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Sample records for alpha-smooth muscle actin

  1. A function for filamentous alpha-smooth muscle actin: Retardation of motility in human breast fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Petersen, Ole William

    1996-01-01

    Actins are known to comprise six mammalian isoforms of which beta- and gamma-nonmuscle actins are present in all cells, whereas alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-sm) actin is normally restricted to cells of the smooth muscle lineages. alpha-Sm actin has been found also to be expressed transiently in cer...... of less prominent focal adhesions as revealed by immunofluorescence staining against vinculin, talin, and beta1-integrin. We propose that an important function of filamentous alpha-sm actin is to immobilize the cells....

  2. The alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in healing human myocardial scars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, I. E.; Havenith, M. G.; de Mey, J. G.; Daemen, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    Interstitial cells in the scars of human myocardial infarctions of different postinfarction times (6 hours to 17 years old) were characterized by antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA), vimentin, and desmin. Basal lamina deposition was studied with antibodies to the basal lamina protein type

  3. Alpha Smooth Muscle Actin Expression in a Case of Ameloblastic Carcinoma: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Roy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present article is to report a case of ameloblastic carcinoma and use a marker alpha smooth muscle actin as a tool to differentiate cases of ameloblastic carcinoma from that of ameloblastoma. Methods: Case study reporting a case of ameloblastic carcinoma (AC with expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA as a marker for emergence of stromal myofibroblasts. The expression of myofibroblasts was also compared with that of ameloblastoma. Results: Difference between the two lesions in the pattern of expression of alpha smooth muscle actin was also observed. There was increase in the number of myofibroblasts in the stroma of AC while in ameloblastoma, it was comparatively less. Secondly, few areas of the carcinomatous ameloblastic island also exhibited a mild positivity towards alpha smooth muscle actin. Conclusions: Increase in number of stromal myofibroblast may be taken as a predictor for carcinomatous transformation. Further studies with greater sample size can validate the use of alpha-SMA as a marker to differentiate ameloblastic carcinoma from ameloblastoma.

  4. Immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in central giant-cell lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Nancy Noya; de la Rosa-García, Estela; Camacho, María Esther Irigoyen

    2016-04-01

    Central giant-cell lesions (CGCLs) are reactive lesions that consist histologically of spindle-shaped stromal cells, (fibroblasts and myofibroblasts) loosely arranged in a fibrous stroma, multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells with haemorrhagic areas. This study identified the immunoexpression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in spindle-shaped stromal cells, and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells. Their association with the clinical and radiographic characteristics of these lesions was identified. Thirty-five cases of CGCLs were studied. Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, glucocorticoid and calcitonin was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The labelling index was 100 times the quotient of the number of positive cells divided by the total number of cells of each type. Logistic regression analysis was applied. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was positive (54%) for spindle stromal cells (myofibroblasts). A significant association was observed with root resorption (P = 0.004) and cortical bone destruction (P = 0.024). Glucocorticoid immunoexpression was positive for 99% of the giant cells and 86.7% of the mononuclear cells. Glucocorticoid immunoexpression in the mononuclear cells was associated with root resorption (P = 0.031). A longer evolution time was associated with lower immunoexpression of glucocorticoid (OR 12.4: P = 0.047). Calcitonin immunoexpression was positive in 86% of the giant cells. Immunoexpression of calcitonin was associated with age (P = 0.040). Myofibroblasts are important components of CGCLs, stromal cells and alpha-smooth muscle. Actin immunoexpression was associated with root and cortical bone resorption. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. P0525 : N-Acetylated alpha smooth muscle actin levels are increased in hepatic fibrosis but decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.J.; Nielsen, Signe Holm; Hansen, N.U.B.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha Smooth Muscle Actin (a-SMA) is upregulated together with extracellular matrix (ECM) during activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells (HSCs) in fibrosis. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) remove acetylations and regulate the expression of genes, which is associated with cancers. There is a close...... relationship between cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and markers enabling identification of patients in risk of developing HCC with cirrhosis is a major unmet clinical need. We developed an ELISA for the assessment of acetylated a-SMA (Aca- SMA) in serum. The objective was to investigate...

