibody-based applications. Ribosome display can successfully be used in the production of VHH. However, the construction of the expression cassette, confirmation of the translation and proper folding of the nascent chain, and the purification of the ribosome complexes, remain cumbersome tasks. Additionally, selection of the most suitable expression system can be challenging. We have designed primers that will amplify virtually all Camelidae VHH. With the help of a double-overlap extension (OE) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) we have fused VHH with the F1 fragment (T7 promoter and species-independent translation sequence) and the F2 fragment (mCherry, Myc-tag, tether, SecM arrest sequence and 3' stem loop) to generate a full-length DNA cassette. OE-PCR generated fragments were incubated directly with cell-free lysates (Leishmania torentolae, rabbit reticulocyte or E. coli) for the synthesis of mRNA-VHH-mCherry-ribosome complexes in vitro. Alternatively, the cassette was ligated in pQE-30 vector and transformed into E. coli to produce ribosome complexes in vivo. The results showed that the same expression cassette could be used to synthesize ribosome complexes with different expression systems. mCherry reporter served to confirm the synthesis and proper folding of the nascent chain, Myc-tag was useful in the rapid purification of ribosome complexes, and combination of the SecM sequence and 3' stem loop made the cassette universal, both for cells-free and E. coli in vivo. This rapid and universal pipeline can effectively be used in antibody ribosome display and VHH production. PMID:25902394

  12. Stone Lakes virus (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus), a variant of Fort Morgan virus isolated from swallow bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) west of the Continental Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Aaron C; Armijos, M Veronica; Wheeler, Sarah; Wright, Stan; Fang, Ying; Langevin, Stanley; Reisen, William K

    2009-09-01

    Multiple isolates of an alphaviruses within the western equine encephalomyelitis-serocomplex that were related closely to Ft. Morgan and its variant Buggy Creek virus were made from swallow bugs, Oeciacus vicarius Horvath (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), collected from cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) nests at the Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Sacramento County, CA, during the summers of 2005 and 2006. This virus (hereafter Stone Lakes virus, family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus, STLV) was the first record of this viral group west of the Continental Divide. STLV replicated well in Vero and other vertebrate cell cultures but failed to replicate in C6/36 cells or infect Culex tarsalis Coquillett mosquitoes. STLV failed to produce elevated viremias in adult chickens or house sparrows and was weakly immunogenic. In addition, STLV was not isolated from cliff swallow nestlings nor was antibody detected in adults collected at mist nets. We suggest that STL and related swallow bug viruses may be primarily infections of cimicids that are maintained and amplified either by vertical or nonviremic transmission and that cliff swallows may primarily be important as a bloodmeal source for the bugs rather than as an amplification host for the viruses. PMID:19769055

  13. Single base mutation in the proα2(I) collagen gene that causes efficient splicing of RNA from exon 27 to exon 29 and synthesis of a shortened but in-frame proα2(I) chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous observations demonstrated that a lethal variant of osteogenesis imperfecta had two altered alleles for proα2(I) chains of type I procollagen. One mutation produced a nonfunctioning allele in that there was synthesis of mRNA but no detectable synthesis of proα2(I) chains from the allele. The mutation in the other allele caused synthesis of shortened proα2(I) chains that lacked most or all of the 18 amino acids encoded by exon 28. Subclones of the proα2(I) gene were prepared from the proband's DNA and the DNA sequence was determined for a 582-base-pair (bp) region that extended from the last 30 bp of intervening sequence 26 to the first 26 bp of intervening sequence 29. Data from six independent subclones demonstrated that all had the same sequence as a previously isolated normal clone for the proα2(I) gene except that four subclones had a single base mutation at the 3' end of intervening sequence 27. The mutation was a substitution of guanine for adenine that changed the universal consensus sequence for the 3' splicing site of RNA from -AG- to -GG-. S1 nuclease experiments demonstrated that about half the proα2(I) mRNA in the proband's fibroblasts was abnormally spliced and that the major species of abnormal proα2(I) mRNA was completely spliced from the last codon of exon 27 to the first codon of exon 29. The mutation is apparently unique among RNA splicing mutations of mammalian systems in producing a shortened polypeptide chain that is in-frame in terms of coding sequences, that is used in the subunit assembly of a protein, and that contributes to a lethal phenotype

  14. Perspectives of antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway of insects with special reference to mosquito in the context of dengue infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Probal Basu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference is a post-transcriptional sequence selective gene control mechanism. Antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway is one of the most momentous constituents of the insect innate immune system that can stymie versatile range of RNA virus like flavivirus. It has been demonstrated that RNA production by alphavirus replication is higher in proportion compared to flavivirus replication in mosquito cells. Studies demonstrated that infection by virus from Togaviridae and Bunyaviridae family of arbovirus to mosquito cells causes defect in RNAi response in-vitro but interestingly, it has also been stated that Dengue virus (DENV could be actively inhibited by RNA interference (RNAi. This article is an endeavor to review the perspectives of the functional significance of antiviral RNA interference as a potent agent of controlling dengue infection in the vector.

  15. In vitro transcription activities of Pol IV, Pol V and RDR2 reveal coupling of Pol IV and RDR2 for dsRNA synthesis in plant RNA silencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Ream, Thomas S.; Marasco, Michelle; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-12-14

    In Arabidopsis, RNA-dependent DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing involves three nuclear RNA polymerases that are biochemically undefined: the presumptive DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, Pol IV and Pol V and the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RDR2. Here, we demonstrate their RNA polymerase activities in vitro. Unlike Pol II, Pols IV and V require an RNA primer, are insensitive to alpha-amanitin and differ in their ability to displace non-template DNA during transcription. Biogenesis of 24 nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) requires both Pol IV and RDR2, which physically associate in vivo. Pol IV does not require RDR2 for activity, but RDR2 is nonfunctional in the absence of associated Pol IV, suggesting that their coupling explains the channeling of Pol IV transcripts into double-stranded RNAs that are then diced into 24 nt siRNAs.

  16. RNA Localization in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) localization is a mechanism by which polarized cells can regulate protein synthesis to specific subcellular compartments in a spatial and temporal manner, and plays a pivotal role in multiple physiological processes from embryonic development to cell differentiation and...... cell protrusions of both cell types. Moreover, the NGS analysis revealed that the mRNA of the intermediate filament proteins nestin and glial fibrilary acidic protein (GFAP) significantlyaccumulatedin astrocyte protrusions, which was examined in closer detail. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH...

  17. Arabidopsis RRP6L1 and RRP6L2 function in FLOWERING LOCUS C silencing via regulation of antisense RNA synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hye Shin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The exosome complex functions in RNA metabolism and transcriptional gene silencing. Here, we report that mutations of two Arabidopsis genes encoding nuclear exosome components AtRRP6L1 and AtRRP6L2, cause de-repression of the main flowering repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and thus delay flowering in early-flowering Arabidopsis ecotypes. AtRRP6L mutations affect the expression of known FLC regulatory antisense (AS RNAs AS I and II, and cause an increase in Histone3 K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3 at FLC. AtRRP6L1 and AtRRP6L2 function redundantly in regulation of FLC and also act independently of the exosome core complex. Moreover, we discovered a novel, long non-coding, non-polyadenylated antisense transcript (ASL, for Antisense Long originating from the FLC locus in wild type plants. The AtRRP6L proteins function as the main regulators of ASL synthesis, as these mutants show little or no ASL transcript. Unlike ASI/II, ASL associates with H3K27me3 regions of FLC, suggesting that it could function in the maintenance of H3K27 trimethylation during vegetative growth. AtRRP6L mutations also affect H3K27me3 levels and nucleosome density at the FLC locus. Furthermore, AtRRP6L1 physically associates with the ASL transcript and directly interacts with the FLC locus. We propose that AtRRP6L proteins participate in the maintenance of H3K27me3 at FLC via regulating ASL. Furthermore, AtRRP6Ls might participate in multiple FLC silencing pathways by regulating diverse antisense RNAs derived from the FLC locus.

  18. Prevalence of antibodies to alphaviruses and flaviviruses in free-ranging game animals and nonhuman primates in the greater Congo basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kading, Rebekah C; Borland, Erin M; Cranfield, Mike; Powers, Ann M

    2013-07-01

    Vector-borne and zoonotic pathogens have comprised a significant proportion of the emerging infectious diseases in humans in recent decades. The role of many wildlife species as reservoirs for arthropod-borne viral pathogens is poorly understood. We investigated the exposure history of various African wildlife species from the Congo basin to mosquito-borne flaviviruses and alphaviruses by testing archived serum samples. Sera from 24 African forest buffalo (Syncerus caffer nanus), 34 African elephants (Loxodonta africana), 40 duikers (Cephalophus and Philantomba spp.), 25 mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx), 32 mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei), five Grauer's gorillas (Gorilla beringei graueri), two L'Hoest's monkeys (Cercopithecus lhoesti), two golden monkeys (Cercopithecus kandti), and three chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) sampled between 1991 and 2009 were tested for antibodies against chikungunya virus (CHIKV), o'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV), West Nile virus (WNV), dengue 2 virus (DENV-2), and yellow fever virus (YFV) by plaque reduction neutralization test. Specific neutralizing antibodies against ONNV were found in African forest buffalo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Gabon, duikers in the DRC, and mandrills in Gabon, providing novel evidence of enzootic circulation of ONNV in these countries. African forest buffalo in the DRC and Gabon also demonstrated evidence of exposure to CHIKV, WNV, and DENV-2, while mandrills in Gabon were antibody positive for CHIKV, DENV-2, WNV, and YFV. All of the elephants tested had a strong neutralizing antibody response to WNV. We also document results from a survey of gorillas for arboviruses, of which 4/32 (13%) had antibody to an alphavirus or flavivirus. Overall, our results demonstrate a high prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against multiple arboviruses in wildlife in equatorial Africa. PMID:23778608

  19. RNA genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, E. (Instituto de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, Madrid (ES)); Holland, J.J. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: Retroviruses, Viroids, and RNA recombination, Volume 2. Topics covered include: Replication of retrovirus genomes, Hepatitis B virus replication, and Evolution of RNA viruses.

  20. relA-dependent RNA polymerase activity in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryals, J; Bremer, H

    1982-01-01

    Parameters relating to RNA synthesis were measured after a temperature shift from 30 to 42 degrees C, in a relA+ and relA- isogenic pair of Escherichia coli strains containing a temperature-sensitive valyl tRNA synthetase. The following results were obtained: (i) the rRNA chain growth rate increased 2-fold in both strains; (ii) newly synthesized rRNA became unstable in both strains; (iii) the stable RNA gene activity (rRNA and tRNA, measured as stable RNA synthesis rate relative to the total ...

  1. Aedes aegypti uses RNA interference in defense against Sindbis virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilusz Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is an important anti-viral defense mechanism. The Aedes aegypti genome encodes RNAi component orthologs, however, most populations of this mosquito are readily infected by, and subsequently transmit flaviviruses and alphaviruses. The goal of this study was to use Ae. aegypti as a model system to determine how the mosquito's anti-viral RNAi pathway interacts with recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus. Results SINV (TR339-eGFP (+ strand RNA, infectious virus titers and infection rates transiently increased in mosquitoes following dsRNA injection to cognate Ago2, Dcr2, or TSN mRNAs. Detection of SINV RNA-derived small RNAs at 2 and 7 days post-infection in non-silenced mosquitoes provided important confirmation of RNAi pathway activity. Two different recombinant SINV viruses (MRE16-eGFP and TR339-eGFP with significant differences in infection kinetics were used to delineate vector/virus interactions in the midgut. We show virus-dependent effects on RNAi component transcript and protein levels during infection. Monitoring midgut Ago2, Dcr2, and TSN transcript levels during infection revealed that only TSN transcripts were significantly increased in midguts over blood-fed controls. Ago2 protein levels were depleted immediately following a non-infectious bloodmeal and varied during SINV infection in a virus-dependent manner. Conclusion We show that silencing RNAi components in Ae. aegypti results in transient increases in SINV replication. Furthermore, Ae. aegypti RNAi is active during SINV infection as indicated by production of virus-specific siRNAs. Lastly, the RNAi response varies in a virus-dependent manner. These data define important features of RNAi anti-viral defense in Ae. aegypti.

  2. In vivo cerebral protein synthesis rates with leucyl-transfer RNA used as a precursor pool: Determination of biochemical parameters to structure tracer kinetic models for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leucine oxidation and incorporation into proteins were examined in the in vivo rat brain to determine rates and compartmentation of these processes for the purpose of structuring mathematical compartmental models for the noninvasive estimation of in vivo human cerebral protein synthesis rates (CPSR) using positron emission tomography (PET). Leucine specific activity (SA) in arterial plasma and intracellular free amino acids, leucyl-tRNA, alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), and protein were determined in whole brain of the adult rat during the first 35 min after intravenous bolus injection of L-[1-14C]leucine. Incorporation of leucine into proteins accounted for 90% of total brain radioactivity at 35 min. The lack of [14C]KIC buildup indicates that leucine oxidation in brain is transaminase limited. Characteristic specific activities were maximal between 0 to 2 min after bolus injection with subsequent decline following the pattern: plasma leucine greater than or equal to leucyl-tRNA approximately KIC greater than intracellular leucine. The time integral of leucine SA in plasma was about four times that of tissue leucine and twice those of leucyl-tRNA and KIC, indicating the existence of free leucine, leucyl-tRNA, and KIC tissue compartments, communicating directly with plasma, and separate secondary free leucine, leucyl-tRNA, and KIC tissue compartments originating in unlabeled leucine from proteolysis. Therefore, a relatively simple model configuration based on the key assumptions that (a) protein incorporation and catabolism proceed from a precursor pool communicating with the plasma space, and (b) leucine catabolism is transaminase limited is justified for the in vivo assessment of CPSR from exogenous leucine sources using PET in humans

  3. Template Role of Double-Stranded RNA in Tombusvirus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalev, Nikolay; Pogany, Judit; Nagy, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Replication of plus-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses of plants is a relatively simple process that involves complementary minus-strand RNA [(−)RNA] synthesis and subsequent (+)RNA synthesis. However, the actual replicative form of the (−)RNA template in the case of plant (+)RNA viruses is not yet established unambiguously. In this paper, using a cell-free replication assay supporting a full cycle of viral replication, we show that replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) leads to the formati...

  4. Analogies between the tRNA methylating enzymes and tRNA's in embryonic and tumor tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of research, role of tRNA in protein synthesis and as a carrier of amino acids; histidine pathway in Salmonella typhimurium; role of tRNA in regulation of translation; ribosomal binding reactions; role of tRNA in hemoglobin synthesis; population of tRNA's in mutant of Drosophila; methylation of tRNA and DNA by dimethylnitrosamine; purification of DNA methylase from HeLa cell nuclei; effects of age on levels of excretion of tRNA breakdown products in cancer patients; and tyrosyl tRNA's in embryonic and adult liver and in hepatomas. (HLW)

  5. Effects of aging on insulin synthesis and secretion. Differential effects on preproinsulin messenger RNA levels, proinsulin biosynthesis, and secretion of newly made and preformed insulin in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, S Y; Halban, P A; Rowe, J W

    1988-01-01

    Aging in men and rodents is associated with a marked decline in glucose stimulated insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cells (B cells). Secreted insulin is the end result of a series of steps along the biosynthetic protein-secretion pathway, including insulin gene transcription, processing of transcripts to preproinsulin mRNA, translation of mRNA, segregation and processing of newly made proinsulin in secretory vesicles, proinsulin to insulin conversion, transport of vesicles to the plasma m...

  6. The capsid-coding region hairpin element (cHP) is a critical determinant of dengue virus and West Nile virus RNA synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Clyde, Karen; Barrera, Julio; Harris, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are members of the Flavivirus genus of positive-strand RNA viruses. RNA sequences and structures, primarily in the untranslated regions, have been shown to modulate flaviviral gene expression and genome replication. Previously, we demonstrated that a structure in the DENV coding region (cHP) enhances translation start codon selection and is required for viral replication. Here we further characterize the role of the cHP in the DENV life cycle. We ...

  7. Mortality and weight loss of Atlantic salmon, Salmon salar L., experimentally infected with salmonid alphavirus subtype 2 and subtype 3 isolates from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taksdal, T; Jensen, B Bang; Böckerman, I; McLoughlin, M F; Hjortaas, M J; Ramstad, A; Sindre, H

    2015-12-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) caused by salmonid alphavirus (SAV) has a significant negative economic impact in the salmonid fish farming industry in northern Europe. Until recently, only SAV subtype 3 was present in Norwegian fish farms. However, in 2011, a marine SAV 2 subtype was detected in a fish farm outside the PD-endemic zone. This subtype has spread rapidly among fish farms in mid-Norway. The PD mortality in several farms has been lower than expected, although high mortality has also been reported. In this situation, the industry and the authorities needed scientific-based information about the virulence of the marine SAV 2 strain in Norway to decide how to handle this new situation. Atlantic salmon post-smolts were experimentally infected with SAV 2 and SAV 3 strains from six different PD cases in Norway. SAV 3-infected fish showed higher mortality than SAV 2-infected fish. Among the SAV 3 isolates, two isolates gave higher mortality than the third one. At the end of the experiment, fish in all SAV-infected groups had significantly lower weight than the uninfected control fish. This is the first published paper on PD to document that waterborne infection produced significantly higher mortality than intraperitoneal injection. PMID:25322679

  8. Alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein bridges RNA and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Vienna L; Choi, Mehee; Petrillo, Jessica E; Gehrke, Lee

    2007-07-20

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNA replication requires the viral coat protein (CP). AMV CP is an integral component of the viral replicase; moreover, it binds to the viral RNA 3'-termini and induces the formation of multiple new base pairs that organize the RNA conformation. The results described here suggest that AMV coat protein binding defines template selection by organizing the 3'-terminal RNA conformation and by positioning the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) at the initiation site for minus strand synthesis. RNA-protein interactions were analyzed by using a modified Northwestern blotting protocol that included both viral coat protein and labeled RNA in the probe solution ("far-Northwestern blotting"). We observed that labeled RNA alone bound the replicase proteins poorly; however, complex formation was enhanced significantly in the presence of AMV CP. The RNA-replicase bridging function of the AMV CP may represent a mechanism for accurate de novo initiation in the absence of canonical 3' transfer RNA signals. PMID:17400272

  9. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  10. Synthesis of a new intercalating nucleic acid analogue with pyrenol insertions and the thermal stability of the resulting oligonucleotides towards DNA over RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osman, Amany M. A.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2010-01-01

    A new intercalating nucleic acid monomer Y was obtained via alkylation of pyren-1-ol with (S)-(?)-2-(2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)ethanol under Mitsunobu conditions followed by hydrolysis with 80% aqueous acetic acid to give a diol which was tritylated with 4,40-dimethoxytrityl chloride followed...... nearly identical hybridization properties with those of intercalating nucleic acid (INA) where neighboring oxygen and carbon atoms are interchanged in the linker. The synthesis of monomer Y avoids the use of allergic intermediates which are a problem in the synthesis of INA....

  11. Synthesis and characterization of rabies virus glycoprotein-tagged amphiphilic cyclodextrins for siRNA delivery in human glioblastoma cells: in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; McCarthy, David J; Godinho, Bruno M D C; Cryan, John F; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2015-04-25

    In man brain cancer is an aggressive, malignant form of tumour, it is highly infiltrative in nature, is associated with cellular heterogeneity and affects cerebral hemispheres of the brain. Current drug therapies are inadequate and an unmet clinical need exists to develop new improved therapeutics. The ability to silence genes associated with disease progression by using short interfering RNA (siRNA) presents the potential to develop safe and effective therapies. In this work, in order to protect the siRNA from degradation, promote cell specific uptake and enhance gene silencing efficiency, a PEGylated cyclodextrin (CD)-based nanoparticle, tagged with a CNS-targeting peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) was formulated and characterized. The modified cyclodextrin derivatives were synthesized and co-formulated to form nanoparticles containing siRNA which were analysed for size, surface charge, stability, cellular uptake and gene-knockdown in brain cancer cells. The results identified an optimised co-formulation prototype at a molar ratio of 1:1.5:0.5 (cationic cyclodextrin:PEGylated cyclodextrin:RVG-tagged PEGylated cyclodextrin) with a size of 281 ± 39.72 nm, a surface charge of 26.73 ± 3 mV, with efficient cellular uptake and a 27% gene-knockdown ability. This CD-based formulation represents a potential nanocomplex for systemic delivery of siRNA targeting brain cancer. PMID:25703259

  12. Design and synthesis of á,á-trehalose derivatives bearing guanidino groups as inhibitors for the Tat Protein-TAR RNA interaction of HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Min; Xu Zhidong; Tu Pengfei; Xiao Sulong; Yu Xiaolin; Yang Ming

    2004-01-01

    Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires specific interactions of Tat protein with the transactivation responsive region (TAR) RNA. Disruption of Tat-TAR RNA interaction could inhibit HIV-1 replication. Here four target compounds were designed and synthesized to bind to TAR RNA for blocking the interaction of Tat-TAR RNA. The core molecule 6,6′-diamino-6,6′ -dideoxy-á,á-trehalose was obtained from selective bromination of a,a-trehalose at C-6,6′, followed by acetylation, azide displacement, deacetylation and reduction.Coupling of the core molecule with the protected amino acid, then deprotection and guanidinylation generated 6,6′-bis(L-arginylamino)-6,6′-dideoxy-á,á-trehalose,6,6′-bisguanidino-6,6′-dideoxy-á ,á-trehalose, 6,6′-bis [((a)-guanidinobutyryl)amino]-6,6′-dideoxy-á,á-trehalose and 6,6′-bis(guanidinoacetylamino)-6,6′-dideoxy-á,á-trehalose, respectively.Their abilities to inhibit Tat-TAR RNA interaction were determined by a Tat-dependent HIV-1LTR-driven CAT assays.

  13. Data on synthesis and characterization of chitosan nanoparticles for in vivo delivery of siRNA-Npr3: Targeting NPR-C expression in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Balaji; Tumala, Anusha; Subramanian, Vimala; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2016-09-01

    This data article contains the data related to the research article 'Transient silencing of Npr3 gene expression improved the circulatory levels of atrial natriuretic peptides and attenuated β-adrenoceptor activation-induced cardiac hypertrophic growth in experimental rats' (Venkatesan et al., 2016 [1]). The siRNA-Npr3 loaded chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized using ionotropic gelation method, where the positive charge of the chitosan interacts with the negative charge of STPP and siRNA-Npr3. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized siRNA-Npr3 loaded chitosan nanoparticles were studied by dynamic light scattering, FE-SEM and HR-TEM analysis. In addition, the loading efficiency and stability of the nanoparticles were also studied. Further, the gene silencing efficacy, hemocompatibility and biocompatibility were studied using Wistar rats (in vivo), isolated red blood cells and H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells, respectively. PMID:27366782

  14. The sRNA RyhB regulates the synthesis of the Escherichia coli methionine sulfoxide reductase MsrB but not MsrA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bos

    Full Text Available Controlling iron homeostasis is crucial for all aerobically grown living cells that are exposed to oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS, as free iron increases the production of ROS. Methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr are key enzymes in repairing ROS-mediated damage to proteins, as they reduce oxidized methionine (MetSO residues to methionine. E. coli synthesizes two Msr, A and B, which exhibit substrate diastereospecificity. The bacterial iron-responsive small RNA (sRNA RyhB controls iron metabolism by modulating intracellular iron usage. We show in this paper that RyhB is a direct regulator of the msrB gene that encodes the MsrB enzyme. RyhB down-regulates msrB transcripts along with Hfq and RNaseE proteins since mutations in the ryhB, fur, hfq, or RNaseE-encoded genes resulted in iron-insensitive expression of msrB. Our results show that RyhB binds to two sequences within the short 5'UTR of msrB mRNA as identified by reverse transcriptase and RNase and lead (II protection assays. Toeprinting analysis shows that RyhB pairing to msrB mRNA prevents efficient ribosome binding and thereby inhibits translation initiation. In vivo site directed-mutagenesis experiments in the msrB 5'UTR region indicate that both RyhB-pairing sites are required to decrease msrB expression. Thus, this study suggests a novel mechanism of translational regulation where a same sRNA can basepair to two different locations within the same mRNA species. In contrast, expression of msrA is not influenced by changes in iron levels.

  15. Transfer RNA and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are "hotspots" for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease. PMID:24917879

  16. Lack of histamine synthesis and down-regulation of H1 and H2 receptor mRNA levels by dexamethasone in cerebral endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstedt, K; Sallmén, T; Eriksson, K S; Lintunen, M; Couraud, P O; Joó, F; Panula, P

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine whether cerebral endothelial cells have the capacity to synthesize histamine or to express mRNA of receptors that specifically respond to available free histamine. The histamine concentrations and the expression of L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC) and histamine H1 and H2 receptor mRNA, both in adult rat brain and in cultured immortalized RBE4 cerebral endothelial cells, were investigated. In this study endothelial cells were devoid of any kind of detectable histamine production, both in vivo and in the immortalized RBE4 cells in culture. Both the immunostainings for histamine and the in situ hybridizations for HDC were negative, as well as histamine determinations by HPLC, indicating that endothelial cells do not possess the capacity to produce histamine. Also, glucocorticoid (dexamethasone) treatment failed to induce histamine production in the cultured cells. Although the cerebral endothelial cells lack histamine production, a nonsaturable uptake in RBE4 cells is demonstrated. The internalized histamine is detected both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, which could indicate a role for histamine as an intracellular messenger. Histamine H1 and H2 receptor mRNA was expressed in RBE4 cells, and glucocorticoid treatment down-regulated the mRNA levels of both H1 and H2 receptors. This mechanism may be involved in glucocorticoid-mediated effects on cerebrovascular permeability and brain edema. PMID:10078884

  17. The small delta antigen of hepatitis delta virus is an acetylated protein and acetylation of lysine 72 may influence its cellular localization and viral RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that encodes two viral nucleocapsid proteins named small and large form hepatitis delta antigen (S-HDAg and L-HDAg). The S-HDAg is essential for viral RNA replication while the L-HDAg is required for viral assembly. In this study, we demonstrated that HDAg are acetylated proteins. Metabolic labeling with [3H]acetate revealed that both forms of HDAg could be acetylated in vivo. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain of cellular acetyltransferase p300 could acetylate the full-length and the N-terminal 88 amino acids of S-HDAg in vitro. By mass spectrometric analysis of the modified protein, Lys-72 of S-HDAg was identified as one of the acetylation sites. Substitution of Lys-72 to Arg caused the mutant S-HDAg to redistribute from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The mutant reduced viral RNA accumulation and resulted in the earlier appearance of L-HDAg. These results demonstrated that HDAg is an acetylated protein and mutation of HDAg at Lys-72 modulates HDAg subcellular localization and may participate in viral RNA nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and replication

  18. Citrus flavonoids repress the mRNA for stearoyl-CoA desaturase, a key enzyme in lipid synthesis and obesity control, in rat primary hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus flavonoids have been shown to decrease plasma lipid levels, improve glucose tolerance, and attenuate obesity. One possible mechanism underlying these physiological effects is reduction of hepatic levels of the mRNA for stearoyl CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), since repression of this enzyme reduces ...

  19. The polymerase of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, Benjamin; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Rahmeh, Amal A.; Whelan, Sean P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Negative-sense (NS) RNA viruses deliver into cells a mega-dalton RNA-protein complex competent for transcription. Within this complex, the RNA is protected in a nucleocapsid protein (NP) sheath which the viral polymerase negotiates during RNA synthesis. The NP-RNA templates come as nonsegemented (NNS) or segmented (SNS), necessitating distinct strategies for transcription by their polymerases. Atomic-level understanding of the NP-RNA of both NNS and SNS RNA viruses show that the RNA must be t...

  20. Nucleolar dominance and ribosomal RNA gene silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, Sarah; Vitins, Alexa; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon that occurs in genetic hybrids and describes the expression of 45S rRNA genes inherited from one progenitor due to the silencing of the other progenitor’s rRNA genes. Nucleolar dominance is a manifestation of rRNA gene dosage control, which also occurs in non-hybrids, regulating the number of active rRNA genes according to the cellular demand for ribosomes and protein synthesis. Ribosomal RNA gene silencing involves changes in DNA methylation an...

  1. Biochemical Impact of the Host Adaptation-associated PB2 E627K Mutation on the Temperature-dependent RNA Synthesis Kinetics of Influenza A Virus Polymerase Complex*

    OpenAIRE

    Aggarwal, Shilpa; Dewhurst, Stephen; Takimoto, Toru; Kim, Baek

    2011-01-01

    Most avian influenza A viruses, which preferentially replicate at the high temperatures found in the digestive tract of birds, have a glutamic acid at residue 627 of the viral RNA polymerase PB2 subunit (Glu-627), whereas the human viruses, which optimally replicate at the low temperatures observed in the human respiratory tract, have a lysine (Lys-627). The mechanism of action for this mutation is still not understood, although interaction with host factors has been proposed to play a major ...

  2. RNA:protein ratio of the unicellular organism as a characteristic of phosphorous and nitrogen stoichiometry and of the cellular requirement of ribosomes for protein synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sams Carl E; Greenwood Duncan J; Karpinets Tatiana V; Ammons John T

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Mean phosphorous:nitrogen (P:N) ratios and relationships of P:N ratios with the growth rate of organisms indicate a surprising similarity among and within microbial species, plants, and insect herbivores. To reveal the cellular mechanisms underling this similarity, the macromolecular composition of seven microorganisms and the effect of specific growth rate (SGR) on RNA:protein ratio, the number of ribosomes, and peptide elongation rate (PER) were analyzed under different ...

  3. Mitotic silencing of human rRNA synthesis: inactivation of the promoter selectivity factor SL1 by cdc2/cyclin B-mediated phosphorylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Heix, J; Vente, A.; Voit, R; Budde, A; Michaelidis, T M; Grummt, I

    1998-01-01

    We have used a reconstituted cell-free transcription system to investigate the molecular basis of mitotic repression of RNA polymerase I (pol I) transcription. We demonstrate that SL1, the TBP-containing promoter-binding factor, is inactivated by cdc2/cyclin B-directed phosphorylation, and reactivated by dephosphorylation. Transcriptional inactivation in vitro is accompanied by phosphorylation of two subunits, e.g. TBP and hTAFI110. To distinguish whether transcriptional repression is due to ...

