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Sample records for alpha-tocopherol transfer protein

  1. Alpha-Tocopherol Transfer Protein (α-TTP): Insights from Alpha-Tocopherol Transfer Protein Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Yunsook; Traber, Maret G.

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP) is a liver cytosolic transport protein that faciliates α-tocopherol (α-T) transfer into liver secreted plasma lipoproteins. Genetic defects in α-TTP, like dietary vitamin E deficiency, are associated with infertility, muscular weakness and neurological disorders. Both human and α-TTP deficient (α-TTP-/-) mice exhibit severe plasma and tissue vitamin E deficiency that can be attenuated by sufficient dietary α-T supplementations. In this review, we summ...

  2. The hepatic alpha tocopherol transfer protein (TTP): ligand-induced protection from proteasomal degradation†

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Varsha; Morley, Samantha; Manor, Danny

    2010-01-01

    There are eight naturally occurring forms of the dietary antioxidant vitamin E. Of these, only α-tocopherol is retained at high levels in vertebrate plasma and tissues. This selectivity is achieved in part by the action of the hepatic alpha tocopherol transfer protein (TTP), which facilitates the selective incorporation of dietary α-tocopherol into circulating lipoproteins. We examined the effects of vitamin E on TTP expression in cultured hepatocytes. Treatment with vitamin E brought about a...

  3. Alpha-tocopherol transfer protein disruption confers resistance to malarial infection in mice

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    Takeya Motohiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various factors impact the severity of malaria, including the nutritional status of the host. Vitamin E, an intra and extracellular anti-oxidant, is one such nutrient whose absence was shown previously to negatively affect Plasmodium development. However, mechanisms of this Plasmodium inhibition, in addition to means by which to exploit this finding as a therapeutic strategy, remain unclear. Methods α-TTP knockout mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 or Plasmodium yoelii XL-17, parasitaemia, survival rate were monitored. In one part of the experiments mice were fed with a supplemented diet of vitamin E and then infected. In addition, parasite DNA damage was monitored by means of comet assay and 8-OHdG test. Moreover, infected mice were treated with chloroquine and parasitaemia and survival rate were monitored. Results Inhibition of α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP, a determinant of vitamin E concentration in circulation, confers resistance to malarial infection as a result of oxidative damage to the parasites. Furthermore, in combination with the anti-malarial drug chloroquine results were even more dramatic. Conclusion Considering that these knockout mice lack observable negative impacts typical of vitamin E deficiency, these results suggest that inhibition of α-TTP activity in the liver may be a useful strategy in the prevention and treatment of malaria infection. Moreover, a combined strategy of α-TTP inhibition and chloroquine treatment might be effective against drug resistant parasites.

  4. Membrane transfer of. cap alpha. -tocopherol: influence of soluble. cap alpha. -tocopherol-binding factors from the liver, lung, heart and brain of the rat

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    Murphy, D.J.; Mavis, R.D.

    1981-10-25

    The pH of liver supernatant was lowered from 7.4 to 5.1, which removed 23% of the soluble protein and 97% of the lipid-soluble phosphate, increased the total ..cap alpha..-tocopherol transfer activity 1.3-fold and the specific activity of the transfer rate 1.6-fold. This transfer activity was proportional to time up to 4 min and to protein concentrations up to 0.1 mg/ml. Fractionation of the pH 5.1-treated liver supernatant by gel filtration produced a single peak of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol transfer activity of M/sub r/ = 34,000 and a single peak of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol-binding activity which was coincident with the transfer activity. The transfer rate of this peak of activity was 316 pmol/min/mg of protein, a 9-fold purification over the original untreated supernatant. This ..cap alpha..-tocopherol transfer rate was reduced by 83 and 96% following pronase digestion or heat treatment (80/sup 0/C) of the soluble fraction, respectively, while trypsin digestion reduced the transfer rate only 18% and phospholipase C digestion had no effect. Untreated liver supernatant possessed the peak of binding activity of M/sub r/ = 34,000 and a high molecular weight binding fraction that eluted at the void volume. Heart and brain supernatants also possessed an ..cap alpha..-tocopherol-binding fraction that eluted at the void volume, while lung supernatant lacked binding activity.

  5. Pedigree Analysis and Exclusion of Alpha-Tocopherol Transfer Protein (TTPA) as a Candidate Gene for Neuroaxonal Dystrophy in the American Quarter Horse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finno, C.J.; Famula, T.; Aleman, M.; Higgins, R.J.; Madigan, J.E.; Bannasch, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Equine neuroaxonal dystrophy/equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy (NAD/EDM) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting young horses of various breeds that resembles ataxia with vitamin E deficiency in humans, an inherited disorder caused by mutations in the alpha-tocopherol transfer protein gene (TTPA). To evaluate variants found upon sequencing TTPA in the horse, the mode of inheritance for NAD/EDM had to be established. Hypothesis NAD/EDM in the American Quarter Horse (QH) is caused by a mutation in TTPA. Animals 88 clinically phenotyped (35 affected [ataxia score ≥2], 53 unaffected) QHs with a diagnosis of NAD/EDM with 6 affected and 4 unaffected cases confirmed at postmortem examination. Procedures Pedigrees and genotypes across 54,000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were assessed to determine heritability and mode of inheritance of NAD/EDM. TTPA sequence of exon/intron boundaries was evaluated in 2 affected and 2 control horses. An association analysis was performed by 71 SNPs surrounding TTPA and 8 SNPs within TTPA that were discovered by sequencing. RT-PCR for TTPA was performed on mRNA from the liver of 4 affected and 4 control horses. Results Equine NAD/EDM appears to be inherited as a polygenic trait and, within this family of QHs, demonstrates high heritability. Sequencing of TTPA identified 12 variants. No significant association was found using the 79 available variants in and surrounding TTPA. RT-PCR yielded PCR products of equivalent sizes between affected cases and controls. Conclusions and Clinical Importance NAD/EDM demonstrates heritability in this family of QHs. Variants in TTPA are not responsible for NAD/EDM in this study population. PMID:23186252

  6. Expression of the Alpha Tocopherol Transfer Protein gene is regulated by Oxidative Stress and Common Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulatowski, Lynn; Dreussi, Cara; Noy, Noa; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Klein, Eric; Manor, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin E (α-tocopherol) is the major lipid soluble antioxidant in most animal species. By controlling the secretion of vitamin E from the liver, the α-tocopherol transfer protein (αTTP) regulates whole-body distribution and levels of this vital nutrient. However, the mechanism(s) that regulate the expression of this protein are poorly understood. Here we report that transcription of the TTPA gene in immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) is induced by oxidative stress and by hypoxia, by agonists of the nuclear receptors PPARα and RXR, and by increased cAMP levels. The data show further that induction of TTPA transcription by oxidative stress is mediated by an already-present transcription factor, and does not require de novo protein synthesis. Silencing of the cAMP response element binding (CREB) transcription factor attenuated transcriptional responses of the TTPA gene to added peroxide, suggesting that CREB mediates responses of this gene to oxidative stress. Using a 1.9 Kb proximal segment of the human TTPA promoter together with site-directed mutagenesis approach, we found that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are commonly found in healthy humans dramatically affect promoter activity. These observations suggest that oxidative stress and individual genetic makeup contribute to vitamin E homeostasis in humans. These findings may explain the variable responses to vitamin E supplementation observed in human clinical trials. PMID:23079030

  7. Coating of peanuts with edible whey protein film containing alpha-tocopherol and ascorbyl palmitate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J H; Hwang, H-M; Min, S; Krochta, J M

    2008-10-01

    Physical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) coating solution incorporating ascorbic palmitate (AP) and alpha-tocopherol (tocopherol) were characterized, and the antioxidant activity of dried WPI coatings against lipid oxidation in roasted peanuts were investigated. The AP and tocopherol were mixed into a 10% (w/w) WPI solution containing 6.7% glycerol. Process 1 (P1) blended an AP and tocopherol mixture directly into the WPI solution using a high-speed homogenizer. Process 2 (P2) used ethanol as a solvent for dissolving AP and tocopherol into the WPI solution. The viscosity and turbidity of the WPI coating solution showed the Newtonian fluid behavior, and 0.25% of critical concentration of AP in WPI solution rheology. After peanuts were coated with WPI solutions, color changes of peanuts were measured during 16 wk of storage at 25 degrees C, and the oxidation of peanuts was determined by hexanal analysis using solid-phase micro-extraction samplers and GC-MS. Regardless of the presence of antioxidants in the coating layer, the formation of hexanal from the oxidation of peanut lipids was reduced by WPI coatings, which indicates WPI coatings protected the peanuts from oxygen permeation and oxidation. However, the incorporation of antioxidants in the WPI coating layer did not show a significant difference in hexanal production from that of WPI coating treatment without incorporation of antioxidants. PMID:19019105

  8. Alpha-tocopherol transfer factor (aTTF) from rat liver mediates the transfer of d-alpha-(/sup 3/H)-tocopherol from liposomes to human erythrocyte ghosts and exhibits saturation kinetics

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    Verdon, C.P.; Blumberg, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    aTTF was observed to transfer d-alpha-(/sup 3/H)-tocopherol (/sup 3/HaT) from egg lecithin liposomes to human erythrocyte ghosts (EG). aTTF may be associated with the 32,000-35,000 MW alpha-Tocopherol Binding Protein previously described to transfer /sup 3/HaT from liposomes to rat liver microsomes and mitochondria prepared by ammonium sulfate precipitation of rat liver cytosol followed by dialysis against 50 mM TRIS-HCl/1 mM EDTA buffer, pH 7.4. Assay for aTTF activity consisted of incubating liposomal /sup 3/HaT and EG in the presence of aTTF or buffer blank for various time periods at 37/sup 0/C, then counting the resulting radioactivity in washed EG after pelleting by centrifugation. Liposomes were prelabeled-with non-exchangable glycerol-(/sup 14/C)-trioleate to correct for liposomes adhering to pelleted EG. Greater than 50% of the tritium found with the EG pellet was recovered by HPLC as /sup 3/HaT. aTTF activity increased with increasing liposomal /sup 3/HaT concentration before reaching a plateau. aTTF activity was similarly saturated by increasing EG concentrations. The same assay conditions with buffer blank along resulted in negligible transfer activity.

  9. Alpha-tocopherol transfer factor (aTTF) from rat liver mediates the transfer of d-alpha-[3H]-tocopherol from liposomes to human erythrocyte ghosts and exhibits saturation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    aTTF was observed to transfer d-alpha-[3H]-tocopherol (3HaT) from egg lecithin liposomes to human erythrocyte ghosts (EG). aTTF may be associated with the 32,000-35,000 MW alpha-Tocopherol Binding Protein previously described to transfer 3HaT from liposomes to rat liver microsomes and mitochondria prepared by ammonium sulfate precipitation of rat liver cytosol followed by dialysis against 50 mM TRIS-HCl/1 mM EDTA buffer, pH 7.4. Assay for aTTF activity consisted of incubating liposomal 3HaT and EG in the presence of aTTF or buffer blank for various time periods at 370C, then counting the resulting radioactivity in washed EG after pelleting by centrifugation. Liposomes were prelabeled-with non-exchangable glycerol-[14C]-trioleate to correct for liposomes adhering to pelleted EG. Greater than 50% of the tritium found with the EG pellet was recovered by HPLC as 3HaT. aTTF activity increased with increasing liposomal 3HaT concentration before reaching a plateau. aTTF activity was similarly saturated by increasing EG concentrations. The same assay conditions with buffer blank along resulted in negligible transfer activity

  10. Effects of Alpha- Tocopherol on the Velocity of Low Density Lipoprotein Oxidation by Cupric Ions

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    Mohammad Ali Ghaffari

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of different concentrations of alpha-tocopherol on in vitro cupric ions induced oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDL. Human native LDL (50 µg protein/ml oxidation was induced by 10 µmol/L of CuSO4. Conjugated dienes were measured spectrophotometrically for up to 440 minutes. The length of the lag phase (Tlag, maximum velocity of the reaction (Vmax and the maximum amount of generated dienes were obtained from kinetic data. Alpha-tocopherol increased Tlag and decreased Vmax with a dependence upon concentration (0-100 µmol/L. There was no difference between the Dmax obtained with cupric ions alone or in the presence of the various concentrations of alpha-tocopherol. The results suggest that alpha-tocopherol may decrease free radicals presence in LDL and thus decrease velocity of LDL oxidation by cupric ions. This mechanism may be a reason for alpha-tocopherol effect in ameliorating atherosclerosis.

  11. Plasma Ubiquinone, Alpha-Tocopherol and Cholesterol in Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Jan; Diamant, Bertil; Edlund, Per Olof;

    1992-01-01

    Farmakologi, Coenzyme Q10, free cholesterol, vitamin E, antioxidants, Alpha-Tocopherol, vitamin Q, plasma, LDL-particle......Farmakologi, Coenzyme Q10, free cholesterol, vitamin E, antioxidants, Alpha-Tocopherol, vitamin Q, plasma, LDL-particle...

  12. Effects of Alpha- Tocopherol on the Velocity of Low Density Lipoprotein Oxidation by Cupric Ions

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    Mohammad Ali Ghaffari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nWe studied the effect of different concentrations of alpha-tocopherol on in vitro cupric ions induced oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDL. Human native LDL (50 µg protein/ml oxidation was induced by 10 µmol/L of CuSO4. Conjugated dienes were measured spectrophotometrically for up to 440 minutes. The length of the lag phase (Tlag, maximum velocity of the reaction (Vmax and the maximum amount of generated dienes were obtained from kinetic data. Alpha-tocopherol increased Tlag and decreased Vmax with a dependence upon concentration (0-100 µmol/L. There was no difference between the Dmax obtained with cupric ions alone or in the presence of the various concentrations of alpha-tocopherol. The results suggest that alpha-tocopherol may decrease free radicals presence in LDL and thus decrease velocity of LDL oxidation by cupric ions. This mechanism may be a reason for alpha-tocopherol effect in ameliorating atherosclerosis.

  13. Responses of gamma irradiated mice to {alpha}-tocopherol

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    Eliosoff, N.M.; Dubner, D.; Gisone, P. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Gerencia de Seguridad Radiologica y Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1992-07-01

    CB57 female mice whole body gamma irradiated were orally administered with acetato DL-{alpha}-tocopherol. It was observed a higher survival in {alpha}-tocopherol treated groups up to 14th and 10th days with doses of 8.5 and 10 Gy respectively and a greater bone marrow cellularity at day 10 in {alpha}-tocopherol treated group irradiated with 10 Gy. (author)

  14. Pharmacological dose of alpha-tocopherol induces cardiotoxicity in Wistar rats determined by echocardiography and histology

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    The effect of pharmacological dose of alpha-tocopherol on heart health was determined in Wistar rats. Animals were randomly assigned to either C (control, n = 11) or E (alpha-tocopherol, n = 11) group. Animals received corn oil (C) or alpha-tocopherol dissolved in corn oil (250 mg alpha-tocopherol/[...

  15. Effect of alpha-tocopherol supplementation during boar semen cryopreservation on sperm characteristics and expression of apoptosis related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeon-Ji; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Song, Hye-Jin; Kang, Eun-Ju; Ock, Sun-A; Kumar, B Mohana; Balasubramanian, S; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2009-04-01

    Boar semen is extremely vulnerable to cold shock and sensitive to peroxidative damage due to high content of unsaturated fatty acids in the phospholipids of the plasma membrane and the relatively low antioxidant capacity of seminal plasma. The present study evaluated the influence of alpha-tocopherol supplementation at various concentrations in the boar semen extender during cryopreservation on post-thawed sperm motility characteristics (total sperm motility, MOT; local motility, LCM; curvilinear velocity, VCL; straight linear velocity, VSL; and average path velocity, VAP), sperm qualities (viability, acrosomal integrity and apoptosis), expression of stress protein (HSP70), and the expression of pro-apoptotic (Bax and Bak) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2l and Bcl-xl) genes. Semen collected from 10 Duroc boars was cryopreserved in lactose-egg yolk buffer supplemented with various concentrations of alpha-tocopherol (0, 100, 200, 400, 600 and 800 microM) using the straw-freezing procedure and stored at -196 degrees C for a minimum period of one month. In frozen-thawed groups, sperm motility was significantly (Psperm. In fresh sperm, HSP70 immunoreactivity expression was observed in the equatorial region, but in frozen-thawed groups, expressions were mostly observed in the sperm head. Higher apoptosis rates were observed in 600 and 800 microM alpha-tocopherol supplemented frozen-thawed groups. In alpha-tocopherol supplemented frozen-thawed groups immediately after thawing, the expression was similar to that of fresh group. But after incubation at 37 degrees C for 3h, the expression in 200 and 800 microM alpha-tocopherol supplemented groups was higher than that of others. Expression of pro-apoptotic genes was significantly higher and anti-apoptotic genes was significantly (Psperm group. In conclusion, alpha-tocopherol, supplemented at 200 microM concentration in boar semen extender during cryopreservation had a positive effect on post-thawed sperm survivability. PMID:19141297

  16. Studies of vitamin E binding and transfer by a rat liver cytosolic protein

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    Posch, K.C.; Mavis, R.D.

    1986-05-01

    In vitro vitamin E binding and transfer were examined using a semipurified (sephadex G-75 fraction) vitamin E binding and transfer protein (VE-TBP) from the rat liver cytosol. Binding and transfer studies thus far indicate that the protein is very specific for d-..cap alpha..-tocopherol. Among the other lipophilic ligands examined only d-..gamma..-tocopherol at high concentrations was competitive with d-..cap alpha..-tocopherol binding. Specificity studies also indicate the protein to be stereospecific in nature since dl-..cap alpha..-tocopherol was only partially competitive. Studies using PMSF and NEM also indicate that neither a hydroxyl nor a sulfhydryl functional group on the protein is required for vitamin E binding. Transfer studies show that the VE-TBP is capable of specifically transferring equal amounts of vitamin E from liposomes to both mitochondria and microsomes when comparable protein concentrations are used. This indicates that no preferential transfer to one membrane type occurs. Pretreatment of mitochondria and microsomes with heat, pronase or trypsin also does not affect transfer of vitamin E. Thus, transfer of vitamin E is not dependent on a membrane protein. Finally, the VE-TBP is capable of unidirectional transport of vitamin E from prelabelled microsomes to vitamin E free liposomes.

  17. Human plasma vitamin E kinetics demonstrate rapid recycling of plasma RRR-alpha-tocopherol.

    OpenAIRE

    Traber, M G; Ramakrishnan, R; Kayden, H J

    1994-01-01

    A kinetic model of vitamin E transport in humans is described using data from our studies with deuterium-labeled stereoisomers of alpha-tocopherol (RRR- and SRR-). In normal subjects, both alpha-tocopherols are present at similar concentrations in chylomicrons, but by 24 hr, RRR-alpha-tocopherol is at higher plasma concentrations because RRR-alpha-tocopherol is preferentially incorporated into very low density lipoproteins, which are then secreted into plasma. In three nondiscriminator patien...

  18. Retinol and Alpha-Tocopherol Levels Among Hemodialysis Patients.

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    Awatif M. Abd El Maksoud*, Asmaa M. Abd Allah*, Waleed Massoud

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma retinol, alpha tocopherol, total cholesterol and triglycerides were measured in 40 patients aged 27-65 years, under regular hemodialysis (HD for 1.8-13 years at Ahmed Maher teaching Hospital and in 28 healthy age and sex matched control. Predialysis and postdialysis measurements were also, done for a subset of 13 hemodialytic patients. Among hemodialytic patients ,all values ( Plasma retinol ,alpha- tocopherol, total cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly higher ( p 100 ug /dl except for one patient . On the other hand ,alpha-tocopherol level in hemodialytic patients was ranged between deficiency ( 1080 ug/dl. Comparing predialysis and postdialysis measurements , the hemodialytic patients showed non significant difference concerning retinol level , while alpha tocopherol was significantly decreased in postdialytic state .In conclusion ; further studies are needed to answer, if hemodialytic patients are at risk for symptomatic vitamin A toxicity?. Even with normal or low plasma vitamin E, it is needed as an antioxidant accessory therapy in hemodialytic patients.

  19. Diffusion of DL-alpha-tocopherol (1); carbon dioxide (2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) DL-alpha-tocopherol; (2) carbon dioxide

  20. Diffusion of D-alpha-tocopherol (1); carbon dioxide (2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) D-alpha-tocopherol; (2) carbon dioxide

  1. Ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, and oregano supplements reduce stress-induced deterioration of chicken meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J F; Stagsted, J; Jensen, S K; Karlsson, A H; Henckel, P

    2003-08-01

    In order to ameliorate a negative effect of stress on meat quality characteristics, chickens were fed a diet supplemented with a combination of ascorbic acid (1,000 ppm) and alpha-tocopherol (200 ppm) or oregano (3%), which has a high content of antioxidants. Chickens were slaughtered by cervical dislocation in the stable (no stress) or after transport and electrical stunning at the slaughter plant (stress). Activities of antioxidative enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathion peroxidase) in pectoralis major (PM), iliotibialis (IL), and liver were unaffected by supplementation. However, erythrocyte stability, which is a more complex model system for determining oxidative status, increased with ascorbic acid-alpha-tocopherol supplementation and tended to increase after oregano supplementation. In nonstressed birds, this improved antioxidative status was reflected in decreased TBA-reactive substances (TBARS) in PM and liver of ascorbic acid-alpha-tocopherol-supplemented chickens and likewise in liver from oregano-supplemented chickens compared to that of nonstressed control birds. However, postmortem temperature, pH, and water-holding capacity were not affected by supplementation. Drip loss from oregano-supplemented chickens showed increased protein oxidation in specific bands, but this did not relate to water-holding capacity or antioxidative status. When exposed to stress, the concentration of TBARS in the control animals increased in PM and IL. Ascorbic acid-alpha-tocopherol supplementation protected IL, and oregano supplementation protected PM from stress-induced increases in TBARS. This differential effect between muscles may indicate differences in protection mechanisms. In conclusion, ascorbic acid-alpha-tocopherol and oregano supplements to chickens protect against stress-induced increase in TBARS, in different muscles. PMID:12943308

  2. Effect of plasma lipid levels and obesity on tissue stores of alpha-tocopherol.

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    Bieri, J G; Evarts, R P

    1975-06-01

    Experiments were designed to determine how varying levels of plasma lipids affect tissue deposition of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E). Hypolipemia was induced by feeding orotic acid, and hyperlipemia was obtained using genetically obese rats. With equal dietary intakes of alpha-tocopherol, hypolipemic rats had lower plasma and tissue concentrations than rats with normal plasma lipids. An exception was liver, which due to fatty enlargement from orotic acid had more alpha-tocopherol. Hyperlipemic obese rats had plasma total lipids and alpha-tocopherol three times those of normal rats with the same intake of alpha-tocopherol. Tissue concentrations of the vitamin, however, were considerably lower in obese rats. Due to their large adipose mass, obese rats had considerably more total body alpha-tocopherol than normal rats. It was concluded that both plasma lipid levels and degree of adiposity are important factors in determining tissue deposition of alpha-tocopherol. PMID:1153426

  3. Action of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol on Staphylococcus aureus efflux pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintino, Saulo R; Morais-Tintino, Cícera D; Campina, Fábia F; Pereira, Raimundo L; Costa, Maria do S; Braga, Maria Flaviana B M; Limaverde, Paulo W; Andrade, Jacqueline C; Siqueira-Junior, José P; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Balbino, Valdir Q; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol is one the most abundant and biologically active isoforms of vitamin E. This compound is a potent antioxidant and one of most studied isoforms of vitamin E. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is an important nutrient for calcium homeostasis and bone health, that has also been recognized as a potent modulator of the immune response. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most important causative agent of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of alpha-tocopherol and cholecalciferol on both S. aureus and multidrug resistant S. aureus efflux pumps. The RN4220 strain has the plasmid pUL5054 that is the carrier of gene that encodes the macrolide resistance protein (an efflux pump) MsrA; the IS-58 strain possesses the TetK tetracycline efflux protein in its genome and the 1199B strain resists to hydrophilic fluoroquinolones via a NorA-mediated mechanism. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and a possible inhibition of efflux pumps was associated to a reduction of the MIC. In this work we observed that in the presence of the treatments there was a decrease in the MIC for the RN4220 and IS-58 strains, suggesting that the substances presented an inhibitory effect on the efflux pumps of these strains. Significant efforts have been done to identify efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) from natural sources and, therefore, the antibacterial properties of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol might be attributed to a direct effect on the bacterial cell depending on their amphipathic structure. PMID:27298617

  4. Coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol protect against amitriptyline toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since amitriptyline is a very frequently prescribed antidepressant drug, it is not surprising that amitriptyline toxicity is relatively common. Amitriptyline toxic systemic effects include cardiovascular, autonomous nervous, and central nervous systems. To understand the mechanisms of amitriptyline toxicity we studied the cytotoxic effects of amitriptyline treatment on cultured primary human fibroblasts and zebrafish embryos, and the protective role of coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol, two membrane antioxidants. We found that amitriptyline treatment induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human fibroblasts. Mitochondrial dysfunction in amitriptyline treatment was characterized by reduced expression levels of mitochondrial proteins and coenzyme Q10, decreased NADH:cytochrome c reductase activity, and a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, and as a consequence of these toxic effects, amitriptyline treatment induced a significant increase in apoptotic cell death activating mitochondrial permeability transition. Coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol supplementation attenuated ROS production, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death, suggesting that oxidative stress affecting cell membrane components is involved in amitriptyline cytotoxicity. Furthermore, amitriptyline-dependent toxicity and antioxidant protection were also evaluated in zebrafish embryos, a well established vertebrate model to study developmental toxicity. Amitriptyline significantly increased embryonic cell death and apoptosis rate, and both antioxidants provided a significant protection against amitriptyline embryotoxicity

  5. Physical exercise-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and heme oxygenase-1 in human leukocytes: effects of RRR-alpha-tocopherol supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niess, A M; Sommer, M; Schneider, M; Angres, C; Tschositsch, K; Golly, I C; Battenfeld, N; Northoff, H; Biesalski, H K; Dickhuth, H H; Fehrenbach, E

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of RRR-alpha-tocopherol (500 IU/day, 8 days) on in vivo cytokine response and cytoplasmic expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the antioxidant stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in human leukocytes after exhaustive exercise. Thirteen men were investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study with a wash-out period of 28 days. The exercise procedure consisted of an incremental treadmill test followed by a continuous run until exhaustion at 110% of the individual anaerobic threshold (total duration 28.5 +/- 0.8 min). HO-1 and iNOS protein were assessed in mono- (M), lympho-, and granulocytes (G) using flow cytometry. Plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 were measured by ELISA. IL-6 rose significantly whereas IL-8 did not exhibit significant changes after exercise. Changes of IL-6 were not affected by RRR-alpha-tocopherol. Exercise induced an increase of iNOS protein primarily in M and G. A small, but significant, increase of HO-1 protein was measured in M and G. RRR-alpha-Tocopherol did not show any significant effects on cytoplasmic expression of iNOS and HO-1 at rest and after exercise. In conclusion, exhaustive exercise induces expression of iNOS and HO-1 in human leukocytes by a mechanism that is not sensitive to RRR-alpha-tocopherol supplementation. PMID:11232592

  6. Coenzyme O*U1*UO, Alpha-Tocopherol and Free Cholesterol in HDL and LDL Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Kurt; Theorell, Henning; Karlsson, Jan; Diamant, Bertil; Folkers, Karl

    Farmakologi, Alpha-tocopherol, Coenzyme Q*U1*U0, free cholesterol, LDL, Antioxidants, Lipoproteins, HDL......Farmakologi, Alpha-tocopherol, Coenzyme Q*U1*U0, free cholesterol, LDL, Antioxidants, Lipoproteins, HDL...

  7. Photoreduction of alkylmethylviologens with {alpha}-tocopherol in dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaguchi, M.; Baglioni, P.; Kevan, L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1992-03-19

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to detect the photoreduction yield of alkylmethylviologens (AV{sup 2+}) in rapidly frozen dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) vesicles containing concentrations of {alpha}-tocopherol (major component of vitamin E) from 0 to 23 mol %. The observed radicals are alkylmethylviologen cation radicals (AV{sup +}) from photoirradiated AV{sup 2+} in DODAC vesicles without {alpha}-tocopherol. For 1-3 mol % {alpha}-tocopherol, the major radical is AV{sup +} and the minor radical is a neutral free radical of {alpha}-tocopherol (EO) which is formed by photoinduced conversion from the {alpha}-tocopherol cation radical (EH{sup +}) with DODAC vesicles acting as proton scavengers. The total ESR intensity increases with an increase of the alkyl chain length of AV{sup 2+}. The AV{sup +} intensity increases slightly with increasing {alpha}-tocopherol concentration. For over 9 mol % {alpha}-tocopherol, the major radical becomes EO, and at 17 mol % EO alone is observed. This is explained by acceleration of the photoreduction of AV{sup 2+} to AV{sup +} by electrons released from {alpha}-tocopherol and further photoreduction of AV{sup +} to AV, which is not detected by ESR spectroscopy. The photoyield for 23 mol % {alpha}-tocopherol in DODAC vesicles without AV{sup 2+} is about 2-fold more than that in hexane solution. This enhancement of photoyield suggests that DODAC may act as a proton scavenger and compartmentalize {alpha}-tocopherol to minimize back electron reaction. 26 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Bioavailability of carotenoids and alpha-tocopherol from fruit juices in the presence of absorption modifiers: in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado-Lorencio, F; Herrero-Barbudo, C; Blanco-Navarro, I; Pérez-Sacristán, B; Olmedilla-Alonso, B

    2009-02-01

    The food industry is playing an increasing role in the development and marketing of new products although little is known regarding the bioavailability of the phytochemicals they contain. Our aim was to assess the effect of the presence of absorption modifiers (milk and iron) on the in vitro bioaccessibility and the serum response in vivo of carotenoids and alpha-tocopherol from fruit juices. Thirty-two young women participated in a three-period (21 d each) supplementation study with a 2-week wash-out in between. Subjects consumed consecutively 2 x 250 ml/d vitamin C-fortified juices supplied as fruit juice, fruit juice containing milk and fruit juice containing milk and iron. Fasting blood samples were collected before and after each supplementation period. In vitro bioaccessibility of carotenoids and alpha-tocopherol was assessed by a static digestion model. Vitamin E and carotenoids from both studies were determined by HPLC. In vitro, xanthophyll ester hydrolysis and transference of free xanthophylls and alpha-tocopherol into the micellar phase were higher in the presence of absorption modifiers. In vivo, consumption of the fruit juices provoked significant increments (within-subject) of alpha-tocopherol and some carotenoids in serum. Dose-adjusted increments in serum of some carotenoids were higher when subjects consumed juices with milk and milk plus iron, although differences did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, the presence of milk and milk plus iron do not influence the bioavailability of carotenoids and alpha-tocopherol from fruit juices in vivo. Our results support the use of in vitro models to assess food-related factors affecting bioavailability of carotenoids and tocopherols from foods. PMID:18616839

  9. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of synthetic alpha-tocopherol for all animal species

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    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The additive synthetic alpha-tocopherol consists of pure all-rac-alpha-tocopherol. In a previous opinion on the safety and efficacy of vitamin E for all animal species, the FEEDAP Panel assessed the safety of the acetate ester of the additive for all animal species, the consumer, the user and the environment. The FEEDAP Panel is not aware of any more recent scientific findings that would modify its previous conclusions. The FEEDAP Panel extended the conclusions drawn in its opinion on the safety of vitamin E (including all-rac-alpha-tocopheryl acetate to all-rac-alpha-tocopherol. All-rac-alpha-tocopherol at use levels is safe for all animal species and the consumer. No concerns for user safety are expected from the use of all-rac-alpha-tocopherol in feed. The use of all-rac-alpha-tocopherol in animal nutrition will not result in a substantial increase in concentration in the environment. Since all-rac-alpha-tocopherol is used as antioxidant in food and its function in feed is essentially the same as that in food, no further demonstration of efficacy is necessary.

  10. Nanoparticles with entrapped {alpha}-tocopherol: synthesis, characterization, and controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zigoneanu, Imola Gabriela [101 E B Doran Building, BAE Department, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Astete, Carlos Ernesto [110 E B Doran Building, BAE Department, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Sabliov, Cristina Mirela [141 E B Doran Building, BAE Department, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)], E-mail: csabliov@lsu.edu

    2008-03-12

    An emulsion evaporation method was used to synthesize spherical poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles with entrapped {alpha}-tocopherol. Two different surfactants were used: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). For SDS nanoparticles, the size of the nanoparticles decreased significantly with the entrapment of {alpha}-tocopherol in the PLGA matrix, while the size of PVA nanoparticles remained unchanged. The polydispersity index after synthesis was under 0.100 for PVA nanoparticles and around 0.150 for SDS nanoparticles. The zeta potential was negative for all PVA nanoparticles. The entrapment efficiency of {alpha}-tocopherol in the polymeric matrix was approximately 89% and 95% for nanoparticles with 8% and 16% {alpha}-tocopherol theoretical loading, respectively. The residual PVA associated with the nanoparticles after purification was approximately 6% ( w/w relative to the nanoparticles). The release profile showed an initial burst followed by a slower release of the {alpha}-tocopherol entrapped inside the PLGA matrix. The release for nanoparticles with 8% {alpha}-tocopherol theoretical loading (86% released in the first hour) was faster than the release for the nanoparticles with 16% {alpha}-tocopherol theoretical loading (34% released in the first hour)

  11. Effect of ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol supplementations on serum leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and serum amyloid A levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Mostafa Jamalan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus Type 2 is one of the most widespread chronic metabolic diseases. In most cases, this type of diabetes is associated with alterations in levels of some inflammatory cytokines and hormones. Considering anti-inflammatory properties of plant extracts rich in ascorbic acid (vitamin C and alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E, anti-diabetic properties of these two well-known antioxidant vitamins were investigated through measurement of serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, insulin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and serum amyloid A (SAA in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Methods: Male patients (n=80 were randomly divided into two groups each consisted of 40 subjects. Test groups were supplemented with ascorbic acid (1000 mg/day or alpha-tocopherol (300 mg/day orally during four weeks. Before and after treatment, serum biochemical factors of subjects were measured and compared. Results: Our results showed that both ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol could induce significant anti-inflammatory effects by decreasing the level of inflammatory factors such as TNF-α, SAA, and hs-CRP in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients. Effects of alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid in decreasing serum leptin level were similar. Ascorbic acid in contrast to alpha-tocopherol diminished fasting insulin and HOMA index but had no effect on LDL serum level. Conclusion: Concerning the obtained results, it is concluded that consumption of supplementary vitamins C and E could decrease induced inflammatory response in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.  It is also possible that vitamin C and vitamin E supplementation can attenuate incidence of some proposed pathological effects of diabetes mellitus.

  12. Demonstration of specific binding sites for 3H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for 3H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (3H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for 3H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for 3H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane

  13. Demonstration of specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitabchi, A.E.; Wimalasena, J.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (/sup 3/H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for /sup 3/H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane.

  14. Lipoperoxides, alpha-tocopherol and ceruloplasmin in gamma-irradiated blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceruloplasmin, alpha-tocopherol and lipid peroxide concentrations are evaluated in blood plasma for transfusion following exposure to irradiation with 60Co gamma rays at doses 23, 50, 100 and 200 Gy. In plasma exposed to irradiation an increase in lipid peroxides and decrease in alpha-tocopherol and ceruloplasmin are observed. The addition of 2.3 U/ml ceruloplasmin to plasma prior to irradiation reduces the quantity of lipid peroxides and protects alpha-tocopherol. The possible explanation is that the metal helates prevent the formation of free hydroxyl radicals and thus inhibit the oxidation of lipid membranes. 15 refs., 1 tab. (author)

  15. Changes of lipid peroxides and alpha-tocopherol in rats with experimentally induced myocardial necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higuchi,Yoshimi

    1982-04-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial necrosis was produced in rats by injection of isoproterenol (80 mg per kg body weight. Lipid peroxides were measured by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. alpha-Tocopherol was assayed by fluorometric analysis. Immediately after isoproterenol injections, serum lipid peroxides increased and serum alpha-tocopherol decreased, then gradually returned to the pre-injection levels. Lipid peroxides increased more rapidly in the heart and liver than in serum. Alpha-Tocopherol decreased in the heart and liver, then gradually returned to the pre-injection levels. These results indicate that increase in serum lipid peroxides reflects production of peroxides in myocardial tissue and in liver. The decrease in alpha-tocopherol may be due to consumption as anti-oxidants in the vascular system and organs.

  16. alpha-Tocopherol enhances tumour growth inhibition by cis-dichlorodiammine platinum (II

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    S. Sarna

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Present studies indicate that alpha-tocopherol enhances the efficacy of cisplatin as demonstrated by inoculation of Dalton's lymphoma cells incubated with either cisplatin (5 or 10 µg/ml alone or cisplatin + alpha-tocopherol (25 or 50 µg/ml into C3H/He mice. Tumour cells (3 x 10(6 cells/mouse incubated with cisplatin grow slowly in syngeneic mice as indicated by the late appearance of tumour. However, mice failed to develop tumour when inoculated with tumour cells incubated with cisplatin + alpha-tocopherol. When the animals were challenged with tumour cells (3 x 10(6 cells/mouse on the 15th day after the initial inoculation, 30-50% survived more than 60 days, with 10% tumour-free survivors being observed in some groups. Antitumour activity was higher in mice receiving lymphoma cells (3 x 10(6 cells/mouse preincubated with cisplatin + alpha-tocopherol compared to cisplatin alone. Tumour-bearing mice receiving cisplatin in combination with different concentrations of alpha-tocopherol exhibited significantly higher (P<0.001 intratumour platinum content (123-306% but without any change in the kidney platinum content as compared to those receiving cisplatin (5 or 10 µg/ml alone. Enhancement of cisplatin-induced tumour growth inhibition is probably due to the modulation of tumour cell membrane permeability by alpha-tocopherol. alpha-Tocopherol might increase the influx of cisplatin into tumour cells, causing the DNA repair machinery to be less efficient due to increased efficiency of adduct formation in the DNA molecule. This effect of alpha-tocopherol can render cisplatin more effective as an antitumour agent.

  17. Effect of dietary alpha-tocopherol supplementation and gamma-irradiation on alpha-tocopherol retention and lipid oxidation in cooked minced chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of dietary alpha-tocopherol supplementation and gamma-irradiation on alpha-tocopherol retention and lipid oxidation in cooked minced chicken during refrigerated storage were studied. Minced breast and thigh meat from broilers fed diets supplemented with 100, 200 or 400 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed was irradiated at 2.5 or 4.0 kGy. Cooked irradiated and unirradiated meat was stored at 4 degrees C for 5 days. alpha-Tocopherol concentrations increased with increasing dietary supplementation. Concentrations decreased during storage, but retention was not affected by irradiation. Lipid stability was determined by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) during storage. TBARS and COPs increased during storage and were reduced by increasing levels of dietary alpha-tocopheryl acetate supplementation. Irradiation accelerated TBARS formation during storage, but this was prevented by supplementation with 200 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed. Irradiation tended to increase COPs during storage, although no consistent effects were observed. In general supplementation with over 400 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed may be required to control cholesterol oxidation in minced chicken. The results suggest that, overall, irradiation had little effect on lipid stability in alpha-tocopherol-supplemented meat following cooking and storage

  18. The effects of alpha-tocopherol supplementation on fracture healing in a postmenopausal osteoporotic rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharlina Mohamad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Osteoporosis increases the risk of bone fractures and may impair fracture healing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether alpha-tocopherol can improve the late-phase fracture healing of osteoporotic bones in ovariectomized rats. METHOD: In total, 24 female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. The first group was sham-operated, and the other two groups were ovariectomized. After two months, the right femora of the rats were fractured under anesthesia and internally repaired with K-wires. The sham-operated and ovariectomized control rat groups were administered olive oil (a vehicle, whereas 60 mg/kg of alpha-tocopherol was administered via oral gavage to the alpha-tocopherol group for six days per week over the course of 8 weeks. The rats were sacrificed, and the femora were dissected out. Computed tomography scans and X-rays were performed to assess fracture healing and callus staging, followed by the assessment of callus strengths through the biomechanical testing of the bones. RESULTS: Significantly higher callus volume and callus staging were observed in the ovariectomized control group compared with the sham-operated and alpha-tocopherol groups. The ovariectomized control group also had significantly lower fracture healing scores than the sham-operated group. There were no differences between the alpha-tocopherol and sham-operated groups with respect to the above parameters. The healed femora of the ovariectomized control group demonstrated significantly lower load and strain parameters than the healed femora of the sham-operated group. Alpha-tocopherol supplementation was not able to restore these biomechanical properties. CONCLUSION: Alpha-tocopherol supplementation appeared to promote bone fracture healing in osteoporotic rats but failed to restore the strength of the fractured bone.

  19. RRR- and SRR-alpha-tocopherols are secreted without discrimination in human chylomicrons, but RRR-alpha-tocopherol is preferentially secreted in very low density lipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traber, M.G.; Burton, G.W.; Ingold, K.U.; Kayden, H.J. (New York Univ. School of Medicine, NY (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Five subjects ingested in a single oral dose containing 50 mg each of 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-(5,7-(C2H3)2)tocopheryl acetate (d6-RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate) with natural stereochemistry, and of 2S,4'R,8'R-alpha-(5-C2H3)tocopheryl acetate (d3-SRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate). These are two of eight stereoisomers in synthetic vitamin E. By day 1 the plasma and red blood cells were enriched fourfold with d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (P less than 0.004). The ratio of d6-RRR-/d2-SRR- further increased over the succeeding 4 days, because the d3-SRR- decreased at a faster rate than did the d6-RRR-stereoisomer. Plasma and lipoproteins were isolated at intervals during the first day, and daily for 3 days, from four additional subjects fed a mixture of equal amounts of the deuterated tocopherols. The plasma contained similar concentrations of the two forms until 11 h, when the d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol concentration became significantly greater (P less than 0.05). The chylomicrons contained similar concentrations of the two deuterated tocopherols, but the VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) became preferentially enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol by 11 h. The pattern of the deuterated tocopherols shows that during chylomicron catabolism all of the plasma lipoproteins were labeled equally with both tocopherols, but that during the subsequent VLDL catabolism the low and high density lipoproteins became enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These results suggest the existence of a mechanism in the liver for assembling VLDL preferentially enriched in RRR- relative to SRR-alpha-tocopherol.

  20. RRR- and SRR-alpha-tocopherols are secreted without discrimination in human chylomicrons, but RRR-alpha-tocopherol is preferentially secreted in very low density lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five subjects ingested in a single oral dose containing 50 mg each of 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-(5,7-(C2H3)2)tocopheryl acetate (d6-RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate) with natural stereochemistry, and of 2S,4'R,8'R-alpha-(5-C2H3)tocopheryl acetate (d3-SRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate). These are two of eight stereoisomers in synthetic vitamin E. By day 1 the plasma and red blood cells were enriched fourfold with d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (P less than 0.004). The ratio of d6-RRR-/d2-SRR- further increased over the succeeding 4 days, because the d3-SRR- decreased at a faster rate than did the d6-RRR-stereoisomer. Plasma and lipoproteins were isolated at intervals during the first day, and daily for 3 days, from four additional subjects fed a mixture of equal amounts of the deuterated tocopherols. The plasma contained similar concentrations of the two forms until 11 h, when the d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol concentration became significantly greater (P less than 0.05). The chylomicrons contained similar concentrations of the two deuterated tocopherols, but the VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) became preferentially enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol by 11 h. The pattern of the deuterated tocopherols shows that during chylomicron catabolism all of the plasma lipoproteins were labeled equally with both tocopherols, but that during the subsequent VLDL catabolism the low and high density lipoproteins became enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These results suggest the existence of a mechanism in the liver for assembling VLDL preferentially enriched in RRR- relative to SRR-alpha-tocopherol

  1. Plasma alpha-tocopherol, total lipids and total cholesterol in wild rockhopper, magellanic and gentoo penguins before and after moulting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G; Ghebremeskel, K; Keymer, I F; Horsley, D T

    1989-06-01

    Post moult rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes crestatus) had significantly higher plasma alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), total lipid and total cholesterol concentrations than their pre-moult counterparts. In the magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) there were post moult increases in total lipid, cholesterol and alpha-tocopherol concentrations, but only the increase in alpha-tocopherol was significant. Plasma alpha-tocopherol, total lipid and total cholesterol concentrations in post moult gentoo (Pygoscelis papua) chicks were similar to those in non-moulting adult gentoos. Species differences in the levels of these nutrients in plasma may be due to differences in their dietary habits. PMID:2773196

  2. Time course and dose response of alpha tocopherol on oxidative stress in haemodialysis patients

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    Coombes Jeff S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality particularly in patients with end stage kidney disease. Although observational data from the general population has shown dietary antioxidant intake is associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, most clinical intervention trials have failed to support this relationship. This may be a consequence of not using an effective antioxidant dose and/or not investigating patients with elevated oxidative stress. The SPACE study, conducted in haemodialysis patients, reported that 800 IU/day of alpha tocopherol significantly reduced cardiovascular disease endpoints. A recent time course and dose response study conducted in hypercholesterolaemic patients that found 1600 IU/day of alpha tocopherol was an optimal dose. There is no such dose response data available for haemodialysis patients. Therefore the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different doses of oral alpha tocopherol on oxidative stress in haemodialysis patients with elevated oxidative stress and the time taken to achieve this effect. Methods The study will consist of a time-course followed by a dose response study. In the time course study 20 haemodialysis patients with elevated oxidative stress will take either 1600 IU/day natural (RRR alpha tocopherol for 20 weeks or placebo. Blood will be collected every two weeks and analysed for a marker of oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and alpha tocopherol. The optimum time period to significantly decrease plasma F2-isoprostanes will be determined from this study. In the dose response study 60 patients will be randomised to receive either placebo, 100, 200, 400, 800 or 1600 IU/day of natural (RRR alpha tocopherol for a time period determined from the time course study. Blood will be collected at baseline and every two weeks and analysed for plasma F2-isoprostanes and alpha tocopherol. It is hypothesised that

  3. Encapsulation of the alpha-tocopherol in a glassy food model matrix

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    Melina Campagnaro Farias

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available alpha-tocopherol was encapsulated in a glassy food model based on solution of maltodextrin (DE 20 and gelatin, through the use of quick freeze and freeze-drying procedures. The ratio of the maltodextrin, alpha-tocopherol and gelatin was 3:2:1 respectively. The morphology of the glassy food model was observed by scanning electron microscopy, whose analyses showed a slightly smooth surface and a rather fragile and porous structure due to cavities formed by ice crystals during freezing, and the absence of crystalline structure. It was observed by x ray diffraction that the material is an amorphous state. The samples stored in a specific plastic vessel isolated from gas and light held its amorphous state with no variations that concern to morphology and keeping 100% of the encapsulated alpha-tocopherol up to 90 days at 25 and 35 °C.

  4. Early detection of doxorubicin-induced cariotoxocity and its prevention by alpha-tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To detect doxorubicin-induced myocardial injury by quantitative estimation of cardiospecific protein, Cardiac Troponin I (cTnI) at early stage and to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of Tocopherol. Study Design: Labbased randomized controlled in-vivo study in rabbits. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pharmacology in collaboration with Pathology department, Army Medical College Rawalpindi, Pakistan from Jan 2012 to Dec 2012. Material and Methods: Eighteen healthy male adult rabbits were used. Cardiotoxicity was induced by single intravenous injection of 12 mg /kg of doxorubicin in a group of rabbits, control group was treated with normal saline only and the rabbits of third group were pretreated with Tocopherol 200 mg/kg of body weight for ten days before injection of doxorubicin 12mg/kg. Results: Doxorubicin produced severe cardiotoxicity confirmed by markedly raised serum levels of cTnI, CK-MB, LDH and grade 3 necrosis of the heart issue in rabbits. The pre-treatment with Tocopherol resulted in improved serum levels of cTnI and the histological picture of heart tissue. Conclusions: The quantitative cTnI estimation for detection of cardiotoxicity at subclinical level can lead to significant economic impact in management of cancer patients because the troponin-negative subjects can be excluded from long term cardiac monitoring programs, which require high cost imaging techniques. Furthermore, the outcome of most potent and widely used doxorubicin chemotherapy can be made successful with the concurrent use of alpha-Tocopherol. (author)

  5. Effect of alpha-tocopherol on bone formation during distraction osteogenesis: a rabbit model

    OpenAIRE

    Kurklu, Mustafa; Yildiz, Cemil; Kose, Ozkan; Yurttas, Yuksel; Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Serdar, Muhittin; Deveci, Salih

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of alpha-tocopherol on distraction osteogenesis. Materials and methods Right tibias of 30 New Zealand white rabbits were distracted at a rate of 0.5 mm/day for 20 days with a circular external fixator. Experimental group rabbits (n = 15) were administered i.m. 20 mg/kg/day alpha-tocopherol for 30 days. Radiographic examinations were performed at the 20th, 30th and 40th days. Bone scintigraphy was performed at the 5th and 20th days....

  6. Thiamin, riboflavin and alpha-tocopherol retention in processed and stored irradiated pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combination treatments for preservation of irradiated pork were investigated with respect to vitamin loss. Ground pork was prepared under nitrogen and packaged in anaerobic foil. The samples were enzyme denatured by heating before and after irradiation, then cooked and stored. Irradiation resulted in thiamin loss, but neither riboflavin nor alpha-tocopherol was affected. Neither thiamin nor riboflavin was affected by heat denaturation, cooking or storage, but heating and cooking increased the measured alpha-tocopherol. The lack of loss of the vitamins was attributed to the exclusion of oxygen

  7. [Endogenous opioid system in the realization of the analgesic effect of alpha-tocopherol in reference to algomenorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzhanovskiĭ, G N; Bakuleva, L P; Luzina, N L; Vinogradov, V A; Iarygin, K N

    1988-02-01

    Beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity was studied in 7 patients with algomenorrhea during pain attack and 15 minutes after alpha-tocopherol administration with a therapeutic aim (till the analgetic effect was reached). There was an increase in beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity after alpha-tocopherol administration. Naloxone administration to 9 patients with algomenorrhea of various etiology resumed the pain. The effect of alpha-tocopherol application for pain relief depended on the pathogenesis of algomenorrhea. At the same time naloxone administration failed to resume the pain in patients, in whom alpha-tocopherol had a strong analgetic effect. It is assumed that the endogenous opioid system participates in alpha-tocopherol effect on pain relief in patients with algomenorrhea. PMID:2964879

  8. Alpha-Tocopherol modulates transcriptional activities that affect essential biological processes in Bovine Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha-tocopherol is the major isoform of vitamin E. after nearly 100 years of research and countless publications, the physiological functions of vitamin E remain mysterious to a certain degree. Nevertheless, vitamin E is one of the most commonly used single nutrient supplements. Recent data has su...

  9. Low Plasma alpha-Tocopherol Concentrations and Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Diabetic Hemodialysis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espe, Katharina M.; Raila, Jens; Henze, Andrea; Blouin, Katja; Schneider, Andreas; Schmiedeke, Daniel; Krane, Vera; Pilz, Stefan; Schweigert, Florian J.; Hocher, Berthold; Wanner, Christoph; Drechsler, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Trials with the antioxidant vitamin E have failed to show benefit in the general population. Considering the different causes of death in ESRD, this study investigated the association between plasma concentrations of alpha-tocopherol and specific clinical outcomes in diabet

  10. Effects of alpha-tocopherol on bacterial translocation and lipid peroxidation in rats with intestinal obstruction

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    Schanaider Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Investigate if alpha-tocopherol has a protective effect on intestinal mucosa after obstruction and to evaluate the potential relations between lipid peroxidation and bacterial translocation. METHODS: Ten rats were submitted to a sham laparotomy and six served as control group. A small bowel obstruction was done in sixteen animals and among them eight were pretreated with alpha-tocopherol. Forty-eight hours later, mesenteric lymph node, spleen, liver and blood cultures and also samples from ileal mucosal were obtained, Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS levels were determined and intestinal histological assessment was performed. RESULTS: Bacterial translocation was significantly increased in the obstructed rats compared with the control, sham and antioxidant pretreated groups (p< 0,05. TBARS (nmol/100mg in untreated obstructed rats increased from 49,0 ± 13,3 in control group to 128,8 ± 40 after 48 hours of intestinal obstruction and achieved 72,3 ± 24,6 in alpha-tocopherol group (p< 0,05. Bacterial adherence to the intestinal epithelial cells surface and mucosal necrosis were significantly increased in the obstructed compared with nonobstructed rats. CONCLUSION: Alpha-tocopherol reduce the deleterious effects of the TBARS over the intestinal mucosal suggesting that in such circumstances there might be an association between bacterial translocation and lipid peroxidation after an intestinal occlusion.

  11. Effects of alpha-tocopherol associated with lovastatin on brain tissue and memory function in SHRSPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Marcela Rodrigues Moreira; Murad, Leonardo Borges; Paganelli, Aline; de Oliveira, Carlos Alberto Basílio; Vianna, Lucia Marques Alves

    2015-10-01

    Strokes are preceded by oxidative stress and inflammation, two processes linked to atherosclerosis and hypertension. Statins have been widely employed to control atherosclerosis; however, there could be neurological implications to its use—including cognitive impairment. Thus,we aimed to determine whether alpha-tocopherol is capable of reversing the neurological side effects of statins and enhancing its anti-inflammatory properties. To assess these effects, 15-week-old stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSPs) were divided into four groups (n = 6, each): alpha-tocopherol (AT), lovastatin (LoV), alpha-tocopherol + lovastatin (AT + LoV), and control (C).We administered 120 IU of alpha-tocopherol diluted in 0.1 ml of coconut oil,whereas the dose of lovastatin was administered at a ratio of 1 mg/kg of rat body weight. The control group received 0.1 ml coconut oil. All animals received the treatments via orogastric gavage.We assessed body weight, diuresis, food and water intake, oxidative stress (malondialdehyde levels), the total cellular injury marker (lactate dehydrogenase), short and long-term memory, cognition, and histopathological changes in the hippocampus. The results demonstrated that lovastatin treatment did not negatively affect the memory of our animal model. In fact, the animals treated with AT and LoV showed improvement in memory and cognition. Additionally, both treatments decrease lactate dehydrogenase and oxidative stress levels. Furthermore, our study also demonstrated hippocampal tissue preservation in the treated groups. PMID:26095118

  12. Impact of castration with or without alpha-tocopherol supplementation on the urethral sphincter of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Kracochansky

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the impact of low levels of testosterone induced by orchiectomy and the effect of alpha-tocopherol supplementation on oxidative stress in the urethral sphincter. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty male Wistar rats weighing 250-300g were divided into four groups with 10 each: Sham group; Orchiectomy group: bilateral orchiectomy; Orchiectomy-pre-Tocopherol group: bilateral orchiectomy preceded by alpha-tocopherol supplementation for four weeks; Orchiectomy-full-Tocopherol group: bilateral orchiectomy with alpha-tocopherol supplementation for four weeks preceding the procedure and for eight weeks afterwards. At the protocol end, animals were euthanized and had the sphincter analyzed stereologically focusing on collagen and muscle fibers percentage. Oxidative stress levels were determined using 8-epi-PGF2. RESULTS: The 8-epi-PGF2 levels were statistically higher (p < 0.0003 in the Orchiectomy group compared to others groups while Sham and Orchiectomy-full-Tocopherol groups presented statistically similar values (p = 0.52. Collagen volumetric densities were significantly lower in Sham and Orchiectomy-full-Tocopherol groups (p < 0.022. Sham group presented statistically greater muscle fiber percent. CONCLUSION: Castration caused oxidative stress in the urethral sphincter complex, with increased collagen deposition. Alpha-tocopherol had a protective effect and its supplementation for twelve weeks provided the greatest protection.

  13. Deuterium NMR studies of model membranes containing 1-alkanol anesthetics or alpha-tocopherol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thewalt, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The phase behavior of model membranes containing 1-alkanol anesthetics has been studied using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The model membrane systems were aqueous multilamellar dispersions composed of either a saturated phosphatidylcholine perdeuterated on the sn-2 chain containing 1-octanol or 1-decanol or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DPPC) containing (/sup 2/H/sub 17/)1-octanol or selectively deuterated 1-decanol. The phase changes monitored by /sup 2/H NMR are corroborated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Incorporated 1-octanol or 1-decanol causes the lipid's gel to liquid crystalline phase transition to broaden and its onset temperature (T/sub m/) to decrease. Octanol has more effect than decanol. The phase transition can also be observed in changes in the labelled 1-alkanols' /sup 2/H NMR spectra with temperature. Using specifically deuterated decanols it is found that the phase change is sensed at different temperatures depending on the position of the /sup 2/H label. The second area of study concerns the effect of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol on aqueous dispersions of saturated, acyl chain perdeuterated phosphatidylcholine. /sup 2/H NMR and DSC show that ..cap alpha..-tocopherol broadens and reduces T/sub m/ of the phospholipid gel to liquid crystalline phase transition, and that the gel phase lipid is disrupted by the presence of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol. Above the phase transition ..cap alpha..-tocopherol increases the phospholipid S/sub CD/.

  14. A feasibility study quantifying in vivo human alpha-tocopherol metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Quantitation of human vitamin E metabolism is incomplete, so we quantified RRR- and all-rac-alpha-tocopherol metabolism in an adult. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to quantify and interpret in vivo human vitamin E metabolism. DESIGN: A man was given an oral dose of 0.001821 mi...

  15. A feasibiity study to quantify in vivo human alpha-tocopherol metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitation of human vitamin E metabolism is incomplete, therefore we conducted study to quantify RRR- and all-rac-alpha-tocopherol (TAc) metabolism in humans. A healthy male was administered an oral dose of 14C-labeled RRR-alpha-TAc (0.001821 micromol, 101.5 nCi 14C), and its appearance was measur...

  16. A FEASIBILITY STUDY TO QUANTIFY IN VIVO HUMAN ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL METABOLISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitation of human vitamin E metabolism is incomplete, therefore we conducted study to quantify RRR- and all-rac-alpha-tocopherol (TAc) metabolism in humans. A healthy male was administered an oral dose of 14C-labeled RRR-alpha-TAc (0.001821 micromol, 101.5 nCi 14C), and its appearance was measur...

  17. Alpha-tocopherol and MRI outcomes in multiple sclerosis--association and prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin I Løken-Amsrud

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Alpha-tocopherol is the main vitamin E compound in humans, and has important antioxidative and immunomodulatory properties. The aim of this study was to study alpha-tocopherol concentrations and their relationship to disease activity in Norwegian multiple sclerosis (MS patients. METHODS: Prospective cohort study in 88 relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS patients, originally included in a randomised placebo-controlled trial of omega-3 fatty acids (the OFAMS study, before and during treatment with interferon beta. The patients were followed for two years with repeated 12 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans and nine serum measurements of alpha-tocopherol. RESULTS: During interferon beta (IFNB treatment, each 10 µmol/L increase in alpha-tocopherol reduced the odds (CI 95% for simultaneous new T2 lesions by 36.8 (0.5-59.8 %, p = 0.048, and for combined unique activity by 35.4 (1.6-57.7 %, p = 0.042, in a hierarchical regression model. These associations were not significant prior to IFNB treatment, and were not noticeably changed by gender, age, body mass index, HLA-DRB1*15, treatment group, compliance, or the concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, retinol, neutralising antibodies against IFNB, or the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. The corresponding odds for having new T1 gadolinium enhancing lesions two months later was reduced by 65.4 (16.5-85.7 %, p = 0.019, and for new T2 lesions by 61.0 (12.4-82.6 %, p = 0.023. CONCLUSION: During treatment with IFNB, increasing serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol were associated with reduced odds for simultaneous and subsequent MRI disease activity in RRMS patients.