  6. "Induction of Thymic HLA-DR signaling with Alpha-smooth muscle Actin expression during the second and third trimesters of gestation "

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    Tamiolakis D

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Less than 5% of prenatal thymoctes express HLA-DR before week 12 of gestation. However, the number of HLA-DR- positive cells increases during the late second and third trimesters of development. To determine the role of alpha-smooth muscle actin in fetal thymic HLA-DR signaling in different stages of development we examined and compared the immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in the myoid cells of the thymic medulla stroma in the 2 nd, and 3rd trimesters of gestation respectively, over the equivalent expression of the protein in the 1 st trimester, in relation with the appearance of HLA-DR-positive thymocytes. Our results demonstrated a quantitative difference in the second and third trimesters of development concerning the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in the stromal myoid cells of the thymic medulla over the equivalent expression of the protein in the first (P<0.0001, t-test. Similar changes in the above period wee found concerning the expression of HLA-DR over the first (P<0.0001, test, suggesting a direct involvement of alpha-smooth muscel acting in the sustainence of HLA-DR reactivity. Our data provide evidence that a contractile microfilament alpha-smooth muscle actin plays a pivotal role in HLA-DR expression, through interaction between medullary stromal cells and thymoctes.

  7. Regional variations in certain cellular characteristics in human lumbar intervertebral discs, including the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastreiter, D; Ozuna, R M; Spector, M

    2001-07-01

    An evaluation of the regional variation of certain cellular features in the human intervertebral disc (IVD) could lead to a better understanding of site-specific properties relative to degradation, response to injury, and healing processes. The objective of this study was to determine how cell density, cell morphology, cell grouping, and expression of a specific actin isoform varied with location and degeneration in the human disc. A total of 41 human L4-L5 and L5-S1 discs removed postmortem from 21 individuals were analyzed. The discs were graded for degeneration based on the Thompson scale and processed for evaluation. Microtomed sections from paraffin-embedded specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or a monoclonal antibody to alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), an actin isoform often associated with contraction. A significant regional dependence was found for most of the measured parameters. A fourfold increase in cell density was found in proceeding from the nucleus pulposus (NP) to the outer annulus (OA) of the IVD. Approximately 30% of the cells in the NP were present in groups. Virtually all of the cells in the NP and 40% of those in the OA were round. Moreover, notable percentages (12-15%) of the cells in the NP and inner annulus (IA) contained alpha-SMA. Only pair density was found to be correlated with Thompson grade, with more degenerated specimens having higher values. A greater effect was also observed on the percentage of cells in groups. These findings provide the basis for future work to investigate the importance of cells in groups, the role of alpha-SMA in the disc, and the changes in these cellular characteristics in pathological disc conditions.

  8. Alpha-smooth muscle actin in pathological human disc nucleus pulposus cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastreiter, Dawn; Chao, Jeannie; Wang, Qi; Ozuna, Richard M; Spector, Myron

    2004-01-01

    That a contractile actin isoform has been found in cells of other cartilage tissues in healing and disease states prompted this investigation of the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in pathological human intervertebral disc tissue. The presence of this isoform has been reported in human intervertebral disc specimens obtained at autopsy from subjects for whom there were no reported symptoms. An objective of this study was to evaluate the cell density and percentage of alpha-SMA-containing cells in pathological nucleus pulposus tissue obtained from lumbar disc surgery from 17 patients. Additionally, explants of nucleus pulposus material were cultured to determine how alpha-SMA expression changed with time in vitro. Seventy-six 5-mm diameter explants (approximately 2 mm thick) pooled from six lumbar surgeries were cultured for 1, 2, 4, or 6 weeks. Microtomed sections of paraffin-embedded specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or a monoclonal antibody to alpha-SMA. Histologically, cells were categorized as to alpha-SMA phenotype (positive or negative), and the areal cell density was determined. The evaluation of the cultured nucleus pulposus explants also included documentation of the percentage of cells that were round or elongated and the percentage of the cells that were part of a group (group: >/= 2 cells). Every nucleus pulposus section exhibited the presence of alpha-SMA-containing cells, which accounted for approximately 24 percent of the cells in vivo. In vivo, the cell density was significantly higher in older individuals (p = 0.02). The average time for cell outgrowth from the explants was 8.6 days. Approximately 10-15 percent of the cells in the explants stained positive for alpha-SMA. The time in culture had no significant effect on any of the outcome measures except the percentage of alpha-SMA-containing cells that were round (p = 0.008), with values decreasing through 4 weeks and then slightly rising at 6 weeks. The role of

  9. Collagen gel contraction serves to rapidly distinguish epithelial- and mesenchymal-derived cells irrespective of alpha-smooth muscle actin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René