  4. Straightforward Synthesis of Purine 4 '-Alkoxy-2 '-deoxynucleosides: First Report of Mixed Purine-Pyrimidine 4 '-Alkoxyoligodeoxynucleotides as New RNA Mimics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrová, Magdalena; Páv, Ondřej; Buděšínský, Miloš; Zborníková, Eva; Novák, Pavel; Rosenbergová, Šárka; Pačes, Ondřej; Liboska, Radek; Dvořáková, Ivana; Šimák, Ondřej; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 14 (2015), s. 3426-3429. ISSN 1523-7060 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-26526S; GA ČR GA13-24880S; GA TA ČR TA03010598 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 4'-alkoxyoligodeoxynucleotides * RNA mimics * antisense Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.364, year: 2014

  5. Aberrant splicing of androgenic receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symtpoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. The authors report a G → T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46, XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely abolishes normal RNA splicing at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary and results in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site in exon 4, which leads to the deletion of 123 nucleotides from the mRNA. Translation of the mutant mRNA results in an androgen receptor protein ∼5 kDa smaller than the wild type. This mutated androgen receptor protein was unable to bind androgens and unable to activate transcription of an androgen-regulated reporter gene construct. This mutation in the human androgen receptor gene demonstrates the importance of an intact steroid-binding domain for proper androgen receptor functioning in vivo

  6. Induction of DNA and RNA synthesis in murine B lymphocytes does not correlate with early changes in cytosolic free calcium concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to ascertain if early changes in cytosolic free calcium concentration [Ca2+] are correlated with either activation, as defined by 3H-uridine incorporation or increase in cell size, or induction of DNA synthesis, 3H-thymidine incorporation, murine B lymphocytes were stimulated with preparations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), rabbit anti-mouse Fab (RAMFab), and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). LPS, although a potent inducer of 3H-thymidine incorporation does not cause an increase in [Ca2+]. F(ab')2RAMFab at 50 μs ml causes a 6X increase in 3H-thymidine incorporation as opposed to a 2-3X increase at 10 μg/ml. IgG-RAMFab at concentrations up to 50 μg/ml neither induces DNA synthesis nor activates cells by any criteria, including 3H-uridine incorporation, increase in cell size, and increase in I-A expression. Both RAMFab causes increases in [Ca2+] that saturate at 10 μg/ml. Minimally proliferative doses of TPA inhibit the increase in [Ca2+] caused by both preparations of RAMFab. However, B cells pretreated with TPA and then stimulated with 2 or 10 μg/ml of either preparation of RAMFab showed increases of 10 X in 3H-uridine and 100X in 3H-thymidine incorporation. These data demonstrate that there appears to be no correlation between early changes in [Ca2+] and either activation or induction of DNA synthesis in murine B cells

  7. In vitro and in vivo application of RNA interference for targeting genes involved in peritrophic matrix synthesis in a lepidopteran system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Umut Toprak; Doug Baldwin; Martin Erlandson; Cedric Gillott; Stephanie Harris; Dwayne D.Hegedus

    2013-01-01

    The midgut of most insects is lined with a semipermeable acellular tube,the peritrophic matrix(PM),composed of chitin and proteins.Although various genes encoding PM proteins have been characterized,our understanding of their roles in PM structure and function is very limited.One promising approach for obtaining functional information is RNA interference,which has been used to reduce the levels of specific mRNAs using double-stranded RNAs administered to larvae by either injection or feeding.Although this method is well documented in dipterans and coleopterans,reports of its success in lepidopterans are varied.In the current study,the silencing midgut genes encoding PM proteins(insect intestinal mucin 1,insect intestinal mucin 4,PM protein l)and the chitin biosynthetic or modifying enzymes(chitin synthase-B and chitin deacetylase 1)in a noctuid lepidopteran,Mamestra configurata,was examined in vitro and in vivo.In vitro studies in primary midgut epithelial cell preparations revealed an acute and rapid silencing(by 24 h)for the gene encoding chitin deacetylase 1 and a slower rate of silencing(by 72 h)for the gene encoding PM protein 1.Genes encoding insect intestinal mucins were slightly silenced by 72 h,whereas no silencing was detected for the gene encoding chitin synthase-B.In vivo experiments focused on chitin deacetylase 1,as the gene was silenced to the greatest extent in vitro.Continuous feeding of neonates and fourth instar larvae with double-stranded RNA resulted in silencing of chitin deacetylase 1 by 24 and 36 h,respectively.Feeding a single dose to neonates also resulted in silencing by 24 h.The current study demonstrates that genes encoding PM proteins can be silenced and outlines conditions for RNA interference by per os feeding in lepidopterans.

  8. NEW TARGET FOR INHIBITION OF BACTERIAL RNA POLYMERASE: "SWITCH REGION"

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Aashish; Talaue, Meliza; Liu, Shuang; Degen, David; Ebright, Richard Y.; Sineva, Elena; Chakraborty, Anirban; Druzhinin, Sergey Y.; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta; Ebright, Yon W.; Zozula, Alex; Shen, Juan; Sengupta, Sonali; Niedfeldt, Rui Rong

    2011-01-01

    A new drug target-- the "switch region"--has been identified within bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme that mediates bacterial RNA synthesis. The new target serves as the binding site for compounds that inhibit bacterial RNA synthesis and kill bacteria. Since the new target is present in most bacterial species, compounds that bind to the new target are active against a broad spectrum of bacterial species. Since the new target is different from targets of other antibacterial agents, c...

  9. Characterization of RNA-Like Oligomers from Lipid-Assisted Nonenzymatic Synthesis: Implications for Origin of Informational Molecules on Early Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya V. Mungi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prebiotic polymerization had to be a nonenzymatic, chemically driven process. These processes would have been particularly favored in scenarios which push reaction regimes far from equilibrium. Dehydration-rehydration (DH-RH cycles are one such regime thought to have been prevalent on prebiotic Earth in niches like volcanic geothermal pools. The present study defines the optimum DH-RH reaction conditions for lipid-assisted polymerization of nucleotides. The resultant products were characterized to understand their chemical makeup. Primarily, our study demonstrates that the resultant RNA-like oligomers have abasic sites, which means these oligomers lack information-carrying capability because of losing most of their bases during the reaction process. This results from low pH and high temperature conditions, which, importantly, also allows the formation of sugar-phosphate oligomers when ribose 5'-monophosphates are used as the starting monomers instead. Formation of such oligomers would have permitted sampling of a large variety of bases on a preformed polymer backbone, resulting in “prebiotic phosphodiester polymers” prior to the emergence of modern RNA-like molecules. This suggests that primitive genetic polymers could have utilized bases that conferred greater N-glycosyl bond stability, a feature crucial for information propagation in low pH and high temperature regimes of early Earth.

  10. Technologies for the Synthesis of mRNA-Encoding Libraries and Discovery of Bioactive Natural Product-Inspired Non-Traditional Macrocyclic Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Suga

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss emerging technologies for drug discovery, which yields novel molecular scaffolds based on natural product-inspired non-traditional peptides expressed using the translation machinery. Unlike natural products, these technologies allow for constructing mRNA-encoding libraries of macrocyclic peptides containing non-canonical sidechains and N-methyl-modified backbones. The complexity of sequence space in such libraries reaches as high as a trillion (>1012, affording initial hits of high affinity ligands against protein targets. Although this article comprehensively covers several related technologies, we discuss in greater detail the technical development and advantages of the Random non-standard Peptide Integration Discovery (RaPID system, including the recent identification of inhibitors against various therapeutic targets.

  11. Self-assembled RNA interference microsponges for efficient siRNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee; Bonner, Daniel K.; Poon, Zhiyong; Hammond, Paula T.

    2012-04-01

    The encapsulation and delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) has been realized using lipid nanoparticles, cationic complexes, inorganic nanoparticles, RNA nanoparticles and dendrimers. Still, the instability of RNA and the relatively ineffectual encapsulation process of siRNA remain critical issues towards the clinical translation of RNA as a therapeutic. Here we report the synthesis of a delivery vehicle that combines carrier and cargo: RNA interference (RNAi) polymers that self-assemble into nanoscale pleated sheets of hairpin RNA, which in turn form sponge-like microspheres. The RNAi-microsponges consist entirely of cleavable RNA strands, and are processed by the cell’s RNA machinery to convert the stable hairpin RNA to siRNA only after cellular uptake, thus inherently providing protection for siRNA during delivery and transport to the cytoplasm. More than half a million copies of siRNA can be delivered to a cell with the uptake of a single RNAi-microsponge. The approach could lead to novel therapeutic routes for siRNA delivery.

  12. Advances in imaging RNA in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nynne Meyn; Oparka, Karl J.; Tilsner, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that many RNAs are targeted to specific locations within cells, and that RNA-processing pathways occur in association with specific subcellular structures. Compartmentation of mRNA translation and RNA processing helps to assemble large RNA–protein complexes, while RNA...... targeting allows local protein synthesis and the asymmetric distribution of transcripts during cell polarisation. In plants, intercellular RNA trafficking also plays an additional role in plant development and pathogen defence. Methods that allow the visualisation of RNA sequences within a cellular context......, and preferably at subcellular resolution, can help to answer important questions in plant cell and developmental biology. Here, we summarise the approaches currently available for localising RNA in vivo and address the specific limitations inherent with plant systems....

  13. Regulatory Roles for Long ncRNA and mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Coolen, Marcel W.; Kuiper, Renske A.; Coen Buiting; Armen R. Karapetyan

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have identified the transcription of a much larger portion of the genome than previously anticipated. Especially in the context of cancer it has become clear that aberrant transcription of both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are frequent events. The current dogma of RNA function describes mRNA to be responsible for the synthesis of proteins, whereas non-coding RNA can have regulatory or epigenetic functions. However, ...

  14. 227 Views of RNA: Is RNA Unique in Its Chemical Isomer Space?

    OpenAIRE

    Cleaves, H. James; Meringer, Markus; Goodwin, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is one of the two nucleic acids used by extant biochemistry and plays a central role as the intermediary carrier of genetic information in transcription and translation. If RNA was involved in the origin of life, it should have a facile prebiotic synthesis. A wide variety of such syntheses have been explored. However, to date no one-pot reaction has been shown capable of yielding RNA monomers from likely prebiotically abundant starting materials, though this do...

  15. Investigation of the Prebiotic Synthesis of Amino Acids and RNA Bases from CO2 using FeS/H2S as a Reducing Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Anthony D.; Miller, Stanley L.; McDonald, Gene; Bada, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    An autotrophic theory of the origin of metabolism and life has been proposed in which carbon dioxide is reduced by ferrous sulfide and hydrogen sulfide by means of a reversed citric acid cycle, leading to the production of amino acids. Similar processes have been proposed for purine synthesis. Ferrous sulfide is a strong reducing agent in the presence of hydrogen sulfide and can produce hydrogen as well as reduce alkenes, alkynes, and thiols to saturated hydrocarbons and reduce ketones to thiols. However, the reduction of carbon dioxide has not been demonstrated. We show here that no amino acids, purines, or pyrimidines are produced from carbon dioxide with the ferrous sulfide and hydrogen sulfide system. Furthermore, this system does not produce amino acids from carboxylic acids by reductive amination and carboxylation. Thus, the proposed autotrophic theory, using carbon dioxide, ferrous sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide, lacks the robustness needed to be a geological process and is, therefore, unlikely to have played a role in the origin of metabolism or the origin of life.

  16. RNA-DNA Differences Are Generated in Human Cells within Seconds after RNA Exits Polymerase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel X. Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA sequences are expected to be identical to their corresponding DNA sequences. Here, we found all 12 types of RNA-DNA sequence differences (RDDs in nascent RNA. Our results show that RDDs begin to occur in RNA chains ∼55 nt from the RNA polymerase II (Pol II active site. These RDDs occur so soon after transcription that they are incompatible with known deaminase-mediated RNA-editing mechanisms. Moreover, the 55 nt delay in appearance indicates that they do not arise during RNA synthesis by Pol II or as a direct consequence of modified base incorporation. Preliminary data suggest that RDD and R-loop formations may be coupled. These findings identify sequence substitution as an early step in cotranscriptional RNA processing.

  17. Effect of nutrition on plasma lipid profile and mRNA levels of ovarian genes involved in steroid hormone synthesis in Hu sheep during luteal phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, S J; Xiao, S H; Wang, C L; Zhong, B S; Zhang, G M; Wang, Z Y; He, D Y; Ding, X L; Xing, H J; Wang, F

    2013-11-01

    Ovarian steroid hormones regulate follicular growth and atresia. This study aims to determine whether key ovarian sterol-regulatory genes are differentially expressed in Hu sheep under different short-term nutritional regimens. Estrus was synchronized using intravaginal progestagen sponges. The ewes were assigned randomly to 3 groups. On d 6 to 12 of their estrous cycle, the control (CON) group received a maintenance diet (1.0×M), the supplemented (SUP) group received 1.5×M, and the restricted (R) group received 0.5×M. On d 7 to 12, blood samples were taken. The sheep were slaughtered at the end of the treatment, and their organs and ovaries were collected. The plasma concentrations of urea (P2.5 mm. Follicle size affected the mRNA expression of very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2), FSH receptor (FSHR), CYP17A1, and CYP19A1 (Pgrowth may involve responses to disrupted reproductive hormone concentrations and influenced the intrafollicular expression of CYP17A1, CYP19A1, and ESR1. This result may be due to increased plasma urea and lipid concentrations. PMID:24045481

  18. Cloning and sequencing of hfq (host factor required for synthesis of bacteriophage Q beta RNA gene of Salmonella Typhimurium isolated from poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthasarathi Behera

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to clone and sequence hfq gene of Salmonella Typhimurium strain PM-45 and compare its sequence with hfq gene of other serovar of Salmonella. Materials and Methods: Salmonella Typhimurium strain PM-45 was procured from the G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, India. The genomic DNA was isolated from Salmonella Typhimurium. Hfq gene was polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplified from the DNA using specific primers, which was subsequently cloned into pET32a vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 pLys cells. The recombinant plasmid was isolated and subjected to restriction enzyme digestion as well as PCR. The clone was then sequenced. The sequence was analyzed and submitted in GenBank. Results: PCR produced an amplicon of 309 bp. Restriction digestion of the recombinant plasmid released the desired insert. The hfq sequence shows 100% homology with similar sequences from other Salmonella Typhimurium isolates. Both nucleotide and amino acid sequences are highly conserved. The submitted sequence is having Genbank accession no KM998764. Conclusion: Hfq, the hexameric RNA binding protein is one of the most important post-transcriptional regulator of bacteria. The sequence of hfq gene of Salmonella Typhimurium is highly conserved within and between Salmonella enterica serovars. This gene sequence is probably under heavy selection pressure to maintain the conformational integrity of its product in spite of its being not a survival gene.

  19. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  20. Human telomerase contains two cooperating telomerase RNA molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Wenz, Christian; Enenkel, Barbara; Amacker, Mario; Kelleher, Colleen; Damm, Klaus; Lingner, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Telomerase uses a short stretch of its intrinsic RNA molecule as template for telomere repeat synthesis. Reverse transcription of the RNA template is catalyzed by the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein subunit. We demonstrate that human telomerase reconstituted from recombinant TERT and telomerase RNA runs as a dimer on a gel filtration column and that it contains two telomerase RNA molecules. Significantly, a telomerase heterodimer reconstituted from wild-type and mutant telomer...

  1. Advances in Lipid Nanoparticles for siRNA Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Sam Chen; Yuen Yi C. Tam; Cullis, Pieter R.

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances in both siRNA (small interfering RNA) and whole genome sequencing have demonstrated great potential in translating genetic information into siRNA-based drugs to halt the synthesis of most disease-causing proteins. Despite its powerful promises as a drug, siRNA requires a sophisticated delivery vehicle because of its rapid degradation in the circulation, inefficient accumulation in target tissues and inability to cross cell membranes to access the cytoplasm where it func...

  2. RNA Viruses and RNAi: Quasispecies Implications for Viral Escape

    OpenAIRE

    Presloid, John B.; Novella, Isabel S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to high mutation rates, populations of RNA viruses exist as a collection of closely related mutants known as a quasispecies. A consequence of error-prone replication is the potential for rapid adaptation of RNA viruses when a selective pressure is applied, including host immune systems and antiviral drugs. RNA interference (RNAi) acts to inhibit protein synthesis by targeting specific mRNAs for degradation and this process has been developed to target RNA viruses, exhibiting their potenti...

  3. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Riddhi; Kumar, Deepak; Sultana, Asma; Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress. PMID:26463088

  4. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.;

    2015-01-01

    .9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...

  5. RNA versatility governs tRNA function: Why tRNA flexibility is essential beyond the translation cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Claus-D

    2016-05-01

    tRNAs undergo multiple conformational changes during the translation cycle that are required for tRNA translocation and proper communication between the ribosome and translation factors. Recent structural data on how destabilized tRNAs utilize the CCA-adding enzyme to proofread themselves put a spotlight on tRNA flexibility beyond the translation cycle. In analogy to tRNA surveillance, this review finds that other processes also exploit versatile tRNA folding to achieve, amongst others, specific aminoacylation, translational regulation by riboswitches or a block of bacterial translation. tRNA flexibility is thereby not restricted to the hinges utilized during translation. In contrast, the flexibility of tRNA is distributed all over its L-shape and is actively exploited by the tRNA-interacting partners to discriminate one tRNA from another. Since the majority of tRNA modifications also modulate tRNA flexibility it seems that cells devote enormous resources to tightly sense and regulate tRNA structure. This is likely required for error-free protein synthesis. PMID:26990636

  6. Phosphorylation of Single Stranded RNA Virus Proteins and Potential for Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forrest Keck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Post translational modification of proteins is a critical requirement that regulates function. Among the diverse kinds of protein post translational modifications, phosphorylation plays essential roles in protein folding, protein:protein interactions, signal transduction, intracellular localization, transcription regulation, cell cycle progression, survival and apoptosis. Protein phosphorylation is also essential for many intracellular pathogens to establish a productive infection cycle. Preservation of protein phosphorylation moieties in pathogens in a manner that mirrors the host components underscores the co-evolutionary trajectory of pathogens and hosts, and sheds light on how successful pathogens have usurped, either in part or as a whole, the host enzymatic machinery. Phosphorylation of viral proteins for many acute RNA viruses including Flaviviruses and Alphaviruses has been demonstrated to be critical for protein functionality. This review focuses on phosphorylation modifications that have been documented to occur on viral proteins with emphasis on acutely infectious, single stranded RNA viruses. The review additionally explores the possibility of repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved inhibitors as antivirals for the treatment of acute RNA viral infections.

  7. Gonadotropin-dependent oocyte maturational competence requires activation of the protein kinase A pathway and synthesis of RNA and protein in ovarian follicles of Nibe, Nibea mitsukurii (Teleostei, Sciaenidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, G.; Shusa, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Patino, R.

    2002-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone- (LH)-dependent ovarian follicle maturation has been recently described in two stages for teleost fishes. The oocyte's ability to respond to the steroidal maturation-inducing hormone (MIH), also known as oocyte maturational competence (OMC), is acquired during the first stage; whereas the MIH-dependent resumption of meiosis occurs during the second stage. However, studies directly addressing OMC have been performed with a limited number of species and therefore the general relevance of the two-stage model and its mechanisms remain uncertain. In this study, we examined the hormonal regulation of OMC and its basic transduction mechanisms in ovarian follicles of the sciaenid teleost, Nibe (Nibea mitsukurii). Exposure to MIH [17,20??-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one or 17,20??,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one] stimulated germinal vesicle breakdown (index of meiotic resumption) in full-grown follicles primed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, an LH-like gonadotropin) but not in those pre-cultured in plain incubation medium. The induction of OMC by HCG was mimicked by protein kinase A (PKA) activators (forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP), and blocked by specific inhibitors of PKA (H89 and H8) as well as inhibitors of RNA (actinomycin D) and protein (cycloheximide) synthesis. Forskolin-induced OMC was also inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. A strong activator of protein kinase C, PMA, inhibited HCG-dependent OMC. In conclusion, OMC in Nibe ovarian follicles is gonadotropin-dependent and requires activation of the PKA pathway followed by gene transcription and translation events. These observations are consistent with the two-stage model of ovarian follicle maturation proposed for other teleosts, and suggest that Nibe can be used as new model species for mechanistic studies of ovarian follicle differentiation and maturation in fishes.

  8. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan-Mi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV NS5 is a viral nonstructural protein that carries both methyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp domains. It is a key component of the viral RNA replicase complex that presumably includes other viral nonstructural and cellular proteins. The biochemical properties of JEV NS5 have not been characterized due to the lack of a robust in vitro RdRp assay system, and the molecular mechanisms for the initiation of RNA synthesis by JEV NS5 remain to be elucidated. Results To characterize the biochemical properties of JEV RdRp, we expressed in Escherichia coli and purified an enzymatically active full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein with a hexahistidine tag at the N-terminus. The purified NS5 protein, but not the mutant NS5 protein with an Ala substitution at the first Asp of the RdRp-conserved GDD motif, exhibited template- and primer-dependent RNA synthesis activity using a poly(A RNA template. The NS5 protein was able to use both plus- and minus-strand 3'-untranslated regions of the JEV genome as templates in the absence of a primer, with the latter RNA being a better template. Analysis of the RNA synthesis initiation site using the 3'-end 83 nucleotides of the JEV genome as a minimal RNA template revealed that the NS5 protein specifically initiates RNA synthesis from an internal site, U81, at the two nucleotides upstream of the 3'-end of the template. Conclusion As a first step toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms for JEV RNA replication and ultimately for the in vitro reconstitution of viral RNA replicase complex, we for the first time established an in vitro JEV RdRp assay system with a functional full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein and characterized the mechanisms of RNA synthesis from nonviral and viral RNA templates. The full-length recombinant JEV NS5 will be useful for the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of this enzyme and for the

  9. Effects of chronic renal failure on protein synthesis and albumin messenger ribonucleic acid in rat liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Zern, M A; Yap, S.H.; Strair, R K; Kaysen, G A; Shafritz, D A

    1984-01-01

    Previously we reported that chronic renal failure in rats leads to preferential disaggregation of liver membrane-bound polysomes associated with a decrease in albumin synthesis. To determine whether reduced albumin synthesis results from reduced cellular levels of albumin messenger RNA (mRNA) or some other molecular mechanism, we have employed mRNA-DNA hybridization in conjunction with cell-free protein synthesis to determine albumin mRNA sequence content and biological activity in subcellula...

  10. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide ‘cap’ on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IR...

  11. The structural basis of tRNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M.; Costantino, David A.; Hammond, John A.; Ruehle, Grant M.; Nix, Jay C.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. This multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states1. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. Examples to address this gap are found in single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3′ end of the Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic RNA (gRNA)2-4, but also interacts with other structures in the gRNA's 3′ untranslated region5, contains the promoter for negative strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes6. This TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is ‘two-faced’: one ‘face’ closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other ‘face’ diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  12. Forms and Functions of Telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathleen

    Telomerase adds single-stranded telomeric DNA repeats to chromosome ends. Unlike other polymerases involved in genome replication, telomerase synthe¬sizes DNA without use of a DNA template. Instead, the enzyme active site copies a template carried within the integral RNA subunit of the telomerase ribonucleo-protein (RNP) complex. In addition to providing a template, telomerase RNA has non-template motifs with critical functions in the catalytic cycle of repeat synthesis. In its complexity of structure and function, telomerase RNA resembles the non-coding RNAs of RNP machines like the ribosome and spliceosome that evolved from catalytic RNAs of the RNA World. However, unlike these RNPs, telomerase evolved its RNP identity after advent of the Protein World. Insights about telomer-ase have broad significance for understanding non-coding RNA biology as well as chromosome end maintenance and human disease.

  13. Disrupted tRNA Genes and tRNA Fragments: A Perspective on tRNA Gene Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Kanai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with lengths of approximately 70–100 nt. They are directly involved in protein synthesis by carrying amino acids to the ribosome. In this sense, tRNAs are key molecules that connect the RNA world and the protein world. Thus, study of the evolution of tRNA molecules may reveal the processes that led to the establishment of the central dogma: genetic information flows from DNA to RNA to protein. Thanks to the development of DNA sequencers in this century, we have determined a huge number of nucleotide sequences from complete genomes as well as from transcriptomes in many species. Recent analyses of these large data sets have shown that particular tRNA genes, especially in Archaea, are disrupted in unique ways: some tRNA genes contain multiple introns and some are split genes. Even tRNA molecules themselves are fragmented post-transcriptionally in many species. These fragmented small RNAs are known as tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs. In this review, I summarize the progress of research into the disrupted tRNA genes and the tRFs, and propose a possible model for the molecular evolution of tRNAs based on the concept of the combination of fragmented tRNA halves.

  14. Disrupted tRNA Genes and tRNA Fragments: A Perspective on tRNA Gene Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs with lengths of approximately 70-100 nt. They are directly involved in protein synthesis by carrying amino acids to the ribosome. In this sense, tRNAs are key molecules that connect the RNA world and the protein world. Thus, study of the evolution of tRNA molecules may reveal the processes that led to the establishment of the central dogma: genetic information flows from DNA to RNA to protein. Thanks to the development of DNA sequencers in this century, we have determined a huge number of nucleotide sequences from complete genomes as well as from transcriptomes in many species. Recent analyses of these large data sets have shown that particular tRNA genes, especially in Archaea, are disrupted in unique ways: some tRNA genes contain multiple introns and some are split genes. Even tRNA molecules themselves are fragmented post-transcriptionally in many species. These fragmented small RNAs are known as tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs). In this review, I summarize the progress of research into the disrupted tRNA genes and the tRFs, and propose a possible model for the molecular evolution of tRNAs based on the concept of the combination of fragmented tRNA halves. PMID:25629271

  15. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, G P

    2016-01-01

    On August 9-11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below. PMID:27099780

  16. Enzymatic activities of the GB virus-B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GB virus-B (GBV-B) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) with greater than 50% sequence similarity to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B. Recombinant GBV-B NS5B was reported to possess RdRp activity (W. Zhong et al., 2000, J. Viral Hepat. 7, 335-342). In this study, the GBV-B RdRp was examined more thoroughly for different RNA synthesis activities, including primer-extension, de novo initiation, template switch, terminal nucleotide addition, and template specificity. The results can be compared with previous characterizations of the HCV RdRp. The two RdRps share similarities in terms of metal ion and template preference, the abilities to add nontemplated nucleotides, perform both de novo initiation and extension from a primer, and switch templates. However, several differences in RNA synthesis between the GBV-B and HCV RdRps were observed, including (i) optimal temperatures for activity, (ii) ranges of Mn2+ concentration tolerated for activity, and (iii) cation requirements for de novo RNA synthesis and terminal transferase activity. To assess whether the recombinant GBV-B RdRp may represent a relevant surrogate system for testing HCV antiviral agents, two compounds demonstrated to be active at nanomolar concentrations against HCV NS5B were tested on the GBV RdRp. A chain terminating nucleotide analog could prevent RNA synthesis, while a nonnucleoside HCV inhibitor was unable to affect RNA synthesis by the GBV RdRp

  17. MiRNA profiles of prostate carcinoma detected by multi-platform miRNA screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wach, Sven; Nolte, Elke; Szczyrba, Jaroslaw; Stöhr, Robert; Hartmann, Arndt; Orntoft, Torben; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Eltze, Elke; Wieland, Wolf; Keck, Bastian; Ekici, Arif B; Grässer, Friedrich; Wullich, Bernd

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression via posttranscriptional inhibition of protein synthesis. They play a vital role in tumorigenesis. To characterize the diagnostic potential of miRNAs in prostate cancer, a leading cause of cancer mortality, we performed...... screening of miRNA expression profiles. We used commercially available microarrays to establish miRNA expression profiles from a cohort of 20 cancer samples. The expression of selected miRNAs was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and the identity of miRNA expressing cells was determined by miRNA in...... situ hybridization. We identified 25 miRNAs that showed a significant differential expression in cancer samples. The comparison with previously published data generated by deep sequencing of cDNA libraries of small RNA molecules revealed a concordance rate of 47% among miRNAs identified with both...

  18. Evolution of DNA and RNA as catalysts for chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäschke, A; Seelig, B

    2000-06-01

    In vitro selection from combinatorial nucleic acid libraries has provided new RNA and DNA molecules that have catalytic properties. Catalyzed reactions now go far beyond self-modifying reactions of nucleic acid molecules. The future application of in vitro selected RNA and DNA catalysts in bioorganic synthesis appears promising. PMID:10826969

  19. Quality control of chemically damaged RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Carrie L; Zaher, Hani S

    2016-10-01

    The "central dogma" of molecular biology describes how information contained in DNA is transformed into RNA and finally into proteins. In order for proteins to maintain their functionality in both the parent cell and subsequent generations, it is essential that the information encoded in DNA and RNA remains unaltered. DNA and RNA are constantly exposed to damaging agents, which can modify nucleic acids and change the information they encode. While much is known about how cells respond to damaged DNA, the importance of protecting RNA has only become appreciated over the past decade. Modification of the nucleobase through oxidation and alkylation has long been known to affect its base-pairing properties during DNA replication. Similarly, recent studies have begun to highlight some of the unwanted consequences of chemical damage on mRNA decoding during translation. Oxidation and alkylation of mRNA appear to have drastic effects on the speed and fidelity of protein synthesis. As some mRNAs can persist for days in certain tissues, it is not surprising that it has recently emerged that mRNA-surveillance and RNA-repair pathways have evolved to clear or correct damaged mRNA. PMID:27155660

  20. Mutational Analysis of the Influenza Virus cRNA Promoter and Identification of Nucleotides Critical for Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, Mandy; Deng, Tao; Addley, Mark; Brownlee, George G.

    2004-01-01

    Replication of the influenza A virus virion RNA (vRNA) requires the synthesis of full-length cRNA, which in turn is used as a template for the synthesis of more vRNA. A “corkscrew” secondary-structure model of the cRNA promoter has been proposed recently. However the data in support of that model were indirect, since they were derived from measurement, by use of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter in 293T cells, of mRNA levels from a modified cRNA promoter rather than the authe...

  1. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Xia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA helicases and chaperones are the two major classes of RNA remodeling proteins, which function to remodel RNA structures and/or RNA-protein interactions, and are required for all aspects of RNA metabolism. Although some virus-encoded RNA helicases/chaperones have been predicted or identified, their RNA remodeling activities in vitro and functions in the viral life cycle remain largely elusive. Enteroviruses are a large group of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family, which includes numerous important human pathogens. Herein, we report that the nonstructural protein 2CATPase of enterovirus 71 (EV71, which is the major causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has been regarded as the most important neurotropic enterovirus after poliovirus eradication, functions not only as an RNA helicase that 3'-to-5' unwinds RNA helices in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent manner, but also as an RNA chaperone that destabilizes helices bidirectionally and facilitates strand annealing and complex RNA structure formation independently of ATP. We also determined that the helicase activity is based on the EV71 2CATPase middle domain, whereas the C-terminus is indispensable for its RNA chaperoning activity. By promoting RNA template recycling, 2CATPase facilitated EV71 RNA synthesis in vitro; when 2CATPase helicase activity was impaired, EV71 RNA replication and virion production were mostly abolished in cells, indicating that 2CATPase-mediated RNA remodeling plays a critical role in the enteroviral life cycle. Furthermore, the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities of 2CATPase are also conserved in coxsackie A virus 16 (CAV16, another important enterovirus. Altogether, our findings are the first to demonstrate the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities associated with enterovirus 2CATPase, and our study provides both in vitro and cellular evidence for their potential roles during viral RNA replication. These findings

  2. RNA catalysis, thermodynamics and the origin of life

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, William G.; Abraham Szöke; Josh Blaustein; Sara M O'Rourke; Robertson, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    The RNA World Hypothesis posits that the first self-replicating molecules were RNAs. RNA self-replicases are, in general, assumed to have employed nucleotide 5'-polyphosphates (or their analogues) as substrates for RNA polymerization. The mechanism by which these substrates might be synthesized with sufficient abundance to supply a growing and evolving population of RNAs is problematic for evolutionary hypotheses because non-enzymatic synthesis and assembly of nucleotide 5'-triphosphates (or ...