  18. Alpha-tocopherol and MRI Outcomes in Multiple Sclerosis – Association and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løken-Amsrud, Kristin I.; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Bakke, Søren J.; Beiske, Antonie G.; Bjerve, Kristian S.; Bjørnarå, Bård T.; Hovdal, Harald; Lilleås, Finn; Midgard, Rune; Pedersen, Tom; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Torkildsen, Øivind; Wergeland, Stig; Holmøy, Trygve

    2013-01-01

    Objective Alpha-tocopherol is the main vitamin E compound in humans, and has important antioxidative and immunomodulatory properties. The aim of this study was to study alpha-tocopherol concentrations and their relationship to disease activity in Norwegian multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods Prospective cohort study in 88 relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients, originally included in a randomised placebo-controlled trial of omega-3 fatty acids (the OFAMS study), before and during treatment with interferon beta. The patients were followed for two years with repeated 12 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and nine serum measurements of alpha-tocopherol. Results During interferon beta (IFNB) treatment, each 10 µmol/L increase in alpha-tocopherol reduced the odds (CI 95%) for simultaneous new T2 lesions by 36.8 (0.5–59.8) %, p = 0.048, and for combined unique activity by 35.4 (1.6–57.7) %, p = 0.042, in a hierarchical regression model. These associations were not significant prior to IFNB treatment, and were not noticeably changed by gender, age, body mass index, HLA-DRB1*15, treatment group, compliance, or the concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, retinol, neutralising antibodies against IFNB, or the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. The corresponding odds for having new T1 gadolinium enhancing lesions two months later was reduced by 65.4 (16.5–85.7) %, p = 0.019, and for new T2 lesions by 61.0 (12.4–82.6) %, p = 0.023. Conclusion During treatment with IFNB, increasing serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol were associated with reduced odds for simultaneous and subsequent MRI disease activity in RRMS patients. PMID:23349882

  19. {alpha}-Tocopherol impact on oxy-radical induced free radical decomposition of DMSO: Spin trapping EPR and theoretical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerzykiewicz, Maria, E-mail: Mariaj@wchuwr.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University, 14 F. Joliot-Curie St., 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Cwielag-Piasecka, Irmina; Witwicki, Maciej; Jezierski, Adam [Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University, 14 F. Joliot-Curie St., 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2011-05-26

    Graphical abstract: {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3}. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of DMSO to {center_dot}CH{sub 3}. {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3}. {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of PBN. {yields} The structures of observed spin adducts were theoretically confirmed. - Abstract: EPR spin trapping and theoretical methods such as density functional theory (DFT) as well as combined DFT and quadratic configuration interaction approach (DFT/QCISD) were used to identify the radicals produced in the reaction of oxy-radicals and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence and absence of {alpha}-tocopherol. Additionally, the mixtures of {alpha}-tocopherol with linolenic acid and glyceryl trilinoleate as well as bioglycerols (glycerol fractions from biodiesel production) were tested. {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibited oxidation of the main decomposition product of DMSO, {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3} but did not prevent the transformation process of N-t-butyl-{alpha}-phenylnitrone (PBN) into 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). Theoretical investigations confirmed the structures of proposed spin adducts and allowed to correlate the EPR parameters observed in the experiment with the spin adducts electronic structure.

  20. Biodegradable films containing {alpha}-tocopherol/{beta}-cyclodextrin complex; Filmes biodegradaveis contendo {alpha}-tocoferol complexado em {beta}-ciclodextrina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Caroline; Martelli, Silvia M.; Soldi, Valdir, E-mail: vsoldi@qmc.ufsc.br [Lab. de Materiais Polimericos (POLIMAT), Dept. de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Barreto, Pedro L.M. [Lab. de Reologia (REOLAB), Dept. de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Alimentos, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The growing environmental concern about pollution and the need to reduce dependence of plastic industry in relation to non-renewable resources has increased the interest of both researchers and industry in the use of biopolymers. In this work {beta}-cyclodextrin/{alpha}-tocopherol complexes were prepared and characterized. In order to obtain polymeric active biofilms, the {beta}-cyclodextrin/{alpha}-tocopherol complex was incorporated into a polymeric matrix of carboxymethylcellulose. The {beta}-cyclodextrin/{alpha}-tocopherol complex was characterized through of X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The physicochemical properties of the films incorporated with the complex were evaluated through mechanical and colorimetric analysis and moisture sorption isotherm. (author)

  1. Radiation-induced peroxidation of lipid dissolved in organic solvent and its inhibition by alpha-tocopherol and cepharanthine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of cepharanthine and alpha-tocopherol on radiation-induced peroxidation of lipids dissolved in methanol(MeOH)-chloroform (CHCl3)-H2O(v/v, 2/1/0.8) were examined. alpha-Tocopherol strongly inhibited radiation-induced peroxidation of lipids dissolved in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O. However, cepharanthine exhibited a weak inhibitory action in this system. The change in the absorption spectrum of alpha-tocopherol and cepharanthine by X-irradiation was measured. The reagents were dissolved in 95% EtOH acidified with 20 mM HCl and in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O. alpha-Tocopherol exhibited the change in its absorption spectrum in both systems, and seemed to be oxidized at a high rate by free radicals. However, cepharanthine slightly exhibited the change in its spectrum in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O, but not in acidified EtOH

  2. Radiation-induced peroxidation of lipid dissolved in organic solvent and its inhibition by alpha-tocopherol and cepharanthine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, N.; Joja, I.; Kuroda, M.; Fujishima, M.; Miyake, M.; Aono, K.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of cepharanthine and alpha-tocopherol on radiation-induced peroxidation of lipids dissolved in methanol(MeOH)-chloroform (CHCl3)-H2O(v/v, 2/1/0.8) were examined. alpha-Tocopherol strongly inhibited radiation-induced peroxidation of lipids dissolved in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O. However, cepharanthine exhibited a weak inhibitory action in this system. The change in the absorption spectrum of alpha-tocopherol and cepharanthine by X-irradiation was measured. The reagents were dissolved in 95% EtOH acidified with 20 mM HCl and in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O. alpha-Tocopherol exhibited the change in its absorption spectrum in both systems, and seemed to be oxidized at a high rate by free radicals. However, cepharanthine slightly exhibited the change in its spectrum in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O, but not in acidified EtOH.

  3. Redox Cycles of Caffeic Acid, alpha-Tocopherol, and Ascorbate: Implications for Protection of Low-Density Lipoproteins Against Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Laranjinha, João; Cadenas, Enrique

    1999-01-01

    This study addresses the dynamic interactions among alpha-tocopherol, caffeic acid, and ascorbate in terms of a sequence of redox cycles aimed at accomplishing optimal synergistic antioxidant protection. Several experimental models were designed to examine these interactions: UV irradiation of alpha-tocopherol-containing sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles, one-electron oxidations catalyzed by the hypervalent state of myoglobin, ferrylmyoglobin, and autoxidation at appropriate pHs. These models w...

  4. Alpha-Tocopherol antioxidant role in rancidity of edible oils from vegetable source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez de la Cuesta, P.J.; Rus Martinez, E.; Galdeano Chaparro, M. [Chemical Engineering Department. Faculty of Sciencies. Univerity of Malaga, Malaga (Spain)

    1996-12-31

    It has been studied oxidative rancidity of olive oil, sunflower oil and sunflower oil of high oleic acid in presence of alpha-tocopherol. The influence of the temperature and the antioxidant concentration on peroxidation of said oils through the utilization of 2``2 factorial designs have been analyzed. Besides, it has been realized the kinetic study of the process determining the corresponding kinetic parameters. (Author) 13 refs.

  5. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Levels in Experimental Brain Injury and the Effects of Alpha-tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgun Senol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The mechanisms, responsible for the secondary injuries occuring after acute injury of the brain are; release of nitrous oxide which is an inflammatory mediator, abnormal formation of free oxygen radicals and excessive stimulation of excitatory aminoacids. In this study, it is aimed to investigate changes in intercellular adhesion molecule levels in the brain, that occur subsequent to blunt head trauma, and after administration of an antioxidant agent, vitamin E. Material and Method: In this study, rats were divided into 4 groups. In group A; rats had only skin incision, group B; rats were traumatized after the skin incision, group C; isotonic (30mg/kg was given intraperitoneally after 30 minutes of the trauma, group D; alpha-tocopherol (30mg/kg was given intraperitoneally, after 30 minutes of the trauma. All the rats in these groups were sacrified after 24 hours. Biparietal and bifrontal lobs were taken about 3x5x1mm tickness and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results: As the result of the statistical analysis, it is detected that although there is an increase in intercellular adhesion molecule levels in brain parenchyma after trauma, it is statistically unsignificant. However, as the traumatized group and the group given alpha-tocopherol after trauma was compared, a statistically significant decrease in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in the alpha-tocopherol given group was seen. Discussion: Alpha-tocopherol, an antioxidant agent, causes decrease in intercellular adhesion molecule levels, by decreasing inflammation.

  6. Can {alpha}-tocopherol and {beta}-carotene supplementation reduce adverse radiation effects on salivary glands?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funegaard, U.; Johansson, I.; Ericson, T. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cariology; Malmer, B.; Henriksson, R. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    1995-12-31

    In this study, we evaluated whether supplementation with antioxidant vitamins can reduce the adverse effects of irradiation on the salivary glands in the rat. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were given a basic diet providing 0.6 mg {alpha}-tocopherol and no {beta}-carotene per day. In two groups the basic diet was supplemented with 3.4 mg {alpha}-tocopherol and 6 mg {beta}-carotene per day from 14 days before irradiation until 12 days after complete irradiation. One group of rats given basic diet and one group given supplemented diet were irradiated with 7 Gy daily for five consecutive days. Isoproterenol and pilocarpine-stimulated whole saliva was collected from all rats 2, 4 and 26 weeks after irradiation. Vitamin-supplemented irradiated rats had higher secretion rates on all three occasions compared with those of irradiated rats given basic diet. The changes in saliva composition seen in irradiated rats were less accentuated in vitamin-supplemented, irradiated rats. The proportions of acinar cells were significantly decreased both in parotid and submandibular glands 26 weeks after irradiation. Supplementation with {alpha}-tocopherol and {beta}-carotene did not alter the morphology of the glands. (author).

  7. Two approaches in preparation for cogeneration alpha-tocopherol and biodiesel from cottonseed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Q.-L.; Zang, L.-Y.; Zhang, L.; Yun, Z. [Nanjing University of Technology (China)

    2012-02-15

    Vitamin E is a group of lipid soluble antioxidants that is widely used in the food, cosmetic and medical industries. It is comprised of four tocopherols and four tocotrienols, i.e. alpha, beta, gamma and delta, which are characterized by a chromanol ring structure with a distinct substitution pattern of methyl groups. This paper presents two approaches in preparation for co-generation of alpha-tocopherol and biodiesel from cottonseed. The approaches are a two-step process and a direct alkaline trans-esterification process. Using single factor experiments and an orthogonal design method, the effects of certain factors on the alpha-tocopherol recovery and conversion of cottonseed oil to biodiesel in both processes was systematically studied. In the two-step process, biodiesel and alpha-tocopherol were produced using a two-phase solvent combined with base-catalyzed trans-esterification. It was observed that 95.5% cottonseed oil was converted to biodiesel. In the direct-alkaline trans-esterification process, 98.3% cottonseed oil was converted to biodiesel.

  8. Alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol concentration in vegetable oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evellyn Câmara Grilo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oils are the richest dietary sources of vitamin E. Vitamin E determination levels in foods are of great importance to adjust the ingestion of nutrients by the population. The purpose of this paper is to determine the concentration of alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol in vegetable oils and compare the alpha-tocopherol value to the nutritional requirement of vitamin E. The analysis was performed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography. The values expressed as mg/kg for alpha and gamma-tocopherol were, respectively, 120.3±4.2 and 122.0±7.9 in canola oil; 432.3±86.6 and 92.3±9.5 in sunflower oil; 173.0±82.3 and 259.7±43.8 in corn oil; 71.3±6.4 and 273.3±11.1 in soybean oil. A significant difference was encountered between the alpha-tocopherol concentrations in vegetable oils. Similar results were found for gamma-tocopherol, except for corn and soybean oils. It was concluded that the soybean oil was not considered a source of vitamin E. The canola and corn oils were considered sources, and the sunflower oil was considered an excellent source.

  9. Effect of D-alpha-tocopherol on tubular nephron acidification by rats with induced diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nascimento Gomes

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine if treatment of diabetic rats with D-alpha-tocopherol could prevent the changes in glomerular and tubular function commonly observed in this disease. Sixty male Wistar rats divided into four groups were studied: control (C, control treated with D-alpha-tocopherol (C + T, diabetic (D, and diabetic treated with D-alpha-tocopherol (D + T. Treatment with D-alpha-tocopherol (40 mg/kg every other day, ip was started three days after diabetes induction with streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, ip. Renal function studies and microperfusion measurements were performed 30 days after diabetes induction and the kidneys were removed for morphometric analyses. Data are reported as means ± SEM. Glomerular filtration rate increased in D rats but decreased in D + T rats (C: 6.43 ± 0.21; D: 7.74 ± 0.45; D + T: 3.86 ± 0.18 ml min-1 kg-1. Alterations of tubular acidification observed in bicarbonate absorption flux (JHCO3 and in acidification half-time (t/2 in group D were reversed in group D + T (JHCO3, C: 2.30 ± 0.10; D: 3.28 ± 0.22; D + T: 1.87 ± 0.08 nmol cm-2 s-1; t/2, C: 4.75 ± 0.20; D: 3.52 ± 0.15; D + T: 5.92 ± 0.19 s. Glomerular area was significantly increased in D, while D + T rats exhibited values similar to C, suggesting that the vitamin prevented the hypertrophic effect of hyperglycemia (C: 8334.21 ± 112.05; D: 10,217.55 ± 100.66; D + T: 8478.21 ± 119.81µm². These results suggest that D-alpha-tocopherol is able to protect rats, at least in part, from the harmful effects of diabetes on renal function.

  10. Protective effects of plasma alpha-tocopherols on the risk of inorganic arsenic-related urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic plays an important role in producing oxidative stress in cultured cells. To investigate the interaction between high oxidative stress and low arsenic methylation capacity on arsenic carcinogenesis, a case-control study was conducted to evaluate the relationship among the indices of oxidative stress, such as urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyquanine (8-OHdG), as well as plasma micronutrients and urinary arsenic profiles on urothelial carcinoma (UC) risk. Urinary 8-OHdG was measured using high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry. Plasma micronutrient levels were analyzed using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The present study showed a significant protective effect of plasma alpha-tocopherol on UC risk. Plasma alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly inversely related to urinary total arsenic concentrations and inorganic arsenic percentage (InAs%), and significantly positively related to dimethylarsinic acid percentage (DMA%). There were no correlations between plasma micronutrients and urinary 8-OHdG. Study participants with lower alpha-tocopherol and higher urinary total arsenic, higher InAs%, higher MMA%, and lower DMA% had a higher UC risk than those with higher alpha-tocopherol and lower urinary total arsenic, lower InAs%, lower MMA%, and higher DMA%. These results suggest that plasma alpha-tocopherol might modify the risk of inorganic arsenic-related UC. - Research Highlights: → Plasma alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly inversely related to UC risk. → There were no correlations between plasma micronutrients and urinary 8-OHdG. → People with lower alpha-tocopherol and higher total arsenic had increased UC risk.

  11. Inhibition of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation in epidermal p53 gene of UV-irradiated mice by alpha-tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutations or alterations in the p53 gene have been observed in 50-100% of ultraviolet light (UV)-induced squamous cell carcinoma in humans and animals. Most of the mutations occurred at dipyrimidine sequences, suggesting that pyrimidine dimers in the p53 gene play a role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. We previously showed that topical alpha-tocopherol prevents UV-induced skin carcinogenesis in the mouse. In the present study we asked whether topical alpha-tocopherol reduces the level of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the murine epidermal p53 gene. Mice received six dorsal applications of 25 mg each of alpha-tocopherol, on alternate days, before exposure to 500 J/m2 of UV-B irradiation. Mice were killed at selected times after irradiation. The level of dimers in the epidermal p53 gene was measured using the T4 endonuclease V assay with quantitative Southern hybridization. Topical alpha-tocopherol caused a 55% reduction in the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the epidermal p53 gene. The rate of reduction of pyrimidine dimers between 1 and 10 hours after irradiation was similar in UV-irradiated mice, regardless of alpha-tocopherol treatment. Therefore, the lower level of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated mice treated with alpha-tocopherol than in control UV-irradiated mice resulted from the prevention of formation of the dimers, and not from enhanced repair of these lesions. Our results indicate that alpha-tocopherol acts as an effective sunscreen in vivo, preventing the formation of premutagenic DNA lesions in a gene known to be important in skin carcinogenesis

  12. Copper-catalyzed oxidation of a structured lipid-based emulsion containing alpha-tocopherol and citric acid: influence of pH and NaCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn-Barnes, Hannah T; Akoh, Casimir C

    2003-11-01

    The effects of salt and pH on copper-catalyzed lipid oxidation in structured lipid-based emulsions were evaluated. Ten percent oil-in-water emulsions were formulated with a canola oil/caprylic acid structured lipid and stabilized with 0.5% whey protein isolate. alpha-Tocopherol and citric acid were added to the emulsions to determine how changes in pH or the addition of NaCl affected their antioxidant activity. The peroxide values and anisidine values of emulsions stored at 50 degrees C were measured over an 8-day period. Increased lipid oxidation occurred in the pH 7.0 emulsions and when 0.5 M NaCl was added to the pH 3.0 samples. Adding alpha-tocopherol, citric acid, or a combination of the two compounds slowed the formation of hydroperoxides and their subsequent decomposition products in pH 3.0 emulsions. PMID:14582985

  13. Influence of Alpha Tocopherol on Heat Stress-Induced Changes in the Reproductive Function of Swiss Albino Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was carried out to investigate the influence of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) on heat stress-induced changes in the reproduction of Swiss albino mice. The evaluated parameters include: the estrous cycle, fertility, post-implantation losses of fetuses and estimation of progesterone levels in the serum. Eight groups of experimental mice (10 each) were used. Groups 1-4 (24 degree C) consisted of a control and alpha-tocopherol (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) treated groups. Groups 5-8 (42 degree C) consisted of a positive control and alpha-tocopherol (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) treated group. Heat-stress reduced significantly (p > 0.001) the number of fetuses and corpora lutea. There was also a significant decrease in the mean weights of fetuses (p > 0.001) and placenta (p > 0.01) in the heat-stress group with a decrease in their serum progesterone levels (p > 0.01). Heat-stress groups treated with high doses of alpha-tocopherol 200 and 400 mg/kg, showed protection against heat-stress related abnormalities. The results showed that alpha-tocopherol plays a role in protection against hyperthermia induced changes in the estrous cycle length, infertility, post-implantation losses and depletion in the serum level of progesterone. (author)

  14. Tissue concentration of doxorubicin (adriamycin in mouse pretreated with alpha-tocopherol or coenzyme Q10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinozawa,Shinya

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The tissue concentration of doxorubicin (adriamycin; ADM and its major metabolite (aglycone I was examined in mice pretreated with alpha-tocopherol (VE or coenzyme Q10 (CoQ. In VE-pretreated group, the concentrations of aglycone I of the liver (1, 3 and 5 h after the administration, kidney (1 and 3h and heart (3h were significantly higher than those in the saline group. The clinical application of VE or CoQ concomitant with anti-tumor drugs especially ADM, requires caution.

  15. Study of alpha-tocopherol as a protector of damages induced to the skin by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study was carried out in animals for determining the characteristics of alpha-tocopherol protection against lesions caused by free radicals produced by ionizing radiation. Two different concentrations of alpha-tocopherol were applied on the same exposed sample. A linear electron accelerator of 6 MeV was used for the production of free radicals and a dose of 2800 cGy. The lesions were submitted to clinical studies for anatomic pathologies. The conclusion of this study is that alpha-tocopherol applied to skin before and immediately after the exposure to ionizing radiation has the capability to protect it, developing a perfectly differentiated epidermis and of greater thickness than normally considered

  16. Effect of anti-hyperlipidemia drugs on the alpha-tocopherol concentration and their potential for murine malaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Aiko; Herbas, Maria Shirley; Shichiri, Mototada; Ishida, Noriko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The current preventions of malaria are protection against mosquito bites and taking chemoprophylactic anti-malarial drugs. However, drug therapies are usually associated with adverse events and emergency of drug-resistant malaria parasites. Previous study showed that host plasma alpha-tocopherol deficiency enhanced resistance against malaria infection in mice. Here, we report a new prevention strategy against malaria by using anti-hyperlipidemia drugs, ezetimibe, berberine, cholestyramine, and probucol to modify the host plasma alpha-tocopherol concentration. The drugs were mixed with diet and fed to C57BL/6J mice for 2 weeks. Although all drugs reduced plasma alpha-tocopherol concentration after 2 weeks of feeding, probucol-treated mice showed 90 % reduction and it was the lowest alpha-tocopherol concentration among the four drugs. Ezetimibe, berberine, and combination of ezetimibe and berberine pretreatment for 2 weeks were not effective against infection of Plasmodium yoelii XL17, a lethal strain, for survival and parasitemia in mice. Two-week pretreatment and 1-week treatment after infection of cholestyramine had also no effect on malaria infection. Survival rates of cholestyramine, ezetimibe, and/or berberine treated mice were 0-22 %. However, probucol caused significant decrease in parasitemia and increased in mice survival following 2-week pretreatment and 1-week treatment after infection. All control mice died while all probucol treated mice survived during the course of infection. Thus, probucol which reduced plasma alpha-tocopherol concentration was effective in enhancing the host to resist malaria infection in mice. Our finding indicates that plasma alpha-tocopherol reducing drugs like probucol might be a candidate for beneficial prevention strategy for travelers from malaria-free area. PMID:26358099

  17. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and. alpha. -tocopherol content of stored potato tubers. [Solanum tuberosum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spychalla, J.P.; Desborough, S.L. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Activated oxygen or oxygen free radical mediated damage to plants has been established or implicated in many plant stress situations. The extent of activated oxygen damage to potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers during low temperature storage and long-term storage is not known. Quantitation of oxygen free radical mediated damage in plant tissues is difficult. However, it is comparatively easy to quantitate endogenous antioxidants, which detoxify potentially damaging forms of activated oxygen. Three tuber antioxidants, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and {alpha}-tocopherol were assayed from four potato cultivars stored at 3{degree}C and 9{degree}C for 40 weeks. Tubers stored at 3{degree}C demonstrated increased superoxide dismutase activities (up to 72%) compared to tubers stored at 9{degree}C. Time dependent increases in the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and {alpha}-tocopherol occurred during the course of the 40 week storage. The possible relationship between these increases in antioxidants and the rate of activated oxygen production in the tubers is discussed.

  18. Removal of. cap alpha. -tocopherol from blood and its comparison with other lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, H.K.; Vang, M.J.; Mavis, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The blood decay curve of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol in rats was compared with those of the two major blood lipids by labeling rat serum in vitro with /sup 3/H-..cap alpha..-tocopherol (AT), /sup 3/H-cholesterol (CHO) or /sup 3/H-trioleoylglycerol (TO) and injecting it into the bloodstream. For the three lipids, loss from blood was biphasic. The half time of the faster decay was 2-4 minutes. The slower curve decayed with half times of 42, 289 and 990 minutes for TO, AT and CHO, respectively. This intermediate rate of AT removal is consistent with its accompanying both of the major blood lipids as they are removed by their respective mechanisms or with a process specific for AT. To investigate the role of liver in the faster curve, animals were hepatectomized. TO and CHO loss remained biphasic after liver removal. However, AT loss became monophasic, with a loss rate intermediate between the non-hepatectomized fast and slow decays. This demonstrates a central role for liver in the metabolism of blood-borne AT and a mode of removal distinct from the other two lipids.

  19. Effects of dietary [alpha]-tocopherol and [beta]-carotene on lipid peroxidation induced by methyl mercuric chloride in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raun Andersen, H.; Andersen, O. (Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Odense, Odense (Denmark))

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of male CBA mice to methyl mercuric chloride, CH[sub 3]HgCl, (10-40 mg/l in drinking water) for 2 weeks resulted in dose-related Hg deposition and enhanced lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain. Mice were fed well-defined semisynthetic diets containing different levels of [alpha]-tocopherol (10, 100 or 1000 mg/kg) or [beta]-carotene (1000, 10,000 or 100,000 IU/kg) for four weeks, two groups on each diet. The concentration of [alpha]-tocopherol and [beta]-carotene used corresponded to deficient, normal and high levels. During the last two weeks, one group on each diet was given 40 mg CH[sub 3]HgCl/l of drinking water. High dietary [alpha]-tocopherol protected against CH[sub 3]HgCl induced hepatic lipid peroxidation, whereas the [alpha]-tocopherol deficient diet further enhanced CH[sub 3]HgCl induced hepatic lipid peroxidation. Similar, though statistically non-significant effects occurred in the kidneys, [alpha]-tocopherol did not protect against CH[sub 3]HgCl induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. Excess dietary [beta]-carotene further enhanced CH[sub 3]HgCl induced lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain. CH[sub 3]HgCl significantly decreased the activity of total glutathione peroxidase (T-GSH-Px) and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) in the kidneys in all dietary groups. High dietary [alpha]-tocopherol enhanced the activity of Se-GSH-Px in liver and kidney compared to the activity in mice fed the normal level of [alpha]-tocopherol. This occurred in mice exposed to CH[sub 3]-HgCl as well as in unexposed mice, and the difference between CH[sub 3]HgCl exposed and unexposed mice was not diminished. High dietary [alpha]-tocopherol increased the activity of both Se-GSH-Px and T-GSH-Px in the brain of CH[sub 3]HgCl-exposed mice. The dietary level of [beta]-carotene did not affect the activity of the two enzymes in the organs investigated. (au) (43 refs.).

  20. SUPPLEMENTATION OF PATIENTS WITH HOMOZYGOUS SICKLE-CELL DISEASE WITH ZINC, ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL, VITAMIN-C, SOYBEAN OIL, AND FISH OIL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MUSKIET, FAJ; MUSKIET, FD; MEIBORG, G; SCHERMER, JG

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen patients (aged 0.7-17.9 y) with homozygous sickle cell disease were supplemented with alpha-tocopherol, vitamin C, zinc, and soybean oil (suppl 1; for 8 mo) and alpha-tocopherol, vitamin C, and fish oil (suppl 2; for 7 mo). Urinary zinc (suppl 1), plasma vitamin C, plasma cholesterol ester

  1. Alpha-tocopherol disappearance rates from plasma depend on lipid concentrations: Studies using deuterium labeled collard greens in younger and older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about alpha-tocopherol's bioavailability as a constituent of food or its dependence on a subject's age. To evaluate the alpha-tocopherol bioavailability from food, we used collard greens grown in deuterated water (2H collard greens) as a source of deuterium-labeled (2H) alpha-tocophe...

  2. Níveis de proteína e de vitamina E para matrizes de frango de corte. 2. Efeito sobre a concentração de alfa-tocoferol na gema e nos tecidos e balanço de nitrogênio Protein and vitamin E levels for broiler breed hens. 2. Effects on yolk and tissue alpha-tocopherol concentration and nitrogen balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L.T. Barreto

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizadas 16 matrizes de frangos de corte com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito de dois níveis de proteína bruta (NPB, 14 e 16%, e dois níveis de vitamina E (NVE, 25 e 250mg/kg, na dieta sobre a concentração de alfa-tocoferol (AT na gema, no fígado, no soro sangüíneo e na excreta, e sobre a retenção de AT e de nitrogênio (N. O período experimental foi de 25 dias, sendo 15 dias para a adaptação das aves à dieta e 10 dias para a coleta de ovos e da excreta para análise de vitamina E (VE e N. O delineamento experimental foi o inteiramente ao acaso, formado por quatro tratamentos em esquema fatorial 2 × 2 (NVE × NPB, constituído cada um por quatro repetições, e cada unidade experimental representada por uma ave. Houve aumento linear (PSixteen broiler breed hens were used with the objective of evaluating the effects of supplementation of two crude protein (14 and 16% CP and two vitamin E levels (25 and 250mg VE/kg in the diet on the alpha-tocopherol (AT concentration in the egg yolk, liver, blood serum and feces, and on the AT and nitrogen (N retentions. The experiment lasted 25 days, in which 15 days were used for hens adaptation and 10 days for egg and fecal collection for AT and N analyses. The experimental design was a complete randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement (CP × VE levels with four repetitions per treatment. The increasing of VE in the diet resulted in increase (P0.05. Thus, it could be concluded that the increasing of VE levels in the diet increased the AT concentrations in the egg yolk and body tissues, and decreased the AT and increased the N retention in broiler breed hens during the laying peak period.

  3. Effects of RRR-alpha-tocopherol on leukocyte expression of HSP72 in response to exhaustive treadmill exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niess, A M; Fehrenbach, E; Schlotz, E; Sommer, M; Angres, C; Tschositsch, K; Battenfeld, N; Golly, I C; Biesalski, H K; Northoff, H; Dickhuth, H H

    2002-08-01

    Previous research revealed an increased expression of HSP72 in leukocytes after vigorous endurance exercise. We questioned whether more intensive but shorter exercise also induces leukocyte HSP72 synthesis. To delineate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in exercise-related HSP72 induction, we additionally examined the effect of RRR-alpha-tocopherol (alpha-toc) on HSP72 expression using a double-blind placebo (P) controlled cross-over design. After supplementation with alpha-toc (500 I.U. daily) or P for 8 days, 9 male subjects performed a combined exhaustive treadmill protocol (total duration 29.4 +/- 2.0 min). HSP72 was assessed on mRNA (RT-PCR) and protein levels (flow cytometry). HSP72 mRNA rose 3 h after exercise only in the P group, but individual differences (alpha-toc - P) did not reveal significant treatment effects. A moderate but significant rise of HSP72 protein occurred in granulocytes up to 48 h after exercise. Three hours post-exercise, granulocyte HSP72 protein was lower when subjects received alpha-toc, but this effect vanished 24 and 48 h post-exercise. Exhaustive treadmill exercise augments HSP72 mRNA in leukocytes and induced a moderate but prolonged response of granulocyte HSP72 protein. These exercise effects are lower when compared to earlier findings obtained after vigorous endurance exercise. ROS seem to be involved, but do not play the major role in the induction of granulocyte HSP72 synthesis after exhaustive exercise. PMID:12215965

  4. Reaction of HO/sub 2//O/sub 2//sup -/ with. cap alpha. -tocopherol in ethanolic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arudi, R.L.; Sutherland, M.W.; Bielski, B.H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The HO/sub 2/ perhydroxyl radical reacts with ..cap alpha..-tocopherol in 85% ethanol containing some H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, EDTA, and O/sub 2/. The resulting transient has a spectral maximum near 390 ..mu... The final product is mostly ..cap alpha..-tocopherylquinone. Best reproducibility for reaction of O/sub 2//sup -/ with ..cap alpha..-tocopherol was obtained in a deoxygenated reaction mixture of 26 +- 3 ..mu..M O/sub 2//sup -/, 0.0565M ..cap alpha..-tocopherol, 5..mu..M EDTA, and 0.005 M KOH in 85% EtOH; the upper limit for the reaction was 6.0 +- 3.0 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, indicating that for all practical purposes O/sub 2//sup -/ does not react at all with ..cap alpha..-tocopherol. Preliminary experiments with Trolox, a vitamin E model compound, indicates that it too reacts with HO/sub 2/ but not with O/sub 2//sup -/. Membrane-bound tocopherols in vivo may fulfil a dual antioxidant role. (DLC)

  5. Role of alpha-tocopherol in counteracting DNA damage induced by Ochratoxin A in primary porcine fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Baldi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A is a mycotoxin responsible for disease states in both humans and animals. OTA mechanisms of action are numerous, including lipid peroxidation. Oxidative damage results in the modification of macromolecules (i.e. DNA, cell death and tissue injure. Several strategies, such as the use of antioxidants, have been used to reduce OTA cytotoxicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of alpha-tocopherol in counteracting DNA damage induced by OTA in cell cultures. Primary porcine fibroblasts, isolated from embryo and from ear, were incubated for 24h with several concentrations of OTA in order to detect DNA fragmentation. OTA produced DNA fragmentation in a concentration dependent manner in both primary cell cultures. The pre-treatment with alpha-tocopherol caused the reduction of DNA fragmentation in both primary cell cultures, after 24h of incubation with OTA. In particular, when OTA was added at 10 µg/ml in embryo fibroblasts, alpha-tocopherol at the concentrations of 1 nM was significantly (P<0.05 able to reduce DNA fragmentation by 16%. In ear fibroblast cultures, alpha-tocopherol at the 1nM concentration was significantly (P<0.05 able to reduce DNA fragmentation by 15.23% in the presence of 5 µg/ml of OTA.

  6. Model membrane partition ESR study in the presence of alpha-tocopherol by a new spin probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severcan, F.; Cannistraro, S. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Perugia (Italy))

    1989-08-01

    The effect of alpha-tocopherol (alpha T) on partitioning and fluidity changes occurring in phospholipid liposomes have been investigated by monitoring the X-band ESR spectrum of the high resolution amphiphilic spin probe perdeutero-di-t-butyl nitroxide (PDDTBN), which partitions in the lipid and water phase of liposomes, showing all the three resonances from each phase well resolved.

  7. Model membrane partition ESR study in the presence of alpha-tocopherol by a new spin probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of alpha-tocopherol (alpha T) on partitioning and fluidity changes occurring in phospholipid liposomes have been investigated by monitoring the X-band ESR spectrum of the high resolution amphiphilic spin probe perdeutero-di-t-butyl nitroxide (PDDTBN), which partitions in the lipid and water phase of liposomes, showing all the three resonances from each phase well resolved

  8. Dynamics of alpha-tocopherol during irradiation, under conditions of enhanced metabolism, and in haemotopoiesis. [X radiation, mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hruba, F.; Neradilova, M.; Novakova, V.; Blahosova, A.; Vulterinova, M.; Parikova, V.

    1976-01-01

    Investigation of serum alpha-tocopherol levels in patients after administration of radioiodine /sup 131/I on therapeutic grounds revealed a decline of the serum level in relation to the amount administered. Fractionated x-ray irradiation gradually reduces the tocopherolaemia. Experiments in mice revealed that tocopherol supplement of the diet increases the resistance of animals to whole-body irradiation, when evaluated from body weight changes and tocopherol levels in organs. During experimental hyperthyroidism in rats the body weight declines, the weight of heart and liver increases and alpha-tocopherol cumulation in the liver and myocardium increases with the duration of hyperthyroidism. This increase of alpha-tocopherol is time-dependent and is significant as compared with controls and hypothyroid animals. The authors assume that during an enhanced fatty acid turnover, alpha-tocopherol cumulates at sites of maximum fatty acid turnover, the latter being used as a source of energy. Saturation with 500 mg tocopherol acetate for seven days caused in a group of healthy women an increase in the number of reticulocytes, depending on the amount of iron present. The increased reticulocyte formation was associated with a reduction of the level and increase of the vitamin B/sub 12/ serum level. The increased red cell saturation with tocopherol was manifested by a greater resistance of the red cell membrane followed up by a temporal haemolysis curve. It was confirmed that tocopherol saturation alone stimulates bone marrow to an increased reticulocyte formation in subjects without deficiency of haematopoietic factors.

  9. Kinetics, bioavailability, and metabolism of RRR-alpha-tocopherol in humans supports lower requirement for vitamin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinetic models enable nutrient needs and kinetic behaviors to be quantified and provide mechanistic insights into metabolism. Therefore, we modeled and quantified the kinetics, bioavailability and metabolism of RRR-alpha-tocopherol in 12 healthy adults. Six men and six women, aged 27 ± 6 y, each i...

  10. The neuroprotective effects of tocotrienol rich fraction and alpha tocopherol against glutamate injury in astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilaga Rati Selvaraju

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF is an extract of palm oil, which consists of 25% alpha tocopherol (α-TCP and 75% tocotrienols. TRF has been shown to possess potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, neuroprotection, and cholesterol lowering activities. Glutamate is the main excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter in the central nervous system of mammalian, which can be excitotoxic, and it has been suggested to play a key role in neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. In this present study, the effects of vitamin E (TRF and α-TCP in protecting astrocytes against glutamate injury were elucidated. Astrocytes induced with 180 mM of glutamate lead to significant cell death. However, glutamate mediated cytotoxicity was diminished via pre and post supplementation of TRF and α-TCP. Hence, vitamin E acted as a potent antioxidant agent in recovering mitochondrial injury due to elevated oxidative stress, and enhanced better survivability upon glutamate toxicity.  

  11. The neuroprotective effects of tocotrienol rich fraction and alpha tocopherol against glutamate injury in astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraju, Thilaga Rati; Khaza’ai, Huzwah; Vidyadaran, Sharmili; Abd Mutalib, Mohd Sokhini; Vasudevan, Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    Tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF) is an extract of palm oil, which consists of 25% alpha tocopherol (α-TCP) and 75% tocotrienols. TRF has been shown to possess potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, neuroprotection, and cholesterol lowering activities. Glutamate is the main excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter in the central nervous system of mammalian, which can be excitotoxic, and it has been suggested to play a key role in neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In this present study, the effects of vitamin E (TRF and α-TCP) in protecting astrocytes against glutamate injury were elucidated. Astrocytes induced with 180 mM of glutamate lead to significant cell death. However, glutamate mediated cytotoxicity was diminished via pre and post supplementation of TRF and α-TCP. Hence, vitamin E acted as a potent antioxidant agent in recovering mitochondrial injury due to elevated oxidative stress, and enhanced better survivability upon glutamate toxicity. PMID:25428670

  12. Pulse radiolytic study of alpha-tocopherol radical mechanisms in ethanolic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jore, D.; Patterson, L.K.; Ferradini, C.

    1986-01-01

    Pulse radiolytic studies of alpha-tocopherol (alpha TH) oxidation-reduction processes were carried out with low doses (5 Gy) of high-energy electrons in O/sub 2/-, N/sub 2/-, and air-saturated ethanolic solutions. Depending on the concentration of oxygen in solution, two different radicals, A . and B ., were observed. The first, A ., was obtained under N/sub 2/ and results from alpha TH reaction with solvated electron (k alpha TH + e-solv = 3.4 X 10(8) mol-1 liter s-1) and with H/sub 3/C-CH-OH, (R.) (k alpha TH + R. = 5 X 10(5) mol-1 liter s-1). B., observed under O/sub 2/, is produced by alpha TH reaction with RO/sub 2/ . peroxyl radicals (k alpha TH + RO/sub 2/ . = 9.5 X 10(4) mol-1 liter s-1).

  13. Photolysis of alpha-tocopherol in olive oils and model systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photolysis of alpha-tocopherol (I) in olive oil (O) and in some model systems (n-hexane = H; anhydrous n-hexane = HA, and triolein = T) was studied under sunlight and under artificial light (lambda 290 nm) by HPLC and GC/MS. In O and T, I disappeared linearly to 50% of the starting concentration, reached a constant value, and finally disappeared rapidly from the medium. In the model system, photolysis followed a pseudo-first-order kinetics. Although no peaks attributable to photoproducts were found in O, a main product identified by 1H and 13C NMR and GC/MS as 5-formyltocopherol (II) was found in the model systems. Irradiation of compound II led to species undetectable by HPLC in agreement with a slower consecutive kinetic process than that of I. In the HA and T systems, the formation of II occurred at lower levels than in H. The possible behavior of photodegradation is discussed

  14. Pulse radiolytic study of alpha-tocopherol radical mechanisms in ethanolic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse radiolytic studies of alpha-tocopherol (alpha TH) oxidation-reduction processes were carried out with low doses (5 Gy) of high-energy electrons in O2-, N2-, and air-saturated ethanolic solutions. Depending on the concentration of oxygen in solution, two different radicals, A . and B ., were observed. The first, A ., was obtained under N2 and results from alpha TH reaction with solvated electron (k alpha TH + e-solv = 3.4 X 10(8) mol-1 liter s-1) and with H3C-CH-OH, (R.) (k alpha TH + R. = 5 X 10(5) mol-1 liter s-1). B., observed under O2, is produced by alpha TH reaction with RO2 . peroxyl radicals (k alpha TH + RO2 . = 9.5 X 10(4) mol-1 liter s-1)

  15. Sensory profile of warmed-over flavour in tenderloin from steers supplemented with alpha-tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacir Evandro Lage

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of warmed-over flavour (WOF in cooked tenderloin and the influence of alpha-tocopherol on its inhibition. A total of 24 animals were confined, 12 of which received 1200 mg/head/day of alpha-tocopherol acetate for 90 days. Longissimus dorsi muscle cuts (tenderloin were obtained for sensory profile assessment by nine trained tasters. The tasters evaluated the taste of the meat based on four general and 18 specific attributes. The results of the evaluations were analysed with ANOVA, post-hoc tests of the means (Tukey tests, and principal component analysis (PCA. There was no significant difference in the WOF between the cuts of meat from the supplemented and non-supplemented animals. However, as the refrigeration period increased, there was a decrease in the intensity of the umami and sweet taste attributes and the flavour and aroma of the roast meat as well as an increase in the intensity of the oxidised vegetable oil flavour and the aromas of fish, hard-boiled egg, flaxseed oil, and oxidised vegetable oil. The samples that had been stored for one day were characterised by PCA as having sweet and umami tastes and the flavour and aroma of roast meat, whereas after three days, the samples were classified as having sour and bitter tastes, the flavour of chicken and nuts, and the aroma of fish. The typical sensory attributes desirable for roasted meat decreased in intensity during the three days of storage after cooking, whereas the intensity of unpleasant (oxidative attributes for the consumer increased.

  16. Oxidation of alpha-tocopherol in micelles and liposomes by the hydroxyl, perhydroxyl, and superoxide free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rates of oxidation of alpha-tocopherol by the hydroxyl- and superoxide free radicals were measured. The radicals were produced in known yields by radiolysis of aqueous solutions with gamma rays. Two main systems were used to dissolve the tocopherol; micelles, made up from charged and uncharged amphiphiles, and membranes made from dimyristyl phosphatidylcholine which could be charged by addition of stearyl amine or dicetyl phosphate. The HO. radicals were efficient oxidants of alpha-tocopherol in all systems, with up to 83% of radicals generated in micelle and 32% in membrane suspensions initiating the oxidation. The HO2 radical was an even more effective oxidant, but when most of it was in the O2 form at neutral or alkaline pH, the oxidation rates became low. Tocopherol held in positively charged micelles or membranes was oxidized at a higher rate by the O2 than in uncharged or negative particles. Possible biological significance of these results is discussed

  17. Effect of alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocopheryl quinone on the radiosensitivity of thiol-depleted mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers is increased when mammalian cells are depleted of endogenous glutathione by buthionine sulphoximine pre-treatment in vitro; a similar gain has not been observed in tumors in vivo despite evidence of glutathione depletion in vivo following buthionine sulphoximine treatment. However, concentrations of biological reducing agents other than glutathione were not measured in the in vivo experiments. Other reducing agents found in tumors include alpha-tocopherol, which reduces the sensitizing efficiency of nitro-aromatic sensitizers in thiol-depleted mammalian cells. These data suggest that the failure to observe large gains in misonidazole sensitizing efficiency in thiol-depleted tumors in vivo may be due, in part, to the presence of biological reducing agents such as alpha-tocopherol

  18. Effect of alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocopheryl quinone on the radiosensitivity of thiol-depleted mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgkiss, R.J.; Stratford, M.R.; Watfa, R.R.

    1989-05-01

    The effect of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers is increased when mammalian cells are depleted of endogenous glutathione by buthionine sulphoximine pre-treatment in vitro; a similar gain has not been observed in tumors in vivo despite evidence of glutathione depletion in vivo following buthionine sulphoximine treatment. However, concentrations of biological reducing agents other than glutathione were not measured in the in vivo experiments. Other reducing agents found in tumors include alpha-tocopherol, which reduces the sensitizing efficiency of nitro-aromatic sensitizers in thiol-depleted mammalian cells. These data suggest that the failure to observe large gains in misonidazole sensitizing efficiency in thiol-depleted tumors in vivo may be due, in part, to the presence of biological reducing agents such as alpha-tocopherol.

  19. Effect of alpha-tocopherol on isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction in rats--electrocardiographic biochemical and histological evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ithayarasi, A P; Padmavathy, V N; Shyamala Devi, C

    1996-10-01

    The effect of alpha-tocopherol (6 mg/100 g body wt, orally, daily for 90 days) pretreatment in isoproterenol (20 mg/100 g body wt, subcutaneously, twice at an interval of two days at the end of the alpha-tocopherol pretreatment) induced myocardial infarction was studied in rats. Isoproterenol administered rats showed electrocardiographic changes suggestive of myocardial infarction with marked ST segment elevation, Q waves appearance and a significant increase in heart rate. In isoproterenol administered rats, a significant decrease was observed in the activities of marker enzymes such as aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase in heart and aorta with a significant increase in their activities in serum. The levels of lipid peroxides in terms of "TBA reactants" increased significantly in serum, heart and aorta on isoproterenol administration. The histology of heart and aorta showed marked fragmentation of muscle fibres and necrotic lesions in isoproterenol administered rats. alpha-Tocopherol pretreated rats showed a near normal ECG pattern, levels of lipid peroxides, activities of marker enzymes and a near normal histology of heart and aorta on isoproterenol administration. PMID:9055097

  20. Effects of ascorbic acid and alpha tocopherol supplementation on basal testosterone cortisol ratio in male sprague dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Basal testosterone cortisol ratio is considered very important to maintain homeostasis. Increase in this ratio has various beneficial effects on body. In this study we determined the effects of ascorbic acid and alpha tocopherol supplementation on basal testosterone cortisol ratio in male Sprague Dawley rats. Methods: It was quasi experimental study carried out in department of Physiology, Army Medical College Rawalpindi in collaboration with National Institute of Health, Islamabad during October 2006 to September 2007. Forty male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups with ten rats in each group and above mentioned antioxidants supplementation were given along with standard diet for one month. After this, blood samples were taken and analyzed for serum testosterone and cortisol by ELISA and malondialdehyde levels colorimetrically. Data were analysed on SPSS version 13 and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: There was no significant rise in testosterone cortisol ratio in rats supplemented with single antioxidant; however rats supplemented with combination of ascorbic acid and alpha tocopherol revealed significant rise in testosterone cortisol ratio with a fall in malondialdehyde levels. Conclusions: Synergistic effects of ascorbic acid and alpha tocopherol resulted in a decline in reactive oxygen species induced lipid peroxidation and rise of testosterone cortisol ratio. (author)

  1. Antiradiation properties of combined pretreatment administration of alpha tocopherol, anthocyans and pyracetam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioprotective combination 'anthopyrrole' consisted of 20 mg/kg alpha tocopherol (water-soluble form of BASF), 50 mg/kg anthocyans (powder) and 200 mg/kg pyracetam was administered orally 2x5 days on adult male ICR mice. Irradiation from a 137Cs source was performed 48 hrs after the last administration. The radioprotective potential of the mixture and of each of its components solely against lethal irradiation of 8 Gy=LD95/30 was assessed by recording the integral measures of 30-day survival rate and mean survival time of succumbing animals. The influence of the mixture on blood formation was studied for a sublethal irradiation of 6 Gy. At postradiation days 3 and 10 records were made on changes in spleen weight and cellularity, and in femoral bone-marrow karyocyte counts. It was found that the pretreatment with the mixture distinctly raised survival rate (50%) in the protected population. The effect observed was shown to result from potentiating interactions between mixture components. Blood-forming organs experienced less radiation damage and recovery process in them were stimulated. 3 figs., 14 refs

  2. Effects of Socio demographic factors on plasma ascorbic acid and alpha tocopherol anti oxidants during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To assess the plasma levels of vitamins C and E at the various stages of pregnancy and to correlate their plasma levels with the socio-demographic factors of pregnant Nigerians. Methodology: The pregnant cases (n=180) were randomly selected according to gestational ages. And the controls (n=20) were non-pregnant women of the same age. Plasma levels of both vitamins were assayed with well established laboratory methods. Results: The mean plasma vitamins C and E in the pregnant cases was lower (by 17-23%) than controls across the three trimesters, p<0.0001. The correlation of vitamin C versus maternal age was significant; r = - 0.59, p<0.05; the mean plasma level of vitamin C declined by 57% as the maternal age increases from 22-37 years. Conclusion: The mean plasma Ascorbic acid and Alpha-tocopherol are reduced during pregnancy and socio-demographic factors have mild effects on the plasma levels of these vitamins. (author)

  3. Removal of. cap alpha. -tocopherol from blood and its comparison with other lipids: studies of inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, H.K.; Mavis, R.D.

    1986-05-01

    To investigate the mechanism of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol (AT) uptake into tissues, loss of /sup 3/H-AT from blood was characterized and compared with the losses of two major blood lipids: /sup 3/H-cholesterol (CHO) and /sup 3/H-trioleoylglycerol (TO). Male Long-Evans rats (200-325 gm) were injected with serum labelled with one lipid, and bled from the tail from 1-240 min. In one group heparin (HEP), an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase which mediates uptake of TO into tissues, was intravenously injected prior to serum and following corn oil gavage. The control group was only gavaged (GAV). A third group was injected with labelled serum which had been incubated with 1,2-cyclohexanedione (CHD), a reagent which modifies the receptors responsible for removal of CHO-rich low density lipoproteins from blood. Labelled serum incubated only with borate buffer (BO) was injected into the fourth group. HEP slowed TO loss from 2-220 min, but left CHO loss unchanged. AT loss was slowed by HEP from 100 min on. That AT responded to HEP but over a time span different from that of TO suggests that AT may be removed by a mechanism distinct from that of TO but sensitive to HEP. CHD slowed CHO loss from 40-240 min while TO and AT loss were uninhibited. This argues against a mechanism of removal common to both AT and CHO.

  4. Testing the Effects of DL-Alpha-Tocopherol Supplementation on Oxidative Damage, Total Antioxidant Protection and the Sex-Specific Responses of Reproductive Effort and Lifespan to Dietary Manipulation in Australian Field Crickets (Teleogryllus commodus

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    C. Ruth Archer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stress theory predicts that the accumulation of oxidative damage causes aging. More generally, oxidative damage could be a cost of reproduction that reduces survival. Both of these hypotheses have mixed empirical support. To better understand the life-history consequences of oxidative damage, we fed male and female Australian field crickets (Teleogryllus commodus four diets differing in their protein and carbohydrate content, which have sex-specific effects on reproductive effort and lifespan. We supplemented half of these crickets with the vitamin E isoform DL-alpha-tocopherol and measured the effects of nutrient intake on lifespan, reproduction, oxidative damage and antioxidant protection. We found a clear trade-off between reproductive effort and lifespan in females but not in males. In direct contrast to the oxidative stress theory, crickets fed diets that improved their lifespan had high levels of oxidative damage to proteins. Supplementation with DL-alpha-tocopherol did not significantly improve lifespan or reproductive effort. However, males fed diets that increased their reproductive investment experienced high oxidative damage to proteins. While this suggests that male reproductive effort could elevate oxidative damage, this was not associated with reduced male survival. Overall, these results provide little evidence that oxidative damage plays a central role in mediating life-history trade-offs in T. commodus.

  5. Testing the Effects of DL-Alpha-Tocopherol Supplementation on Oxidative Damage, Total Antioxidant Protection and the Sex-Specific Responses of Reproductive Effort and Lifespan to Dietary Manipulation in Australian Field Crickets (Teleogryllus commodus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, C Ruth; Hempenstall, Sarah; Royle, Nick J; Selman, Colin; Willis, Sheridan; Rapkin, James; Blount, Jon D; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative stress theory predicts that the accumulation of oxidative damage causes aging. More generally, oxidative damage could be a cost of reproduction that reduces survival. Both of these hypotheses have mixed empirical support. To better understand the life-history consequences of oxidative damage, we fed male and female Australian field crickets (Teleogryllus commodus) four diets differing in their protein and carbohydrate content, which have sex-specific effects on reproductive effort and lifespan. We supplemented half of these crickets with the vitamin E isoform DL-alpha-tocopherol and measured the effects of nutrient intake on lifespan, reproduction, oxidative damage and antioxidant protection. We found a clear trade-off between reproductive effort and lifespan in females but not in males. In direct contrast to the oxidative stress theory, crickets fed diets that improved their lifespan had high levels of oxidative damage to proteins. Supplementation with DL-alpha-tocopherol did not significantly improve lifespan or reproductive effort. However, males fed diets that increased their reproductive investment experienced high oxidative damage to proteins. While this suggests that male reproductive effort could elevate oxidative damage, this was not associated with reduced male survival. Overall, these results provide little evidence that oxidative damage plays a central role in mediating life-history trade-offs in T. commodus. PMID:26783958

  6. Effect of N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine and alpha-Tocopherol Administration on Endogenous Antioxidant Protection of Liver DNA and RNA and plasma Lipid Profile in gamma-Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study wasundertaken to evaluate the combined antioxidative capacity of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, 120 mg/100g b. wt) and alpha tocopherol (10mg/100g b. wt.) injected intra peritoneally one h before irradiation of male rats. Whole body gamma irradiation (2Gy) induced significant elevation in liver DNA and significant drop in liver protein content, while liver RNA showed no significant changes. Triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol elevated significantly after irradiation, whereas no significant changes were observed in total cholesterol, while HDL-cholesterol significantly decreased. Blood and liver glutathione were significantly decreased, whereas plasma MDA was significantly increased. NAC and alpha-tocopherol injection elevated RNA and blood glutathione levels compared to control and depressed total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels, as well as MDA in the liver. The combined treatment prior to irradiation decreased DNA, elevated RNA and normalized liver protein content. Triglycerides were decreased after 1 and 3 days and total cholesterol dropped significantly on the 1st and 7th days. LDL was ameliorated while HDL was significantly declined then elevated after 7 days. Blood glutathione was normalized while liver glutathione was significantly elevated and MDA was reduced both in liver and plasma. This combined treatment has proven to be recommended to enhance the natural defenses against deleterious effects of oxidative stress

  7. Effect of diclofenac alone or in combination with alpha-tocopherol on the oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in healthy and osteoartheritic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ivestigate the effects of diclofenac alone or when combined with alpha-tocopherol on the oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in healthy and osteoartheritic (OA) patients. The study was carried out at the College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, KIgdom of Saudi Arabia, over the period 1999 to 2000. 12 healthy controls and 12 osteoartheritic patients were recruited to the study. They were given diclofenac 50mg thricedaily orally, initially for 5 days then alpha-tocopherol at 200mg thrice daily orally, was added for another 5 days. Blood samples were drawn before the start of study and at 5 days following treatmentwith diclofenac alone and 10 days following treatment with diclophenac and alpha-tocopherol. Chemiluminescence (CL)reponse was measured for wohle blood and isolated (PMNs) on all samples. Diclofenac enhanced CL response of whole blood and PMNs of healthy controls when stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonized zymosan (OPZ). Cotreatment with alpha-tocopherol resulted in no appreciable change in the CL response of whole blood when stimulated with PMA or OPZ but a further significant enhancement of CL response of isolated PMNs when these cells were stimulated by either PMA or OPZ. In osteoartheritic patients, diclofenac alone and when combined with alpha-tocopherol showed no significant change in CL response of the whole blood.The CL response of PMNs from OA patients was decreased by diclofenac alone. However the inhibitory effect was not observed when alpha-tocopherol was used together with diclofenac. The effect of diclofenac alone or in combination with alpha-tocopherol did not produce a consistent effect on the CL response of whole blood or isolated PMNs of healthy or osteoartheritic patients. (author)

  8. Retinol, alpha-tocopherol and fatty acid content in Bulgarian black Sea fish species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stancheva, M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to measure and evaluate the total lipids, fatty acid profile, retinol content and alpha-tocopherol content in the edible tissue of four commercially important fish species from the Bulgarian Black sea: Sprat (Sprattus sprattus, Round Goby (Neogobius rattan, Black Sea Horse Mackerel (Trahurus medditeraneus ponticus and Shad (Alosa pontica. Fat soluble vitamins were analyzed simultaneously using an HPLC system. The highest content of retinol was established in the Sprat (142.3 ± 4.4 μg/100g and the highest content of alphatocopherol was found in the Black Sea Horse Mackerel (1112.7 ± 39.2 μg/100g. The fatty acid (FA composition was analyzed by GC/MS. The content of omega 3 (n3 FAs was significantly higher (p , 0.001 than the content of omega 6 (n6 FAs in each of the analyzed fish samples. The n6/n3 FA ratio was within the recommended range (0.20–1.50 for Sprat, Round Goby and Shad. Relatively high levels of retinol and alpha-tocopherol, FA composition, n3/n6 FA and PUFA/SFA ratios indicate that these fish species have good nutritional quality.

    El objeto de la investigación presentada es definir y comparar los lípidos totales, el perfil de ácidos grasos y el contenido de retinol y alfa-tocoferol en el tejido comestible de cuatro especies de peces con importancia comercial del Mar Negro búlgaro —espadín (Sprattus Sprattus, gobio de boca negra (Neogobius Melanostomus, chicharro (Trachurus Trachurus y sábalo del Mar Negro (Caspialosa Pontica. Dos vitaminas liposolubles son analizadas simultáneamente mediante cromatografía líquida de alta eficacia (HPLC. El contenido mayor de retinol se encuentra en el espadín (142.3 ± 4.4 μg/100g, y de alfa-tocoferol en el chicharro (1112.7 ± 39.2 μg/100g. El contenido de ácidos grasos ha sido analizado mediante cromatografía gaseosa/espectrometría de masas (GC/MS. El contenido de ácidos grasos (AG

  9. Photochemical interaction of ascorbic acid with riboflavin, nicotinamide and alpha-tocopherol in cream formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, I; Sheraz, M A; Ahmed, S; Bano, R; Vaid, F H M

    2012-04-01

    The present work is based on a study of the effect of some vitamins such as riboflavin (RF), nicotinamide (NA) and alpha-tocopherol (TP) on the photodegradation of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) (AH₂) in oil-in-water cream formulations using a UV irradiation source. A UV spectrophotometric and the official iodimetric methods have been used for the assay of AH₂ in cream formulations. These methods have been validated in the presence of RF, NA and TP before their application to the creams. The recoveries of AH₂ in the creams are in the range of 90-95% and the reproducibility of the method is within ±5%. The apparent first-order rate constants (k(obs) ) for the photodegradation of AH₂ in the presence of RF, NA and TP, individually, in the creams have been obtained. The second-order rate constants for the photochemical interaction of AH₂ and the vitamins RF, NA and TP have been determined from the plots of k(obs) for AH₂ photolysis versus the individual vitamin concentration along with the values of k₀ from the intercept on the vertical axis. The values of k₀ in the presence of RF and NA are lower than those of the k(obs) , indicating that these vitamins act as photosensitizers for the degradation of AH₂ in creams. On the contrary, the value of k₀ in the presence of TP is higher than that of the k(obs) , suggesting a stabilizing effect of this vitamin on the degradation of AH₂ in creams. The mode of interaction of the individual vitamins with AH₂ on photolysis has been discussed. PMID:22014159

  10. Alpha-tocopherol succinate- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors mitigate radiation combined injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay K.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Beattie, Lindsay A.; Ducey, Elizabeth J.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of alpha-tocopherol succinate (TS)- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors in mitigating combined injury associated with acute radiation exposure in combination with secondary physical wounding. CD2F1 mice were exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and then transfused intravenously with 5 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from TS- and AMD3100-injected mice after irradiation. Within 1 h after irradiation, mice were exposed to secondary wounding. Mice were observed for 30 d after irradiation and cytokine analysis was conducted by multiplex Luminex assay at various time-points after irradiation and wounding. Our results initially demonstrated that transfusion of TS-mobilized progenitors from normal mice enhanced survival of acutely irradiated mice exposed 24 h prior to transfusion to supralethal doses (11.5–12.5 Gy) of 60Co gamma-radiation. Subsequently, comparable transfusions of TS-mobilized progenitors were shown to significantly mitigate severe combined injuries in acutely irradiated mice. TS administered 24 h before irradiation was able to protect mice against combined injury as well. Cytokine results demonstrated that wounding modulates irradiation-induced cytokines. This study further supports the conclusion that the infusion of TS-mobilized progenitor-containing PBMCs acts as a bridging therapy in radiation-combined-injury mice. We suggest that this novel bridging therapeutic approach involving the infusion of TS-mobilized hematopoietic progenitors following acute radiation exposure or combined injury might be applicable to humans. PMID:23814114

  11. Alpha-tocopherol succinate- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors mitigate radiation combined injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of alpha-tocopherol succinate (TS)- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors in mitigating combined injury associated with acute radiation exposure in combination with secondary physical wounding. CD2F1 mice were exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and then transfused intravenously with 5 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from TS- and AMD3100-injected mice after irradiation. Within 1 h after irradiation, mice were exposed to secondary wounding. Mice were observed for 30 d after irradiation and cytokine analysis was conducted by multiplex Luminex assay at various time-points after irradiation and wounding. Our results initially demonstrated that transfusion of TS-mobilized progenitors from normal mice enhanced survival of acutely irradiated mice exposed 24 h prior to transfusion to supralethal doses (11.5–12.5 Gy) of 60Co gamma-radiation. Subsequently, comparable transfusions of TS-mobilized progenitors were shown to significantly mitigate severe combined injuries in acutely irradiated mice. TS administered 24 h before irradiation was able to protect mice against combined injury as well. Cytokine results demonstrated that wounding modulates irradiation-induced cytokines. This study further supports the conclusion that the infusion of TS-mobilized progenitor-containing PBMCs acts as a bridging therapy in radiation-combined-injury mice. We suggest that this novel bridging therapeutic approach involving the infusion of TS-mobilized hematopoietic progenitors following acute radiation exposure or combined injury might be applicable to humans. (author)

  12. Determinação de alfa-Tocoferol em alho irradiado utilizando cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência (CLAE Determination of alpha-Tocopherol (vitamin E in irradiated garlic by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Dias Gonçalves Rios

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of 60Co ionizing radiations in doses of 0, 75, 100, 150, 200 and 250Gy on garlic, upon the alpha-tocopherol concentration were studied. The alpha-tocopherol contents were established by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, after direct hexane extraction from the garlic samples. The alpha-tocopherol was determined through normal-phase column, and mobile phase was composed by hexane: iso-propyl alcohol (99:01 v/v, with 2mL/min flow rate and fluorescence detector. It is statistically shown that an irradiation dose of up to 150 Gy does not affect the garlic alpha-tocopherol content.