    2004-01-01

    contractility (10.0% reduction in gel height) than their true mesenchymal counterparts (53.1% reduction in gel height). To test whether at all force generation could be induced in the nonmesenchymal cells by alpha-sm actin, transductions were performed to obtain a tetracycline-dependent expression. Expression...... compartment and the stromal compartment express alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-sm actin) as part of a myoepithelial or a myofibroblastic differentiation program, respectively. Moreover, because both epithelial- and mesenchymal-derived cells are nontumorigenic, other means of discrimination are warranted....... Here, we describe the contraction of hydrated collagen gels as a rapid functional assay for the distinction between epithelial- and mesenchymal-derived stromal-like cells irrespective of the status of alpha-sm actin expression. Three epithelial-derived cell lines and three genuine mesenchymal...

  10. In vitro expression of the alpha-smooth muscle actin isoform by rat lung mesenchymal cells: regulation by culture condition and transforming growth factor-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J J; Woodcock-Mitchell, J L; Perry, L; Zhao, J; Low, R B; Baldor, L; Absher, P M

    1993-07-01

    alpha-Smooth muscle actin (alpha SM actin)-containing cells recently have been demonstrated in intraalveolar lesions in both rat and human tissues following lung injury. In order to develop model systems for the study of such cells, we examined cultured lung cell lines for this phenotype. The adult rat lung fibroblast-like "RL" cell lines were found to express alpha SM actin mRNA and protein and to organize this actin into stress fiber-like structures. Immunocytochemical staining of subclones of the RL87 line demonstrated the presence in the cultures of at least four cell phenotypes, one that fails to express alpha SM actin and three distinct morphologic types that do express alpha SM actin. The proportion of cellular actin that is the alpha-isoform was modulated by the culture conditions. RL cells growing at low density expressed minimal alpha SM actin. On reaching confluent densities, however, alpha SM actin increased to at least 20% of the total actin content. This effect, combined with the observation that the most immunoreactive cells were those that displayed overlapping cell processes in culture, suggests that cell-cell contact may be involved in actin isoform regulation in these cells. Similar to the response of some smooth muscle cell lines, alpha SM actin expression in RL cells also was promoted by conditions, e.g., maintenance in low serum medium, which minimize cell division. alpha SM actin expression was modulated in RL cells by the growth factor transforming growth factor-beta. Addition of this cytokine to growing cells substantially elevated the proportion of alpha SM actin protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. CD34-positive stromal cells and alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive stromal cells in the tumor capsule of skin sweat gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hirofumi; Enzan, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Eriko; Moriki, Toshiaki; Toi, Makoto; Zhang, Yanhu

    2002-01-01

    To elucidate the roles of CD34-positive stromal cells and alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive stromal cells at the tumor border of skin sweat gland neoplasms, we examined expression of stromal cell markers in the tumor capsule of 19 skin sweat gland neoplasms (16 mixed tumors of the skin and three nodular hidradenomas) using monoclonal antibodies to CD34, CD31, cytokeratin 14 (CK14), alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) and high molecular weight caldesmon (HCD). We regarded CD34-positive, CD31-, CK14-, ASMA- and HCD-negative stromal cells to be CD34-positive stromal cells, and ASMA-positive, HCD-, CK14-, CD34- and CD31-negative stromal cells to be ASMA-positive stromal cells. CD34-positive stromal cells were detected in the tumor capsule of all 19 of the tumors examined. In nine of the 16 mixed tumors (56%) and all of the three nodular hidradenomas, ASMA-positive stromal cells were detected at the immediate inner side of the CD34-positive stromal cell layers. These results indicate that cellular components in the tumor capsules of mixed tumors of the skin and nodular hidradenomas are CD34-positive stromal cells and ASMA-positive stromal cells, and suggest that stromal cells of these two cell types are associated with tumor capsule formation of skin sweat gland neoplasms.

  12. Alpha-smooth muscle actin and serotonin receptors 2A and 2B in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cremer, Signe Emilie; Moesgaard, S. G.; Rasmussen, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    suggested. In an age-matched population of dogs with non-clinical and clinical MMVD, the objectives were to investigate (1) gene expression of 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2BR, (2) protein expression and spatial relationship of 5-HT2AR, 5-HT2BR and MF in the mitral valve (MV) and the cardiac anterior papillary muscle...... (AP) and (3) serum 5-HT concentrations. Gene expression of 5-HT2BR was significantly higher in MV and AP among dogs with clinical MMVD. This was not found for 5-HT2BR protein expression, though association of 5-HT2BR with myxomatous pathology and co-localization of 5-HT2BR and MF in MV and AP support...