  3. Structural Insights into tRNA Dynamics on the Ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xabier Agirrezabala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution structures at different stages, as well as biochemical, single molecule and computational approaches have highlighted the elasticity of tRNA molecules when bound to the ribosome. It is well acknowledged that the inherent structural flexibility of the tRNA lies at the heart of the protein synthesis process. Here, we review the recent advances and describe considerations that the conformational changes of the tRNA molecules offer about the mechanisms grounded in translation.

  4. Structural Insights into tRNA Dynamics on the Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Valle, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures at different stages, as well as biochemical, single molecule and computational approaches have highlighted the elasticity of tRNA molecules when bound to the ribosome. It is well acknowledged that the inherent structural flexibility of the tRNA lies at the heart of the protein synthesis process. Here, we review the recent advances and describe considerations that the conformational changes of the tRNA molecules offer about the mechanisms grounded in translation. PMID:25941930

  5. Structural Insights into tRNA Dynamics on the Ribosome

    OpenAIRE

    Xabier Agirrezabala; Mikel Valle

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures at different stages, as well as biochemical, single molecule and computational approaches have highlighted the elasticity of tRNA molecules when bound to the ribosome. It is well acknowledged that the inherent structural flexibility of the tRNA lies at the heart of the protein synthesis process. Here, we review the recent advances and describe considerations that the conformational changes of the tRNA molecules offer about the mechanisms grounded in translation.

  6. The structural basis of transfer RNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M; Costantino, David A; Hammond, John A; Ruehle, Grant M; Nix, Jay C; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-17

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles, and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. Such multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. To address this gap it is useful to study examples from single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3' end of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic (g)RNA, but also interacts with other structures in the 3' untranslated region of the gRNA, contains the promoter for negative-strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes. TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is 'two faced': one face closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other face diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  7. Disruption of Specific RNA-RNA Interactions in a Double-Stranded RNA Virus Inhibits Genome Packaging and Virus Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Teodoro; Sung, Po-Yu; Roy, Polly

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes hemorrhagic disease in economically important livestock. The BTV genome is organized into ten discrete double-stranded RNA molecules (S1-S10) which have been suggested to follow a sequential packaging pathway from smallest to largest segment during virus capsid assembly. To substantiate and extend these studies, we have investigated the RNA sorting and packaging mechanisms with a new experimental approach using inhibitory oligonucleotides. Putative packaging signals present in the 3'untranslated regions of BTV segments were targeted by a number of nuclease resistant oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) and their effects on virus replication in cell culture were assessed. ORNs complementary to the 3' UTR of BTV RNAs significantly inhibited virus replication without affecting protein synthesis. Same ORNs were found to inhibit complex formation when added to a novel RNA-RNA interaction assay which measured the formation of supramolecular complexes between and among different RNA segments. ORNs targeting the 3'UTR of BTV segment 10, the smallest RNA segment, were shown to be the most potent and deletions or substitution mutations of the targeted sequences diminished the RNA complexes and abolished the recovery of viable viruses using reverse genetics. Cell-free capsid assembly/RNA packaging assay also confirmed that the inhibitory ORNs could interfere with RNA packaging and further substitution mutations within the putative RNA packaging sequence have identified the recognition sequence concerned. Exchange of 3'UTR between segments have further demonstrated that RNA recognition was segment specific, most likely acting as part of the secondary structure of the entire genomic segment. Our data confirm that genome packaging in this segmented dsRNA virus occurs via the formation of supramolecular complexes formed by the interaction of specific sequences located in the 3' UTRs. Additionally, the inhibition of packaging in-trans with inhibitory ORNs

  8. Wolbachia Blocks Viral Genome Replication Early in Infection without a Transcriptional Response by the Endosymbiont or Host Small RNA Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Rainey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia can protect insects against viral infection, and is being introduced into mosquito populations in the wild to block the transmission of arboviruses that infect humans and are a major public health concern. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this antiviral protection, we have developed a new model system combining Wolbachia-infected Drosophila melanogaster cell culture with the model mosquito-borne Semliki Forest virus (SFV; Togaviridae, Alphavirus. Wolbachia provides strong antiviral protection rapidly after infection, suggesting that an early stage post-infection is being blocked. Wolbachia does appear to have major effects on events distinct from entry, assembly or exit as it inhibits the replication of an SFV replicon transfected into the cells. Furthermore, it causes a far greater reduction in the expression of proteins from the 3´ open reading frame than the 5´ non-structural protein open reading frame, indicating that it is blocking the replication of viral RNA. Further to this separation of the replicase proteins and viral RNA in transreplication assays shows that uncoupling of viral RNA and replicase proteins does not overcome Wolbachia's antiviral activity. This further suggests that replicative processes are disrupted, such as translation or replication, by Wolbachia infection. This may occur by Wolbachia mounting an active antiviral response, but the virus did not cause any transcriptional response by the bacterium, suggesting that this is not the case. Host microRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in protection, but again we found that host cell miRNA expression was unaffected by the bacterium and neither do our findings suggest any involvement of the antiviral siRNA pathway. We conclude that Wolbachia may directly interfere with early events in virus replication such as translation of incoming viral RNA or RNA transcription, and this likely involves an intrinsic (as opposed

  9. Wolbachia Blocks Viral Genome Replication Early in Infection without a Transcriptional Response by the Endosymbiont or Host Small RNA Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Stephanie M; Martinez, Julien; McFarlane, Melanie; Juneja, Punita; Sarkies, Peter; Lulla, Aleksei; Schnettler, Esther; Varjak, Margus; Merits, Andres; Miska, Eric A; Jiggins, Francis M; Kohl, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia can protect insects against viral infection, and is being introduced into mosquito populations in the wild to block the transmission of arboviruses that infect humans and are a major public health concern. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this antiviral protection, we have developed a new model system combining Wolbachia-infected Drosophila melanogaster cell culture with the model mosquito-borne Semliki Forest virus (SFV; Togaviridae, Alphavirus). Wolbachia provides strong antiviral protection rapidly after infection, suggesting that an early stage post-infection is being blocked. Wolbachia does appear to have major effects on events distinct from entry, assembly or exit as it inhibits the replication of an SFV replicon transfected into the cells. Furthermore, it causes a far greater reduction in the expression of proteins from the 3´ open reading frame than the 5´ non-structural protein open reading frame, indicating that it is blocking the replication of viral RNA. Further to this separation of the replicase proteins and viral RNA in transreplication assays shows that uncoupling of viral RNA and replicase proteins does not overcome Wolbachia's antiviral activity. This further suggests that replicative processes are disrupted, such as translation or replication, by Wolbachia infection. This may occur by Wolbachia mounting an active antiviral response, but the virus did not cause any transcriptional response by the bacterium, suggesting that this is not the case. Host microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in protection, but again we found that host cell miRNA expression was unaffected by the bacterium and neither do our findings suggest any involvement of the antiviral siRNA pathway. We conclude that Wolbachia may directly interfere with early events in virus replication such as translation of incoming viral RNA or RNA transcription, and this likely involves an intrinsic (as opposed to an induced

  10. Short, synthetic and selectively 13C-labeled RNA sequences for the NMR structure determination of protein–RNA complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Wenter, Philipp; Reymond, Luc; Auweter, Sigrid D.; Allain, Frédéric H.-T.; Pitsch, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    We report an optimized synthesis of all canonical 2′-O-TOM protected ribonucleoside phosphoramidites and solid supports containing [13C5]-labeled ribose moieties, their sequence-specific introduction into very short RNA sequences and their use for the structure determination of two protein–RNA complexes. These specifically labeled sequences facilitate RNA resonance assignments and are essential to assign a high number of sugar–sugar and intermolecular NOEs, which ultimately improve the precis...

  11. Inhibition of luciferase expression in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by Sindbis virus expression of antisense luciferase RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B W; Olson, K E; Allen-Miura, T; Rayms-Keller, A; Carlson, J O; Coates, C J; Jasinskiene, N; James, A A; Beaty, B J; Higgs, S

    1999-11-01

    A rapid and reproducible method of inhibiting the expression of specific genes in mosquitoes should further our understanding of gene function and may lead to the identification of mosquito genes that determine vector competence or are involved in pathogen transmission. We hypothesized that the virus expression system based on the mosquito-borne Alphavirus, Sindbis (Togaviridae), may efficiently transcribe effector RNAs that inhibit expression of a targeted mosquito gene. To test this hypothesis, germ-line-transformed Aedes aegypti that express luciferase (LUC) from the mosquito Apyrase promoter were intrathoracically inoculated with a double subgenomic Sindbis (dsSIN) virus TE/3'2J/anti-luc (Anti-luc) that transcribes RNA complementary to the 5' end of the LUC mRNA. LUC activity was monitored in mosquitoes infected with either Anti-luc or control dsSIN viruses expressing unrelated antisense RNAs. Mosquitoes infected with Anti-luc virus exhibited 90% reduction in LUC compared with uninfected and control dsSIN-infected mosquitoes at 5 and 9 days postinoculation. We demonstrate that a gene expressed from the mosquito genome can be inhibited by using an antisense strategy. The dsSIN antisense RNA expression system is an important tool for studying gene function in vivo. PMID:10557332

  12. DBR1 siRNA inhibition of HIV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu Yathi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 and all retroviruses are related to retroelements of simpler organisms such as the yeast Ty elements. Recent work has suggested that the yeast retroelement Ty1 replicates via an unexpected RNA lariat intermediate in cDNA synthesis. The putative genomic RNA lariat intermediate is formed by a 2'-5' phosphodiester bond, like that found in pre-mRNA intron lariats and it facilitates the minus-strand template switch during cDNA synthesis. We hypothesized that HIV-1 might also form a genomic RNA lariat and therefore that siRNA-mediated inhibition of expression of the human RNA lariat de-branching enzyme (DBR1 expression would specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Results We designed three short interfering RNA (siRNA molecules targeting DBR1, which were capable of reducing DBR1 mRNA expression by 80% and did not significantly affect cell viability. We assessed HIV-1 replication in the presence of DBR1 siRNA and found that DBR1 knockdown led to decreases in viral cDNA and protein production. These effects could be reversed by cotransfection of a DBR1 cDNA indicating that the inhibition of HIV-1 replication was a specific effect of DBR1 underexpression. Conclusion These data suggest that DBR1 function may be needed to debranch a putative HIV-1 genomic RNA lariat prior to completion of reverse transcription.

  13. Extracellular RNA Communication (ExRNA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Until recently, scientists believed RNA worked mostly inside the cell that produced it. Some types of RNA help translate genes into proteins that are necessary for...

  14. Modeling sRNA-regulated Plasmid Maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Chen Chris

    2016-01-01

    We study a theoretical model for the toxin-antitoxin (hok/sok) mechanism for plasmid maintenance in bacteria. Toxin-antitoxin systems enforce the maintenance of a plasmid through post-segregational killing of cells that have lost the plasmid. Key to their function is the tight regulation of expression of a protein toxin by an sRNA antitoxin. Here, we focus on the nonlinear nature of the regulatory circuit dynamics of the toxin-antitoxin mechanism. The mechanism relies on a transient increase in protein concentration rather than on the steady state of the genetic circuit. Through a systematic analysis of the parameter dependence of this transient increase, we confirm some known design features of this system and identify new ones: for an efficient toxin-antitoxin mechanism, the synthesis rate of the toxin's mRNA template should be lower that of the sRNA antitoxin, the mRNA template should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin, and the mRNA-sRNA complex should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin. Moreover, ...

  15. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure...

  16. Depletion of pre-16S rRNA in starved Escherichia coli cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Cangelosi, G A; Brabant, W H

    1997-01-01

    Specific hybridization assays for intermediates in rRNA synthesis (pre-rRNA) may become useful for monitoring the growth activity of individual microbial species in complex natural systems. This possibility depends upon the assumption that rRNA processing in microbial cells continues after growth and pre-rRNA synthesis cease, resulting in drainage of the pre-rRNA pool. This is not the case in many eukaryotic cells, but less is known about the situation in bacteria. Therefore, we used DNA prob...

  17. RNA interference of avian influenza virus H5N1 by directly inhibiting mRNA with siRNA expression plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Avian influenza virus H5N1 causes widespread infection in the birds and human respiratory tract, but existing vaccines and drug therapy are of limited value. Here we show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for conserved regions of the viral genome can potently inhibit influenza virus production in cell lines, embryonated chicken eggs and BALB/c mice. SiRNA expression plasmid pBabe-Super was chosen in the study, which directed the synthesis of small interfering RNA in cells. The inhibition depended on the presence of a functional antisense strand in the small interfering RNA duplex, suggesting that viral mRNA is the target of RNA interference. Among three small interfering RNA expression plasmids we designed, we found that small interfering RNA for nucleocapsid protein (NP) had a specific effect in inhibiting the accumulation of RNA in infected cells because of a critical requirement for newly synthesized nucleocapsid proteins in avian influenza viral RNA transcription and replication. The findings reveal that newly synthesized nucleocapsid, polymerase A (PA) and polymerase B1 (PB1) proteins are required for avian influenza virus transcription and replication and provide a basis for the development of small interfering RNA as prophylaxis and therapy for avian influenza infection in birds and humans. (author)

  18. Symbiont-mediated RNA interference in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Miranda M. A.; Facey, Paul D.; Del Sol, Ricardo; Fernández-Martínez, Lorena T.; Evans, Meirwyn C.; Mitchell, Jacob J.; Bodger, Owen G.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) methods for insects are often limited by problems with double-stranded (ds) RNA delivery, which restricts reverse genetics studies and the development of RNAi-based biocides. We therefore delegated to insect symbiotic bacteria the task of: (i) constitutive dsRNA synthesis and (ii) trauma-free delivery. RNaseIII-deficient, dsRNA-expressing bacterial strains were created from the symbionts of two very diverse pest species: a long-lived blood-sucking bug, Rhodnius prolixus, and a short-lived globally invasive polyphagous agricultural pest, western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). When ingested, the manipulated bacteria colonized the insects, successfully competed with the wild-type microflora, and sustainably mediated systemic knockdown phenotypes that were horizontally transmissible. This represents a significant advance in the ability to deliver RNAi, potentially to a large range of non-model insects. PMID:26911963

  19. [RNA-synthesizing activity in the liver of rats after a flight on the Kosmos 1667 biosatellite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeeva, V F; Komolova, G S

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a short-term flight (7 days) on the RNA synthetic activity in isolated nuclei of the rat liver and its content of nucleic acids was investigated. Postflight the activity of RNA-polymerase, the key enzyme of RNA synthesis, increased. The endogenous synthesis of RNA in nuclei grew, probably, due to the change in the activity of RNA-polymerase. Conversely, the concentration of nucleic acids in the liver tended to decrease. The results obtained give evidence that the changes in the RNA synthetic apparatus of hepatocytes in short-term flights are similar in sign to those seen in long-term flights. PMID:2447326

  20. Transcription of the major neurospora crassa microRNA-like small RNAs relies on RNA polymerase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuying Yang

    Full Text Available Most plant and animal microRNAs (miRNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We previously discovered miRNA-like small RNAs (milRNAs in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and uncovered at least four different pathways for milRNA production. To understand the evolutionary origin of milRNAs, we determined the roles of polymerases II and III (Pol II and Pol III in milRNA transcription. Our results show that Pol III is responsible for the transcription of the major milRNAs produced in this organism. The inhibition of Pol III activity by an inhibitor or by gene silencing abolishes the production of most abundant milRNAs and pri-milRNAs. In addition, Pol III associates with these milRNA producing loci. Even though silencing of Pol II does not affect the synthesis of the most abundant milRNAs, Pol II or both Pol II and Pol III are associated with some milRNA-producing loci, suggesting a regulatory interaction between the two polymerases for some milRNA transcription. Furthermore, we show that one of the Pol III-transcribed milRNAs is derived from a tRNA precursor, and its biogenesis requires RNase Z, which cleaves the tRNA moiety to generate pre-milRNA. Our study identifies the transcriptional machinery responsible for the synthesis of fungal milRNAs and sheds light on the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic small RNAs.

  1. Nuclear transport factor directs localization of protein synthesis during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den; Meinema, Anne C.; Krasnikov, Viktor; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Poolman, Bert

    2009-01-01

    Export of messenger RNA from the transcription site in the nucleus and mRNA targeting to the translation site in the cytoplasm are key regulatory processes in protein synthesis. In yeast, the mRNA-binding proteins Nab2p and Nab4p/Hrp1p accompany transcripts to their translation site, where the karyo

  2. RNA-seq of human reference RNA samples using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Ryan M; Wu, Douglas C; Qin, Yidan; Yao, Jun; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized our ability to analyze transcriptomes. Current RNA-seq methods are highly reproducible, but each has biases resulting from different modes of RNA sample preparation, reverse transcription, and adapter addition, leading to variability between methods. Moreover, the transcriptome cannot be profiled comprehensively because highly structured RNAs, such as tRNAs and snoRNAs, are refractory to conventional RNA-seq methods. Recently, we developed a new method for strand-specific RNA-seq using thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases (TGIRTs). TGIRT enzymes have higher processivity and fidelity than conventional retroviral reverse transcriptases plus a novel template-switching activity that enables RNA-seq adapter addition during cDNA synthesis without using RNA ligase. Here, we obtained TGIRT-seq data sets for well-characterized human RNA reference samples and compared them to previous data sets obtained for these RNAs by the Illumina TruSeq v2 and v3 methods. We find that TGIRT-seq recapitulates the relative abundance of human transcripts and RNA spike-ins in ribo-depleted, fragmented RNA samples comparably to non-strand-specific TruSeq v2 and better than strand-specific TruSeq v3. Moreover, TGIRT-seq is more strand specific than TruSeq v3 and eliminates sampling biases from random hexamer priming, which are inherent to TruSeq. The TGIRT-seq data sets also show more uniform 5' to 3' gene coverage and identify more splice junctions, particularly near the 5' ends of mRNAs, than do the TruSeq data sets. Finally, TGIRT-seq enables the simultaneous profiling of mRNAs and lncRNAs in the same RNA-seq experiment as structured small ncRNAs, including tRNAs, which are essentially absent with TruSeq. PMID:26826130

  3. Analyzing MiRNA-LncRNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are noncoding transcripts usually longer than 200 nts that have recently emerged as one of the largest and significantly diverse RNA families. The biological role and functions of lncRNAs are still mostly uncharacterized. Their target-mimetic, sponge/decoy function on microRNAs was recently uncovered. miRNAs are a class of noncoding RNA species (~22 nts) that play a central role in posttranscriptional regulation of protein coding genes by mRNA cleavage, direct translational repression and/or mRNA destabilization. LncRNAs can act as miRNA sponges, reducing their regulatory effect on mRNAs. This function introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA-target interaction network. This chapter focuses on the study of miRNA-lncRNA interactions with either in silico or experimentally supported analyses. The proposed methodologies can be appropriately adapted in order to become the backbone of advanced multistep functional miRNA analyses. PMID:26721498

  4. Hyponatremia in rats induces downregulation of vasopressin synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, A G; Roberts, M. M.; Evron, W A; Verbalis, J G; Sherman, T G

    1990-01-01

    Hyponatremia due to inappropriate secretion of vasopressin is a common disorder in human pathophysiology, but vasopressin synthesis during hypoosmolality has not been investigated. We used a new method to quantitate synthesis of vasopressin in rats after 3, 7, and 14 d of hyponatremia induced by administering dDAVP (a vasopressin agonist) and a liquid diet. Vasopressin synthesis was completely turned off by 7 d. Vasopressin mRNA levels in the hypothalamus paralleled the reduction in synthesis...

  5. Effects of ionizing radiation on RNA metabolism in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell growth respone of cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, line CHO, to 800 rads of X irradiation involves a period of division delay, followed by a period of resumed division which terminates in a plateau phase. Over 95% of the cells die eventually. No direct effects on RNA or protein metabolism are evident during the delay period. During the resumed division and beginning of plateau phases, however, a specific and relatively constant reduction in mRNA synthesis relative to messenger-like RNA and heterogeneous nuclear RNA synthesis is evidenced. The ratio of mRNA to messenger-like RNA synthesis ranges from 0.8 to 0.65 during these phases. The effect is not due to altered cell-cycle distribution, and evidence is presented to indicate that it is probably not a compensatory response to the unbalanced growth that occurs during the division delay period

  6. Characterization of miRNA Expression in Human Degenerative Lumbar Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohrt-Nissen, Søren; Døssing, Kristina B V; Rossing, Maria; Lajer, Christel; Vikeså, Jonas; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Dahl, Benny

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ∼22 nucleotide RNA sequences that regulate messengerRNA translation. miRNAs have shown to play a role in synthesis of inflammatory mediators. Since inflammation play a role in intervertebral disk (IVD) degeneration, the objective was to isolate miRNA from human lumbar...... intervertebral disks and subsequently characterize the difference in miRNA expression between the annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP)....

  7. Kinetics of toxA and regA mRNA accumulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, D W; Iglewski, B H

    1988-01-01

    DNA probes specific for an internal portion of the toxA and regA genes were used to examine the synthesis of mRNA during the growth cycle of P. aeruginosa PA103. RNA dot blot analysis revealed that in a low-iron growth medium, the synthesis of regA and toxA mRNA followed a biphasic expression pattern. Analysis of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity also indicated that an early and late phase of exotoxin A synthesis occurred. Utilizing an internal SalI probe, examination of the size distribution o...

  8. Transfer RNA: From pioneering crystallographic studies to contemporary tRNA biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Schelcher, Cédric; Chihade, Joseph; Masquida, Benoît; Giegé, Philippe; Sauter, Claude

    2016-07-15

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) play a key role in protein synthesis as adaptor molecules between messenger RNA and protein sequences on the ribosome. Their discovery in the early sixties provoked a worldwide infatuation with the study of their architecture and their function in the decoding of genetic information. tRNAs are also emblematic molecules in crystallography: the determination of the first tRNA crystal structures represented a milestone in structural biology and tRNAs were for a long period the sole source of information on RNA folding, architecture, and post-transcriptional modifications. Crystallographic data on tRNAs in complex with aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) also provided the first insight into protein:RNA interactions. Beyond the translation process and the history of structural investigations on tRNA, this review also illustrates the renewal of tRNA biology with the discovery of a growing number of tRNA partners in the cell, the involvement of tRNAs in a variety of regulatory and metabolic pathways, and emerging applications in biotechnology and synthetic biology. PMID:26968773

  9. MicroRNA immunobiology: when microRNA chemists meet immunologists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhai H Chen

    2011-01-01

    Although interdisciplinary research has been heralded as the engine of basic discovery for decades,many in the immunology community have been taken back by the recent marriage between microRNA (miRNA) and immunology.MicroRNAs were first discovered by Ambros and colleagues in 1993.1 They are small untranslated RNAs,highly conserved between different eukaryotic species.2-5 They are encoded by specific genes in the genome,which are controlled at the transcriptional level in a manner similar to protein-encoding genes.2 Following the synthesis of the primary miRNA by RNA polymerase Ⅱ or Ⅲ,nuclear processing by the enzyme Drosha produces a primary miRNA transcript which can be shuttled into the cytoplasm 2 Final production of the mature miRNA species requires further cytoplasmic processing by an RNase Ⅲ enzyme called Dicer,producing a 19- to 24-base pair product,capable of being incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complex.The RNA-induced silencing complex,in turn,is able to use the 'seed sequence' of the miRNA to recognize complementary mRNA transcripts for degradation or translational silencing.To date,more than 800 human miRNAs have been identified,regulating an estimated 50% of all human genes.Each miRNA appears to regulate the expression of tens to hundreds of genes,thereby functioning as 'master-switches' that regulate and coordinate multiple cellular pathways in important processes such as embryonic development and oncogenesis,as well as cellular growth and proliferation.

  10. The mouse telomerase RNA 5"-end lies just upstream of the telomerase template sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Hinkley, C S; Blasco, M A; Funk, W D; Feng, J; Villeponteau, B; Greider, C W; Herr, W.

    1998-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme with an essential RNA component. Embedded within the telomerase RNA is a template sequence for telomere synthesis. We have characterized the structure of the 5' regions of the human and mouse telomerase-RNA genes, and have found a striking difference in the location of the template sequence: Whereas the 5'-end of the human telomerase RNA lies 45 nt from the telomerase-RNA template sequence, the 5'-end of the mouse telomerase RNA lies just 2 nt from the...

  11. Who Regulates Whom? An Overview of RNA Granules and Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Poblete-Durán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After viral infection, host cells respond by mounting an anti-viral stress response in order to create a hostile atmosphere for viral replication, leading to the shut-off of mRNA translation (protein synthesis and the assembly of RNA granules. Two of these RNA granules have been well characterized in yeast and mammalian cells, stress granules (SGs, which are translationally silent sites of RNA triage and processing bodies (PBs, which are involved in mRNA degradation. This review discusses the role of these RNA granules in the evasion of anti-viral stress responses through virus-induced remodeling of cellular ribonucleoproteins (RNPs.

  12. tRNA-mRNA mimicry drives translation initiation from a viral IRES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, David A; Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Rambo, Robert P; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs initiate protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells by a noncanonical cap-independent mechanism. IRESes are critical for many pathogenic viruses, but efforts to understand their function are complicated by the diversity of IRES sequences as well as by limited high-resolution structural information. The intergenic region (IGR) IRESes of the Dicistroviridae viruses are powerful model systems to begin to understand IRES function. Here we present the crystal structure of a Dicistroviridae IGR IRES domain that interacts with the ribosome's decoding groove. We find that this RNA domain precisely mimics the transfer RNA anticodon-messenger RNA codon interaction, and its modeled orientation on the ribosome helps explain translocation without peptide bond formation. When combined with a previous structure, this work completes the first high-resolution description of an IRES RNA and provides insight into how RNAs can manipulate complex biological machines. PMID:18157151

  13. RNA Catalysis, Thermodynamics and the Origin of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Scott

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The RNA World Hypothesis posits that the first self-replicating molecules were RNAs. RNA self-replicases are, in general, assumed to have employed nucleotide 5ʹ-polyphosphates (or their analogues as substrates for RNA polymerization. The mechanism by which these substrates might be synthesized with sufficient abundance to supply a growing and evolving population of RNAs is problematic for evolutionary hypotheses because non-enzymatic synthesis and assembly of nucleotide 5ʹ-triphosphates (or other analogously activated phosphodiester species is inherently difficult. However, nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates are also phosphodiesters, and are the natural and abundant products of RNA degradation. These have previously been dismissed as viable substrates for prebiotic RNA synthesis. We propose that the arguments for their dismissal are based on a flawed assumption, and that nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates in fact possess several significant, advantageous properties that indeed make them particularly viable substrates for prebiotic RNA synthesis. An RNA World hypothesis based upon the polymerization of nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates possesses additional explanatory power in that it accounts for the observed ribozyme “fossil record”, suggests a viable mechanism for substrate transport across lipid vesicle boundaries of primordial proto-cells, circumvents the problems of substrate scarcity and implausible synthetic pathways, provides for a primitive but effective RNA replicase editing mechanism, and definitively explains why RNA, rather than DNA, must have been the original catalyst. Finally, our analysis compels us to propose that a fundamental and universal property that drives the evolution of living systems, as well as pre-biotic replicating molecules (be they composed of RNA or protein, is that they exploit chemical reactions that already possess competing kinetically-preferred and thermodynamically-preferred pathways in a

  14. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper;

    2012-01-01

    to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...... other RNA molecules show virtually no oxidation. The iron-storage disease hemochromatosis exhibits the most prominent general increase in RNA oxidation ever observed. Oxidation of RNA primarily leads to strand breaks and to oxidative base modifications. Oxidized mRNA is recognized by the ribosomes...

  15. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-06-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide 'cap' on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IRES RNAs and IRES-ribosome complexes are revealing the structural basis of viral IRES' 'hijacking' of the protein-making machinery. It now seems that there are fundamental differences in the 3D structures used by different IRESs, although there are some common features in how they interact with ribosomes. PMID:18468443

  16. Irreducibility in RNA structures

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Emma Y.; Reidys, Christian M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study irreducibility in RNA structures. By RNA structure we mean RNA secondary as well as RNA pseudoknot structures. In our analysis we shall contrast random and minimum free energy (mfe) configurations. We compute various distributions: of the numbers of irreducible substructures, their locations and sizes, parameterized in terms of the maximal number of mutually crossing arcs, $k-1$, and the minimal size of stacks $\\sigma$. In particular, we analyze the size of the largest ...

  17. Depletion of pre-16S rRNA in starved Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangelosi, G A; Brabant, W H

    1997-07-01

    Specific hybridization assays for intermediates in rRNA synthesis (pre-rRNA) may become useful for monitoring the growth activity of individual microbial species in complex natural systems. This possibility depends upon the assumption that rRNA processing in microbial cells continues after growth and pre-rRNA synthesis cease, resulting in drainage of the pre-rRNA pool. This is not the case in many eukaryotic cells, but less is known about the situation in bacteria. Therefore, we used DNA probes to measure steady-state cellular pre-16S rRNA pools during growth state transitions in Escherichia coli. Pre-16S rRNA became undetectable when cells entered the stationary phase on rich medium and was replenished upon restoration of favorable growth conditions. These fluctuations were of much greater magnitude than concurrent fluctuations in the mature 16S rRNA pool. The extent of pre-16S rRNA depletion depended upon the circumstances limiting growth. It was significantly more pronounced in carbon-energy-starved cells than in nitrogen-starved cells or in cells treated with energy uncouplers. In the presence of the transcriptional inhibitor rifampin, rates of pre-16S rRNA depletion in carbon-energy-starved cells and nitrogen-starved cells were similar, suggesting that the difference between these conditions resides primarily at the level of pre-rRNA synthesis. Chloramphenicol, which inhibits the final steps in rRNA maturation, halted pre-16S rRNA depletion under all conditions. The data show that E. coli cells continue to process pre-rRNA after growth and rrn operon transcription cease, leading to drainage of the pre-rRNA pool. This supports the feasibility of using pre-rRNA-targeted probes to monitor bacterial growth in natural systems, with the caveat that patterns of pre-rRNA depletion vary with the conditions limiting growth. PMID:9226253

  18. Towards a structural understanding of IRES RNA function

    OpenAIRE

    Filbin, Megan E.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Protein synthesis of an RNA template can initiate by two different known mechanisms: cap-dependent translation initiation and cap-independent translation initiation. The latter is driven by RNA sequences called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that are found in both viral RNAs and cellular mRNAs. The diverse mechanisms used by IRESs are reflected in their structural diversity, and this structural diversity challenges us to develop a cohesive model linking IRES function to structure. With...