  13. Determination of alpha-Tocopherol (vitamin E) in irradiated garlic by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); Determinacao de alpha-tocoferol em alho irradiado utilizando cromatografia liquida de alta frequencia (CLAE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Magda Dias Goncalves; Penteado, Marilene de Vuono Camargo [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Alimentos e Nutricao Experimental]. E-mail: riosmagda@hotmail.com

    2003-02-01

    The effects of {sup 60}Co ionizing radiations in doses of 0, 75, 100, 150, 200 and 250Gy on garlic, upon the {alpha}-tocopherol concentration were studied. The {alpha}-tocopherol contents were established by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), after direct hexane extraction from the garlic samples. The {alpha}-tocopherol was determined through normal phase column, and mobile phase was composed by hexane: iso-propyl alcohol (99:01 v/v), with 2mL/min flow rate and fluorescence detector. It is statistically shown that an irradiation dose of up to 150 Gy does not affect the garlic {alpha}-tocopherol content. (author)

  14. 7-ketocholesterol incorporation into sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched (lipid raft) domains is impaired by vitamin E: a specific role for alpha-tocopherol with consequences on cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Marie-Charlotte; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Desrumaux, Catherine; Monier, Serge; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Athias, Anne; Néel, Dominique; Lagrost, Laurent

    2009-06-01

    Cholesterol oxides, in particular 7-ketocholesterol, are proatherogenic compounds that induce cell death in the vascular wall when localized in lipid raft domains of the cell membrane. Deleterious effects of 7-ketocholesterol can be prevented by vitamin E, but the molecular mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, unlike gamma-tocopherol, the alpha-tocopherol vitamin E form was found to prevent 7-ketocholesterol-mediated apoptosis of A7R5 smooth muscle cells. To be operative, alpha-tocopherol needed to be added to the cells before 7-ketocholesterol, and its anti-apoptotic effect was reduced and even suppressed when added together or after 7-ketocholesterol, respectively. Both pre- and co-treatment of the cells with alpha-tocopherol resulted in the redistribution of 7-ketocholesterol out of the sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched (lipid raft) domains. In turn, fewer amounts of alpha-tocopherol associated with lipid rafts on 7-ketocholesterol-pretreated cells compared with untreated cells, with no prevention of cell death in this case. In further support of the implication of lipid raft domains, the dephosphorylation/inactivation of Akt-PKB was involved in the 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis. Akt-PKB dephosphorylation was prevented by alpha-tocopherol, but not gamma-tocopherol pretreatment. PMID:19351882

  15. Growth performance and feed utilization of keureling (Tor tambra fingerlings fed a formulated diet with different doses of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchlisin Zainal A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the optimum dosage of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol in the diet of keureling, Tor tambra (Val. fingerlings for optimal growth performance and feed utilization. Five doses of vitamin E were tested: 0 mg kg−1 feed (control; 150 mg kg−1 feed; 300 mg kg−1 feed; 450 mg kg−1 feed; 600 mg kg−1. The feed ratio was 5% body weight, which was delivered twice daily at 08:00 and 17:00 for 60 days. The results showed that higher growth performance, feeding conversion ratios, feed efficiency, protein retention, and protein digestibility were obtained at 600 mg kg−1 feed, but the value was not significantly different from the other doses. The optimal dose in terms of the hepatosomatic index and survival rate was 300 mg kg−1. Hence, it was concluded that the optimum, most economical dose of vitamin E supplement for keureling (T. tambra was 150 mg kg−1 feed, because this value was not significantly different from the doses of 300 and 600 mg kg−1 feed.

  16. The effects of gamma- and electron beam-irradiation on. alpha. -tocopherol (vitamin E) present as an antioxidant in polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.W.; Crowson, A.; Leathard, D.A.; Mistry, U. (Sheffield Polytechnic (United Kingdom))

    1991-08-19

    The authors have reported on the effects of gamma- and electron beam-irradiation on additives (chiefly hindered phenols and organophosphites) present in food-contact polymers. It has been shown that increasing doses of either form of radiation result in the progressive transformation of such antioxidants into other substances, some of which are the same as products derived from the antioxidant under thermal oxidation conditions, and some of which are different substances. Now, the effect of both electron beam- and gamma-irradiation on {alpha}-tocopherol (vitamin E) present in polypropylene is reported. (author).

  17. Free-radical oxidation of lipids in erythrocyte membranes and endogenous alpha-tocopherol dynamics in blood plasma of acute leukemia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagezyan, K.G.; Bilyan, L.F.; Osipova, E.N.; Porosyan, A.S.

    1985-12-01

    Interaction between free-radical oxidation of lipids and dynamics of the endogenous alpha-tocopherol level in membrane erythrocytes was studied in healthy blood donors (14), acute leukemia patients before treatment (27) and persons in remission (11) after appropriate treatment by the commonly known VAMP, AVAMP and TsAMP procedures and, in some cases, by use of combinations of prednisolone and 6-mercaptopurine. Free-radical oxidation of lipids was determined by the malonic dialdehyde yield in ascorbate- and NADPH-independent oxidation systems. The studies showed an inversely proportional dependence between reduction of the alpha-tocopherol level in the acute leukemia patients blood plasma and the intensity of free radical oxidation of lipids in the erythrocyte membranes. The combined therapy recommended in the study inhibited the peroxide formation process in the erythrocyte membranes significantly and promoted restoration of the endogenous alpha-tocopherol level which facilitated a favorable course of acute leukemia and promoted possible remission.

  18. Reduction of irradiation off-odor and lipid oxidation in ground beef by {alpha}-tocopherol addition and the use of a charcoal pack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, S.H. [Busan Regional Food and Drug Administration, Busan 608-829 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, A. [National Institute of Animal Science, RDA, Suwon 441-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.K. [Cooperative Research, Extension, and Education Service, Northern Marianas College, Saipan, MP 96950 (Korea, Republic of); Song, H.P. [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.H. [Cooperative Research, Extension, and Education Service, Northern Marianas College, Saipan, MP 96950 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M. [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, C. [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: cheorun@cnu.ac.kr

    2009-02-15

    A combination of a charcoal pack during irradiation and {alpha}-tocopherol addition into ground beef was applied to eliminate an irradiation characteristic off-odor and to retard the lipid oxidation caused by the irradiation process. Ground beef was mixed with 200 ppm {alpha}-tocopherol and gamma irradiated with 0, 5, and 10 kGy with or without a charcoal pack present during the irradiation treatment. The pH of the control group was lower than that of {alpha}-tocopherol and charcoal pack treatment initially but increased rapidly and showed higher pH at day 7. Addition of {alpha}-tocopherol with or without charcoal pack addition showed lower 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values in irradiated ground beef at days 3 and 7 compared to those without addition. The color of ground beef was not significantly affected by the treatment. However, odor preference result showed that 10 kGy-irradiated ground beef with a combination of charcoal pack and {alpha}-tocopherol addition had higher scores than the control group regardless of irradiation. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis identified various volatile compounds that were created by irradiation of ground beef. These compounds were reduced or eliminated when a charcoal pack was used during the irradiation process. The results of the present study imply that combination of packaging with a charcoal pack during the irradiation process and addition of {alpha}-tocopherol into ground beef is a good method to effectively eliminate an irradiation off-odor and retard the lipid oxidation development in ground beef caused by irradiation.

  19. Oxidation of alpha-tocopherol in micelles and liposomes by the hydroxyl, perhydroxyl, and superoxide free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuzawa, K.; Gebicki, J.M.

    1983-10-01

    Rates of oxidation of alpha-tocopherol by the hydroxyl- and superoxide free radicals were measured. The radicals were produced in known yields by radiolysis of aqueous solutions with gamma rays. Two main systems were used to dissolve the tocopherol; micelles, made up from charged and uncharged amphiphiles, and membranes made from dimyristyl phosphatidylcholine which could be charged by addition of stearyl amine or dicetyl phosphate. The HO. radicals were efficient oxidants of alpha-tocopherol in all systems, with up to 83% of radicals generated in micelle and 32% in membrane suspensions initiating the oxidation. The HO/sub 2/ radical was an even more effective oxidant, but when most of it was in the O/sub 2/ form at neutral or alkaline pH, the oxidation rates became low. Tocopherol held in positively charged micelles or membranes was oxidized at a higher rate by the O/sub 2/ than in uncharged or negative particles. Possible biological significance of these results is discussed.

  20. A comparison of the in vitro binding of. cap alpha. -tocopherol to microsomes of lung, liver, heart and brain of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, D.J.; Mavis, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The in vitro binding of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol to microsomes of lung, liver, heart and brain of the rat was studied with the insoluble tocopherol ligand presented as a complex with bovine serum albumin. Under these conditions, all microsomes showed nonsaturable binding of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol and the amount bound to microsomes was linearly proportional to the concentration of albumin-complexed tocopherol. Increasing the amount of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol bound to microsomes in this manner reduced the extent of lipid peroxidation induced by added ferrous iron. The apparent affinities of the microsomes for ..cap alpha..-tocopherol, as indicated by the amount bound at a given concentration of albumin-complexed tocopherol, decreased in the order brain>liver approximately equal to heart>lung. The differences in affinity did not correlate with total fatty acid content (r=-0.39), total unsaturated fatty acid content (r=-0.26), or with the content of fatty acids containing two or more double bonds (r=-0.01). A high positive correlation was found with the content of fatty acids containing three or more double bonds (r=+0.96). Since lung microsomes contain approximately 6-times the tocopherol levels of liver and brain and about twice that of heart microsomes, these results show that the in vivo levels of microsomal tocopherol do not reflect microsomal affinity for this biological antioxidant.

  1. Effect of D-Alpha Tocopherol Therapy towards Malondialdehyde Level and Histology of Kidney in Rattus norvegicus with MLD-STZ Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa Agnestiansyah Mahardhian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic Nephropathy is a kidney disease which occurs due to complication of diabetes mellitus  as a consequence of the damage of the kidney endothelial cells. Hyperglicemia condition in patients with diabetes mellitus that induces an oxidative stress, were related to endothelial cell damage. Oxidative stress as a result of hyperglycemia will activate a number of signal transduction pathways resulting in increase of  free radicals. D-alpha tocopherol as one of antioxidant substance, that can act as an inhibitor of free radical chain reactions, play an important role in the reduction of the oxidative stress effect. Effect of D-alpha-tocopherol in reducing oxidative stress is identified by the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA in kidney and histology of kidney. This study used five groups mice; they were a control group, a diabetic group which was induced with MLD-STZ, and a therapeutic groups with a varieties doses of D-alpha tocopherol (100 mg/kgBW, 200 mg/kgBW and 300 mg/kgBW. The results showed that the D-alpha tocopherol was able to reduce the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and repair the histology of kidney of mice induced by MLD-STZ.

  2. High levels of dietary unsaturated fat decrease alpha-tocopherol content of whole body, liver, and plasma of chickens without variations in intestinal apparent absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, C; Baucells, M D; Manzanilla, E G; Barroeta, A C

    2008-03-01

    An experiment was designed to assess the effect of dietary unsaturated fat inclusion level on alpha-tocopherol apparent absorption and deposition in broiler chickens at 2 ages (20 and 39 d). The dietary fat was a mixture of linseed and fish oil, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The experimental treatments were the result of 4 levels of supplementation with alpha-tocopheryl acetate (0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg; E0, E100, E200, and E400 treatments, respectively) and 4 dietary oil inclusion levels (2, 4, 6, and 8%; O2, O4, O6, and O8 treatments respectively). Almond husk was used as an energy dilutor in the high-fat diets. Apparent absorption of total fatty acids was high in all treatments averaging 88% and was higher with high fat dietary inclusion level. alpha-Tocopheryl acetate hydrolysis and apparent absorption of alpha-tocopherol were similar in both ages and were not affected by fat inclusion level, except for a reduction of the absorption in the low-fat diet (O2) in the E100 treatment at 20 d of age. Despite this lack of differences in hydrolysis and absorption, higher-fat PUFA diets induced lower concentrations of free alpha-tocopherol in the excreta, at high alpha-tocopherol doses, suggesting an increase in the destruction of alpha-tocopherol by lipid oxidation in the gastrointestinal tract. Similarly, total and hepatic alpha-tocopherol deposition was lower in the birds fed high-PUFA diets in the E200- and E400-supplemented birds, possibly due to a destruction of vitamin E when protecting these PUFA from lipid peroxidation. alpha-Tocopherol concentration in liver and, to a lesser extent, in plasma was a useful indicator of the degree of response of this vitamin to different factors that can affect its bioavailability; however, in the present experiment, CV were too high to use liver and plasma concentrations as estimators of total body vitamin E. PMID:18281576

  3. Nascent VLDL from liver perfusions of cynomolgus monkeys are preferentially enriched in RRR- compared with SRR-alpha-tocopherol: Studies using deuterated tocopherols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport and secretion of vitamin E in lipoproteins have been studied in cynomolgus monkeys fed tocopherols labeled with different amounts of deuterium. The animals were fed a single dose of vitamin E containing 60 mumol of each 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-(5,7-(C2H3)2)tocopheryl acetate (d6-RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate; alpha-tocopherol with natural stereochemistry), 2S,4'R,8'R-alpha-5-(C2H3)tocopheryl acetate (d3-SRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate; alpha-tocopherol with unnatural stereochemistry), and 2R,4'R,8'R-gamma-(3,4-2H)tocopherol (d2-RRR-gamma-tocopherol; gamma-tocopherol with natural stereochemistry). Chylomicrons, as well as the other plasma lipoproteins, contained equal concentrations of all three tocopherols at the earliest time points after feeding suggesting that all three tocopherols were absorbed equally. At later times plasma lipoproteins became preferentially enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol. This is likely to be due to hepatic secretion of VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) and other lipoproteins, which were enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol, as demonstrated in the lipoproteins isolated from perfused livers that had been obtained 24 h following the administration of the deuterated tocopherols. Taken together these data demonstrate that the liver, not the intestine, is the likely site of discrimination between tocopherol isomers and that the liver secretes nascent lipoproteins preferentially enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol

  4. Nascent VLDL from liver perfusions of cynomolgus monkeys are preferentially enriched in RRR- compared with SRR-alpha-tocopherol: Studies using deuterated tocopherols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traber, M.G.; Rudel, L.L.; Burton, G.W.; Hughes, L.; Ingold, K.U.; Kayden, H.J. (New York Univ. School of Medicine, NY (USA))

    1990-04-01

    The transport and secretion of vitamin E in lipoproteins have been studied in cynomolgus monkeys fed tocopherols labeled with different amounts of deuterium. The animals were fed a single dose of vitamin E containing 60 mumol of each 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-(5,7-(C2H3)2)tocopheryl acetate (d6-RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate; alpha-tocopherol with natural stereochemistry), 2S,4'R,8'R-alpha-5-(C2H3)tocopheryl acetate (d3-SRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate; alpha-tocopherol with unnatural stereochemistry), and 2R,4'R,8'R-gamma-(3,4-2H)tocopherol (d2-RRR-gamma-tocopherol; gamma-tocopherol with natural stereochemistry). Chylomicrons, as well as the other plasma lipoproteins, contained equal concentrations of all three tocopherols at the earliest time points after feeding suggesting that all three tocopherols were absorbed equally. At later times plasma lipoproteins became preferentially enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol. This is likely to be due to hepatic secretion of VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) and other lipoproteins, which were enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol, as demonstrated in the lipoproteins isolated from perfused livers that had been obtained 24 h following the administration of the deuterated tocopherols. Taken together these data demonstrate that the liver, not the intestine, is the likely site of discrimination between tocopherol isomers and that the liver secretes nascent lipoproteins preferentially enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol.

  5. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition to the......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  6. Effect of. cap alpha. -tocopherol, butylated-hydroxytoluene and hydroxy-anisole on the activation and binding of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ to macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ch' ih, J.J.; Biedrzycka, D.; Devlin, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    The anti-oxidants, ..cap alpha..-tocopherol(TPA), butylated-hydroxy-toluene(BHT) and hydroxyanisole(BHA) inhibit the carcinogenic and toxic effects of a variety of chemical compounds, their effect on aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB/sub 1/) activation and binding was examined utilizing rat liver microsomes and cells. With a NADPH generating system, oxygen, microsomes, (/sup 3/H)-AFB/sub 1/, 2.2 pmoles/h/mg protein was activated and bound to macromolecules. In hepatocytes, 3.4 and 1.4 pmoles of AFB/sub 1/ per 10/sup 6/ cells were taken up and bound to macromolecules, whereas the nucleic acid fraction contained 0.19 pmoles of bound AFB/sub 1/. Moderate decreases of AFB/sub 1/ activation and binding were observed when TPA was present in both cell-free and hepatocytes systems. Only in hepatocytes, BHT inhibited the AFB/sub 1/ uptake and binding to nucleic acids. BHA, however, inhibited microsomal activation of AFB/sub 1/ by 73%; maximum inhibition was reached at 1 mM. AFB/sub 1/ uptake, and binding to nucleic acids were inhibited by 65% and 79% by BHA. GSH-transferase activity of cells treated with these agents was not altered. The effect of BHA at various concentrations on AFB activation was compared with cytochrome P-450 inhibitors; the ED/sub 50/ of SKF 525A, BHA and metyrapone was 9 uM, 80 uM and 380 uM respectively. The data suggest that TPA, BHA and BHT exert their effect by different mechanisms.

  7. Intensive swimming exercise-induced oxidative stress and reproductive dysfunction in male wistar rats: protective role of alpha-tocopherol succinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Indranil; Jana, Kuladip; Samanta, Prabhat Kumar

    2004-04-01

    In the present study, 30 male rats (age 3 mos, Wt 128.6 +/- 3.7 g) were randomly divided into Control group (CG), Experimental group (EG), and Supplemented group (SG), 10 per group. An exercise protocol (3 hrs swimming per day, 5 days a week for 4 weeks) was followed in EG and SG, with no exercise in CG. In SG, alpha-tocopherol succinate was injected sub-cutaneously at a dose of 50 mg x kg(- 1) per body weight per day. After 4 weeks of exercise, significant diminutions (p Intensive swimming exercise-induced oxidative stress causes dysfunction in the male reproductive system, which can be protected by alpha-tocopherol succinate. PMID:15064426

  8. Chiral effects on the /sup 13/C resonances of. cap alpha. -tocopherol and related compounds. A novel illustration of Newman's rule of six

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownstein, S.; Burton, G.W.; Hughes, L.; Ingold, K.U.

    1989-02-03

    The 100-MHz /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of (2R,4'R,8'R)-..cap alpha..-tocopherol (natural vitamin E) has been completely assigned with the aid of a number of selectively deuteriated (2R,4'R,8'R)-..cap alpha..-tocopherols. The /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of (2RS,4'RS,8'RS)-..cap alpha..-tocopherol (all-racemic, synthetic vitamin E) has also been measured. Many of the individual carbons in this all-racemic mixture of eight ..cap alpha..-tocopherol stereoisomers give more than one resonance with eight of the carbons (2-CH/sub 3/, 2',3',4',4'-CH/sub 3/, 5', 8', and 9') giving the maximum number of four resonances from each of the four enantiomeric pairs; these resonances have also been assigned. The structurally related 5'-hydroxy-2-(4',8',12'-trimethyltridecyl)-2,4,6,7-tetramethyl-2,3,-dihydrobenzofuran (HTDBF) has been synthesized for the first time in the 2R,4'R,8'R and 2S,4'R,8'R configurations and their /sup 13/C resonances have been assigned. In its all-racemic form this compound also shows up to four resonances from a single carbon. Related observations have been made with phytol and isophytol. A careful examination of these chirally induced chemical shift differences for the individual carbon atoms, ..delta.., reveals a bond-alternation effect with maxima at a separation of one, three, and five bonds from the closest chiral center and with the maximum at a five-bond separation being greater than that at a three-bond separation. 32 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Structure and dynamics of alpha-tocopherol in model membranes and in solution: a broad-line and high-resolution NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to study the conformational dynamics of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) in solution and in model membranes. In nonviscous solution, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that alpha-tocopherol is in rapid equilibrium between two or more puckered conformers of its heterocyclic ring. The most likely conformers to be so involved are the two half-chair forms. Deuterium NMR spectra of specifically deuteriated alpha-tocopherol in multilamellar dispersions of egg phosphatidylcholine, measured in the liquid-crystalline state, were characteristic of axially symmetric motional averaging. The orientation of the rotational axis within the molecular framework was determined. Studies on oriented multilamellar membranes revealed that this axis is perpendicular to the surface of the membrane. The profile of quadrupolar splittings along the hydrophobic tail does not have a plateau, in contrast to that of the fatty acyl chains of the membrane lipids. Longitudinal relaxation times (T1) were short. The presence of a minimum in their temperature dependence shows that molecular motion with an effective correlation time tau eff approximately equal to 3 X 10(-9)s is responsible for relaxation. However, the temperatures and absolute values of the minima depend on the position of the deuterium in the molecule, demonstrating that tau eff represents a complex blend of motions

  10. Elevated Serum Retinol and Low Beta-Carotene but not Alpha-Tocopherol Concentrations Are Associated with Dyslipidemia in Brazilian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Mellina Neyla de Lima; Diniz, Alcides da Silva; Arruda, Ilma Kruze Grande de

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the status of retinol, beta-carotene, and alpha-tocopherol serum concentrations in adolescents with dyslipidemia. A case series dyslipidemia study was conducted, with an attached control group, including 104 adolescents of public schools in Recife during the months of March/April 2013. Retinol, beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol serum concentrations were analysed by high efficiency liquid chromatography. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, clinical and biochemical variables were analysed. Dyslipidemic adolescents had high serum concentrations of both retinol (p=0.007) and beta-carotene/apolipoprotein A-I ratio (p=0.034); they also had low concentrations of beta-carotene/total cholesterol (p<0.0001) and beta-carotene/apolipoprotein B ratios (p=0.033) when compared to the controls. The alpha-tocopherol serum status was not associated with dyslipidemia. Overweight, abdominal obesity, lipid profile markers, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were more prevalent in dyslipidemic adolescents. The findings show an association between vitamin A and dyslipidemia in adolescents. However, additional investigations of this risk group are necessary to clarify the mechanisms of action of this nutrient in the pathogenesis of this syndrome, aiming at reducing cardiometabolic risks as of earlier ages. PMID:27264090

  11. Study of the antioxidant effect of {alpha}-tocopherol on low-density lipoprotein peroxidation induced at low and high {gamma}-radiation dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Abdelouahed [Research Centre on Aging and Department of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 4C4 (Canada)]. E-mail: abdelouahed.khalil@usherbrooke.ca; Milochevitch, Christelle [Research Centre on Aging and Department of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 4C4 (Canada)

    2005-02-01

    It is well known that vitamin E ({alpha}-tocopherol, {alpha}-toc) is a very efficient lipid soluble antioxidant and several studies showed its beneficial action in the prevention and reduction of atherosclerosis. However, some in vitro studies suggest a prooxidant role of vitamin E, which could occur under given circumstances. This study was thus designed to investigate the antioxidant vs. prooxidant effect of vitamin E with regards to LDL peroxidation induced under different oxidative stress conditions. LDL was enriched with {alpha}-tocopherol and different {alpha}-toc/LDL ratios were studied (8.0{+-}2.5, 14.3{+-}3.0, 33.3{+-}3.7, 42.7{+-}3.5 and 48.2{+-}4.5 molecules of {alpha}-toc/LDL particle). Enriched and control LDL were oxidized by action of {sup {center_dot}}OH and O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} free radicals produced by {gamma}-radiolysis at different dose rates. Susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was examined by the measure of conjugated diene and TBARS formation as well as LDL endogenous {alpha}-toc disappearance. Increasing LDL {alpha}-toc concentration reduced the LDL susceptibility to oxidation and their oxidizability. {alpha}-toc disappearance rates were comprised between 43 and 8.3x10{sup -10} M s{sup -1} and decreased with the radiation dose rate. Our results support an antioxidant role for {alpha}-tocopherol at high and low oxidative stress conditions.

  12. Structure and dynamics of alpha-tocopherol in model membranes and in solution: a broad-line and high-resolution NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekiel, I.H.; Hughes, L.; Burton, G.W.; Jovall, P.A.; Ingold, K.U.; Smith, I.C.

    1988-03-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to study the conformational dynamics of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) in solution and in model membranes. In nonviscous solution, /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that alpha-tocopherol is in rapid equilibrium between two or more puckered conformers of its heterocyclic ring. The most likely conformers to be so involved are the two half-chair forms. Deuterium NMR spectra of specifically deuteriated alpha-tocopherol in multilamellar dispersions of egg phosphatidylcholine, measured in the liquid-crystalline state, were characteristic of axially symmetric motional averaging. The orientation of the rotational axis within the molecular framework was determined. Studies on oriented multilamellar membranes revealed that this axis is perpendicular to the surface of the membrane. The profile of quadrupolar splittings along the hydrophobic tail does not have a plateau, in contrast to that of the fatty acyl chains of the membrane lipids. Longitudinal relaxation times (T1) were short. The presence of a minimum in their temperature dependence shows that molecular motion with an effective correlation time tau eff approximately equal to 3 X 10(-9)s is responsible for relaxation. However, the temperatures and absolute values of the minima depend on the position of the deuterium in the molecule, demonstrating that tau eff represents a complex blend of motions.

  13. Effect of high dose alpha-tocopherol acetate on the toxicity and tissue distribution of adriamycin (doxorubicin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinozawa,Shinya

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of alpha-tocopherol acetate (VE on the toxicity and tissue distribution of adriamycin (ADM in mice was studied. After the administration of ADM in 2 doses of 15 mg/kg, mice pretreated with olive oil survived 7.1 +/- 1.0 days, while mice pretreated with VE in ten doses of 500 mg/kg/day (subcutaneously survived 5.5 +/- 1.7 days (p less than 0.01. The total concentration of ADM and its major metabolite, aglycone I in the liver (1, 3, 5 h, kidneys (1, 3 h, and heart (3 h, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography was significantly higher in the VE-pretreated group (four doses of 500 mg/kg/day than in the olive oil-pretreated group. The aglycone levels of the VE-pretreated group were significantly higher than those of the olive oil-pretreated group in the liver, kidney and heart, but there was no significant difference between the groups in the levels of the unmetabolized form. Considering these results, the administration of VE concomitant with anti-tumor drugs, including ADM, requires great caution.

  14. A novel eye drop of alpha tocopherol to prevent ocular oxidant damage: improve the stability and ocular efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jiayu; Tang, Jingling; Bu, Meng; Sun, Yanhui; Wang, Xinyu; Wu, Linhua; Liu, Hongzhuo

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to design novel mixed micelles as an ophthalmic delivery system for alpha-tocopherol (TOC) to prevent its degradation and improve ocular efficacy. The nonionic polymers, Polyoxyl 15 Hydroxystearate (Solutol® HS15) and Pluronic® F127, were discovered to be the most effective agents for retaining the activity and solubilization of TOC, respectively. Prepared by a thin-film hydration method, HS15/Pluronic® F127 yielded good encapsulation percentages of TOC, with a 27.7% drug loading efficiency. Incorporation of cetalkonium chloride (CKC) into HS15/Pluronic® F127 mixed micelles made the zeta potential of the micelles +17 mV, potentially prolonging the residence time of formulations on ocular surfaces. The optimized micelle preparation remained stable when diluted in a synthetic tear solution. It is known that the antioxidant ability of TOC in typical formulations reduces to around 85% of its initial value after 1 month when stored at 4 or 25 °C under an air atmosphere, which limits ophthalmic applications to less than 1 month. However, encapsulated TOC in investigated micelles remained stable for at least 6 months when sealed with N2. Finally, the cationic micelles were well tolerated after multiple administrations in rabbits, and they improved ocular accumulation of TOC. Taken together, these data suggest that the optimized micelle preparations described in this study may be suitable drug carriers for the treatment of ocular oxidant damage. PMID:26340610

  15. Microencapsulation of H. pluvialis oleoresins with different fatty acid composition: Kinetic stability of astaxanthin and alpha-tocopherol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Andrés; Masson, Lilia; Velasco, Joaquín; del Valle, José Manuel; Robert, Paz

    2016-01-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is a natural source of astaxanthin (AX). However, AX loses its natural protection when extracted from this microalga. In this study, a supercritical fluid extract (SFE) of H. pluvialis was obtained and added to oils with different fatty acid compositions (sunflower oil (SO) or high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO)). The oleoresins of H. pluvialis ((SO+SFE) and (HOSO+SFE)) were encapsulated with Capsul by spray drying. The stability of the oleoresins and powders were studied at 40, 50 and 70° C. AX and alpha-tocopherol (AT) degradation followed a zero-order and first-order kinetic model, respectively, for all systems. The encapsulation of oleoresins improved the stability of AX and AT to a greater extent in oleoresins with a monounsaturated fatty acid profile, as shown by the significantly lowest degradation rate constants and longest half-lives. Therefore, the encapsulation of H. pluvialis oleoresins is an alternative to developing a functional ingredient for healthy food design. PMID:26213069

  16. Suppression of alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid in VEGF-induced angiogenesis and the possible mechanisms in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA) has been reported to exhibit both anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities in cell culture and animal studies. However, it is unclear whether α-TEA possesses anti-angiogenic effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of α-TEA on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression both in vitro and ex vivo. We found that the α-TEA inhibited tube formation, invasion, and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and that such actions were accompanied by reduced expression of MMP-2. α-TEA also inhibited ex vivo angiogenesis, as indicated by chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane assay. We further showed that α-TEA attenuated protein expression of VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2)-mediated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), phosphorylated p38, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Moreover, α-TEA (30 μM) significantly up-regulated protein expression of tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP)-2 (by 138%) and the metastasis suppressor gene nm23-H1 (by 54%). These results demonstrate that the anti-angiogenic effect of α-TEA both in vitro and ex vivo and its possible mechanistic action appears to involve the inhibition of MMP-2 level through VEGFR-2-mediated FAK and p38 signaling pathways and through up-regulation of TIMP-2 and nm23-H1 expression. - Graphical abstract: Possible mechanisms of α-TEA on inhibited angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Brief summary In the present study, we have demonstrated that VEGF-mediated angiogenesis is significantly inhibited by α-TEA, and that this effect involves inhibition of MMP-2 level through VEGFR-2-mediated FAK and p38 signaling pathways related to invasion and migration. - Highlights: • The anti-angiogenic effect and the mechanistic action of α-TEA were investigated. • α-TEA significantly inhibited VEGF-mediated angiogenesis both in vitro and ex vivo. • α-TEA down

  17. Suppression of alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid in VEGF-induced angiogenesis and the possible mechanisms in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hung, E-mail: chchuang@hk.edu.tw [Department of Nutrition, Master Program of Biomedical Nutrition, Hungkuang University, 1018 Sec. 6 Taiwan Boulevard, Taichung 43302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Chia-Hua [Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, National Chung-Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lu, Ta-Jung [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Technology and Innovation Management, National Chung-Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hu, Miao-Lin, E-mail: mlhuhu@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, National Chung-Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-12-15

    Alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA) has been reported to exhibit both anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities in cell culture and animal studies. However, it is unclear whether α-TEA possesses anti-angiogenic effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of α-TEA on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression both in vitro and ex vivo. We found that the α-TEA inhibited tube formation, invasion, and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and that such actions were accompanied by reduced expression of MMP-2. α-TEA also inhibited ex vivo angiogenesis, as indicated by chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane assay. We further showed that α-TEA attenuated protein expression of VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2)-mediated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), phosphorylated p38, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Moreover, α-TEA (30 μM) significantly up-regulated protein expression of tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP)-2 (by 138%) and the metastasis suppressor gene nm23-H1 (by 54%). These results demonstrate that the anti-angiogenic effect of α-TEA both in vitro and ex vivo and its possible mechanistic action appears to involve the inhibition of MMP-2 level through VEGFR-2-mediated FAK and p38 signaling pathways and through up-regulation of TIMP-2 and nm23-H1 expression. - Graphical abstract: Possible mechanisms of α-TEA on inhibited angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Brief summary In the present study, we have demonstrated that VEGF-mediated angiogenesis is significantly inhibited by α-TEA, and that this effect involves inhibition of MMP-2 level through VEGFR-2-mediated FAK and p38 signaling pathways related to invasion and migration. - Highlights: • The anti-angiogenic effect and the mechanistic action of α-TEA were investigated. • α-TEA significantly inhibited VEGF-mediated angiogenesis both in vitro and ex vivo. • α-TEA down

  18. Kinetics of ozonation. 4. Reactions of ozone with. cap alpha. -tocopherol and oleate and linoleate esters in carbon tetrachloride and in aqueous micellar solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giamalva, D.H.; Church, D.F.; Pryor, W.A.

    1986-10-15

    Vitamin E (..cap alpha..-tocopherol; ..cap alpha..-T) is known to protect animals against the deleterious effects of ozone in polluted air; one such effect is the ozone-initiated autooxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) that occur in membranes. In order to assess the possibility of a direct reaction of ozone with ..cap alpha..-T competing with the very fast ozone-PUFA reaction, we have measured the rates of reaction of ozone with ..cap alpha..-T, oleic acid, and linoleic acid. I CCl/sub 4/ as solvent, ..cap alpha..-T reacts with ozone with a rate constant of about 5500 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/; methyl oleate and methyl linoleate react 2 orders of magnitude faster. In aqueous micellar solutions the rate constants for ..cap alpha..-T and the fatty acids are more similar. The k for the ozone/..cap alpha..-T reaction is about 1 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ at pH 7, but decreases as the solution becomes more acidic; the k's for oleic acid and linoleic acid are ca. 1 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and exhibit no significant pH dependence. Since the ratio of fatty acids to ..cap alpha..-T in membranes is typically at least 100-1000 to 1, we conclude that the direct reaction of ozone with ..cap alpha..-T is unlikely. Thus, the protection that vitamin E provides to animals breathing ozone-containing air must result from vitamin E acting as a free radical scavenger. We have also detected the ..cap alpha..-tocopheroxyl radical as an intermediate from the reaction of ozone with ..cap alpha..-T both in CCl/sub 4/ and aqueous micelles using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The authors suggest that the observation of this intermediate is consistent with an initial electron transfer from ..cap alpha..-T to ozone.

  19. Lipid-transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiujuan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are basic proteins found in abundance in higher plants. LTPs play lots of roles in plants such as participation in cutin formation, embryogenesis, defense reactions against phytopathogens, symbiosis, and the adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions. In addition, LTPs from field mustard and Chinese daffodil exhibit antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells. LTPs from chili pepper and coffee manifest inhibitory activity against fungi pathogenic to humans such as Candida species. The intent of this article is to review LTPs in the plant kingdom. PMID:23193591

  20. Electron transfer in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H B; Winkler, J R

    1996-01-01

    Electron-transfer (ET) reactions are key steps in a diverse array of biological transformations ranging from photosynthesis to aerobic respiration. A powerful theoretical formalism has been developed that describes ET rates in terms of two parameters: the nuclear reorganization energy (lambda) and the electronic-coupling strength (HAB). Studies of ET reactions in ruthenium-modified proteins have probed lambda and HAB in several metalloproteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, azurin). This work has shown that protein reorganization energies are sensitive to the medium surrounding the redox sites and that an aqueous environment, in particular, leads to large reorganization energies. Analyses of electronic-coupling strengths suggest that the efficiency of long-range ET depends on the protein secondary structure: beta sheets appear to mediate coupling more efficiently than alpha-helical structures, and hydrogen bonds play a critical role in both. PMID:8811189

  1. Evaluation and comparison of bond strength to 10% carbamide peroxide bleached enamel following the application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol solutions: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Asha; Vivekananda, Pai AR; Thomas, Manuel S

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare composite bond strength to carbamide peroxide bleached enamel following the application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol solutions. Materials and Methods: Sixty premolars were divided into six groups. Groups I and VI served as unbleached and bleached controls respectively. Groups II, III, IV and V served as the experimental groups and were subjected to 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching followed by 10 min application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and 10% and 25% alpha-tocopherol solutions, respectively. Following composite bonding, shear bond strength was determined and the results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey highest significant difference test. Results: Only Group IV showed significantly lower bond strength when compared to Group I (unbleached control). When compared to Group VI (bleached control), except Group IV, groups II, III and V showed significantly higher bond strength. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental groups corresponding to 10% and 25% and similar concentrations of sodium ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol solutions. Conclusion: Following 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching, except 10% alpha tocopherol, 10 min application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and 25% alpha-tocopherol solutions significantly improves the shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel. PMID:23716960

  2. Evaluation and comparison of bond strength to 10% carbamide peroxide bleached enamel following the application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol solutions: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Thapa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate and compare composite bond strength to carbamide peroxide bleached enamel following the application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol solutions. Materials and Methods: Sixty premolars were divided into six groups. Groups I and VI served as unbleached and bleached controls respectively. Groups II, III, IV and V served as the experimental groups and were subjected to 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching followed by 10 min application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and 10% and 25% alpha-tocopherol solutions, respectively. Following composite bonding, shear bond strength was determined and the results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey highest significant difference test. Results: Only Group IV showed significantly lower bond strength when compared to Group I (unbleached control. When compared to Group VI (bleached control, except Group IV, groups II, III and V showed significantly higher bond strength. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental groups corresponding to 10% and 25% and similar concentrations of sodium ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol solutions. Conclusion: Following 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching, except 10% alpha tocopherol, 10 min application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and 25% alpha-tocopherol solutions significantly improves the shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel.

  3. Distribution of glycosidic derivatives of DL-alpha-tocopherol in liposomes. Spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Vitamin E is known for its strong affinity to biomembranes through interactions with membrane phospholipids. However, due to its poor absorbability and bioavailability its clinical application is limited. Enhanced physiological activity is expected from synthesized tocopherol derivatives, whose physiological activity of vitamin E is enabled by the enzymatic hydrolysis of the glycoside bond. Physicochemical and spectroscopic studies allow to get an insight into the location of these tocopherol derivatives in biological membranes and their expected interactions with membrane components. We investigated spectroscopic properties of synthesized DL-α-tocopheryl β-D-glucopyranoside in liposomes. The absorption and emission data and the fluorescence lifetime values obtained in lipid bilayer were referred to those found in homogenous solutions. In liposomes the emission maximum and fluorescence lifetime of the glycosides were similar to those observed in methanol, which suggests medium value dielectric constant and low viscosity environment. The partition constant and standard free energy change were calculated from the fluorescence data. The obtained dependences confirms the presence of interaction between the studied glycoside and the membrane and indicates spontaneous partition of the glycoside in the lipid bilayer. High anisotropy value indicates the low mobility of glucoside in the bilayer. The similarity of anisotropy values at different membrane concentrations suggests that presence of sugar moiety did not change the mechanism of inclusion of tocopherol part into membrane. An efficient fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process was observed from the steady state data for DL-α-tocopheryl β-D-glucopyranoside (donor) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5- hexatriene (DPH) (acceptor) pair in lipid bilayer. The distance between the donor and the acceptor in lipids bilayer calculated according to Foerster's theory is 24 A. The all

  4. Toxic effects of methamidophos on paraoxonase 1 activity and on rat kidney and liver and ameliorating effects of alpha-tocopherol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araoud, Manel; Neffeti, Fadoua; Douki, Wahiba; Khaled, Lamia; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel; Kenani, Abderraouf; Houas, Zohra

    2016-07-01

    The role of alpha-tocopherol on nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity induced by methamidophos (MT) was investigated in wistar rats. Animals were given via gavage, for four weeks, a low dose of MT (MT1), a high dose of MT (MT2), vitamin E (200 mg/kg of bw) or both MT2 plus vitamin E (Vit E) and control group was given distillate water. MT treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the body weight of MT2-treated group. Moreover, MT-treated groups had significantly lower butyrylcholinesterase (p control group (p levels (p control group. However, significant low uric acid level (p < 0.05) was noted in MT2 plus vit E-treated rats compared with MT2-treated group. Histopathological changes in organ tissues were observed in both MT-treated groups and MT2 plus vit E-treated rats. However, the damage was reduced in MT2 plus vit E-treated rats. Therefore, this study deduces that alpha-tocopherol administration may ameliorate the adverse effects of subacute exposure to MT on rat liver and kidney and this antioxidant can protect PON1 from oxidative stress induced by this organophosphorus pesticide. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 842-854, 2016. PMID:25535039

  5. Effects of Ascorbic Acid, Alpha-Tocopherol and Allopurinol on Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rabbit Skeletal Muscle: An Experimental Study

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    Bilgehan Erkut

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ischemia reperfusion injury to skeletal muscle, following an acute arterial occlusion is important cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present study was to determine and evaluate the effects of ascorbic acide, alpha-tocopherol and allopurinol on ischemia reperfusion injury in rabbit skeletal muscle.Methods: Forty-eight New Zealand white rabbits, all male, weighing between 2.5 to 3.0 (mean 2.8 kg, were used in the study. They were separated into four groups. Group I was the control group without any drugs. The other groups were treatment groups (groups II, III, and IV. Group II rabbits administrated 50 mg/kg ascorbic acide and 100 mg/kg alpha-tocopherol 3 days prior to ischemia, group III rabbits received 50 mg/kg allopurinol 2 days prior to ischemia, and group IV rabbits were administrated both 50 mg/kg ascorbic acide, 100 mg/kg alpha-tocopherol 3 days prior to ischemia and 50 mg/kg allopurinol 2 days prior to ischemia. Two hours ischemia and 2 hours reperfusion were underwent to the treatment groups. At the end of the reperfusion periods, muscle samples were taken from rectus femoris muscle for determination of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities as antioxidant enzymes, and malondialdehyde as an indicator of lipid peroxidation and xanthine oxidase levels as source hydroxyl radical. Besides, histopathological changes (edema, inflammation, ring formation and splitting formation were evaluated in the muscle specimens. Results: In the treatment groups; superoxide dismutase (U/mgprotein, catalase (U/mgprotein, and glutathione peroxidise (U/mgprotein levels increased, malondialdehyde (nmol/mgprotein and xanthine oksidase (mU/mgprotein levels decreased compared to control I (p < 0.05. Increase of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase levels were the highest and decrease of malondialdehyde and xanthine oxidase levels were the highest in group IV compared to groups II and III

  6. A lipid transfer protein that transfers lipid

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, T. P.

    2007-01-01

    Very few lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) have been caught in the act of transferring lipids in vivo from a donor membrane to an acceptor membrane. Now, two studies (Halter, D., S. Neumann, S. M. van Dijk, J. Wolthoorn, A. M. de Maziere, O.V. Vieira, P. Mattjus, J. Klumperman, G. van Meer, and H. Sprong. 2007. J. Cell Biol. 179: 101 115; D'Angelo, G., E. Polishchuk, G. D. Tullio, M. Santoro, A. D. Campli, A. Godi, G. West, J. Bielawski, C.C. Chuang, A. C. van der Spoel, et al. 2007. Nature. 449...

  7. Influence of preliminary chronic irradiation and treatment with. cap alpha. -tocopherol on the frequency of chromosome aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells induced by acute. gamma. -irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, A.A.; Akhundov, V.Yu.; Alekperov, U.K.; Gamzaeva, I.A.; Asadova, A.I.; Shekhtman, A.B.; Gabaj, N.S. (AN Azerbajdzhanskoj SSR, Baku. Inst. Botaniki)

    The incidence of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells of femur did not exceed the spontaneous one in CBA mice exposed, during 70 days, to ..gamma..-radiation at dose-rates of 33.7-35.8 nA/kg and cumulative dose of 2.75 Gy. A single acute exposure of intact animals to a dose of 2.98 Gy increased significantly the mutation level. Preirradiation with small doses increased the resistance of hereditary structures to sublethal radiation doses. Exogenous ..cap alpha..-tocopherol (0.06 mg/20 g mass) protected the genetic apparatus of cells from total-body irradiation and was an additional factor decreasing the mutaton level after acute exposure of mice at the background of long-term irradiation with small doses.

  8. The influence of magnesium-pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-glutamate in comparison with probucol, alpha-tocopherol and trolox on copper-induced oxidation of human low density lipoprotein in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögl, C; Schneider, W; Elstner, E F

    1994-06-15

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the presence of magnesium-pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-glutamate (MPPG), pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PP), alpha-tocopherol, probucol or trolox is more resistant against copper-induced oxidation as control-LDL in vitro. The efficiency of the drugs is: probucol > MPPG > trolox > alpha-tocopherol > PP. LDL oxidation is determined by its increasing negative surface charge, fragmentation of apolipoprotein B-100 and changes of the fatty acid content of LDL. The protection of the drugs depends on their concentration and incubation time. Different experiments point to the fact that copper-induced oxidation of LDL in vitro starts with the binding of copper at the apolipoprotein B-100, resulting in an increasing negative surface charge and fragmentation of the apolipoprotein B-100. Afterwards a decrease of LDL-bound linoleic acid (18:2) is measurable. PMID:8031313

  9. Protective Effect of Alpha-Tocopherol Isomer from Vitamin E against the H2O2 Induced Toxicity on Dental Pulp Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda da Silveira Vargas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of different concentrations of vitamin E alpha-tocopherol (α-T isomer against the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on dental pulp cells. The cells (MDPC-23 were seeded in 96-well plates for 72 hours, followed by treatment with 1, 3, 5, or 10 mM α-T for 60 minutes. They were then exposed or not to H2O2 for 30 minutes. In positive and negative control groups, the cells were exposed to culture medium with or without H2O2 (0.018%, respectively. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests; α=5%. Significant reduction of cell viability (58.5% was observed in positive control compared with the negative control. Cells pretreated with α-T at 1, 3, 5, and 10 mM concentrations and exposed to H2O2 had their viability decreased by 43%, 32%, 25%, and 27.5%, respectively. These values were significantly lower than those observed in the positive control, thereby showing a protective effect of α-T against the H2O2 toxicity. Overall, the vitamin E α-T isomer protected the immortalized MDPC-23 pulp cells against the toxic effects of H2O2. The most effective cell protection was provided by 5 and 10 mM concentrations of α-T.

  10. Protective Effect of Alpha-Tocopherol Isomer from Vitamin E against the H2O2 Induced Toxicity on Dental Pulp Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Fernanda da Silveira; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Hebling, Josimeri; De Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of different concentrations of vitamin E alpha-tocopherol (α-T) isomer against the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on dental pulp cells. The cells (MDPC-23) were seeded in 96-well plates for 72 hours, followed by treatment with 1, 3, 5, or 10 mM α-T for 60 minutes. They were then exposed or not to H2O2 for 30 minutes. In positive and negative control groups, the cells were exposed to culture medium with or without H2O2 (0.018%), respectively. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests; α = 5%). Significant reduction of cell viability (58.5%) was observed in positive control compared with the negative control. Cells pretreated with α-T at 1, 3, 5, and 10 mM concentrations and exposed to H2O2 had their viability decreased by 43%, 32%, 25%, and 27.5%, respectively. These values were significantly lower than those observed in the positive control, thereby showing a protective effect of α-T against the H2O2 toxicity. Overall, the vitamin E α-T isomer protected the immortalized MDPC-23 pulp cells against the toxic effects of H2O2. The most effective cell protection was provided by 5 and 10 mM concentrations of α-T. PMID:24587995

  11. Folate, vitamin B12, alpha-tocopherol and selected liver components in periparturient dairy goats supplemented with choline and vitamin E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dell'Orto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of rumen-protected choline and vitamin E administration on status of folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin E and selected liver components was studied on 4 groups of 12 periparturient dairy goats: control, CTR; choline supplemented, RPC; vitamin E, VITE; choline and vitamin E, RPCE. Plasma folate did not differ between groups, except at parturition when RPC and RPCE goats had higher folate levels than CTR and VITE animals. Neither RPC nor vitamin E affected vitamin B12 plasma concentrations, while a time effect was observed after the third week of lactation, when B12 levels in each group started to increase. Alpha-tocopherol supplementation was associated with increased plasma a-tocopherol in the VITE and RPCE compared to the CRT and RPC groups, while RPC supplementation did not affect a-tocopherol levels in both RPC and RPCE groups compared to CTR and VITE ones. In control and RPC goats liver total lipid did not differ, while DNA contents and their ratio, were respectively higher and lower in RPC supplemented animals. Overall these results suggest that greater choline availability seems to be essential for optimising metabolic health and methyl group status, in dairy ruminants.

  12. Alpha-tocopherol quinine ameliorates spatial memory deficits by reducing beta-amyloid oligomers, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in transgenic mice with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Wei; Yang, Shi-Gao; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Yang-Xin; Xu, Peng-Xin; Wang, Teng; Ling, Tie-Jun; Liu, Rui-Tian

    2016-01-01

    The pathologies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with soluble beta-amyloid (Aβ) oligomers, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. Decreasing the levels of Aβ oligomer, glial activation and oxidative stress are potential therapeutic approaches for AD treatment. We previously found alpha-tocopherol quinine (α-TQ) inhibited Aβ aggregation and cytotoxicity, decreased the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro. However, whether α-TQ ameliorates memory deficits and other neuropathologies in mice or patients with AD remains unknown. In this study, we reported that orally administered α-TQ ameliorated memory impairment in APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice, decreased oxidative stress and the levels of Aβ oligomer in the brains of mice, prevented the production of inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammatory mediators, such as interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β, and inhibited microglial activation by inhibiting NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings suggest that α-TQ has potential therapeutic value for AD treatment. PMID:26358659

  13. In Vivo Effects of Vanadium Pentoxide and Antioxidants (Ascorbic Acid and Alpha-Tocopherol) on Apoptotic, Cytotoxic, and Genotoxic Damage in Peripheral Blood of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, María del Carmen; Hernández-Cortés, Lourdes Montserrat; Altamirano-Lozano, Mario Agustín

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), ascorbic acid (AA), and alpha-tocopherol (α-TOH) on apoptotic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic activity. Groups of five Hsd:ICR mice were treated with the following: (a) vehicle, distilled water; (b) vehicle, corn oil; (c) AA, 100 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip); (d) α-TOH, 20 mg/kg by gavage; (e) V2O5, 40 mg/kg by ip injection; (f) AA + V2O5; and (g) α-TOH + V2O5. Genotoxic damage was evaluated by examining micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) obtained from the caudal vein at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after treatments. Induction of apoptosis and cell viability were assessed at 48 h after treatment in nucleated cells of peripheral blood. Treatment with AA alone reduced basal MN-PCE, while V2O5 treatment marginally increased MN-PCE at all times after injection. Antioxidants treatments prior to V2O5 administration decreased MN-PCE compared to the V2O5 group, with the most significant effect in the AA + V2O5 group. The apoptotic cells increased with all treatments, suggesting that this process may contribute to the elimination of the cells with V2O5-induced DNA damage (MN-PCE). The necrotic cells only increased in the V2O5 group. Therefore, antioxidants such as AA and α-TOH can be used effectively to protect or reduce the genotoxic effects induced by vanadium compounds like V2O5. PMID:27413422

  14. Superparamagnetic iron oxide--loaded poly(lactic acid)-D-alpha-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate copolymer nanoparticles as MRI contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashant, Chandrasekharan; Dipak, Maity; Yang, Chang-Tong; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Jun, Ding; Feng, Si-Shen

    2010-07-01

    We developed a strategy to formulate supraparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) in nanoparticles (NPs) of biodegradable copolymer made up of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and d-alpha-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) for medical imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of high contrast and low side effects. The IOs-loaded PLA-TPGS NPs (IOs-PNPs) were prepared by the single emulsion method and the nanoprecipitation method. Effects of the process parameters such as the emulsifier concentration, IOs loading in the nanoparticles, and the solvent to non-solvent ratio on the IOs distribution within the polymeric matrix were investigated and the formulation was then optimized. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed direct visual evidence for the well dispersed distribution of the IOs within the NPs. We further investigated the biocompatibility and cellular uptake of the IOs-PNPs in vitro with MCF-7 breast cancer cells and NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast in close comparison with the commercial IOs imaging agent Resovist. MRI imaging was further carried out to investigate the biodistribution of the IOs formulated in the IOs-PNPs, especially in the liver to understand the liver clearance process, which was also made in close comparison with Resovist. We found that the PLA-TPGS NPs formulation at the clinically approved dose of 0.8 mg Fe/kg could be cleared within 24 h in comparison with several weeks for Resovist. Xenograft tumor model MRI confirmed the advantages of the IOs-PNPs formulation versus Resovist through the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect of the tumor vasculature. PMID:20434210

  15. Metabolomic profile of response to supplementation with β-carotene in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondul, Alison M; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Evans, Anne M; Karoly, Edward D; Virtamo, Jarmo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Two chemoprevention trials found that supplementation with β-carotene increased the risk of lung cancer and overall mortality. The biologic basis of these findings remains poorly understood. Objective: The objective was to compare the on-study change in metabolomic profiles of men randomly assigned to receive or not receive β-carotene supplements in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study. Design: The ATBC Study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, primary cancer prevention trial; participants were Finnish male smokers assigned to 1 of 4 intervention groups: 1) α-tocopherol, 2) β-carotene, 3) both, or 4) placebo. Fifty participants with both baseline and follow-up fasting serum samples were randomly selected from each of these groups. Metabolomic profiling was conducted by mass spectrometry. The association between change in each metabolite over time and trial assignment (β-carotene or no β-carotene) was estimated by linear regression. Results: We measured 489 metabolites, and 17 changed significantly (P < 0.05) in response to β-carotene supplementation. More of these 17 metabolites were of xenobiotic origin than would be expected by chance (9 of 60, or 15%; P = 0.00004). We also found a suggestive association with 1,5-anhydroglucitol—a marker of glycemic control (β = −0.379, P = 0.0071). Conclusions: Male smokers supplemented with β-carotene developed metabolomic profiles consistent with the induction of cytochrome P450 enzymes, the primary metabolizers of xenobiotics in humans. These findings may shed light on the increased mortality associated with β-carotene supplementation in the ATBC Study and suggest the need to explore potential interactions between medication use and dietary supplements, particularly among smokers. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00342992. PMID:23803886

  16. Concentração de alfa-tocoferol no soro e colostro materno de adolescentes e adultas Levels of alpha-tocopherol in maternal serum and colostrum of adolescents and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Dimenstein

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: avaliar a concentração de alfa-tocoferol no soro e colostro materno de puérperas adolescentes e adultas e verificar a adequação nutricional de vitamina E do colostro oferecido ao lactente. MÉTODOS: participaram do estudo 72 puérperas, sendo 25 adolescentes e 47 adultas. Foram coletados 5 mL de sangue e 2 mL de colostro em condição de jejum para análise dos níveis de alfa-tocoferol. As amostras foram analisadas por cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência. A adequação nutricional do colostro para a vitamina E foi calculada pelo produto do volume estimado de ingestão de leite com a concentração de alfa-tocoferol no colostro e por comparação direta desse produto com o valor de referência para ingestão do nutriente (4 mg/dia. RESULTADOS: os níveis de alfa-tocoferol no soro de puérperas adolescentes e adultas foram, respectivamente, 30,8±9,8 e 34,1±9,5 µmol/L (média±DP. No colostro, as adolescentes apresentaram concentração de alfa-tocoferol de 32,9±15,8 µmol/L e as adultas de 30,4 ± 18,0 µmol/L, não sendo encontrada diferença significativa entre as concentrações séricas, assim como no colostro dos grupos estudados. CONCLUSÕES: Tanto as puérperas adolescentes quanto as adultas apresentaram um estado nutricional satisfatório de vitamina E refletido no colostro cujos valores foram capazes de suprir o requerimento nutricional do lactente, sugerindo que a idade materna não influencia os níveis de alfa-tocoferol do colostro humano.PURPOSE: to assess the alpha-tocopherol concentration in the serum and colostrum of adolescent and adult mothers and to determine the nutritional adequacy of vitamin E in the colostrum offered to infants. METHODS: in total, 72 pregnant women participated in the study, 25 adolescents and 47 adults. An amount of 5 mL of blood and 2 mL of colostrum were collected under fasting conditions for the analysis of alpha-tocopherol levels. The samples were analyzed by means of high

  17. Binding and uptake of 125iodine-labelled, oxidized low density lipoprotein by macrophages: comparison of the effects of alpha-tocopherol, probucol, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate and magnesium-pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmer, D; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, R; Schneider, W; Elstner, E F

    1997-01-01

    Specific and unspecific binding and uptake (internalization) by macrophages of 125iodine-labelled, copper-oxidized human low density lipoprotein is differently influenced by the anti-oxidants alpha-tocopherol (alpha-Toc), probucol (Prob), pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PP) and the magnesium-pyridoxal-5'-phosphate glutamate complex (MPPG). Binding as well as internalization, mediated by the so-called "scavenger receptor" is lower in the presence of MPPG whereas both specific binding and internalization are enhanced. The comparison of the effects in vitro allows a rating of the potentially anti-atherogenic and thus protective effects of the tested substances as follows: MPPG > PP > alpha-Toc > Prob. PMID:9090072

  18. Binding and uptake of {sup 125}iodine-labelled, oxidized low density lipoprotein by macrophages: Comparison of the effects of {alpha}-tocopherol, probucol, pyridoxal-5`-phosphate and magnesium-pyridoxal-5`-phosphate-glutamate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selmer, D. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Phytopathologie; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, R. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik; Schneider, W. [Steigerwald Arzneimittel, Darmstadt (Germany); Elstner, E.F. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Phytopathologie

    1997-01-01

    Specific and unspecific binding and uptake (internalization) by macrophages of {sup 125}iodine-labelled, copper-oxidized human low density lipoprotein is differently influenced by the anti-oxidants {alpha}-tocopherol ({alpha}-Toc), probucol (Prob), pyridoxal-5`-phosphate (PP) and the magnesium-pyridoxal-5`-phosphate glutamate complex (MPPG). Binding as well as internalization, mediated by the so-called `scavenger receptor` is lower in the presence of MPPG whereas both specific binding and internalization are enhanced. The comparison of the effects in vitro allows a rating of the potentially anti-atherogenic and thus protective effects of the tested substances as follows: MPPG>PP>{alpha}-Toc>Prob. (orig.)