  13. A stable explant culture of HER2/neu invasive carcinoma supported by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin expressing stromal cells to evaluate therapeutic agents

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    Piechocki Marie P

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To gain a better understanding of the effects of therapeutic agents on the tumor microenvironment in invasive cancers, we developed a co-culture model from an invasive lobular carcinoma. Tumor cells expressing HER2/neu organize in nests surrounded by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA expressing tumor stroma to resemble the morphology of an invading tumor. This co-culture, Mammary Adenocarcinoma Model (MAM-1 maintains a 1:1 ratio of HER2/neu positive tumor cells to α-SMA-reactive stromal cells and renews this configuration for over 20 passages in vitro. Methods We characterized the cellular elements of the MAM-1 model by microarray analysis, and immunocytochemistry. We developed flow cytometric assays to evaluate the relative responses of the tumor and stroma to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Iressa. Results The MAM-1 gene expression profile contains clusters that represent the ErbB-2 breast cancer signature and stroma-specific clusters associated with invasive breast cancers. The stability of this model and the ability to antigenically label the tumor and stromal fractions allowed us to determine the specificity of Iressa, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for targeting the tumor cell population. Treatment resulted in a selective dose-dependent reduction in phospho-pMEK1/2 and pp44/42MAPK in tumor cells. Within 24 h the tumor cell fraction was reduced 1.9-fold while the stromal cell fraction increased >3-fold, consistent with specific reductions in phospho-pp44/42 MAPK, MEK1/2 and PCNA in tumor cells and reciprocal increases in the stromal cells. Erosion of the tumor cell nests and augmented growth of the stromal cells resembled a fibrotic response. Conclusion This model demonstrates the specificity of Iressa for HER2/neu expressing tumor cells versus the tumor associated myofibroblasts and is appropriate for delineating effects of therapy on signal transduction in the breast tumor microenvironment and improving

  14. A stable explant culture of HER2/neu invasive carcinoma supported by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin expressing stromal cells to evaluate therapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechocki, Marie P

    2008-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the effects of therapeutic agents on the tumor microenvironment in invasive cancers, we developed a co-culture model from an invasive lobular carcinoma. Tumor cells expressing HER2/neu organize in nests surrounded by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA) expressing tumor stroma to resemble the morphology of an invading tumor. This co-culture, Mammary Adenocarcinoma Model (MAM-1) maintains a 1:1 ratio of HER2/neu positive tumor cells to α-SMA-reactive stromal cells and renews this configuration for over 20 passages in vitro. We characterized the cellular elements of the MAM-1 model by microarray analysis, and immunocytochemistry. We developed flow cytometric assays to evaluate the relative responses of the tumor and stroma to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Iressa. The MAM-1 gene expression profile contains clusters that represent the ErbB-2 breast cancer signature and stroma-specific clusters associated with invasive breast cancers. The stability of this model and the ability to antigenically label the tumor and stromal fractions allowed us to determine the specificity of Iressa, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for targeting the tumor cell population. Treatment resulted in a selective dose-dependent reduction in phospho-pMEK1/2 and pp44/42MAPK in tumor cells. Within 24 h the tumor cell fraction was reduced 1.9-fold while the stromal cell fraction increased >3-fold, consistent with specific reductions in phospho-pp44/42 MAPK, MEK1/2 and PCNA in tumor cells and reciprocal increases in the stromal cells. Erosion of the tumor cell nests and augmented growth of the stromal cells resembled a fibrotic response. This model demonstrates the specificity of Iressa for HER2/neu expressing tumor cells versus the tumor associated myofibroblasts and is appropriate for delineating effects of therapy on signal transduction in the breast tumor microenvironment and improving strategies that can dually or differentially target the tumor and stromal

  15. Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen as marker of myoepithelial and basal cells in the parotid gland, pleomorphic adenomas and adenoid cystic carcinomas. An immunohistological comparison between T and sialosyl-T antigens, alpha-smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin 14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Christensen, M