  19. Working with RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Working with RNA is not a special discipline in molecular biology. However, RNA is chemically and structurally different from DNA and a few simple work rules have to be implemented to maintain the integrity of the RNA. Alkaline pH, high temperatures, and heavy metal ions should be avoided when...

  20. Fast Prediction of RNA-RNA Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Raheleh; Backofen, Rolf; Sahinalp, S. Cenk

    Regulatory antisense RNAs are a class of ncRNAs that regulate gene expression by prohibiting the translation of an mRNA by establishing stable interactions with a target sequence. There is great demand for efficient computational methods to predict the specific interaction between an ncRNA and its target mRNA(s). There are a number of algorithms in the literature which can predict a variety of such interactions - unfortunately at a very high computational cost. Although some existing target prediction approaches are much faster, they are specialized for interactions with a single binding site.

  1. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-02-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including their generating function, singularity analysis as well as explicit recurrence relations. In particular, our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures. PMID:21541694

  2. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Thomas J X

    2010-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called ``zig-zag'' configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including their generating function, singularity analysis as well as explicit recurrence relations. In particular, our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures.

  3. Functional insights from molecular modeling, docking, and dynamics study of a cypoviral RNA dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Anirban; Dutta, Anirudha; Biswas, Poulomi; Das, Amit Kumar; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (AmCPV) contains 11 double stranded RNA genome segments and infects tasar silkworm A. mylitta. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is reported as a key enzyme responsible for propagation of the virus in the host cell but its structure function relationship still remains elusive. Here a computational approach has been taken to compare sequence and secondary structure of AmCPV RdRp with other viral RdRps to identify consensus motifs. Then a reliable pairwise sequence alignment of AmCPV RdRp with its closest sequence structure homologue λ3 RdRp is done to predict three dimensional structure of AmCPV RdRp. After comparing with other structurally known viral RdRps, important sequence and/or structural features involved in substrate entry or binding, polymerase reaction and the product release events have been identified. A conserved RNA pentanucleotide (5'-AGAGC-3') at the 3'-end of virus genome is predicted as cis-acting signal for RNA synthesis and its docking and simulation study along with the model of AmCPV RdRp has allowed to predict mode of template binding by the viral polymerase. It is found that template RNA enters into the catalytic center through nine sequence-independent and two sequence-dependent interactions with the specific amino acid residues. However, number of sequence dependent interactions remains almost same during 10 nano-second simulation time while total number of interactions decreases. Further, docking of N(7)-methyl-GpppG (mRNA cap) on the model as well as prediction of RNA secondary structure has shown the template entry process in the active site. These findings have led to postulate the mechanism of RNA-dependent RNA polymerization process by AmCPV RdRp. To our knowledge, this is the first report to evaluate structure function relationship of a cypoviral RdRp. PMID:26264734

  4. Methods for RNA Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Signe

    While increasing evidence appoints diverse types of RNA as key players in the regulatory networks underlying cellular differentiation and metabolism, the potential functions of thousands of conserved RNA structures encoded in mammalian genomes remain to be determined. Since the functions of most...... RNAs rely on interactions with proteins, the establishment of protein-binding profiles is essential for the characterization of RNAs. Aiming to facilitate RNA analysis, this thesis introduces proteomics- as well as transcriptomics-based methods for the functional characterization of RNA. First, RNA......-protein pulldown combined with mass spectrometry analysis is applied for in vivo as well as in vitro identification of RNA-binding proteins, the latter succeeding in verifying known RNA-protein interactions. Secondly, acknowledging the significance of flexible promoter usage for the diversification of the...

  5. Fast prediction of RNA-RNA interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backofen Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory antisense RNAs are a class of ncRNAs that regulate gene expression by prohibiting the translation of an mRNA by establishing stable interactions with a target sequence. There is great demand for efficient computational methods to predict the specific interaction between an ncRNA and its target mRNA(s. There are a number of algorithms in the literature which can predict a variety of such interactions - unfortunately at a very high computational cost. Although some existing target prediction approaches are much faster, they are specialized for interactions with a single binding site. Methods In this paper we present a novel algorithm to accurately predict the minimum free energy structure of RNA-RNA interaction under the most general type of interactions studied in the literature. Moreover, we introduce a fast heuristic method to predict the specific (multiple binding sites of two interacting RNAs. Results We verify the performance of our algorithms for joint structure and binding site prediction on a set of known interacting RNA pairs. Experimental results show our algorithms are highly accurate and outperform all competitive approaches.

  6. Small noncoding RNA modulates japanese encephalitis virus replication and translation in trans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yi-Hsin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence and structural elements in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV are known to regulate translation and replication. We previously reported an abundant accumulation of small subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA which is collinear with the highly conserved regions of the 3'-UTR in JEV-infected cells. However, function of the sfRNA in JEV life cycle remains unknown. Results Northern blot and real-time RT-PCR analyses indicated that the sfRNA becomes apparent at the time point at which minus-strand RNA (antigenome reaches a plateau suggesting a role for sfRNA in the regulation of antigenome synthesis. Transfection of minus-sense sfRNA into JEV-infected cells, in order to counter the effects of plus-sense sfRNA, resulted in higher levels of antigenome suggesting that the presence of the sfRNA inhibits antigenome synthesis. Trans-acting effect of sfRNA on JEV translation was studied using a reporter mRNA containing the luciferase gene fused to partial coding regions of JEV and flanked by the respective JEV UTRs. In vivo and in vitro translation revealed that sfRNA inhibited JEV translation. Conclusions Our results indicate that sfRNA modulates viral translation and replication in trans.

  7. An in vitro Flaviviridae replicase system capable of authentic RNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have established an in vitro replication system for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a surrogate for the closely-related hepatitis C virus. In an in vitro reaction, BVDV replication complexes synthesize vRNA and replicative form (RF) and replicative intermediate (RI) RNAs. Kinetic and heparin trapping experiments demonstrate the recycling of RF and RI products and the initiation of vRNA synthesis in this system. Consistent with this, quantitative hybridization reveals the asymmetric synthesis of positive and negative strand RNA products. These findings support the notion that RF serves as a template and RI as a precursor in the synthesis of vRNA. Furthermore, the antiviral activity of an NS5B inhibitor was similar in BVDV replicase and infectivity assays. Together, these results indicate that the in vitro activity of BVDV replicase complexes recapitulates RNA replication that occurs in infected cells, providing a system in which to study both mechanisms and inhibitors of Flaviviridae replication

  8. Multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses using an oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Grubaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne viruses are important emerging pathogens world-wide. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, infect hundreds of millions of people and animals each year. Global surveillance of these viruses in mosquito vectors using molecular based assays is critical for prevention and control of the associated diseases. Here, we report an oligonucleotide DNA microarray design, termed ArboChip5.1, for multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses from the genera Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae, Alphavirus (Togaviridae, Orthobunyavirus (Bunyaviridae, and Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assay utilizes targeted PCR amplification of three genes from each virus genus for electrochemical detection on a portable, field-tested microarray platform. Fifty-two viruses propagated in cell-culture were used to evaluate the specificity of the PCR primer sets and the ArboChip5.1 microarray capture probes. The microarray detected all of the tested viruses and differentiated between many closely related viruses such as members of the dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Semliki Forest virus clades. Laboratory infected mosquitoes were used to simulate field samples and to determine the limits of detection. Additionally, we identified dengue virus type 3, Japanese encephalitis virus, Tembusu virus, Culex flavivirus, and a Quang Binh-like virus from mosquitoes collected in Thailand in 2011 and 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that the described assay can be utilized in a comprehensive field surveillance program by the broad-range amplification and specific identification of arboviruses from infected mosquitoes. Furthermore, the microarray platform can be deployed in the field and viral RNA extraction to data analysis can occur in as little as 12 h. The information derived from the ArboChip5.1 microarray can help to establish

  9. Sublethal RNA Oxidation as a Mechanism for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular RNA is subjected to the same oxidative insults as DNA and other cellular macromolecules, oxidative damage to RNA has not been a major focus in investigations of the biological consequences of free radical damage. In fact, because it is largely single-stranded and its bases lack the protection of hydrogen bonding and binding by specific proteins, RNA may be more susceptible to oxidative insults than is DNA. Oxidative damage to protein-coding RNA or non-coding RNA will, in turn, potentially cause errors in proteins and/or dysregulation of gene expression. While less lethal than mutations in the genome, such sublethal insults to cells might be associated with underlying mechanisms of several chronic diseases, including neurodegenerative disease. Recently, oxidative RNA damage has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and prion diseases. Of particular interest, oxidative RNA damage can be demonstrated in vulnerable neurons early in disease, suggesting that RNA oxidation may actively contribute to the onset of the disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that, mechanistically speaking, the detrimental effects of oxidative RNA damage to protein synthesis are attenuated, at least in part, by the existence of protective mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of the damaged ribonucleotides into the translational machinery. Further investigations aimed at understanding the processing mechanisms related to oxidative RNA damage and its consequences may provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other degenerative diseases and lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  10. Translocation and rotation of tRNA during template-independent RNA polymerization by tRNA nucleotidyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Seisuke; Takeshita, Daijiro; Tomita, Kozo

    2014-02-01

    The 3'-terminal CCA (CCA-3' at positions 74-76) of tRNA is synthesized by CCA-adding enzyme using CTP and ATP as substrates, without a nucleic acid template. In Aquifex aeolicus, CC-adding and A-adding enzymes collaboratively synthesize the CCA-3'. The mechanism of CCA-3' synthesis by these two enzymes remained obscure. We now present crystal structures representing CC addition onto tRNA by A. aeolicus CC-adding enzyme. After C₇₄ addition in an enclosed active pocket and pyrophosphate release, the tRNA translocates and rotates relative to the enzyme, and C₇₅ addition occurs in the same active pocket as C₇₄ addition. At both the C₇₄-adding and C₇₅-adding stages, CTP is selected by Watson-Crick-like hydrogen bonds between the cytosine of CTP and conserved Asp and Arg residues in the pocket. After C₇₄C₇₅ addition and pyrophosphate release, the tRNA translocates further and drops off the enzyme, and the CC-adding enzyme terminates RNA polymerization. PMID:24389024

  11. Membrane-bound tomato mosaic virus replication proteins participate in RNA synthesis and are associated with host proteins in a pattern distinct from those that are not membrane bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikiori, Masaki; Dohi, Koji; Mori, Masashi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Naito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2006-09-01

    Extracts of vacuole-depleted, tomato mosaic virus (ToMV)-infected plant protoplasts contained an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that utilized an endogenous template to synthesize ToMV-related positive-strand RNAs in a pattern similar to that observed in vivo. Despite the fact that only minor fractions of the ToMV 130- and 180-kDa replication proteins were associated with membranes, the RdRp activity was exclusively associated with membranes. A genome-sized, negative-strand RNA template was associated with membranes and was resistant to micrococcal nuclease unless treated with detergents. Non-membrane-bound replication proteins did not exhibit RdRp activity, even in the presence of ToMV RNA. While the non-membrane-bound replication proteins remained soluble after treatment with Triton X-100, the same treatment made the membrane-bound replication proteins in a form that precipitated upon low-speed centrifugation. On the other hand, the detergent lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) efficiently solubilized the membrane-bound replication proteins. Upon LPC treatment, the endogenous template-dependent RdRp activity was reduced and exogenous ToMV RNA template-dependent RdRp activity appeared instead. This activity, as well as the viral 130-kDa protein and the host proteins Hsp70, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), TOM1, and TOM2A copurified with FLAG-tagged viral 180-kDa protein from LPC-solubilized membranes. In contrast, Hsp70 and only small amounts of the 130-kDa protein and eEF1A copurified with FLAG-tagged non-membrane-bound 180-kDa protein. These results suggest that the viral replication proteins are associated with the intracellular membranes harboring TOM1 and TOM2A and that this association is important for RdRp activity. Self-association of the viral replication proteins and their association with other host proteins may also be important for RdRp activity. PMID:16912296

  12. Photoaffinity labelling of t-RNA binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the photoaffinity labelling of E.coli ribosomes in the region of peptidyl transferase, an analogue to the substrate peptidyl-tRNA-ethyl-2-diazomalalonyl-Phe-tRNAsup(Phe) was synthesized. UV irradiation of the reversible complex with 70S ribosomes and poly(U) led to the formation of a covalent bond between N-acyl-Phe-tRNA and 23S-rRNA. The irreversibly bound N-acyl-phenylalanyl group may be transferred to puromycin in a reaction catalyzed by peptidyl transferase, in the presence of the Phe-tRNA, it forms products of a peptide synthesis covalently bound to 23S-RNA. The 23S-rRNA sequence thus labelled, which has not yet been identified, should therefore be in the active centre of the peptidyl transferase or in its near neighbourhood. An analysis of the reaction product showed that the N-acyl-Phe-tRNA is bound specifically to one or more sites of a 3'-terminal 18S fragment of the 23S-RNA. An attempt to prove the existence of further tRNA interaction with ribosonal substrate binding sites led to the discovery of a poly(U2,G)-stimulated, UV-inducible irreversible binding of valin-specific tRNA (E.coli) to 16S-rRNA in one or several tRNA decoding sites. A preliminary analysis of the T1 fragments of tRNAsup(Val) after binding to 16S-rRNA indicates that the DHU loop of tRNA takes part in this photoreaction. (orig.)

  13. Reprogramming, Circular Reasoning and Self versus Non-self: One-Stop Shopping with RNA Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Yiannis A.; Rezaei, Ali; St. Laurent, Georges; Reenan, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription of genetic information from archival DNA into RNA molecule working copies is vital for proper cellular function and is highly accurate. In turn, RNAs serve structural, enzymatic, and regulatory roles, as well as being informational templates for the ribosomal translation of proteins. Following RNA synthesis, maturing of RNA molecules occurs through various RNA processing events. One component of the collection of processes involving RNA species, broadly defined as RNA metabolism, is the RNA-editing pathway and is found in all animals. Acting specifically on RNA substrates with double-stranded character, RNA editing has been shown to regulate a plethora of genomic outputs, including gene recoding, RNA splicing, biogenesis and targeting actions of microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, and global gene expression. Recent evidence suggests that RNA modifications mediated via RNA editing influence the biogenesis of circular RNAs and safeguard against aberrant innate immune responses generated to endogenous RNA sources. These novel roles have the potential to contribute new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis mediated by mishandling of double-stranded RNA. Here, we discuss recent advances in the field, which highlight novel roles associated with the RNA-editing process and emphasize their importance during cellular RNA metabolism. In addition, we highlight the relevance of these newly discovered roles in the context of neurological disorders and the more general concept of innate recognition of self versus non-self. PMID:27458478

  14. Visualization of mRNA translation in living cells

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUEZ, ALEXIS J.; Shenoy, Shailesh M; Singer, Robert H.; Condeelis, John

    2006-01-01

    The role of mRNA localization is presumably to effect cell asymmetry by synthesizing proteins in specific cellular compartments. However, protein synthesis has never been directly demonstrated at the sites of mRNA localization. To address this, we developed a live cell method for imaging translation of β-actin mRNA. Constructs coding for β-actin, containing tetracysteine motifs, were transfected into C2C12 cells, and sites of nascent polypeptide chains were detected using the biarsenial dyes ...

  15. RNA Viruses Infecting Pest Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    RNA viruses are viruses whose genetic material is ribonucleic acid (RNA). RNA viruses may be double or single-stranded based on the type of RNA they contain. Single-stranded RNA viruses can be further grouped into negative sense or positive-sense viruses according to the polarity of their RNA. Fur...

  16. Regulation of glucose homeostasis by small RNA mediated activation of sugar phosphatase mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Papenfort, Kai; Sun, Yan; Miyakoshi, Masatoshi; Vanderpool, Carin K.; Vogel, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is strictly controlled in all domains of life. Bacteria that are unable to balance intracellular sugar levels and deal with potentially toxic phosphosugars cease growth and risk being outcompeted. Here, we identify the conserved haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzyme YigL as the previously hypothesized phosphatase for detoxification of phosphosugars, and reveal that its synthesis is activated by an Hfq dependent small RNA in Salmonella typhimurium. We show that the glucos...

  17. Vaccine Adjuvants in Fish Vaccines Make a Difference: Comparing Three Adjuvants (Montanide ISA763A Oil, CpG/Poly I:C Combo and VHSV Glycoprotein) Alone or in Combination Formulated with an Inactivated Whole Salmonid Alphavirus Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thim, Hanna L; Villoing, Stéphane; McLoughlin, Marian; Christie, Karen Elina; Grove, Søren; Frost, Petter; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2014-01-01

    Most commercial vaccines offered to the aquaculture industry include inactivated antigens (Ag) formulated in oil adjuvants. Safety concerns are related to the use of oil adjuvants in multivalent vaccines for fish, since adverse side effects (e.g., adhesions) can appear. Therefore, there is a request for vaccine formulations for which protection will be maintained or improved, while the risk of side effects is reduced. Here, by using an inactivated salmonid alphavirus (SAV) as the test Ag, the combined use of two Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand adjuvants, CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) and poly I:C, as well as a genetic adjuvant consisting of a DNA plasmid vector expressing the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) glycoprotein (G) was explored. VHSV-G DNA vaccine was intramuscularly injected in combination with intraperitoneal injection of either SAV Ag alone or combined with the oil adjuvant, Montanide ISA763, or the CpG/polyI:C combo. Adjuvant formulations were evaluated for their ability to boost immune responses and induce protection against SAV in Atlantic salmon, following cohabitation challenge. It was observed that CpG/polyI:C-based formulations generated the highest neutralizing antibody titres (nAbs) before challenge, which endured post challenge. nAb responses for VHSV G-DNA- and oil-adjuvanted formulations were marginal compared to the CpG/poly I:C treatment. Interestingly, heat-inactivated sera showed reduced nAb titres compared to their non-heated counterparts, which suggests a role of complement-mediated neutralization against SAV. Consistently elevated levels of innate antiviral immune genes in the CpG/polyI:C injected groups suggested a role of IFN-mediated responses. Co-delivery of the VHSV-G DNA construct with either CpG/polyI:C or oil-adjuvanted SAV vaccine generated higher CD4 responses in head kidney at 48 h compared to injection of this vector or SAV Ag alone. The results demonstrate that a combination of pattern recognizing receptor (PRR

  18. Vaccine Adjuvants in Fish Vaccines Make a Difference: Comparing Three Adjuvants (Montanide ISA763A Oil, CpG/Poly I:C Combo and VHSV Glycoprotein Alone or in Combination Formulated with an Inactivated Whole Salmonid Alphavirus Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna L. Thim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Most commercial vaccines offered to the aquaculture industry include inactivated antigens (Ag formulated in oil adjuvants. Safety concerns are related to the use of oil adjuvants in multivalent vaccines for fish, since adverse side effects (e.g., adhesions can appear. Therefore, there is a request for vaccine formulations for which protection will be maintained or improved, while the risk of side effects is reduced. Here, by using an inactivated salmonid alphavirus (SAV as the test Ag, the combined use of two Toll-like receptor (TLR ligand adjuvants, CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs and poly I:C, as well as a genetic adjuvant consisting of a DNA plasmid vector expressing the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV glycoprotein (G was explored. VHSV-G DNA vaccine was intramuscularly injected in combination with intraperitoneal injection of either SAV Ag alone or combined with the oil adjuvant, Montanide ISA763, or the CpG/polyI:C combo. Adjuvant formulations were evaluated for their ability to boost immune responses and induce protection against SAV in Atlantic salmon, following cohabitation challenge. It was observed that CpG/polyI:C-based formulations generated the highest neutralizing antibody titres (nAbs before challenge, which endured post challenge. nAb responses for VHSV G-DNA- and oil-adjuvanted formulations were marginal compared to the CpG/poly I:C treatment. Interestingly, heat-inactivated sera showed reduced nAb titres compared to their non-heated counterparts, which suggests a role of complement-mediated neutralization against SAV. Consistently elevated levels of innate antiviral immune genes in the CpG/polyI:C injected groups suggested a role of IFN-mediated responses. Co-delivery of the VHSV-G DNA construct with either CpG/polyI:C or oil-adjuvanted SAV vaccine generated higher CD4 responses in head kidney at 48 h compared to injection of this vector or SAV Ag alone. The results demonstrate that a combination of pattern recognizing

  19. Dicodon monitoring of protein synthesis (DiCoMPS) reveals levels of synthesis of a viral protein in single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Barhoom, Sima; Farrell, Ian; Shai, Ben; Dahary, Dvir; Cooperman, Barry S.; Smilansky, Zeev; Elroy-Stein, Orna; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    The current report represents a further advancement of our previously reported technology termed Fluorescent transfer RNA (tRNA) for Translation Monitoring (FtTM), for monitoring of active global protein synthesis sites in single live cells. FtTM measures Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals, generated when fluorescent tRNAs (fl-tRNAs), separately labeled as a FRET pair, occupy adjacent sites on the ribosome. The current technology, termed DiCodon Monitoring of Protein Synthesis (...

  20. In vitro base modification of Escherichia coli glutamate 2 transfer-RNA and phenylalanine transfer-RNA gene transcripts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmids were constructed that contain an E. Coli tRNA2Glu or tRNAPhe gene in a system transcribable by T7 or SP6 RNA polymerase. Selectively 32P-labeled transcripts of these plasmids were used to study tRNA base modification in vitro in crude extracts by nearest neighbor analysis. The synthesis of 5-methyl-aminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm5s2U) was studied. Complete synthesis of mnm5s22U is not observed. Instead, 2-thiouridine (s2U) is synthesized. Synthesis requires ATP, cysteine, Mg+, and monovalent cation concentrations below 50 mM. The reaction has a pH optimum above 7.0. Sulfide ion will substitute for cysteine in the reaction but sulfate, sulfite, methionine, homocysteine, and β-mercaptopyruvate will not. Extracts from E. coli strains carrying either the asuE or asuF mutations have reduced s2U synthetic activity which supports in vivo evidence that the wild type genes are involved in 2-thiolation of uridine. The enzyme is shown to be unstable both upon storage at -80 degree C and during the modification reaction. A method was developed to study the synthesis of any one of four pseudouridines ψ found at different positions of the tRNA cloverleaf. Synthesis of ψ is observed at three of the four positions-positions 32, 39, and 55. The asuC mutation is shown to affect ψ synthesis only at position 39 confirming that it is an allele of hisT and that the hisT mutations do not affect ψ synthesis at position 32 in E. coli. Synthesis of ψ32, ψ39, and ψ55 does not require any prior modification. Synthesis of dihydrouridine, 7-methylguanosine, and 3(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)uridine is also observed. Synthesis of 2-methyladenosine and ψ 13 is not seen. Removal of part of the aminoacyl stem reduces synthesis of all modifications examined by 3' fold or more

  1. RNA synthetic biology inspired from bacteria: construction of transcription attenuators under antisense regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among all biopolymers, ribonucleic acids or RNA have unique functional versatility, which led to the early suggestion that RNA alone (or a closely related biopolymer) might have once sustained a primitive form of life based on a single type of biopolymer. This has been supported by the demonstration of processive RNA-based replication and the discovery of 'riboswitches' or RNA switches, which directly sense their metabolic environment. In this paper, we further explore the plausibility of this 'RNA world' scenario and show, through synthetic molecular design guided by advanced RNA simulations, that RNA can also perform elementary regulation tasks on its own. We demonstrate that RNA synthetic regulatory modules directly inspired from bacterial transcription attenuators can efficiently activate or repress the expression of other RNA by merely controlling their folding paths 'on the fly' during transcription through simple RNA–RNA antisense interaction. Factors, such as NTP concentration and RNA synthesis rate, affecting the efficiency of this kinetic regulation mechanism are also studied and discussed in the light of evolutionary constraints. Overall, this suggests that direct coupling among synthesis, folding and regulation of RNAs may have enabled the early emergence of autonomous RNA-based regulation networks in absence of both DNA and protein partners

  2. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A; Gwerder, Myriam; Gutsche, Katrin; Altmeyer, Matthias; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Fink, Daniel; Rask, Maj-Britt; Grøfte, Merete; Lukas, Claudia; Nielsen, Michael L; Smerdon, Stephen J; Lukas, Jiri; Stucki, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in trans signalling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient recrui...

  3. Characterization of novel hepadnaviral RNA species accumulated in hepatoma cells treated with viral DNA polymerase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pinghu; Liu, Fei; Guo, Fang; Zhao, Qiong; Chang, Jinhong; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2016-07-01

    Inhibitors of hepadnaviral DNA polymerases are predicted to inhibit both minus and plus strand of viral DNA synthesis and arrest viral DNA replication at the stage of pregenomic (pg) RNA-containing nucleocapsids. However, analyses of the RNA species of human and duck hepatitis B viruses (HBV and DHBV, respectively) in hepatoma cells treated with viral DNA polymerase inhibitors revealed the genesis of novel RNA species migrating slightly faster than the full-length pgRNA. The DNA polymerase inhibitor-induced accumulation of these RNA species were abolished in the presence of alpha-interferon or HBV nucleocapsid assembly inhibitors. Moreover, they were protected from microccocal nuclease digestion and devoid of a poly-A tail. These characteristics suggest that the novel RNA species are most likely generated from RNase H cleavage of encapsidated pgRNA, after primer translocation and synthesis of the 5' terminal portion of minus strand DNA. In support of this hypothesis, DNA polymerase inhibitor treatment of chicken hepatoma cells transfected with a DHBV genome encoding an RNase H inactive DNA polymerase (E696H) failed to produce such RNA species. Our results thus suggest that the currently available DNA polymerase inhibitors do not efficiently arrest minus strand DNA synthesis at the early stage in hepatocytes. Hence, development of novel antiviral agents that more potently suppress viral DNA synthesis or viral nucleocapsid assembly inhibitors that are mechanistically complementary to the currently available DNA polymerase inhibitors are warranted. PMID:27083116

  4. A Contemporary, Laboratory-Intensive Course on Messenger RNA Transcription and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Sue; Miller, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) plays a pivotal role in the central dogma of molecular biology. Importantly, molecular events occurring during and after mRNA synthesis have the potential to create multiple proteins from one gene, leading to some of the remarkable protein diversity that genomes hold. The North Carolina State University…

  5. In situ localization of chalcone synthase mRNA in pea root nodule development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, W.C.; Canter Cremers, H.C.J.; Hogendijk, P.; Katinakis, P.; Wijffelman, C.A.; Franssen, H.J.; Kammen, van A.; Bisseling, T.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper studies on the role of flavonoids in pea root nodule development are reported. Flavonoid synthesis was followed by localizing chalcone synthase (CHS) mRNA in infected pea roots and in root nodules. In a nodule primordium, CHS mRNA is present in all cells of the primordium. Therefore it

  6. Structural and mechanistic characterization of 6S RNA from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Karen; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Lechner, Marcus; Damm, Katrin; Hoch, Philipp G; Salas, Margarita; Hartmann, Roland K

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial 6S RNAs competitively inhibit binding of RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzymes to DNA promoters, thereby globally regulating transcription. RNAP uses 6S RNA itself as a template to synthesize short transcripts, termed pRNAs (product RNAs). Longer pRNAs (approx. ≥ 10 nt) rearrange the 6S RNA structure and thereby disrupt the 6S RNA:RNAP complex, which enables the enzyme to resume transcription at DNA promoters. We studied 6S RNA of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, representing the thermodynamically most stable 6S RNA known so far. Applying structure probing and NMR, we show that the RNA adopts the canonical rod-shaped 6S RNA architecture with little structure formation in the central bulge (CB) even at moderate temperatures (≤37 °C). 6S RNA:pRNA complex formation triggers an internal structure rearrangement of 6S RNA, i.e. formation of a so-called central bulge collapse (CBC) helix. The persistence of several characteristic NMR imino proton resonances upon pRNA annealing demonstrates that defined helical segments on both sides of the CB are retained in the pRNA-bound state, thus representing a basic framework of the RNA's architecture. RNA-seq analyses revealed pRNA synthesis from 6S RNA in A. aeolicus, identifying 9 to ∼17-mers as the major length species. A. aeolicus 6S RNA can also serve as a template for in vitro pRNA synthesis by RNAP from the mesophile Bacillus subtilis. Binding of a synthetic pRNA to A. aeolicus 6S RNA blocks formation of 6S RNA:RNAP complexes. Our findings indicate that A. aeolicus 6S RNA function in its hyperthermophilic host is mechanistically identical to that of other bacterial 6S RNAs. The use of artificial pRNA variants, designed to disrupt helix P2 from the 3'-CB instead of the 5'-CB but preventing formation of the CBC helix, indicated that the mechanism of pRNA-induced RNAP release has been evolutionarily optimized for transcriptional pRNA initiation in the 5'-CB. PMID:25771336

  7. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of plants

    OpenAIRE

    Fraenkel-Conrat, H

    1983-01-01

    The existence of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (EC 2.7.7.48) in plants has been definitely proven by their isolation in pure form from cucumber and tobacco in our laboratory and from cowpea at Wageningen. These enzymes are single-chain proteins of 100-130 kilodaltons. They show clear physical and biochemical differences characteristic for a given plant species, even when their amounts in the plants were greatly increased prior to isolation by infection with the same virus. The role of these e...

  8. RNA decay by messenger RNA interferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Overgaard, Martin; Winther, Kristoffer Skovbo; Gerdes, Kenn

    2008-01-01

    Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mRNA...... cleaving enzymes such as RelE of Escherichia coli and the corresponding antitoxin RelB. In particular, we describe a set of plasmid vectors useful for the detailed analysis of cleavage sites in model mRNAs....