  19. Effects of α-Tocopherol and β-Carotene Supplementation on Cancer Incidence and Mortality: 18-Year Post-Intervention Follow-Up of the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study

    OpenAIRE

    Virtamo, Jarmo; Taylor, Phil R; Kontto, Jukka; Männistö, Satu; Utriainen, Meri; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Huttunen, Jussi; Albanes, Demetrius

    2013-01-01

    In the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study among 29,133 Finnish male smokers aged 50–69 years, daily α-tocopherol (50 mg) for a median of 6.1 years decreased the risk of prostate cancer, whereas β-carotene (20 mg) increased risk of lung cancer and overall mortality. To determine the post-intervention effects of α-tocopherol and β-carotene, 25,563 men were followed 18 years for cancer incidence and all causes of mortality through national registers. Neither supplemen...

  20. Iron in Relation to Gastric Cancer in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Michael B.; Kamangar, Farin; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Taylor, Philip R.; Abnet, Christian C.; Wood, Richard J.; Petty, Gayle; Cross, Amanda J.; Dawsey, Sanford M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Iron is an essential micronutrient that can have carcinogenic effects when at high or low concentrations. Previous studies of iron in relation to gastric cancer have not assessed subtype-specific relationships. We used the prospective ATBC Cancer Prevention Study to assess whether iron metrics were associated with gastric cardia cancer (GCC) and gastric noncardia cancer (GNCC). Methods We selected 341 incident gastric cancer cases (86 cardia, 172 noncardia, and 83 non-specified), accrued during 22 years of follow-up, and 341 individually matched controls. We measured prediagnostic serum iron, ferritin, unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC), and C-reactive protein. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and transferrin saturation were estimated from these metrics. Dietary iron exposures were estimated from a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression was used for analysis. Results Serum iron metrics were not associated with GCC, except for a potential ‘n’-shaped relationship with TIBC (global p=0.038). GNCC was inversely associated with serum ferritin (global p=0.024), serum iron (global p=0.060) and, possibly, transferrin saturation. TIBC appeared to share a ‘u’shaped relationship with GNCC (global p=0.033). Dietary iron exposures were not associated with either subsite. Adjustment for Helicobacter pylori and gastric atrophy had little effect on observed associations. Conclusions We found little evidence for the involvement of iron exposure in the pathogenesis of GCC. GNCC was associated with an iron profile similar to that of iron deficiency. PMID:23001240

  1. The Cardioprotective Effect of Vitamin E (Alpha-Tocopherol Is Strongly Related to Age and Gender in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xia Hu

    Full Text Available Vitamin E (VitE only prevented cardiovascular diseases in some patients and the mechanisms remain unknown. VitE levels can be affected by aging and gender. We hypothesize that age and gender can influence VitE's cardioprotective effect. Mice were divided into 4 groups according to age and gender, and each group of mice were divided into a control group and a VitE group. The mice were administered water or VitE for 21 days; Afterward, the cardiac function and myocardial infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were measured after myocardial ischemia reperfusion(MI/R. VitE may significantly improved cardiac function in young male mice and aged female mice by enhancing ERK1/2 activity and reducing JNK activity. Enhanced expression of HSP90 and Bcl-2 were also seen in young male mice. No changes in cardiac function and cardiac proteins were detected in aged male mice and VitE was even liked to exert a reverse effect in cardiac function in young mice by enhancing JNK activity and reducing Bcl-2 expression. Those effects were in accordance with the changes of myocardial infarction size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis in each group of mice. VitE may reduce MI/R injury by inhibiting cardiomyocyte apoptosis in young male mice and aged female mice but not in aged male mice. VitE was possibly harmful for young female mice, shown as increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis after MI/R. Thus, we speculated that the efficacy of VitE in cardiac protection was associated with age and gender.

  2. The Cardioprotective Effect of Vitamin E (Alpha-Tocopherol) Is Strongly Related to Age and Gender in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Lin, Ze-Bang; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Jing-Feng; Chen, Yang-Xin; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xi; Ou, Zhi-Jun; Ou, Jing-Song

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin E (VitE) only prevented cardiovascular diseases in some patients and the mechanisms remain unknown. VitE levels can be affected by aging and gender. We hypothesize that age and gender can influence VitE’s cardioprotective effect. Mice were divided into 4 groups according to age and gender, and each group of mice were divided into a control group and a VitE group. The mice were administered water or VitE for 21 days; Afterward, the cardiac function and myocardial infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were measured after myocardial ischemia reperfusion(MI/R). VitE may significantly improved cardiac function in young male mice and aged female mice by enhancing ERK1/2 activity and reducing JNK activity. Enhanced expression of HSP90 and Bcl-2 were also seen in young male mice. No changes in cardiac function and cardiac proteins were detected in aged male mice and VitE was even liked to exert a reverse effect in cardiac function in young mice by enhancing JNK activity and reducing Bcl-2 expression. Those effects were in accordance with the changes of myocardial infarction size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis in each group of mice. VitE may reduce MI/R injury by inhibiting cardiomyocyte apoptosis in young male mice and aged female mice but not in aged male mice. VitE was possibly harmful for young female mice, shown as increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis after MI/R. Thus, we speculated that the efficacy of VitE in cardiac protection was associated with age and gender. PMID:26331272

  3. Vitamin E analogue, D-alpha tocopherol succinate, enhances x-ray induced growth delay of human adenocarcinoma cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of d-alpha Tocopherol succinate (alpha-TS) in modifying radiation-induced viability reduction and apoptosis occurrence in the model for normal and cancer cells. Our hypothesis was that alpha-TS enhances the growth-inhibitory effect of x-irradiation in cancer cells and that the effect is more pronounced in these cells than in normal cells. Murine NIH 3T3 Swiss albino embryonic cells and HT29 human Caucasian colon adenocarcinoma cells were used in the experiments. Alpha-TS was added to the cultures 1 h prior to irradiation with doses of 2 or 5Gy of x-ray. After irradiation cells were incubated for 73 h. Trypan blue exclusion viability test and estimation of apoptosis and necrosis were made. Apoptotic and necrotic cells were counted in fluorescence microscope using fluorescence dyes: propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342. For experiments with the dose of 5 Gy at least five series of experiments were performed. At lower doses (up to approximately 25μM/ml) treatment with alpha-TS alone enhanced growth of both cell lines. At higher doses treatment with alpha-TS alone delayed the growth of the cell cultures, accompanied by 20-25% necrosis. At the concentrations higher than 25μM/mL alpha-TS alone caused growth delay of both cell cultures, being much more pronounced for the cancer cell line HT29. At the concentrations of 50 μM/mL, responsible for about 30-60% of growth delay, there was observed a synergy effect for x-rays and alpha-TS for both cell lines. The effect was more pronounced for HT29 cells (DMF=0.48 for HT29 versus DMF=0.73 for NIH 3T3). These results may confirm the views of the literature reports suggesting that use of vitamin E together with radiation could be favorable for colon cancer treatment; however, more experiments using more advanced techniques are needed

  4. Enhancement of lipid stability of broiler breast meat and meat products fed on alpha lipoic acid and alpha tocopherol acetate supplemented feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaib Muhammad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was designed to investigate the effect of alpha lipoic acid (ALA and alpha tocopherol acetate (ATA on the antioxidant potential, lipid stability and the quality of the broiler breast meat and meat products. The treatment plan was as (T1 = control feed, T2 = 200 mg ATA + 25 mg ALA/kg feed, T3 = 200 mg ATA + 75 mg ALA/kg feed, T4 = 200 mg ATA + 150 mg ALA/kg feed, T5 = Oxidized oil (4%, T6 = 200 mg ATA + 150 mg ALA + Oxidized oil (4%/kg feed. After two weeks of acclimatization the birds were fed with ALA and ATA enriched diet. The results revealed that maximum deposition of ALA took place in T4 which contain maximum dose of ALA. The TBARS and DPPH values of the broiler breast meat were in T4 (0.14 ± 0.01 MDA/kg of meat, 76.69 ± 0.14% and in T5 were (0.24 ± 0.15 MDA/Kg of meat, 44.98 ± 0.04% accordingly. ATA concentration were also highest in T4 (206.43 ± 0.22 mg/g of meat and lowest in T5 (79.09 ± 0.06 mg/g of meat. Sensory evaluation results showed that nuggets and patties made of T5 containing oxidized oil were least liked and T4 got highest score. In a nutshell, 150 mg/kg feed dietary supplementation of ALA with constant level of ATA can ameliorate the antioxidant potential, lipid stability and nutritional qualities of broiler breast meat and meat products.

  5. Mechanisms of Ligand Transfer by the Hepatic Tocopherol Transfer Protein*

    OpenAIRE

    Morley, Samantha; Cecchini, Matt; Zhang, Wendy; Virgulti, Alessandro; Noy, Noa; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Manor, Danny

    2008-01-01

    α-Tocopherol is a member of the vitamin E family that functions as the principal fat-soluble antioxidant in vertebrates. Body-wide distribution of tocopherol is regulated by the hepatic α-tocopherol transfer protein (αTTP), which stimulates secretion of the vitamin from hepatocytes to circulating lipoproteins. This biological activity of αTTP is thought to stem from its ability to facilitate the transfer of vitamin E between membranes, but the mechanism by which the pr...

  6. The Effects of Combined Antioxidant Supplementation on Antioxidant Capacity, DNA Single-Strand Breaks and Regulation of Insulin Growth Factor-1/IGF-Binding Protein 3 in the Ferret Model of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and its major binding protein, IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) are implicated in lung cancer and other malignancies. We have previously shown that the combination of three major antioxidants [beta-carotene (BC), alpha-tocopherol (AT) and ascorbic acid (...

  7. Lipid transfer proteins of barley

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žídková, Jitka; Matejková, M.; Petry-Podgorska, Inga; Žídek, L.; Sikorová, K.; Nálezková, M.; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2007), s. 51. ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics /6./. 29.03.2007-31.03.2007, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : protein separation * barley * MALDI-TOF/TOF MS-MS Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  8. Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein mass and phospholipid transfer protein activity are associated with leptin in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, R. P. F.; de Vries, R.; Dallinga-Thie, G. M.; van Tol, A.; Sluiter, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    Adipose tissue contributes to plasma levels of lipid transfer proteins and is also the major source of plasma adipokines. We hypothesized that plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mass, phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity and cholesteryl ester transfer (CET, a measure of CETP a

  9. Regulation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, M. Mahmood; Nijstad, Niels; Franceschini, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) facilitates the transport of dietary and endogenous fat by the intestine and liver by assisting in the assembly and secretion of triglyceride-rich apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. Higher concentrations of apolipoprotein B lipoproteins predispose individuals to various cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, obesity and the metabolic syndrome. These can potentially be avoided by reducing MTP activity. In t...

  10. Nonlinear exciton transfer in protein helices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the transfer of vibronic excitation energy in helical forms of proteins. The steric structure of the helix protein is modelled by a three-dimensional network of oscillators representing peptide groups. The covalent and hydrogen bonds between the peptide groups are described by pair interaction potentials. Each peptide group possesses one internal vibrational (excitonic) degree of freedom embodying the amide-I mode. The transfer dynamics of an amide-I exciton along the helix is expressed in terms of a tight-binding system. In the first part of this paper we study a reduced system arising when the vibrations of the covalent bonds are neglected. For the resulting system consisting of the exciton coupled to the hydrogen bond vibrations oriented along the helix axis we construct polaron solutions. Subsequently we investigate the mobility of the polarons within the complete protein matrix including deformations of the covalent bonds too. In particular we show that, during a phase of adaptation going along with internal energy exchange between the exciton and the bond vibrations, a relaxation into a new steady regime takes place. The newly reached equilibrium state is characterized by a localized exciton breather and is attributed local deformations of the steric peptide cage in the form of phonobreathers. Finally, coherent motion of an exciton breather is initiated through suitable injection of kinetic energy. In this way the long-range transfer of vibronic amide-I energy in the steric protein cage is provided. Interestingly, the α-helix possesses better facilities in supporting mobile localized excitons compared to the 3-10-helix form of proteins

  11. Determination of phospholipid transfer proteins in rat tissues by immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several quantitative immunoassays have been developed for two phospholipid transfer proteins from rat liver, i.e. the phosphatidylcholine transfer protein and the non-specific lipid transfer protein. The development of a double-antibody radioimmunoassay for the phosphatidylcholine transfer protein is described. The transfer protein was labelled with iodine-125 by the mild glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase method. Although less than one tyrosine residue per molecule of transfer protein was labelled, only 20% of the labelled transfer protein was immunoprecipitable. This value could be increased to 80% by purifying the labelled protein by affinity chromatography on a column of anti-phosphatidylcholine transfer protein-IgG coupled to Sepharose 4B. The radioimmunoassay was used to determine the levels of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein in homogenates and 105 000 xg supernatants from various rat tissues as well as several Morris hepatomas. An enzyme immunoassay for the non-specific lipid transfer protein is also described. The antiserum that was raised especially by the author was cross-reactive with the non-specific lipid transfer protein present in 105 000 xg supernatants from human, mouse and bovine liver. The non-specific lipid transfer protein lost its immunoreactivity upon labelling with iodine-125 using different labelling techniques. Therefore, a regular radioimmunoassay could not be developed. The results of these different assays were compared. (Auth.)

  12. Electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins. Significant achievements in the relevant fields are summarized including the direct electron transfer between proteins and electrodes, the thermodynamic and kinetic properties, catalytic activities and activity regulation of the redox proteins. It has been demonstrated that the electrochemical technique is an effective tool for protein studies, especially for probing into the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins.

  13. Níveis de alfa-tocoferol no soro e colostro de lactantes e associação com variáveis maternas Alpha-tocopherol level in serum and colostrum of breastfeeding women and association with maternal variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Queiroz de Lira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Diagnosticar bioquimicamente o estado nutricional de vitamina E de lactantes por meio da análise do alfa-tocoferol no soro e no colostro, verificar sua associação com variáveis maternas e determinar a prevalência de deficiência de vitamina E nessas mulheres. MÉTODOS: Participaram do estudo 103 puérperas que foram classificadas quanto às seguintes variáveis maternas: idade, estado nutricional pré-gestacional, ganho de peso gestacional, paridade e tipo de parto. Amostras de soro e colostro foram coletadas em jejum no pós-parto imediato e o alfa-tocoferol foi analisado por cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência (CLAE. Para definir o estado nutricional de vitamina E, foi adotado ponto de corte sérico (697,7 μg/dL. A análise estatística foi realizada com o uso do teste t de Student para amostras independentes e correlação de Pearson. As diferenças foram consideradas significativas quando pPURPOSE: To determine the nutritional status of vitamin E in breastfeeding women through the analysis of alpha-tocopherol concentration in serum and colostrum, to analyze its relation with maternal variables and to determine the prevalence of vitamin E deficiency in these women. METHODS: The study included 103 mothers who were classified according to maternal variables: age, nutritional status before pregnancy, gestational weight gain, parity and mode of delivery. Colostrum and serum samples were collected under fasting conditions in the immediate postpartum period. Alpha-tocopherol was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. A serum cutoff of 697.7 μg/dL was adopted to define the nutritional status of vitamin E. Statistical analysis was performed with the Student's t test for independent samples and Pearson's correlation. Differences were significant when p<0.05. RESULTS: The average concentration of alpha-tocopherol was 1.125±551.0 μg/dL in colostrum and 1,138.6±346.0 μg/dL in serum, indicating adequate

  14. Acquisition of Triacylglycerol Transfer Activity by Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein During Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Rava, Paul; Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2007-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is essential for the assembly of neutral lipid rich apolipoprotein B (apoB)-lipoproteins. Previously we reported that the Drosophila MTP transfers phospholipids but does not transfer triglycerides. In contrast, human MTP transfers both lipids. To explore the acquisition of triglyceride transfer activity by MTP, we evaluated amino acid sequences, protein structures, as well as the biochemical and cellular properties of various MTP orthologs obtain...

  15. Disease: H00981 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available xia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused... by mutations in the alpha tocopherol transfer protein (TTPA) gene. It causes ataxia and peripheral neuropat

  16. Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, Vitamin D Binding Protein, and Risk of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Mondul, Alison M.; Kopp, William; Rager, Helen; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported a significant positive association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], the accepted biomarker of vitamin D status, and prostate cancer risk. To further elucidate this association, we examined the influence of vitamin D binding protein (DBP), the primary transporter of vitamin D compounds in the circulation. Prediagnostic serum concentrations of DBP were assayed for 950 cases and 964 matched controls with existing 25(OH)D measurements within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-C...

  17. Deltamethrin-induced oxidative stress and biochemical changes in tissues and blood of catfish (Clarias gariepinus: antioxidant defense and role of alpha-tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Kamal A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pyrethroid class of insecticides, including deltamethrin, is being used as substitutes for organochlorines and organophosphates in pest-control programs because of their low environmental persistence and toxicity. This study was aimed to investigate the impact of commonly used pesticides (deltamethrin on the blood and tissue oxidative stress level in catfish (Clarias gariepinus; in addition to the protective effect of α-tocopherol on deltamethrin induced oxidative stress. Catfish were divided into three groups, 1st control group include 20 fish divided into two tanks each one contain 10 fish, 2nd deltamethrin group, where Fish exposed to deltamethrin in a concentration (0.75 μg/l and 3rd Vitamin E group, Fish exposed to deltamethrin and vitamin E at a dose of 12 μg/l for successive 4 days. Serum, liver, kidney and Gills were collected for biochemical assays. Tissue oxidative stress biomarkers malondialdhyde (MDA and catalase activity in liver, kidney and gills tissues, serum liver enzymes (ALT and AST, serum albumin, total protein, urea and creatinine were analysed. Results Our results showed that 48 h. exposure to 0.75 μg/l deltamethrin significantly (p  Conclusions It could be concluded that deltamethrin is highly toxic to catfish even in very low concentration (0.75 μg/l. Moreover the effect of deltamethrin was pronounced in the liver of catfish in comparison with kidneys and gills. Moreover fish antioxidants and oxidative stress could be used as biomarkers for aquatic pollution, thus helping in the diagnosis of pollution. Adminstration of 12 μg/l α-tocopherol restored the quantified tissue and serum parameters, so supplementation of α-tocopherol consider an effective way to counter the toxicity of deltamethrin in the catfish.

  18. Dietary vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol acetate) and selenium supplementation from different sources: performance, ascites-related variables and antioxidant status in broilers reared at low and optimum temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, S; Malayoğlu, H Basmacioğlu; Yalçin, S; Karadas, F; Koçtürk, S; Cabuk, M; Oktay, G; Ozdemir, S; Ozdemir, E; Ergül, M

    2007-10-01

    1. This study compared the effect of dietary supplementation with organic or inorganic selenium (Se) sources plus control amounts or large amounts of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol acetate) in broilers raised at control (20 to 24 degrees C) or low (14.5 to 16.8 degrees C) temperatures after 2 weeks of age. 2. The following dietary treatments were used from one day old. Diet 1, the control diet, comprised a commercial diet containing 0.15 mg/kg inorganic Se and 50 mg vitamin E/kg feed. Diet 2 was the same as diet 1, supplemented with 0.15 mg/kg inorganic Se. Diet 3 was the same as diet 2 but was supplemented with 200 mg/kg vitamin E. Diet 4 was the same as diet 1, but inorganic Se was replaced with 0.30 mg/kg organic Se. Diet 5 was the same as diet 4, supplemented with 200 mg/kg vitamin E. 3. Low temperature reduced the growth rate of broilers; however, at 6 weeks, there were no differences in the body weights of birds fed on organic Se supplemented diets housed at low or control temperature. The feed conversion ratio was significantly affected by low temperature but not by diet. The heterophil/lymphocyte ratio was higher in chicks after one week in the cold, indicating mild stress. Blood triiodothyronine levels were significantly higher in birds after 1 and 4 weeks in the cold but thyroxin was not affected. 4. Organic Se supplementation increased relative lung weight at the control temperature, which might lead to greater respiratory capacity. Relative spleen weight significantly decreased in broilers fed diets supplemented with inorganic Se under cold conditions, a possible indication of chronic oxidative stress. 5. At the low temperature, supplementation with organic Se alone, or with inorganic Se and vitamin E increased glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) activity and glutathione (GSH) concentration in the liver of broilers, which may indicate increased activity of birds' antioxidant defence against suboptimal environments. PMID:17952730

  19. Biokinetics of dietary RRR-alpha-tocopherol in the male guinea pig at three dietary levels of vitamin C and two levels of vitamin E. Evidence that vitamin C does not spare vitamin E in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The net rates of uptake of new and loss of old 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-tocopherol (RRR-alpha-TOH) have been measured in the blood and in nine tissues of male guinea pigs over an eight week period by feeding diets containing deuterium-labelled alpha-tocopheryl acetate (d6-RRR-alpha-TOAc). There was an initial two week lead-in period during which 24 animals [the high vitamin E (HE) group] received diets containing 36 mg of unlabelled (d0) RRR-alpha-TOAc and 250 mg of ascorbic acid per kg diet, while another 24 animals [the low vitamin E (LE) group] received diets containing 5 mg d0-RRR-alpha-TOAc and 250 mg ascorbic acid per kg diet. The HE group was then divided into three equal subgroups, which were fed diets containing 36 mg d6-RRR-alpha-TOAc and 5000 mg [the high vitamin C (HEHC) subgroup], 250 mg [the normal vitamin C (HENC) subgroup] and 50 mg [the low vitamin C (HELC) subgroup] ascorbic acid per kg diet. One animal from each group was sacrificed each week and the blood and tissues were analyzed for d0- and d6-RRR-alpha-TOH by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The LE group was similarly divided into three equal subgroups with animals receiving diets containing 5 mg d6-RRR-alpha-TOAc and 5,000 mg (LEHC), 250 mg (LENC) and 50 mg (LELC) ascorbic acid per kg diet with a similar protocol being followed for sacrifice and analyses. In the HE group the total (d0(-) + d6-) RRR-alpha-TOH concentrations in blood and tissues remained essentially constant over the eight week experiment, whereas in the LE group the total RRR-alpha-TOH concentrations declined noticeably. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of old d0-RRR-alpha-TOH nor in the concentrations of new d6-RRR-alpha-TOH found in any tissue at a particular time between the HEHC, HENC and HELC subgroups, nor between the LEHC, LENC and LELC subgroups

  20. Effects of α-Tocopherol and β-Carotene Supplementation on Cancer Incidence and Mortality: 18-Year Post-Intervention Follow-Up of the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtamo, Jarmo; Taylor, Phil R.; Kontto, Jukka; Männistö, Satu; Utriainen, Meri; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Huttunen, Jussi; Albanes, Demetrius

    2014-01-01

    In the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study among 29,133 Finnish male smokers aged 50–69 years, daily α-tocopherol (50 mg) for a median of 6.1 years decreased the risk of prostate cancer, whereas β-carotene (20 mg) increased risk of lung cancer and overall mortality. To determine the post-intervention effects of α-tocopherol and β-carotene, 25,563 men were followed 18 years for cancer incidence and all causes of mortality through national registers. Neither supplement had significant effects on post-trial cancer incidence. Relative risk (RR) for lung cancer (n=2,881) was 1.04 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96–1.11) among β-carotene recipients compared with nonrecipients. For prostate cancer (n=2,321) RR was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.89–1.05) among α-tocopherol recipients compared with nonrecipients with the preventive effect of α-tocopherol continuing approximately 8 years post-intervention. Body mass index significantly modified the effect of α-tocopherol on prostate cancer (P for interaction=0.01): RR 1.00 (95% CI, 0.88–1.14) in normal-weight men, 0.87 (95% CI, 0.77–0.98) in overweight men, and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.01–1.55) in obese men. The post-trial relative mortality (based on 16,686 deaths) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.98–1.05) for α-tocopherol recipients compared with nonrecipients and 1.02 (95% CI, 0.99–1.05) for β-carotene recipients compared with nonrecipients. α-Tocopherol decreased post-trial prostate cancer mortality (RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.70–0.99), whereas β-carotene increased it (RR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01–1.42). In conclusion, supplementation with α-tocopherol and β-carotene appeared to have no late effects on cancer incidence. The preventive effect of moderate-dose α-tocopherol on prostate cancer continued several years post-trial and resulted in lower prostate cancer mortality. PMID:24338499

  1. Biochemical parameters as biomarkers for the early recognition of environmental pollution on Scots pine trees. II. The antioxidative metabolites ascorbic acid, glutathione, {alpha}-tocopherol and the enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, H.; Haertling, S. [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Halle (Germany). Dept. of Soil Sciences

    2001-10-01

    Field investigations with Scots pine trees (Pinus sylvestris L.) were performed in eastern Germany, where ambient SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and O{sub 3} concentrations differed significantly in 1992-99 at three sites, namely Neuglobsow (yearly mean SO{sub 2} in 1992: 9 {mu}g m{sup -3}), Taura (yearly mean SO{sub 2} in 1992: 54 {mu}g m{sup -3}) and Roesa (yearly mean SO{sub 2} in 1992: 73 {mu}g m{sup -3}). To investigate the effects of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and O{sub 3} on antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, ascorbic acid, glutathione, glutathione reductase, {alpha}-tocopherol) and pigments including chlorophyll fluorescence as well as visible damage symptoms in the form of needle yellowing and tip necroses, needles of the 1st and 2nd age class from young and mature trees were collected at the sites every October. Eight years after the start of the field study in 1992, the ambient SO{sub 2} concentrations had decreased significantly at Neuglobsow (yearly mean SO{sub 2} in 1999: 4 {mu}g m{sup -3}), Taura (yearly mean SO{sub 2} in 1999: 5 {mu}g m{sup -3}) and Roesa (yearly mean SO{sub 2} in 1999: 5 {mu}g m{sup -3}). NO{sub x} and O{sub 3} differed less at the three sites and showed no temporal variations. Whole needle glutathione continuously decreased, although concentrations were higher in needles of the 1st and 2nd age class from the polluted sites Taura and Roesa than the unpolluted site Neuglobsow. The activities of glutathione reductase exhibited the same site-related differences and temporal variations and were correlated with concentrations of oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In contrast, the activities of the enzyme superoxide dismutase and the concentrations of whole needle ascorbic acid remained unchanged over the period. Only at the end of the investigation period did the concentrations of oxidized ascorbic acid (dehydroascorbate) increase in six-month-old needles at the polluted sites Taura and Roesa. Despite the clear decreases in SO{sub 2}, the visible symptoms

  2. Biokinetics of dietary RRR-alpha-tocopherol in the male guinea pig at three dietary levels of vitamin C and two levels of vitamin E. Evidence that vitamin C does not spare vitamin E in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, G.W.; Wronska, U.; Stone, L.; Foster, D.O.; Ingold, K.U. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-04-01

    The net rates of uptake of new and loss of old 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-tocopherol (RRR-alpha-TOH) have been measured in the blood and in nine tissues of male guinea pigs over an eight week period by feeding diets containing deuterium-labelled alpha-tocopheryl acetate (d6-RRR-alpha-TOAc). There was an initial two week lead-in period during which 24 animals (the high vitamin E (HE) group) received diets containing 36 mg of unlabelled (d0) RRR-alpha-TOAc and 250 mg of ascorbic acid per kg diet, while another 24 animals (the low vitamin E (LE) group) received diets containing 5 mg d0-RRR-alpha-TOAc and 250 mg ascorbic acid per kg diet. The HE group was then divided into three equal subgroups, which were fed diets containing 36 mg d6-RRR-alpha-TOAc and 5000 mg (the high vitamin C (HEHC) subgroup), 250 mg (the normal vitamin C (HENC) subgroup) and 50 mg (the low vitamin C (HELC) subgroup) ascorbic acid per kg diet. One animal from each group was sacrificed each week and the blood and tissues were analyzed for d0- and d6-RRR-alpha-TOH by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The LE group was similarly divided into three equal subgroups with animals receiving diets containing 5 mg d6-RRR-alpha-TOAc and 5,000 mg (LEHC), 250 mg (LENC) and 50 mg (LELC) ascorbic acid per kg diet with a similar protocol being followed for sacrifice and analyses. In the HE group the total (d0(-) + d6-) RRR-alpha-TOH concentrations in blood and tissues remained essentially constant over the eight week experiment, whereas in the LE group the total RRR-alpha-TOH concentrations declined noticeably. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of old d0-RRR-alpha-TOH nor in the concentrations of new d6-RRR-alpha-TOH found in any tissue at a particular time between the HEHC, HENC and HELC subgroups, nor between the LEHC, LENC and LELC subgroups.

  3. Protein-protein interactions of mitochondrial-associated protein via bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiba, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are essential biological reactions occurring at inter- and intra-cellular levels. The analysis of their mechanism is generally required in order link to understand their various cellular functions. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), which is based on an enzymatic activity of luciferase, is a useful tool for investigating protein-protein interactions in live cells. The combination of the BRET system and biomolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) would provide us a better understanding of the hetero-oligomeric structural states of protein complexes. In this review, we discuss the application of BRET to the protein-protein interactions of mitochondrial-associated proteins and discuss its physiological relevance. PMID:27493852

  4. Vitamin E is essential for Purkinje neuron integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Ulatowski, L.; Parker, R.; Warrier, G.; Sultana, R.; Butterfield, D.A.; Manor, D.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) is an essential dietary antioxidant with important neuroprotective functions. Alpha-tocopherol deficiency manifests primarily in neurological pathologies, notably cerebellar dysfunctions such as spinocerebellar ataxia. To study the roles of α-tocopherol in the cerebellum, we used the Ttpa-/- mice which lack the tocopherol transfer protein (TTP) and are a faithful model of vitamin E deficiency and oxidative stress. When fed vitamin E deficient diet, Ttpa-/- mice ha...

  5. Neutral-lipid transfers and cholesteryl ester transfer protein in hemodialyzed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reade, V; Mezdour, H; Reade, R; Kandoussi, M; Dracon, M; Fruchart, J C; Cachera, C

    1996-01-01

    Abnormalities in cholesteryl ester transfers may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis observed in patients with end-stage renal failure treated by chronic hemodialysis. Net neutral-lipid transfers and cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity and mass were investigated in 20 hemodialyzed patients, arbitrarily divided into two groups based on fasting triglyceride levels, and compared to triglyceride-matched control groups. In the hypertriglyceridemic subjects (plasma triglyceride values > 150 mg/dl), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was decreased, and the net cholesteryl ester transfer rates were significantly higher than the rates in normolipidemic subjects. The comparison of subjects matched for plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels showed no significant difference in cholesteryl ester or triglyceride transfer rates between patients and controls. Our results suggest that normal or elevated net neutral-lipid transfers are not related to the renal status of the subjects, but rather to their plasma triglyceride levels. PMID:8886176

  6. Non-specific lipid transfer proteins in maize

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Kaifa; Zhong, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Background In plant, non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are small, basic proteins that have been reported to be involved in numerous biological processes such as transfer of phospholipids, reproductive development, pathogen defence and abiotic stress response. To date, only a tiny fraction of plant nsLTPs have been functionally identified, and even fewer have been identified in maize [Zea mays (Zm)]. Results In this study, we carried out a genome-wide analysis of nsLTP gene family ...

  7. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-28

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements. PMID:23387626

  8. Investigating Protein-protein Interactions in Live Cells Using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Sara B.; Fisher, Simon E.

    2014-01-01

    Assays based on Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) provide a sensitive and reliable means to monitor protein-protein interactions in live cells. BRET is the non-radiative transfer of energy from a 'donor' luciferase enzyme to an 'acceptor' fluorescent protein. In the most common configuration of this assay, the donor is Renilla reniformis luciferase and the acceptor is Yellow Fluorescent Protein (YFP). Because the efficiency of energy transfer is strongly distance-dependent, observation of the BRET phenomenon requires that the donor and acceptor be in close proximity. To test for an interaction between two proteins of interest in cultured mammalian cells, one protein is expressed as a fusion with luciferase and the second as a fusion with YFP. An interaction between the two proteins of interest may bring the donor and acceptor sufficiently close for energy transfer to occur. Compared to other techniques for investigating protein-protein interactions, the BRET assay is sensitive, requires little hands-on time and few reagents, and is able to detect interactions which are weak, transient, or dependent on the biochemical environment found within a live cell. It is therefore an ideal approach for confirming putative interactions suggested by yeast two-hybrid or mass spectrometry proteomics studies, and in addition it is well-suited for mapping interacting regions, assessing the effect of post-translational modifications on protein-protein interactions, and evaluating the impact of mutations identified in patient DNA. PMID:24893771

  9. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    OpenAIRE

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as ...

  10. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  11. Concerted actions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein in type 2 diabetes : effects of apolipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; van Tol, Arie

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review Type 2 diabetes frequently coincides with dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated plasma triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and the presence of small dense low-density lipoprotein particles. Plasma lipid transfer proteins play an essential role in lipopr

  12. Plant lipid transfer proteins : Evolution, expression and function

    OpenAIRE

    Edstam, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are known for the ability to transfer different lipids in vitro, but their in vivo functions have not yet been elucidated. They seem to play a role in the defense against biotic and abiotic stresses; the gene expression of nsLTPs is often upregulated when exposed to stresses. Further, two different nsLTPs have been shown to affect the lipid composition of the plant cuticle, a structure acting as a protective barrier. However, more eviden...

  13. Conformational Dependence of a Protein Kinase Phosphate Transfer Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Henkelman, Graeme; Tung, Chang-Shung; Fenimore,, P W; McMahon, Benjamin H

    2004-01-01

    Atomic motions and energetics for a phosphate transfer reaction catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are calculated by plane-wave density functional theory, starting from structures of proteins crystallized in both the reactant conformation (RC) and the transition-state conformation (TC). In the TC, we calculate that the reactants and products are nearly isoenergetic with a 0.2 eV barrier; while phosphate transfer is unfavorable by over 1.2 eV in the RC, with an even higher barrier. With the protein in the TC, the motions involved in reaction are small, with only P$_\\gamma$ and the catalytic proton moving more than 0.5 \\AA. Examination of the structures reveals that in the RC the active site cleft is not completely closed and there is insufficient space for the phosphorylated serine residue in the product state. Together, these observations imply that the phosphate transfer reaction occurs rapidly and reversibly in a particular conformation of the protein, and that the reaction can be gated by...

  14. Effects of intersegmental transfers on target location by proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Sheinman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We study a model for a protein searching for a target, using facilitated diffusion, on a DNA molecule confined in a finite volume. The model includes three distinct pathways for facilitated diffusion: (a) sliding - in which the protein diffuses along the contour of the DNA (b) jumping - where the protein travels between two sites along the DNA by three-dimensional diffusion, and finally (c) intersegmental transfer - which allows the protein to move from one site to another by transiently binding both at the same time. The typical search time is calculated using scaling arguments which are verified numerically. Our results suggest that the inclusion of intersegmental transfer (i) decreases the search time considerably (ii) makes the search time much more robust to variations in the parameters of the model and (iii) that the optimal search time occurs in a regime very different than that found for models which ignore intersegmental transfers. The behavior we find is rich and shows surprising dependencies, for e...

  15. PRIMO: A Transferable Coarse-grained Force Field for Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Parimal; Gopal, Srinivasa Murthy; Cheng, Yi-Ming; Predeus, Alexander; Feig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We describe here the PRIMO (PRotein Intermediate Model) force field, a physics-based fully transferable additive coarse-grained potential energy function that is compatible with an all-atom force field for multi-scale simulations. The energy function consists of standard molecular dynamics energy terms plus a hydrogen-bonding potential term and is mainly parameterized based on the CHARMM22/CMAP force field in a bottom-up fashion. The solvent is treated implicitly via the generalized Born mode...

  16. A study of oxidative stress, thiol proteins and role of vitamin E supplementation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M. Raut

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lipid peroxide plays an important role in inflammatory lung disease. Increased epithelial permeability produced by cigarette smoke is likely to be mediated through depletion of thiol proteins. Imbalance between oxidants and thiol proteins is also an established fact in these patients. Materials & methods: In the present study 30 healthy non-smokers were served as controls and 20 patients with stable COPD were included. Their base line clinical examination, Malondialdehyde (MDA as an oxidant, alpha tocopherol and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD as an antioxidants and thiol proteins levels were measured. All above parameters were repeated after 12 weeks of supplementation with 400 IU of vitamin E daily. Results: We observed that the mean malondialdehyde levels in these patients at base line were high (p<0.001 than Control Plasma alpha-tocopherol, SOD and thiol proteins levels were low (p<0.001 in the patients compared to controls. Exogenous vitamin E (400 IU twice daily Supplementation did not bring about any significant change in plasma Erythrocyte Superoxide Dismutase and vitamin E. But slight increase in the plasma thiol proteins levels was seen. The present study shows that initially the plasma lipid peroxide (MDA levels were high antioxidant (alpha- tocopherol, SOD and thiol proteins were low in patients with COPD. Exogenous supplementation with vitamin E increases slightly thiol proteins levels and brings down the levels of MDA showing attenuation of further damage. Conclusion: Our study confirmed the existence of oxidative stress and and the augmentation of antioxidant defenses as shown by slight increase in thiol proteins level. The antioxidant therapy is adjunct in lung disease patients and opens a promising field in prevention of oxidative stress related complications in these patients.

  17. Teores de retinol, beta-caroteno e alfa-tocoferol em leites bovinos comercializados na cidade de São Paulo Amounts of retinol, beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol in cow milk comercialized in the city of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute BIANCHINI

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Os teores de retinol, beta-caroteno e alfa-tocoferol foram determinados por cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência em leites em pó, pasteurizados e esterilizados, comercializados na Cidade de São Paulo. Após a saponificação e extração, os compostos foram determinados simultaneamente utilizando-se coluna de sílica, fase móvel constituída por hexano:isopropanol (99:1 e fluxo de 2,0mL/min. O retinol e o beta-caroteno foram determinados no detector UV/visível e o alfa-tocoferol no detector de fluorescência, ligado em série com o anterior. Os valores de vitamina A dos leites foram calculados com e sem a consideração do beta-caroteno. A maior contribuição deste nutriente no valor de vitamina A esteve entre os leites em pó, cerca de 17% em uma das marcas. Os altos teores das vitamina A e E encontrados em alguns leites, indicam que os mesmos provavelmente receberam adição destas vitaminas, não trazendo, entretanto, tal informação no rótulo. A análise de vitaminas nestes produtos indica a necessidade de maior controle de qualidade dos mesmos.The amount of retinol, beta-carotene, alpha -tocopherol in powder, pasteurized and sterilized milk, comercialized in the city of São Paulo, were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. After saponification and extraction, compounds were determined simultaneously through a normal-phase column, mobile phase composed by hexan:2-propanol (99:1 and 2 mL/min flow. The retinol and beta-carotene were analysed by a UV/visible detector and the alpha-tocopherol by a fluorescence detector, both linked in series. The milk vitamin A values were calculated with and without beta-carotene. The major contribution of beta-carotene in the vitamin A value was in powder milks, around 17% in one of the brands. The high amounts of vitamin A and E found in some milks indicate that they probably were enriched with these vitamins but nothing is mentioned about this in their labels. The analysis of

  18. Serum Vitamin D, Vitamin D Binding Protein, and Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Anic, Gabriella M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Mondul, Alison M.; Satu Männistö; Demetrius Albanes

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously reported a positive association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and colorectal cancer risk. To further elucidate this association, we examined the molar ratio of 25(OH)D to vitamin D binding protein (DBP), the primary 25(OH)D transport protein, and whether DBP modified the association between 25(OH)D and colorectal cancer risk. Methods In a nested case-control study within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, controls were 1∶1 match...

  19. Controlling time scales for electron transfer through proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot Wherland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer processes within proteins constitute key elements in biological energy conversion processes as well as in a wide variety of biochemical transformations. Pursuit of the parameters that control the rates of these processes is driven by the great interest in the latter reactions. Here, we review a considerable body of results emerging from investigation of intramolecular electron transfer (ET reactions in two types of proteins, all done by the use of the pulse-radiolysis method: first are described results of extensive studies of a model system, the bacterial electron mediating protein azurin, where an internal ET between the disulfide radical ion and the Cu(II is induced. Impact of specific structural changes introduced into azurin on the reaction rates and the parameters controlling it are discussed. Then, the presentation is extended to results of investigations of intra-protein ET reactions that are part of catalytic cycles of multi-copper containing enzymes. Again, the rates and the parameters controlling them are presented and discussed in the context of their efficacy and possible constraints set on their evolution.

  20. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  1. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D-mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A

    2007-07-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  2. A potent antimicrobial protein from onion seeds showing sequence homology to plant lipid transfer proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Cammue, Bruno; Thevissen, Karin; Hendriks, M.; Eggermont, Kristel; Goderis, I. J.; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jozef; Osborn, R W; Guerbette, F.; Kader, J. C.; Broekaert, Willem

    1995-01-01

    An antimicrobial protein of about 10 kD, called Ace-AMP1, was isolated from onion (Allium cepa L.) seeds. Based on the near-complete amino acid sequence of this protein, oligonucleotides were designed for polymerase chain reaction-based cloning of the corresponding cDNA. The mature protein is homologous to plant nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), but it shares only 76% of the residues that are conserved among all known plant nsLTPs and is unusually rich in arginine. Ace-AMP1 inhibi...

  3. Acute and chronic effects of a 24-hour intravenous triglyceride emulsion challenge on plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase, phospholipid transfer protein, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; Van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    1999-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) are key factors in remodeling of high density lipoproteins (HDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. We examined the effect of a large, 24 h intravenous fat load on plasma

  4. L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine inhibits the transfer function of phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Hiroaki; Westerman, Jan; Snoek, Gerry T; Taraschi, Theodore F; Janes, Nathan

    2003-12-30

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha (PITP-alpha) is a bifunctional phospholipid transfer protein that is highly selective for phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho). Polar lipid metabolites, including L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine (GroPCho), increasingly have been linked to changes in cellular function and to disease. In this study, polar lipid metabolites of PtdIns and PtdCho were tested for their ability to influence PITP-alpha activity. GroPCho inhibited the ability of PITP-alpha to transfer PtdIns or PtdCho between liposomes. The IC(50) of both processes was dependent on membrane composition. D-myo-inositol 1-phosphate and glycerylphosphorylinositol modestly enhanced PITP-alpha-mediated phospholipid transfer. Choline, phosphorylcholine (PCho), CDP-choline, glyceryl-3-phosphate, myo-inositol and D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate had little effect. Membrane surface charge was a strong determinant of the GroPCho inhibition with the inhibition being greatest for highly anionic membranes. GroPCho was shown to enhance the binding of PITP-alpha to anionic vesicles. In membranes of low surface charge, phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) was a determinant enabling the GroPCho inhibition. Anionic charge and PtdEtn content appeared to increase the strength of PITP-alpha-membrane interactions. The GroPCho-enhanced PITP-alpha-membrane binding was sufficient to cause inhibition, but not sufficient to account for the extent of inhibition observed. Processes associated with strengthened PITP-alpha-membrane binding in the presence of GroPCho appeared to impair the phospholipid insertion/extraction process. PMID:14729069

  5. Haptoglobin inhibits phospholipid transfer protein activity in hyperlipidemic human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Carlos G

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haptoglobin is a plasma protein that scavenges haemoglobin during haemolysis. Phospholipid Transfer Protein (PLTP transfers lipids from Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL to High Density Lipoproteins (HDL. PLTP is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis which causes coronary artery disease, the leading cause of death in North America. It has been shown that Apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1 binds and regulates PLTP activity. Haptoglobin can also bind to Apo-A1, affecting the ability of Apo-A1 to induce enzymatic activities. Thus we hypothesize that haptoglobin inhibits PLTP activity. This work tested the effect of Haptoglobin and Apo-A1 addition on PLTP activity in human plasma samples. The results will contribute to our understanding of the role of haptoglobin on modulating reverse cholesterol transport. Results We analyzed the PLTP activity and Apo-A1 and Haptoglobin content in six hyperlipidemic and six normolipidemic plasmas. We found that Apo-A1 levels are proportional to PLTP activity in hyperlipidemic (R2 = 0.66, p 2 = 0.57, p > 0.05. When the PLTP activity was graphed versus the Hp/Apo-A1 ratio in hyperlipidemic plasma there was a significant correlation (R2 = 0.69, p Conclusion These findings suggest an inhibitory effect of Haptoglobin over PLTP activity in hyperlipidemic plasma that may contribute to the regulation of reverse cholesterol transport.

  6. Resonant energy transfer based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, X. (Xuedong); Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivslent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GM1 has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction. Keywords: Biosensor, Fluorescence resonant energy transfer, Multivalent interaction, Cholera Toxin, Ganglioside GM1, Signal Transduction

  7. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2015-12-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life's ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein's elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic activated

  8. A case study of apple seed and grape allergy with sensitisation to nonspecific lipid transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Ari; Katelaris, Constance H; Baumgart, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Lipid transfer proteins can be an important cause of allergy given their stability and high degree of protein sequence homology. We describe the case of a child who developed two separate episodes of anaphylaxis after consuming apple seed and grape, with evidence that nonspecific lipid transfer proteins may have been responsible for these reactions. Lipid transfer protein allergy should be considered when anaphylaxis is inconsistent, such as in patients who can tolerate fruit pulp but react to fresh whole fruit juices. PMID:27141487

  9. A case study of apple seed and grape allergy with sensitisation to nonspecific lipid transfer protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katelaris, Constance H; Baumgart, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins can be an important cause of allergy given their stability and high degree of protein sequence homology. We describe the case of a child who developed two separate episodes of anaphylaxis after consuming apple seed and grape, with evidence that nonspecific lipid transfer proteins may have been responsible for these reactions. Lipid transfer protein allergy should be considered when anaphylaxis is inconsistent, such as in patients who can tolerate fruit pulp but react to fresh whole fruit juices. PMID:27141487

  10. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-12-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life’s ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein’s elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic

  11. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life’s ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein’s elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic

  12. Characterization of a new antifungal lipid transfer protein from wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirubakaran, S Isaac; Begum, S Mubarak; Ulaganathan, K; Sakthivel, N

    2008-10-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are members of the family of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR-14) that are believed to be involved in plant defense responses. In this study, a novel gene Ltp 3F1 encoding an antifungal protein from wheat (Sumai 3) was subcloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL-21 (DE3) and enriched using ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by gel permeation chromatography. Molecular phylogeny analyses of wheat Ltp 3F1 gene showed a strong identity to other plant LTPs. Predicted three-dimensional structural model showed the presence of 6 alpha-helices and 9 loop turns. The active site catalytic residues Gly30, Pro50, Ala52 and Cys55 may be suggested for catalyzing the reaction involved in lipid binding. SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed the production of recombinant fusion protein. The LTP fusion protein exhibited a broad-spectrum antifungal activity against Alternaria sp., Rhizoctonia solani, Curvularia lunata, Bipolaris oryzae, Cylindrocladium scoparium, Botrytis cinerea and Sarocladium oryzae. Gene cassette with cyanamide hydratase (cah) marker and Ltp 3F1 gene was constructed for genetic transformation in tobacco. Efficient regeneration was achieved in selective media amended with cyanamide. Transgenic plants with normal phenotype were obtained. Results of PCR and Southern, Northern and Western hybridization analyses confirmed the integration and expression of genes in transgenic plants. Experiments with detached leaves from transgenic tobacco expressing Ltp 3F1 gene showed fungal resistance. Due to the innate potential of broad-spectrum antifungal activity, wheat Ltp 3F1 gene can be used to enhance resistance against fungi in crop plants. PMID:18595724

  13. Electron transfer, decoherence, and protein dynamics: insights from atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narth, Christophe; Gillet, Natacha; Cailliez, Fabien; Lévy, Bernard; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2015-04-21

    Electron transfer in biological systems drives the processes of life. From cellular respiration to photosynthesis and enzymatic catalysis, electron transfers (ET) are chemical processes on which essential biological functions rely. Over the last 40 years, scientists have sought understanding of how these essential processes function in biology. One important breakthrough was the discovery that Marcus theory (MT) of electron transfer is applicable to biological systems. Chemists have experimentally collected both the reorganization energies (λ) and the driving forces (ΔG°), two parameters of Marcus theory, for a large variety of ET processes in proteins. At the same time, theoretical chemists have developed computational approaches that rely on molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry calculations to access numerical estimates of λ and ΔG°. Yet another crucial piece in determining the rate of an electron transfer is the electronic coupling between the initial and final electronic wave functions. This is an important prefactor in the nonadiabatic rate expression, since it reflects the probability that an electron tunnels from the electron donor to the acceptor through the intervening medium. The fact that a protein matrix supports electron tunneling much more efficiently than vacuum is now well documented, both experimentally and theoretically. Meanwhile, many chemists have provided examples of the rich physical chemistry that can be induced by protein dynamics. This Account describes our studies of the dynamical effects on electron tunneling. We present our analysis of two examples of natural biological systems through MD simulations and tunneling pathway analyses. Through these examples, we show that protein dynamics sustain efficient tunneling. Second, we introduce two time scales: τcoh and τFC. The former characterizes how fast the electronic coupling varies with nuclear vibrations (which cause dephasing). The latter reflects the time taken by the system

  14. AcEST: DK956185 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ypti GN=retm ... 48 2e-05 sp|Q757H2|CSR1_ASHGO Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein CSR1 ... 47 7e-05 sp|Q06705|CSR1..._YEAST Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein CSR1 ... 41 0.003 sp|P41034|TTPA_RAT Alpha-tocopherol

  15. Proton transfer and water exchange in the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon, Noam

    2014-03-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is the only naturally occurring protein in which excited-state proton-transfer has been identified. Upon excitation, a proton is ejected from its chromophore, travelling through the ``privileged water molecule'' (PWM) and Ser205 to Glu222, on a 10 ps timescale or faster. However, time-resolved fluorescence from the chromophore exhibits a t-α power-law decay extending into the ns regime. With increasing temperature, α switches from 1/2 (below 230 K) to 3/2 (above it). This has been interpreted as pseudo one-dimensional proton hopping along an internal ``proton wire,'' with an activated process that opens a ``doorway'' for proton escape to solution at the higher temperatures. To identify such putative pathways, we have developed a computer code mapping all ``proton wires'' within a protein structure. Applying it to a X-ray GFP structure of 0.9 Angstrom resolution, a proton wire indeed continues from Glu222 along the axis of the GFP ``barrel,'' connecting to a negatively charged surface patch (a ``proton collecting antenna''?). This might explain the t- 1 / 2 behavior. However, a direct escape pathway opening from the chromophore to solution is not readily identified in the X-ray structure. Here we report molecular dynamics results showing that the PWM escapes to solution on the 100 ps timescale. This occurs by fluctuations of the beta-sheet, creating an opening through which water molecules can leave and enter the protein. The exact pathway of the PWM on its way in and out has been identified, as well as the water-exchange kinetics that follows a stretched-exponential time behavior. This research was supported by the ISRAEL SCIENCE FOUNDATION grant No. 766/12.

  16. Intercellular Protein Transfer from Thymocytes to Thymic Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Promiscuous expression of tissue restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is crucial for negative selection of self-reactive T cells to establish central tolerance. Intercellular transfer of self-peptide-MHC complexes from mTECs to thymic dendritic cells (DCs) allows DCs to acquire TRAs, which in turn contributes to negative selection and regulatory T cell generation. However, mTECs are unlikely to express all TRAs, such as immunoglobulins generated only in B cells after somatic recombination, hyper-mutation, or class-switches. We report here that both mTECs and cortical TECs can efficiently acquire not only cell surface but also intracellular proteins from thymocytes. This reveals a previously unappreciated intercellular sharing of molecules from thymocytes to TECs, which may broaden the TRA inventory in mTECs for establishing a full spectrum of central tolerance. PMID:27022746

  17. Influence of vitamin D binding protein on the association between circulating vitamin D and risk of bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mondul, A M; Weinstein, S J; Virtamo, J; Albanes, D

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is little research investigating the role of vitamin D binding protein (DBP) in the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and disease risk. Methods: Within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study, 250 bladder cancer cases were randomly sampled and matched 1:1 to controls on age and date of blood collection. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of bladder cancer were estimated by quartiles of DBP (measured by ELISA), 25(OH)...

  18. New horizons for cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Gregory G

    2012-02-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels bear an inverse relationship to cardiovascular risk. To date, however, no intervention specifically targeting HDL has been demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular risk. Cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates transfer of cholesterol ester from HDL to apolipoprotein B-containing particles. Most, but not all observational cohort studies indicate that genetic polymorphisms of CETP associated with reduced activity and higher HDL cholesterol levels are also associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Some, but not all studies indicate that CETP inhibition in rabbits retards atherosclerosis, whereas transgenic CETP expression in mice promotes atherosclerosis. Torcetrapib, the first CETP inhibitor to reach phase III clinical development, was abandoned due to excess mortality associated with increases in aldosterone and blood pressure. Two other CETP inhibitors have entered phase III clinical development. Anacetrapib is a potent inhibitor of CETP that produces very large increases in HDL cholesterol and large reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, beyond those achieved with statins. Dalcetrapib is a less potent CETP inhibitor that produces smaller increases in HDL cholesterol with minimal effect on LDL cholesterol. Both agents appear to allow efflux of cholesterol from macrophages to HDL in vitro, and neither agent affects blood pressure or aldosterone in vivo. Two large cardiovascular outcomes trials, one with anacetrapib and one with dalcetrapib, should provide a conclusive test of the hypothesis that inhibition of CETP decreases cardiovascular risk. PMID:22083134

  19. Purification, characterization and substrate specificity of rabbit lung phospholipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, F H; Tian, Q; Strickland, M S

    1992-05-01

    Three phospholipid transfer proteins, namely proteins I, II and III, were purified from the rabbit lung cytosolic fraction. The molecular masses of phospholipid transfer proteins I, II and III are 32 kilodaltons (kDa), 22 kDa and 32 kDa, respectively; their isoelectric point values are 6.5, 7.0 and 6.8, respectively. Phospholipid transfer proteins I and III transferred phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) from donor unilamellar liposomes to acceptor multilamellar liposomes; protein II transferred PC but not PI. All the three phospholipid transfer proteins transferred phosphatidylethanolamine poorly and showed no tendency to transfer triolein. The transfer of [14C]PC from unilamellar liposomes to multilamellar liposomes facilitated by each protein was affected differently by the presence of acidic phospholipids in the PC unilamellar liposomes. In an equal molar ratio of acidic phospholipid and PC, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) reduced the activities of proteins I and III by 70% (P = 0.0004 and 0.0032, respectively) whereas PI and phosphatidylserine (PS) had an insignificant effect. In contrast, the protein II activity was stimulated 2-3-times more by either PG (P = 0.0024), PI (P = 0.0006) or PS (P = 0.0038). In addition, protein II transferred dioleoylPC (DOPC) about 2-times more effectively than dipalmitoylPC (DPPC) (P = 0.0002), whereas proteins I and III transferred DPPC 20-40% more effectively than DOPC but this was statistically insignificant. The markedly different substrate specificities of the three lung phospholipid transfer proteins suggest that these proteins may play an important role in sorting intracellular membrane phospholipids, possibly including lung surfactant phospholipids. PMID:1596521

  20. Utility of a fluorescent vitamin E analog as a probe for tocopherol transfer protein activity

    OpenAIRE

    Morley, Samantha; Cross, Valerie; Cecchini, Matt; Nava, Phil; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Manor, Danny

    2006-01-01

    The tocopherol transfer protein (TTP1) is a member of the CRAL-TRIO family of lipid binding proteins that facilitates vitamin E transfer between membrane vesicles in vitro. In cultured hepatocytes, TTP enhances the secretion of tocopherol to the media; presumably, tocopherol transfer is at the basis of this biological activity. The mechanism underlying ligand transfer by TTP is presently unknown, and available tools for monitoring this activity suffer from complicated assay procedure and poor...

  1. Histological and biochemical serum effects of alpha-tocopherol on ischemia/reperfusion-related injuries induced in the pelvic limb of rats Efeitos histológicos e bioquímicos séricos do alfa-tocoferol na lesão de isquemia e reperfusão em membro pélvico de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Gomes da Silva

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the protective action of alpha-tocopherol in ischemia/reperfusion injuries of pelvic member of rats. METHODS: Thirty adult male rats of the Wistar strain were randomized into three experimental groups of 10: Group I - control group with no ischemia or reperfusion. Groups II and III - four hours of ischemia and of hours of reperfusion by means of clamping of the infrarenal aorta. The animals of Group II were treated with saline and those of Group III were treated with i.v. alpha-tocopherol (50 mg/kg. Parameters studied were biopsies of the soleus muscle, dosing of creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, potassium, calcium and arterial blood gasometry. RESULTS: The results of biopsies of the soleus muscles studied by optical microscopy, were not significant in terms of presence of edema among the three groups studied. Variables inflammation and necrosis were not observed, therefore cannot be statistically analyzed. As to dosing of calcium and lactate dehydrogenase, the pH, pO2 and pCO2 values were not significant for all groups studied. We observed that the levels of potassium (Group II > Group I, Fcalculated = 5.84; Fcritical = 3.33, creatine phosphokinase (Group II > Groups I and III, Hcalculated = 13.92; Hcritical = 5.99 and bicarbonate (Groups I and III > Group II, Hcalculated = 11.98; Hcritical = 5.99 presented significant results among groups. CONCLUSION: From the serum biochemical perspective, the treatment with alpha-tocopherol has attenuated the metabolic injuries in the ischemia/reperfusion syndrome in this experimental model.OBJETIVO: Avaliar ação protetora do alfa-tocoferol na lesão de isquemia e reperfusão em membro pélvico de ratos. MÉTODOS: Trinta ratos machos adultos da linhagem wistar foram distribuídos aleatoriamente, em três grupos experimentais, com 10 animais cada: Grupo I - Grupo controle sem isquemia ou reperfusão. Grupos II e III - quatro horas de isquemia e duas horas de reperfus

  2. Breeding bread wheat cultivars for high protein content by transfer of protein genes from Triticum dicoccoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triticum dicoccoides sel. G-25, a selection of wild emmer with a protein content of 20.5% and a kernel weight of 31.5 mg, was used as the donor of protein genes. Since this selection is highly resistant to stripe rust, the object of the crossing programme was to transfer this resistance, together with the high protein potential, to durum and bread wheat cultivars susceptible to the disease. In the tetraploid lines obtained from the T. dicoccoides/T. durum cross, the protein values ranged from 17 to 22%. These lines had resistance to stripe rust from the wild emmer and to stem rust from the durum. After two further crosses between these tetraploid lines and T. aestivum cultivars, several lines were selected which combined good yield, high protein level and resistance to rust diseases. These lines attained protein levels of 14 to 19% in the whole grain and 14 to 17% in the flour, combined with yields of 4.5 to 6.0 t/ha. They had also inherited resistance to stem rust, and in some instances also to leaf rust, from the cultivated wheat parental lines. (author)

  3. In silico allergenicity prediction of several lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garino, Cristiano; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are common allergens and they are particularly widespread within the plant kingdom. They have a highly conserved three-dimensional structure that generate a strong cross-reactivity among the members of this family. In the last years several web tools for the prediction of allergenicity of new molecules based on their homology with known allergens have been released, and guidelines to assess potential allergenicity of proteins through bioinformatics have been established. Even if such tools are only partially reliable yet, they can provide important indications when other kinds of molecular characterization are lacking. The potential allergenicity of 28 amino acid sequences of LTPs homologs, either retrieved from the UniProt database or in silico deduced from the corresponding EST coding sequence, was predicted using 7 publicly available web tools. Moreover, their similarity degree to their closest known LTP allergens was calculated, in order to evaluate their potential cross-reactivity. Finally, all sequences were studied for their identity degree with the peach allergen Pru p 3, considering the regions involved in the formation of its known conformational IgE-binding epitope. Most of the analyzed sequences displayed a high probability to be allergenic according to all the software employed. The analyzed LTPs from bell pepper, cassava, mango, mungbean and soybean showed high homology (>70%) with some known allergenic LTPs, suggesting a potential risk of cross-reactivity for sensitized individuals. Other LTPs, like for example those from canola, cassava, mango, mungbean, papaya or persimmon, displayed a high degree of identity with Pru p 3 within the consensus sequence responsible for the formation, at three-dimensional level, of its major conformational epitope. Since recent studies highlighted how in patients mono-sensitized to peach LTP the levels of IgE seem directly proportional to the chance of developing cross

  4. Supplementing alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E and vitamin D3 in high fat diet decrease IL-6 production in murine epididymal adipose tissue and 3T3-L1 adipocytes following LPS stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oller do Nascimento Claudia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that high fat diets (HFDs induce obesity and an increase in proinflammatory adipokines. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is considered the major inflammatory mediator in obesity. Obesity is associated with a vitamin deficiency, especially of vitamins E and D3. We examined the effects of vitamin D3 and vitamin E supplementation on levels of IL-6 and IL-10 (as a marker of anti-inflammatory cytokines since, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines is maintained protein expression in adipose tissue of mice provided with an HFD. Additionally, we measured the effects of vitamin E and vitamin D3 treatment on LPS-stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes IL-6 and IL-10 secretion. Results IL-6 protein levels and the IL-6/IL-10 ratio were decreased in epididymal white adipose tissue in groups receiving vitamins E and D3 supplementation compared to the HFD group. A 24-hour treatment of vitamin D3 and vitamin E significantly reduced the IL-6 levels in the adipocytes culture medium without affecting IL-10 levels. Conclusions Vitamin D3 and vitamin E supplementation in an HFD had an anti-inflammatory effect by decreasing IL-6 production in epididymal adipose tissue in mice and in 3T3-L1 adipocytes stimulated with LPS. Our results suggest that vitamin E and D3 supplementation can be used as an adjunctive therapy to reduce the proinflammatory cytokines present in obese patients.