    1995-01-01

    was the only marker of cells in solid undifferentiated areas of adenoid cystic carcinomas. Our study supports the view, that modified "myoepithelial" cells in the tumours consist of a mixture of basal cells and myoepithelial cells. None of the investigated structures was in itself an ideal marker......Controversy centres on the role and identification of myoepithelial (MEC) and basal cells in salivary gland tumours, and recent studies suggest that both basal cells and myoepithelial cells participate in the formation of salivary gland tumours. We have correlated the expression of different well......-known markers of normal MEC/basal cells (i.e. alpha-smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin 14) with T (Thomsen-Friedenreich) antigen and its sialylated derivative: sialosyl-T antigen,) in 17 normal parotid glands and in two tumour types with MEC participation (i.e pleomorphic adenomas (PA) and adenoid cystic...

  16. Up-regulation of alpha-smooth muscle actin in cardiomyocytes from non-hypertrophic and non-failing transgenic mouse hearts expressing N-terminal truncated cardiac troponin I

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    Stephanie Kern

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that a restrictive N-terminal truncation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI-ND is up-regulated in the heart in adaptation to hemodynamic stresses. Over-expression of cTnI-ND in the hearts of transgenic mice revealed functional benefits such as increased relaxation and myocardial compliance. In the present study, we investigated the subsequent effect on myocardial remodeling. The alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA isoform is normally expressed in differentiating cardiomyocytes and is a marker for myocardial hypertrophy in adult hearts. Our results show that in cTnI-ND transgenic mice of between 2 and 3 months of age (young adults, a significant level of α-SMA is expressed in the heart as compared with wild-type animals. Although blood vessel density was increased in the cTnI-ND heart, the mass of smooth muscle tissue did not correlate with the increased level of α-SMA. Instead, immunocytochemical staining and Western blotting of protein extracts from isolated cardiomyocytes identified cardiomyocytes as the source of increased α-SMA in cTnI-ND hearts. We further found that while a portion of the up-regulated α-SMA protein was incorporated into the sarcomeric thin filaments, the majority of SMA protein was found outside of myofibrils. This distribution pattern suggests dual functions for the up-regulated α-SMA as both a contractile component to affect contractility and as possible effector of early remodeling in non-hypertrophic, non-failing cTnI-ND hearts.

  17. Relaxin stimulates MMP-2 and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression by human periodontal ligament cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, S.; Bildt, M.M.; Degroot, J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2008-01-01

    The main cells in the periodontal ligament (PDL) are the fibroblasts, which play an important role in periodontal remodelling. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are largely responsible for the degradation of extracellular matrix proteins in the PDL. Previous studies have indicated that MMP production

  18. Alpha-smooth muscle actin within epithelial islands is predictive of ameloblastic carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello, I.O.; Alanen, K.; Slootweg, P.J.; Salo, T.

    2009-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most common clinically significant odontogenic tumor. It is considered benign but locally invasive and associated with variable clinico-pathological behavior. Ameloblastic carcinoma is a malignant tumor having features of ameloblastoma in addition to cytologic atypia with or

  19. Immunoreactivity for alpha-smooth muscle actin characterizes a potentially aggressive subgroup of little basal cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Pilloni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is a very common malignant skin tumor that rarely metastatizes, but is often locally aggressive. Several factors, like large size (more than 3 cm, exposure to ultraviolet rays, histological variants, level of infiltration and perineural or perivascular invasion, are associated with a more aggressive clinical course. These morphological features seem to be more determinant in mideface localized BCC, which frequently show a significantly higher recurrence rate. An immunohistochemical profile, characterized by reactivity of tumor cells for p53, Ki67 and alpha-SMA has been associated with a more aggressive behaviour in large BCCs. The aim of this study was to verify if also little (less than 3 cm basal cell carcinomas can express immunohistochemical markers typical for an aggressive behaviour.

  20. Granulation tissue exhibits differences in alpha-smooth muscle actin expression after laser-assisted skin closure (LASC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Capon, Alexandre; Fleurisse, Laurence; Creusy, Collette

    2001-05-01

    Laser assisted skin closure (LASC) has been shown to accelerate wound healing and to reduce scarring. However, the mechanisms involved during the cutaneous wound repair after LASC remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the inflammation process and the wound repair fibroplasia, particularly the involvement of granulation tissue fibroblasts (myofibroblasts).