  9. Controlling translation elongation efficiency: tRNA regulation of ribosome flux on the mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgoni, Barbara; Marshall, Elizabeth; McFarland, Matthew R; Romano, M Carmen; Stansfield, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Gene expression can be regulated by a wide variety of mechanisms. One example concerns the growing body of evidence that the protein-production rate can be regulated at the level of translation elongation by controlling ribosome flux across the mRNA. Variations in the abundance of tRNA molecules cause different rates of translation of their counterpart codons. This, in turn, produces a variable landscape of translational rate across each and every mRNA, with the dynamic formation and deformation of ribosomal queues being regulated by both tRNA availability and the rates of translation initiation and termination. In the present article, a range of examples of tRNA control of gene expression are reviewed, and the use of mathematical modelling to develop a predictive understanding of the consequences of that regulation is discussed and explained. These findings encourage a view that predicting the protein-synthesis rate of each mRNA requires a holistic understanding of how each stage of translation, including elongation, contributes to the overall protein-production rate. PMID:24450645

  10. Functional Evolution in Orthologous Cell-encoded RNA-dependent RNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xinlei; Hamid, Fursham M; El Sahili, Abbas; Darwis, Dina Amallia; Wong, Yee Hwa; Bhushan, Shashi; Makeyev, Eugene V; Lescar, Julien

    2016-04-22

    Many eukaryotic organisms encode more than one RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) that probably emerged as a result of gene duplication. Such RdRP paralogs often participate in distinct RNA silencing pathways and show characteristic repertoires of enzymatic activities in vitro However, to what extent members of individual paralogous groups can undergo functional changes during speciation remains an open question. We show that orthologs of QDE-1, an RdRP component of the quelling pathway in Neurospora crassa, have rapidly diverged in evolution at the amino acid sequence level. Analyses of purified QDE-1 polymerases from N. crassa (QDE-1(Ncr)) and related fungi, Thielavia terrestris (QDE-1(Tte)) and Myceliophthora thermophila (QDE-1(Mth)), show that all three enzymes can synthesize RNA, but the precise modes of their action differ considerably. Unlike their QDE-1(Ncr) counterpart favoring processive RNA synthesis, QDE-1(Tte) and QDE-1(Mth) produce predominantly short RNA copies via primer-independent initiation. Surprisingly, a 3.19 Å resolution crystal structure of QDE-1(Tte) reveals a quasisymmetric dimer similar to QDE-1(Ncr) Further electron microscopy analyses confirm that QDE-1(Tte) occurs as a dimer in solution and retains this status upon interaction with a template. We conclude that divergence of orthologous RdRPs can result in functional innovation while retaining overall protein fold and quaternary structure. PMID:26907693

  11. Redox status affects the catalytic activity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Assaf; Banerjee, Rajat; de Armas, Merly;

    2010-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases (GluRS) provide Glu-tRNA for different processes including protein synthesis, glutamine transamidation and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. Many organisms contain multiple GluRSs, but whether these duplications solely broaden tRNA specificity or also play additional roles in...... vitro, GluRS1 activity is reversibly inactivated upon oxidation by hemin and hydrogen peroxide. The targets for oxidation-based inhibition were found to be cysteines from a SWIM zinc-binding motif located in the tRNA acceptor helix-binding domain. tRNA(Glu) was able to protect GluRS1 against oxidative...

  12. RNA design rules from a massive open laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeehyung; Kladwang, Wipapat; Lee, Minjae; Cantu, Daniel; Azizyan, Martin; Kim, Hanjoo; Limpaecher, Alex; Yoon, Sungroh; Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2014-02-11

    Self-assembling RNA molecules present compelling substrates for the rational interrogation and control of living systems. However, imperfect in silico models--even at the secondary structure level--hinder the design of new RNAs that function properly when synthesized. Here, we present a unique and potentially general approach to such empirical problems: the Massive Open Laboratory. The EteRNA project connects 37,000 enthusiasts to RNA design puzzles through an online interface. Uniquely, EteRNA participants not only manipulate simulated molecules but also control a remote experimental pipeline for high-throughput RNA synthesis and structure mapping. We show herein that the EteRNA community leveraged dozens of cycles of continuous wet laboratory feedback to learn strategies for solving in vitro RNA design problems on which automated methods fail. The top strategies--including several previously unrecognized negative design rules--were distilled by machine learning into an algorithm, EteRNABot. Over a rigorous 1-y testing phase, both the EteRNA community and EteRNABot significantly outperformed prior algorithms in a dozen RNA secondary structure design tests, including the creation of dendrimer-like structures and scaffolds for small molecule sensors. These results show that an online community can carry out large-scale experiments, hypothesis generation, and algorithm design to create practical advances in empirical science. PMID:24469816

  13. Total RNA extraction from strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) and several other woody-plants

    OpenAIRE

    Zamboni A.; Pierantoni L; Franceschi P

    2008-01-01

    Studies of plant gene expression today need pure preparations of high-yielding undegraded RNA. This is not easily accomplished when working with plants and tissues like strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) leaves that accumulate large amounts of polysaccharides and polyphenolic compounds, which co-purify with RNA. An improved leaf-tissue protocol developed for gene expression studies on Arbutus unedo yields for the first time a purity of RNA extract that makes possible cDNA synthesis and qPCR anal...

  14. Determinants in mammalian telomerase RNA that mediate enzyme processivity and cross-species incompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jiunn-Liang; Greider, Carol W

    2003-01-01

    Telomerase contains two essential components: an RNA molecule that templates telomeric repeat synthesis and a catalytic protein component. Human telomerase is processive, while the mouse enzyme has much lower processivity. We have identified nucleotide determinants in the telomerase RNA that are responsible for this difference in processivity. Mutations adjacent to the template region of human and mouse telomerase RNA significantly altered telomerase processivity both in vitro and in vivo. We...

  15. Analysis of energy-based algorithms for RNA secondary structure prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Hajiaghayi Monir; Condon Anne; Hoos Holger H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background RNA molecules play critical roles in the cells of organisms, including roles in gene regulation, catalysis, and synthesis of proteins. Since RNA function depends in large part on its folded structures, much effort has been invested in developing accurate methods for prediction of RNA secondary structure from the base sequence. Minimum free energy (MFE) predictions are widely used, based on nearest neighbor thermodynamic parameters of Mathews, Turner et al. or those of Andr...

  16. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Huang, Fenix Wenda; Penner, Robert;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist...

  17. Interstrain Variation in Amylase Gene Copy Number and mRNA Abundance in Three Mouse Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Meisler, Miriam H.; Antonucci, Tammy K.; Treisman, Laurelee O.; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Samuelson, Linda C.

    1986-01-01

    Amylase expression in strain YBR differs in several respects from the standard mouse phenotype. The synthesis of salivary amylase is elevated twofold in YBR mice and the synthesis of pancreatic amylase is reduced to one-half the normal rate. We have compared the concentrations of amylase mRNA in the parotid, liver and pancreas of YBR mice with those in strains A/J and C3H. We observed differences in amylase mRNA abundance which can account for the levels of amylase protein synthesis in the pa...

  18. Factors Required for the Uridylylation of the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus 3B1, 3B2, and 3B3 Peptides by the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (3Dpol) In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Arabinda; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Belsham, Graham J.

    2005-01-01

    The 5′ terminus of picornavirus genomic RNA is covalently linked to the virus-encoded peptide 3B (VPg). Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is unique in encoding and using 3 distinct forms of this peptide. These peptides each act as primers for RNA synthesis by the virus-encoded RNA polymerase 3Dpol. To act as the primer for positive-strand RNA synthesis, the 3B peptides have to be uridylylated to form VPgpU(pU). For certain picornaviruses, it has been shown that this reaction is achieved by ...

  19. Ribonucleic acid synthesis in normal and immune macrophages after antigenic stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, L S; Tewari, R P; Solotorovsky, M

    1976-06-01

    Macrophage ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis is an important metabolic process intimately related to the function of these cells. Mouse peritoneal macrophage RNA was extracted with phenol in the presence of bentonite and electrophoresed on composite agarose-polyacrylamide gels. The pulse-chase technique was used to follow the precursor relationships in macrophage ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation. The rRNA species at 18S and 28S appeared at 15 and 45 min, respectively, after RNA synthesis was halted. Their appearance corresponded closely to decreases in the rRNA precursors at 45S, 36S, and 34S. Studies of RNA methylation aided in confirming the identity of these ribosomal species. Unmethylated RNA species appeared as messenger RNA between 5S and 15S, and at about 55S probably represented heterodisperse nuclear RNA. When normal macrophages were incubated with heat-killed Salmonella enteritidis, an acceleration in the maturation of RNA was observed. The accelerated maturation was indicated by the earlier appearance of 28S rRNA and the more rapid development of an equilibrium state, where further labeling did not change the RNA profile. In macrophage RNA from mice immunized with S. enteritidis, rRNA species appeared rapidly but did not accumulate to the same extent as observed for normal macrophages. Precursor rRNA and other RNA species developed as usual, suggesting specific degradation of mature rRNA. Such rRNA wastage could indicate a mechanism controlling ribosome assembly in the non-proliferating activated macrophage. The pattern of RNA synthesis in immune macrophages was essentially unchanged by the presence of heat-killed S. enteritidis in vitro. PMID:971940

  20. Experimental identification of microRNA targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørom, Ulf Andersson; Lund, Anders H

    microRNAs are small RNAs that regulate protein synthesis post-transcriptionally. Animal microRNAs recognize their targets by incomplete base pairing to sequence motifs most often present in the 3' untranslated region of their target mRNAs. This partial complementarity vastly expands the repertoire...... of potential targets and constitutes a problem for computational target prediction. Although computational analyses have shed light on important aspects of microRNA target recognition, several questions remain regarding how microRNAs can recognize and regulate their targets. Forward experimental...... approaches allow for an unbiased study of microRNA target recognition and may unveil novel, rare or uncommon target binding patterns. In this review we focus on animal microRNAs and the experimental approaches that have been described for identification of their targets....

  1. Hypernegative Supercoiling Inhibits Growth by Causing RNA Degradation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, Imad; Usongo, Valentine; Nolent, Flora; Sanscartier, Patrick; Hraiky, Chadi; Drlica, Karl; Drolet, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Transcription-induced hypernegative supercoiling is a hallmark of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (topA) mutants. However, its physiological significance has remained unclear. Temperature downshift of a mutant yielded transient growth arrest and a parallel increase in hypernegative supercoiling that was more severe with lower temperature. Both properties were alleviated by overexpression of RNase HI. While ribosomes in extracts showed normal activity when obtained during growth arrest, mRNA on ribosomes was reduced for fis and shorter for crp, polysomes were much less abundant relative to monosomes, and protein synthesis rate dropped, as did the ratio of large to small proteins. Altered processing and degradation of lacA and fis mRNA was also observed. These data are consistent with truncation of mRNA during growth arrest. These effects were not affected by a mutation in the gene encoding RNase E, indicating that this endonuclease is not involved in the abnormal mRNA processing. They were also unaffected by spectinomycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, which argued against induction of RNase activity. In vitro transcription revealed that R-loop formation is more extensive on hypernegatively supercoiled templates. These results allow us, for the first time, to present a model by which hypernegative supercoiling inhibits growth. In this model, the introduction of hypernegative supercoiling by gyrase facilitates degradation of nascent RNA; overproduction of RNase HI limits the accumulation of hypernegative supercoiling, thereby preventing extensive RNA degradation. PMID:18790862

  2. Hypernegative supercoiling inhibits growth by causing RNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, Imad; Usongo, Valentine; Nolent, Flora; Sanscartier, Patrick; Hraiky, Chadi; Drlica, Karl; Drolet, Marc

    2008-11-01

    Transcription-induced hypernegative supercoiling is a hallmark of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (topA) mutants. However, its physiological significance has remained unclear. Temperature downshift of a mutant yielded transient growth arrest and a parallel increase in hypernegative supercoiling that was more severe with lower temperature. Both properties were alleviated by overexpression of RNase HI. While ribosomes in extracts showed normal activity when obtained during growth arrest, mRNA on ribosomes was reduced for fis and shorter for crp, polysomes were much less abundant relative to monosomes, and protein synthesis rate dropped, as did the ratio of large to small proteins. Altered processing and degradation of lacA and fis mRNA was also observed. These data are consistent with truncation of mRNA during growth arrest. These effects were not affected by a mutation in the gene encoding RNase E, indicating that this endonuclease is not involved in the abnormal mRNA processing. They were also unaffected by spectinomycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, which argued against induction of RNase activity. In vitro transcription revealed that R-loop formation is more extensive on hypernegatively supercoiled templates. These results allow us, for the first time, to present a model by which hypernegative supercoiling inhibits growth. In this model, the introduction of hypernegative supercoiling by gyrase facilitates degradation of nascent RNA; overproduction of RNase HI limits the accumulation of hypernegative supercoiling, thereby preventing extensive RNA degradation. PMID:18790862

  3. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sung Un; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific b...

  4. She2p, a novel RNA-binding protein tethers ASH1 mRNA to the Myo4p myosin motor via She3p

    OpenAIRE

    Böhl, Florian; Kruse, Claudia; Frank, Andrea; Ferring, Dunja; Jansen, Ralf-Peter

    2000-01-01

    RNA localization is a widespread mechanism to achieve localized protein synthesis. In budding yeast, localization of ASH1 mRNA controls daughter cell-specific accumulation of the transcriptional regulator Ash1p, which determines mating type switching. ASH1 mRNA localization depends on four independently acting sequences (‘zipcodes’) within the mRNA. In addition, the class V myosin Myo4p and a set of She proteins with as yet unknown function are essential for ASH1 localization. Here we show th...

  5. Kinetic Analysis of tRNA Methylfransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ya-Ming; Masuda, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules contain many chemical modifications that are introduced after transcription. A major form of these modifications is methyl transfer to bases and backbone groups, using S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet) as the methyl donor. Each methylation confers a specific advantage to tRNA in structure or in function. A remarkable methylation is to the G37 base on the 3' side of the anticodon to generate m1G37-tRNA, which suppresses frameshift errors during protein synthesis and is therefore essential for cell growth in all three domains of life. This methylation is catalyzed by TrmD in bacteria and by Trm5 in eukaryotes and archaea. Although TrmD and Trm5 catalyze the same methylation reaction, kinetic analysis reveal that these two enzymes are unrelated to each other and are distinct in their reaction mechanism. This chapter summarizes the kinetic assays that are used to reveal the distinction between TrmD and Trm5. Three types of assays are described, the steady-state, the pre-steady-state, and the single turnover assays, which collectively provide the basis for mechanistic investigation of AdoMet-dependent methyl transfer reactions. PMID:26253967

  6. The first two nucleotides of the respiratory syncytial virus antigenome RNA replication product can be selected independently of the promoter terminus

    OpenAIRE

    Noton, Sarah L.; Fearns, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which unsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses initiate genome replication is poorly understood. Using respiratory syncytial virus as an example, this paper shows that RSV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase can correctly initiate antigenome synthesis even if the first two nucleotides of the template are deleted. The nontemplated addition of the nucleotides suggests a model for how the RSV polymerase initiates antigenome synthesis.

  7. Ab initio RNA folding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding. (topical review)

  8. Ab initio RNA folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-01

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  9. HUMAN MITOCHONDRIAL tRNA MUTATIONS IN MATERNALLY INHERITED DEAFNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jing; GONG Sha-sha; TANG Xiao-wen; ZHU Yi; GUAN Min-xin

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes have been shown to be associated with maternally inherited syn-dromic and non-syndromic deafness. Among those, mutations such as tRNALeu(UUR) 3243A>G associated with syndromic deafness are often present in heteroplasmy, and the non-syndromic deafness-associated tRNA mu-tations including tRNASer(UCN) 7445A>G are often in homoplasmy or in high levels of heteroplasmy. These tRNA mutations are the primary factors underlying the development of hearing loss. However, other tRNA mutations such as tRNAThr 15927G>A and tRNASer(UCN) 7444G>A are insufficient to produce a deafness phe-notype, but always act in synergy with the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations, and can modulate their phenotypic manifestation. These tRNA mutations may alter the structure and function of the corresponding mitochondrial tRNAs and cause failures in tRNAs metabolism. Thereby, the impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis and subsequent defects in respiration caused by these tRNA mutations, results in mitochon-drial dysfunctions and eventually leads to the development of hearing loss. Here, we summarized the deaf-ness-associated mitochondrial tRNA mutations and discussed the pathophysiology of these mitochondrial tRNA mutations, and we hope these data will provide a foundation for the early diagnosis, management, and treatment of maternally inherited deafness.

  10. Synergism and Mutualism in Non-Enzymatic RNA Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Kaddour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The link between non-enzymatic RNA polymerization and RNA self-replication is a key step towards the “RNA world” and still far from being solved, despite extensive research. Clay minerals, lipids and, more recently, peptides were found to catalyze the non-enzymatic synthesis of RNA oligomers. Herein, a review of the main models for the formation of the first RNA polymers is presented in such a way as to emphasize the cooperation between life’s building blocks in their emergence and evolution. A logical outcome of the previous results is a combination of these models, in which RNA polymerization might have been catalyzed cooperatively by clays, lipids and peptides in one multi-component prebiotic soup. The resulting RNAs and oligopeptides might have mutualistically evolved towards functional RNAs and catalytic peptides, preceding the first RNA replication, thus supporting an RNA-peptide world. The investigation of such a system is a formidable challenge, given its complexity deriving from a tremendously large number of reactants and innumerable products. A rudimentary experimental design is outlined, which could be used in an initial attempt to study a quaternary component system.

  11. RNA interference prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced preprotachykinin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We showed previously that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces noncholinergic airway hyperreactivity to capsaicin via an upregulation of tachykinin synthesis. This study was designed to test whether double-stranded preprotachykinin (ds PPT) RNA, RNA interference (RNAi), prevents the LPS-induced alterations. First, cultured primary nodose ganglial cells of newborn Brown-Norway rats were divided into four groups: control; LPS; LPS+RNAi; and LPS+RNAi+liposome. Second, young Brown-Norway rats for the in vivo study were divided into three groups (control; LPS; and LPS+RNAi), and ds PPT RNA was microinjected bilaterally into the nodose ganglia in the LPS+RNAi group. Then, ganglial cells were collected from the culture whereas the nodose ganglia and lungs were sampled from the animals, and PPT mRNA and substance P (SP) levels were analyzed. Also, airway reactivity to capsaicin was performed in vivo. LPS induced significant increases in PPT mRNA and SP levels in vitro and in vivo and an increase in airway reactivity to capsaicin in vivo. However, ds PPT RNA, but not scrambled RNA, prevented all LPS-induced alterations. The effect of ds PPT RNA was not enhanced by liposome in vitro. Therefore, we demonstrated that the local application of RNAi prevents effectively the activation of the noncholinergic system modulating the lungs/airways

  12. Parental RNA is Significantly Degraded During Arabidopsis Seed Germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Li; Jian-Xun Feng; Pei Han; Yu-Xian Zhu

    2006-01-01

    Germination is the first and maybe the foremost growth stage in the life cycle of a plant. Herein, we report that initiation of germination in the Arabidopsis Columbia ecotype was accompanied by a sharp decrease in the amount of extractable total RNA. At the beginning of our germination experiment, we were usually able to obtain 35-40 μg total RNA from 100 mg dry seeds. However, after 3 d of cold stratification, we could only obtain less than 5 μg total RNA from the same amount of starting material. Young seedlings contained approximately 100 μg total RNA per 100 mg fresh tissue. Further studies showed that inhibition of de novo RNA synthesis by actinomycin D prevented the degradation of parental RNA and, in the meantime, significantly delayed the germination process. Several ribonuclease-like genes that were highly expressed in dry seeds, and especially during the cold stratification period, were discovered. We propose that these enzymes are involved in the regulation of parental RNA degradation. These results indicate that parental RNA metabolism may be an important process for Arabidopsis seed germination.

  13. Generation of siRNA Nanosheets for Efficient RNA Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-04-01

    After the discovery of small interference RNA (siRNA), nanostructured siRNA delivery systems have been introduced to achieve an efficient regulation of the target gene expression. Here we report a new siRNA-generating two dimensional nanostructure in a formation of nanosized sheet. Inspired by tunable mechanical and functional properties of the previously reported RNA membrane, siRNA nanosized sheets (siRNA-NS) with multiple Dicer cleavage sites were prepared. The siRNA-NS has two dimensional structure, providing a large surface area for Dicer to cleave the siRNA-NS for the generation of functional siRNAs. Furthermore, downregulation of the cellular target gene expression was achieved by delivery of siRNA-NS without chemical modification of RNA strands or conjugation to other substances.

  14. Shapes of interacting RNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Benjamin Mingming; Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological...... genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows to compute the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform...... sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus....

  15. Synthetic mRNA with Superior Properties that Mimics the Intracellular Fates of Natural Histone mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Slevin, Michael K; Marzluff, William F; Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Since DNA and histone levels must be closely balanced for cell survival, histone expressions are highly regulated. The regulation of replication-dependent histone expression is mainly achieved at the mRNA level, as the mRNAs are rapidly removed when DNA replication is inhibited during S-phase. Histone mRNA degradation initiates with addition of multiple uridines (oligouridylation) following the 3' stem-loop (SL) catalyzed by terminal uridyltransferase (TUTase). Previous studies showed that histone mRNA degradation occurs through both 5' → 3' and 3' → 5' processes, but the relative contributions are difficult to dissect due to lack of established protocols. The translational efficiency and stability of synthetic mRNA in both cultured cells and whole animals can be improved by structural modifications at the both 5' and 3' termini. In this chapter, we present methods of utilizing modified cap dinucleotide analogs to block 5' → 3' degradation of a reporter mRNA containing canonical histone mRNA 3' SL and monitoring how oligouridylation and 3' → 5' degradation occur. Protocols are presented for synthesis of reporter mRNA containing the histone 3' SL and modified cap analogs, monitoring mRNA stability and unidirectional degradation either from 5' or 3' termini, and detection of oligo(U) tracts from degradation products by either traditional or deep sequencing. PMID:27236794

  16. Detection of bacteriophage phi 6 minus-strand RNA and novel mRNA isoconformers synthesized in vivo and in vitro, by strand-separating agarose gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two urea-free agarose gel protocols that resolve the six individual strands of bacteriophage phi 6 dsRNA were developed and used to analyze phage RNA synthesis in vivo and in vitro. Citrate gels separate strands of the large and medium chromosomes while Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) gels resolve the medium and small dsRNA segments. Minus strands migrate faster than plus strands on citrate gels but are retarded on TBE gels. A study of electrophoretic conditions showed that pH affects strand resolution on citrate gels, and that voltage gradient, agarose concentration, and ethidium bromide significantly alter strand migration on TBE gels. Analysis of native phi 6 RNA synthesized in vivo and in vitro showed that the large and medium message RNAs comigrate with the corresponding plus strands of denatured virion dsRNA. The small messenger RNA is exceptional. Native small mRNA was detected as three isoconformers in vivo and in vitro. The isoconformers were converted by heat denaturation to a single RNA species that comigrates with the virion s+ strand. Minus strands labeled in vivo were detected only after heat denaturation. Minus strand synthesis was detected also in heat-denatured samples from in vitro phi 6 nucleocapsid RNA polymerase reactions at pH values suboptimal for transcription

  17. Electronic fingerprinting of RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Gegenheimer, P

    1988-01-01

    Software has been developed to assist RNA fingerprinting analysis. One program generates, from a DNA sequence data file, the oligonucleotides resulting from digestion of an RNA transcript labeled with any specified nucleotide(s). Oligonucleotides are sorted according to their position on the fingerprint. Expected molar yields and products of secondary redigestion are also indicated. A second program facilitates calculation of experimental molar yields of oligonucleotides.

  18. RNA Viruses and RNAi: Quasispecies Implications for Viral Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Presloid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to high mutation rates, populations of RNA viruses exist as a collection of closely related mutants known as a quasispecies. A consequence of error-prone replication is the potential for rapid adaptation of RNA viruses when a selective pressure is applied, including host immune systems and antiviral drugs. RNA interference (RNAi acts to inhibit protein synthesis by targeting specific mRNAs for degradation and this process has been developed to target RNA viruses, exhibiting their potential as a therapeutic against infections. However, viruses containing mutations conferring resistance to RNAi were isolated in nearly all cases, underlining the problems of rapid viral evolution. Thus, while promising, the use of RNAi in treating or preventing viral diseases remains fraught with the typical complications that result from high specificity of the target, as seen in other antiviral regimens.

  19. Dicodon monitoring of protein synthesis (DiCoMPS) reveals levels of synthesis of a viral protein in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoom, Sima; Farrell, Ian; Shai, Ben; Dahary, Dvir; Cooperman, Barry S; Smilansky, Zeev; Elroy-Stein, Orna; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2013-10-01

    The current report represents a further advancement of our previously reported technology termed Fluorescent transfer RNA (tRNA) for Translation Monitoring (FtTM), for monitoring of active global protein synthesis sites in single live cells. FtTM measures Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals, generated when fluorescent tRNAs (fl-tRNAs), separately labeled as a FRET pair, occupy adjacent sites on the ribosome. The current technology, termed DiCodon Monitoring of Protein Synthesis (DiCoMPS), was developed for monitoring active synthesis of a specific protein. In DiCoMPS, specific fl-tRNA pair combinations are selected for transfection, based on the degree of enrichment of a dicodon sequence to which they bind in the mRNA of interest, relative to the background transcriptome of the cell in which the assay is performed. In this study, we used cells infected with the Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus 2-Ibaraki and measured, through DiCoMPS, the synthesis of the viral non-structural protein 3 (NS3), which is enriched in the AUA:AUA dicodon. fl-tRNA(Ile)UAU-generated FRET signals were specifically enhanced in infected cells, increased in the course of infection and were diminished on siRNA-mediated knockdown of NS3. Our results establish an experimental approach for the single-cell measurement of the levels of synthesis of a specific viral protein. PMID:23965304

  20. RNA Polymerase III Output Is Functionally Linked to tRNA Dimethyl-G26 Modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneeshkumar G Arimbasseri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of the differential abundance or activity of tRNAs can be important determinants of gene regulation. RNA polymerase (RNAP III synthesizes all tRNAs in eukaryotes and it derepression is associated with cancer. Maf1 is a conserved general repressor of RNAP III under the control of the target of rapamycin (TOR that acts to integrate transcriptional output and protein synthetic demand toward metabolic economy. Studies in budding yeast have indicated that the global tRNA gene activation that occurs with derepression of RNAP III via maf1-deletion is accompanied by a paradoxical loss of tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor activity, manifested as an antisuppression phenotype, by an unknown mechanism. We show that maf1-antisuppression also occurs in the fission yeast S. pombe amidst general activation of RNAP III. We used tRNA-HydroSeq to document that little changes occurred in the relative levels of different tRNAs in maf1Δ cells. By contrast, the efficiency of N2,N2-dimethyl G26 (m(22G26 modification on certain tRNAs was decreased in response to maf1-deletion and associated with antisuppression, and was validated by other methods. Over-expression of Trm1, which produces m(22G26, reversed maf1-antisuppression. A model that emerges is that competition by increased tRNA levels in maf1Δ cells leads to m(22G26 hypomodification due to limiting Trm1, reducing the activity of suppressor-tRNASerUCA and accounting for antisuppression. Consistent with this, we show that RNAP III mutations associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy decrease tRNA transcription, increase m(22G26 efficiency and reverse antisuppression. Extending this more broadly, we show that a decrease in tRNA synthesis by treatment with rapamycin leads to increased m(22G26 modification and that this response is conserved among highly divergent yeasts and human cells.

  1. A freeze frame view of vesicular stomatitis virus transcription defines a minimal length of RNA for 5' processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely Tekes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The RNA synthesis machinery of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV comprises the genomic RNA encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein (N and associated with the RNA dependent RNA polymerase, the viral components of which are a large protein (L and an accessory phosphoprotein (P. The 241 kDa L protein contains all the enzymatic activities necessary for synthesis of the viral mRNAs, including capping, cap methylation and polyadenylation. Those RNA processing reactions are intimately coordinated with nucleotide polymerization such that failure to cap results in termination of transcription and failure to methylate can result in hyper polyadenylation. The mRNA processing reactions thus serve as a critical check point in viral RNA synthesis which may control the synthesis of incorrectly modified RNAs. Here, we report the length at which viral transcripts first gain access to the capping machinery during synthesis. By reconstitution of transcription in vitro with highly purified recombinant polymerase and engineered templates in which we omitted sites for incorporation of UTP, we found that transcripts that were 30-nucleotides in length were uncapped, whereas those that were 31-nucleotides in length contained a cap structure. The minimal RNA length required for mRNA cap addition was also sufficient for methylation since the 31-nucleotide long transcripts were methylated at both ribose-2'-O and guanine-N-7 positions. This work provides insights into the spatial relationship between the active sites for the RNA dependent RNA polymerase and polyribonucleotidyltransferase responsible for capping of the viral RNA. We combine the present findings with our recently described electron microscopic structure of the VSV polymerase and propose a model of how the spatial arrangement of the capping activities of L may influence nucleotide polymerization.

  2. Single-molecule RNA observation in vivo reveals dynamics of co-transcriptional splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, M. L.; Coulon, A.; de Turris, V.; Palangat, M.; Chow, C. C.; Singer, R. H.; Larson, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of pre-mRNA and the splicing of that pre-mRNA to form completed transcripts requires coordination between two large multi-subunit complexes (the transcription elongation complex and the spliceosome). How this coordination occurs in vivo is unknown. Here we report the first experimental observation of transcription and splicing occurring at the same gene in living cells. By utilizing the PP7/MS2 fluorescent RNA reporter system, we can directly observe two distinct regions of the nascent RNA, allowing us to measure the rise and fall time of the intron and exon of a reporter gene stably integrated into a human cell line. The reporter gene consists of a beta globin gene where we have inserted a 24 RNA hairpin cassette into the intron/exon. Upon synthesis, the RNA hairpins are tightly bound by fluorescently-labeled PP7/MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins. After gene induction, a single locus of active transcription in the nucleus shows fluorescence intensity changes characteristic of the synthesis and excision of the intron/exon. Using fluctuation analysis, we determine the elongation rate to be 1.5 kb/min. From the temporal cross correlation function, we determine that splicing of this gene must be co-transcriptional with a splicing time of ~100 seconds before termination and a ~200 second pause at termination. We propose that dual-color RNA imaging may be extended to investigate other mechanisms of transcription, gene regulation, and RNA processing.

  3. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism. PMID:27165283

  4. Search for antisense copies of beta-globin mRNA in anemic mouse spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor John M

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies by Volloch and coworkers have reported that during the expression of high levels of β-globin mRNA in the spleen of anemic mice, they could also detect small but significant levels of an antisense (AS globin RNA species, which they postulated might have somehow arisen by RNA-directed RNA synthesis. For two reasons we undertook to confirm and possibly extend these studies. First, previous studies in our lab have focussed on what is an unequivocal example of host RNA-directed RNA polymerase activity on the RNA genome of human hepatitis delta virus. Second, if AS globin species do exist they could in turn form double-stranded RNA species which might induce post-transcriptional gene silencing, a phenomenon somehow provoked in eukaryotic cells by AS RNA sequences. Results We reexamined critical aspects of the previous globin studies. We used intraperitoneal injections of phenylhydrazine to induce anemia in mice, as demonstrated by the appearance and ultimate disappearance of splenomegaly. While a 30-fold increase in globin mRNA was detected in the spleen, the relative amount of putative AS RNA could be no more than 0.004%. Conclusions Contrary to earlier reports, induction of a major increase in globin transcripts in the mouse spleen was not associated with a detectable level of antisense RNA to globin mRNA.