  5. Construction and analysis of a plant non-specific lipid transfer protein database (nsLTPDB)

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Nai-Jyuan; Lee Chi-Ching; Cheng Chao-Sheng; Lo Wei-Cheng; Yang Ya-Fen; Chen Ming-Nan; Lyu Ping-Chiang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are small and basic proteins. Recently, nsLTPs have been reported involved in many physiological functions such as mediating phospholipid transfer, participating in plant defence activity against bacterial and fungal pathogens, and enhancing cell wall extension in tobacco. However, the lipid transfer mechanism of nsLTPs is still unclear, and comprehensive information of nsLTPs is difficult to obtain. Methods In this study...

  6. Probing Membrane Protein Structure Using Water Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of ...

  7. Sphingolipid metabolism and interorganellar transport: localization of sphingolipid enzymes and lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    In recent decades, many sphingolipid enzymes, sphingolipid-metabolism regulators and sphingolipid transfer proteins have been isolated and characterized. This review will provide an overview of the intracellular localization and topology of sphingolipid enzymes in mammalian cells to highlight the locations where respective sphingolipid species are produced. Interestingly, three sphingolipids that reside or are synthesized in cytosolic leaflets of membranes (ceramide, glucosylceramide and ceramide-1-phosphate) all have cytosolic lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). These LTPs consist of ceramide transfer protein (CERT), four-phosphate adaptor protein 2 (FAPP2) and ceramide-1-phosphate transfer protein (CPTP), respectively. These LTPs execute functions that affect both the location and metabolism of the lipids they bind. Molecular details describing the mechanisms of regulation of LTPs continue to emerge and reveal a number of critical processes, including competing phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions and binding interactions with regulatory proteins and lipids that influence the transport, organelle distribution and metabolism of sphingolipids. PMID:25382749

  8. PPAR-β/δ activation promotes phospholipid transfer protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehaibi, Khouloud; Cedó, Lídia; Metso, Jari; Palomer, Xavier; Santos, David; Quesada, Helena; Naceur Slimane, Mohamed; Wahli, Walter; Julve, Josep; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Jauhiainen, Matti; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2015-03-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-β/δ has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for treating dyslipidemia, including beneficial effects on HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). In the current study, we determined the effects of the PPAR-β/δ agonist GW0742 on HDL composition and the expression of liver HDL-related genes in mice and cultured human cells. The experiments were carried out in C57BL/6 wild-type, LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice and PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice treated with GW0742 (10mg/kg/day) or a vehicle solution for 14 days. GW0742 upregulated liver phospholipid transfer protein (Pltp) gene expression and increased serum PLTP activity in mice. When given to wild-type mice, GW0742 significantly increased serum HDL-C and HDL phospholipids; GW0742 also raised serum potential to generate preβ-HDL formation. The GW0742-mediated effects on liver Pltp expression and serum enzyme activity were completely abolished in PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice. GW0742 also stimulated PLTP mRNA expression in mouse J774 macrophages, differentiated human THP-1 macrophages and human hepatoma Huh7. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a common transcriptional upregulation by GW0742-activated PPAR-β/δ of Pltp expression in cultured cells and in mouse liver resulting in enhanced serum PLTP activity. Our results also indicate that PPAR-β/δ activation may modulate PLTP-mediated preβ-HDL formation and macrophage cholesterol efflux. PMID:25662586

  9. Fast electron transfer through a single molecule natively structured redox protein

    OpenAIRE

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Chi, Qijin; Macdonald, J. Emyr; Ulstrup, Jens; Jones, D Dafydd; Elliott, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The electron transfer properties of proteins are normally measured as molecularly averaged ensembles. Through these and related measurements, proteins are widely regarded as macroscopically insulating materials. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we present new measurements of the conductance through single-molecules of the electron transfer protein cytochrome b562 in its native conformation, under pseudo-physiological conditions. This is achieved by thiol (SH) linker pairs at opposi...

  10. Computational design and biochemical characterization of maize nonspecific lipid transfer protein variants for biosensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Eun Jung; Mao, Jessica; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of proteins that bind and transfer lipids. Utilizing the maize LTP, we have successfully engineered fluorescent reagentless biosensors for the natural ligand of LTPs; this was achieved by using computational protein design to remove a disulfide bridge and attaching a thio-reactive fluorophore. Conformational change induced by ligand titration is thought to affect the fluorescence of the fluorophore, allowing detection of ligand binding. Fluorescence...

  11. Das Phosphatidylinositol-Transfer-Protein PITPnm2 in humanen Thrombozyten

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Die Analyse des Phosphoproteoms in ruhenden und in aktivierten humanen Plättchen führte zur Identifikation des PITPnm2-Proteins. Dieses Protein wird bei einer Stimulation von Thrombozyten mit dem Prostazyklinanalogon Iloprost phosphoryliert. Diese Ergebnisse gaben Anlass zu weiteren Untersuchungen zum Vorkommen und zur Funktion dieses Proteins in Thrombozyten. In der Arbeit wurde gezeigt, dass das PITPnm2-Protein das einzige Protein der PITP-Familie ist, welches in humanen Thrombozyten exprim...

  12. Control of zinc transfer between thionein, metallothionein, and zinc proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Claus; Maret, Wolfgang; Vallee, Bert L.

    1998-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT), despite its high metal binding constant (KZn = 3.2 × 1013 M−1 at pH 7.4), can transfer zinc to the apoforms of zinc enzymes that have inherently lower stability constants. To gain insight into this paradox, we have studied zinc transfer between zinc enzymes and MT. Zinc can be transferred in both directions—i.e., from the enzymes to thionein (the apoform of MT) and from MT to the apoenzymes. Agents that mediate or enhance zinc transfer have be...

  13. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P;

    2002-01-01

    -induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  14. Isolation of two glycolipid transfer proteins from bovine brain: reactivity toward gangliosides and neutral glycosphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, C M; Vaswani, K K; Ledeen, R W

    1987-09-22

    Two glycolipid transfer proteins that catalyze the transfer of gangliosides and neutral glycosphingolipids from phosphatidylcholine vesicles to erythrocyte ghosts have been isolated from calf brain. Purification procedures included differential centrifugation, precipitation at pH 5.1, ammonium sulfate precipitation, and gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 and G-75. The final stage employed fast protein liquid chromatography (Mono S), producing two peaks of activity. Apparent purity of the major peak (TP I) was approximately 85-90%, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate/urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. That of the minor fraction (TP II) was less. The major band of both fractions had a molecular mass of approximately 20,000 daltons. Both proteins catalyzed the transfer of ganglioside GM1 as well as asialo-GM1, but transfer protein I was more effective with di- and trisialogangliosides. Transfer protein II appeared to be somewhat more specific for neutral glycolipids in that GA1 was transferred more rapidly than any of the gangliosides; however, lactosylceramide transfer was relatively slow. Neither protein catalyzed transfer of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:3689771

  15. Isolation of two glycolipid transfer proteins from bovine brain: reactivity toward gangliosides and neutral glycosphingolipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two glycolipid transfer proteins that catalyze the transfer of gangliosides and neutral glycosphingolipids from phosphatidylcholine vesicles to erythrocyte ghosts have been isolated from calf brain. Purification procedures included differential centrifugation, precipitation at pH 5.1, ammonium sulfate precipitation, and gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 and G-75. The final stage employed fast protein liquid chromatography (Mono S), producing two peaks of activity. Apparent purity of the major peak (TP I) was approximately 85-90%, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate/urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Radiolabeled glycolipids were used in the analysis. That of the minor fraction (TP II) was less. The major band of both fractions had a molecular mass of approximately 20,000 daltons. Both proteins catalyzed the transfer of ganglioside GM1 as well as asialo-GM1, but transfer protein I was more effective with di- and trisialogangliosides. Transfer protein II appeared to be somewhat more specific for neutral glycolipids in that GA1 was transferred more rapidly than any of the gangliosides; however, lactosylceramide transfer was relatively slow. Neither protein catalyzed transfer of phosphatidylcholine

  16. Horizontal transfer, not duplication, drives the expansion of protein families in prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J Treangen

    Full Text Available Gene duplication followed by neo- or sub-functionalization deeply impacts the evolution of protein families and is regarded as the main source of adaptive functional novelty in eukaryotes. While there is ample evidence of adaptive gene duplication in prokaryotes, it is not clear whether duplication outweighs the contribution of horizontal gene transfer in the expansion of protein families. We analyzed closely related prokaryote strains or species with small genomes (Helicobacter, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Sulfolobus, average-sized genomes (Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae, and large genomes (Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobiaceae to untangle the effects of duplication and horizontal transfer. After removing the effects of transposable elements and phages, we show that the vast majority of expansions of protein families are due to transfer, even among large genomes. Transferred genes--xenologs--persist longer in prokaryotic lineages possibly due to a higher/longer adaptive role. On the other hand, duplicated genes--paralogs--are expressed more, and, when persistent, they evolve slower. This suggests that gene transfer and gene duplication have very different roles in shaping the evolution of biological systems: transfer allows the acquisition of new functions and duplication leads to higher gene dosage. Accordingly, we show that paralogs share most protein-protein interactions and genetic regulators, whereas xenologs share very few of them. Prokaryotes invented most of life's biochemical diversity. Therefore, the study of the evolution of biology systems should explicitly account for the predominant role of horizontal gene transfer in the diversification of protein families.

  17. Computational study of ligand binding in lipid transfer proteins: Structures, interfaces, and free energies of protein-lipid complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez Pacios, Luis; Gomez Casado, Cristina; Tordesillas Villuendas, Leticia; Palacín Gómez, Aranzazu; Sanchez-Monge Laguna De Rins, Maria Rosa; Díaz Perales, Araceli

    2012-01-01

    Plant nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) bind a wide variety of lipids, which allows them to perform disparate functions. Recent reports on their multifunctionality in plant growth processes have posed new questions on the versatile binding abilities of these proteins. The lack of binding specificity has been customarily explained in qualitative terms on the basis of a supposed structural flexibility and nonspecificity of hydrophobic protein-ligand interactions. We present here a co...

  18. In vitro thermodynamic dissection of human copper transfer from chaperone to target protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz S Niemiec

    Full Text Available Transient protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are fundamental components of biological activity. To understand biological activity, not only the structures of the involved proteins are important but also the energetics of the individual steps of a reaction. Here we use in vitro biophysical methods to deduce thermodynamic parameters of copper (Cu transfer from the human copper chaperone Atox1 to the fourth metal-binding domain of the Wilson disease protein (WD4. Atox1 and WD4 have the same fold (ferredoxin-like fold and Cu-binding site (two surface exposed cysteine residues and thus it is not clear what drives metal transfer from one protein to the other. Cu transfer is a two-step reaction involving a metal-dependent ternary complex in which the metal is coordinated by cysteines from both proteins (i.e., Atox1-Cu-WD4. We employ size exclusion chromatography to estimate individual equilibrium constants for the two steps. This information together with calorimetric titration data are used to reveal enthalpic and entropic contributions of each step in the transfer process. Upon combining the equilibrium constants for both steps, a metal exchange factor (from Atox1 to WD4 of 10 is calculated, governed by a negative net enthalpy change of ∼10 kJ/mol. Thus, small variations in interaction energies, not always obvious upon comparing protein structures alone, may fuel vectorial metal transfer.

  19. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein lipidation and control of CD1d on antigen-presenting cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dougan, Stephanie K.; Salas, Azucena; Rava, Paul; Agyemang, Amma; Kaser, Arthur; Morrison, Jamin; Khurana, Archana; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Johnson, Caroline; Exley, Mark; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone that loads lipids onto apolipoprotein B, also regulates CD1d presentation of glycolipid antigens in the liver and intestine. We show MTP RNA and protein in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and by immunoblotting of mouse liver mononuclear cells and mouse and human B cell lines. Functional MTP, demonstrated by specific triglyceride transfer activity, is prese...

  20. Funktionelle Charakterisierung zweier Lipid Transfer Proteine in der Arabidopsis thaliana Pathogenantwort

    OpenAIRE

    Bieber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Die Multigenfamilie der Lipid Transfer Proteine (LTP) stellt eine Gruppe von kleinen Proteinen dar, welche in allen höheren Landpflanzen vorkommen. In der Modellpflanze Arabidopsis thaliana werden 92 Proteine zur Klasse der LTPs gezählt. Die Benennung der Proteinfamilie basiert auf dem beobachteten in vitro Transfer von Lipiden zwischen zwei Membranen. Alle LTPs weisen ein konserviertes, 8 Cysteine beinhaltendes Motiv und eine hydrophobe Tasche auf, welche für die Bindung hydrophober Moleküle...

  1. Glycolipid Transfer Protein Interaction with Bilayer Vesicles: Modulation by Changing Lipid Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Chetan S; Chung, Taeowan; Pike, Helen M.; Brown, Rhoderick E.

    2005-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are important constituents of lipid rafts and caveolae, are essential for the normal development of cells, and are adhesion sites for various infectious agents. One strategy for modulating GSL composition in lipid rafts is to selectively transfer GSL to or from these putative membrane microdomains. Glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) catalyzes selective intermembrane transfer of GSLs. To enable effective use of GLTP as a tool to modify the glycolipid content of membra...

  2. Preferential transfer of certain plasma membrane proteins onto T and B cells by trogocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Daubeuf

    Full Text Available T and B cells capture antigens via membrane fragments of antigen presenting cells (APC in a process termed trogocytosis. Whether (and how a preferential transfer of some APC components occurs during trogocytosis is still largely unknown. We analyzed the transfer onto murine T and B cells of a large panel of fluorescent proteins with different intra-cellular localizations in the APC or various types of anchors in the plasma membrane (PM. Only the latter were transferred by trogocytosis, albeit with different efficiencies. Unexpectedly, proteins anchored to the PM's cytoplasmic face, or recruited to it via interaction with phosphinositides, were more efficiently transferred than those facing the outside of the cell. For proteins spanning the PM's whole width, transfer efficiency was found to vary quite substantially, with tetraspanins, CD4 and FcRgamma found among the most efficiently transferred proteins. We exploited our findings to set immunodiagnostic assays based on the capture of preferentially transferred components onto T or B cells. The preferential transfer documented here should prove useful in deciphering the cellular structures involved in trogocytosis.

  3. The role of profilin and lipid transfer protein in strawberry allergy in the Mediterranean area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zuidmeer; E. Salentijn; M.F. Rivas; E.G. Mancebo; R. Asero; C.I. Matos; K.T.B. Pelgrom; L.J.W.J. Gilissen; R. van Ree

    2006-01-01

    Background In contrast to other Rosaceae fruit, only few cases of patients with adverse reactions to strawberry are listed in literature. Objective To identify allergenic proteins in strawberry and to express and characterize recombinant strawberry lipid transfer protein (LTP; rFra a 3). Methods Est

  4. Direct observation of resonance tryptophan-to-chromophore energy transfer in visible fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, NV; Borst, JW; Hink, MA; van Hoek, A; Visser, AJWG

    2005-01-01

    Visible fluorescent proteins from Aequorea victoria contain next to the fluorophoric group a single tryptophan residue. Both molecules form a single donor-acceptor pair for resonance energy transfer (RET) within the protein. Time-resolved fluorescence experiments using tryptophan excitation have sho

  5. Surprisingly high stability of barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, towards denaturant, heat and proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Winther, J R

    2001-01-01

    Barley LTP1 belongs to a large family of plant proteins termed non-specific lipid transfer proteins. The in vivo function of these proteins is unknown, but it has been suggested that they are involved in responses towards stresses such as pathogens, drought, heat, cold and salt. Also, the proteins...... have been suggested as transporters of monomers for cutin synthesis. We have analysed the stability of LTP1 towards denaturant, heat and proteases and found it to be a highly stable protein, which apparently does not denature at temperatures up to 100 degrees C. This high stability may be important...

  6. Saturation transfer difference NMR studies of protein-ligand interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Szczepina, Monica Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    The mycolyl–arabinogalactan–peptidoglycan complex coats the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is a structure composed of galactofuranosyl (Galf) residues attached via alternating β-(1→6) and β-(1→5) linkages synthesized by bifunctional galactofuranosyltransferases, GlfT1 and GlfT2. We have used Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy to examine the active site architecture of GlfT2 using trisaccharide acceptor substrates, β-D-Galf-(1→6)-β-D-Galf-(1→5)-β-D-Galf-O(CH2)7CH...

  7. Multi-label multi-kernel transfer learning for human protein subcellular localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyu Mei

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed much progress in computational modelling for protein subcellular localization. However, the existing sequence-based predictive models demonstrate moderate or unsatisfactory performance, and the gene ontology (GO based models may take the risk of performance overestimation for novel proteins. Furthermore, many human proteins have multiple subcellular locations, which renders the computational modelling more complicated. Up to the present, there are far few researches specialized for predicting the subcellular localization of human proteins that may reside in multiple cellular compartments. In this paper, we propose a multi-label multi-kernel transfer learning model for human protein subcellular localization (MLMK-TLM. MLMK-TLM proposes a multi-label confusion matrix, formally formulates three multi-labelling performance measures and adapts one-against-all multi-class probabilistic outputs to multi-label learning scenario, based on which to further extends our published work GO-TLM (gene ontology based transfer learning model for protein subcellular localization and MK-TLM (multi-kernel transfer learning based on Chou's PseAAC formulation for protein submitochondria localization for multiplex human protein subcellular localization. With the advantages of proper homolog knowledge transfer, comprehensive survey of model performance for novel protein and multi-labelling capability, MLMK-TLM will gain more practical applicability. The experiments on human protein benchmark dataset show that MLMK-TLM significantly outperforms the baseline model and demonstrates good multi-labelling ability for novel human proteins. Some findings (predictions are validated by the latest Swiss-Prot database. The software can be freely downloaded at http://soft.synu.edu.cn/upload/msy.rar.

  8. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26672896

  9. Lipid-regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes by oxysterol-binding protein homologues

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Timothy A.; Choi, Mal-Gi; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Mears, Jason A.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hinshaw, Jenny E.; Prinz, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are transferred between cellular membranes by vesicular and poorly understood nonvesicular pathways. Oxysterol-binding protein–related proteins (ORPs) have been implicated in sterol sensing and nonvesicular transport. In this study, we show that yeast ORPs use a novel mechanism that allows regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes, such as organelle contact sites. We find that the core lipid-binding domain found in all ORPs can simultaneously bind two membranes. Usin...

  10. Extended synaptotagmins are Ca2+-dependent lipid transfer proteins at membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijia; Liu, Yinghui; Gulbranson, Daniel R; Paine, Alex; Rathore, Shailendra S; Shen, Jingshi

    2016-04-19

    Organelles are in constant communication with each other through exchange of proteins (mediated by trafficking vesicles) and lipids [mediated by both trafficking vesicles and lipid transfer proteins (LTPs)]. It has long been known that vesicle trafficking can be tightly regulated by the second messenger Ca(2+), allowing membrane protein transport to be adjusted according to physiological demands. However, it remains unclear whether LTP-mediated lipid transport can also be regulated by Ca(2+) In this work, we show that extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), poorly understood membrane proteins at endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites, are Ca(2+)-dependent LTPs. Using both recombinant and endogenous mammalian proteins, we discovered that E-Syts transfer glycerophospholipids between membrane bilayers in the presence of Ca(2+) E-Syts use their lipid-accommodating synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid binding protein (SMP) domains to transfer lipids. However, the SMP domains themselves cannot transport lipids unless the two membranes are tightly tethered by Ca(2+)-bound C2 domains. Strikingly, the Ca(2+)-regulated lipid transfer activity of E-Syts was fully recapitulated when the SMP domain was fused to the cytosolic domain of synaptotagmin-1, the Ca(2+)sensor in synaptic vesicle fusion, indicating that a common mechanism of membrane tethering governs the Ca(2+)regulation of lipid transfer and vesicle fusion. Finally, we showed that microsomal vesicles isolated from mammalian cells contained robust Ca(2+)-dependent lipid transfer activities, which were mediated by E-Syts. These findings established E-Syts as a novel class of LTPs and showed that LTP-mediated lipid trafficking, like vesicular transport, can be subject to tight Ca(2+)regulation. PMID:27044075

  11. Electrotransfer of proteins in an environmentally friendly methanol-free transfer buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Marco A

    2008-02-15

    Western blot transfer buffer was modified to substitute the acute poison methanol, with the common rubbing alcohol, isopropanol in concentrations of as low as 5 % for protein electrotransfer. Commercially available molecular weight markers and rabbit serum were run on polyacrylamide gels and shown to be transferred adequately to both nitrocellulose and polyvinylidene difluoride membranes under either wet or semi-dry conditions with similar results in all cases. This procedure was successfully used for immunodetection of the rabbit IgG heavy chain from serum. Therefore, this represents a good alternative for less toxic and environmentally friendly conditions for western immunoblotting of proteins. PMID:17850757

  12. Inhibition of cholesterol ester transfer protein CGS 25159 and changes in lipoproteins in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, H V; Poirier, K J; Lee, W H; Satoh, Y

    1997-01-01

    As a result of screening, several isoflavans were identified to be antagonists of cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. The present study evaluates CGS 25159, a synthetic isoflavan, as a putative inhibitor of CETP activity of human and hamster plasma. Determined by [3]CE transfer from HDL to VLDL + LDL fraction or by fluorescent-CE transfer assay, CGS 25159 inhibited CETP in both human plasma bottom fraction (d = 1.21 g/ml) and in plasma from Golden Syrian Hamsters with an IC50 contention that pharmacological down regulation of CETP activity could result in favorable changes in lipoprotein profile. PMID:9051198

  13. Fast electron transfer through a single molecule natively structured redox protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Chi, Qijin; Macdonald, J. Emyr;

    2012-01-01

    The electron transfer properties of proteins are normally measured as molecularly averaged ensembles. Through these and related measurements, proteins are widely regarded as macroscopically insulating materials. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we present new measurements of the...... conductance through single-molecules of the electron transfer protein cytochrome b562 in its native conformation, under pseudo-physiological conditions. This is achieved by thiol (SH) linker pairs at opposite ends of the molecule through protein engineering, resulting in defined covalent contact between a...... gold surface and a platinum–iridium STM tip. Two different orientations of the linkers were examined: a long-axis configuration (SH-LA) and a short-axis configuration (SH-SA). In each case, the molecular conductance could be ‘gated’ through electrochemical control of the heme redox state. Reproducible...

  14. Níveis de alfa-tocoferol no soro e leite materno de puérperas atendidas em maternidade pública de Natal, Rio Grande do Norte Levels of alpha-tocopherol in the serum and breast-milk of child-bearing women attending a public maternity hospital in the city of Natal , in the Brazilian State of Rio Grande do Norte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Rejane Siqueira Garcia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: avaliar os níveis de alfa-tocoferol no soro e leite materno em diferentes estágios de lactação de puérperas e verificar a adequação nutri cional de vitamina E do leite oferecido ao lactente. MÉTODOS: participaram do estudo 32 parturientes adultas com idade média de 25 anos. Foram coletados 5 mL de sangue e 2 mL de colostro, em condição de jejum, para análise dos níveis de alfa tocoferol. Entre 10 e 15 dias pós-parto foram coletados mais 2 mL de leite. As amostras foram analisadas por Cromatografia Líquida de Alta Eficiência. A adequação nutricional do leite para a vitamina E foi calculada pelo produto do volume estimado de ingestão de leite com a concentração de α-tocoferol no leite e por comparação direta desse produto com o valor de referência para ingestão do nutriente (4 mg/dia. RESULTADOS: os níveis de alfa-tocoferol no sangue foram 29 ± 0,9 µmol/L (Média ± Erro padrão e no colostro e leite de transição foram 28,7 ± 4,7 µmol/L e 7,8 ± 1,0 µmol/L, respectivamente. O consumo estimado de colostro forneceu 241% da recomendação dietética e o de leite de transição atingiu 66%. CONCLUSÕES: o grupo de mulheres estudadas apresentou um estado nutricional satisfatório de vitamina E, refletido no leite materno, principalmente no colostro, cujos valores foram capazes de suprir mais do que o dobro do requerimento nutricional do lactente.OBJECTIVES: to evaluate levels of alpha-tocopherol in the serum and breast-milk of women at various stages in lactation and to confirm whether nutritio nally appropriate levels of vitamin E are present in the milk given to the babies. METHODS: thirty-two child-bearing women with an average age of 25 years took part in the study. 5 mL of blood and 2 mL of colostrum were collected, under fasting conditions, for the purposes of analyzing the levels of alpha-tocopherol. Between 10 to 15 days after childbirth, a further 2 mL of breast-milk was collected. The samples were

  15. Molecularly Imprinted Electropolymer for a Hexameric Heme Protein with Direct Electron Transfer and Peroxide Electrocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Peng; Aysu Yarman; Jetzschmann, Katharina J.; Jae-Hun Jeoung; Daniel Schad; Holger Dobbek; Ulla Wollenberger; Scheller, Frieder W.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) with direct electron transfer (DET) and bioelectrocatalytic activity of the target protein is presented. Thin films of MIPs for the recognition of a hexameric tyrosine-coordinated heme protein (HTHP) have been prepared by electropolymerization of scopoletin after oriented assembly of HTHP on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) on gold electrodes. Cavities which should resemble the shape and size of HTHP wer...

  16. Flavoproteins, iron proteins, and hemoproteins as electron-transfer components of the sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeGall, J. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marseille, France); DerVartanian, D.V.; Peck, H.D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This review article with 105 references discusses the most recent publications that deal with the discovery of new redox proteins of the sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to the genera Desulfotomaculum and Desulfovibrio and proposes explanations for their physical and biological functions. The redox proteins studied as part of the electron-transfer system of these bacteria include flavodoxins, ferredoxins, rubredoxins, cytochromes and several reductose-type enzymes. (KRM)

  17. The biochemistry and biology of extracellular plant lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs)

    OpenAIRE

    Trevor H Yeats; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.

    2008-01-01

    Plant lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are abundant, small, lipid binding proteins that are capable of exchanging lipids between membranes in vitro. Despite their name, a role in intracellular lipid transport is considered unlikely, based on their extracellular localization. A number of other biological roles, including antimicrobial defense, signaling, and cell wall loosening, have been proposed, but conclusive evidence is generally lacking, and these functions are not well correlated with in ...

  18. Measuring protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Richard N

    2013-01-01

    The method of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative approach that can be used to detect Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The use of FLIM to measure the FRET that results from the interactions between proteins labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs) inside living cells provides a non-invasive method for mapping interactomes. Here, the use of the phasor plot method to analyze frequency domain (FD) FLIM measurements is described, and measurements obtained fro...

  19. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, Ole; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...

  20. Natural ligand binding and transfer from liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) to membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Hagan, Robert M; Wilton, David C; Córsico, Betina

    2010-09-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is distinctive among fatty acid-binding proteins because it binds more than one molecule of long-chain fatty acid and a variety of diverse ligands. Also, the transfer of fluorescent fatty acid analogues to model membranes under physiological ionic strength follows a different mechanism compared to most of the members of this family of intracellular lipid binding proteins. Tryptophan insertion mutants sensitive to ligand binding have allowed us to directly measure the binding affinity, ligand partitioning and transfer to model membranes of natural ligands. Binding of fatty acids shows a cooperative mechanism, while acyl-CoAs binding presents a hyperbolic behavior. Saturated fatty acids seem to have a stronger partition to protein vs. membranes, compared to unsaturated fatty acids. Natural ligand transfer rates are more than 200-fold higher compared to fluorescently-labeled analogues. Interestingly, oleoyl-CoA presents a markedly different transfer behavior compared to the rest of the ligands tested, probably indicating the possibility of specific targeting of ligands to different metabolic fates. PMID:20541621

  1. Linker proteins enable ultrafast excitation energy transfer in the phycobilisome antenna system of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganou, C; David, L; Adir, N; Mkandawire, M

    2016-01-01

    We applied a femtosecond flash method, using induced transient absorption changes, to obtain a time-resolved view of excitation energy transfer in intact phycobilisomes of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus at room temperature. Our measurement of an excitation energy transfer rate of 888 fs in phycobilisomes shows the existence of ultrafast kinetics along the phycocyanin rod subcomplex to the allophycocyanin core that is faster than expected for previous excitation energy transfer based on Förster theory in phycobilisomes. Allophycocyanin in the core further transfers energy to the terminal emitter(s) in 17 ps. In the phycobilisome, rod doublets composed of hexameric phycocyanin discs and internal linker proteins are arranged in a parallel fashion, facilitating direct rod-rod interactions. Excitonic splitting likely drives rod absorption at 635 nm as a result of strong coupling between β84 chromophores (20 ± 1 Å) in adjacent hexamers. In comparison to the absorbance of the phycobilisome antenna system of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, which possesses a single rod structure, the linkers in T. vulcanus rods induce a 17 nm red shift in the absorbance spectrum. Furthermore, the kinetics of 888 fs indicates that the presence of the linker protein induces ultrafast excitation energy transfer between phycocyanin and allophycocyanin inside the phycobilisome, which is faster than all previous excitation energy transfer in phycobilisome subunits or sub-complexes reported to date. PMID:26537632

  2. Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein (MTP) Associates with Cytosolic Lipid Droplets in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Love, Joseph D.; Suzuki, Takashi; Robinson, Delia B.; Harris, Carla M.; Johnson, Joyce E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Jerome, W. Gray; Swift, Larry L.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets are intracellular energy storage organelles composed of a hydrophobic core of neutral lipid, surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipid and a diverse array of proteins. The function of the vast majority of these proteins with regard to the formation and/or turnover of lipid droplets is unknown. Our laboratory was the first to report that microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), a lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, was expr...

  3. Role of pigment-protein coupling and pathways of excitation energy transfer in FMO complex

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Davinder

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of different pigment-protein couplings and the role of quantum interference among different energy transfer channels in excitation energy transfer (EET) in FMO complex. We employ the non-Markovian master equation that allows the use of different values of pigment-protein couplings and cut-off frequencies for different BChla sites, in the adiabatic limit of electron transfer in FMO complex. Several pathways of EET are identified and investigated using a realistic set of pigment-pigment couplings and the site energy of each BChla site. We analyze that it is the destructive interference between different channels of a particular pathway that is responsible for the time-scales of oscillations of excitation energy as observed in the recent experiments.

  4. Purification and antipathogenic activity of lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) from the leaves of Arabidopsis and spinach

    OpenAIRE

    Segura, Ana; Moreno, Manuel; García Olmedo, Francisco

    1993-01-01

    Two homogeneous proteins active in vitro against the bacterial pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus were obtained from a crude cell-wall preparation from the leaves of Columbia wild-type Arabidopsis. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of these proteins allowed their identification as lipid transfer proteins (LTP-a1, LTP-a2); the LTP1-a1 sequence was identical to that deduced from a previously described cDNA (EMBL M80566) and LTP-a2 was quite divergent (44% identical position...

  5. Identificazione e caratterizzazione dell'allergene Lipid Transfer Protein di pomodoro

    OpenAIRE

    Rasore, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Le non specific lipid transfer proteins appartengono alla famiglia delle LTP1 e rappresentano le più importanti proteine allergeniche in grado di causare reazioni IgE-mediate nell'area Mediterranea. Sebbene i casi più noti di reazioni avverse alle nsLTPs siano allergie ai frutti di Rosaceae, fra le proteine allergeniche del pomodoro è stata identificata Lyc e 3 (LTP di pomodoro). Inoltre è stato osservato che Lyc e 3 è in grado di conservare la sua reattività immunologica anche a seguito di p...

  6. Influence of insulin sensitivity and the TaqIB cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene polymorphism on plasma lecithin : Cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activities and their response to hyperinsulinaemia in nondiabetic men.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; Van Tol, A; Stulp, BK; Dullaart, RPF

    1999-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesteryl acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), and lipoprotein lipases are involved in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. We evaluated the influence of insulin sensitivity and of the TaqIB CETP gem polymorphism (B

  7. Progress and challenges in simulating and understanding electron transfer in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Lande, Aurélien; Gillet, Natacha; Chen, Shufeng; Salahub, Dennis R

    2015-09-15

    This Review presents an overview of the most common numerical simulation approaches for the investigation of electron transfer (ET) in proteins. We try to highlight the merits of the different approaches but also the current limitations and challenges. The article is organized into three sections. Section 2 deals with direct simulation algorithms of charge migration in proteins. Section 3 summarizes the methods for testing the applicability of the Marcus theory for ET in proteins and for evaluating key thermodynamic quantities entering the reaction rates (reorganization energies and driving force). Recent studies interrogating the validity of the theory due to the presence of non-ergodic effects or of non-linear responses are also described. Section 4 focuses on the tunneling aspects of electron transfer. How can the electronic coupling between charge transfer states be evaluated by quantum chemistry approaches and rationalized? What interesting physics regarding the impact of protein dynamics on tunneling can be addressed? We will illustrate the different sections with examples taken from the literature to show what types of system are currently manageable with current methodologies. We also take care to recall what has been learned on the biophysics of ET within proteins thanks to the advent of atomistic simulations. PMID:26116376

  8. Lipid transfer proteins do their thing anchored at membrane contact sites… but what is their thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Louise H; Levine, Tim P

    2016-04-15

    Membrane contact sites are structures where two organelles come close together to regulate flow of material and information between them. One type of inter-organelle communication is lipid exchange, which must occur for membrane maintenance and in response to environmental and cellular stimuli. Soluble lipid transfer proteins have been extensively studied, but additional families of transfer proteins have been identified that are anchored into membranes by transmembrane helices so that they cannot diffuse through the cytosol to deliver lipids. If such proteins target membrane contact sites they may be major players in lipid metabolism. The eukaryotic family of so-called Lipid transfer proteins Anchored at Membrane contact sites (LAMs) all contain both a sterol-specific lipid transfer domain in the StARkin superfamily (related to StART/Bet_v1), and one or more transmembrane helices anchoring them in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), making them interesting subjects for study in relation to sterol metabolism. They target a variety of membrane contact sites, including newly described contacts between organelles that were already known to make contact by other means. Lam1-4p target punctate ER-plasma membrane contacts. Lam5p and Lam6p target multiple contacts including a new category: vacuolar non-NVJ cytoplasmic ER (VancE) contacts. These developments confirm previous observations on tubular lipid-binding proteins (TULIPs) that established the importance of membrane anchored proteins for lipid traffic. However, the question remaining to be solved is the most difficult of all: are LAMs transporters, or alternately are they regulators that affect traffic more indirectly? PMID:27068964

  9. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  10. First isolation and antinociceptive activity of a lipid transfer protein from noni (Morinda citrifolia) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Dyély C O; Costa, Andrea S; Lima, Amanda D R; Silva, Fredy D A; Lobo, Marina D P; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O; Moreira, Renato A; Leal, Luzia K A M; Miron, Diogo; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, Hermógenes D

    2016-05-01

    In this study a novel heat-stable lipid transfer protein, designated McLTP1, was purified from noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) seeds, using four purification steps which resulted in a high-purified protein yield (72mg McLTP1 from 100g of noni seeds). McLTP1 exhibited molecular masses of 9.450 and 9.466kDa, determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The N-terminal sequence of McLTP1 (AVPCGQVSSALSPCMSYLTGGGDDPEARCCAGV), as analysed by NCBI-BLAST database, revealed a high degree of identity with other reported plant lipid transfer proteins. In addition, this protein proved to be resistant to pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin digestion. McLTP1 given intraperitoneally (1, 2, 4 and 8mg/kg) and orally (8mg/kg) caused an inhibition of the writhing response induced by acetic acid in mice. This protein displayed thermostability, retaining 100% of its antinociceptive activity after 30min incubation at 80°C. Pretreatment of mice with McLTP1 (8mg/kg, i.p. and p.o.) also decreased neurogenic and inflammatory phases of nociception in the formalin test. Naloxone (2mg/kg, i.p.) antagonised the antinociceptive effect of McLTP1 suggesting that the opioid mechanisms mediate the analgesic properties of this protein. PMID:26783638

  11. Electron transfer dissociation provides higher-order structural information of native and partially unfolded protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermyte, Frederik; Sobott, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Top-down sequencing approaches are becoming ever more popular for protein characterization, due to the ability to distinguish and characterize different protein isoforms. Under non-denaturing conditions, electron transfer dissociation (ETD) can furthermore provide important information on the exposed surface of proteins or complexes, thereby contributing to the characterization of their higher-order structure. Here, we investigate this approach using top-down ETD of tetrameric hemoglobin, concanavalin A, and alcohol dehydrogenase combined with ion mobility (IM) on a commercially available quadrupole/ion mobility/time-of-flight instrument (Waters Synapt G2). By applying supplemental activation in the transfer cell (post-IM), we release ETD fragments and attain good sequence coverage in the exposed terminal regions of the protein. We investigate the correlation between observed sites of fragmentation with regions of solvent accessibility, as derived from the crystal structure. Ion acceleration prior to ETD is also used to cause collision-induced unfolding (CIU) of the complexes without monomer ejection, as evidenced by the IM profiles. These partially unfolded tetramers show efficient fragmentation in some regions which are not sequenced under more gentle MS conditions. We show that by increasing CIU in small increments and monitoring the changes in the fragmentation pattern, it is possible to follow the initial steps of gas-phase protein unfolding. Fragments from partially unfolded protein complexes are released immediately after electron transfer, prior to IM (they do not share the drift time of their precursor), and observed without the need for supplemental activation. This is further evidence that the higher-order structure in these protein regions has been disrupted. PMID:26081219

  12. A bioinformatics approach to investigate the function of non specific lipid transfer proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Jayachandra Pandiyan, Muneeswaran

    2010-01-01

    Plant non specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) enhance in vitro transfer of phospholipids between membranes. Our analysis exploited the large amount of Arabidopsis transcriptome data in public databases to learn more about the function of nsLTPs. The analysis revealed that some nsLTPs are expressed only in roots, some are seed specific, and others are specific for tissues above ground whereas certain nsLTPs show a more general expression pattern. Only few nsLTPs showed a strong up or dow...

  13. Lipid binding in rice nonspecific lipid transfer protein-1 complexes from Oryza sativa

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Hui-Chun; Cheng, Pei-Tsung; Peng, Peiyu; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Sun, Yuh-Ju

    2004-01-01

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) facilitate the transfer of phospholipids, glycolipids, fatty acids and steroids between membranes, with wide-ranging binding affinities. Three crystal structures of rice nsLTP1 from Oryza sativa, complexed with myristic (MYR), palmitic (PAL) or stearic acid (STE) were determined. The overall structures of the rice nsLTP1 complexes belong to the four-helix bundle folding with a long C-terminal loop. The nsLTP1–MYR and the nsLTP1–STE complexes bind a...

  14. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Hanne R; Brix, Susanne; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2004-05-01

    While allergic reactions to soya are increasingly investigated, the normal immune response to ingested soya is scarcely described. In the present study, we wanted to characterise the soya-specific immune response in healthy mice ingesting soya protein. Mice fed a soya-containing diet (F0) and mice of the first (F1) and second (F2) offspring generation bred on a soya protein-free diet were used either directly or were transferred between the soya-containing and soya protein-free diet during pregnancy or neonatal life. The mice were compared as to levels of naturally occurring specific antibodies analysed by ELISA, and to the presence of oral tolerance detected as a suppressed antibody and cell-proliferation response upon immunisation with soya protein. F0 mice generated soya-specific antibodies, while oral tolerance to the same soya proteins was also clearly induced. When F0 dams were transferred to soya protein-free feed before mating, the F1 and F2 offspring generations showed no significantly different response, indicating that soya-specific immune components were not maternally transmitted. However, the ingestion of dietary soya protein by F1 mice during late pregnancy and lactation caused a lasting antibody response in the offspring, but in this case in the absence of oral tolerance. This indicates that, under certain conditions, factors involved in spontaneous antibody production can be transmitted from mother to offspring. Understanding the immune response to soya protein ingested under healthy conditions is important in the assessment of adverse effects of soya protein and in the use of animal allergy models. The present results add to this understanding. PMID:15137924

  15. Genetically encoded protein photocrosslinker with a transferable mass spectrometry-identifiable label

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Song, Haiping; He, Dan; Zhang, Shuai; Dai, Shizhong; Lin, Shixian; Meng, Rong; Wang, Chu; Chen, Peng R.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling photocrosslinking reagents with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions in living systems, but it still suffers from high rates of false-positive identifications as well as the lack of information on interaction interface due to the challenges in deciphering crosslinking peptides. Here we develop a genetically encoded photo-affinity unnatural amino acid that introduces a mass spectrometry-identifiable label (MS-label) to the captured prey proteins after photocrosslinking and prey–bait separation. This strategy, termed IMAPP (In-situ cleavage and MS-label transfer After Protein Photocrosslinking), enables direct identification of photo-captured substrate peptides that are difficult to uncover by conventional genetically encoded photocrosslinkers. Taking advantage of the MS-label, the IMAPP strategy significantly enhances the confidence for identifying protein–protein interactions and enables simultaneous mapping of the binding interface under living conditions. PMID:27460181

  16. Probability weighted ensemble transfer learning for predicting interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyu Mei

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of host-pathogen protein interaction networks is of great significance to reveal the underlying microbic pathogenesis. However, the current experimentally-derived networks are generally small and should be augmented by computational methods for less-biased biological inference. From the point of view of computational modelling, data scarcity, data unavailability and negative data sampling are the three major problems for host-pathogen protein interaction networks reconstruction. In this work, we are motivated to address the three concerns and propose a probability weighted ensemble transfer learning model for HIV-human protein interaction prediction (PWEN-TLM, where support vector machine (SVM is adopted as the individual classifier of the ensemble model. In the model, data scarcity and data unavailability are tackled by homolog knowledge transfer. The importance of homolog knowledge is measured by the ROC-AUC metric of the individual classifiers, whose outputs are probability weighted to yield the final decision. In addition, we further validate the assumption that only the homolog knowledge is sufficient to train a satisfactory model for host-pathogen protein interaction prediction. Thus the model is more robust against data unavailability with less demanding data constraint. As regards with negative data construction, experiments show that exclusiveness of subcellular co-localized proteins is unbiased and more reliable than random sampling. Last, we conduct analysis of overlapped predictions between our model and the existing models, and apply the model to novel host-pathogen PPIs recognition for further biological research.

  17. Identification of compounds with binding affinity to proteins via magnetization transfer from bulk water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalvit, Claudio; Pevarello, Paolo; Tato, Marco; Veronesi, Marina; Vulpetti, Anna; Sundstroem, Michael [Pharmacia (Italy)

    2000-09-15

    A powerful screening by NMR methodology (WaterLOGSY), based on transfer of magnetization from bulk water, for the identification of compounds that interact with target biomolecules (proteins, RNA and DNA fragments) is described. The method exploits efficiently the large reservoir of H{sub 2}O magnetization. The high sensitivity of the technique reduces the amount of biomolecule and ligands needed for the screening, which constitutes an important requirement for high throughput screening by NMR of large libraries of compounds. Application of the method to a compound mixture against the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) protein is presented.

  18. Regulation of non-specific lipid transfer proteins in abiotically stressed Physcomitrella patens

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins is a large and diverse protein family found in plants, with roles in biological systems ranging from long distance signaling to plant pathogen defense. Little is known about the roles of nsLTPs, but recent studies have cast some light on the issue, among other things proposing that they may be involved in the cutice formation on land-living liverworts, mosses and non-seedbearing plants. Increased cuticle formation is thought to be a part of a plants defens...

  19. Structural and Functional Characterization of Recombinant Isoforms of the Lentil Lipid Transfer Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanov, I. V.; Finkina, E. I.; Balandin, S. V.; Melnikova, D. N.; Stukacheva, E. A.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant isoforms Lc-LTP1 and Lc-LTP3 of the lentil lipid transfer protein were overexpressed in E. coli cells. It was confirmed that both proteins are stabilized by four disulfide bonds and characterized by a high proportion of the α-helical structure. It was found that Lc-LTP1 and Lc-LTP3 possess antimicrobial activity and can bind fatty acids. Both isoforms have the ability to bind specific IgE from sera of patients with food allergies, which recognize similar epitopes of the major ...

  20. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF RECOMBINANT ISOFORMS OF THE LENTIL LIPID TRANSFER PROTEIN

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanov, I. V.; Finkina, E. I.; Balandin, S. V.; Melnikova, D. N.; Stukacheva, E. A.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant isoforms Lc-LTP1 and Lc-LTP3 of the lentil lipid transfer protein were overexpressed in E. coli cells. It was confirmed that both proteins are stabilized by four disulfide bonds and characterized by a high proportion of the α-helical structure. It was found that Lc-LTP1 and Lc-LTP3 possess antimicrobial activity and can bind fatty acids. Both isoforms have the ability to bind specific IgE from sera of patients with food allergies, which recognize similar epitopes of the major ...

  1. Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein Enhances Cellular Cholesteryl Esterification by Relieving Product Inhibition*

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester synthesis by the acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase enzymes ACAT1 and ACAT2 is, in part, a cellular homeostatic mechanism to avoid toxicity associated with high free cholesterol levels. In hepatocytes and enterocytes, cholesteryl esters are secreted as part of apoB lipoproteins, the assembly of which is critically dependent on microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). Conditional genetic ablation of MTP reduces cholesteryl esters and enhances ...

  2. No association between microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) haplotype and longevity in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Nebel, Almut; Croucher, Peter J. P.; Stiegeler, Rieke; Nikolaus, Susanna; Krawczak, Michael; Schreiber, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Human longevity is a multifactorial condition with a significant genetic contribution. A recent association study in two independent samples of long-lived U.S. Caucasians [long-lived individuals (LLI)] identified a SNP haplotype of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP, 4q25) that was underrepresented among LLI when compared with younger controls. This suggested that variation in the MTP gene might modify human longevity. Because of its function in lipid metabolism, the MTP gene p...

  3. Activation of transfer RNA-guanine ribosyltransferase by protein kinase C.

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, R C; Brooks, B. J.; Eriotou, P; Kelly, D F; Sagar, S.; Hart, K L; Elliott, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    Transfer RNA-guanine ribosyltransferase (TGRase) irreversibly incorporates queuine into the first position in the anticodon of four tRNA isoacceptors. Rat brain protein kinase C (PKC) was shown to stimulate rat liver TGRase activity. TGRase preparations derived from rat liver have been observed to decrease in activity over time in storage at -20 or -70 degrees C. Contamination of the samples by phosphatases was indicated by a p-nitrophenylphosphate conversion test. The addition of micromolar ...

  4. The α-Tocopherol Transfer Protein Is Essential for Vertebrate Embryogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Galen W Miller; Lynn Ulatowski; Labut, Edwin M.; Lebold, Katie M.; Danny Manor; Jeffrey Atkinson; Barton, Carrie L.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Traber, Maret G.

    2012-01-01

    The hepatic α-tocopherol transfer protein (TTP) is required for optimal α-tocopherol bioavailability in humans; mutations in the human TTPA gene result in the heritable disorder ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED, OMIM #277460). TTP is also expressed in mammalian uterine and placental cells and in the human embryonic yolk-sac, underscoring TTP's significance during fetal development. TTP and vitamin E are essential for productive pregnancy in rodents, but their precise physiological role ...

  5. Expression pattern of GPI-anchored non-specific lipid transfer proteins in Physcomitrella patens

    OpenAIRE

    Höglund, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    During the water-to-land transition, that occurred approximately 450 MYA, novel habitats wererevealed to the emerging plants. This terrestrial habitat was a harsh environment compared to theaquatic, with shifting substrate content, irregular supply of water, damaging UV-radiation andrapid fluctuating temperatures. Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTP) are today only foundin the land living plants and not in the green algae. This suggests that these genes might haveevolved to help the p...

  6. An extracellular lipid transfer protein is relocalized intracellularly during seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnussat, Luciana; Burbach, Christian; Baluska, Frantisek; de la Canal, Laura

    2012-11-01

    Plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) constitute a family of small proteins recognized as being extracellular. In agreement with this notion, several lines of evidence have shown the apoplastic localization of HaAP10, a LTP from Helianthus annuus dry seeds. However, HaAP10 was recently detected intracellularly in imbibing seeds. To clarify its distribution, immunolocalization experiments were performed during the course of germination and confirmed its intracellular localization upon early seed imbibition. Further assays using a hydrophobic dye, FM4-64, inhibitors of vesicular traffic, and immunolocalization of the pectin rhamnogalacturonan-II, allowed the conclusion that endocytosis is activated as soon as seed imbibition starts. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that HaAP10 is endocytosed throughout imbibition. Biochemical and cellular approaches indicate that the intracellular fraction of this LTP appears associated with oil bodies and some evidence also suggest its presence in glyoxysomes. So, HaAP10 is apoplastic in dry seeds and upon imbibition is rapidly internalized and relocalized to organelles involved in lipid metabolism. The results suggest that HaAP10 may be acting as a fatty acid shuttle between the oil body and the glyoxysome during seed germination. This concept is consistent with the initial proposition that LTPs participate in the intracellular transfer of lipids which was further denied based on their apparent extracellular localization. This report reveals for the first time the relocalization of a lipid transfer protein and opens new perspectives on its role. PMID:23162115

  7. The surface protein Shr of Streptococcus pyogenes binds heme and transfers it to the streptococcal heme-binding protein Shp

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Benfang; Liu Mengyao; Zhu Hui

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The heme acquisition machinery in Streptococcus pyogenes is believed to consist of the surface proteins, Shr and Shp, and heme-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter HtsABC. Shp has been shown to rapidly transfer its heme to the lipoprotein component, HtsA, of HtsABC. The function of Shr and the heme source of Shp have not been established. Results The objective of this study was to determine whether Shr binds heme and is a heme source of Shp. To achieve the objective, ...

  8. Measuring protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard N

    2014-03-15

    The method of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative approach that can be used to detect Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The use of FLIM to measure the FRET that results from the interactions between proteins labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs) inside living cells provides a non-invasive method for mapping interactomes. Here, the use of the phasor plot method to analyze frequency domain (FD) FLIM measurements is described, and measurements obtained from cells producing the 'FRET standard' fusion proteins are used to validate the FLIM system for FRET measurements. The FLIM FRET approach is then used to measure both homologous and heterologous protein-protein interactions (PPI) involving the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). C/EBPα is a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, and localizes to heterochromatin where it interacts with the heterochromatin protein 1 alpha (HP1α). The FLIM-FRET method is used to quantify the homologous interactions between the FP-labeled basic leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα. Then the heterologous interactions between the C/EBPa BZip domain and HP1a are quantified using the FRET-FLIM method. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. PMID:23806643

  9. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano Luis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient communication between distant sites within a protein is essential for cooperative biological response. Although often associated with large allosteric movements, more subtle changes in protein dynamics can also induce long-range correlations. However, an appropriate formalism that directly relates protein structural dynamics to information exchange between functional sites is still lacking. Results Here we introduce a method to analyze protein dynamics within the framework of information theory and show that signal transduction within proteins can be considered as a particular instance of communication over a noisy channel. In particular, we analyze the conformational correlations between protein residues and apply the concept of mutual information to quantify information exchange. Mapping out changes of mutual information on the protein structure then allows visualizing how distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located in the phosphopeptide and specificity binding sites and a number of residues at the other side of the domain near the linkers that connect the SH2 domain to the SH3 and kinase domains. We find that for this particular domain, communication is affected by a series of contiguous residues that connect distal sites by crossing the core of the SH2 domain. Conclusion As a result, our method provides a means to directly map the exchange of biological information on the structure of protein domains, making it clear how binding triggers conformational changes in the protein structure. As such it provides a structural road, next to the existing attempts at sequence level, to predict long-range interactions within protein structures.

  10. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is related to insulin resistance : impaired acute lowering by insulin in obese Type II diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    1998-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) have important functions in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. We determined the association of plasma CETP and PLTP activities (measured with exogenous' substrate assays) with insulin resistance, plasma trigl

  11. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5'-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  12. Purification and structural characterisation of lipid transfer protein from red wine and grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeckels, Nadine; Tenzer, Stefan; Rosfa, Susanne; Schild, Hansjoerg; Decker, Heinz; Wigand, Petra

    2013-05-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTP) play a major role in plant defence and are of particular interest due to their known ability to cause allergic reactions. These proteins are expressed in grapes and also remain detectable after vinification, especially in red wine. However, it remains unknown whether the protein undergoes any changes during the vinification process. Here, we present a purification method for LTPs from Dornfelder grapes and wine. By liquid-chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) we identified LTPs from two different species (Vitis vinifera and Vitis aestivalis). Additionally, the purified LTPs were characterised using spectrometric methods, confirming their high purity and structural stability during vinification. We conclude that LTPs are resistant to the alcohol content (13.5 vol%), acidic milieu of wine and other ingredients present during the vinification process, indicating that the allergenic potential of grape LTP is not diminished by the vinification process. PMID:23265486

  13. Magnetization transfer magnetic resonance of human atherosclerotic plaques ex vivo detects areas of high protein density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Ye

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins are major plaque components, and their degradation is related to the plaque instability. We sought to assess the feasibility of magnetization transfer (MT magnetic resonance (MR for identifying fibrin and collagen in carotid atherosclerotic plaques ex vivo. Methods Human carotid artery specimens (n = 34 were obtained after resection from patients undergoing endarterectomy. MR was completed within 12 hr after surgery on an 11.7T MR microscope prior to fixation. Two sets of T1W spoiled gradient echo images were acquired with and without the application of a saturation pulse set to 10 kHz off resonance. The magnetization transfer ratio (MTR was calculated, and the degree of MT contrast was correlated with histology. Results MT with appropriate calibration clearly detected regions with high protein density, which showed a higher MTR (thick fibers (collagen type I (54 ± 8% compared to regions with a low amount of protein including lipid (46 ± 8% (p = 0.05, thin fibers (collagen type III (11 ± 6% (p = 0.03, and calcification (6.8 ± 4% (p = 0.02. Intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH with different protein density demonstrated different MT effects. Old (rich in protein debris and recent IPH (rich in fibrin had a much higher MTR 69 ± 6% and 55 ± 9%, respectively, compared to fresh IPH (rich in intact red blood cells(9 ± 3%. Conclusions MT MR enhances plaque tissue contrast and identifies the protein-rich regions of carotid artery specimens. The additional information from MTR of IPH may provide important insight into the role of IPH on plaque stability, evolution, and the risk for future ischemic events.

  14. Transfers

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier Sala-i-Martin

    1992-01-01

    In this paper I develop a positive theory of intergenerational transfers. I argue that transfers are a means to induce retirement. that is, to buy the elderly out of the labor force. The reason why societies choose to do such a thing is that aggregate output is higher if the elderly do not work. I model this idea through positive externalities in the average stock of human capital: because skills depreciate with age. one implication of these externalities is that the elderly have a negative e...

  15. Transcriptional modulation of hepatic lipoprotein assembly and secretion : coordinate regulation of the liver-fatty acid binding protein and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein genes

    OpenAIRE

    Spann, Nathanael J.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic production of apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins provides a means to transport essential lipids and fat-soluble nutrients to peripheral tissues for utilization and storage. Liver-fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) bind fatty acids and glycerolipids, respectively and facilitate their transfer into the VLDL assembly and secretion pathway. Sequence analysis reveals that the proximal promoter regions of L-FABP and MTP contain...

  16. Transfer of protein antigens into milk after intravenous injection into lactating mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the transfer of bovine serum 125I-albumin (125I-BSA), bovine 125I-gamma-globulin (125I-BGG), 125I-ovalbumin (125I-OVA), and 125I-beta-lactoglobulin (125I-BLG) from the blood into the milk of lactating mice. Equal amounts (by weight) of the radiolabeled proteins were injected intravenously into mice 1 wk postpartum. Total radioactivity, trichloroacetic acid-precipitable radioactivity, and specifically immunoprecipitable radioactivity were measured in serum, mammary gland homogenate, and milk. Clearance of immunoreactive OVA (iOVA) and iBLG from the circulation was more rapid than iBSA and iBGG. The radioactivity in mammary tissue associated with BSA and BGG was greater than 70% immunoprecipitable throughout the 4-h test interval; 125I-OVA and 125I-BLG were less than 12% precipitable 1 and 4 h after injection. In milk obtained at 4 h, there was an approximately 10-fold greater accumulation of iBSA or iBGG than of iOVA or iBLG. These experiments demonstrate that protein antigens differ in their ability to transfer from maternal circulation into milk. The transfer into milk appeared to be in proportion to persistence of the antigens in the maternal circulation

  17. Expression and secretion of rabbit plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein by Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, H; Li, Q; Ohnishi, T; Ko, K W; Agellon, L B; Yokoyama, S

    1996-03-01

    The rabbit cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris by introducing the CETP cDNA under the control of the methanol-inducible alcohol oxidase promoter. The cDNA was cloned from in vitro amplified cDNA of rabbit liver mRNA. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned cDNA differed slightly from the previously published sequence that changed the amino acid sequence in six residues. Interestingly, five of these replacements are identical to the corresponding residues in human CEPT. In addition, the encoded mature N-terminal sequence was changed from Cys- to Arg-Glu-Phe- to link the CETP sequence to the yeast acid phosphatase signal peptide. The culture medium of the transformed cells induced with 1% methanol contained both cholesteryl ester and triglyceride transfer activity comparable to that of rabbit plasma. Like rabbit plasma, the lipid transfer activity in the medium could be inhibited by monoclonal antibodies that block CE/TG transfer or TG transfer alone. Immunoblot analysis of M(r) = 80 K and minor species of M(r) = 60-100 K. In spite of these differences, the specific transfer activity of the recombinant CETP was indistinguishable from that of rabbit plasma CETP of M(r) = 74 K. N-Glycosidase F treatment converted both the recombinant and plasma CETP to a single species of M(r) = 55 K. Both the plasma and recombinant CETP lost their activity after removal of N-linked carbohydrate and sialic acid. A single 55 K component was found in the cell-lysates. The intracellular form of the recombinant CETP was not modified by N-glycosidase F treatment. In conclusion, the recombinant CETP is synthesized as an inactive polypeptide that is processed and secreted as a functional glycoprotein. In addition, the N-terminal Cys residue of the plasma CETP is not required for its activity. PMID:8728322

  18. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein, low density lipoprotein particle size and intima media thickness in patients with coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tosheska, Katerina; Labudovic, Danica; Jovanova, Silvana; Jaglikovski, Branko; Alabakovska, Sonja

    2011-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) plays a key role in reverse cholesterol transport and high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Predominance of small, dense LDL particles is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD).