  1. The histological quantification of alpha-smooth muscle actin predicts future graft fibrosis in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Sharat; Stéphenne, Xavier; Komuta, Mina; Bouzin, Caroline; Ambroise, Jerome; Smets, Françoise; Reding, Raymond; Sokal, Etienne M

    2017-02-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells express cytoplasmic ASMA prior to secreting collagen and consequent liver fibrosis. We hypothesized that quantifying ASMA could predict severity of future fibrosis after LT. For this, 32 pairs of protocol biopsies, that is, "baseline" and "follow-up" biopsies taken at 1- to 2-year intervals from 18 stable pediatric LT recipients, transplanted between 2006 and 2012 were selected. Morphometric quantification of "ASMA-positive area percentage" was performed on the baseline biopsy. Histological and fibrosis assessment using Metavir and LAFSc was performed on all biopsies. The difference of fibrosis severity between the "baseline" and "follow-up" was termed "prospective change in fibrosis." Significant association was seen between extent of ASMA positivity on baseline biopsy and "prospective change in fibrosis" using Metavir (P=.02), cumulative LAFSc (P=.02), and portal LAFSc (P=.01) values. ASMA-positive area percentage >1.05 predicted increased fibrosis on next biopsy with 90.0% specificity. Additionally, an association was observed between extent of ASMA positivity and concomitant ductular reaction (P=.06), but not with histological inflammation in the portal tract or lobular area. Hence, ASMA quantification can predict the future course of fibrosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dynamic Regulation of Sarcomeric Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2010-01-01

    In striated muscle, the actin cytoskeleton is differentiated into myofibrils. Actin and myosin filaments are organized in sarcomeres and specialized for producing contractile forces. Regular arrangement of actin filaments with uniform length and polarity is critical for the contractile function. However, the mechanisms of assembly and maintenance of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle are not completely understood. Live imaging of actin in striated muscle has revealed that actin sub...

  3. Immunohistochemistry with keratin and smooth muscle actin monoclonal antibodies in canine digestive tract and extramural glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, J H; van den Ingh, T S; de Neijs, M; van Mil, F N; Ivanyi, D; Ramaekers, F C

    1992-05-01

    The canine digestive system and its extramural glands (parotid gland, liver, pancreas) were immunohistochemically studied using a panel of twelve monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) specific for human keratin proteins and for alpha-smooth muscle actin. Various epithelial tissues and cells were characterized by different keratin staining patterns. So, the epithelial lining of the upper alimentary tract was characterized by staining with the MoAb 6B10, specific for keratin-type (K) 4, and the absence of staining with the MoAbs directed against K 8 and 18 (CAM 5.2 and RGE 53, DE-K18 respectively), whereas the lower alimentary tract epithelium was not labeled by 6B10, but stained by the latter MoAbs. In the salivary glands the luminal and basal cells of the adenomeres as well as the different ductal structures could be immunohistochemically differentiated. The duct epithelium in liver and pancreas showed next to keratin staining characteristics in common with hepatocytes and exocrine pancreatic cells, additional staining by several keratin MoAbs. The keratin staining patterns in the canine tissues showed, in addition to similarities also distinct discrepancies when compared to the staining patterns in corresponding human tissues. Myoepithelial cells in salivary and oesophageal glands could be differentiated from other basally located epithelial cells by their exclusive immunoreactivity for alpha-smooth muscle actin. Canine pancreatic endocrine cells were not labeled by any of the keratin MoAbs. It is concluded that immunohistochemistry with polypeptide specific MoAbs specific for human keratin-types can be used to differentiate between different types of canine epithelial tissues and epithelial cells in the digestive tract. As a result such reagents may find their application in developmental biology and pathology of this species.

  4. Non-Straub type actin from molluscan catch muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelud' ko, Nikolay S., E-mail: sheludko@stl.ru; Girich, Ulyana V.; Lazarev, Stanislav S.; Vyatchin, Ilya G.