  5. The onset of hemoglobin synthesis in spleens of irradiated mice after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) for globin was isolated from spleens of irradiated mice in which erythroid differentiation was induced by a bone marrow graft. The globin mRNA was isolated either by means of sucrose gradients of reticulocyte polysomal RNA or by affinity chromatography of total spleen RNA on poly (U)-sepharose. The globin mRNA was tested in a wheat embryo cell-free system. The appearance of mRNA in the spleen erythroid colonies was correlated with other parameters of erythroid differentiation such as globin synthesis, activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthetase and iron uptake. Poly(A) containing mRNA did appear already on the 3rd day after grafting. However, significant translational activity of globin mRNA could be demonstrated only one day later together with increase in globin synthesis and delta-aminolevulinic acid synthetase and enhanced iron uptake. In the second part of this study mouse spleen cells rich in erythroid elements were incubated with a specific heme synthesis inhibitor (isonicotinic acid hydrazide, INH) and the synthesis of 9 S RNA was estimated. It was found that a 40-minute incubation with INH reduced uridine incorporation into 9 S RNA fraction by about 40%. (author)

  6. Promoter-wide hypermethylation of the ribosomal RNA gene promoter in the suicide brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick O McGowan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alterations in gene expression in the suicide brain have been reported and for several genes DNA methylation as an epigenetic regulator is thought to play a role. rRNA genes, that encode ribosomal RNA, are the backbone of the protein synthesis machinery and levels of rRNA gene promoter methylation determine rRNA transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We test here by sodium bisulfite mapping of the rRNA promoter and quantitative real-time PCR of rRNA expression the hypothesis that epigenetic differences in critical loci in the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of suicide. Suicide subjects in this study were selected for a history of early childhood neglect/abuse, which is associated with decreased hippocampal volume and cognitive impairments. rRNA was significantly hypermethylated throughout the promoter and 5' regulatory region in the brain of suicide subjects, consistent with reduced rRNA expression in the hippocampus. This difference in rRNA methylation was not evident in the cerebellum and occurred in the absence of genome-wide changes in methylation, as assessed by nearest neighbor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to show aberrant regulation of the protein synthesis machinery in the suicide brain. The data implicate the epigenetic modulation of rRNA in the pathophysiology of suicide.

  7. mRNA turnover rate limits siRNA and microRNA efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Erik; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora

    2010-01-01

    What determines how strongly an mRNA responds to a microRNA or an siRNA? We know that properties of the sequence match between the small RNA and the mRNA are crucial. However, large-scale validations of siRNA efficacies have shown that certain transcripts remain recalcitrant to perturbation even after repeated redesign of the siRNA (Krueger et al, 2007). Weak response to RNAi may thus be an inherent property of the mRNA, but the underlying factors have proven difficult to uncover. siRNAs indu...

  8. Organic synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the Organic Synthesis Chemistry laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The laboratory activities are centered on the chemistry of natural products, which have a biological activity and on the development of new reactions, useful in the organic synthesis. The research works involve the following domains: the natural products chemistry which are applied in pharmacology, the plants and insects chemistry, the organic synthesis, the radical chemistry new reactions and the bio-organic physicochemistry. The published papers, the congress communications and the thesis are listed

  9. RNA Structures as Mediators of Neurological Diseases and as Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-07-01

    RNAs adopt diverse folded structures that are essential for function and thus play critical roles in cellular biology. A striking example of this is the ribosome, a complex, three-dimensionally folded macromolecular machine that orchestrates protein synthesis. Advances in RNA biochemistry, structural and molecular biology, and bioinformatics have revealed other non-coding RNAs whose functions are dictated by their structure. It is not surprising that aberrantly folded RNA structures contribute to disease. In this Review, we provide a brief introduction into RNA structural biology and then describe how RNA structures function in cells and cause or contribute to neurological disease. Finally, we highlight successful applications of rational design principles to provide chemical probes and lead compounds targeting structured RNAs. Based on several examples of well-characterized RNA-driven neurological disorders, we demonstrate how designed small molecules can facilitate the study of RNA dysfunction, elucidating previously unknown roles for RNA in disease, and provide lead therapeutics. PMID:26139368

  10. Discovery of a novel compound with anti-venezuelan equine encephalitis virus activity that targets the nonstructural protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Chung

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses present serious health threats as emerging and re-emerging viruses. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV, a New World alphavirus, can cause encephalitis in humans and horses, but there are no therapeutics for treatment. To date, compounds reported as anti-VEEV or anti-alphavirus inhibitors have shown moderate activity. To discover new classes of anti-VEEV inhibitors with novel viral targets, we used a high-throughput screen based on the measurement of cell protection from live VEEV TC-83-induced cytopathic effect to screen a 340,000 compound library. Of those, we identified five novel anti-VEEV compounds and chose a quinazolinone compound, CID15997213 (IC50 = 0.84 µM, for further characterization. The antiviral effect of CID15997213 was alphavirus-specific, inhibiting VEEV and Western equine encephalitis virus, but not Eastern equine encephalitis virus. In vitro assays confirmed inhibition of viral RNA, protein, and progeny synthesis. No antiviral activity was detected against a select group of RNA viruses. We found mutations conferring the resistance to the compound in the N-terminal domain of nsP2 and confirmed the target residues using a reverse genetic approach. Time of addition studies showed that the compound inhibits the middle stage of replication when viral genome replication is most active. In mice, the compound showed complete protection from lethal VEEV disease at 50 mg/kg/day. Collectively, these results reveal a potent anti-VEEV compound that uniquely targets the viral nsP2 N-terminal domain. While the function of nsP2 has yet to be characterized, our studies suggest that the protein might play a critical role in viral replication, and further, may represent an innovative opportunity to develop therapeutic interventions for alphavirus infection.

  11. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Alters the mRNA Translation Processing in L-02 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min HONG; Yan-chun CHE; Gui-zhen TANG; Wei CUN; Xue-mei ZHANG; Long-ding LIU; Qi-han LI

    2008-01-01

    HSV-1 infection-mediated regulation of mRNA translation in host cells is a systematic and complicated process. Investigation of the details of this mechanism will facilitate understanding of biological variations in the viral replication process and host cells. In this study, a comparative proteomics technology platform was applied by two-dimension electrophoresis of HSV-1 infected normal human L-02 cell and control cell lysates. The observed protein spots were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by the PDQuest software package. A number of the different observed protein spots closely associated with cellular protein synthesis were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The expression levels of the RPLP1 protein, which is required for mRNA translation, and KHSRP protein, which is involved in rapid decay of mRNA, were up-regulated, whereas the expression level of RNP H2, which is involved in positive regulation on the mRNA splicing process, was down-regulated. All of these results suggest that HSV-1 infection can influence cellular protein synthesis via modulation of cellular regulatory proteins involved in RNA splicing, translation and decay, resulting in optimisation of viral protein synthesis when cellular protein synthesis is shut off. Although there is need for further investigations regarding the detailed mechanisms of cellular protein control, our studies provide new insight into the targeting of varied virus signaling pathways involved in host cellular protein synthesis.

  12. Simple Method for Constructing RNA Triangle, Square, Pentagon by Tuning Interior RNA 3WJ Angle from 60° to 90° or 108°.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khisamutdinov, Emil F; Bui, My Nguyen Hoan; Jasinski, Daniel; Zhao, Zhengyi; Cui, Zheng; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Precise shape control of architectures at the nanometer scale is an intriguing but extremely challenging facet. RNA has recently emerged as a unique material and thermostable building block for use in nanoparticle construction. Here, we describe a simple method from design to synthesis of RNA triangle, square, and pentagon by stretching RNA 3WJ native angle from 60° to 90° and 108°, using the three-way junction (3WJ) of the pRNA from bacteriophage phi29 dsDNA packaging motor. These methods for the construction of elegant polygons can be applied to other RNA building blocks including the utilization and application of RNA 4-way, 5-way, and other multi-way junctions. PMID:25967062

  13. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Jørgen E; Penner, Robert C; Reidys, Christian M

    2011-01-01

    The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist for fixed genus only finitely many irreducible shadows. This implies that for fixed genus there are only finitely many classes of interaction structures. In particular the simplest case of genus zero already provides the formalism for certain types of structures that occur in nature and are not covered by other filtrations. This case of genus zero interaction structures is already of practical interest, is studied here in detail and found to be expressed by a multiple context-free grammar extending the usual one for RNA secondary structures. We show that in $O(n^6)$ time and $O(n^4)$ space complexity, this grammar for genus zero interaction structures provides not only minimum free energy solutions but also the complete partit...

  14. RNA structure-based ribosome recruitment: Lessons from the Dicistroviridae intergenic region IRESes

    OpenAIRE

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the canonical process of initiating protein synthesis on an mRNA depends on many large protein factors and the modified nucleotide cap on the 5′ end of the mRNA. However, certain RNA sequences can bypass the need for these proteins and cap, using an RNA structure-based mechanism called internal initiation of translation. These RNAs are called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESes), and the cap-independent initiation pathway they support is critical for successful infection by m...

  15. The role of mitochondrial tRNA variants in female breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xian-Li; Meng, Hua; Zhang, Wei; Qin, Yu-Hua; Zhao, Ning-Min

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial tRNA (Mt-tRNA) variants have been found to be involved in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer. These tRNAs, which played critical roles in mitochondrial protein synthesis, were important regulators in tumorigenesis. Distinguishing the polymorphisms or mutations in mt-tRNA genes was still puzzling for the clinicians and geneticists when confronted with the breast cancer. In this study, we performed a detailed analysis of recently reported mutations in mt-tRNA genes and further discussed the relationship between these variants and breast cancer. PMID:25703847

  16. Inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcription by triple-helix forming oligonucleotides with viral RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Volkmann, S; Jendis, J; Frauendorf, A; Moelling, K

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral RNA into double-stranded DNA is catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT). A highly conserved polypurine tract (PPT) on the viral RNA serves as primer for plus-strand DNA synthesis and is a possible target for triple-helix formation. Triple-helix formation during reverse transcription involves either single-stranded RNA or an RNA.DNA hybrid. The effect of triple-helix formation on reverse transcription has been analyzed here in vitro using a three-strand-syst...

  17. Selection of tRNA charging quality control mechanisms that increase mistranslation of the genetic code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadavalli, Srujana S; Ibba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mistranslation can follow two events during protein synthesis: production of non-cognate amino acid:transfer RNA (tRNA) pairs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and inaccurate selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs by the ribosome. Many aaRSs actively edit non-cognate amino acids, but editing mechanisms...... are not evolutionarily conserved, and their physiological significance remains unclear. To address the connection between aaRSs and mistranslation, the evolutionary divergence of tyrosine editing by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS) was used as a model. Certain PheRSs are naturally error prone...

  18. Detection of hepatitis C virus RNA using reverse transcription PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of the viral genome (HCV RNA) is by a combination of cDNA synthesis and PCR followed by gel analysis and/or hybridization assay. In principle, cDNA is synthesized using the viral RNA as template and the enzyme, reverse transcriptase. The cDNA is then amplified by PCR and the product detected. Agarose gel electrophoresis provides a rapid and simple detection method; however, it is non-quantitative. The assay protocol described in this paper is adapted from that published by Chan et al. Comments on various aspects of the assay are based on experience with the method in our laboratory

  19. RNA polymerase of the killer virus of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The L/sub A/ and M double-stranded (ds) RNA segments of the cytoplasmically inherited killer virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are encapsidated in virions that contain a DNA-independent transcriptase activity. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of full-length (+) stranded copies of the genomic dsRNA segments, denoted l/sub A/ and m. The L/sub A/ dsRNA segment appears to encode the major capsid protein in which both dsRNA molecules are encapsidated, while M dsRNA encodes products responsible for the two killer phenotypes of toxin production and resistance to toxin. Proteins extracted from transcriptionally active virions fail to cross-react with antibody to yeast DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, suggesting that none of the subunits of the host cell polymerases are active in viral transcription. Sequence analysis of the in vitro transcripts reveals neither to be 3'-terminally polyadenylated, although m contains an apparent internal polyA-like tract. In the presence of any three ribonucleoside triphosphates (0.5 mM), the fourth ribonucleoside triphosphate shows an optimal rate of incorporation into transcript at a concentration of 20 μM. However, in a 3-hour reaction, the yield of a product RNA increases with the concentration of the limiting ribonucleotide up to 0.5 mM. Gel electrophoresis of the reaction products reveals that increasing the substrate concentration accelerates the appearance of radioactivity in full-length l/sub A/ and m transcripts

  20. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2016-07-11

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses.

  1. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  2. MicroRNA-Attenuated Clone of Virulent Semliki Forest Virus Overcomes Antiviral Type I Interferon in Resistant Mouse CT-2A Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martikainen, Miika; Niittykoski, Minna; von und zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Immonen, Arto; Koponen, Susanna; van Geenen, Maartje; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Ylösmäki, Erkko; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Saksela, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma is a terminal disease with no effective treatment currently available. Among the new therapy candidates are oncolytic viruses capable of selectively replicating in cancer cells, causing tumor lysis and inducing adaptive immune responses against the tumor. However, tumor antiviral responses, primarily mediated by type I interferon (IFN-I), remain a key problem that severely restricts viral replication and oncolysis. We show here that the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) strain SFV4, which causes lethal encephalitis in mice, is able to infect and replicate independent of the IFN-I defense in mouse glioblastoma cells and cell lines originating from primary human glioblastoma patient samples. The ability to tolerate IFN-I was retained in SFV4-miRT124 cells, a derivative cell line of strain SFV4 with a restricted capacity to replicate in neurons due to insertion of target sites for neuronal microRNA 124. The IFN-I tolerance was associated with the viral nsp3-nsp4 gene region and distinct from the genetic loci responsible for SFV neurovirulence. In contrast to the naturally attenuated strain SFV A7(74) and its derivatives, SFV4-miRT124 displayed increased oncolytic potency in CT-2A murine astrocytoma cells and in the human glioblastoma cell lines pretreated with IFN-I. Following a single intraperitoneal injection of SFV4-miRT124 into C57BL/6 mice bearing CT-2A orthotopic gliomas, the virus homed to the brain and was amplified in the tumor, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and improved survival. IMPORTANCE Although progress has been made in development of replicative oncolytic viruses, information regarding their overall therapeutic potency in a clinical setting is still lacking. This could be at least partially dependent on the IFN-I sensitivity of the viruses used. Here, we show that the conditionally replicating SFV4-miRT124 virus shares the IFN-I tolerance of the pathogenic wild-type SFV, thereby allowing efficient targeting of a glioma

  3. Yeast nuclear RNA processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jade; Bernstein; Eric; A; Toth

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear RNA processing requires dynamic and intricately regulated machinery composed of multiple enzymes and their cofactors.In this review,we summarize recent experiments using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system that have yielded important insights regarding the conversion of pre-RNAs to functional RNAs,and the elimination of aberrant RNAs and unneeded intermediates from the nuclear RNA pool.Much progress has been made recently in describing the 3D structure of many elements of the nuclear degradation machinery and its cofactors.Similarly,the regulatory mechanisms that govern RNA processing are gradually coming into focus.Such advances invariably generate many new questions,which we highlight in this review.

  4. Alignments of RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blin, Guillaume; Denise, Alain; Dulucq, Serge; Herrbach, Claire; Touzet, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    We describe a theoretical unifying framework to express the comparison of RNA structures, which we call alignment hierarchy. This framework relies on the definition of common supersequences for arc-annotated sequences and encompasses the main existing models for RNA structure comparison based on trees and arc-annotated sequences with a variety of edit operations. It also gives rise to edit models that have not been studied yet. We provide a thorough analysis of the alignment hierarchy, including a new polynomial-time algorithm and an NP-completeness proof. The polynomial-time algorithm involves biologically relevant edit operations such as pairing or unpairing nucleotides. It has been implemented in a software, called gardenia, which is available at the Web server http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/RNA/gardenia. PMID:20431150

  5. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzhong Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes.

  6. Sensing of RNA viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    Our knowledge regarding the contribution of the innate immune system in recognizing and subsequently initiating a host response to an invasion of RNA virus has been rapidly growing over the last decade. Descriptions of the receptors involved and the molecular mechanisms they employ to sense viral...... pathogen-associated molecular patterns have emerged in great detail. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge regarding the receptors used to detect RNA virus invasion, the molecular structures these receptors sense, and the involved downstream signaling pathways....

  7. Evolutionary perspectives of telomerase RNA structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlevsky, Joshua D; Chen, Julian J-L

    2016-08-01

    Telomerase is the eukaryotic solution to the 'end-replication problem' of linear chromosomes by synthesising the highly repetitive DNA constituent of telomeres, the nucleoprotein cap that protects chromosome termini. Functioning as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme, telomerase is minimally composed of the highly conserved catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and essential telomerase RNA (TR) component. Beyond merely providing the template for telomeric DNA synthesis, TR is an innate telomerase component and directly facilitates enzymatic function. TR accomplishes this by having evolved structural elements for stable assembly with the TERT protein and the regulation of the telomerase catalytic cycle. Despite its prominence and prevalence, TR has profoundly diverged in length, sequence, and biogenesis pathway among distinct evolutionary lineages. This diversity has generated numerous structural and mechanistic solutions for ensuring proper RNP formation and high fidelity telomeric DNA synthesis. Telomerase provides unique insights into RNA and protein coevolution within RNP enzymes. PMID:27359343

  8. 227 Views of RNA: Is RNA Unique in Its Chemical Isomer Space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meringer, Markus; Goodwin, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is one of the two nucleic acids used by extant biochemistry and plays a central role as the intermediary carrier of genetic information in transcription and translation. If RNA was involved in the origin of life, it should have a facile prebiotic synthesis. A wide variety of such syntheses have been explored. However, to date no one-pot reaction has been shown capable of yielding RNA monomers from likely prebiotically abundant starting materials, though this does not rule out the possibility that simpler, more easily prebiotically accessible nucleic acids may have preceded RNA. Given structural constraints, such as the ability to form complementary base pairs and a linear covalent polymer, a variety of structural isomers of RNA could potentially function as genetic platforms. By using structure-generation software, all the potential structural isomers of the ribosides (BC5H9O4, where B is nucleobase), as well as a set of simpler minimal analogues derived from them, that can potentially serve as monomeric building blocks of nucleic acid–like molecules are enumerated. Molecules are selected based on their likely stability under biochemically relevant conditions (e.g., moderate pH and temperature) and the presence of at least two functional groups allowing the monomers to be incorporated into linear polymers. The resulting structures are then evaluated by using molecular descriptors typically applied in quantitative structure–property relationship (QSPR) studies and predicted physicochemical properties. Several databases have been queried to determine whether any of the computed isomers had been synthesized previously. Very few of the molecules that emerge from this structure set have been previously described. We conclude that ribonucleosides may have competed with a multitude of alternative structures whose potential proto-biochemical roles and abiotic syntheses remain to be explored. Key Words: Evolution—Chemical evolution

  9. MDA5 Detects the Double-Stranded RNA Replicative Form in Picornavirus-Infected Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Feng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available RIG-I and MDA5 are cytosolic RNA sensors that play a critical role in innate antiviral responses. Major advances have been made in identifying RIG-I ligands, but our knowledge of the ligands for MDA5 remains restricted to data from transfection experiments mostly using poly(I:C, a synthetic dsRNA mimic. Here, we dissected the IFN-α/β-stimulatory activity of different viral RNA species produced during picornavirus infection, both by RNA transfection and in infected cells in which specific steps of viral RNA replication were inhibited. Our results show that the incoming genomic plus-strand RNA does not activate MDA5, but minus-strand RNA synthesis and production of the 7.5 kbp replicative form trigger a strong IFN-α/β response. IFN-α/β production does not rely on plus-strand RNA synthesis and thus generation of the partially double-stranded replicative intermediate. This study reports MDA5 activation by a natural RNA ligand under physiological conditions.

  10. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double stranded (ds)RNA ‘trigger’ molecules into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by enzymes of the Dicer family. The siRNA molecules are essential components of the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC), which u...

  11. Branched RNA: A New Architecture for RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aviñó

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Branched RNAs with two and four strands were synthesized. These structures were used to obtain branched siRNA. The branched siRNA duplexes had similar inhibitory capacity as those of unmodified siRNA duplexes, as deduced from gene silencing experiments of the TNF-α protein. Branched RNAs are considered novel structures for siRNA technology, and they provide an innovative tool for specific gene inhibition. As the method described here is compatible with most RNA modifications described to date, these compounds may be further functionalized to obtain more potent siRNA derivatives and can be attached to suitable delivery systems.

  12. Studying RNA-protein interactions in vivo by RNA immunoprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selth, Luke A; Close, Pierre; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    The crucial roles played by RNA-binding proteins in all aspects of RNA metabolism, particularly in the regulation of transcription, have become increasingly evident. Moreover, other factors that do not directly interact with RNA molecules can nevertheless function proximally to RNA polymerases and...... have significant effects on gene expression. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) is a powerful technique used to detect direct and indirect interactions between individual proteins and specific RNA molecules in vivo. Here, we describe RIP methods for both yeast and mammalian cells....

  13. Translation Initiation is Controlled by RNA Folding Kinetics via a Ribosome Drafting Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Salis, Howard M

    2016-06-01

    RNA folding plays an important role in controlling protein synthesis as well as other cellular processes. Existing models have focused on how RNA folding energetics control translation initiation rate under equilibrium conditions but have largely ignored the effects of nonequilibrium RNA folding. We introduce a new mechanism, called "ribosome drafting", that explains how a mRNA's folding kinetics and the ribosome's binding rate collectively control its translation initiation rate. During cycles of translation, ribosome drafting emerges whenever successive ribosomes bind to a mRNA faster than the mRNA can refold, maintaining it in a nonequilibrium state with an acceleration of protein synthesis. Using computational design, time-correlated single photon counting, and expression measurements, we demonstrate that slow-folding and fast-folding RNA structures with equivalent folding energetics can vary protein synthesis rates by 1000-fold. We determine the necessary conditions for ribosome drafting by characterizing mRNAs with rationally designed ribosome binding rates, folding kinetics, and folding energetics, confirming the predictions of a nonequilibrium Markov model of translation. Our results have widespread implications, illustrating how competitive folding and assembly kinetics can shape the gene expression machinery's sequence-structure-function relationship inside cells. PMID:27199273

  14. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  15. Selective stimulation of translational expression by Alu RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Carol M.; Kimura, Richard H.; Schmid, Carl W.

    2002-01-01

    Human Alu and adenovirus VA1 RNAs each stimulate the translational expression of reporter genes in co-transient transfection assays without affecting either the rate of global protein synthesis or the abundance of the reporter mRNA. This selective, post-transcriptional stimulation of expression, which is observed in human and mouse cell lines and for three reporters, acts through a PKR- independent mechanism. The activity of Alu and VA1 RNAs in this assay is transient, causing a reduction in ...

  16. The RNA interference revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lenz

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of double-stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing has rapidly led to its use as a method of choice for blocking a gene, and has turned it into one of the most discussed topics in cell biology. Although still in its infancy, the field of RNA interference has already produced a vast array of results, mainly in Caenorhabditis elegans, but recently also in mammalian systems. Micro-RNAs are short hairpins of RNA capable of blocking translation, which are transcribed from genomic DNA and are implicated in several aspects from development to cell signaling. The present review discusses the main methods used for gene silencing in cell culture and animal models, including the selection of target sequences, delivery methods and strategies for a successful silencing. Expected developments are briefly discussed, ranging from reverse genetics to therapeutics. Thus, the development of the new paradigm of RNA-mediated gene silencing has produced two important advances: knowledge of a basic cellular mechanism present in the majority of eukaryotic cells and access to a potent and specific new method for gene silencing.

  17. HCV IRES domain IIb affects the configuration of coding RNA in the 40S subunit's decoding groove

    OpenAIRE

    Filbin, Megan E.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) uses a structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNA to recruit the translation machinery to the viral RNA and begin protein synthesis without the ribosomal scanning process required for canonical translation initiation. Different IRES structural domains are used in this process, which begins with direct binding of the 40S ribosomal subunit to the IRES RNA and involves specific manipulation of the translational machinery. We have found that upon initial 40S subuni...

  18. Ku autoantigen is the regulatory component of a template-associated protein kinase that phosphorylates RNA polymerase II.

    OpenAIRE

    Dvir, A; Peterson, S R; Knuth, M W; Lu, H.; Dynan, W S

    1992-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II contains a tandemly repeated heptapeptide sequence. Previous work has shown that this sequence is phosphorylated at multiple sites by a template-associated protein kinase, in a reaction that is closely associated with the initiation of RNA synthesis. We have purified this kinase to apparent homogeneity from human (HeLa) cells. The purified kinase phosphorylates native RNA polymerase II only in the presence of DNA and the general transcription ...

  19. Seasonal changes in hepatic progesterone receptor mRNA, estrogen receptor mRNA, and vitellogenin mRNA in the painted turtle, Chrysemys picta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodia-Lora, Noemí; Callard, Ian P

    2002-10-01

    Previous studies using the fresh water turtle Chrysemys picta have demonstrated that progesterone (P) inhibits estradiol (E)-induced vitellogenin (vtg) secretion in this species. Further, there is evidence for the differential expression of the two P receptor isoforms (PRA and PRB) in the liver during the turtle seasonal cycle, correlating with hepatic vitellogenesis. In this study we report changes in the hepatic PR mPNA, ER mRNA, and vitellogenin (vtg) mRNA transcripts during the reproductive cycle of the turtle. Fragments of the turtle hepatic PR and ER cDNAs were cloned and sequenced and a previously cloned turtle vtg cDNA were used as probes in Northern blotting. No 3.7-kb PR mRNA, corresponding to the smaller PR transcript, PRA of other species was found, although, a smaller 1.8-kb transcript (putative PRC mRNA) was present. These observations suggest that the turtle as in the chicken and human, the 4.5-kb PR mRNA transcript encodes both PRA and PRB proteins. Only the larger PR mRNA transcript (4.5-kb), was found to vary significantly during the annual cycle, being highest when vitellogenesis was inhibited in winter and summer. Vtg mRNA could not be detected during the summer or winter, was highest during vitellogenesis in the spring, and reappeared during the fall period of vitellogenesis and ovarian recrudescence. ER mRNA followed a similar pattern, being highest during spring and early fall, when vtg synthesis is high. The data suggest that P/PR, as well as E/ER, may be involved in the seasonal regulation of hepatic vitellogenesis in this species. PMID:12392693

  20. Footprints of a trypanosomatid RNA world: pre-small subunit rRNA processing by spliced leader addition trans-splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Gustavo Mayer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The addition of a capped mini-exon [spliced leader (SL] through trans-splicing is essential for the maturation of RNA polymerase (pol II-transcribed polycistronic pre-mRNAs in all members of the Trypanosomatidae family. This process is an inter-molecular splicing reaction that follows the same basic rules of cis-splicing reactions. In this study, we demonstrated that mini-exons were added to precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA are transcribed by RNA pol I, including the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS region. Additionally, we detected the SL-5'ETS molecule using three distinct methods and located the acceptor site between two known 5'ETS rRNA processing sites (A' and A1 in four different trypanosomatids. Moreover, we detected a polyadenylated 5'ETS upstream of the trans-splicing acceptor site, which also occurs in pre-mRNA trans-splicing. After treatment with an indirect trans-splicing inhibitor (sinefungin, we observed SL-5'ETS decay. However, treatment with 5-fluorouracil (a precursor of RNA synthesis that inhibits the degradation of pre-rRNA led to the accumulation of SL-5'ETS, suggesting that the molecule may play a role in rRNA degradation. The detection of trans-splicing in these molecules may indicate broad RNA-joining properties, regardless of the polymerase used for transcription.

  1. A conformational switch is responsible for the reversal of the 6S RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibition in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, Benedikt; Wagner, Rolf

    2012-12-01

    6S RNA is a bacterial transcriptional regulator,which accumulates during stationary phase and inhibits transcription from many promoters due to stable association with σ 70 -containing RNA polymerase. This inhibitory RNA polymerase ∼ 6S RNA complex dissociates during nutritional upshift, when cells undergo outgrowth from stationary phase, releasing active RNA polymerase ready for transcription. The release reaction depends on a characteristic property of 6S RNAs, namely to act as template for the de novo synthesis of small RNAs, termed pRNAs.Here, we used limited hydrolysis with structure-specific RNases and in-line probing of isolated 6S RNA and 6SRNA ∼ pRNA complexes to investigate the molecular details leading to the release reaction. Our results indicate that pRNA transcription induces the refolding of the 6S RNA secondary structure by disrupting part of the closing stem(conserved sequence regions CRI and CRIV) and formation of a new hairpin (conserved sequence regions CRIII and CRIV). Comparison of the dimethylsulfate modification pattern of 6S RNA in living cells at stationary growth and during outgrowth confirmed the conformational change observed in vitro. Based on our results, a model describing the individual steps of the release reaction is presented. PMID:23667906

  2. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  3. Translation of avidin mRNA from chick oviduct in the oestrous mouse uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestrogen-primed immature chicks were injected with 5.0 mg of progesterone. Twenty hours after, progesterone avidin mRNA was isolated and purified by a method including an antibody precipitation of the avidin polysomes, phenol extraction and nitrocellulose trapping. A water solution of mRNA (1 μg) with [14C]amino acids was instilled into the uterine horn of oestrous or dioestrous mice. Saline and [14C]amino acids were injected into the opposite control uterine horn. Avidin was assayed by an antibody method. A clear-cut avidin synthesis was found in the oestrous uterus, whereas the dioestrous showed only a slight avidin synthesis. This suggests that there are no absolute species-specific factors required at the translational level of uterine protein synthesis and that the mammalian uterus can translate foreign hormone-specific proteins at a rate dependent on the endogenous protein synthesis. (author)

  4. 生长激素和胰岛素样生长因子Ⅰ对奶牛乳蛋白合成关键激酶及调节因子mRNA表达量的影响%Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor Ⅰ : Effects on mRNA Expression Levels of Key Kinases and Regulatory Factors Regulating Milk Protein Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季昀; 庞学燕; 田青; 王梦芝; 王洪荣; 敖长金

    2013-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor Ⅰ (IGF- Ⅰ ) on mRNA expression levels of key kinases and regulatory factors regulating milk protein synthesis in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells in vitro. Four treatments were employed to culture the purified mammary epithelial cells of a Holstein dairy cow and growth medium without serum was used in a control group, and based on the control group, mediums supplemented with GH (100 ng/mL), IGF-Ⅰ (100 ng/mL) and GH (100 ng/mL) +IGF-Ⅰ (100 ng/mL) were used in experimental groups. After cultured for 24 h, the mRNA expression levels of CSN3, key kinases and regulatory factors regulating milk protein synthesis, GHR and IGF- Ⅰ R were determined by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The results showed as follows: there were mRNA expressions of GHR and IGF-Ⅰ R in mammary epithelial cells cultured in vitro, and CSN3 mRNA expression level was significantly enhanced in all experimental groups (P <0. 05) , however, no cumulative effect was found; compared with the control group, the mRNA expression level of E74-like transcription factor 5 (ELF5) tended to be increased in GH group (P <0. 10) , mRNA expression levels of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 ( rpS6K1) were significantly increased in IGF-Ⅰ group (P < 0. 05) , but on augmented effect was found in GH + IGF-Ⅰ group. All results indicate that GH and IGF-Ⅰ may modulate κ-casein synthesis independently through affecting mRNA expressions of key kinases and regulatory factors that regulating milk protein synthesis.%本试验旨在探讨生长激素(GH)和胰岛素样生长因子Ⅰ (IGF-Ⅰ)对体外培养的奶牛乳腺上皮细胞内调控乳蛋白合成的关键激酶及调节因子mRNA表达量的影响.试验对纯化后的荷斯坦奶牛乳腺上皮细胞进行4种处理,对照组采用无血清生长培养基,试验组在对照

  5. Detection of viral RNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyboh, Kishanda; Ajamian, Lara; Mouland, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    localization using a method like this, abundant information has been gained on both viral and cellular RNA trafficking events. For instance, HIV-1 produces RNA in the nucleus of infected cells but the RNA is only translated in the cytoplasm. When one key viral protein is missing (Rev), FISH of the viral RNA has revealed that the block to viral replication is due to the retention of the HIV-1 genomic RNA in the nucleus. Here, we present the method for visual analysis of viral genomic RNA in situ. The method makes use of a labelled RNA probe. This probe is designed to be complementary to the viral genomic RNA. During the in vitro synthesis of the antisense RNA probe, the ribonucleotide that is modified with digoxigenin (DIG) is included in an in vitro transcription reaction. Once the probe has hybridized to the target mRNA in cells, subsequent antibody labelling steps (Figure 1) will reveal the localization of the mRNA as well as proteins of interest when performing FISH/IF. PMID:22588480

  6. Natural RNA circles function as efficient microRNA sponges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Birkballe; Jensen, Trine I; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm;

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so-called comp......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so......-called competing endogenous RNA in humans and target mimicry in plants. We previously identified a highly expressed circular RNA (circRNA) in human and mouse brain. Here we show that this circRNA acts as a miR-7 sponge; we term this circular transcript ciRS-7 (circular RNA sponge for miR-7). ciRS-7 contains more......R-138 sponge, suggesting that miRNA sponge effects achieved by circRNA formation are a general phenomenon. This study serves as the first, to our knowledge, functional analysis of a naturally expressed circRNA....