  19. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å3). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours

  20. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizatullina, Albina K. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Bogdanov, Ivan V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Telezhinskaya, Irina N.; Balandin, Sergey V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Shenkarev, Zakhar O. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Arseniev, Alexander S. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V., E-mail: ovch@ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å{sup 3}). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours.

  1. An inhibitor of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibits apoB secretion from HepG2 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Jamil, H.; Gordon, D A; Eustice, D C; Brooks, C M; Dickson, J K; Chen, Y; Ricci, B.; C. H. Chu; Harrity, T W; Ciosek, C P; Biller, S A; Gregg, R E; Wetterau, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    The microsomal triglyceride (TG) transfer protein (MTP) is a heterodimeric lipid transfer protein that catalyzes the transport of triglyceride, cholesteryl ester, and phosphatidylcholine between membranes. Previous studies showing that the proximal cause of abetalipoproteinemia is an absence of MTP indicate that MTP function is required for the assembly of the apolipoprotein B (apoB) containing plasma lipoproteins, i.e., very low density lipoproteins and chylomicrons. However, the precise rol...

  2. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Analysis of the Putative Non-Specific Lipid Transfer Proteins in Brassica rapa L

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun; Gao, Guizhen; Xu, Kun; Chen, Biyun; Yan, Guixin; Li, Feng; Qiao, Jiangwei; Zhang, Tianyao; Wu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLtps) are small, basic proteins encoded by multigene families and have reported functions in many physiological processes such as mediating phospholipid transfer, defense reactions against phytopathogens, the adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions, and sexual reproduction. To date, no genome-wide overview of the Brassica rapa nsLtp (BrnsLtp) gene family has been performed. Therefore, as the first step and as a helpful ...

  3. Molecularly Imprinted Electropolymer for a Hexameric Heme Protein with Direct Electron Transfer and Peroxide Electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lei; Yarman, Aysu; Jetzschmann, Katharina J; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Schad, Daniel; Dobbek, Holger; Wollenberger, Ulla; Scheller, Frieder W

    2016-01-01

    For the first time a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) with direct electron transfer (DET) and bioelectrocatalytic activity of the target protein is presented. Thin films of MIPs for the recognition of a hexameric tyrosine-coordinated heme protein (HTHP) have been prepared by electropolymerization of scopoletin after oriented assembly of HTHP on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) on gold electrodes. Cavities which should resemble the shape and size of HTHP were formed by template removal. Rebinding of the target protein sums up the recognition by non-covalent interactions between the protein and the MIP with the electrostatic attraction of the protein by the SAM. HTHP bound to the MIP exhibits quasi-reversible DET which is reflected by a pair of well pronounced redox peaks in the cyclic voltammograms (CVs) with a formal potential of -184.4 ± 13.7 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (1 M KCl) at pH 8.0 and it was able to catalyze the cathodic reduction of peroxide. At saturation the MIP films show a 12-fold higher electroactive surface concentration of HTHP than the non-imprinted polymer (NIP). PMID:26907299

  4. Molecularly Imprinted Electropolymer for a Hexameric Heme Protein with Direct Electron Transfer and Peroxide Electrocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Peng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP with direct electron transfer (DET and bioelectrocatalytic activity of the target protein is presented. Thin films of MIPs for the recognition of a hexameric tyrosine-coordinated heme protein (HTHP have been prepared by electropolymerization of scopoletin after oriented assembly of HTHP on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA on gold electrodes. Cavities which should resemble the shape and size of HTHP were formed by template removal. Rebinding of the target protein sums up the recognition by non-covalent interactions between the protein and the MIP with the electrostatic attraction of the protein by the SAM. HTHP bound to the MIP exhibits quasi-reversible DET which is reflected by a pair of well pronounced redox peaks in the cyclic voltammograms (CVs with a formal potential of −184.4 ± 13.7 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (1 M KCl at pH 8.0 and it was able to catalyze the cathodic reduction of peroxide. At saturation the MIP films show a 12-fold higher electroactive surface concentration of HTHP than the non-imprinted polymer (NIP.

  5. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Dot-Protein Kinase Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françisco M. Raymo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In search of viable strategies to identify selective inhibitors of protein kinases, we have designed a binding assay to probe the interactions of human phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1 with potential ligands. Our protocol is based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between semiconductor quantum dots (QDs and organic dyes. Specifically, we have expressed and purified the catalytic kinase domain of PDK1 with an N-terminal histidine tag [His6-PDK1(ΔPH]. We have conjugated this construct to CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs coated with dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA and tested the response of the resulting assembly to a molecular dyad incorporating an ATP ligand and a BODIPY chromophore. The supramolecular association of the BODIPY-ATP dyad with the His6-PDK1(ΔPH-QD assembly encourages the transfer of energy from the QDs to the BODIPY dyes upon excitation. The addition of ATP results in the displacement of BODIPY-ATP from the binding domain of the His6-PDK1(ΔPH conjugated to the nanoparticles. The competitive binding, however, does not prevent the energy transfer process. A control experiment with QDs, lacking the His6-PDK1(ΔPH, indicates that the BODIPY-ATP dyad adsorbs nonspecifically on the surface of the nanoparticles, promoting the transfer of energy from the CdSe core to the adsorbed BODIPY dyes. Thus, the implementation of FRET-based assays to probe the binding domain of PDK1 with luminescent QDs requires the identification of energy acceptors unable to interact nonspecifically with the surface of the nanoparticles.

  6. Barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, contains a new type of lipid-like post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Lerche, Mathilde H.; Poulsen, Flemming Martin;

    2001-01-01

    In plants a group of proteins termed nonspecific lipid transfer proteins are found. These proteins bind and catalyze transfer of lipids in vitro, but their in vivo function is unknown. They have been suggested to be involved in different aspects of plant physiology and cell biology, including the...... formation of cutin and involvement in stress and pathogen responses, but there is yet no direct demonstration of an in vivo function. We have found and characterized a novel post-translational modification of the barley nonspecific lipid transfer protein, LTP1. The protein-modification bond is of a new type...... found to be lipid-like in nature. The modification does not resemble any standard lipid post-translational modification but is similar to a compound with known antimicrobial activity....

  7. Protein microarrays based on polymer brushes prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbey, Raphael; Kauffmann, Ekkehard; Ehrat, Markus; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2010-12-13

    Polymer brushes represent an interesting platform for the development of high-capacity protein binding surfaces. Whereas the protein binding properties of polymer brushes have been investigated before, this manuscript evaluates the feasibility of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) and PGMA-co-poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PGMA-co-PDEAEMA) (co)polymer brushes grown via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) as protein reactive substrates in a commercially available microarray system using tantalum-pentoxide-coated optical waveguide-based chips. The performance of the polymer-brush-based protein microarray chips is assessed using commercially available dodecylphosphate (DDP)-modified chips as the benchmark. In contrast to the 2D planar, DDP-coated chips, the polymer-brush-covered chips represent a 3D sampling volume. This was reflected in the results of protein immobilization studies, which indicated that the polymer-brush-based coatings had a higher protein binding capacity as compared to the reference substrates. The protein binding capacity of the polymer-brush-based coatings was found to increase with increasing brush thickness and could also be enhanced by copolymerization of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA), which catalyzes epoxide ring-opening of the glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) units. The performance of the polymer-brush-based microarray chips was evaluated in two proof-of-concept microarray experiments, which involved the detection of biotin-streptavidin binding as well as a model TNFα reverse assay. These experiments revealed that the use of polymer-brush-modified microarray chips resulted not only in the highest absolute fluorescence readouts, reflecting the 3D nature and enhanced sampling volume provided by the brush coating, but also in significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. These characteristics make the proposed polymer brushes an attractive alternative to commercially available, 2D microarray

  8. REACH coarse-grained biomolecular simulation: transferability between different protein structural classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-08-01

    Coarse graining of protein interactions provides a means of simulating large biological systems. The REACH (Realistic Extension Algorithm via Covariance Hessian) coarse-graining method, in which the force constants of a residue-scale elastic network model are calculated from the variance-covariance matrix obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, involves direct mapping between scales without the need for iterative optimization. Here, the transferability of the REACH force field is examined between protein molecules of different structural classes. As test cases, myoglobin (all alpha), plastocyanin (all beta), and dihydrofolate reductase (alpha/beta) are taken. The force constants derived are found to be closely similar in all three proteins. An MD version of REACH is presented, and low-temperature coarse-grained (CG) REACH MD simulations of the three proteins are compared with atomistic MD results. The mean-square fluctuations of the atomistic MD are well reproduced by the CGMD. Model functions for the CG interactions, derived by averaging over the three proteins, are also shown to produce fluctuations in good agreement with the atomistic MD. The results indicate that, similarly to the use of atomistic force fields, it is now possible to use a single, generic REACH force field for all protein studies, without having first to derive parameters from atomistic MD simulation for each individual system studied. The REACH method is thus likely to be a reliable way of determining spatiotemporal motion of a variety of proteins without the need for expensive computation of long atomistic MD simulations. PMID:18469078

  9. Identification of a Novel Transcript and Regulatory Mechanism for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Takashi; Brown, Judy J.; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. Previous studies in our laboratory identified a novel splice variant of MTP in mice that we named MTP-B. MTP-B has a unique first exon (1B) located 2.7 kB upstream of the first exon (1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A). The two mature isoforms, though nearly identical in sequence and function, have different tissue expression patterns. In this study we report t...

  10. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein regulates endogenous and exogenous antigen presentation by group 1 CD1 molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Kaser, Arthur; Hava, David L.; Dougan, Stephanie K.; Chen, Zhangguo; Zeissig, Sebastian; Brenner, Michael B.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Lipid antigens are presented to T cells by the non-polymorphic MHC class I-related CD1 molecules. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident chaperone that has been shown to lipidate the group 2 CD1 molecule CD1d and thus to regulate its function. We now report that MTP also regulates the function of group 1 CD1 molecules CD1a, CD1b, and CD1c. Pharmacological inhibition of MTP in monocyte-derived dendritic cells and lymphoblastoid B cell lines tra...

  11. Editing of CD1d-Bound Lipid Antigens by Endosomal Lipid Transfer Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Dapeng; Cantu, Carlos; Sagiv, Yuval; Schrantz, Nicolas; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Qi, Xiaoyang; Mahuran, Don J.; Carlos R Morales; Grabowski, Gregory A.; Benlagha, Kamel; Savage, Paul; Bendelac, Albert; Teyton, Luc

    2003-01-01

    It is now established that CD1 molecules present lipid antigens to T cells, although it is not clear how the exchange of lipids between membrane compartments and the CD1 binding groove is assisted. We report that mice deficient in prosaposin, the precursor to a family of endosomal lipid transfer proteins (LTP), exhibit specific defects in CD1d-mediated antigen presentation and lack Vα14 NKT cells. In vitro, saposins extracted monomeric lipids from membranes and from CD1, thereby promoting the...

  12. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 μm, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 μm. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%

  13. Recent developments in atom transfer radical polymerization initiators for development of polymer-protein bioconjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKHILESH KUMAR SHAKYA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in modern synthetic polymer chemistry is to synthesize end defined polymers of different end functionality with predetermined uniform molecular weight. End functionalized polymers/copolymers basically in block and grafting form are having several potential applications in biomedical areas in the form of surface modifications, coatings, adhesives, and in order to increase the biocompatibility of polymeric blends. Among the existing controlled radical polymerization (CRP methods for synthesis of these functional polymers, the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP is one of the powerful techniques. The functional groups in these polymers can be easily introduced at the chain ends through functionalized ATRP initiators. A number of ATRP initiators have been developed in polymer science to develop defined polymer-protein bioconjugates. This critical review basically focuses on different types of ATRP initiators and their mechanisms used in the synthesis of polymer-protein bioconjugates.

  14. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    CERN Document Server

    Awazu, K; Tamiya, E

    2002-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm sup 2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 mu m, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 mu m. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%.

  15. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awazu, Kunio; Kinpara, Takeshi; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2002-05-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm 2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 μm, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 μm. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%.

  16. Structural and Functional Characterization of Recombinant Isoforms of the Lentil Lipid Transfer Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, I V; Finkina, E I; Balandin, S V; Melnikova, D N; Stukacheva, E A; Ovchinnikova, T V

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant isoforms Lc-LTP1 and Lc-LTP3 of the lentil lipid transfer protein were overexpressed in E. coli cells. It was confirmed that both proteins are stabilized by four disulfide bonds and characterized by a high proportion of the α-helical structure. It was found that Lc-LTP1 and Lc-LTP3 possess antimicrobial activity and can bind fatty acids. Both isoforms have the ability to bind specific IgE from sera of patients with food allergies, which recognize similar epitopes of the major peach allergen Pru p 3. Both isoforms were shown to have immunological properties similar to those of other plant allergenic LTPs, but Lc-LTP3 displayed a less pronounced immunoreactivity. PMID:26483961

  17. Surface residues dynamically organize water bridges to enhance electron transfer between proteins

    CERN Document Server

    de la Lande, Aurélien; Řezáč, Jan; Sanders, Barry C; Salahub, Dennis R; 10.1073/pnas.0914457107

    2010-01-01

    Cellular energy production depends on electron transfer (ET) between proteins. In this theoretical study, we investigate the impact of structural and conformational variations on the electronic coupling between the redox proteins methylamine dehydrogenase and amicyanin from Paracoccus denitrificans. We used molecular dynamics simulations to generate configurations over a duration of 40ns (sampled at 100fs intervals) in conjunction with an ET pathway analysis to estimate the ET coupling strength of each configuration. In the wild type complex, we find that the most frequently occurring molecular configurations afford superior electronic coupling due to the consistent presence of a water molecule hydrogen-bonded between the donor and acceptor sites. We attribute the persistence of this water bridge to a "molecular breakwater" composed of several hydrophobic residues surrounding the acceptor site. The breakwater supports the function of nearby solvent-organizing residues by limiting the exchange of water molecul...

  18. Formation of long-lived radicals on proteins by radical transfer from heme enzymes--a common process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostdal, H; Andersen, H J; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    albumin via the heme edge of the peroxidase. In contrast, albumin radical formation by the HRP/H2O2/free tyrosine system was only marginally affected by proteolysis, consistent with free tyrosine phenoxyl radicals being the mediators of radical transfer, without significant protein-protein interaction...

  19. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer and Conformational Stability of Proteins: An Advanced Biophysical Module for Physical Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Katheryn M.; Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2008-01-01

    Protein folding is an exploding area of research in biophysics and physical chemistry. Here, we describe the integration of several techniques, including absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, to probe important topics in protein folding. Cytochrome c is used as a model…

  20. The orchestra of lipid-transfer proteins at the crossroads between metabolism and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapparino, Antonella; Maeda, Kenji; Turei, Denes; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Within the eukaryotic cell, more than 1000 species of lipids define a series of membranes essential for cell function. Tightly controlled systems of lipid transport underlie the proper spatiotemporal distribution of membrane lipids, the coordination of spatially separated lipid metabolic pathways, and lipid signaling mediated by soluble proteins that may be localized some distance away from membranes. Alongside the well-established vesicular transport of lipids, non-vesicular transport mediated by a group of proteins referred to as lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) is emerging as a key mechanism of lipid transport in a broad range of biological processes. More than a hundred LTPs exist in humans and these can be divided into at least ten protein families. LTPs are widely distributed in tissues, organelles and membrane contact sites (MCSs), as well as in the extracellular space. They all possess a soluble and globular domain that encapsulates a lipid monomer and they specifically bind and transport a wide range of lipids. Here, we present the most recent discoveries in the functions and physiological roles of LTPs, which have expanded the playground of lipids into the aqueous spaces of cells. PMID:26658141

  1. Enhanced Dissociation of Intact Proteins with High Capacity Electron Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Nicholas M.; Mullen, Christopher; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Sharma, Seema; Senko, Michael W.; Zabrouskov, Vlad; Westphall, Michael S.; Syka, John E. P.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2016-03-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is a valuable tool for protein sequence analysis, especially for the fragmentation of intact proteins. However, low product ion signal-to-noise often requires some degree of signal averaging to achieve high quality MS/MS spectra of intact proteins. Here we describe a new implementation of ETD on the newest generation of quadrupole-Orbitrap-linear ion trap Tribrid, the Orbitrap Fusion Lumos, for improved product ion signal-to-noise via ETD reactions on larger precursor populations. In this new high precursor capacity ETD implementation, precursor cations are accumulated in the center section of the high pressure cell in the dual pressure linear ion trap prior to charge-sign independent trapping, rather than precursor ion sequestration in only the back section as is done for standard ETD. This new scheme increases the charge capacity of the precursor accumulation event, enabling storage of approximately 3-fold more precursor charges. High capacity ETD boosts the number of matching fragments identified in a single MS/MS event, reducing the need for spectral averaging. These improvements in intra-scan dynamic range via reaction of larger precursor populations, which have been previously demonstrated through custom modified hardware, are now available on a commercial platform, offering considerable benefits for intact protein analysis and top down proteomics. In this work, we characterize the advantages of high precursor capacity ETD through studies with myoglobin and carbonic anhydrase.

  2. Ultrafast quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins: Interresidue and intrahelical electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins has been critical to the understanding of protein dynamics and enzyme reactions using tryptophan as a molecular optical probe. We report here our systematic examinations of potential quenching residues with more than 40 proteins. With site-directed mutation, we placed tryptophan to desired positions or altered its neighboring residues to screen quenching groups among 20 amino acid residues and of peptide backbones. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the ultrafast quenching dynamics within 100 ps and identified two ultrafast quenching groups, the carbonyl- and sulfur-containing residues. The former is glutamine and glutamate residues and the later is disulfide bond and cysteine residue. The quenching by the peptide-bond carbonyl group as well as other potential residues mostly occurs in longer than 100 ps. These ultrafast quenching dynamics occur at van der Waals distances through intraprotein electron transfer with high directionality. Following optimal molecular orbital overlap, electron jumps from the benzene ring of the indole moiety in a vertical orientation to the LUMO of acceptor quenching residues. Molecular dynamics simulations were invoked to elucidate various correlations of quenching dynamics with separation distances, relative orientations, local fluctuations and reaction heterogeneity. These unique ultrafast quenching pairs, as recently found to extensively occur in high-resolution protein structures, may have significant biological implications

  3. Unraveling the structure of membrane proteins in situ by transfer function corrected cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibauer, Matthias; Hoffmann, Christian; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nickell, Stephan; Engelhardt, Harald

    2012-12-01

    Cryo-electron tomography in combination with subtomogram averaging allows to investigate the structure of protein assemblies in their natural environment in a close to live state. To make full use of the structural information contained in tomograms it is necessary to analyze the contrast transfer function (CTF) of projections and to restore the phases of higher spatial frequencies. CTF correction is however hampered by the difficulty of determining the actual defocus values from tilt series data, which is due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of electron micrographs. In this study, an extended acquisition scheme is introduced that enables an independent CTF determination. Two high-dose images are recorded along the tilt axis on both sides of each projection, which allow an accurate determination of the defocus values of these images. These values are used to calculate the CTF for each image of the tilt series. We applied this scheme to the mycobacterial outer membrane protein MspA reconstituted in lipid vesicles and tested several variants of CTF estimation in combination with subtomogram averaging and correction of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The 3D electron density map of MspA was compared with a structure previously determined by X-ray crystallography. We were able to demonstrate that structural information up to a resolution of 16.8Å can be recovered using our CTF correction approach, whereas the uncorrected 3D map had a resolution of only 26.2Å. PMID:23000705

  4. Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for directly detecting nucleic acids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Fang, Xueen; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-06-15

    Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay (FRET) is gaining great interest in detecting macro-biological molecule. It is difficult to achieve conveniently and fast detection for macro-biological molecule. Herein, a graphene oxide (GO)-based paper chip (glass fiber) integrated with fluorescence labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) for fast, inexpensive and direct detection of biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) has been developed. In this paper, we employed the Cy3/FAM-labeled ssDNA as the reporter and the GO as quencher and the original glass fiber paper as data acquisition substrates. The chip which was designed and fabricated by a cutting machine is a miniature biosensor that monitors fluorescence recovery from resonance energy transfer. The hybridization assays and fluorescence detection were all simplified, and the surface of the chip did not require immobilization or washing. A Nikon Eclipse was employed as excited resource and a commercial digital camera was employed for capturing digital images. This paper-based microfluidics chip has been applied in the detection of proteins and nucleic acids. The biosensing capability meets many potential requirements for disease diagnosis and biological analysis. PMID:26807518

  5. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic pig produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZhongHua; SUN Shuang; LI YuTian; WANG HongBin; R S PRATHER; SONG Jun; WANG ZhenKun; TIAN JiangTian; KONG QingRan; ZHENG Zhong; YIN Zhi; GAO Li; MA HaiKun

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer is a very promising route for producing transgenic farm ani-mals. Research on GFP transgenic pigs can provide useful information for breeding transgenic pigs, human disease models and human organ xenotransplantation. In this study, a liposomal transfection system was screened and transgenic embryos were reconstructed by nuclear transfer of GFP positive cells into enucleated in vitro matured oocytes. The development of reconstructed embryos both in vitro and in vivo was observed, and GFP expression was determined. The results showed that porcine fe-tal-derived fibroblast cells cultured with 4.0 plJmL liposome and 1.6 pg/mL plasmid DNA for 6 h re-sulted in the highest transfection rate (3.6%). The percentage of GFP reconstructed embryos that de-veloped in vitro to the blastocyst stage was 10%. Of those the GFP positive percentage was 48%. Re-constructed transgenic embryos were transferred to 10 recipients. 5 of them were pregnant, and 3 de-livered 6 cloned piglets in which 4 piglets were transgenic for the GFP as verified by both GFP protein expression and GFP DNA sequence analysis. The percentage of reconstructed embryos that resulted in cloned piglets was 1.0%; while the percentage of piglets that were transgenic was 0.7%. This is the first group of transgenic cloned pigs born in China, marking a great progress in Chinese transgenic cloned pig research.

  6. Structural determinants of stability to proteolysis, processing and impact on allergenic potential of non-specific lipid transfer proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Syed Umer

    2012-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a class of low molecular weight hydrophobic conserved proteins comprising four intramolecular disulphide bonds making the structure very resistant to proteolysis and harsh food processing conditions. These proteins are identified as strong allergens sensitizing through the gut and share epitopes with LTPs from closely related species. Peach LTP, Pru p 3 is the primary sensitizer in the Mediterranean area being the most frequent food allergen. Wheat LTP, Tri ...

  7. Isolation and full characterisation of a potentially allergenic lipid transfer protein (LTP) in almond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Sofie; Tedeschi, Tullia; Faccini, Andrea; Garino, Cristiano; Arlorio, Marco; Dossena, Arnaldo; Sforza, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTP) were shown to be among the most significant allergens, in particular in several fruits belonging to the Rosaceae family. The molecular features of LTPs, such as the presence of eight cysteine residues forming four disulfide bridges, confer a compact structure, decreasing the probability of degradation due to cooking or digestion, thereby increasing the chance of systemic absorption and severe allergic reactions. Few studies on LTP-induced allergies regarding almond (Prunus dulcis L) are available in the literature. In the present work, we describe for the first time the extraction and purification of an almond LTP, achieving its full characterisation by using liquid chromatography and exact mass spectrometry; the full sequence was identified by means of LC-ESI-Orbitrap-MS applying a bottom-up approach. The characterised protein consists of 92 amino acids and has a calculated exact MW of 9579.0. The presence of four disulfide bridges was confirmed after reduction, as shown by a mass increment of 8 Da. Finally, its potential allergenicity was confirmed via an in silico approach. The results presented here demonstrate the enormous potential of advanced MS techniques for obtaining high-quality structural and functional data of allergenic proteins in a short time. PMID:25658292

  8. Resonance Energy Transfer between protein and rhamnolipid capped ZnS quantum dots: Application in in-gel staining of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiraman, Narayanan; Mohan, Abhilash; Kannan, Ashwin; Pennathur, Gautam

    The interaction of proteins with quantum dots is an interesting field of research. These interactions occur at the nanoscale. We have probed the interaction of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) with rhamnolipid capped ZnS (RhlZnSQDs) using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Optical studies on mixtures of RhlZnSQDs and proteins resulted in Förster's Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from proteins to QDs. This phenomenon has been exploited to detect proteins in agarose gel electrophoresis. The activity of the CRL was unaffected on the addition of QDs as revealed by zymography.

  9. Elucidating the design principles of photosynthetic electron-transfer proteins by site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishara Silva, K; Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H; Lakshmi, K V

    2016-05-01

    Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine solvent accessibility, side-chain dynamics, and inter-spin distances at specific sites in biological macromolecules. This information provides important insights into the structure and dynamics of both natural and designed proteins and protein complexes. Here, we discuss the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy in probing the charge-transfer cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) such as photosystem I (PSI) and the bacterial reaction center (bRC). Photosynthetic RCs are large multi-subunit proteins (molecular weight≥300kDa) that perform light-driven charge transfer reactions in photosynthesis. These reactions are carried out by cofactors that are paramagnetic in one of their oxidation states. This renders the RCs unsuitable for conventional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigations. However, the presence of native paramagnetic centers and the ability to covalently attach site-directed spin labels in RCs makes them ideally suited for the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy. The paramagnetic centers serve as probes of conformational changes, dynamics of subunit assembly, and the relative motion of cofactors and peptide subunits. In this review, we describe novel applications of SDSL EPR spectroscopy for elucidating the effects of local structure and dynamics on the electron-transfer cofactors of photosynthetic RCs. Because SDSL EPR Spectroscopy is uniquely suited to provide dynamic information on protein motion, it is a particularly useful method in the engineering and analysis of designed electron transfer proteins and protein networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics - the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26334844

  10. Using nonfluorescent Förster resonance energy transfer acceptors in protein binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Skinner, Joseph P; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this article is to highlight the versatility of nonfluorescent Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptors in determination of protein equilibrium dissociation constants and kinetic rates. Using a nonfluorescent acceptor eliminates the necessity to spectrally isolate the donor fluorescence when performing binding titrations covering a broad range of reagent concentrations. Moreover, random distribution of the donor and acceptor chromophores on the surface of proteins increases the probability of FRET occurring on their interaction. Three high-affinity antibodies are presented in this study as characteristic protein systems. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) 106.3 binds brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)5-13(C10A) and full-length BNP1-32 with the dissociation constants 0.26+/-0.01 and 0.05+/-0.02 nM, respectively, which was confirmed by kinetic measurements. For anti-hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) mAb 8F11, studied at two incorporation ratios (IRs=1.9 and 3.8) of the nonfluorescent FRET acceptor, K(D) values of 0.04+/-0.02 and 0.059(-0.004)(+0.006) nM, respectively, were obtained. Likewise, the binding of goat anti-hamster immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody was not affected by conjugation and yielded K(D) values of 1.26+/-0.04, 1.25+/-0.05, and 1.14+/-0.04 nM at IRs of 1.7, 4.7, and 8.1, respectively. We conclude that this FRET-based method offers high sensitivity, practical simplicity, and versatility in protein binding studies. PMID:19563765

  11. Electron transfer patterns of the di-heme protein cytochrome c(4) from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Anders Christer; Schmidt, L.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2009-01-01

    We report kinetic data for the two-step electron transfer (ET) oxidation and reduction of the two-domain di-heme redox protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome (cyt) c(4) by [Co(bipy)(3)](2- 3-) (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Following earlier reports, the data accord with both bi- and tri......-exponential kinetics. A complete kinetic scheme includes both "cooperative" intermolecular ET between each heme group and the external reaction partner, and intramolecular ET between the two heme groups. A now data analysis scheme shows unequivocally that two-ET oxidation and reduction of P. stutzeri cyt c(4) is...... entirely dominated by intermolecular ET between the heme groups and the external reaction partner in the ms time range, with virtually no contribution from intramolecular interheme ET in this time range. This is in striking contrast to two-ET electrochemical oxidation or reduction of P. stutzeri cyt c(4...

  12. Light-induced conformational changes and energy transfer in red fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reversible conformational changes have been photo-induced in the red fluorescent protein DsRed at low temperature by wavelength-selective laser irradiation. We have found two new fluorescent forms: a shifted-red (SR-) and a new green (G'-) form that absorb and emit, respectively, ∼14 nm to the red and ∼80 nm to the blue of the 'mature' red (R-) form present in an un-illuminated sample of DsRed. Further, we have identified the 0-0 transitions of the various forms by spectral hole burning and estimated their ground-state energy differences and barrier heights by means of temperature-dependent excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy between 1.6 and 295 K. We have also proven that 'downhill' energy transfer takes place between these forms within the tetrameric structure of DsRed

  13. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Äijänen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib is transferred into the lipid binding pocket. The novel insight gained in this study has potential use in the development of new molecular agents capable of preventing the progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Surface-tuned electron transfer and electrocatalysis of hexameric tyrosine-coordinated heme protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lei; Utesch, Tillmann; Yarman, Aysu; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Steinborn, Silke; Dobbek, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Tanne, Johannes; Wollenberger, Ulla; Scheller, Frieder W

    2015-05-11

    Molecular modeling, electrochemical methods, and quartz crystal microbalance were used to characterize immobilized hexameric tyrosine-coordinated heme protein (HTHP) on bare carbon or on gold electrodes modified with positively and negatively charged self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), respectively. HTHP binds to the positively charged surface but no direct electron transfer (DET) is found due to the long distance of the active sites from the electrode surfaces. At carboxyl-terminated surfaces, the neutrally charged bottom of HTHP can bind to the SAM. For this "disc" orientation all six hemes are close to the electrode and their direct electron transfer should be efficient. HTHP on all negatively charged SAMs showed a quasi-reversible redox behavior with rate constant ks values between 0.93 and 2.86 s(-1) and apparent formal potentials ${E{{0{^{\\prime }}\\hfill \\atop {\\rm app}\\hfill}}}$ between -131.1 and -249.1 mV. On the MUA/MU-modified electrode, the maximum surface concentration corresponds to a complete monolayer of the hexameric HTHP in the disc orientation. HTHP electrostatically immobilized on negatively charged SAMs shows electrocatalysis of peroxide reduction and enzymatic oxidation of NADH. PMID:25825040

  15. Transfer of Immunity from Mother to Offspring Is Mediated via Egg-Yolk Protein Vitellogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Heli; Amdam, Gro V; Freitak, Dalial

    2015-07-01

    Insect immune systems can recognize specific pathogens and prime offspring immunity. High specificity of immune priming can be achieved when insect females transfer immune elicitors into developing oocytes. The molecular mechanism behind this transfer has been a mystery. Here, we establish that the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin is the carrier of immune elicitors. Using the honey bee, Apis mellifera, model system, we demonstrate with microscopy and western blotting that vitellogenin binds to bacteria, both Paenibacillus larvae--the gram-positive bacterium causing American foulbrood disease--and to Escherichia coli that represents gram-negative bacteria. Next, we verify that vitellogenin binds to pathogen-associated molecular patterns; lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan and zymosan, using surface plasmon resonance. We document that vitellogenin is required for transport of cell-wall pieces of E. coli into eggs by imaging tissue sections. These experiments identify vitellogenin, which is distributed widely in oviparous species, as the carrier of immune-priming signals. This work reveals a molecular explanation for trans-generational immunity in insects and a previously undescribed role for vitellogenin. PMID:26230630

  16. Epidural ropivacaine hydrochloride during labour: protein binding, placental transfer and neonatal outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Porter, J M

    2012-02-03

    This study was undertaken: (i) to quantify the effects of labour and epidural analgesia on plasma alpha1-acid glycoprotein concentration, (ii) to examine the effects of changes in plasma alpha1-acid glycoprotein concentration on plasma protein binding and placental transfer of ropivacaine, and (iii) to examine the association between umbilical venous ropivacaine concentration and neurobehavioural function in the neonate. Multiparous patients undergoing induction of labour received a continuous epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine following an epidural bolus. A significant association was demonstrated between maternal plasma alpha1-acid glycoprotein concentration and 1\\/free fraction of ropivacaine 60 min after starting ropivacaine administration (r(2) = 0.77) but not at delivery. No significant correlation was demonstrable between maternal unbound ropivacaine concentration and either neonatal (cord) ropivacaine concentration or UV\\/MV (a measure of placental transfer). Thirty minutes after delivery, 9\\/10 neonates had neurological and adaptive capacity scores < 35, whereas only three infants had scores < 35 at 2 h. All scores exceeded 35 16 h after delivery. No association between mean (SD) umbilical venous ropivacaine concentration [0.09 (0.08) mg x l(-1)] and neurological and adaptive capacity scores was demonstrated.

  17. AcEST: BP916259 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |YN02_CAEEL Uncharacterized protein T23G5.2 OS=Caenorha... 41 0.002 sp|Q757H2|CSR1..._ASHGO Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein CSR1 ... 41 0.002 sp|Q9VMD6|RETM_DROME Protein real-time OS=Dr...|O66585|Y209_AQUAE Uncharacterized protein aq_209 OS=Aquifex a... 37 0.032 sp|Q06705|CSR1_YEAST Phosphatidyl...inositol transfer protein CSR1 ... 35 0.16 sp|P41034|TTPA_RAT Alpha-tocopherol transfer protein OS=Rattus n.

  18. Characterization of a new antifungal non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) from sugar beet leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, A K; Brunstedt, J; Madsen, M T;

    2000-01-01

    cysteines at conserved positions, the protein can be classified as a member of the plant family of non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs). The protein is 47% identical to IWF1, an antifungal nsLTP previously isolated from leaves of sugar beet. A potential site for N-linked glycosylation present in...... sequence of 26 amino acid residues. The protein shows a strong in vitro antifungal activity against Cercospora beticola (causal agent of leaf spot disease in sugar beet) and inhibits fungal growth at concentrations below 10 µg ml(-1)....

  19. Expression of VEGF protein of lung and liver in GM-CSF gene transferred mice after neutron acute injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study lung and liver vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein expression changes in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor(GM-CSF) transgene mice after neutron exposure. Methods: Male BALB/C mice were irradiated with neutron, in dose of 0.6Gy, the mice were divided into the non-transfer group and the gene transfer group. In the gene transfer group, hGM-CSF gene was transfered by electroporation in vivo 24 h prior to exposure. Animals in the two groups were sacrificed at the 1st, 14th, 28th day, using pathologic test, immunohistochemica test and Western blot to study VEGF protein expression in lung and liver. Results: From 14 d to 28 d after exposure, the levels of VEGF protein expression in the mice in the genetransfer group was significantly higher than that in the non-transfer group. Conclusion: GM-CSF in vivo gene transfer in mice significantly promote angiogenesis and restoration in the climax and recovery phase acute injury caused by neutron. (authors)

  20. THE INTEGRITY OF THE α-HELICAL DOMAIN OF INTESTINAL FATTY ACID BINDING PROTEIN IS ESSENTIAL FOR THE COLLISION-MEDIATED TRANSFER OF FATTY ACIDS TO PHOSPHOLIPID MEMBRANES

    OpenAIRE

    Franchini, G. R.; Storch, J.; Corsico, B.

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal FABP (IFABP) and liver FABP (LFABP), homologous proteins expressed at high levels in intestinal absorptive cells, employ markedly different mechanisms of fatty acid transfer to acceptor model membranes. Transfer from IFABP occurs during protein-membrane-collisional interactions, while for LFABP transfer occurs by diffusion through the aqueous phase. In addition, transfer from IFABP is markedly faster than from LFABP. The overall goal of this study was to further explore the structu...

  1. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L;

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase-inactive muta......To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase...

  2. Measuring ligand-dependent and ligand-independent interactions between nuclear receptors and associated proteins using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET2)

    OpenAIRE

    Koterba, Kristen L.; Rowan, Brian G.

    2006-01-01

    Bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET2) is a recently developed technology for the measurement of protein-protein interactions in a live, cell-based system. BRET2 is characterized by the efficient transfer of excited energy between a bioluminescent donor molecule (Renilla luciferase) and a fluorescent acceptor molecule (a mutant of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP2)). The BRET2 assay offers advantages over fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) because it does not require an ext...

  3. Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins and the biological landscape of phosphoinositide signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Ghosh, Ratna; Bankaitis, Vytas A

    2016-09-01

    Phosphoinositides and soluble inositol phosphates are essential components of a complex intracellular chemical code that regulates major aspects of lipid signaling in eukaryotes. These involvements span a broad array of biological outcomes and activities, and cells are faced with the problem of how to compartmentalize and organize these various signaling events into a coherent scheme. It is in the arena of how phosphoinositide signaling circuits are integrated and, and how phosphoinositide pools are functionally defined and channeled to privileged effectors, that phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) transfer proteins (PITPs) are emerging as critical players. As plant systems offer some unique advantages and opportunities for study of these proteins, we discuss herein our perspectives regarding the progress made in plant systems regarding PITP function. We also suggest interesting prospects that plant systems hold for interrogating how PITPs work, particularly in multi-domain contexts, to diversify the biological outcomes for phosphoinositide signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27038688

  4. Vitamin E and Phosphoinositides Regulate the Intracellular Localization of the Hepatic α-Tocopherol Transfer Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Stacey; Ghelfi, Mikel; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Parker, Robert; Qian, Jinghui; Carlin, Cathleen; Manor, Danny

    2016-08-12

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) is an essential nutrient for all vertebrates. From the eight naturally occurring members of the vitamin E family, α-tocopherol is the most biologically active species and is selectively retained in tissues. The hepatic α-tocopherol transfer protein (TTP) preferentially selects dietary α-tocopherol and facilitates its transport through the hepatocyte and its secretion to the circulation. In doing so, TTP regulates body-wide levels of α-tocopherol. The mechanisms by which TTP facilitates α-tocopherol trafficking in hepatocytes are poorly understood. We found that the intracellular localization of TTP in hepatocytes is dynamic and responds to the presence of α-tocopherol. In the absence of the vitamin, TTP is localized to perinuclear vesicles that harbor CD71, transferrin, and Rab8, markers of the recycling endosomes. Upon treatment with α-tocopherol, TTP- and α-tocopherol-containing vesicles translocate to the plasma membrane, prior to secretion of the vitamin to the exterior of the cells. The change in TTP localization is specific to α-tocopherol and is time- and dose-dependent. The aberrant intracellular localization patterns of lipid binding-defective TTP mutants highlight the importance of protein-lipid interaction in the transport of α-tocopherol. These findings provide the basis for a proposed mechanistic model that describes TTP-facilitated trafficking of α-tocopherol through hepatocytes. PMID:27307040

  5. VirB8-like protein TraH is crucial for DNA transfer in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fercher, Christian; Probst, Ines; Kohler, Verena; Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Arends, Karsten; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Zangger, Klaus; Meyer, N Helge; Keller, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Untreatable bacterial infections caused by a perpetual increase of antibiotic resistant strains represent a serious threat to human healthcare in the 21(st) century. Conjugative DNA transfer is the most important mechanism for antibiotic resistance and virulence gene dissemination among bacteria and is mediated by a protein complex, known as type IV secretion system (T4SS). The core of the T4SS is a multiprotein complex that spans the bacterial envelope as a channel for macromolecular secretion. We report the NMR structure and functional characterization of the transfer protein TraH encoded by the conjugative Gram-positive broad-host range plasmid pIP501. The structure exhibits a striking similarity to VirB8 proteins of Gram-negative secretion systems where they play an essential role in the scaffold of the secretion machinery. Considering TraM as the first VirB8-like protein discovered in pIP501, TraH represents the second protein affiliated with this family in the respective transfer operon. A markerless traH deletion in pIP501 resulted in a total loss of transfer in Enterococcus faecalis as compared with the pIP501 wild type (wt) plasmid, demonstrating that TraH is essential for pIP501 mediated conjugation. Moreover, oligomerization state and topology of TraH in the native membrane were determined providing insights in molecular organization of a Gram-positive T4SS. PMID:27103580

  6. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar B. T. Ghisaidoobe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available F resonance energy transfer (FRET occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (\\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{ex}}\\sim\\ nm, \\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{em}}\\sim\\ 350 nm, in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the proteinlocal environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic F resonance energy transfer (iFRET, a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins.

  7. Exosomes: vehicles for the transfer of toxic proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayne Anthony Bellingham

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous vesicles secreted by a number of cell types including neurons and can be isolated from conditioned cell media or bodily fluids such as urine and plasma. Exosome biogenesis involves the inward budding of endosomes to form multivesicular bodies (MVB. When fused with the plasma membrane, the MVB releases the vesicles into the extracellular environment as exosomes. Proposed functions of these vesicles include roles in cell-cell signaling, removal of unwanted proteins, and the transfer of pathogens between cells. One such pathogen which exploits this pathway is the prion, the infectious particle responsible for the transmissible neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD of humans or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE of cattle. Similarly, exosomes are also involved in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP which is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Exosomes have been shown to contain full-length APP and several distinct proteolytically cleaved products of APP, including Aβ. In addition, these fragments can be modulated using inhibitors of the proteases involved in APP cleavage. These observations provide further evidence for a novel pathway in which PrP and APP fragments are released from cells. Other proteins such as superoxide dismutase I (SOD-1 and alpha-synuclein (involved in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Parkinson’s disease respectively are also found associated with exosomes. This review will focus on the role of exosomes in neurodegenerative disorders and discuss the potential of these vesicles for the spread of neurotoxicity, therapeutics and diagnostics for these diseases.

  8. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an α helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(Sγ-Cβ-Hβ)Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven instrumental in affording new

  9. Horizontal gene transfer of zinc and non-zinc forms of bacterial ribosomal protein S4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthey-Schulten Zaida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The universal ribosomal protein S4 is essential for the initiation of small subunit ribosomal assembly and translational accuracy. Being part of the information processing machinery of the cell, the gene for S4 is generally thought of as being inherited vertically and has been used in concatenated gene phylogenies. Here we report the evolution of ribosomal protein S4 in relation to a broad sharing of zinc/non-zinc forms of the gene and study the scope of horizontal gene transfer (HGT of S4 during bacterial evolution. Results In this study we present the complex evolutionary history of ribosomal protein S4 using 660 bacterial genomes from 16 major bacterial phyla. According to conserved characteristics in the sequences, S4 can be classified into C+ (zinc-binding and C- (zinc-free variants, with 26 genomes (mainly from the class Clostridia containing genes for both. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of the S4 sequences was incongruent with the standard bacterial phylogeny, indicating a departure from strict vertical inheritance. Further analysis using the genome content near the S4 genes, which are usually located in a conserved gene cluster, showed not only that HGT of the C- gene had occurred at various stages of bacterial evolution, but also that both the C- and C+ genes were present before the individual phyla diverged. To explain the latter, we theorize that a gene pool existed early in bacterial evolution from which bacteria could sample S4 gene variants, according to environmental conditions. The distribution of the C+/- variants for seven other zinc-binding ribosomal proteins in these 660 bacterial genomes is consistent with that seen for S4 and may shed light on the evolutionary pressures involved. Conclusion The complex history presented for "core" protein S4 suggests the existence of a gene pool before the emergence of bacterial lineages and reflects the pervasive nature of HGT in subsequent bacterial evolution

  10. Specific adduction of plant lipid transfer protein by an allene oxide generated by 9-lipoxygenase and allene oxide synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Bakan, Benedicte; Hamberg, Mats; Perrocheau, Ludivine; Maume, Daniel; Rogniaux, Helene; Tranquet, Olivier; Rondeau, Corinne; Blein, J Pierre; Ponchet, Michel; Marion, Didier

    2006-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are ubiquitous plant lipid-binding proteins that have been associated with multiple developmental and stress responses. Although LTPs typically bind fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives in a non-covalent way, studies on the LTPs of barley seeds have identified an abundantly occurring covalently modified form, LTP1b, the lipid ligand of which has resisted clarification. In the present study, this adduct was identified as the {alpha}-ketol 9-hydroxy-10-oxo-12(Z)...

  11. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HPr and Enzyme IIAGlc are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIAGlc. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser46, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser46. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser46 occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser46. HPr-Enzyme IIAGlc complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of 15N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly 15N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIAGlc. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system

  12. Screening of α-Tocopherol Transfer Protein Sensitive Genes in Human Hepatoma Cells (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang-Hua; Fu, Jun-Cai; Liu, Kun; Zuo, Zhao-Yun; Jia, Hui-Na; Ma, Yong; Luo, Hai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    α-Tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP) is a ~32 kDa protein expressed mainly in hepatocytes. The major function of the protein is to bind specifically to α-tocopherol and, together, the complex transfers from late lysosomes to the cell membrane. A previous study indicated that some factors might be required in the transferring process. However, there is little information available about the potential transferring factors. In addition, there remains much to learn about other physiological processes which α-TTP might participate in. Thus, in this study a human α-TTP eukaryotic expression vector was successfully constructed and expressed in human hepatoma cells (HepG2). The sensitive genes related to α-TTP were then screened by microarray technology. Results showed that expression of the vector in HepG2 cells led to the identification of 323 genes showing differential expression. The differentially expressed transcripts were divided into four main categories, including (1) cell inflammation; (2) cell cycle and cell apoptosis; (3) cell signaling and gene regulation; and (4) cellular movement. A few cellular movement related transcripts were selected and verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Expressions of some were significantly increased in α-TTP-expressed group, which indicated that these factors were likely to play a role in the transferring process. PMID:27355945

  13. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, Jan M; Hellgren, Lars I;

    2009-01-01

    secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB) lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP); the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism...

  14. CD1d-mediated presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes requires microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Gijzel, Sanne M W; Siersbæk, Rasmus;

    2014-01-01

    microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), which we show is also under the transcriptional regulation of C/EBPβ and -δ, as a novel player in the presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes. Overall, our findings indicate that adipocytes can function as non-professional lipid antigen...

  15. Transcript Profiles of Two Wheat Lipid Transfer Protein-encoding Genes are Altered During Attach by Hessian Fly Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘GeneCalling’, an mRNA profiling technology, was used to identify a candidate lipid transfer protein (LTP) sequence that showed decreased mRNA abundance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell) plants following attack by virulent Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor Say) larvae (compatible interaction)...

  16. The alpha-helical domain of liver fatty acid binding protein is responsible for the diffusion-mediated transfer of fatty acids to phospholipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córsico, Betina; Liou, Heng Ling; Storch, Judith

    2004-03-30

    Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) and liver FABP (LFABP), homologous proteins expressed at high levels in intestinal absorptive cells, employ markedly different mechanisms for the transfer of fatty acids (FAs) to acceptor membranes. Transfer from IFABP occurs during protein-membrane collisional interactions, while for LFABP, transfer occurs by diffusion through the aqueous phase. Earlier, we had shown that the helical domain of IFABP is critical in determining its collisional FA transfer mechanism. In the study presented here, we have engineered a pair of chimeric proteins, one with the "body" (ligand binding domain) of IFABP and the alpha-helical region of LFABP (alphaLbetaIFABP) and the other with the ligand binding pocket of LFABP and the helical domain of IFABP (alphaIbetaLFABP). The objective of this work was to determine whether the change in the alpha-helical domain of each FABP would alter the rate and mechanism of transfer of FA from the chimeric proteins in comparison with those of the wild-type proteins. The fatty acid transfer properties of the FABP chimeras were examined using a fluorescence resonance transfer assay. The results showed a significant modification of the absolute rate of FA transfer from the chimeric proteins compared to that of the wild type, indicating that the slower rate of FA transfer observed for wild-type LFABP relative to that of wild-type IFABP is, in part, determined by the helical domain of the proteins. In addition to these quantitative changes, it was of great interest to observe that the apparent mechanism of FA transfer also changed when the alpha-helical domain was exchanged, with transfer from alphaLbetaIFABP occurring by aqueous diffusion and transfer from alphaIbetaLFABP occurring via protein-membrane collisional interactions. These results demonstrate that the alpha-helical region of LFABP is responsible for its diffusional mechanism of fatty acid transfer to membranes. PMID:15035630

  17. Identification of a Novel Transcript and Regulatory Mechanism for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Suzuki

    Full Text Available Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP is essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. Previous studies in our laboratory identified a novel splice variant of MTP in mice that we named MTP-B. MTP-B has a unique first exon (1B located 2.7 kB upstream of the first exon (1A for canonical MTP (MTP-A. The two mature isoforms, though nearly identical in sequence and function, have different tissue expression patterns. In this study we report the identification of a second MTP splice variant (MTP-C, which contains both exons 1B and 1A. MTP-C is expressed in all the tissues we tested. In cells transfected with MTP-C, protein expression was less than 15% of that found when the cells were transfected with MTP-A or MTP-B. In silico analysis of the 5'-UTR of MTP-C revealed seven ATGs upstream of the start site for MTP-A, which is the only viable start site in frame with the main coding sequence. One of those ATGs was located in the 5'-UTR for MTP-A. We generated reporter constructs in which the 5'-UTRs of MTP-A or MTP-C were inserted between an SV40 promoter and the coding sequence of the luciferase gene and transfected these constructs into HEK 293 cells. Luciferase activity was significantly reduced by the MTP-C 5'-UTR, but not by the MTP-A 5'-UTR. We conclude that alternative splicing plays a key role in regulating MTP expression by introducing unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP levels and activity.

  18. Cleavage of lambda repressor and synthesis of RecA protein induced by transferred UV-damaged F sex factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transfer of a UV-damaged F sex factor to a recipient lambda lysogen induces prophage lambda development. Under these conditions RecA protein synthesis was induced and lambda repressor cleaved, as observed upon direct induction, that ist, wehen the recipient lambda lysogen was directly exposed to UV-light. The efficiency of induction of RecA protein synthesis in recipient bacteria which had received an irradiated F-lac factor was about 80% of that measured upon direct induction. We observed the simultaneous disappearance of lambda repressor and a slight production of cleavage fragments; quantitation by densitometric scanning of the autoradiogram after correction for the efficiency of transfer indicated that 55% of lambda repressor was cleaved. Transfer of UV-damaged Hfr DNA failed to induce RecA protein synthesis. A lambda phage vector carrying oriF, the cloned origin of F plasmid replication, after exposure to UV-light and infection of a recipient lysogen, induced RecA protein synthesis and a moderate but significant cleavage of lambda repressor. Indirect induction by UV-damaged F sex factor or phage lambdaoriF resulted in biochemical cellular reactions similar to those observed upon direct induction. LexA repressor that negatively controls RecA protein synthesis appeared more susceptible to cleavage than did lambda repressor. (orig.)

  19. The assembly of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins: an essential role for the microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D A; Bennett, A J; Billett, M A; Salter, A M

    1998-09-01

    Raised plasma triacylglycerol is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and an understanding of factors which regulate the synthesis and degradation of lipoproteins which carry triacylglycerol in the blood may lead to novel approaches to the treatment of hypertriacylglycerolaemia. An active microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTP) is essential for the assembly of particles which transport triacylglycerol through the circulation. After absorption in the intestine, dietary fat and fat-soluble vitamins are incorporated into chylomicrons in the intestinal epithelial cells, and these lipoproteins reach the bloodstream via the lymphatic system. Patients with the rare genetic disorder, abetalipoproteinaemia, in which MTP activity is absent, present clinically with fat-soluble vitamin and essential fatty acid deficiency, indicating a key role for MTP in the movement of fat into the body. The triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein found in fasting blood, VLDL, is assembled in the liver by an MTP-dependent process similar to chylomicron assembly, and transports triacylglycerol to extra-hepatic tissues such as adipose tissue and heart. In the absence of MTP activity, VLDL are not synthesized and only extremely low levels of triacylglycerol are present in the blood. Dietary components, including fat, cholesterol and ethanol, can modify the expression of the MTP gene and, hence, MTP activity. The present review summarizes current knowledge of the role of MTP in the assembly and secretion of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins, and the regulation of its activity in both animal and cell systems. PMID:9875061

  20. The α-tocopherol transfer protein is essential for vertebrate embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen W Miller

    Full Text Available The hepatic α-tocopherol transfer protein (TTP is required for optimal α-tocopherol bioavailability in humans; mutations in the human TTPA gene result in the heritable disorder ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED, OMIM #277460. TTP is also expressed in mammalian uterine and placental cells and in the human embryonic yolk-sac, underscoring TTP's significance during fetal development. TTP and vitamin E are essential for productive pregnancy in rodents, but their precise physiological role in embryogenesis is unknown. We hypothesize that TTP is required to regulate delivery of α-tocopherol to critical target sites in the developing embryo. We tested to find if TTP is essential for proper vertebrate development, utilizing the zebrafish as a non-placental model. We verify that TTP is expressed in the adult zebrafish and its amino acid sequence is homologous to the human ortholog. We show that embryonic transcription of TTP mRNA increases >7-fold during the first 24 hours following fertilization. In situ hybridization demonstrates that Ttpa transcripts are localized in the developing brain, eyes and tail bud at 1-day post fertilization. Inhibiting TTP expression using oligonucleotide morpholinos results in severe malformations of the head and eyes in nearly all morpholino-injected embryos (88% compared with 5.6% in those injected with control morpholinos or 1.7% in non-injected embryos. We conclude that TTP is essential for early development of the vertebrate central nervous system.

  1. 植物脂质转移蛋白%Lipid Transfer Proteins in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田爱梅; 曹家树

    2008-01-01

    脂质转移蛋白(lipid transfer proteins,LTPs)是植物生命活动中一类重要的活性蛋白质,在体外能够可逆地结合和转运多种脂质分子.目前已从多种植物中分离到LTPs基因.随着研究的深入,其不同水平的转录本在不同植物的不同发育阶段和生理条件下的不同组织中被发现,但LTPs体内确切的生理、生化功能和作用机制尚不明确.现介绍目前这一领域细胞与分子生物学方面的研究进展,并结合本课题组的研究结果进行了相关探讨,为进一步研究LTPs在植物生殖发育、抗性和防御反应及信号转导中的作用机制提供了新的线索.

  2. Quality Control System for Beer Developed with Monoclonal Antibodies Specific to Barley Lipid Transfer Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukie Murakami-Yamaguchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-specific lipid transfer protein (LTP in barley grain reacted with the IgE in sera drawn from food allergy patients. A sandwich-type of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was developed with mouse monoclonal antibodies raised against LTP purified with barley flour. This ELISA showed a practical working range of 0.3–3 ng/mL and no cross-reactivity with wheat, adlay and rye. Using this ELISA, LTP was determined in several types of barley-foods, including fermented foods such as malt vinegar, barley-malt miso and beer. LTP content in beer of the same kind was approximately constant, even if manufacturing factory and production days were different. Not only as a factor of foam formation and stability but also as an allergen, controlling and monitoring of LTP in beer should be considered. Taken together, our LTP-detecting ELISA can be proposed as an appropriate system for the quality control of beer.

  3. Expression of Heat Shock Proteins in Human Fibroblast Cells under Magnetic Resonant Coupling Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Mizuno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, resonant coupling wireless power transfer (WPT technology has been attracting attention and has been widely researched for practical use. Moreover, dosimetric evaluation has also been discussed to evaluate the potential health risks of the electromagnetic field from this WPT technology based on the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines. However, there has not been much experimental evaluation of the potential health risks of this WPT technology. In this study, to evaluate whether magnetic resonant coupling WPT induces cellular stress, we focused on heat shock proteins (Hsps and determined the expression level of Hsps 27, 70 and 90 in WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells using a western blotting method. The expression level of Hsps under conditions of magnetic resonant coupling WPT for 24 h was not significantly different compared with control cells, although the expression level of Hsps for cells exposed to heat stress conditions was significantly increased. These results suggested that exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT did not cause detectable cell stress.

  4. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc{sub 1} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V., E-mail: dmitrym@asu.edu [Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc{sub 1} bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  5. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    HPr and Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser{sup 46} occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser{sup 46}. HPr-Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of {sup 15}N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system.

  6. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activities in growth hormone-deficient adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, JAM; van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    2000-01-01

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement on plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), factors involved in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism, We unknown. We carried out a 6 mouths study in 24

  7. Markers of protein oxidation by hydroxyl radical and reactive nitrogen species in tissues of aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeuwenburgh, C; Hansen, P; Shaish, A; Holloszy, J O; Heinecke, J W

    1998-02-01

    Many lines of evidence implicate oxidative damage in aging. Possible pathways include reactions that modify aromatic amino acid residues on proteins. o-Tyrosine is a stable marker for oxidation of protein-bound phenylalanine by hydroxyl radical, whereas 3-nitrotyrosine is a marker for oxidation of protein-bound tyrosine by reactive nitrogen species. To test the hypothesis that proteins damaged by hydroxyl radical and reactive nitrogen accumulate with aging, we used isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure levels of o-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine in heart, skeletal muscle, and liver from young adult (9 mo) and old (24 mo) female Long-Evans/Wistar hybrid rats. We also measured these markers in young adult and old rats that received antioxidant supplements (alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, butylated hydroxytoluene, and ascorbic acid) from the age of 5 mo. We found that aging did not significantly increase levels of protein-bound o-tyrosine or 3-nitrotyrosine in any of the tissues. Antioxidant supplementation had no effect on the levels of protein-bound o-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine in either young or old animals. These observations indicate that the o-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine do not increase significantly in heart, skeletal muscle, and liver in old rats, suggesting that proteins damaged by hydroxyl radical and reactive nitrogen species do not accumulate in these tissues with advancing age. PMID:9486304

  8. Principles and application of intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET) for label-free detection of native proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyo Jin; Kim, Ju Hwan; Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2015-07-01

    Tryptophan residues in proteins of interest were evaluated as FRET donors to facilitate the development of a label-free protein detection system, coined "intrinsic Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (iFRET)". iFRET fluorescence probes, composed of an efficient and tryptophan-specific FRET acceptor in addition to a target protein-specific ligand, selectively bind to the target proteins thereby enabling Förster resonance energy transfer between the protein tryptophan residues and the iFRET probe. We have developed efficient iFRET acceptor fluorophores and a deep UV microscope, which were successfully applied to detect native target proteins in live cells.

  9. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein assembly in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein-deficient McA-RH7777 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yanwen; Manchekar, Medha; Sun, Zhihuan; Richardson, Paul E.; Dashti, Nassrin

    2010-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is required for the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins. Previously, we demonstrated that the N-terminal 1,000 residues of apoB (apoB:1000) are necessary for the initiation of apoB-containing lipoprotein assembly in rat hepatoma McA-RH7777 cells and that these particles are phospholipid (PL) rich. To determine if the PL transfer activity of MTP is sufficient for the assembly and secretion of primordial apoB:10...

  10. Gene gun transferring-bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) gene enhanced bone fracture healing in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wenju; Wei, Haifeng; Xia, Chunmei; Zhu, Xiaomeng; Hou, Guozhu; Xu, Feng; Xinghua SONG; Zhan, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Transferring the bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) genes into the tissues or cells can improve the bone healing of the fracture has been widely accepted. We evaluated the efficiency of using gene gun to transfer the BMP-2 gene thereby affected the healing of a fractured bone. Methods: The vector coding for BMP-2 was constructed by a non-replicating encephalo-myocarditis virus (ECMV)-based vector. The segmental bone defect (1.5 cm) model was created by a wire-saw at the middle part...

  11. Intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein increases mortality in aged mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice with conditional, intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp-IKO exhibit a complete block in chylomicron assembly together with lipid malabsorption. Young (8-10 week Mttp-IKO mice have improved survival when subjected to a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced sepsis. However, 80% of deaths in sepsis occur in patients over age 65. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age impacts outcome in Mttp-IKO mice subjected to sepsis. METHODS: Aged (20-24 months Mttp-IKO mice and WT mice underwent intratracheal injection with P. aeruginosa. Mice were either sacrificed 24 hours post-operatively for mechanistic studies or followed seven days for survival. RESULTS: In contrast to young septic Mttp-IKO mice, aged septic Mttp-IKO mice had a significantly higher mortality than aged septic WT mice (80% vs. 39%, p = 0.005. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice exhibited increased gut epithelial apoptosis, increased jejunal Bax/Bcl-2 and Bax/Bcl-XL ratios yet simultaneously demonstrated increased crypt proliferation and villus length. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice also manifested increased pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels, suggesting increased neutrophil infiltration, as well as decreased systemic TNFα compared to aged septic WT mice. CONCLUSIONS: Blocking intestinal chylomicron secretion alters mortality following sepsis in an age-dependent manner. Increases in gut apoptosis and pulmonary neutrophil infiltration, and decreased systemic TNFα represent potential mechanisms for why intestine-specific Mttp deletion is beneficial in young septic mice but harmful in aged mice as each of these parameters are altered differently in young and aged septic WT and Mttp-IKO mice.