  7. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double strand

  8. Dimethyl sulphoxide and haemin induce ferrochelatase mRNA by different mechanisms in murine erythroleukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Y; Fujita, H; Taketani, S; Sassa, S

    1993-03-01

    The level of mRNA encoding ferrochelatase (FeC), the terminal enzyme of the haem biosynthetic pathway, was examined in murine erythroleukaemia (MEL) cells when they were induced to undergo erythroid cell differentiation by treatment with dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), or haemin. FeC mRNA increased within 12 h after DMSO or haemin treatment of MEL cells, and its level continued to increase for 48 h. Treatment of cells with succinylacetone (SA), a potent inhibitor of haem synthesis, suppressed a DMSO-mediated increase in FeC mRNA, and haemin treatment reversed a SA-mediated decrease in FeC mRNA. Nuclear runoff analyses showed that, while DMSO increased the rate of transcription of FeC mRNA, haemin did not. These results indicate that the induction of FeC mRNA by DMSO is largely transcriptional, while that by haemin is post-transcriptional. PMID:8485055

  9. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D;

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translation...... the catalytic efficiency of serine attachment to tRNA, but had no effect on the activity of MtArgRS. Further, the most pronounced improvements in the aminoacylation activity of MtSerRS induced by MtArgRS were observed under conditions of elevated temperature and osmolarity. These data indicate that......, although the precise biological role remains largely unknown. To gain further insights into archaeal MSCs, possible protein-protein interactions with the atypical Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus seryl-tRNA synthetase (MtSerRS) were investigated. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed arginyl-tRNA...

  10. Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome in Classical and Hybrid States of tRNA Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkle, Jack A.; Wang, Leyi; Feldman, Michael B.; Pulk, Arto; Chen, Vincent B.; Kapral, Gary J.; Noeske, Jonas; Richardson, Jane S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna (Cornell); (UCB); (Duke)

    2011-09-06

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome controls the movement of tRNA and mRNA by means of large-scale structural rearrangements. We describe structures of the intact bacterial ribosome from Escherichia coli that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined to a resolution of {approx}3.2 angstroms by means of x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit site. The structures help to explain how the ratchet-like motion of the two ribosomal subunits contributes to the mechanisms of translocation, termination, and ribosome recycling.

  11. A closely related group of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from double-stranded RNA viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Bruenn, J A

    1993-01-01

    Probably one of the first proteinaceous enzymes was an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP). Although there are several conserved motifs present in the RDRPs of most positive and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses, the RDRPs of the dsRNA viruses show no detectable sequence similarity outside the conserved motifs. There is now, however, a group of dsRNA viruses of lower eucaryotes whose RDRPs are detectably similar. The origin of this sequence similarity appears to be common descent from one o...

  12. Regulated Pumilio-2 binding controls RINGO/Spy mRNA translation and CPEB activation

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanabhan, Kiran; Richter, Joel D.

    2006-01-01

    CPEB is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that controls the polyadenylation-induced translation of mos and cyclin B1 mRNAs in maturing Xenopus oocytes. CPEB activity requires not only the phosphorylation of S174, but also the synthesis of a heretofore-unknown upstream effector molecule. We show that the synthesis of RINGO/Spy, an atypical activator of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks), is necessary for CPEB-directed polyadenylation. Deletion analysis and mRNA reporter assays show that a c...

  13. Toward a structural understanding of IRES RNA function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbin, Megan E; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2009-06-01

    Protein synthesis of an RNA template can start by two different known mechanisms: cap-dependent translation initiation and cap-independent translation initiation. The latter is driven by RNA sequences called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that are found in both viral RNAs and cellular mRNAs. The diverse mechanisms used by IRESs are reflected in their structural diversity, and this structural diversity challenges us to develop a cohesive model linking IRES function to structure. With more direct structural information available for the viral IRESs, data suggest an inverse correlation between the degree to which an IRES RNA can form a stable structure on its own and the number of factors that it requires to function. Lessons learned from the viral IRESs may help understand the cellular IRESs, although more structural data are needed before any strong links can be made. PMID:19362464

  14. The Origin of the RNA World a Kinetic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wattis, J A D; Wattis, Jonathan A. D.; Coveney, Peter V.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to propose, construct and analyse microscopic kinetic models for the emergence of long chains of RNA from monomeric beta-D-ribonucleotide precursors in prebiotic circumstances. Our theory starts out from similar but more general chemical assumptions to those of Eigen, namely that catalytic replication can lead to a large population of long chains. In particular, our models incorporate the possibility of (i) direct chain growth, (ii) template-assisted synthesis and (iii) catalysis by RNA replicase ribozymes, all with varying degrees of efficiency. However, in our models the reaction mechanisms are kept `open'; we do not assume the existence of closed hypercycles which sustain a population of long chains. Rather it is the feasibility of the initial emergence of a self-sustaining set of RNA chains from monomeric nucleotides which is our prime concern. We confront directly the central nonlinear features of the problem, which have often been overlooked in previous studies. Our detailed m...

  15. lncRNA-RNA Interactions across the Human Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szcześniak, Michał Wojciech; Makałowska, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a numerous class of non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. There is possibility that a fraction of lncRNAs are not functional and represent mere transcriptional noise but a growing body of evidence shows they are engaged in a plethora of molecular functions and contribute considerably to the observed diversification of eukaryotic transcriptomes and proteomes. Still, however, only ca. 1% of lncRNAs have well established functions and much remains to be done towards decipherment of their biological roles. One of the least studied aspects of lncRNAs biology is their engagement in gene expression regulation through RNA-RNA interactions. By hybridizing with mate RNA molecules, lncRNAs could potentially participate in modulation of pre-mRNA splicing, RNA editing, mRNA stability control, translation activation, or abrogation of miRNA-induced repression. Here, we implemented a similarity-search based method for transcriptome-wide identification of RNA-RNA interactions, which enabled us to find 18,871,097 lncRNA-RNA base-pairings in human. Further analyses showed that the interactions could be involved in processing, stability control and functions of 57,303 transcripts. An extensive use of RNA-Seq data provided support for approximately one third of the interactions, at least in terms of the two RNA components being co-expressed. The results suggest that lncRNA-RNA interactions are broadly used to regulate and diversify the human transcriptome. PMID:26930590

  16. RNA thermodynamic structural entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute th...

  17. RNA Interference in livestock

    OpenAIRE

    Merkl, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    RNA Interference (RNAi) allows experimental reduction of gene expression, providing a tool for the investigation of gene function, disease therapy and the generation of animal models for human diseases. RNAi offers an opportunity to carry out precise genetic manipulations in a wide variety of species. This thesis describes the use of RNAi to downregulate two porcine genes, the whey protein Beta-Lactoglobulin (BLG) and the tumor suppressor protein p53. BLG is a major component in porcine and r...

  18. The Functions of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Willmann, Matthew R.; Endres, Matthew W.; Cook, Rebecca T.; Gregory, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    One recently identified mechanism that regulates mRNA abundance is RNA silencing, and pioneering work in Arabidopsis thaliana and other genetic model organisms helped define this process. RNA silencing pathways are triggered by either self-complementary fold-back structures or the production of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) that gives rise to small RNAs (smRNAs) known as microRNAs (miRNAs) or small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). These smRNAs direct sequence-specific regulation of various gene trans...

  19. MicroRNA from tuberculosis RNA: A bioinformatics study

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit, Somsri; Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2012-01-01

    The role of microRNA in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis is the interesting topic in chest medicine at present. Recently, it was proposed that the microRNA can be a useful biomarker for monitoring of pulmonary tuberculosis and might be the important part in pathogenesis of disease. Here, the authors perform a bioinformatics study to assess the microRNA within known tuberculosis RNA. The microRNA part can be detected and this can be important key information in further study of the p...

  20. An inhibitor of eIF2 activity in the sRNA pool of eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Michael; Porter, David L; McCarthy, Thomas L

    2011-08-15

    Eukaryotic protein synthesis is a multi-step and highly controlled process that includes an early initiation complex containing eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2), GTP, and methionine-charged initiator methionyl-tRNA (met-tRNAi). During studies to reconstruct formation of the ternary complex containing these molecules, we detected a potent inhibitor in low molecular mass RNA (sRNA) preparations of eukaryotic tRNA. The ternary complex inhibitor (TCI) was retained in the total sRNA pool after met-tRNAi was charged by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, co-eluted with sRNA by size exclusion chromatography, but resolved from met-tRNAi by ion exchange chromatography. The adverse effect of TCI was not overcome by high GTP or magnesium omission and was independent of GTP regeneration. Rather, TCI suppressed the rate of ternary complex formation, and disrupted protein synthesis and the accumulation of heavy polymeric ribosomes in reticulocyte lysates in vitro. Lastly, a component or components in ribosome depleted cell lysate significantly reversed TCI activity. Since assembly of the met-tRNAi/eIF2/GTP ternary complex is integral to protein synthesis, awareness of TCI is important to avoid confusion in studies of translation initiation. A clear definition of TCI may also allow a better appreciation of physiologic or pathologic situations, factors, and events that control protein synthesis in vivo. PMID:21640800

  1. Purification of RNA Polymerase II General Transcription Factors from Rat Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Conaway, Ronald C.; Reines, Daniel; Garrett, Karla Pfeil; Powell, Wade; Conaway, Joan Weliky

    1996-01-01

    Eukaryotic messenger RNA synthesis is a complex biochemical process requiring the concerted action of multiple “general” transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity of RNA polymerase II at both the initiation1 and elongation2,3 stages of transcription. Because the general transcription factors are present at low levels in mammalian cells, their purification is a formidable undertaking. For this reason we explored the feasibility of using rat liver as a source for purification of the...

  2. Synthetic RNA switches as a tool for temporal and spatial control over gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Andrew L.; Wolf, Joshua J.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2012-01-01

    The engineering of biological systems offers significant promise for advances in areas including health and medicine, chemical synthesis, energy production, and environmental sustainability. Realizing this potential requires tools that enable design of sophisticated genetic systems. The functional diversity of RNA makes it an attractive and versatile substrate for programming sensing, information processing, computation, and control functions. Recent advances in the design of synthetic RNA sw...

  3. Comparison of Two Methods of RNA Extraction from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Rodrigues Gouveia; Suzete Cleusa Ferreira; Jerenice Esdras Ferreira; Sheila Aparecida Coelho Siqueira; Juliana Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare two different methods of extracting RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We further aimed to identify possible influences of variables—such as tissue size, duration of paraffin block storage, fixative type, primers used for cDNA synthesis, and endogenous genes tested—on the success of amplification from the samples. Both tested protocols used the same commercial kit for RNA extraction (the Recov...

  4. Enhanced RNA Polymerase III-dependent Transcription Is Required for Oncogenic Transformation*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Sandra A. S.; Dubeau, Louis; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2008-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription, responsible for the synthesis of various stable RNAs, including 5 S rRNAs and tRNAs, is regulated by oncogenic proteins and tumor suppressors. Although it is well established that RNA pol III-dependent transcription is deregulated in transformed cells and malignant tumors, it has not been determined whether this represents a cause or consequence of these processes. We show that Rat1a fibroblasts undergoing oncogenic transformatio...

  5. BRF1 mutations alter RNA polymerase III-dependent transcription and cause neurodevelopmental anomalies.

    OpenAIRE

    Borck, G; Hög, F.; Dentici, M.; Tan, P; Sowada, N.; Medeira, A.; Gueneau, L.; Thiele, H; Kousi, M.; Lepri, F.; Wenzeck, L.; Blumenthal, I; Radicioni, A.; Schwarzenberg, T.; Mandriani, B.

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) synthesizes tRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs to regulate protein synthesis. Dysregulation of Pol III transcription has been linked to cancer, and germline mutations in genes encoding Pol III subunits or tRNA processing factors cause neurogenetic disorders in humans, such as hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and pontocerebellar hypoplasia. Here we describe an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and intellectual disability, as well...

  6. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase in Complex with Primer-Template RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosley, Ralph T.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Murakami, Eisuke; Lam, Angela M.; Grice, Rena L.; Du, Jinfa; Sofia, Michael J.; Furman, Philip A.; Otto, Michael J. (Pharmasset); (Emerald)

    2012-08-01

    The replication of the hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is accomplished by the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), for which mechanistic understanding and structure-guided drug design efforts have been hampered by its propensity to crystallize in a closed, polymerization-incompetent state. The removal of an autoinhibitory {beta}-hairpin loop from genotype 2a HCV NS5B increases de novo RNA synthesis by >100-fold, promotes RNA binding, and facilitated the determination of the first crystallographic structures of HCV polymerase in complex with RNA primer-template pairs. These crystal structures demonstrate the structural realignment required for primer-template recognition and elongation, provide new insights into HCV RNA synthesis at the molecular level, and may prove useful in the structure-based design of novel antiviral compounds. Additionally, our approach for obtaining the RNA primer-template-bound structure of HCV polymerase may be generally applicable to solving RNA-bound complexes for other viral RdRps that contain similar regulatory {beta}-hairpin loops, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus.

  7. Organic Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Romea, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Organic Synthesis is a one-semester course of the fourth year of the Chemistry Degree at the Universitat de Barcelona. This course covers the most important transformations in Organic Chemistry, including a short introduction to the Retrosynthetic Analysis. The aim is to provide a solid knowledge of the main reactions and their mechanism, which could later be improved during Master studies.

  8. 227 Views of RNA: Is RNA Unique in Its Chemical Isomer Space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaves, H James; Meringer, Markus; Goodwin, Jay

    2015-07-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is one of the two nucleic acids used by extant biochemistry and plays a central role as the intermediary carrier of genetic information in transcription and translation. If RNA was involved in the origin of life, it should have a facile prebiotic synthesis. A wide variety of such syntheses have been explored. However, to date no one-pot reaction has been shown capable of yielding RNA monomers from likely prebiotically abundant starting materials, though this does not rule out the possibility that simpler, more easily prebiotically accessible nucleic acids may have preceded RNA. Given structural constraints, such as the ability to form complementary base pairs and a linear covalent polymer, a variety of structural isomers of RNA could potentially function as genetic platforms. By using structure-generation software, all the potential structural isomers of the ribosides (BC5H9O4, where B is nucleobase), as well as a set of simpler minimal analogues derived from them, that can potentially serve as monomeric building blocks of nucleic acid-like molecules are enumerated. Molecules are selected based on their likely stability under biochemically relevant conditions (e.g., moderate pH and temperature) and the presence of at least two functional groups allowing the monomers to be incorporated into linear polymers. The resulting structures are then evaluated by using molecular descriptors typically applied in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies and predicted physicochemical properties. Several databases have been queried to determine whether any of the computed isomers had been synthesized previously. Very few of the molecules that emerge from this structure set have been previously described. We conclude that ribonucleosides may have competed with a multitude of alternative structures whose potential proto-biochemical roles and abiotic syntheses remain to be explored. PMID:26200431

  9. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  10. Genetic relatedness of orbiviruses by RNA-RNA blot hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA-RNA blot hybridization was developed in order to identify type-specific genes among double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses, to assess the genetic relatedness of dsRNA viruses and to classify new strains. Viral dsRNA segments were electrophoresed through 10% polyacrylamide gels, transferred to membranes, and hybridized to [5'32P]-pCp labeled genomic RNA from a related strain. Hybridization was performed at 520C, 50% formamide, 5X SSC. Under these conditions heterologous RNA species must share ≥ 74% sequence homology in order to form stable dsRNA hybrids. Cognate genes of nine members of the Palyam serogroup of orbiviruses were identified and their sequence relatedness to the prototype. Palyam virus, was determined. Reciprocal blot hybridizations were performed using radiolabeled genomic RNA of all members of the Palyam serogroup. Unique and variant genes were identified by lack of cross-homology or by weak homology between segments. Since genes 2 and 6 exhibited the highest degree of sequence variability, response to the vertebrate immune system may be a major cause of sequence divergence among members of a single serogroup. Changuinola serogroup isolates were compared by dot-blot hybridization, while Colorado tick fever (CTF) serogroup isolates were compared by the RNA-RNA blot hybridization procedure described for reovirus and Palyam serogroup isolates. Preliminary blot hybridization data were also obtained on the relatedness of members of different Orbivirus serogroups

  11. Dipeptide catalysed prebiotic polymerization of RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Rafal; Luisi, Pier Luigi; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2011-01-01

    A very short peptide composed of only two amino acid residues; Ser and His, was reported to exhibit broad hydrolytic activities. The dipeptide SerHis can catalyse the hydrolysis of esters, proteins and nucleic acids1. The ability of such a short peptide to be an efficient catalyst could be an...... thermodynamic equilibrium towards condensation can be shifted even in this environment. For example, the reverse-proteolysis in prebiotic environment has been described for SerHis3. In this case, SerHis was able to condensate amino acids into insoluble peptides, which in turn pulled the equilibrium further...... toward more peptide synthesis. In the present work we describe a prebiotically plausible system in which the SerHis dipeptide acts as catalyst for the formation of RNA oligomers from imidazole derivatives of mononucleotides. The thermodynamic shift towards condensation was achieved using water...

  12. Current preclinical small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based conjugate systems for RNA therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Hyeon; Kang, Yoon Young; Jang, Hyo-Eun; Mok, Hyejung

    2016-09-01

    Recent promising clinical results of RNA therapeutics have drawn big attention of academia and industries to RNA therapeutics and their carrier systems. To improve their feasibility in clinics, systemic evaluations of currently available carrier systems under clinical trials and preclinical studies are needed. In this review, we focus on recent noticeable preclinical studies and clinical results regarding siRNA-based conjugates for clinical translations. Advantages and drawbacks of siRNA-based conjugates are discussed, compared to particle-based delivery systems. Then, representative siRNA-based conjugates with aptamers, peptides, carbohydrates, lipids, polymers, and nanostructured materials are introduced. To improve feasibility of siRNA conjugates in preclinical studies, several considerations for the rational design of siRNA conjugates in terms of cleavability, immune responses, multivalent conjugations, and mechanism of action are also presented. Lastly, we discuss lessons from previous preclinical and clinical studies related to siRNA conjugates and perspectives of their clinical applications. PMID:26514375

  13. The control of melanin synthesis during oogenesis in Xenopus laevis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study investigates the mechanisms that control the synthesis of pigment during Xenopus laevis oogenesis. In this study, in vitro and in vivo assays indicate that the activity of the enzyme tyrosinase, the only enzyme necessary for the synthesis of pigment also reaches a peak during mid-oogenesis. The isotopes carbon 14, tritium, phosphorus 32 and sulfur 35 are used in this experiments. Furthermore, in vitro tyrosinase assays of polysomes isolated from different stage oocytes show that the rise in tyrosinase activity during mid-oogenesis is accompanied by a rise in polysomes synthesizing tyrosinase. This suggests that the synthesis of tyrosinase is restricted to mid-oogenesis. It was also established that oocyte tyrosinase is synthesized as a 32 kd polypeptide and is processed intra-melanosomally into a 120-130 kd tetramer. It is this form that is catalytically active in vivo. Oocyte tyrosinase does not require post-translational protease activation. To investigate the hypothesis that the synthesis of tyrosinase is restricted to mid-oogenesis, the accumulation of messenger RNA coding for tyrosinase was measured at different stages of oogenesis using a tyrosinase cDNA probe. The preparation of the tyrosinase cDNA probe required the purification of tyrosinase mRNA. This was achieved by a technique based on affinity chromatography of polysomes. This enriched 'tyrosinase mRNA' translated in vitro into two major proteins of 32 kd and 20 kd. The mRNA microinjected into Xenopus oocytes is translated into active tyrosinase. Hybridization of the tyrosinase cDNA probe to dot blots of oocyte mRNA suggested that tyrosinase mRNA accumulation reaches a peak just before maximal tyrosinase synthesis. The absence of tyrosinase mRNA late in oogenesis suggests that this message is not synthesized at this stage. These results are interpreted in terms of the functional significance of lampbrush chromosomes

  14. Key steps from the “RNA World” to the “DNA World”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renard B.-L.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the « RNA World » hypothesis of the origin of life, RNAs are assumed to be the central macromolecules able to self-replicate, conserve information and catalyze the reactions necessary for a primitive metabolism and many enzymatic cofactors may be regarded as molecular fossils of the “RNA World”. In the key steps involved in the transition from the RNA World to the DNA World, two main steps can be distinguished: (i the synthesis of 2’-deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides catalyzed nowadays by the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase and (ii the synthesis of thymine, a base specific for DNA, from uracil which is a base specific for RNA, catalyzed today by the enzyme thymidylate synthase. In regard to the chemistry of sulfur used by both enzymes for achieving their respective catalysis, we were interested in the search for simple sulfur reactions able to catalyze such transformations and report here on first results in an approach from thionucleosides to the catalysis involved in the conversion of uracil to thymine. In the RNA World, the recruitment of cofactors was crucial to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA and we also describe interesting preliminary results obtained in the prebiotic synthesis of pyridoxal (vitamin B6 that is the precursor of the key coenzyme pyridoxal phosphate (PLP able to catalyze nowadays seven different enzymatic reactions.

  15. RNA Silencing in Aspergillus nidulans Is Independent of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, T. M.; Keller, N P

    2005-01-01

    The versatility of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRPs) in eukaryotic gene silencing is perhaps best illustrated in the kingdom Fungi. Biochemical and genetic studies of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Neurospora crassa show that these types of enzymes are involved in a number of fundamental gene-silencing processes, including heterochromatin regulation and RNA silencing in S. pombe and meiotic silencing and RNA silencing in N. crassa. Here we show that Aspergillus nidulans, another model fung...

  16. Quantifying elongation rhythm during full-length protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Gabriel; Chen, Chunlai; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cui, Xiaonan; Zhang, Haibo; Asahara, Haruichi; Chong, Shaorong; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E; Cooperman, Barry S

    2013-07-31

    Pauses regulate the rhythm of ribosomal protein synthesis. Mutations disrupting even minor pauses can give rise to improperly formed proteins and human disease. Such minor pauses are difficult to characterize by ensemble methods, but can be readily examined by single-molecule (sm) approaches. Here we use smFRET to carry out real-time monitoring of the expression of a full-length protein, the green fluorescent protein variant Emerald GFP. We demonstrate significant correlations between measured elongation rates and codon and isoacceptor tRNA usage, and provide a quantitative estimate of the effect on elongation rate of replacing a codon recognizing an abundant tRNA with a synonymous codon cognate to a rarer tRNA. Our results suggest that tRNA selection plays an important general role in modulating the rates and rhythms of protein synthesis, potentially influencing simultaneous co-translational processes such as folding and chemical modification. PMID:23822614

  17. Can we estimate bacterial growth rates from ribosomal RNA content?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the quantity of RNA in bacterial cells and their growth rate under laboratory conditions. It may be possible to use this relationship to provide information on the activity of natural bacterial communities, and in particular on growth rate. However, if this approach is to provide reliably interpretable information, the relationship between RNA content and growth rate must be well-understood. In particular, a requisite of such applications is that the relationship must be universal among bacteria, or alternately that the relationship can be determined and measured for specific bacterial taxa. The RNA-growth rate relationship has not been used to evaluate bacterial growth in field studies, although RNA content has been measured in single cells and in bulk extracts of field samples taken from coastal environments. These measurements have been treated as probable indicators of bacterial activity, but have not yet been interpreted as estimators of growth rate. The primary obstacle to such interpretations is a lack of information on biological and environmental factors that affect the RNA-growth rate relationship. In this paper, the available data on the RNA-growth rate relationship in bacteria will be reviewed, including hypotheses regarding the regulation of RNA synthesis and degradation as a function of growth rate and environmental factors; i.e. the basic mechanisms for maintaining RNA content in proportion to growth rate. An assessment of the published laboratory and field data, the current status of this research area, and some of the remaining questions will be presented.

  18. Global Mapping of Human RNA-RNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Eesha; Sterne-Weiler, Tim; O'Hanlon, Dave; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2016-05-19

    The majority of the human genome is transcribed into non-coding (nc)RNAs that lack known biological functions or else are only partially characterized. Numerous characterized ncRNAs function via base pairing with target RNA sequences to direct their biological activities, which include critical roles in RNA processing, modification, turnover, and translation. To define roles for ncRNAs, we have developed a method enabling the global-scale mapping of RNA-RNA duplexes crosslinked in vivo, "LIGation of interacting RNA followed by high-throughput sequencing" (LIGR-seq). Applying this method in human cells reveals a remarkable landscape of RNA-RNA interactions involving all major classes of ncRNA and mRNA. LIGR-seq data reveal unexpected interactions between small nucleolar (sno)RNAs and mRNAs, including those involving the orphan C/D box snoRNA, SNORD83B, that control steady-state levels of its target mRNAs. LIGR-seq thus represents a powerful approach for illuminating the functions of the myriad of uncharacterized RNAs that act via base-pairing interactions. PMID:27184080

  19. Sulfonamide bearing oligonucleotides: Simple synthesis and efficient RNA recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, P.; Chandak, N.; Nielsen, P.;

    2012-01-01

    Four pyrimidine nucleosides wherein a benzensulfonamide group is linked to the C-5 position of the uracil nucleobase through a triazolyl or an alkynyl linker were prepared by Cu(I)-assisted azide-alkyne cycloadditions (CuAAC) or Sonogashira reactions, respectively, and incorporated into oligonucl...

  20. Regulatory Roles for Long ncRNA and mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetyan, Armen R.; Buiting, Coen; Kuiper, Renske A.; Coolen, Marcel W., E-mail: M.Coolen@gen.umcn.nl [Department of Human Genetics, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences (NCMLS), Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen 6500 HB (Netherlands)

    2013-04-26

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have identified the transcription of a much larger portion of the genome than previously anticipated. Especially in the context of cancer it has become clear that aberrant transcription of both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are frequent events. The current dogma of RNA function describes mRNA to be responsible for the synthesis of proteins, whereas non-coding RNA can have regulatory or epigenetic functions. However, this distinction between protein coding and regulatory ability of transcripts may not be that strict. Here, we review the increasing body of evidence for the existence of multifunctional RNAs that have both protein-coding and trans-regulatory roles. Moreover, we demonstrate that coding transcripts bind to components of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2) with similar affinities as non-coding transcripts, revealing potential epigenetic regulation by mRNAs. We hypothesize that studies on the regulatory ability of disease-associated mRNAs will form an important new field of research.

  1. Regulatory Roles for Long ncRNA and mRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel W. Coolen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have identified the transcription of a much larger portion of the genome than previously anticipated. Especially in the context of cancer it has become clear that aberrant transcription of both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are frequent events. The current dogma of RNA function describes mRNA to be responsible for the synthesis of proteins, whereas non-coding RNA can have regulatory or epigenetic functions. However, this distinction between protein coding and regulatory ability of transcripts may not be that strict. Here, we review the increasing body of evidence for the existence of multifunctional RNAs that have both protein-coding and trans-regulatory roles. Moreover, we demonstrate that coding transcripts bind to components of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2 with similar affinities as non-coding transcripts, revealing potential epigenetic regulation by mRNAs. We hypothesize that studies on the regulatory ability of disease-associated mRNAs will form an important new field of research.

  2. Regulatory Roles for Long ncRNA and mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have identified the transcription of a much larger portion of the genome than previously anticipated. Especially in the context of cancer it has become clear that aberrant transcription of both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are frequent events. The current dogma of RNA function describes mRNA to be responsible for the synthesis of proteins, whereas non-coding RNA can have regulatory or epigenetic functions. However, this distinction between protein coding and regulatory ability of transcripts may not be that strict. Here, we review the increasing body of evidence for the existence of multifunctional RNAs that have both protein-coding and trans-regulatory roles. Moreover, we demonstrate that coding transcripts bind to components of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2) with similar affinities as non-coding transcripts, revealing potential epigenetic regulation by mRNAs. We hypothesize that studies on the regulatory ability of disease-associated mRNAs will form an important new field of research

  3. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs. However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  4. PURE mRNA display for in vitro selection of single-chain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagumo, Yu; Fujiwara, Kei; Horisawa, Kenichi; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Doi, Nobuhide

    2016-05-01

    mRNA display is a method to form a covalent linkage between a cell-free synthesized protein (phenotype) and its encoding mRNA (genotype) through puromycin for in vitro selection of proteins. Although a wheat germ cell-free translation system has been previously used in our mRNA display system, a protein synthesis using recombinant elements (PURE) system is a more attractive approach because it contains no endogenous nucleases and proteases and is optimized for folding of antibodies with disulphide bonds. However, when we used the PURE system for mRNA display of single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies, the formation efficiency of the mRNA-protein conjugates was quite low. To establish an efficient platform for the PURE mRNA display of scFv, we performed affinity selection of a library of scFv antibodies with a C-terminal random sequence and obtained C-terminal sequences that increased the formation of mRNA-protein conjugates. We also identified unexpected common substitution mutations around the start codon of scFv antibodies, which were inferred to destabilize the mRNA secondary structure. This destabilization causes an increase in protein expression and the efficiency of the formation of mRNA-protein conjugates. We believe these improvements should make the PURE mRNA display more efficient for selecting antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26711234

  5. RNA interference in Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terenius, Ole; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Garbutt, Jennie S.;

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive...... in RNAi experiments in Lepidoptera are discussed. The review also points to a need to further investigate the mechanism of RNAi in lepidopteran insects and its possible connection to the innate immune response. Our general understanding of RNAi in Lepidoptera will be further aided in the future as...

  6. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E. [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States); Eghbalnia, Hamid R., E-mail: eghbalhd@uc.edu [University of Cincinnati, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (United States)

    2012-04-15

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation ({sup 1}H-{sup 15}N 2D HMQC) and proton-proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-{sup 1}H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino

  7. RNA SURVEILLANCE– AN EMERGING ROLE FOR RNA REGULATORY NETWORKS IN AGING

    OpenAIRE

    Montano, Monty; Long, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we describe recent advances in the field of RNA regulatory biology and relate these advances to aging science. We introduce a new term, RNA surveillance, an RNA regulatory process that is conserved in metazoans, and describe how RNA surveillance represents molecular cross-talk between two emerging RNA regulatory systems – RNA interference and RNA editing. We discuss how RNA surveillance mechanisms influence mRNA and microRNA expression and activity during lifespan. Additionall...

  8. Switching off small RNA regulation with trap-mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Johansen, Jesper; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Small non-coding regulatory RNAs in bacteria have been shown predominantly to be tightly regulated at the level of transcription initiation, and sRNAs that function by an antisense mechanism on trans-encoded target mRNAs have been shown or predicted to act stoichiometrically. Here we show that Mic......M, which silences the expression of an outer membrane protein, YbfM under most growth conditions, does not become destabilized by target mRNA overexpression, indicating that the small RNA regulator acts catalytically. Furthermore, our regulatory studies suggested that control of micM expression is unlikely...... to operate at the level of transcription initiation. By employing a highly sensitive genetic screen we uncovered a novel RNA-based regulatory principle in which induction of a trap-mRNA leads to selective degradation of a small regulatory RNA molecule, thereby abolishing the sRNA-based silencing of...

  9. Promoter Clearance by RNA Polymerase II Is an Extended, Multistep Process Strongly Affected by Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Mahadeb; McKean, David; Luse, Donal S.

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized RNA polymerase II complexes halted from +16 to +49 on two templates which differ in the initial 20 nucleotides (nt) of the transcribed region. On a template with a purine-rich initial transcript, most complexes halted between +20 and +32 become arrested and cannot resume RNA synthesis without the SII elongation factor. These arrested complexes all translocate upstream to the same location, such that about 12 to 13 bases of RNA remain in each of the complexes after SII-me...

  10. The 3′ Untranslated Region of the Andes Hantavirus Small mRNA Functionally Replaces the Poly(A) Tail and Stimulates Cap-Dependent Translation Initiation from the Viral mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In the process of translation of eukaryotic mRNAs, the 5′ cap and the 3′ poly(A) tail interact synergistically to stimulate protein synthesis. Unlike its cellular counterparts, the small mRNA (SmRNA) of Andes hantavirus (ANDV), a member of the Bunyaviridae, lacks a 3′ poly(A) tail. Here we report that the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the ANDV SmRNA functionally replaces a poly(A) tail and synergistically stimulates cap-dependent translation initiation from the viral mRNA. Stimulation of ...

  11. Radiostimulation of protein synthesis in barley seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barley seeds were irradiated with 10 gy of gamma-radiation and protein synthesis was measured in terms of incorporation of (3H) leucine at varying periods after the onset of germination. It is found that the process of translation of long-life mRNA is accentuated by about 20 percent in the irradiated barley seeds during the first hour of germination as compared to the corresponding appropriate control. (author)

  12. Role of RNA interference in plant improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Umesh Balkrishna; Gurav, Ranjit Gajanan; Bapat, Vishwas Anant

    2011-06-01

    Research to alter crops for their better performance involving modern technology is underway in numerous plants, and achievements in transgenic plants are impacting crop improvements in unparalleled ways. Striking progress has been made using genetic engineering technology over the past two decades in manipulating genes from diverse and exotic sources, and inserting them into crop plants for inducing desirable characteristics. RNA interference (RNAi) has recently been identified as a natural mechanism for regulation of gene expression in all higher organisms from plants to humans and promises greater accuracy and precision to plant improvement. The expression of any gene can be down-regulated in a highly explicit manner exclusive of affecting the expression of any other gene by using RNAi technologies. Additional research in this field has been focused on a number of other areas including microRNAs, hairpin RNA, and promoter methylation. Manipulating new RNAi pathways, which generate small RNA molecules to amend gene expression in crops, can produce new quality traits and having better potentiality of protection against abiotic and biotic stresses. Nutritional improvement, change in morphology, or enhanced secondary metabolite synthesis are some of the other advantages of RNAi technology. In addition to its roles in regulating gene expression, RNAi is also used as a natural defense mechanism against molecular parasites such as jumping genes and viral genetic elements that affect genome stability. Even though much advancement has been made on the field of RNAi over the preceding few years, the full prospective of RNAi for crop improvement remains to be fully realized. The intricacy of RNAi pathway, the molecular machineries, and how it relates to plant development are still to be explained.

  13. Evolutionary triplet models of structured RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Robert K; Holmes, Ian

    2009-08-01

    The reconstruction and synthesis of ancestral RNAs is a feasible goal for paleogenetics. This will require new bioinformatics methods, including a robust statistical framework for reconstructing histories of substitutions, indels and structural changes. We describe a "transducer composition" algorithm for extending pairwise probabilistic models of RNA structural evolution to models of multiple sequences related by a phylogenetic tree. This algorithm draws on formal models of computational linguistics as well as the 1985 protosequence algorithm of David Sankoff. The output of the composition algorithm is a multiple-sequence stochastic context-free grammar. We describe dynamic programming algorithms, which are robust to null cycles and empty bifurcations, for parsing this grammar. Example applications include structural alignment of non-coding RNAs, propagation of structural information from an experimentally-characterized sequence to its homologs, and inference of the ancestral structure of a set of diverged RNAs. We implemented the above algorithms for a simple model of pairwise RNA structural evolution; in particular, the algorithms for maximum likelihood (ML) alignment of three known RNA structures and a known phylogeny and inference of the common ancestral structure. We compared this ML algorithm to a variety of related, but simpler, techniques, including ML alignment algorithms for simpler models that omitted various aspects of the full model and also a posterior-decoding alignment algorithm for one of the simpler models. In our tests, incorporation of basepair structure was the most important factor for accurate alignment inference; appropriate use of posterior-decoding was next; and fine details of the model were least important. Posterior-decoding heuristics can be substantially faster than exact phylogenetic inference, so this motivates the use of sum-over-pairs heuristics where possible (and approximate sum-over-pairs). For more exact probabilistic

  14. Evolutionary triplet models of structured RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction and synthesis of ancestral RNAs is a feasible goal for paleogenetics. This will require new bioinformatics methods, including a robust statistical framework for reconstructing histories of substitutions, indels and structural changes. We describe a "transducer composition" algorithm for extending pairwise probabilistic models of RNA structural evolution to models of multiple sequences related by a phylogenetic tree. This algorithm draws on formal models of computational linguistics as well as the 1985 protosequence algorithm of David Sankoff. The output of the composition algorithm is a multiple-sequence stochastic context-free grammar. We describe dynamic programming algorithms, which are robust to null cycles and empty bifurcations, for parsing this grammar. Example applications include structural alignment of non-coding RNAs, propagation of structural information from an experimentally-characterized sequence to its homologs, and inference of the ancestral structure of a set of diverged RNAs. We implemented the above algorithms for a simple model of pairwise RNA structural evolution; in particular, the algorithms for maximum likelihood (ML alignment of three known RNA structures and a known phylogeny and inference of the common ancestral structure. We compared this ML algorithm to a variety of related, but simpler, techniques, including ML alignment algorithms for simpler models that omitted various aspects of the full model and also a posterior-decoding alignment algorithm for one of the simpler models. In our tests, incorporation of basepair structure was the most important factor for accurate alignment inference; appropriate use of posterior-decoding was next; and fine details of the model were least important. Posterior-decoding heuristics can be substantially faster than exact phylogenetic inference, so this motivates the use of sum-over-pairs heuristics where possible (and approximate sum-over-pairs. For more exact

  15. RNA regulons and the RNA-protein interaction network

    OpenAIRE

    Imig, J.; Kanitz, A.; Gerber, AP

    2012-01-01

    The development of genome-wide analysis tools has prompted global investigation of the gene expression program, revealing highly coordinated control mechanisms that ensure proper spatiotemporal activity of a cell's macromolecular components. With respect to the regulation of RNA transcripts, the concept of RNA regulons, which – by analogy with DNA regulons in bacteria – refers to the coordinated control of functionally related RNA molecules, has emerged as a unifying theory that describes the...

  16. RNA-RNA interaction prediction based on multiple sequence alignments

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Andrew X; Qin, Jing; Reidys, Christian M

    2010-01-01

    Recently, $O(N^6)$ time and $O(N^4)$ space dynamic programming algorithms have become available that compute the partition function of RNA-RNA interaction complexes for pairs of RNA sequences. These algorithms and the biological requirement of more reliable interactions motivate to utilize the additional information contained in multiple sequence alignments and to generalize the above framework to the partition function and base pairing probabilities for multiple sequence alignments.

  17. Plasticity-related microRNA and their potential contribution to the maintenance of long-term potentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Brigid; Joilin, Greig; Williams, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a form of synaptic plasticity that is an excellent model for the molecular mechanisms that underlie memory. LTP, like memory, is persistent, and both are widely believed to be maintained by a coordinated genomic response. Recently, a novel class of non-coding RNA, microRNA, has been implicated in the regulation of LTP. MicroRNA negatively regulate protein synthesis by binding to specific messenger RNA response elements. The aim of this review is to summarize ex...

  18. RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase 6 Is Required for Efficient hpRNA-Induced Gene Silencing in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Harmoko, Rikno; Fanata, Wahyu Indra Duwi; Yoo, Jae Yong; Ko, Ki Seong; Rim, Yeong Gil; Uddin, Mohammad Nazim; Siswoyo, Tri Agus; Lee, Seung Sik; Kim, Dool Yi; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kyun Oh

    2013-01-01

    In plants, transgenes with inverted repeats are used to induce efficient RNA silencing, which is also frequently induced by highly transcribed sense transgenes. RNA silencing induced by sense transgenes is dependent on RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6), which converts single-stranded (ss) RNA into double-stranded (ds) RNA. By contrast, it has been proposed that RNA silencing induced by self-complementary hairpin RNA (hpRNA) does not require RDR6, because the hpRNA can directly fold back o...

  19. Effect of single base changes and the absence of modified bases in 16S RNA on the reconstitution and function of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gene coding for E. coli 16S rRNA was placed in pUC19 under the control of the strong class III T7 promoter, phi 10, by ligation of the 1490 bp BclI/BstEII fragment of the rrnB operon with appropriate synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Such constructs allowed efficient in vitro synthesis of full-length transcripts (up to 900 mol RNA/mol template) free of modified bases. The synthetic RNA could be assembled into 30S subunits upon addition of E. coli 30S ribosomal proteins. The particles co-sedimented with authentic 30S particles and were electron microscopically indistinguishable from them. Upon addition of 50S subunits, codon-dependent P-site binding of tRNA and codon-dependent polypeptide synthesis were >80% of 30S reconstituted from natural 16S RNA and >50% of isolated 30S. UV-induced crosslinking of P-site bound AcVal-tRNA to residue C1400 was preserved. Changing C1400 to A had little effect on reconstitution, P-site binding, or polypeptide synthesis. However, the substitution of C1499 by G markedly inhibited assembly. The effect on P-site binding and polypeptide synthesis is under study. These results show (1) none of the modified bases of 16S RNA are essential for protein synthesis, (2) substitution of A for C1400 has little functional effect, and (3) position 1400 may be important for ribosome assembly

  20. RNA interference and antiviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionally conserved gene silencing mechanism present in a variety of eukaryotic species. RNAi uses short double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to trigger degradation or translation repression of homologous RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner. This system can be induced effectively in vitro and in vivo by direct application of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), or by expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) with non-viral and viral vectors. To date, RNAi has been extensively used as a novel and effective tool for functional genomic studies, and has displayed great potential in treating human diseases, including human genetic and acquired disorders such as cancer and viral infections. In the present review, we focus on the recent development in the use of RNAi in the prevention and treatment of viral infections. The mechanisms,strategies, hurdles and prospects of employing RNAi in the pharmaceutical industry are also discussed.

  1. An RNA secondary structure bias for non-homologous reverse transcriptase-mediated deletions in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Mogens; Carrasco, Maria L; Jespersen, Thomas;

    2004-01-01

    result from template switching during first-strand cDNA synthesis and that the choice of acceptor sites for non-homologous recombination are guided by non-paired regions. Our results may have implications for recombination events taking place within structured regions of retroviral RNA genomes......, especially in the absence of longer stretches of sequence similarity....

  2. Subunit Folds and Maturation Pathway of a dsRNA Virus Capsid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, D.; Bouřa, Evžen; Wu, W.; Cheng, N.; Plevka, P.; Qiao, J.; Mindich, L.; Heymann, J. B.; Hurley, J. H.; Steven, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 8 (2013), s. 1374-1383. ISSN 0969-2126 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : RNA bacteriophage phi-6 * minus-strand synthesis * cryoelectron microscopy * angstrom resolution * atomic-structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.794, year: 2013

  3. Alternative methods for the efficient construction of short hairpin RNA expression vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Zhang, Tingting; Guo, Lijun; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-06-01

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated RNA interference has become a basic technique in modern molecular biology and biochemistry for studying gene function and biological pathways. Here, we report two alternative and efficient methods to construct shRNA expression vectors based respectively on multiple-step sequential PCR and primer extension-homologous recombination (PE-HR). Neither method requires synthesizing long oligonucleotides containing hairpin sequences as used in traditional approaches. The hairpin sequences may produce mutations during oligo synthesis, pose problems in annealing, and lead to inefficient cloning. The PE-HR method further provides rapid and economical construction of shRNA expression vectors without needing the ligation procedure. PMID:25794926

  4. Inhibition of Escherichia coli precursor-16S rRNA processing by mouse intestinal contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Tine Rask; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Holmstrøm, Kim; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Molin, Søren

    1999-01-01

    . We have applied fluorescence in situ hybridization of pre-16S rRNA to Escherichia coli cells growing in vitro in extracts from two different compartments of the mouse intestine: the caecal mucus layer, where E. coli grew rapidly, and the contents of the caecum, which supported much slower bacterial......The correlation between ribosome content and growth rate found in many bacterial species has proved useful for estimating the growth activity of individual cells by quantitative in situ rRNA hybridization. However, in dynamic environments, the stability of mature ribosomal RNA causes problems in...... using cellular rRNA contents for direct monitoring of bacterial growth activity in situ. In a recent paper, Cangelosi and Brabant suggested monitoring the content of precursors in rRNA synthesis (pre-rRNAs) as an alternative approach. These are rapidly broken down after the cessation of bacterial growth...

  5. Semiautomated improvement of RNA alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Knudsen, Bjarne;

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a semiautomated RNA sequence editor (SARSE) that integrates tools for analyzing RNA alignments. The editor highlights different properties of the alignment by color, and its integrated analysis tools prevent the introduction of errors when doing alignment editing. SARSE readily...... the SARSE editor makes it a flexible tool to improve all RNA alignments with relatively little human intervention. Online documentation and software are available at (http://sarse.ku.dk)....

  6. RNA nanoparticles come of age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John J.Rossi

    2011-01-01

    @@ RNA has multiple functions in nature, including informa- tional transfer (mRNA) Ill, adaptor function (tRNAs) [2], guide functions (snRNAs, snoRNAs) [3,4]catalytic func- tion (ribozymes and the large ribosomal RNA) [5-7], and environmental sensing (riboswitehes) [8].In contrast, DNA only serves as an information storage molecule, and proteins serve as structural and enzymatic molecules.

  7. Regulation of RNA binding proteins in trypanosomatid protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, María Albertina; Cervini, Gabriela; Cassola, Alejandro

    2016-02-26

    Posttranscriptional mechanisms have a critical role in the overall outcome of gene expression. These mechanisms are especially relevant in protozoa from the genus Trypanosoma, which is composed by death threatening parasites affecting people in Sub-saharan Africa or in the Americas. In these parasites the classic view of regulation of transcription initiation to modulate the products of a given gene cannot be applied. This is due to the presence of transcription start sites that give rise to long polycistronic units that need to be processed costranscriptionally by trans-splicing and polyadenylation to give mature monocistronic mRNAs. Posttranscriptional mechanisms such as mRNA degradation and translational repression are responsible for the final synthesis of the required protein products. In this context, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in trypanosomes have a relevant role as modulators of mRNA abundance and translational repression by associating to the 3' untranslated regions in mRNA. Many different RBPs have been proposed to modulate cohorts of mRNAs in trypanosomes. However, the current understanding of their functions lacks a dynamic view on the different steps at which these RBPs are regulated. Here, we discuss different evidences to propose regulatory events for different RBPs in these parasites. These events vary from regulated developmental expression, to biogenesis of cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes in the nucleus, and condensation of RBPs and mRNA into large cytoplasmic granules. Finally, we discuss how newly identified posttranslational modifications of RBPs and mRNA metabolism-related proteins could have an enormous impact on the modulation of mRNA abundance. To understand these modifications is especially relevant in these parasites due to the fact that the enzymes involved could be interesting targets for drug therapy. PMID:26981203

  8. Minigene-like inhibition of protein synthesis mediated by hungry codons near the start codon

    OpenAIRE

    Jacinto-Loeza, Eva; Vivanco-Domínguez, Serafín; Guarneros, Gabriel; Hernández-Sánchez, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Rare AGA or AGG codons close to the initiation codon inhibit protein synthesis by a tRNA-sequestering mechanism as toxic minigenes do. To further understand this mechanism, a parallel analysis of protein synthesis and peptidyl-tRNA accumulation was performed using both a set of lacZ constructs where AGAAGA codons were moved codon by codon from +2, +3 up to +7, +8 positions and a series of 3–8 codon minigenes containing AGAAGA codons before the stop codon. β-Galactosidase synthesis from the AG...

  9. Induction of hepatic synthesis of serum amyloid A protein and actin.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, J F; Stearman, R S; Peltzman, C G; Potter, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Major changes in the mRNA population of murine liver occur after administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, an agent that causes increases in the concentrations of acute-phase serum proteins. The mRNA for one of these, serum amyloid A, is increased at least 500-fold compared to the normal level. It becomes one of the most abundant hepatic mRNAs, and serum amyloid A synthesis comprises about 2.5% of total hepatic protein synthesis in the acute-phase response. Its synthesis is tissue-speci...

  10. The expanding functions of cellular helicases: the tombusvirus RNA replication enhancer co-opts the plant eIF4AIII-like AtRH2 and the DDX5-like AtRH5 DEAD-box RNA helicases to promote viral asymmetric RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kovalev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on recruited host factors that aid several critical steps during replication. Several of the co-opted host factors bind to the viral RNA, which plays multiple roles, including mRNA function, as an assembly platform for the viral replicase (VRC, template for RNA synthesis, and encapsidation during infection. It is likely that remodeling of the viral RNAs and RNA-protein complexes during the switch from one step to another requires RNA helicases. In this paper, we have discovered a second group of cellular RNA helicases, including the eIF4AIII-like yeast Fal1p and the DDX5-like Dbp3p and the orthologous plant AtRH2 and AtRH5 DEAD box helicases, which are co-opted by tombusviruses. Unlike the previously characterized DDX3-like AtRH20/Ded1p helicases that bind to the 3' terminal promoter region in the viral minus-strand (-RNA, the other class of eIF4AIII-like RNA helicases bind to a different cis-acting element, namely the 5' proximal RIII(- replication enhancer (REN element in the TBSV (-RNA. We show that the binding of AtRH2 and AtRH5 helicases to the TBSV (-RNA could unwind the dsRNA structure within the RIII(- REN. This unique characteristic allows the eIF4AIII-like helicases to perform novel pro-viral functions involving the RIII(- REN in stimulation of plus-strand (+RNA synthesis. We also show that AtRH2 and AtRH5 helicases are components of the tombusvirus VRCs based on co-purification experiments. We propose that eIF4AIII-like helicases destabilize dsRNA replication intermediate within the RIII(- REN that promotes bringing the 5' and 3' terminal (-RNA sequences in close vicinity via long-range RNA-RNA base pairing. This newly formed RNA structure promoted by eIF4AIII helicase together with AtRH20 helicase might facilitate the recycling of the viral replicases for multiple rounds of (+-strand synthesis, thus resulting in asymmetrical viral replication.

  11. Discovery of an essential nucleotidylating activity associated with a newly delineated conserved domain in the RNA polymerase-containing protein of all nidoviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Kathleen C.; Gulyaeva, Anastasia; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Janssen, George M. C.; Ruben, Mark; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; van Veelen, Peter A.; Samborskiy, Dmitry V.; Kravchenko, Alexander A.; Leontovich, Andrey M.; Sidorov, Igor A.; Snijder, Eric J.; Posthuma, Clara C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that catalyzes the synthesis of their RNA(s). In the case of positive-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the order Nidovirales, the RdRp resides in a replicase subunit that is unusually large. Bioinformatics analysis of this non-structural protein has now revealed a nidoviral signature domain (genetic marker) that is N-terminally adjacent to the RdRp and has no apparent homologs elsewhere. Based on its conservation profile, this domain ...

  12. microRNA as a potential vector for the propagation of robustness in protein expression and oscillatory dynamics within a ceRNA network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Gérard

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. miRNAs can induce thresholds in protein synthesis. Such thresholds in protein output can be also achieved by oligomerization of transcription factors (TF for the control of gene expression. First, we propose a minimal model for protein expression regulated by miRNA and by oligomerization of TF. We show that miRNA and oligomerization of TF generate a buffer, which increases the robustness of protein output towards molecular noise as well as towards random variation of kinetics parameters. Next, we extend the model by considering that the same miRNA can bind to multiple messenger RNAs, which accounts for the dynamics of a minimal competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs network. The model shows that, through common miRNA regulation, TF can control the expression of all proteins formed by the ceRNA network, even if it drives the expression of only one gene in the network. The model further suggests that the threshold in protein synthesis mediated by the oligomerization of TF can be propagated to the other genes, which can increase the robustness of the expression of all genes in such ceRNA network. Furthermore, we show that a miRNA could increase the time delay of a "Goodwin-like" oscillator model, which may favor the occurrence of oscillations of large amplitude. This result predicts important roles of miRNAs in the control of the molecular mechanisms leading to the emergence of biological rhythms. Moreover, a model for the latter oscillator embedded in a ceRNA network indicates that the oscillatory behavior can be propagated, via the shared miRNA, to all proteins formed by such ceRNA network. Thus, by means of computational models, we show that miRNAs could act as vectors allowing the propagation of robustness in protein synthesis as well as oscillatory behaviors within ceRNA networks.

  13. Differential Synthesis in Vitro of Barley Aleurone and Starchy Endosperm Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundy, John; Hejgaard, Jørn; Hansen, Annette;

    1986-01-01

    . Thus, expression of genes encoding ASI, PSI, protein C, and PAPI is tissue and stage-specific during seed development. Only ASI, CI-1, and PAPI were synthesized in significant amounts with mRNA from cultured aleurone layers. The levels of synthesis of PAPI and CI-1 were independent of hormone treatment....... In contrast, synthesis of alpha-amylase (included as control) and of ASI showed antagonistic hormonal control: while GA promotes and ABA reduces accumulation of mRNA for alpha-amylase, these hormones have the opposite effect on ASI mRNA levels....

  14. Continuous presence of phorbol ester is required for its IL-1 beta mRNA stabilizing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljander, P; Hurme, M

    1993-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) activating phorbol esters are known to prevent the decay of mRNA of several cytokines and proto-oncogenes. To examine whether the phorbol ester signal is continuously required for this stabilizing effect, THP-1 monocytic cells were stimulated either with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), which can be removed from the cells by washings, or with the more hydrophobic phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Both of these stimuli induced high levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) mRNA. When the cells were washed at the peak of the IL-1 beta mRNA expression, this mRNA decayed rapidly in the PDBu stimulated cells while in PMA stimulated cells the mRNA levels were not affected. Moreover, this mRNA degradation induced by the removal of PDBu could be inhibited by readdition of the phorbol ester. This restabilization could be prevented by pharmacologic inhibitors of PKC, but not by inhibiting protein or RNA synthesis. Thus these data suggest that the phorbol ester must be continuously present to exert its mRNA stabilizing effect and that its effect is PKC-mediated but does not require active protein or RNA synthesis. PMID:8416817

  15. Decameric SelA•tRNA(Sec) ring structure reveals mechanism of bacterial selenocysteine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Bröcker, Markus J; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Hammond, Gifty; Suetsugu, Shiro; Söll, Dieter; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2013-04-01

    The 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), is synthesized on its cognate transfer RNA (tRNA(Sec)). In bacteria, SelA synthesizes Sec from Ser-tRNA(Sec), whereas in archaea and eukaryotes SepSecS forms Sec from phosphoserine (Sep) acylated to tRNA(Sec). We determined the crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus SelA complexes, which revealed a ring-shaped homodecamer that binds 10 tRNA(Sec) molecules, each interacting with four SelA subunits. The SelA N-terminal domain binds the tRNA(Sec)-specific D-arm structure, thereby discriminating Ser-tRNA(Sec) from Ser-tRNA(Ser). A large cleft is created between two subunits and accommodates the 3'-terminal region of Ser-tRNA(Sec). The SelA structures together with in vivo and in vitro enzyme assays show decamerization to be essential for SelA function. SelA catalyzes pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent Sec formation involving Arg residues nonhomologous to those in SepSecS. Different protein architecture and substrate coordination of the bacterial enzyme provide structural evidence for independent evolution of the two Sec synthesis systems present in nature. PMID:23559248

  16. Influence of microRNA on the Maintenance of Human Iron Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Clarke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient critical for many cellular functions including DNA synthesis, ATP generation, and cellular proliferation. Though essential, excessive iron may contribute to the generation of free radicals capable of damaging cellular lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. As such, the maintenance and control of cellular iron homeostasis is critical to prevent either iron deficiency or iron toxicity conditions. The maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis is largely coordinated by a family of cytosolic RNA binding proteins known as Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRP that function to post-transcriptionally control the translation and/or stability of mRNA encoding proteins required for iron uptake, storage, transport, and utilization. More recently, a class of small non-coding RNA known as microRNA (miRNA has also been implicated in the control of iron metabolism. To date, miRNA have been demonstrated to post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of genes associated with iron acquisition (transferrin receptor and divalent metal transporter, iron export (ferroportin, iron storage (ferritin, iron utilization (ISCU, and coordination of systemic iron homeostasis (HFE and hemojevelin. Given the diversity of miRNA and number of potential mRNA targets, characterizing factors that contribute to alterations in miRNA expression, biogenesis, and processing will enhance our understanding of mechanisms by which cells respond to changes in iron demand and/or iron availability to control cellular iron homeostasis.

  17. PEGylation of 6-amino-6-deoxy-curdlan for efficient in vivo siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altangerel, Altanzul; Cai, Jia; Liu, Lixia; Wu, Yinga; Baigude, Huricha; Han, Jingfen

    2016-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved gene-silencing phenomenon that shows great promise for developing new therapies. However, the development of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based therapies need to establish efficient delivery system that silences target genes with siRNA doses that is clinically feasible in humans. Here we report synthesis and in vivo study of a novel PEGylated curdlan-based nanoparticle, designated as 6AC-100PEG, obtained by conjugation of mPEG 2000 to 6-amino-6-deoxy-curdlan. The complex of siRNA/6AC-100PEG showed homogenous nanoparticles with an average diameter of 200nm. MTT assay indicated that 6AC-100PEG does not have apparent cytotoxicity. Systemic administration of a complex of siapoB/6AC-100PEG significantly reduced the level of apoB mRNA in mouse liver, indicating that 6AC-100PEG can efficiently deliver siRNA to mouse liver and induce RNAi. Administration of siRNA/6AC-100PEG to mouse did not elevate liver enzyme level in the serum, indicating that 6AC-100PEG nanoparticle is a promising in vivo siRNA delivery agent. PMID:26877000

  18. The RNA interference pathway affects midgut infection- and escape barriers for Sindbis virus in Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RNA interference (RNAi pathway acts as an innate antiviral immune response in Aedes aegypti, modulating arbovirus infection of mosquitoes. Sindbis virus (SINV; family: Togaviridae, genus: Alphavirus is an arbovirus that infects Ae. aegypti in the laboratory. SINV strain TR339 encounters a midgut escape barrier (MEB during infection of Ae. aegypti. The nature of this barrier is not well understood. To investigate the role of the midgut as the central organ determining vector competence for arboviruses, we generated transgenic mosquitoes in which the RNAi pathway was impaired in midgut tissue of bloodfed females. We used these mosquitoes to reveal effects of RNAi impairment in the midgut on SINV replication, midgut infection and dissemination efficiencies, and mosquito longevity. Results As a novel tool for studying arbovirus-mosquito interactions, we engineered a transgenic mosquito line with an impaired RNAi pathway in the midgut of bloodfed females by silencing expression of the Aa-dcr2 gene. In midgut tissue of the transgenic Carb/dcr16 line, Aa-dcr2 expression was reduced ~50% between 1-7 days post-bloodmeal (pbm when compared to the recipient mosquito strain. After infection with SINV-TR339EGFP, Aa-dcr2 expression levels were enhanced in both mosquito strains. In the RNAi pathway impaired mosquito strain SINV titers and midgut infection rates were significantly higher at 7 days pbm. There was also a strong tendency for increased virus dissemination rates among the transgenic mosquitoes. Between 7-14 days pbm, SINV was diminished in midgut tissue of the transgenic mosquitoes. Transgenic impairment of the RNAi pathway and/or SINV infection did not affect longevity of the mosquitoes. Conclusions We showed that RNAi impaired transgenic mosquitoes are a useful tool for studying arbovirus-mosquito interactions at the molecular level. Following ingestion by Ae. aegypti, the recombinant SINV-TR339EGFP was confronted with both

  19. Bifurcations in the interplay of messenger RNA, protein and nonprotein coding RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: zhdanov@catalysis.ru

    2008-07-18

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-protein association resulting in suppression of the protein regulatory activity or (ii) ncRNA-mRNA association resulting in degradation of the miRNA-mRNA complex. The kinetic models describing these two scenarios are found to predict bistability provided that protein suppresses the ncRNA formation.

  20. Bifurcations in the interplay of messenger RNA, protein and nonprotein coding RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-protein association resulting in suppression of the protein regulatory activity or (ii) ncRNA-mRNA association resulting in degradation of the miRNA-mRNA complex. The kinetic models describing these two scenarios are found to predict bistability provided that protein suppresses the ncRNA formation