  12. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E McLaughlin

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin, a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1 contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  13. Fluorescence/bioluminescence resonance energy transfer techniques to study G-protein-coupled receptor activation and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Martin J; Nuber, Susanne; Hoffmann, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and BRET) techniques allow the sensitive monitoring of distances between two labels at the nanometer scale. Depending on the placement of the labels, this permits the analysis of conformational changes within a single protein (for example of a receptor) or the monitoring of protein-protein interactions (for example, between receptors and G-protein subunits). Over the past decade, numerous such techniques have been developed to monitor the activation and signaling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in both the purified, reconstituted state and in intact cells. These techniques span the entire spectrum from ligand binding to the receptors down to intracellular second messengers. They allow the determination and the visualization of signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution. With these techniques, it has been demonstrated that GPCR signals may show spatial and temporal patterning. In particular, evidence has been provided for spatial compartmentalization of GPCRs and their signals in intact cells and for distinct physiological consequences of such spatial patterning. We review here the FRET and BRET technologies that have been developed for G-protein-coupled receptors and their signaling proteins (G-proteins, effectors) and the concepts that result from such experiments. PMID:22407612

  14. The ice-binding proteins of a snow alga, Chloromonas brevispina: probable acquisition by horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, James A

    2014-11-01

    All ice-and snow-related unicellular algae examined so far secrete ice-binding proteins (IBPs) to mitigate freezing damage. Two types of IBP have been identified in chlorophytes. Type 1 IBPs are members of a large family of proteins that share a large domain of unknown function (DUF3494). Previous studies have suggested that the type 1 algal IBP genes were acquired by horizontal gene transfer. To test this hypothesis I sequenced the IBP genes of a snow alga, Chloromonas brevispina. The IBPs were identified by ice affinity purification, de novo sequencing of a tryptic peptide and large-scale sequencing of the transcriptome and genome. C. brevispina has genes for over 20 IBP isoforms, which strongly indicates their importance. The IBPs are all of type 1 and match fungal and bacterial proteins more closely than they match known algal IBPs, providing further evidence that the genes were acquired by horizontal transfer. Modeling of the 3D structures of the IBPs based on the known structure of a homologous protein suggests that the ice-binding site has characteristics that are shared by all DUF3494 proteins. PMID:25081506

  15. Nonspecific lipid-transfer protein genes expression in grape (vitis sp.) Cells in response to fungal elicitor treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Gomès, Eric; Sagot, Emeric; Gaillard, Cécile; Laquitaine, Laurent; Poinssot, Benoît; Sanejouand, Yves-Henri; Delrot, Serge; Coutos-Thévenot, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are small, basic cystein-rich proteins believed to be involved in plant defense mechanisms. Three cDNAs coding nsLTPs from grape (Vitis vinifera sp.) were cloned by reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR. The expression of nsLTP genes was investigated in 41B-rootstock grape cell suspension, in response to various defense-related signal molecules. Ergosterol (a fungi-specific sterol) and a proteinaceous elicitor puri...

  16. On the role of a Lipid-Transfer Protein. Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant is compromised in germination and seedling growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnussat, Luciana A; Oyarburo, Natalia; Cimmino, Carlos; Pinedo, Marcela L; de la Canal, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Plant Lipid-Transfer Proteins (LTPs) exhibit the ability to reversibly bind/transport lipids in vitro. LTPs have been involved in diverse physiological processes but conclusive evidence on their role has only been presented for a few members, none of them related to seed physiology. Arabidopsis seeds rely on storage oil breakdown to supply carbon skeletons and energy for seedling growth. Here, Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant was analyzed for its ability to germinate and for seedling establishment. Ltp3 showed delayed germination and reduced germination frequency. Seedling growth appeared reduced in the mutant but this growth restriction was rescued by the addition of an exogenous carbon supply, suggesting a defective oil mobilization. Lipid breakdown analysis during seedling growth revealed a differential profile in the mutant compared to the wild type. The involvement of LTP3 in germination and seedling growth and its relationship with the lipid transfer ability of this protein is discussed. PMID:26479260

  17. Modeling, docking and dynamics simulations of a non-specific lipid transfer protein from Peganum harmala L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zheng; Wang, Zi-jie; Xu, Huai-long; Tian, Yang; Li, Xin; Bao, Jin-ku; Sun, Su-rong; Yue, Bi-song

    2013-12-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (ns-LTPs), ubiquitously found in various types of plants, have been well-known to transfer amphiphilic lipids and promote the lipid exchange between mitochondria and microbody. In this study, an in silico analysis was proposed to study ns-LTP in Peganum harmala L., which may belong to ns-LTP1 family, aiming at constructing its three-dimensional structure. Moreover, we adopted MEGA to analyze ns-LTPs and other species phylogenetically, which brought out an initial sequence alignment of ns-LTPs. In addition, we used molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations to further investigate the affinities and stabilities of ns-LTP with several ligands complexes. Taken together, our results about ns-LTPs and their ligand-binding activities can provide a better understanding of the lipid-protein interactions, indicating some future applications of ns-LTP-mediated transport. PMID:23891721

  18. Analysis of the role of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein in the liver of tissue-specific knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Raabe, Martin; Véniant, Murielle M.; Sullivan, Meghan A.; Zlot, Constance H.; Björkegren, Johan; Nielsen, Lars Bo; Wong, Jinny S; Hamilton, Robert L.; Young, Stephen G.

    1999-01-01

    A deficiency in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) causes the human lipoprotein deficiency syndrome abetalipoproteinemia. However, the role of MTP in the assembly and secretion of VLDL in the liver is not precisely understood. It is not clear, for instance, whether MTP is required to move the bulk of triglycerides into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during the assembly of VLDL particles. To define MTP’s role in hepatic lipoprotein assembly, we recently knocked out the...

  19. Molecular regulation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein gene, MTP : Functional genetic studies in relation to cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ledmyr, Helena

    2004-01-01

    The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, MTP, is expressed mainly in the liver, intestine and in the heart. It is crucial for the assembly and secretion of apob-containing lipoproteins, chylomicrons in the intestine and very-low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in the liver. MTP's role in the heart is not fully understood, but it is likely to provide an export system for excess triglycerides from the heart muscle. We hypothesized that functional polymorphisms in the MTP gene...

  20. Thermal denaturation of barley lipid transfer protein 1 studied by nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žídková, Jitka; Matejková, M.; Žídek, L.; Wimmerová, M.; Sklenář, V.; Bobálová, Janette

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, 1a (2009), b53. ISSN 1211-5894. [Meeting of the Czech and Slovak Structural Biologists /7./. 12.03.2009-14.03.2009, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : thermal denaturation * barley lipid transfer protein 1 * NMR Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  1. On the role of a Lipid-Transfer Protein. Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant is compromised in germination and seedling growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnussat, Luciana A; Oyarburo, Natalia; Cimmino, Carlos; Pinedo, Marcela L; de la Canal, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Plant Lipid-Transfer Proteins (LTPs) exhibit the ability to reversibly bind/transport lipids in vitro. LTPs have been involved in diverse physiological processes but conclusive evidence on their role has only been presented for a few members, none of them related to seed physiology. Arabidopsis seeds rely on storage oil breakdown to supply carbon skeletons and energy for seedling growth. Here, Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant was analyzed for its ability to germinate and for seedling establishment. Lt...

  2. Enhanced tolerance to bacterial pathogens caused by the transgenic expression of barley lipid transfer protein LTP2

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Fernández, Antonio; García Olmedo, Francisco

    1997-01-01

    Purified lipid transfer protein LTP2 from barley applied on tobacco leaves eliminated symptoms caused by infiltration of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 153. Growth of the pathogen in leaves of transgenic tobacco plants was retarded when compared with non-transformed controls. The percentage of inoculation points that showed necrotic lesions was greatly reduced in transgenic tobacco 17–38% versus 78%) and the average size of these lesions was 61–81% that of control. The average total lesion a...

  3. Impaired Macromolecular Protein Pools in Fronto-Striato-Thalamic Circuits in Type 2 Diabetes Revealed by Magnetization Transfer Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shaolin; Ajilore, Olusola; Wu, Minjie; Lamar, Melissa; Kumar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with white matter microstructural changes, cognitive impairment, and decreased resting-state functional connectivity and spontaneous brain activity. This study used magnetization transfer imaging to examine, for the first time, the integrity of macromolecular protein pools in fronto-striato-thalamic circuits and its clinical and cognitive correlates in patients with T2DM. T2DM patients without mood disorders (n = 2...

  4. JTT-130, a Novel Intestine-Specific Inhibitor of Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein, Reduces Food Preference for Fat

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuko Mera; Takahiro Hata; Yukihito Ishii; Daisuke Tomimoto; Takashi Kawai; Takeshi Ohta; Makoto Kakutani

    2014-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is involved in the assembly and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from enterocytes and hepatocytes. JTT-130 is a novel intestine-specific MTP inhibitor, which has been shown to be useful in the prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia, obesity, and diabetes. JTT-130 has also been shown to suppress food intake in a dietary fat-dependent manner in rats. However, whether JTT-130 enables changes in food preference and nutrient consumption r...

  5. Role of horizontal gene transfer as a control on the coevolution of ribosomal proteins and the genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woese, Carl R.; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2011-03-31

    Our main goal is to develop the conceptual and computational tools necessary to understand the evolution of the universal processes of translation and replication and to identify events of horizontal gene transfer that occurred within the components. We will attempt to uncover the major evolutionary transitions that accompanied the development of protein synthesis by the ribosome and associated components of the translation apparatus. Our project goes beyond standard genomic approaches to explore homologs that are represented at both the structure and sequence level. Accordingly, use of structural phylogenetic analysis allows us to probe further back into deep evolutionary time than competing approaches, permitting greater resolution of primitive folds and structures. Specifically, our work focuses on the elements of translation, ranging from the emergence of the canonical genetic code to the evolution of specific protein folds, mediated by the predominance of horizontal gene transfer in early life. A unique element of this study is the explicit accounting for the impact of phenotype selection on translation, through a coevolutionary control mechanism. Our work contributes to DOE mission objectives through: (1) sophisticated computer simulation of protein dynamics and evolution, and the further refinement of techniques for structural phylogeny, which complement sequence information, leading to improved annotation of genomic databases; (2) development of evolutionary approaches to exploring cellular function and machinery in an integrated way; and (3) documentation of the phenotype interaction with translation over evolutionary time, reflecting the system response to changing selection pressures through horizontal gene transfer.

  6. Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) transfers fatty acids and fatty acyl coas to membranes

    OpenAIRE

    De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Hagan, Robert M; Wilton, David C.; Córsico, Betina

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to analyze LFABP´s capacity to transfer acyl CoAs to artificial membranes and compare it to LCFA transfer employing natural ligands, in order to better understand the specific physiological role of LFABP in the cell.

  7. Transfer-messenger RNA controls the translation of cell-cycle and stress proteins in Streptomyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barends, Sharief; Zehl, Martin; Bialek, Sylwia;

    2010-01-01

    coelicolor, trans-translation has a specialized role in stress management. Analysis of proteins that were carboxy-terminally His(8)-tagged by a recombinant tmRNA identified only 10 targets, including the stress proteins: DnaK heat-shock protein 70, thiostrepton-induced protein A, universal stress protein A...... functionality for tmRNA, promoting the translation of the same mRNA it targets, at the expense of sacrificing the first nascent protein. In streptomycetes, tmRNA has evolved into a dedicated task force that ensures the instantaneous response to the exposure to stress....

  8. Estimating protein-protein interaction affinity in single living cells using Förster resonance energy transfer measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ledet; Raarup, Merete Krog; Rubak, Ege

    Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) images we study the possibility of estimating the equilibrium dissociation constant Kd and the intrinsic FRET efficiency Em from single cells. We model the measurement uncertainty in the acquired images and use the method of total least squares for e...

  9. ARCHITECTURE OF A CHARGE-TRANSFER STATE REGULATING LIGHT HARVESTING IN A PLANT ANTENNA PROTEIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Graham; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-04-02

    Energy-dependent quenching of excess absorbed light energy (qE) is a vital mechanism for regulating photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. All of the physiological characteristics of qE have been positively correlated with charge-transfer between coupled chlorophyll and zeaxanthin molecules in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, we present evidence for charge-transfer quenching in all three of the individual minor antenna complexes of PSII (CP29, CP26, and CP24), and we conclude that charge-transfer quenching in CP29 involves a de-localized state of an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. We propose that reversible conformational changes in CP29 can `tune? the electronic coupling between the chlorophylls in this dimer, thereby modulating the energy of the chlorophylls-zeaxanthin charge-transfer state and switching on and off the charge-transfer quenching during qE.

  10. Receptor-G Protein Interaction Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer: Lessons From Protease-Activated Receptor 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli eAYOUB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its development, the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET approach has been extensively applied to study G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in real time and in live cells. One of the major aspects of GPCRs investigated in considerable details is their physical coupling to the heterotrimeric G proteins. As a result, new concepts have emerged, but few questions are still a matter of debate illustrating the complexity of GPCR-G protein interactions and coupling. Here, we summarized the recent advances on our understanding of GPCR-G protein coupling based on BRET approaches and supported by other FRET-based studies. We essentially focused on our recent studies in which we addressed the concept of preassembly versus the agonist-dependent interaction between the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1 and its cognate G proteins. We discussed the concept of agonist-induced conformational changes within the preassembled PAR1-G protein complexes as well as the critical question how the multiple coupling of PAR1 with two different G proteins, Gi1 and G12, but also -arrestin 1, can be regulated.

  11. Setting up a Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer high throughput screening assay to search for protein/protein interaction inhibitors in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril eCouturier

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Each step of the cell life and its response or adaptation to its environment are mediated by a network of protein/protein interactions termed interactome. Our knowledge of this network keeps growing due to the development of sensitive techniques devoted to study these interactions. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET technique was primarily developed to allow the dynamic monitoring of protein-protein interactions in living cells, and has widely been used to study receptor activation by intra- or extra-molecular conformational changes within receptors and activated complexes in mammal cells. Some interactions are described as crucial in human pathological processes, and a new class of drugs targeting them has recently emerged. The BRET method is well suited to identify inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and here is described why and how to set up and optimize a High Throughput Screening assay based on BRET to search for such inhibitory compounds. The different parameters to take into account when developing such BRET assays in mammal cells are reviewed to give general guidelines: considerations on the targeted interaction, choice of BRET version, inducibility of the interaction, kinetic of the monitored interaction, and of the BRET reading, influence substrate concentration, number of cells and medium composition used on the Z’ factor, and expected interferences for colored or fluorescent compounds.

  12. On the transfer of serum proteins to the rat intestinal juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Hansen, G H; Olsen, J;

    1994-01-01

    The in vivo pattern of serum proteins in the rat small-intestinal juice was characterized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Immunoglobulins and albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, transferrin, and orosomucoid were present. Larger serum proteins were absent (ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, alpha-1-macroglob......The in vivo pattern of serum proteins in the rat small-intestinal juice was characterized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Immunoglobulins and albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, transferrin, and orosomucoid were present. Larger serum proteins were absent (ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, alpha-1...... proteins in the intestinal juice is a selective passage through the capillary wall followed by passive intercellular transport via delivery of the serum in the interstitial space during disintegration of the enterocytes....

  13. Microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein prevents presecretory degradation of apolipoprotein B-100. A dithiothreitol-sensitive protease is involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, F; Nicodeme, E; Grand-Perret, T

    1996-09-15

    The role of microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTP) in the secretion of apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100) has been studied using an inhibitor of MTP: 4'-bromo-3'-methylmetaqualone. In vitro, this compound inhibits trioleoylglycerol transfer between lipid vesicles mediated by MTP with an IC50 of 0.9 microM whereas it does not inhibit the lipid transfer mediated by the cholesteryl ester transfer protein. In HepG2 cells, 4'-bromo-3'-methylmetaqualone inhibits the secretion of apoB-100 with an IC50 of 0.3 microM, without affecting the secretion of several other proteins like apoA-I or albumin. Moreover, there is no accumulation of apoB-100 in treated cells. Oleic acid, which increases apoB-100 secretion, only slightly modifies the IC50 of 4'-bromo-3'-methylmetaqualone (0.5 microM). The latter has no effect on the synthesis of major lipids within the cell, but decreases the secretion of triacylglycerol into apoB-100-containing lipoproteins. Pulse/chase experiments reveal that 4'-bromo-3'-methylmetaqualone acts on apoB-100 production either at the co-translational or post-translational level. The cysteine protease inhibitor N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal does not protect apoB-100 from the 4'-bromo-3'-methylmetaqualone effect but seems to be involved in a later step of apoB-100 intracellular degradation. By contrast, dithiothreitol can totally reverse the effect of the MTP inhibitor on apoB-100 production. The mechanism of MTP-mediated lipid assembly with apoB-100 is discussed. PMID:8856075

  14. Transferable coarse-grained potential for $\\textit{de novo}$ protein folding and design

    CERN Document Server

    Coluzza, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding and design are major biophysical problems, the solution of which would lead to important applications especially in medicine. Here a novel protein model capable of simultaneously provide quantitative protein design and folding is introduced. With computer simulations it is shown that, for a large set of real protein structures, the model produces designed sequences with similar physical properties to the corresponding natural occurring sequences. The designed sequences are not yet fully realistic and require further experimental testing. For an independent set of proteins, notoriously difficult to fold, the correct folding of both the designed and the natural sequences is also demonstrated. The folding properties are characterized by free energy calculations. which not only are consistent among natural and designed proteins, but we also show a remarkable precision when the folded structures are compared to the experimentally determined ones. Ultimately, this novel coarse-grained protein model ...

  15. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Lan, Minbo

    2016-02-01

    An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU-PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm2, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  16. Leading coordinate analysis of reaction pathways in proton chain transfer: Application to a two-proton transfer model for the green fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'leading coordinate' approach to computing an approximate reaction pathway, with subsequent determination of the true minimum energy profile, is applied to a two-proton chain transfer model based on the chromophore and its surrounding moieties within the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using an ab initio quantum chemical method, a number of different relaxed energy profiles are found for several plausible guesses at leading coordinates. The results obtained for different trial leading coordinates are rationalized through the calculation of a two-dimensional relaxed potential energy surface (PES) for the system. Analysis of the 2-D relaxed PES reveals that two of the trial pathways are entirely spurious, while two others contain useful information and can be used to furnish starting points for successful saddle-point searches. Implications for selection of trial leading coordinates in this class of proton chain transfer reactions are discussed, and a simple diagnostic function is proposed for revealing whether or not a relaxed pathway based on a trial leading coordinate is likely to furnish useful information

  17. A trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex for extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yimo; Wang, Zheming; Liu, Juan; Levar, Caleb; Edwards, Marcus; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Zhi; Beyenal, Haluk; Bond, Daniel R.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang

    2014-09-24

    The multiheme, outer membrane c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) OmcB of Geobacter sulfurreducens was previously proposed to mediate electron transfer across the outer membrane. However, the underlying mechanism has remained uncharacterized. In G. sulfurreducens, the omcB gene is part of two tandem four-gene clusters, each is predicted to encode a transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (OmaB/OmaC), and an outer membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC), respectively. Here we showed that OmbB/OmbC, OmaB/OmaC and OmcB/OmcC of G. sulfurreducens PCA formed the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complexes, which were involved in transferring electrons across the outer membrane. The isolated Pcc protein complexes reconstituted in proteoliposomes transferred electrons from reduced methyl viologen across the lipid bilayer of liposomes to Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. The pcc clusters were found in all eight sequenced Geobacter and 11 other bacterial genomes from six different phyla, demonstrating a widespread distribution of Pcc protein complexes in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Deletion of ombB-omaB-omcB-orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC gene clusters had no impact on the growth of G. sulfurreducens PCA with fumarate, but diminished the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. Complementation with the ombB-omaB-omcB gene cluster restored the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite.

  18. A trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex for extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yimo; Wang, Zheming; Liu, Juan; Levar, Caleb; Edwards, Marcus J; Babauta, Jerome T; Kennedy, David W; Shi, Zhi; Beyenal, Haluk; Bond, Daniel R; Clarke, Thomas A; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Rosso, Kevin M; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K; Shi, Liang

    2014-01-01

    The multi-heme, outer membrane c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) OmcB of Geobacter sulfurreducens was previously proposed to mediate electron transfer across the outer membrane. However, the underlying mechanism has remained uncharacterized. In G. sulfurreducens, the omcB gene is part of two tandem four-gene clusters, each is predicted to encode a transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (OmaB/OmaC) and an outer membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC) respectively. Here, we showed that OmbB/OmbC, OmaB/OmaC and OmcB/OmcC of G. sulfurreducens PCA formed the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complexes, which were involved in transferring electrons across the outer membrane. The isolated Pcc protein complexes reconstituted in proteoliposomes transferred electrons from reduced methyl viologen across the lipid bilayer of liposomes to Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. The pcc clusters were found in all eight sequenced Geobacter and 11 other bacterial genomes from six different phyla, demonstrating a widespread distribution of Pcc protein complexes in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Deletion of ombB-omaB-omcB-orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC gene clusters had no impact on the growth of G. sulfurreducens PCA with fumarate but diminished the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. Complementation with the ombB-omaB-omcB gene cluster restored the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. PMID:25139405

  19. The lumenal loop M672-P707 of the Menkes protein (ATP7A) transfers copper to peptidylglycine monooxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otoikhian, Adenike [Oregon Health & Sciences University; Barry, Amanda N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayfield, Mary [Oregon Health & Science University; Nilges, Mark [Illinois EPR Center; Huang, Yiping [Johns Hopkins University; Lutsenko, Svetlana [Johns Hopkins University; Blackburn, Ninian [Oregon Health & Science University

    2012-05-14

    Copper transfer to cuproproteins located in vesicular compartments of the secretory pathway depends on activity of the copper translocating ATPase (ATP7A or ATP7B) but the mechanism of transfer is largely unexplored. Copper-ATPase ATP7A is unique in having a sequence rich in histidine and methionine residues located on the lumenal side of the membrane. The corresponding fragment binds Cu(I) when expressed as a chimera with a scaffold protein, and mutations or deletions of His and/or Met residues in its sequence inhibit dephosphorylation of the ATPase, a catalytic step associated with copper release. Here we present evidence for a potential role of this lumenal region of ATP7A in copper transfer to cuproenzymes. Both Cu(II) and Cu(I) forms were investigated since the form in which copper is transferred to acceptor proteins is currently unknown. Analysis of Cu(II) using EPR demonstrated that at Cu:P ratios below 1:1, 15N-substituted protein had Cu(II) bound by 4 His residues, but this coordination changed as the Cu(II) to protein ratio increased towards 2:1. XAS confirmed this coordination via analysis of the intensity of outer-shell scattering from imidazole residues. The Cu(II) complexes could be reduced to their Cu(I) counterparts by ascorbate, but here again, as shown by EXAFS and XANES spectroscopy, the coordination was dependent on copper loading. At low copper Cu(I) was bound by a mixed ligand set of His + Met while at higher ratios His coordination predominated. The copper-loaded loop was able to transfer either Cu(II) or Cu(I) to peptidylglycine monooxygenase in the presence of chelating resin, generating catalytically active enzyme in a process that appeared to involve direct interaction between the two partners. The variation of coordination with copper loading suggests copper-dependent conformational change which in turn could act as a signal for regulating copper release by the ATPase pump.

  20. Atomic force microscopy study of the adsorption of protein molecules on transferred Langmuir monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordered protein films have been obtained by the adsorption of protein molecules on a Langmuir monolayer, which had previously formed on a silicon substrate, using the Langmuir-Blodgett and molecular self-organization methods. A mixture of cholesterol with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and a polymer-cellulose acetopivalinate-were used as immobilization materials. Protein molecules (catalase and alkaline phosphatase) immobilized on solid substrates have been investigated by atomic force micros-copy. It was shown that the developed combined technique provides a deposition of homogeneous ultrathin protein films with a high degree of filling.

  1. EFFECT OF ADIPOSITY ON PLASMA-LIPID TRANSFER PROTEIN ACTIVITIES - A POSSIBLE LINK BETWEEN INSULIN-RESISTANCE AND HIGH-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN METABOLISM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF; SLUITER, WJ; DIKKESCHEI, LD; HOOGENBERG, K; VANTOL, A

    1994-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels associated with obesity and insulin resistance are not well understood. Lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) are key factors in the esterification of c

  2. Evolution of Type II Antifreeze Protein Genes in Teleost Fish: A Complex Scenario Involving Lateral Gene Transfers and Episodic Directional Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Ulf Sorhannus

    2012-01-01

    I examined hypotheses about lateral transfer of type II antifreeze protein (AFP) genes among “distantly” related teleost fish. The effects of episodic directional selection on amino acid evolution were also investigated. The strict consensus results showed that the type II AFP and type II antifreeze-like protein genes were transferred from Osmerus mordax to Clupea harengus, from the ancestral lineage of the Brachyopsis rostratus—Hemitripterus americanus clade to the ancestor of the Hypomesus ...

  3. The integrity of the alpha-helical domain of intestinal fatty acid binding protein is essential for the collision-mediated transfer of fatty acids to phospholipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, G R; Storch, J; Corsico, B

    2008-04-01

    Intestinal FABP (IFABP) and liver FABP (LFABP), homologous proteins expressed at high levels in intestinal absorptive cells, employ markedly different mechanisms of fatty acid transfer to acceptor model membranes. Transfer from IFABP occurs during protein-membrane collisional interactions, while for LFABP transfer occurs by diffusion through the aqueous phase. In addition, transfer from IFABP is markedly faster than from LFABP. The overall goal of this study was to further explore the structural differences between IFABP and LFABP which underlie their large functional differences in ligand transport. In particular, we addressed the role of the alphaI-helix domain in the unique transport properties of intestinal FABP. A chimeric protein was engineered with the 'body' (ligand binding domain) of IFABP and the alphaI-helix of LFABP (alpha(I)LbetaIFABP), and the fatty acid transfer properties of the chimeric FABP were examined using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. The results showed a significant decrease in the absolute rate of FA transfer from alpha(I)LbetaIFABP compared to IFABP. The results indicate that the alphaI-helix is crucial for IFABP collisional FA transfer, and further indicate the participation of the alphaII-helix in the formation of a protein-membrane "collisional complex". Photo-crosslinking experiments with a photoactivable reagent demonstrated the direct interaction of IFABP with membranes and further support the importance of the alphaI helix of IFABP in its physical interaction with membranes. PMID:18284926

  4. Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

  5. Protein hydrogen exchange measured at single-residue resolution by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard;

    2009-01-01

    Because of unparalleled sensitivity and tolerance to protein size, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a popular method for measuring the solution hydrogen (1H/2H) exchange (HX) of biologically relevant protein states. While incorporated deuterium can be localized to different regions by pepsin...

  6. Effects of alpha-tocopherol on fracture resistance after endodontic treatment, bleaching and restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Cristina Fagundes JORDÃO-BASSO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the effects of 10% alphatocopherol on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin. Fifty bovine incisors were selected, including 10 sound teeth that constituted the control group (G1 (C. The remaining 40 teeth, which were endodontically treated, were divided into four groups (n = 10: G2 (CR, consisting of teeth immediately restored with composite resin; G3 (HP + CR, consisting of teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin; G4 (HP + SA + CR, which received treatment similar to that used for G3, but with 10% sodium ascorbate gel applied after the bleaching protocol; and G5 (HP + AT + CR, which was similar to G4 but included 10% alphatocopherol gel as an antioxidant. After 24 h, composite restorations were performed, and teeth were subjected to a fracture resistance test at a speed of 0.5 mm/min in an electromechanical testing machine. The axial force was applied with an angle of incidence of 135° relative to the long axis of the root. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p = 0.05. G1 exhibited the highest fracture resistance (p < 0.05. No significant differences among the other experimental groups were observed. The 10% sodium ascorbate and 10% alphatocopherol gels did not improve the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide.

  7. Abiotic stress modifies the synthesis of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene in phytoplankton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häubner, Norbert; Sylvander, Peter; Vuori, Kristiina; Snoeijs, Pauline

    2014-08-01

    We performed laboratory experiments to investi-gate whether the synthesis of the antioxidants α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and β-carotene in phytoplankton depends on changes in abiotic factors. Cultures of Nodularia spumigena, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Skeletonema costatum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Prorocentrum cordatum, and Rhodomonas salina were incubated at different tempe-ratures, photon flux densities and salinities for 48 h. We found that abiotic stress, within natural ecological ranges, affects the synthesis of the two antioxidants in different ways in different species. In most cases antioxidant production was stimulated by increased abiotic stress. In P. tricornutum KAC 37 and D. tertiolecta SCCAP K-0591, both good producers of this compound, α-tocopherol accumulation was negatively affected by environmentally induced higher photosystem II efficiency (Fv /Fm ). On the other hand, β-carotene accumulation was positively affected by higher Fv /Fm in N. spumigena KAC 7, P. tricornutum KAC 37, D. tertiolecta SCCAP K-0591 and R. salina SCCAP K-0294. These different patterns in the synthesis of the two compounds may be explained by their different locations and functions in the cell. While α-tocopherol is heavily involved in the protection of prevention of lipid peroxidation in membranes, β-carotene performs immediate photo-oxidative protection in the antennae complex of photosystem II. Overall, our results suggest a high variability in the antioxidant pool of natural aquatic ecosystems, which can be subject to short-term temperature, photon flux density and salinity fluctuations. The antioxidant levels in natural phytoplankton communities depend on species composition, the physiological condition of the species, and their respective strategies to deal with reactive oxygen species. Since α-tocopherol and β-carotene, as well as many other nonenzymatic antioxidants, are exclusively produced by photo-synthetic organisms, and are required by higher trophic levels through dietary intake, regime shifts in the phytoplankton as a result of large-scale environmental changes, such as climate change, may have serious consequences for aquatic food webs. PMID:26988459

  8. Alpha -tocopherol supplementation on chromium toxicity : a study on rat liver and kidney cell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Membrane damage is one of the important consequence of chromium, an environmental toxicant, to produce cytotoxicity. α-tocopherol, a membrane protectant can be used to reduce the chromium-induced membrane damage. In the present study, the impact of chromium in presence and absence of α-tocopherol was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100g body weight). Significant increase in membrane cholesterol level as well as significant decrease in membrane phospholipid level in chromium exposed ( 0.8 mg /100g body weight/d, i.p., for 4 weeks) animals suggest structural alteration of both liver and kidney plasma memebrane. The alkaline phosphatase, total ATPase and Na+-K+-ATPase activities of plasma membrane were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment. However, α-tocopherol (30 mg / 100g diet) supplementation can restrict the changes in these membrane-bound enzyme activities. Thus, the usefulness of dietary supplementation of α-tocopherol to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage is suggested.

  9. Alpha-tocopherol concentration in serum and colostrum of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Barros S. Resende

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the levels of α-tocopherol in colostrum and in the serum of healthy and diabetic mothers.METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled 51 volunteer mothers, 20 with the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus and 31 without associated diseases. Serum and colostrum samples were collected in fasting in the immediate postpartum period and α-tocopherol was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. In order to define the nutritional status of vitamin E, the cutoff point for the serum (697.7µg/dL was adopted. Student's t-test for independent variables compared the average concentrations of α-tocopherol in the serum and in the colostrum between control and gestational diabetes mellitus groups. Pearson's correlation was used to assess the relationship between the concentration of α-tocopherol in serum and colostrum for both groups. Differences were considered significant when p<0.05.RESULTS: The α-tocopherol concentration in colostrum was 1,483.1±533.8µg/dL for Control Group and 1,368.8±681.8µg/dL for diabetic women, without differences between groups (p=0.50. However, α-tocopherol concentration in the serum was 1,059.5±372.7µg/dL in the Control Group and 1,391.4±531.5µg/dL in the diabetic one (p<0.01. No correlation was found between the concentration of α-tocopherol in the serum and in the colostrum for control and diabetic groups.CONCLUSIONS: The groups had adequate nutritional status of vitamin E. Gestational diabetes was not associated with changes in α-tocopherol concentration in colostrum.

  10. Rectal administration of d-alpha tocopherol for active ulcerative colitis: A preliminary report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Amir Mirbagheri; Behtash Ghazi Nezami; Solmaz Assa; Mannan Hajimahmoodi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-oxidant and anti-neutrophil recruitment effects of rectal d-alpha (d-α) tocopherol administration on mild and moderately active ulcerative colitis (UC).METHODS: Fifteen patients with mild and moderately active ulcerative colitis were enrolled in an open-label study of d-α tocopherol enema (8000 U/d) for 12 wk. All patients were receiving concomitant therapy with 5-aminosalicylic acid derivatives (5-ASA) and/or immunomodulator medications. Endoscopic evaluation was performed at baseline and after 4th and 12th weeks. Disease activity was measured with the Mayo disease activity index (DAI) and remission was defined as DAI of≤2 with no blood in stool. Clinical response was defined as a DAI reduction of≥2.RESULTS: At the end of 12th week, the average DAI score significantly decreased compared to the beginning of the study (2.3±0.37 vs 8±0.48, P < 0.0001). One patient was withdrawn after 3 wk for being unavailable to follow-up. On the 4th week of therapy, 12 patients showed clinical response, 3 of whom (21.4%) achieving remission. After 12 wk, all 14 patients responded clinically to the therapy and remission was induced in 9 of them (64%). No patient reported adverse events or was hospitalized due to worsened disease activity.CONCLUSION: This preliminary report suggests that rectal d-α tocopherol may represent a novel therapy for mild and moderately active UC. The observed results might be due to the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties of vitamin E.

  11. Alpha-tocopherol ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through the regulation of Th1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haikuo Xue

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a serious neurological autoimmune disease, it commonly affects young adults. Vitamin E (Vit E is an important component of human diet with antioxidant activity, which protects the body’s biological systems. In order to assess the effect of Vit E treatment on this autoimmune disease, we established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS, and treated EAE with α-tocopherol (AT which is the main content of Vit E. Materials and Methods:Twenty C57BL/6 adult female mice were used and divided into two groups randomly. EAE was induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG, and one group was treated with AT, at a dose of 100 mg/kg on the 3th day post-immunization with MOG, the other group was treated with 1% alcohol. Mice were euthanized on day 14, post-immunization, spleens were removed for assessing splenocytes proliferation and cytokine profile, and spinal cords were dissected to assess the infiltration of inflammatory cells in spinal cord. Results:AT was able to attenuate the severity of EAE and delay the disease progression. H&E staining and fast blue staining indicated that AT reduced the inflammation and the demyelination reaction in the spinal cord. Treatment with AT significantly decreased the proliferation of splenocytes. AT also inhibited the production of IFN-γ (Th1 cytokine, though the other cytokines were only affected slightly. Conclusion:According to the results, AT ameliorated EAE, through suppressing the proliferation of T cells and the Th1 response. AT may be used as a potential treatment for MS.

  12. In vivo adverse effects of alpha-tocopherol on the semen quality of male bucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, A; Qureshi, M S; Khan, R U

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress has detrimental effects on semen quality during spermatogenesis and semen processing for artificial insemination. This work was conducted to study the effect of different levels of vitamin E on the semen traits, oxidative status and trace minerals in Beetal bucks. Thirty-six bucks of similar body weight and age (1 year) were randomly divided into four groups. One group was kept as control with no supplementation (group 1), and the others were supplemented with 200 (group 2), 400 (group 3) and 800 IU (group 4) vitamin E/animal/day for 2 months. At the end of the experiment, semen samples were collected and evaluated. Seminal plasma was separated to study the concentration of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and trace minerals (Zn, Cu, Mn and Fe). Group 3 showed significantly higher (p mineral levels (Zn, Cu, Mn) in the seminal plasma. The increased supplementation from 0 to 400 showed a general increasing trend in improving semen quality. However, the dose of 800 IU/kg had no useful effect in further improving the semen quality. PMID:25580862

  13. Alpha-Tocopherol Counteracts the Cytotoxicity Induced by Ochratoxin A in Primary Porcine Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusi, Eleonora; Rebucci, Raffaella; Pecorini, Chiara; Campagnoli, Anna; Pinotti, Luciano; Saccone, Francesca; Cheli, Federica; Purup, Stig; Sejrsen, Kristen; Baldi, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine the half-lethal concentration of ochratoxin A (OTA) as well as the levels of lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA fragmentation induced by OTA in primary porcine fibroblasts, and to examine the role of α-tocopherol in counteracting its toxicity. Cells showed a dose-, time- and origin-dependent (ear vs. embryo) sensitivity to ochratoxin A. Pre-incubation for 3 h with 1 nM α-tocopherol significantly (P < 0.01) reduced OTA cytotoxicity, lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA damage in both fibroblast cultures. These findings indicate that α-tocopherol supplementation may counteract short-term OTA toxicity, supporting its defensive role in the cell membrane. PMID:22069637

  14. Synthesis and computational investigation of molecularly imprinted nanospheres for selective recognition of alpha-tocopherol succinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacham, Theeraphon; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are macromolecular matrices that can mimic the functional properties of antibodies, receptors and enzymes while possessing higher durability. As such, these polymers are interesting materials for applications in biomimetic sensor, drug synthesis, drug delivery and separation. In this study, we prepared MIPs and molecularly imprinted nanospheres (MINs) as receptors with specific recognition properties toward tocopherol succinate (TPS) in comparison to tocopherol (TP) and tocopherol nicotinate (TPN). MIPs were synthesized using methacrylic acid (MAA) as functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crosslinking agent and dichloromethane or acetronitrile as porogenic solvent under thermal-induced polymerization condition. Results indicated that imprinted polymers of TPS-MIP, TP-MIP and TPN-MIP all bound specifically to their template molecules at 2 folds greater than the non-imprinted polymers. The calculated binding capacity of all MIP was approximately 2 mg per gram of polymer when using the optimal rebinding solvent EtOH:H2O (3:2, v/v). Furthermore, the MINs toward TPS and TP were prepared by precipitation polymerization that yielded particles that are 200-400 nm in size. The binding capacities of MINs to their templates were greater than that of the non-imprinted nanospheres when using the optimal rebinding solvent EtOH:H2O (4:1, v/v). Computer simulation was performed to provide mechanistic insights on the binding modalities of template-monomer complexes. In conclusion, we had successful prepared MIPs and MINs for binding specifically to TP and TPS. Such MIPs and MINs have great potential for industrial and medical applications, particularly for the selective separation of TP and TPS. PMID:26622214

  15. Alpha-tocopherol concentration in serum and colostrum of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Fernanda Barros S.; Clemente, Heleni Aires; Bezerra, Dalila Fernandes; Grilo, Evellyn Câmara; de Melo, Larisse Rayanne M.; Bellot, Paula Emília N. R.; Dantas, Raquel Costa S.; Dimenstein, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the levels of α-tocopherol in colostrum and in the serum of healthy and diabetic mothers. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled 51 volunteer mothers, 20 with the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus and 31 without associated diseases. Serum and colostrum samples were collected in fasting in the immediate postpartum period and α-tocopherol was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In order to define the nutritional status of vitamin E, the cutoff point for the serum (697.7µg/dL) was adopted. Student's t-test for independent variables compared the average concentrations of α-tocopherol in the serum and in the colostrum between control and gestational diabetes mellitus groups. Pearson's correlation was used to assess the relationship between the concentration of α-tocopherol in serum and colostrum for both groups. Differences were considered significant when p<0.05. RESULTS: The α-tocopherol concentration in colostrum was 1,483.1±533.8µg/dL for Control Group and 1,368.8±681.8µg/dL for diabetic women, without differences between groups (p=0.50). However, α-tocopherol concentration in the serum was 1,059.5±372.7µg/dL in the Control Group and 1,391.4±531.5µg/dL in the diabetic one (p<0.01). No correlation was found between the concentration of α-tocopherol in the serum and in the colostrum for control and diabetic groups. CONCLUSIONS: The groups had adequate nutritional status of vitamin E. Gestational diabetes was not associated with changes in α-tocopherol concentration in colostrum. PMID:25119748

  16. Hepatoprotective effect of curcumin and alpha-tocopherol against cisplatin-induced oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background cis-Diammineplatinum (II) dichloride (cisplatin) is the important anti-cancer agent useful in treatment of various cancers. Unfortunately, it can produce unwanted side effects in various tissues, including the liver. The present study investigated the possible protective role of curcumin and α-tocopherol against oxidative stress-induced hepatotoxicity in rats upon cisplatin treatment. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n = 5). Saline and Cis groups, rats were intraperitoneal (i.p.) injected with normal saline and cisplatin [20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)], respectively. Cis + α-tocopherol group, Cis + Cur group and Cis + α-tocopherol + Cur group, rats were pre-treated with a single dose of α-tocopherol (250 mg/kg b.w.), curcumin (200 mg/kg b.w.) and combined α-tocopherol with curcumin, respectively, for 24 h prior the administration of cisplatin. After 72 h of first injection, specimens were collected. Liver enzyme, lipid peroxidation biomarker, liver histopathology and gene expression of liver nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase were investigated. Results Cisplatin revealed a significant increase of hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and a significant reduction of hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities compared to the saline group. It elicited a marked increase of the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels and demonstrated the liver pathologies including liver congestion, disorganization of hepatic cords and ground glass appearance of hepatocytes. It also demonstrated a significant increase of NADPH oxidase gene expression compared to saline group. Pre-treatment with combined curcumin and α-tocopherol improved the liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation biomarker, liver histopathology and gene expression of liver NADPH oxidase in cisplatin-treated rats. Conclusions The findings indicate that pre-treatment with combined curcumin and α-tocopherol can protect cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity including the biochemical, histological and molecular aspects. The down-regulations of NADPH oxidase gene expression may be involved in abrogating oxidative stress via reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. PMID:24674233

  17. Alpha-tocopherol and Ascorbic Acid Combinations Influence the Maturation of Sheep Oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Miclea

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to establish whether supplementation with combinations of α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid could improve the maturation and expansion of sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes. Sheep oocytes were cultured for 24 hours at 37°C in 5.4% CO2 atmosphere in M199 containing 20 μM α-tocopherol+750 μM ascorbic acid or 5 μM α-tocopherol+250 μM ascorbic acid. Afterwards, cumulus oophorus expansion was assessed and oocytes were denuded. The presence of the first polar body was assessed by fluorescent staining with Hoechst 33258. Differences between treatments were analyzed by the analysis of variance and interpreted using the LSD test. Supplementation with the combination of 20 μM α-tocopherol+750 μM ascorbic acid resulted in significantly greater (p<0.05 percentages of COCs that were scored as 3. However, the number of COCs scored at 4 decreased. The same dynamic could be seen when oocytes were checked for the presence of the first polar body. Percentages decreased with the increase in antioxidant concentration. This indicates that although antioxidants, in these particular concentrations have been proven to have a positive influence on swine oocyte maturation the same cannot be said for ovine female gametes.

  18. Interactions between alpha-tocopherol, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lipoxygenases during embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebold, Katie M; Traber, Maret G

    2013-01-01

    α-Tocopherol is a lipid-soluble antioxidant that is specifically required for reproduction and embryogenesis. However, since its discovery, α-tocopherol’s specific biologic functions, other than as an antioxidant, and the mechanism(s) mediating its requirement for embryogenesis, remain unknown. As an antioxidant, α-tocopherol protects polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from lipid peroxidation. α-Tocopherol is likely required during embryonic development to protect PUFAs that are crucial to development, specifically arachidonic (ARA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. Additionally, ARA and DHA are metabolized to bioactive lipid mediators via lipoxygenase enzymes and α-tocopherol may directly protect, or it may mediate the production and/or actions of these lipid mediators. In this review, we discuss how α-tocopherol 1) prevents the nonspecific, radical-mediated peroxidation of PUFAs, 2) functions within a greater antioxidant network to modulate the production and/or function of lipid mediators derived from 12- and 12/15-lipoxygenase and 3) modulates 5-lipoxygenase activity. The application and implication of such interactions with be discussed in the context α-tocopherol requirements during embryogenesis. PMID:23920314

  19. Alpha-Tocopherol Counteracts the Cytotoxicity Induced by Ochratoxin A in Primary Porcine Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Fusi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the current study were to determine the half-lethal concentration of ochratoxin A (OTA as well as the levels of lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA fragmentation induced by OTA in primary porcine fibroblasts, and to examine the role of α-tocopherol in counteracting its toxicity. Cells showed a dose-, time- and origin-dependent (ear vs. embryo sensitivity to ochratoxin A. Pre-incubation for 3 h with 1 nM α-tocopherol significantly (P < 0.01 reduced OTA cytotoxicity, lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA damage in both fibroblast cultures. These findings indicate that α-tocopherol supplementation may counteract short-term OTA toxicity, supporting its defensive role in the cell membrane.

  20. Determination of alpha-Tocopherol (vitamin E) in irradiated garlic by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of 60Co ionizing radiations in doses of 0, 75, 100, 150, 200 and 250Gy on garlic, upon the α-tocopherol concentration were studied. The α-tocopherol contents were established by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), after direct hexane extraction from the garlic samples. The α-tocopherol was determined through normal phase column, and mobile phase was composed by hexane: iso-propyl alcohol (99:01 v/v), with 2mL/min flow rate and fluorescence detector. It is statistically shown that an irradiation dose of up to 150 Gy does not affect the garlic α-tocopherol content. (author)

  1. Spectroscopic studies of alpha tocopherol interaction with a model liposome and its influence on oxidation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krilov, Dubravka; Kosović, Marin; Serec, Kristina

    2014-08-01

    The influence of α-tocopherol on the surface conformation of liposome, as a model component of lipoproteins, and its role in oxidation process were studied. FT-IR spectra from suspensions of neat liposome, mixtures of liposome and α-tocopherol and liposome with incorporated α-tocopherol were analyzed. When α-tocopherol was incorporated into liposome, intensities of some bands were decreased or increased in comparison with the spectra of liposome and α-tocopherol mixture. These changes reflect the different localization of α-tocopherol in two types of liposome suspensions. The oxidation of liposome suspensions was initiated by addition of cupric ions. After prolonged oxidation, the differences in FT-IR spectra of oxidized samples were recorded. Differences were observed in comparison with spectra of native and oxidized liposomes were analyzed. The rate of oxidation was measured by EPR oximetry. Oxidation was generally very slow, but faster in liposome without α-tocopherol, indicating the protective role of α-tocopherol against liposome oxidation. On the other hand, liposome suspensions with EDTA in the buffer were not oxidized at all, while those with α-tocopherol and liposome mixture were only slightly oxidized. In this case the consumption of oxygen was the result of liposome oxidation supported by α-tocopherol. These results reflect the ambivalent role of α-tocopherol in liposome oxidation, similarly to findings in studies of lipoprotein oxidation.

  2. Alpha-Tocopherol Counteracts the Cytotoxicity Induced by Ochratoxin A in Primary Porcine Fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusi, Elenora; Rebucci, Raffaella; Pecorini, Chiara;

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine the half-lethal concentration of ochratoxin A (OTA) as well as the levels of lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA fragmentation induced by OTA in primary porcine fibroblasts, and to examine the role of α-tocopherol in counteracting its toxicity. Ce...

  3. Expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein in lipoprotein-synthesizing tissues of the developing chicken embryo ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Eresheim, Christine; Plieschnig, Julia; Ivessa, N. Erwin; Schneider, Wolfgang J.; Hermann, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, in the chicken major sites of lipoprotein synthesis and secretion are not only the liver and intestine, but also the kidney and the embryonic yolk sac. Two key components in the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and apolipoprotein B (apoB). We have analyzed the expression of MTP in the embryonic liver, small intestine, and kidney, and have studied the expression of MTP in, and the secretion of apoB from, t...

  4. A vertebrate model for the study of lipid binding/transfer protein function: conservation of OSBP-related proteins between zebrafish and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Wohlfahrt, Gerd; Paavola, Jere; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2014-04-11

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and OSBP-related (ORP) or OSBP-like (OSBPL) proteins constitute a family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) present in eukaryotes from yeast to man. The mechanisms of ORP function have remained incompletely understood. However, several ORPs are present at membrane contact sites and act as either lipid transporters or sensors that control lipid metabolism, cell signaling, and vesicle transport. Zebrafish, Danio rerio, has gained increasing popularity as a model organism in developmental biology, human disease, toxicology, and drug discovery. However, LTPs in the fish are thus far unexplored. In this article we report a series of bioinformatic analyses showing that the OSBPL gene family is highly conserved between the fish and human. The OSBPL subfamily structure is markedly similar between the two organisms, and all 12 human genes have orthologs, designated osbpl and located on 11 chromosomes in D. rerio. Interestingly, osbpl2 and osbpl3 are present as two closely related homologs (a and b), due to gene duplication events in the teleost lineage. Moreover, the domain structures of the distinct ORP proteins are almost identical between zebrafish and man, and molecular modeling in the present study suggests that ORD liganding by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P) is a feature conserved between yeast Osh3p, human ORP3, and zebrafish Osbpl3. The present analysis identifies D. rerio as an attractive model to study the functions of ORPs in vertebrate development and metabolism. PMID:24326072

  5. Protein repellent hydrophilic grafts prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization from polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Eskimergen, Rüya;

    2012-01-01

    Grafting of poly(ethylene glycol)methacrylate (PEGMA) and N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAAm) from UV-initiator modified polypropylene (PP) was performed by Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI-ATRP). The modification and hydrophilization of the PP substrates were confirmed with ...

  6. Surface residues dynamically organize water bridges to enhance electron transfer between proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la Lande, A.; Babcock, N. S.; Řezáč, Jan; Sanders, B. C.; Salahub, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 26 (2010), s. 11799-11804. ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electron transfer * pathway model * mutations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.771, year: 2010

  7. Blue copper proteins as a model for investigating electron transfer processes within polypeptide matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1994-01-01

    Cu(II) ion bound at a distance of approximately 2.6 nm has been studied, in naturally occurring and in single-site mutated azurins. The role of changing specific amino acid residues on the internal long-range electron transfer (LRET) process and its potential pathways has been investigated. It is...

  8. Electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide for sensitive protein kinase activity and inhibitor sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Wei-Bin; Zhao, Hui-Fang; Xiang, Cai-Yun; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-01-21

    Herein, a novel electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) biosensor using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as donor and graphene oxide (GO) as acceptor for monitoring the activity of protein kinase was presented for the first time. Anti-phosphoserine antibody conjugated graphene oxide (Ab-GO) nonocomposite could be captured onto the phosphorylated peptide/GQDs modified electrode surface through antibody-antigen interaction in the presence of casein kinase II (CK2) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), resulting in ECL from the GQDs quenching by closely contacting GO. This ECL quenching degree was positively correlated with CK2 activity. Therefore, on the basis of ECL-RET between GQDs and GO, the activity of protein kinase can be detected sensitively. This biosensor can also be used for quantitative analysis CK2 activity in serum samples and qualitative screening kinase inhibition, indicating the potential application of the developed method in biochemical fundamental research and clinical diagnosis. PMID:26724763

  9. Novel Methods To Detect Membrane Proteins | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute on Aging's Laboratory of Cardiovascular Sciences is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize modules to aid the study of mammalian membrane proteins.

  10. Expression of 9 kDa lipid transfer protein genes in developing wheat grains is enhanced by high temperature but not by post-anthesis fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A survey of EST databases identified sixteen 9 kDa non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) expressed in developing grains from the US spring wheat Butte 86. Two of the most prevalent sequences encoded nsLTPs similar to proteins identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/mass spectrometr...

  11. Photoabsorption and resonance energy transfer phenomenon in CdTe-protein bioconjugates: an insight into QD-biomolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayaka, Aaydha C; Thakur, Munna S

    2011-05-18

    Luminescent quantum dots (QDs) possess unique photophysical properties, which are advantageous in the development of new generation robust fluorescent probes based on Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) phenomena. Bioconjugation of these QDs with biomolecules create hybrid materials having unique photophysical properties along with biological activity. The present study is aimed at characterizing QD bioconjugates in terms of optical behavior. Colloidal CdTe QDs capped with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were conjugated to different proteins by the carbodiimide protocol using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and a coupling reagent like N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). The photoabsorption of these QD-protein bioconjugates demonstrated an effective coupling of electronic orbitals of constituents. A linear variation in absorbance of bioconjugates at 330 nm proportionate to conjugation suggests a covalent attachment as confirmed by gel electrophoresis. A red shift in the fluorescence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) due to conjugation inferred a decrease in Stokes shift and solvent polarization effects on protein. A proportionate quenching in BSA fluorescence followed by an enhancement of QD fluorescence point toward nonradiative dipolar interactions. Further, reduction in photobleaching of BSA suggests QD-biomolecular interactions. Bioconjugation has significantly influenced the photoabsorption spectrum of QD bioconjugates suggesting the formation of a possible protein shell on the surface of QD. The experimental result suggests that these bioconjugates can be considered nanoparticle (NP) superstructures for the development of a new generation of robust nanoprobes. PMID:21452896

  12. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit

    2015-04-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Peptide and protein sequence analysis by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Syka, John E. P.; Coon, Joshua J.; Schroeder, Melanie J.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.

    2004-01-01

    Peptide sequence analysis using a combination of gas-phase ion/ion chemistry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is demonstrated. Singly charged anthracene anions transfer an electron to multiply protonated peptides in a radio frequency quadrupole linear ion trap (QLT) and induce fragmentation of the peptide backbone along pathways that are analogous to those observed in electron capture dissociation. Modifications to the QLT that enable this ion/ion chemistry are presented, and automated ac...

  14. Role of Plasma Phospholipid Transfer Protein in Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Albers, John J.; Vuletic, Simona; Cheung, Marian C.

    2011-01-01

    The understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological role of PLTP has greatly increased since the discovery of PLTP more than a quarter of century ago. A comprehensive review of PLTP is presented on the following topics: PLTP gene organization and structure; PLTP transfer properties; different forms of PLTP; characteristics of plasma PLTP complexes; relationship of plasma PLTP activity, mass and specific activity with lipoprotein and metabolic factors; role of PLTP in lipoprotein met...

  15. Functional Virus-Based Polymer-Protein Nanoparticles by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Pokorski, Jonathan K.; Breitenkamp, Kurt; Finn, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    Viruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) are useful tools in biomedical research. Their defined structural attributes make them attractive platforms for engineered interactions over large molecular surface areas. In this report, we describe the use of VLPs as multivalent macroinitiators for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The introduction of chemically reactive monomers during polymerization provides a robust platform for post-synthetic modification via the copper-catalyzed azide-...

  16. Electron transfer reactions in proteins labeled with ReI(CO)3(α-diimine)(imidazole)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záliš, Stanislav; Baková, Radka; Vlček Jr., Antonín

    Praha : MFF UK, 2009 - (Burda, J.). s. 94-94 ISBN 978-80-7378-098-2. [Modeling Interactions in Biomolecules IV. 14.09.2009-19.09.2009, Hrubá Skála] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400702; GA MŠk OC09043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electron transfer * spectroscopy * FFTIR spectra Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  17. Asynchronous through-bond homonuclear isotropic mixing: application to carbon–carbon transfer in perdeuterated proteins under MAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulminskaya, Natalia; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus, E-mail: rali@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Multiple-bond carbon–carbon homonuclear mixing is a hurdle in extensively deuterated proteins and under fast MAS due to the absence of an effective proton dipolar-coupling network. Such conditions are now commonly employed in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Here, we introduce an isotropic homonuclear {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C through-bond mixing sequence, MOCCA, for the solid state. Even though applied under MAS, this scheme performs without rotor synchronization and thus does not pose the usual hurdles in terms of power dissipation for fast spinning. We compare its performance with existing homonuclear {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C mixing schemes using a perdeuterated and partially proton-backexchanged protein. Based on the analysis of side chain carbon–carbon correlations, we show that particularly MOCCA with standard 180-degree pulses and delays leading to non-rotor-synchronized spacing performs exceptionally well. This method provides high magnetization transfer efficiency for multiple-bond transfer in the aliphatic region compared with other tested mixing sequences. In addition, we show that this sequence can also be tailor-made for recoupling within a selected spectral region using band-selective pulses.

  18. A Quantitative Theoretical Framework For Protein-Induced Fluorescence Enhancement-Förster-Type Resonance Energy Transfer (PIFE-FRET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Eitan; Ploetz, Evelyn; Hohlbein, Johannes; Cordes, Thorben; Weiss, Shimon

    2016-07-01

    Single-molecule, protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) serves as a molecular ruler at molecular distances inaccessible to other spectroscopic rulers such as Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) or photoinduced electron transfer. In order to provide two simultaneous measurements of two distances on different molecular length scales for the analysis of macromolecular complexes, we and others recently combined measurements of PIFE and FRET (PIFE-FRET) on the single molecule level. PIFE relies on steric hindrance of the fluorophore Cy3, which is covalently attached to a biomolecule of interest, to rotate out of an excited-state trans isomer to the cis isomer through a 90° intermediate. In this work, we provide a theoretical framework that accounts for relevant photophysical and kinetic parameters of PIFE-FRET, show how this framework allows the extraction of the fold-decrease in isomerization mobility from experimental data, and show how these results provide information on changes in the accessible volume of Cy3. The utility of this model is then demonstrated for experimental results on PIFE-FRET measurement of different protein-DNA interactions. The proposed model and extracted parameters could serve as a benchmark to allow quantitative comparison of PIFE effects in different biological systems. PMID:27184889

  19. Asynchronous through-bond homonuclear isotropic mixing: application to carbon–carbon transfer in perdeuterated proteins under MAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple-bond carbon–carbon homonuclear mixing is a hurdle in extensively deuterated proteins and under fast MAS due to the absence of an effective proton dipolar-coupling network. Such conditions are now commonly employed in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Here, we introduce an isotropic homonuclear 13C–13C through-bond mixing sequence, MOCCA, for the solid state. Even though applied under MAS, this scheme performs without rotor synchronization and thus does not pose the usual hurdles in terms of power dissipation for fast spinning. We compare its performance with existing homonuclear 13C–13C mixing schemes using a perdeuterated and partially proton-backexchanged protein. Based on the analysis of side chain carbon–carbon correlations, we show that particularly MOCCA with standard 180-degree pulses and delays leading to non-rotor-synchronized spacing performs exceptionally well. This method provides high magnetization transfer efficiency for multiple-bond transfer in the aliphatic region compared with other tested mixing sequences. In addition, we show that this sequence can also be tailor-made for recoupling within a selected spectral region using band-selective pulses

  20. BraLTP1, a Lipid Transfer Protein Gene Involved in Epicuticular Wax Deposition, Cell Proliferation and Flower Development in Brassica napus

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fang(Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China); Xiong, Xiaojuan; Wu, Lei; Fu, Donghui; Hayward, Alice; Zeng, Xinhua; Cao, Yinglong; Yuhua WU; Li, Yunjing; Wu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) constitute large multigene families that possess complex physiological functions, many of which remain unclear. This study isolated and characterized the function of a lipid transfer protein gene, BraLTP1 from Brassica rapa, in the important oilseed crops Brassica napus. BraLTP1 encodes a predicted secretory protein, in the little known VI Class of nsLTP families. Overexpression of BnaLTP1 in B. napus caused abnormal green coloration and red...

  1. Ameliorated stress related proteins are associated with improved cardiac function by sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase gene transfer in heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qing Fu; Xiao-Ying Li; Xiao-Chun Lu; Ya-Fei Mi; Tao Liu; Wei-Hua Ye

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that overexpression of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2a) in a variety of heart failure (HF) models was associated with greatly enhanced cardiac performance. However, it still undefined the effect of SERCA2a overexpression on the systemic inflammatory response and neuro-hormonal factors. Methods A rapid right ventricular pacing model of experimental HF was used in beagles. Then the animals underwent recombinant adeno-associated virus 1 (rAAV1) mediated gene transfection by direct intra-myocardium injection. HF animals were randomized to receive the SERCA2a gene, enhanced green fluorescent protein (control) gene, or equivalent phosphate buffered saline. Thirty days after gene delivery, the cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiographic testing. The protein level of SERCA2a was measured by western blotting. The proteomic analysis of left ventricular (LV) sample was determined using two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The serum levels of the systemic inflammatory and neuro-hormonal factors were assayed using radioimmunoassay kits. Results The cardiac function improved after SERCA- 2a gene transfer due to the significantly increased SERCA2a protein level. Beagles treated with SERCA2a had significantly decreased serum levels of the inflammatory markers (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α) and neuro-hormonal factors (brain natriuretic peptide, endothelin-1 and angiotensin Ⅱ) compared with HF animals. The myocardial proteomic analysis showed that haptoglobin heavy chain, heat shock protein (alpha-crystallin-related, B6) were down-regulated, and galectin-1 was up-regulated in SERCA2a group compared with HF group, companied by up-regulated contractile proteins and NADH dehydrogenase. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that regional intramyocardial injections of rAAV1-SERCA2a vectors may improve global LV function, correlating with reverse activation of the systemic inflammatory

  2. Horizontal gene transfer of zinc and non-zinc forms of bacterial ribosomal protein S4

    OpenAIRE

    Luthey-Schulten Zaida; Roberts Elijah; Chen Ke

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The universal ribosomal protein S4 is essential for the initiation of small subunit ribosomal assembly and translational accuracy. Being part of the information processing machinery of the cell, the gene for S4 is generally thought of as being inherited vertically and has been used in concatenated gene phylogenies. Here we report the evolution of ribosomal protein S4 in relation to a broad sharing of zinc/non-zinc forms of the gene and study the scope of horizontal gene tr...

  3. Bid, a widely expressed proapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family, displays lipid transfer activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esposti, M D; Erler, Janine Terra; Hickman, J A;

    2001-01-01

    Bid is an abundant proapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family that is crucial for the induction of death receptor-mediated apoptosis in primary tissues such as liver. Bid action has been proposed to involve the relocation of its truncated form, tBid, to mitochondria to facilitate the release of apo...

  4. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    While allergic reactions to soya are increasingly investigated, the normal immune response to ingested soya is scarcely described. In the present study, we wanted to characterise the soya-specific immune response in healthy mice ingesting soya protein. Mice fed a soya-containing diet (F0) and mic...

  5. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing III: Reduction potentials of electron transfer proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Scott Perrin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A module for fast determination of reduction potentials, E°, of redox-active proteins has been implemented in the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing web portal (www.charmming.org. The free energy of reduction, which is proportional to E°, is composed of an intrinsic contribution due to the redox site and an environmental contribution due to the protein and solvent. Here, the intrinsic contribution is selected from a library of pre-calculated density functional theory values for each type of redox site and redox couple, while the environmental contribution is calculated from a crystal structure of the protein using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics. An accompanying lesson demonstrates a calculation of E°. In this lesson, an ionizable residue in a [4Fe-4S]-protein that causes a pH-dependent E° is identified, and the E° of a mutant that would test the identification is predicted. This demonstration is valuable to both computational chemistry students and researchers interested in predicting sequence determinants of E° for mutagenesis.

  6. Tissue-specific expression of a gene encoding a cell wall-localized lipid transfer protein from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, S; Hecht, U; Kippers, A; Botella, J; De Vries, S; Somerville, C

    1994-05-01

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) from plants are characterized by their ability to stimulate phospholipid transfer between membranes in vitro. However, because these proteins are generally located outside of the plasma membrane, it is unlikely that they have a similar role in vivo. As a step toward identifying the function of these proteins, one of several LTP genes from Arabidoposis has been cloned and the expression pattern of the gene has been examined by analysis of the tissue specificity of beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic plants containing LTP promoter-GUS fusions and by in situ mRNA localization. The LTP1 promoter was active early in development in protoderm cells of embryos, vascular tissues, lignified tips of cotyledons, shoot meristem, and stipules. In adult plants, the gene was expressed in epidermal cells of young leaves and the stem. In flowers, expression was observed in the epidermis of all developing influorescence and flower organ primordia, the epidermis of the siliques and the outer ovule wall, the stigma, petal tips, and floral nectaries of mature flowers, and the petal/sepal abscission zone of mature siliques. The presence of GUS activity in guard cells, lateral roots, pollen grains, leaf vascular tissue, and internal cells of stipules and nectaries was not confirmed by in situ hybridizations, supporting previous observations that suggest that the reporter gene is subject to artifactual expression. These results are consistent with a role for the LTP1 gene product in some aspect of secretion or deposition of lipophilic substances in the cell walls of expanding epidermal cells and certain secretory tissues. The LTP1 promoter region contained sequences homologous to putative regulatory elements of genes in the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway, suggesting that the expression of the LTP1 gene may be regulated by the same or similar mechanisms as genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway. PMID:8029357

  7. Protein dynamics and electron transfer: Electronic decoherence and non-Condon effects

    OpenAIRE

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Balabin, Ilya A.; Kawatsu, Tsutomu; Beratan, David N.

    2005-01-01

    We compute the autocorrelation function of the donor-acceptor tunneling matrix element 〈TDA(t)TDA(0)〉 for six Ru-azurin derivatives. Comparison of this decay time to the decay time of the time-dependent Franck-Condon factor {computed by Rossky and coworkers [Lockwood, D. M., Cheng, Y.-K. & Rossky, P. J. (2001) Chem. Phys. Lett. 345, 159-165]} reveals the extent to which non-Condon effects influence the electron-transfer rate. 〈TDA(t)TDA(0)〉 is studied as a function of donor-acceptor distance,...

  8. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A2A and D2 receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D2R-CFP or A2AR-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D2R-CFP and A2AR-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A2AR positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A2ARs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A2A receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  9. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guescini, M. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino (Italy); Leo, G.; Genedani, S. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); Carone, C. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); IRCCS San Camillo Lido, Venezia (Italy); Pederzoli, F. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ciruela, F. [Departament Patologia i Terapeutica Experimental, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Guidolin, D. [Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, University of Padua (Italy); Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino (Italy); Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K. [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Agnati, L.F., E-mail: luigiagnati@tin.it [IRCCS San Camillo Lido, Venezia (Italy)

    2012-03-10

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A{sub 2A} and D{sub 2} receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D{sub 2}R-CFP or A{sub 2A}R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D{sub 2}R-CFP and A{sub 2A}R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A{sub 2A}R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A{sub 2A}Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A{sub 2A} receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of barley and maize lipid transfer proteins show different ligand binding preferences in agreement with experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lorna J; Roby, Ysobel; Allison, Jane R; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-07-30

    Experimental studies of barley and maize lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) show that the two proteins bind the ligand palmitate in opposite orientations in their internal cavities. Moreover, maize LTP is reported to bind the ligand caprate in the internal cavity in a mixture of two orientations with approximately equal occupancy. Six 30 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of maize and barley LTP with ligands bound in two orientations (modes M and B) have been used to understand the different ligand binding preferences. The simulations show that both maize and barley LTP could bind palmitate in the orientation observed experimentally for maize LTP (mode M), with the predominant interaction being a salt bridge between the ligand carboxylate headgroup and a conserved arginine side chain. However, the simulation of barley LTP with palmitate in the mode B orientation shows the most favorable protein-ligand interaction energy. In contrast, the simulations of maize LTP with palmitate and with caprate in the mode B orientation show no persistent ligand binding, the ligands leaving the cavity during the simulations. Sequence differences between maize and barley LTP in the AB loop region, in residues at the base of the hydrophobic cavity, and in the helix A region are identified as contributing to the different behavior. The simulations reproduce well the experimentally observed binding preferences for palmitate and suggest that the experimental data for maize LTP with caprate reflect ligand mobility in binding mode M rather than the population of binding modes M and B. PMID:23834513

  11. A wheat lipid transfer protein (TdLTP4) promotes tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Hela; Saibi, Walid; Alaoui, Meryem Mrani; Hmyene, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Khaled; Hanin, Moez; Brini, Faïçal

    2015-04-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are members of the family of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR-14) that are believed to be involved in plant defense responses. In this study, we report the isolation and characterization of a novel gene TdLTP4 encoding an LTP protein from durum wheat [Triticum turgidum L. subsp. Durum Desf.]. Molecular Phylogeny analyses of wheat TdLTP4 gene showed a high identity to other plant LTPs. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of six helices and nine loop turns. Expression analysis in two local durum wheat varieties with marked differences in salt and drought tolerance, revealed a higher transcript accumulation of TdLTP4 under different stress conditions in the tolerant variety, compared to the sensitive one. The overexpression of TdLTP4 in Arabidopsis resulted in a promoted plant growth under various stress conditions including NaCl, ABA, JA and H2O2 treatments. Moreover, the LTP-overexpressing lines exhibit less sensitivity to jasmonate than wild-type plants. Furthermore, detached leaves from transgenic Arabidopsis expressing TdLTP4 gene showed enhanced fungal resistance against Alternaria solani and Botrytis cinerea. Together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of TdLTP4 gene in the tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in crop plants. PMID:25703105

  12. Ready to use bioinformatics analysis as a tool to predict immobilisation strategies for protein direct electron transfer (DET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazelles, R; Lalaoui, N; Hartmann, T; Leimkühler, S; Wollenberger, U; Antonietti, M; Cosnier, S

    2016-11-15

    Direct electron transfer (DET) to proteins is of considerable interest for the development of biosensors and bioelectrocatalysts. While protein structure is mainly used as a method of attaching the protein to the electrode surface, we employed bioinformatics analysis to predict the suitable orientation of the enzymes to promote DET. Structure similarity and secondary structure prediction were combined underlying localized amino-acids able to direct one of the enzyme's electron relays toward the electrode surface by creating a suitable bioelectrocatalytic nanostructure. The electro-polymerization of pyrene pyrrole onto a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) electrode allowed the targeted orientation of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme from Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcFDH) by means of hydrophobic interactions. Its electron relays were directed to the FTO surface, thus promoting DET. The reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) generating a maximum current density of 1μAcm(-2) with 10mM NAD(+) leads to a turnover number of 0.09electron/s/molRcFDH. This work represents a practical approach to evaluate electrode surface modification strategies in order to create valuable bioelectrocatalysts. PMID:27156017

  13. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors in the treatment of dyslipidemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanwei Li

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibitors are gaining substantial research interest for raising high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The aim of the research was to estimate the efficacy and safety of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors as novel lipid modifying drugs. Systematic searches of English literature for randomized controlled trials (RCT were collected from MEDLINE, EBASE, CENTRAL and references listed in eligible studies. Two independent authors assessed the search results and only included the double-blind RCTs by using cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors as exclusively or co-administrated with statin therapy irrespective of gender in enrolled adult subjects. Two independent authors extracted the data by using predefined data fields. Of 503 studies identified, 14 studies met the inclusion criteria, and 12 studies were included into the final meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis revealed that CETP inhibitors increased the HDL-c levels (n = 2826, p<0.00001, mean difference (MD = 20.47, 95% CI [19.80 to 21.15] and total cholesterol (n = 3423, p = 0.0002, MD = 3.57, 95%CI [1.69 to 5.44] to some extent combined with a reduction in triglyceride (n = 3739, p<0.00001, MD = -10.47, 95% CI [-11.91 to -9.03] and LDL-c (n = 3159, p<0.00001, MD = -17.12, 95% CI [-18.87 to -15.36] irrespective of mono-therapy or co-administration with statins. Subgroup analysis suggested that the lipid modifying effects varied according to the four currently available CETP inhibitors. CETP inhibitor therapy did not increase the adverse events when compared with control. However, we observed a slight increase in blood pressure (SBP, n = 2384, p<0.00001, MD = 2.73, 95% CI [2.14 to 3.31], DBP, n = 2384, p<0.00001, MD = 1.16, 95% CI [0.73 to 1.60] after CETP inhibitor treatment, which were mainly ascribed to the torcetrapib treatment subgroup. CETP inhibitors therapy is associated with significant increase in HDL-c and decrease in

  14. Retroviral-mediated transfer of genomic globin genes leads to regulated production of RNA and protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-titer amphotropic retroviral vector containing the neomycin resistance gene and a hybrid γ-β genomic human globin gene has been constructed. Mouse erythroleukemia cells infected with this virus were found to contain the full transcriptional unit of the transferred human globin gene by Southern blot analysis. These cells contain normally initiated, spliced, and terminated human globin mRNA. The human globin mRNA level increased 5- to 10-fold upon induction of the mouse erythroleukemia cells. Human globin chains were produced but only in a fraction of the cells as detected by immunofluorescent staining. A similar retrovirus containing a human β-globin gene was used to transduce mouse erythroleukemia cells resulting in much higher levels of human globin synthesis than detected in mouse erythroleukemia cells transduced with the γ-β globin virus

  15. Development of an isoform-specific tandem mass spectrometry assay for absolute quantitation of maize lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Severin E; McClain, Scott; Thelen, Jay J

    2015-01-28

    Precise and accurate quantitation of maize grain allergens is important for seed and food industries. The major allergen in maize grain is Zea m 14, a lipid transfer protein (LTP). The B73 maize genome encodes for at least six LTPs sharing 15%-87% sequence identity to Zea m 14. Phylogenetic analysis of the maize LTP family revealed one gene that corresponds to Zea m 14 (denoted as LTPa) and two other genes sharing 43% (LTPc) and 74% (LTPb) identity with Zea m 14 that are putative homologues. Using stable isotope peptide mimics as internal standards for LTPs, we present a multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry approach for multiplexed, absolute quantitation of all three LTP proteins and alternative transcript models therein. To validate quantitative accuracy, a redundant peptide, simultaneously representing the two most abundant LTPs, was included. Analysis of 21 maize varieties revealed LTPa was most prominently expressed in maize grain, ranging from 9 to 32 μg LTP/mg protein. Proteins belonging to the LTPb and LTPc gene models were also expressed but at approximately 10- and 100-fold lower levels than LTPa, respectively. The quantitative results provided by the redundant peptide show around 95% agreement with the sum of the two unique peptides, thus providing support for the LTP gene models and validating the accuracy of this method. Though not all Zea m 14-related LTPs are abundant in grain, their high sequence homology and detectable expression in maize grain signify that LTPb and LTPc are putative allergens and should be accounted for in any quantitation strategy for maize LTP allergens. PMID:25540820

  16. Isoform identification, recombinant production and characterization of the allergen lipid transfer protein 1 from pear (Pyr c 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazzina, Ileana; Amato, Stefano; Passera, Elisabetta; Sforza, Stefano; Mistrello, Gianni; Berni, Rodolfo; Folli, Claudia

    2012-01-10

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins belonging to LTP1 family represent the most important allergens for non pollen-related allergies to Rosaceae fruits in the Mediterranean area. Peach LTP1 (Pru p 3) is a major allergen and is considered the prototypic allergenic LTP. On the contrary, pear allergy without pollinosis seems to be under-reported when compared to other Rosaceae fruits suggesting that the as-yet-uncharacterized pear LTP1 (Pyr c 3) has in vivo a low allergenicity. We report here on the identification of four cDNAs encoding for LTP1 in pear fruits. The two isoforms exhibiting amino acid sequences most similar to those of peach and apple homologues were obtained as recombinant proteins. Such isoforms exhibited CD spectra and lipid binding ability typical of LTP1 family. Moreover, pear LTP1 mRNA was mainly found in the peel, as previously shown for other Rosaceae fruits. By means of IgE ELISA assays a considerable immunoreactivity of these proteins to LTP-sensitive patient sera was detected, even though allergic reactions after ingestion of pear were not reported in the clinical history of the patients. Finally, the abundance of LTP1 in protein extracts from pear peel, in which LTP1 from Rosaceae fruits is mainly confined, was estimated to be much lower as compared to peach peel. Our data suggest that the two isoforms of pear LTP1 characterized in this study possess biochemical features and IgE-binding ability similar to allergenic LTPs. Their low concentrations in pear might be the cause of the low frequency of LTP-mediated pear allergy. PMID:22015956

  17. Gold nanoparticle assisted assembly of a heme protein for enhancement of long-range interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg;

    2007-01-01

    -defined stoichiometry. The systems were investigated in homogeneous solution and at liquid/solid interface. Conjugation of cyt c results in a small but consistent broadening of the nanoparticle plasmon band. This phenomenon can be explained in terms of long-range electronic interactions between the gold nanoparticle...... with that of cyt c in the absence of AuNPs is observed. AuNPs appear to serve as excellent ET relays, most likely by facilitating the electronic coupling between the protein redox center and the electrode surface.......Interfacial electron transfer (ET) of biological macromolecules such as metalloproteins is the key process in bioelectrochemistry, enzymatic electrocatalysis, artificial ET chains, single-molecule electronic amplification and rectification, and other phenomena associated with the area...

  18. Effects of medium-chain fatty acids and oleic acid on blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tholstrup, T.; Ehnholm, C.; Jauhiainen, M.;

    2004-01-01

    cholesterol, although this claim is poorly documented. Objective: We compared the effects of a diet rich in either MCFAs or oleic acid on fasting blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities in healthy men. Design: In a study with a double-blind, randomized, crossover...... design, 17 healthy young men replaced part of their habitual dietary fat intake with 70 g MCTs (66% 8:0 and 34% 10:0) or high-oleic sunflower oil (89.4% 18:1). Each intervention period lasted 21 d, and the 2 periods were separated by a washout period of 2 wk. Blood samples were taken before and after the...... oleic acid, MCT fat unfavorably affected lipid profiles in healthy young men by increasing plasma LDL cholesterol and triacylglycerol. No changes in the activities of phospholipid transfer protein and cholesterol ester transfer protein were evident....

  19. Turning On and Off Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Fluorescent Proteins by π-Stacking, Halide Binding, and Tyr145 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Alexey M; Acharya, Atanu; Titelmayer, Anastasia V; Mamontova, Anastasia V; Bravaya, Ksenia B; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Krylov, Anna I

    2016-04-13

    Photoinduced electron transfer in fluorescent proteins from the GFP family can be regarded either as an asset facilitating new applications or as a nuisance leading to the loss of optical output. Photooxidation commonly results in green-to-red photoconversion called oxidative redding. We discovered that yellow FPs do not undergo redding; however, the redding is restored upon halide binding. Calculations of the energetics of one-electron oxidation and possible electron transfer (ET) pathways suggested that excited-state ET proceeds through a hopping mechanism via Tyr145. In YFPs, the π-stacking of the chromophore with Tyr203 reduces its electron-donating ability, which can be restored by halide binding. Point mutations confirmed that Tyr145 is a key residue controlling ET. Substitution of Tyr145 by less-efficient electron acceptors resulted in highly photostable mutants. This strategy (i.e., calculation and disruption of ET pathways by mutations) may represent a new approach toward enhancing photostability of FPs. PMID:26999576

  20. Role of Tim50 in the transfer of precursor proteins from the outer to the inner membrane of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokranjac, Dejana; Sichting, Martin; Popov-Celeketić, Dusan; Mapa, Koyeli; Gevorkyan-Airapetov, Lada; Zohary, Keren; Hell, Kai; Azem, Abdussalam; Neupert, Walter

    2009-03-01

    Transport of essentially all matrix and a number of inner membrane proteins is governed, entirely or in part, by N-terminal presequences and requires a coordinated action of the translocases of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes (TOM and TIM23 complexes). Here, we have analyzed Tim50, a subunit of the TIM23 complex that is implicated in transfer of precursors from TOM to TIM23. Tim50 is recruited to the TIM23 complex via Tim23 in an interaction that is essentially independent of the rest of the translocase. We find Tim50 in close proximity to the intermembrane space side of the TOM complex where it recognizes both types of TIM23 substrates, those that are to be transported into the matrix and those destined to the inner membrane, suggesting that Tim50 recognizes presequences. This function of Tim50 depends on its association with TIM23. We conclude that the efficient transfer of precursors between TOM and TIM23 complexes requires the concerted action of Tim50 with Tim23. PMID:19144822

  1. Transferable aspherical atom model refinement of protein and DNA structures against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to the independent-atom model (IAM), in which all atoms are assumed to be spherical and neutral, the transferable aspherical atom model (TAAM) takes into account the deformed valence charge density resulting from chemical bond formation and the presence of lone electron pairs. Both models can be used to refine small and large molecules, e.g. proteins and nucleic acids, against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction data. The University at Buffalo theoretical databank of aspherical pseudo-atoms has been used in the refinement of an oligopeptide, of Z-DNA hexamer and dodecamer duplexes, and of bovine trypsin. The application of the TAAM to these data improves the quality of the electron-density maps and the visibility of H atoms. It also lowers the conventional R factors and improves the atomic displacement parameters and the results of the Hirshfeld rigid-bond test. An additional advantage is that the transferred charge density allows the estimation of Coulombic interaction energy and electrostatic potential. PMID:27303797

  2. A Quantitative Theoretical Framework For Protein-Induced Fluorescence Enhancement–Förster-Type Resonance Energy Transfer (PIFE-FRET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule, protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) serves as a molecular ruler at molecular distances inaccessible to other spectroscopic rulers such as Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) or photoinduced electron transfer. In order to provide two simultaneous measurements of two distances on different molecular length scales for the analysis of macromolecular complexes, we and others recently combined measurements of PIFE and FRET (PIFE-FRET) on the single molecule level. PIFE relies on steric hindrance of the fluorophore Cy3, which is covalently attached to a biomolecule of interest, to rotate out of an excited-state trans isomer to the cis isomer through a 90° intermediate. In this work, we provide a theoretical framework that accounts for relevant photophysical and kinetic parameters of PIFE-FRET, show how this framework allows the extraction of the fold-decrease in isomerization mobility from experimental data, and show how these results provide information on changes in the accessible volume of Cy3. The utility of this model is then demonstrated for experimental results on PIFE-FRET measurement of different protein–DNA interactions. The proposed model and extracted parameters could serve as a benchmark to allow quantitative comparison of PIFE effects in different biological systems. PMID:27184889

  3. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer; RMN de proteines (4Fe-4S): proprietes structurales et transfert electronique intramoleculaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.G.

    1996-10-17

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an {alpha} helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(S{sub {gamma}}-C{sub {beta}}-H{sub {beta}})Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven

  4. Transfer of Ho Endonuclease and Ufo1 to the Proteasome by the UbL-UbA Shuttle Protein, Ddi1, Analysed by Complex Formation In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Voloshin, Olga; Bakhrat, Anya; Herrmann, Sharon; Raveh, Dina

    2012-01-01

    The F-box protein, Ufo1, recruits Ho endonuclease to the SCFUfo1 complex for ubiquitylation. Both ubiquitylated Ho and Ufo1 are transferred by the UbL-UbA protein, Ddi1, to the 19S Regulatory Particle (RP) of the proteasome for degradation. The Ddi1-UbL domain binds Rpn1 of the 19S RP, the Ddi1-UbA domain binds ubiquitin chains on the degradation substrate. Here we used complex reconstitution in vitro to identify stages in the transfer of Ho and Ufo1 from the SCFUfo1 complex to the proteasome...

  5. Transfer of Ho Endonuclease and Ufo1 to the Proteasome by the UbL-UbA Shuttle Protein, Ddi1, Analysed by Complex Formation In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Voloshin; Anya Bakhrat; Sharon Herrmann; Dina Raveh

    2012-01-01

    The F-box protein, Ufo1, recruits Ho endonuclease to the SCF(Ufo1) complex for ubiquitylation. Both ubiquitylated Ho and Ufo1 are transferred by the UbL-UbA protein, Ddi1, to the 19S Regulatory Particle (RP) of the proteasome for degradation. The Ddi1-UbL domain binds Rpn1 of the 19S RP, the Ddi1-UbA domain binds ubiquitin chains on the degradation substrate. Here we used complex reconstitution in vitro to identify stages in the transfer of Ho and Ufo1 from the SCF(Ufo1) complex to the protea...

  6. (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignment of the Gram-positive conjugative transfer protein TraHpIP501.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fercher, Christian; Keller, Walter; Zangger, Klaus; Helge Meyer, N

    2016-04-01

    Conjugative transfer of DNA represents the most important transmission pathway in terms of antibiotic resistance and virulence gene dissemination among bacteria. TraH is a putative transfer protein of the type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded by the Gram-positive (G+) conjugative plasmid pIP501. This molecular machine involves a multi-protein core complex spanning the bacterial envelope thereby serving as a macromolecular secretion channel. Here, we report the near complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment of a soluble TraH variant comprising the C-terminal domain. PMID:26559076

  7. Inhibition of hepatic microsomal triglyceride transfer protein – a novel therapeutic option for treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuorio A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Alpo Vuorio,1,2 Matti J Tikkanen,3 Petri T Kovanen4 1Health Center Mehiläinen, Vantaa, Finland; 2Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Lappeenranta, Finland; 3Heart and Lung Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum, Helsinki, Finland; 4Wihuri Research Institute, Biomedicum, Helsinki, Finland Abstract: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL-receptor gene (LDLR. Patients with homozygous FH (hoFH have inherited a mutated LDLR gene from both parents, and therefore all their LDL-receptors are incapable of functioning normally. In hoFH, serum LDL levels often exceed 13 mmol/L and tendon and cutaneous xanthomata appear early (under 10 years of age. If untreated, this extremely severe form of hypercholesterolemia may cause death in childhood or in early adulthood. Based on recent data, it can be estimated that the prevalence of hoFH is about 1:500,000 or even 1:400,000. Until now, the treatment of hoFH has been based on high-dose statin treatment combined with LDL apheresis. Since the LDL cholesterol-lowering effect of statins is weak in this disease, and apheresis is a cumbersome treatment and not available at all centers, alternative novel pharmaceutical therapies are needed. Lomitapide is a newly introduced drug, capable of effectively decreasing serum LDL cholesterol concentration in hoFH. It inhibits the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP. By inhibiting in hepatocytes the transfer of triglycerides into very low density lipoprotein particles, the drug blocks their assembly and secretion into the circulating blood. Since the very low density lipoprotein particles are precursors of LDL particles in the circulation, the reduced secretion of the former results in lower plasma concentration of the latter. The greatest concern in lomitapide treatment has been the increase in liver fat, which can be, however

  8. A wheat lipid transfer protein 3 could enhance the basal thermotolerance and oxidative stress resistance of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zang, Xin-shan; Kabir, Muhammad Rezaul; Liu, Ke-lu; Liu, Zhen-shan; Ni, Zhong-fu; Yao, Ying-yin; Hu, Zhao-rong; Sun, Qi-xin; Peng, Hui-ru

    2014-10-15

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the major grain crops, and heat stress adversely affects wheat production in many regions of the world. Previously, we found a heat-responsive gene named Lipid Transfer Protein 3 (TaLTP3) in wheat. TaLTP3 was deduced to be regulated by cold, ABA, MeJA, Auxin and oxidative stress according to cis-acting motifs in its promoter sequences. In this study, we show that TaLTP3 is responsive to prolonged water deficit, salt or ABA treatment in wheat seedlings. Also, TaLTP3 accumulation was observed after the plant suffered from heat stress both at the seedling and the grain-filling stages. TaLTP3 protein was localized in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of tobacco epidermal cells. Overexpression of TaLTP3 in yeast imparted tolerance to heat stress compared to cells expressing the vector alone. Most importantly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered to overexpress TaLTP3 showed higher thermotolerance than control plants at the seedling stage. Further investigation indicated that transgenic lines decreased H₂O₂ accumulation and membrane injury under heat stress. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TaLTP3 confers heat stress tolerance possibly through reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging. PMID:25106859

  9. The biochemical basis and clinical evidence of food allergy due to lipid transfer proteins: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winkle, R Christopher; Chang, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are ubiquitous proteins that are found in divergent plant species. Although the exact function of LTPs is not fully understood, LTPs are conserved across a broad range of plant species. Because LTPs share structural features, there is an increased probability for significant allergic cross-reactivity. The molecular features of LTPs also decrease the probability of degradation due to cooking or digestion, thereby increasing the probability of systemic absorption and severe allergic reactions. LTP allergy, unlike other forms of anaphylaxis, tends to occur more frequently in areas of lower latitude. The geographic distribution of LTP allergy, along with evidence of increased sensitization after respiratory exposure, has led to the hypothesis that LTP-related food allergy may be secondary to sensitization via the respiratory route. Clinical reactions associated with LTPs have broad clinical phenotypes and can be severe in nature. Life-threatening clinical reactions have been associated with ingestion of a multitude of plant products. Component-resolved diagnosis has played a significant role in research applications for LTP allergy. In the future, component-resolved diagnosis may play a significant role in day-to-day clinical care. Also, quantitative analysis of LTPs in foodstuffs may allow for the identification and/or production of low-LTP foods, thereby decreasing the risk to patients with LTP allergy. Furthermore, sublingual immunotherapy may provide a therapeutic option for patients with LTP allergy. PMID:23179517

  10. Cross-reactivity among non-specific lipid-transfer proteins from food and pollen allergenic sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, María; López-Matas, M Ángeles; Moya, Raquel; Carnés, Jerónimo

    2014-12-15

    Non-specific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are a family of pan-allergens present in foods and pollen. However, sequence homology among them is limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the IgE-mediated cross-reactivity between nsLTPs from different sources and evaluate the allergenic properties of LTPs from peach (Pru p 3) and pellitory (Par j 1/Par j 2), major fruit and pollen allergens. Both proteins were purified and characterised. Cross-reactivity studies among nsLTPs from different foods and pollens were performed by immunoblot inhibition using sera specific to peach or pellitory pollen. Cross-reactivity with Pru p 3 was observed in hazelnut, onion, corn, peanut and apple while in pollens, none of the extracts was inhibited with Par j 1/2. In conclusion, Pru p 3 did not inhibit LTPs from most fruits. Therefore, although Pru p 3 covers the largest number of epitopes, diagnosis with only this allergen may not detect all LTP sensitivities. PMID:25038692

  11. SEC14 phospholipid transfer protein is involved in lipid signaling-mediated plant immune responses in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Kiba

    Full Text Available We previously identified a gene related to the SEC14-gene phospholipid transfer protein superfamily that is induced in Nicotiana benthamiana (NbSEC14 in response to infection with Ralstonia solanacearum. We here report that NbSEC14 plays a role in plant immune responses via phospholipid-turnover. NbSEC14-silencing compromised expression of defense-related PR-4 and accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA and its derivative JA-Ile. Transient expression of NbSEC14 induced PR-4 gene expression. Activities of diacylglycerol kinase, phospholipase C and D, and the synthesis of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid elicited by avirulent R. solanacearum were reduced in NbSEC14-silenced plants. Accumulation of signaling lipids and activation of diacylglycerol kinase and phospholipases were enhanced by transient expression of NbSEC14. These results suggest that the NbSEC14 protein plays a role at the interface between lipid signaling-metabolism and plant innate immune responses.

  12. Genome-wide survey and expression analysis of the putative non-specific lipid transfer proteins in Brassica rapa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLtps are small, basic proteins encoded by multigene families and have reported functions in many physiological processes such as mediating phospholipid transfer, defense reactions against phytopathogens, the adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions, and sexual reproduction. To date, no genome-wide overview of the Brassica rapa nsLtp (BrnsLtp gene family has been performed. Therefore, as the first step and as a helpful strategy to elucidate the functions of BrnsLtps, a genome-wide study for this gene family is necessary. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this study, a total of 63 putative BrnsLtp genes were identified through a comprehensive in silico analysis of the whole genome of B. rapa. Based on the sequence similarities, these BrnsLtps was grouped into nine types (I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VIII, IX, and XI. There is no type VII nsLtps in B. rapa, and a new type, XI nsLtps, was identified in B. rapa. Furthermore, nine type II AtLtps have no homologous genes in B. rapa. Gene duplication analysis demonstrated that the conserved collinear block of each BrnsLtp is highly identical to those in Arabidopsis and that both segmental duplications and tandem duplications seem to play equal roles in the diversification of this gene family. Expression analysis indicated that 29 out of the 63 BrnsLtps showed specific expression patterns. After careful comparison and analysis, we hypothesize that some of the type I BrnsLtps may function like Arabidopsis pathogenesis-related-14 (PR-14 proteins to protect the plant from phytopathogen attack. Eleven BrnsLtps with inflorescence-specific expression may play important roles in sexual reproduction. Additionally, BrnsLtpI.3 may have functions similar to Arabidopsis LTP1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The genome-wide identification, bioinformatic analysis and expression analysis of BrnsLtp genes should facilitate research of this gene family and

  13. Production of Fibronectin Binding Protein A at the surface of Lactococcus lactis increases plasmid transfer in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pontes

    Full Text Available Lactococci are noninvasive lactic acid bacteria frequently used as protein delivery vectors and, more recently, as DNA delivery vehicles. We previously showed that Lactococcus lactis (LL expressing the Fibronectin-Binding Protein A of Staphylococcus aureus (LL-FnBPA+ showed higher internalization rates in vitro in Caco-2 cells than the native (wt lactococci and were able to deliver a eukaryotic Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP expression plasmid in 1% of human Caco-2 cells. Here, using the bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG, one of the major cow's milk allergen, and GFP we characterized the potential of LL-FnBPA+ as an in vivo DNA vaccine delivery vehicle. We first showed that the invasive strain LL-FnBPA+ carrying the plasmid pValac:BLG (LL-FnBPA+ BLG was more invasive than LL-BLG and showed the same invasivity as LL-FnBPA+. Then we demonstrated that the Caco-2 cells, co-incubated with LL-FnBPA+ BLG produced up to 30 times more BLG than the Caco-2 cells co-incubated with the non invasive LL-BLG. Using two different gene reporters, BLG and GFP, and two different methods of detection, EIA and fluorescence microscopy, we showed in vivo that: i in order to be effective, LL-FnBPA+ required a pre-coating with Fetal Calf Serum before oral administration; ii plasmid transfer occurred in enterocytes without regard to the strains used (invasive or not; iii the use of LL-FnBPA+ increased the number of mice producing BLG, but not the level of BLG produced. We thus confirmed the good potential of invasive recombinant lactic acid bacteria as DNA delivery vector in vivo.

  14. Identification of disulfide bonds in wheat gluten proteins by means of mass spectrometry/electron transfer dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Elena; Wieser, Herbert; Koehler, Peter

    2012-04-11

    Disulfide bonds within gluten proteins play a key role in the breadmaking performance of wheat flour. In the present study, disulfide bonds of wheat gluten proteins were identified by using a new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique with alternating electron transfer dissociation (ETD)/collision-induced dissociation (CID). Wheat flour was partially hydrolyzed with thermolysin (pH 6.5, 37 °C, 16 h), and the digest was subjected to LC-MS with alternating ETD/CID fragmentation. Whereas CID provided peptide fragments with intact disulfide bonds, cleavage of disulfide bonds was preferred over peptide backbone fragmentations in ETD. The simultaneous observation of disulfide-linked and disulfide-cleaved peptide ions in the mass spectra not only provided distinct interpretation with high confidence but also simplified the conventional approach for determination of disulfide bonds, which often requires two separate experiments with and without chemical reduction. By application of the new method 14 cystine peptides were identified. Eight peptides confirmed previously established disulfide bonds within gluten proteins, and the other six cystine peptides were identified for the first time. One of the newly identified cystine peptides represented a "head-to-tail" cross-link between high molecular weight glutenin subunits. This type of cross-link, which has been postulated as an integral part of glutenin models published previously, has now been proven experimentally for the first time. From the six remaining cystine peptides interchain disulfide bonds between α-gliadins, γ-gliadins, and low molecular weight glutenin subunits were established. PMID:22439977

  15. Gene transfer and expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein in variant HT-29c cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Lars Boenicke; Bradley D. Howard; Ilka Vogel; Hoiger Kalthoff

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in retrovirally transduced variant HT29 cells.METHODS: The retroviral vector prkat EGFP/neo was constructed and transfected into the 293T cell using a standard calcium phosphate precipitation method. HT-29c cells (selected from HT-29 cells) were transduced by a retroviral vector encoding the GEFP gene. The fluorescence intensity of colorectal carcinoma HT-29c cells after transduced with the EGFP bearing retrovirus was visualized using fluorescence microscope and fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Multiple biological behaviors of transduced cells such as the proliferating potential and the expression of various antigens were comparatively analyzed between untransduced and transduced cells in vitro. EGFP expression of the fresh tumor tissue was assessed in vivo.RESULTS: After transduced, HT-29c cells displayed a stable and long-term EGFP expression under the nonselective conditionsin vitro. After cells were successively cultured to passage 50 in vitro, EGFP expression was still at a high level. Their biological behaviors, such as expression of tumor antigens, proliferation rate and aggregation capability were not different compared to untransduced parental cells in vitro. In subcutaneous tumors, EGFP was stable and highly expressed.CONCLUSION: An EGFP expressing retroviral vector was used to transduce HT-29c cells. The transduced cells show a stable and long-term EGFP expression in vitro and in vivo.These cells with EGFP are a valuable tool forin vivo research of tumor metastatic spread.

  16. Photosynthetic electron transfer from reaction center pigment-protein complex in silica nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Ippei; Iwaki, Masayo; Fujita, Daiju; Tsutsui, Yasutaka; Ishizaka, Souji; Dewa, Makiko; Nango, Mamoru; Kajino, Tsutomu; Fukushima, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Shigeru

    2010-08-17

    A photosynthetic reaction center (RC) pigment-protein complex purified from a thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium, Thermochromatium tepidum, was adsorbed to a folded-sheet silica mesoporous material (FSM). The RC has a molecular structure with a 7.0 x 5.0 x 13 nm diameter. The amount of RC adsorbed to the FSM compound with an average internal pore diameter of 7.9 nm (FSM(7.9)) was high at 0.29 gRC/gFSM, while that to the FSM(2.7) (2.7 nm diameter) was low at 0.02 gRC/gFSM, suggesting the specific binding of the RC into the 7.9 nm pores of FSM(7.9). An N(2)-adsorption isotherm study indicated the incorporation of the RC into the 7.9 nm pores. The RC inside FSM(7.9) showed absorption spectra in the visible and infrared regions similar to those of the RC in solution, indicating almost no structural changes induced by the adsorption. The RC-FSM(7.9) conjugate showed the high photochemical activity with the increased thermal stability up to 50 degrees C in the measurements by laser spectroscopy. The conjugates rapidly provided electrons to a dye in the outer medium or showed electric current on the ITO electrode upon the illumination. The RC-FSM conjugate will be useful for the construction of artificial photosynthetic systems and new photodevices. PMID:20695584

  17. A novel lipid transfer protein from the pea Pisum sativum: isolation, recombinant expression, solution structure, antifungal activity, lipid binding, and allergenic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanov, Ivan V.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Rumynskiy, Eugene I.; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) assemble a family of small (7–9 kDa) ubiquitous cationic proteins with an ability to bind and transport lipids as well as participate in various physiological processes including defense against phytopathogens. They also form one of the most clinically relevant classes of plant allergens. Nothing is known to date about correlation between lipid-binding and IgE-binding properties of LTPs. The garden pea Pisum sativum is widely consumed crop and i...

  18. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, Ole; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi-biological environment, suitable for detailed observations of long-range protein interfacial ET at the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Because azurin is located at clearly identifiable fixed site...

  19. Cross-Species Analysis of Protein Dynamics Associated with Hydride and Proton Transfer in the Catalytic Cycle of the Light-Driven Enzyme Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeven, Robin; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-02-16

    Experimental interrogation of the relationship between protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis is challenging. Light-activated protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) is an excellent model for investigating this relationship because photoinitiation of the reaction cycle enables coordinated turnover in a "dark-assembled" ternary enzyme-substrate complex. The catalytic cycle involves sequential hydride and proton transfers (from NADPH and an active site tyrosine residue, respectively) to the substrate protochlorophyllide. Studies with a limited cross-species subset of POR enzymes (n = 4) have suggested that protein dynamics associated with hydride and proton transfer are distinct [Heyes, D. J., Levy, C., Sakuma, M., Robertson, D. L., and Scrutton, N. S. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 11849-11854]. Here, we use steady-state assays and single-turnover laser flash spectroscopy to analyze hydride and proton transfer dynamics in an extended series of POR enzymes taken from many species, including cyanobacteria, algae, embryophytes, and angiosperms. Hydride/proton transfer in all eukaryotic PORs is faster compared to prokaryotic PORs, suggesting active site architecture has been optimized in eukaryotic PORs following endosymbiosis. Visible pump-probe spectroscopy was also used to demonstrate a common photoexcitation mechanism for representative POR enzymes from different branches of the phylogenetic tree. Dynamics associated with hydride transfer are localized to the active site of all POR enzymes and are conserved. However, dynamics associated with proton transfer are variable. Protein dynamics associated with proton transfer are also coupled to solvent dynamics in cyanobacterial PORs, and these networks are likely required to optimize (shorten) the donor-acceptor distance for proton transfer. These extended networks are absent in algal and plant PORs. Our analysis suggests that extended networks of dynamics are disfavored, possibly through natural selection. Implications for

  20. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petitjean Céline

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants. Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Results Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. Conclusions We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  1. Effect of enhanced Renilla luciferase and fluorescent protein variants on the Foerster distance of Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacres, Helen, E-mail: helen.dacres@csiro.au [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Michie, Michelle; Wang, Jian [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Pfleger, Kevin D.G. [Laboratory for Molecular Endocrinology-GPCRs, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) and Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Trowell, Stephen C. [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First experimental determination of Foerster distance (R{sub 0}) for enhanced BRET systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of brighter BRET components RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components substantially increased (25%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 1} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components marginally increased (2-9%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 2} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brighter BRET components improve the different weaknesses of BRET{sup 1} and BRET{sup 2} systems. -- Abstract: Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is an important tool for monitoring macromolecular interactions and is useful as a transduction technique for biosensor development. Foerster distance (R{sub 0}), the intermolecular separation characterized by 50% of the maximum possible energy transfer, is a critical BRET parameter. R{sub 0} provides a means of linking measured changes in BRET ratio to a physical dimension scale and allows estimation of the range of distances that can be measured by any donor-acceptor pair. The sensitivity of BRET assays has recently been improved by introduction of new BRET components, RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus with improved quantum yields, stability and brightness. We determined R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 1} systems incorporating novel RLuc variants RLuc2 or RLuc8, in combination with Venus, as 5.68 or 5.55 nm respectively. These values were approximately 25% higher than the R{sub 0} of the original BRET{sup 1} system. R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 2} systems combining green fluorescent proteins (GFP{sup 2}) with RLuc2 or RLuc8 variants was 7.67 or 8.15 nm, i.e. only 2-9% greater than the original BRET{sup 2} system despite being {approx}30-fold brighter.

  2. Molecular characterization of Api g 2, a novel allergenic member of the lipid-transfer protein 1 family from celery stalks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Gadermaier; M. Egger; T. Girbl; A. Erler; A. Harrer; E. Vejvar; M. Liso; K. Richter; L. Zuidmeer; A. Mari; F. Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Scope: Celery represents a relevant cross-reactive food allergen source in the adult population. As the currently known allergens are not typical elicitors of severe symptoms, we aimed to identify and characterize a non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP). Methods and results: MS and cDNA clonin

  3. Important role for bone marrow-derived cholesteryl ester transfer protein in lipoprotein cholesterol redistribution and atherosclerotic lesion development in LDL receptor knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eck, Miranda; Ye, Dan; Hildebrand, Reeni B.; Kruijt, J. Kar; de Haan, Willeke; Hoekstra, Menno; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.

    2007-01-01

    Abundant amounts of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) are found in macrophage-derived foam cells in the arterial wall, but its function in atherogenesis is unknown. To investigate the role of macrophage CETP in atherosclerosis, LDL receptor knockout mice were transplanted with bone marrow fr

  4. Role of phospholipid transfer protein and pre beta-high density lipoproteins in maintaining cholesterol efflux from Fu5AH cells to plasma from insulin-resistant subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, RPF; Van Tol, A

    2001-01-01

    Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) enhances the generation of pre beta -high density lipoproteins (HDL) that may act as initial accepters of cellular cholesterol, and are likely to play an important role in the antiatherogenic process of reverse cholesterol transport. We: examined the inter

  5. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone responsiveness to low sodium and blood pressure reactivity to angiotensin-II are unrelated to cholesteryl ester transfer protein mass in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, Jan A.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Navis, Gerjan; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The blood pressure increase associated with the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, torcetrapib is probably attributable to an off-target effect but it is unknown whether activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may be related to variation in the pla

  6. Cholesteryl ester transfer-protein modulator and inhibitors and their potential for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkai H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hisashi ShinkaiCentral Pharmaceutical Research Institute, JT Inc, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol and lowered high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, raising HDL cholesterol induced by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibition is an attractive approach for reducing the residual risk of cardiovascular events that persist in many patients receiving low-density LDL cholesterol-lowering therapy with statins. The development of torcetrapib, a CETP inhibitor, was terminated due to its adverse cardiovascular effects. These adverse effects did not influence the mechanism of CETP inhibition, but affected the molecule itself. Therefore a CETP modulator, dalcetrapib, and a CETP inhibitor, anacetrapib, are in Phase III of clinical trials to evaluate their effects on cardiovascular outcomes. In the dal-VESSEL (dalcetrapib Phase IIb endothelial function study and the dal-PLAQUE (safety and efficacy of dalcetrapib on atherosclerotic disease using novel non-invasive multimodality imaging clinical studies, dalcetrapib reduced CETP activity by 50% and increased HDL cholesterol levels by 31% without changing LDL cholesterol levels. Moreover, dalcetrapib was associated with a reduction in carotid vessel-wall inflammation at 6 months, as well as a reduced vessel-wall area at 24 months compared with the placebo. In the DEFINE (determining the efficacy and tolerability of CETP inhibition with anacetrapib clinical study, anacetrapib increased HDL cholesterol levels by 138% and decreased LDL cholesterol levels by 36%. In contrast with torcetrapib, anacetrapib had no adverse cardiovascular effects. The potential of dalcetrapib and anacetrapib in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases will be revealed by two large-scale clinical trials, the dal-OUTCOMES (efficacy and safety of dalcetrapib in patients with recent acute coronary syndrome study and the

  7. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further

  8. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun, E-mail: yinxj33@msn.com

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  9. Farnesoid X receptor up-regulates expression of Lipid transfer inhibitor protein in liver cells and mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liangpeng [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Liu, Hong [Department of Hematology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Peng, Jiahe; Wang, Yongchao; Zhang, Yan; Dong, Jinyu; Liu, Xiaohua; Guo, Dongmei [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Jiang, Yu, E-mail: yujiang61@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •FXR up-regulates apoF. •It binds to ER1 element. •It activates apoF gene promoter. -- Abstract: Apolipoprotein F is a component protein mainly secreted by liver and resides on several lipoprotein classes. It can inhibit lipids transfer between different lipoproteins. FXR is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily which is also highly expressed in the liver. It modulates bile acids synthesis and lipids metabolism by transcriptional regulation. We aimed to determine whether apoF can be regulated by FXR. The FXR agonist Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and GW4064 both can activate the expression of apoF in liver cell lines and in C57/BL6 mouse liver. This is dependent on the binding of FXR to the FXR element ER1 (−2904 to −2892 bp) in the apoF gene promoter. Taken together, we have identified apoF as likely another target gene of FXR.

  10. Farnesoid X receptor up-regulates expression of Lipid transfer inhibitor protein in liver cells and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •FXR up-regulates apoF. •It binds to ER1 element. •It activates apoF gene promoter. -- Abstract: Apolipoprotein F is a component protein mainly secreted by liver and resides on several lipoprotein classes. It can inhibit lipids transfer between different lipoproteins. FXR is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily which is also highly expressed in the liver. It modulates bile acids synthesis and lipids metabolism by transcriptional regulation. We aimed to determine whether apoF can be regulated by FXR. The FXR agonist Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and GW4064 both can activate the expression of apoF in liver cell lines and in C57/BL6 mouse liver. This is dependent on the binding of FXR to the FXR element ER1 (−2904 to −2892 bp) in the apoF gene promoter. Taken together, we have identified apoF as likely another target gene of FXR

  11. Identification of a Stelar-Localized Transport Protein That Facilitates Root-to-Shoot Transfer of Chloride in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bo

    2015-12-11

    Under saline conditions, higher plants restrict the accumulation of chloride ions (Cl–) in the shoot by regulating their transfer from the root symplast into the xylem-associated apoplast. To identify molecular mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon, we undertook a transcriptional screen of salt stressed Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots. Microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter-GUS fusions identified a candidate gene involved in Cl– xylem loading from the Nitrate transporter 1/Peptide Transporter family (NPF2.4). This gene was highly expressed in the root stele compared to the cortex, and its expression decreased after exposure to NaCl or abscisic acid. NPF2.4 fused to fluorescent proteins, expressed either transiently or stably, was targeted to the plasma membrane. Electrophysiological analysis of NPF2.4 in Xenopus laevis oocytes suggested that NPF2.4 catalyzed passive Cl– efflux out of cells and was much less permeable to NO3−. Shoot Cl– accumulation was decreased following NPF2.4 artificial microRNA knockdown, whereas it was increased by overexpression of NPF2.4. Taken together, these results suggest that NPF2.4 is involved in long-distance transport of Cl– in plants, playing a role in the loading and the regulation of Cl– loading into the xylem of Arabidopsis roots during salinity stress.

  12. Effect of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein gene polymorphism in the promoter region on dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetic subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莉明; 芳野原; 前田英一; 曾淑范

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene variation and diabetic dyslipidemia among Chinese. Methods Using PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and gene sequencing, we studied the influence of a common MTP gene polymorphism in the p romoter region on the apoB-containing lipoproteins in 44 Chinese type 2 diabeti c subjects and 32 non-diabetic volunteers. Results A common functional G/T polymorphism in 493 bp upstream from the transcriptional start point was detected among native Chinese. There were 41 carriers (53.9%) of the MTP-493 G/G genotype, 28 (36.8%) of the MTP-493 G/T genotype and 7 (9.3%) of the MTP-493 T/T genotype. The allele frequency of M TP-493 T in the diabetic group was 0.30. The MTP-493 T/T diabetic group had significantly higher TG (P<0.05), VLDL-CH (P<0.05) and smaller LDL pa rticle size (P<0.001) than the MTP-493 common genotype group. Conclusion Genetic variation in the MTP promoter is likely to be highly involved in the production of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetic subjects.

  13. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP) Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jülke, Sabine; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana clubroots indicate that lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) could be involved in disease development or at least in adaptation to the disease symptoms. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the role of some, of the still enigmatic LTPs during clubroot development. For a functional approach, we have generated transgenic plants that overexpress LTP genes in a root specific manner or show reduced LTP gene expression. Our results showed that overexpression of some of the LTP genes resulted in reduced disease severity whereas the lipid content in clubs of LTP mutants seems to be unaffected. Additional studies indicate a role for some LTPs during salt stress conditions in roots of A. thaliana. PMID:27135222

  14. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Jülke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana clubroots indicate that lipid transfer proteins (LTPs could be involved in disease development or at least in adaptation to the disease symptoms. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the role of some, of the still enigmatic LTPs during clubroot development. For a functional approach, we have generated transgenic plants that overexpress LTP genes in a root specific manner or show reduced LTP gene expression. Our results showed that overexpression of some of the LTP genes resulted in reduced disease severity whereas the lipid content in clubs of LTP mutants seems to be unaffected. Additional studies indicate a role for some LTPs during salt stress conditions in roots of A. thaliana.

  15. Interaction of Protease-Activated Receptor 2 with G Proteins and Beta-Arrestin 1 Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli eAyoub

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are well recognized as being able to activate several signaling pathways through the activation of different G proteins as well as other signaling proteins such as beta-arrestins. Therefore, understanding how such multiple GPCR-mediated signaling can be integrated constitute an important aspect. Here, we applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET to shed more light on the G protein coupling profile of trypsin receptor, or protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2, and its interaction with beta-arrestin1. Using YFP and Rluc fusion constructs expressed in COS-7 cells, BRET data revealed a pre-assembly of PAR2 with both Galphai1 and Galphao and a rapid and transient activation of these G proteins upon receptor activation. In contrast, no preassembly of PAR2 with Galpha12 could be detected and their physical association can be measured with a very slow and sustained kinetics similar to that of beta-arrestin1 recruitment. These data demonstrate the coupling of PAR2 with Galphai1, Galphao and Galpha12 in COS-7 cells with differences in the kinetics of GPCR-G protein coupling, a parameter that very likely influences the cellular response. Moreover, this further illustrates that preassembly or agonist-induced G protein interaction depends on receptor-G protein pairs indicating another level of complexity and regulation of the signaling of GPCR-G protein complexes and its multiplicity.

  16. Association of -971 G/A Cholesteryl-Ester Transfer Protein Gene Polymorphism with Lipid Profile in Primary Hyperlipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Barkhordari

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary heart disease (CHD is a leading cause of death worldwide and hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia are major risk factors for the disease. Considering the role of hyperlipidemia as the underlying cause of cardiovascular mortalities and morbidities, and the limited and conflicting results of studies on CETP gene polymorphisms in Iran, we aimed to study -971 G/A polymorphism of cholesterol ester transfer protein gene in patients with primary hyperlipidemia.Methods: In this case-control study performed in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences (from May 2010 to April 2011, we recruited 200 patients with primary hyperlipidemia (total cholesterol >250 mg/dl and/or triglyceride >200 mg/dl as the cases and 200 healthy individuals with normal cholesterol and triglyceride as the control group. Gene segments were replicated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and -971 G/A polymorphism genotypes were identified by RFLP technique. Subsequently, plasma CETP activity was measured enzymeatically by a kit in a fluorescence spectrometer.Results: The allele and genotype frequencies were not significantly different (P>0.05 between the two groups (in the control group: AA 24%, GA 47% and GG 28.5% and in the case group: AA 18%, GA 51% and GG 31%. In the case group, homozygous individuals with A alleles (AA genotype had greater cholesterol and HDL-c concentrations than those with other alleles (GG and GA. In both cases and controls, individuals with AA genotype had lower CETP concentrations.Conclusion: We conclude that -971 G/A polymorphism in CETP gene promoter can affect lipid profile and alter CETP activity.

  17. Ciprofibrate increases cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene expression and the indirect reverse cholesterol transport to the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berti Jairo A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CETP is a plasma protein that modulates atherosclerosis risk through its HDL-cholesterol reducing action. The aim of this work was to examine the effect of the PPARα agonist, ciprofibrate, on the CETP gene expression, in the presence and absence of apolipoprotein (apo CIII induced hypertriglyceridemia, and its impact on the HDL metabolism. Results Mice expressing apo CIII and/or CETP and non-transgenic littermates (CIII, CIII/CETP, CETP, non-Tg were treated with ciprofibrate during 3 weeks. Drug treatment reduced plasma triglycerides (30-43% and non-esterified fatty acids (19-47% levels. Cholesterol (chol distribution in plasma lipoprotein responses to ciprofibrate treatment was dependent on the genotypes. Treated CIII expressing mice presented elevation in VLDL-chol and reduction in HDL-chol. Treated CETP expressing mice responded with reduction in LDL-chol whereas in non-Tg mice the LDL-chol increased. In addition, ciprofibrate increased plasma post heparin lipoprotein lipase activity (1.3-2.1 fold in all groups but hepatic lipase activity decreased in treated CETP and non-Tg mice. Plasma CETP activity and liver CETP mRNA levels were significantly increased in treated CIII/CETP and CETP mice (30-100%. Kinetic studies with 3H-cholesteryl ether (CEt labelled HDL showed a 50% reduction in the 3H-CEt found in the LDL fraction in ciprofibrate treated compared to non-treated CETP mice. This means that 3H-CEt transferred from HDL to LDL was more efficiently removed from the plasma in the fibrate treated mice. Accordingly, the amount of 3H-CEt recovered in the liver 6 hours after HDL injection was increased by 35%. Conclusion Together these data showed that the PPARα agonist ciprofibrate stimulates CETP gene expression and changes the cholesterol flow through the reverse cholesterol transport, increasing plasma cholesterol removal through LDL.

  18. The Relationship Between Genetic Variations of the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Gene and Coronary Artery Disease in Turkish Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Fuat; Gurlertop, Yekta; Pirim, Ibrahim; Sevimli, Serdar; Dogan, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Aksoy, Hulya; Karakelloglu, Sule; Senocak, Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    Objective Although the relationship between cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and cholesterol metabolism has been characterized in recent years, the effect of CETP genetic variants associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) is still unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between CETP gene polymorphism and levels of lipid in patients with CAD. Materials and Methods We conducted a case-control study that included 194 unrelated subjects who underwent coronary angiography for suspected ischemic heart disease. This group was divided into 96 patients with angiographically documented CAD and 98 subjects (individuals matched for age and gender) without angiographically documented CAD (CAD-free subjects), all of whom were studied to examine the genotypic distribution of the CETP gene polymorphism in CAD. Genotyping was performed via polymerase chain reaction. Results Of the 96 patients with CAD, 38 (40%) were B1B1, 42 (44%) B1B2 and 16 (16%) B2B2, compared with the control subjects, of which 35 (36%) were B1B1, 44 (45%) B1B2 and 19 (19%) B2B2. There were no significant differences between patients with CAD and control subjects in the distribution of the CETP gene polymorphism. Patients with the B1B1 genotype had lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and higher triglyceride (TG) levels than patients with the B2B2 genotype (p<0.05). In addition, among control subjects HDL-C levels were significantly higher in subjects with the B2B2 genotype than in subjects with the B1B1 genotype (p<0.01). Conclusion Our results suggest that genetic variations of the CTEP gene may be responsible for low HDL-C levels but may not be considered as a risk factor for CAD in the Turkish population. PMID:25610061

  19. Upconversion nanophosphor: an efficient phosphopeptides-recognizing matrix and luminescence resonance energy transfer donor for robust detection of protein kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenghui; Chang, Lijuan; Wang, Honghong; Bai, Jie; Ren, Wei; Li, Zhengping

    2014-06-17

    Protein kinases play important regulatory roles in intracellular signal transduction pathways. The aberrant activities of protein kinases are closely associated with the development of various diseases, which necessitates the development of practical and sensitive assays for monitoring protein kinase activities as well as for screening of potential kinase-targeted drugs. We demonstrate here a robust luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET)-based protein kinase assay by using NaYF4:Yb,Er, one of the most efficient upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs), as an autofluorescence-free LRET donor and a tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)-labeled substrate peptide as the acceptor. Fascinatingly, besides acting as the LRET donor, NaYF4:Yb,Er UCNPs also serve as the phosphopeptide-recognizing matrix because the intrinsic rare earth ions of UCNPs can specifically capture the fluorescent phosphopeptides catalyzed by protein kinases over the unphosphorylated ones. Therefore, a sensitive and generic protein kinase assay is developed in an extremely simple mix-and-read format without any requirement of surface modification, substrate immobilization, separation, or washing steps, showing great potential in protein kinases-related clinical diagnosis and drug discovery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report by use of rare earth-doped UCNPs as both the phospho-recognizing and signal reporting elements for protein kinase analysis. PMID:24871878

  20. Expression and characterization of a new isoform of the 9 kDa allergenic lipid transfer protein from tomato (variety San Marzano).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Leoni, Claudia; Fanizza, Immacolata; Rinalducci, Sara; Placido, Antonio; Ceci, Luigi R

    2015-11-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are food allergens found first in fruits of the Rosaceae family and later identified in other food plants. Their high structural stability causes them to behave as allergens in cooked and processed foods. Allergenic LTPs have been identified in tomato fruits as well, but studies of their thermal stability and structural characteristics are limited. In this article we report the identification of the coding region for a novel 9 kDa LTP isoform in the tomato variety San Marzano, together with the expression of the recombinant mature protein. The purified recombinant protein was further characterized for its thermal stability and was found to bind 1-palmitoil-2-lysophosphatidylcholine (Lyso-C16) after thermal treatments up to 105 °C. Analysis of a modeling derived structure of the protein allowed the identification of possible epitope regions on the molecular surface. PMID:26232648