    2016-05-27

    We have developed a method of obtaining natural actin from smooth muscles of the bivalves on the example of the Crenomytilus grayanus catch muscle. The muscles were previously rigorized to prevent a loss of thin filaments during homogenization and washings. Thin filaments were isolated with a low ionic strength solution in the presence of ATP and sodium pyrophosphate. Surface proteins of thin filaments-tropomyosin, troponin, calponin and some minor actin-binding proteins-were dissociated from actin filaments by increasing the ionic strength to 0.6 M KCL. Natural fibrillar actin obtained in that way depolymerizes easily in low ionic strength solutions commonly used for the extraction of Straub-type actin from acetone powder. Purification of natural actin was carried out by the polymerization–depolymerization cycle. The content of inactivated actin remaining in the supernatant is much less than at a similar purification of Straub-type actin. A comparative investigation was performed between the natural mussel actin and the Straub-type rabbit skeletal actin in terms of the key properties of actin: polymerization, activation of Mg-ATPase activity of myosin, and the electron-microscopic structure of actin polymers. -- Highlights: •We developed method of repolymerizable invertebrate smooth muscle actin obtaining. •Our method does not involve use of denaturating agents, which could modify proteins. •Viscosity and polymerization rate of actin, gained that way, is similar to Straub one. •Electron microscopy showed that repolymerized mussel actin is similar to Straub one. •Repolymerized mussel actin has greater ATPase activating capacity, than Straub actin.

  5. Collagen gel contraction serves to rapidly distinguish epithelial- and mesenchymal-derived cells irrespective of alpha-smooth muscle actin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal-like cells in the stroma of breast cancer may arise as a consequence of plasticity within the epithelial compartment, also referred to as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, or by recruitment of genuine mesenchymal cells from the peritumoral stroma. Cells of both the epithelial...... under these conditions did not augment contractility. It is concluded that epithelial-derived mesenchymal-like cells are functionally defective within a connective tissue environment irrespective of an apparent contractile phenotype....

  6. Human muscle LIM protein dimerizes along the actin cytoskeleton and cross-links actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Céline; Moreau, Flora; Moes, Michèle; Luthold, Carole; Dieterle, Monika; Goretti, Emeline; Neumann, Katrin; Steinmetz, André; Thomas, Clément

    2014-08-01

    The muscle LIM protein (MLP) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein playing important roles in the regulation of myocyte remodeling and adaptation to hypertrophic stimuli. Missense mutations in human MLP or its ablation in transgenic mice promotes cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The exact function(s) of MLP in the cytoplasmic compartment and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that MLP autonomously binds to, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments (AFs) independently of calcium and pH. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have shown how MLP cross-links actin filaments into both unipolar and mixed-polarity bundles. Quantitative analysis of the actin cytoskeleton configuration confirmed that MLP substantially promotes actin bundling in live myoblasts. In addition, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays revealed MLP self-association. Remarkably, BiFC complexes mostly localize along actin filament-rich structures, such as stress fibers and sarcomeres, supporting a functional link between MLP self-association and actin cross-linking. Finally, we have demonstrated that MLP self-associates through its N-terminal LIM domain, whereas it binds to AFs through its C-terminal LIM domain. Together our data support that MLP contributes to the maintenance of cardiomyocyte cytoarchitecture by a mechanism involving its self-association and actin filament cross-linking. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Sumoylated α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscle of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, Munehiro; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Shigenaga, Ayako; Baba, Takeshi; Naito, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Yamakura, Fumiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of two major muscle fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative fibers and fast-twitch glycolytic fibers. The proteins in these muscle fibers are known to differ in their expression, relative abundance, and post-translational modifications. In this study, we report a previously unreported post-translational modification of α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscles of adult male F344 rats in vivo. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), we first examined the differences in the protein expression profiles between the soleus and plantaris muscles. We found higher intensity protein spots at approximately 60 kDa and pH 9 on 2D-PAGE for the soleus muscle compared with the plantaris muscle. These spots were identified as α-skeletal muscle actin by liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and western blot analyses. In addition, we found that the 60 kDa α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1, using 2D-PAGE and western blot analyses. Furthermore, we found that α-skeletal muscle actin with larger molecular weight was localized in the nuclear and cytosol of the skeletal muscle, but not in the myofibrillar fraction by the combination of subcellular fractionation and western blot analyses. These results suggest that α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by SUMO-1 in the skeletal muscles, localized in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, and the extent of this modification is much higher in the slow muscles than in the fast muscles. This is the first study to show the presence of SUMOylated actin in animal tissues.

  8. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  9. Ca2+ bound to the high affinity divalent cation-binding site of actin enhances actophorin-induced depolymerization of muscle F-actin but inhibits actophorin-induced depolymerization of Acanthamoeba F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossakowska, M; Korn, E D

    1996-08-01

    The cation tightly bound to actin, Mg2+ or Ca2+, affects the ability of actophorin to accelerate depolymerization of filaments and bind to monomers of actin prepared from rabbit skeletal muscle and Acanthamoeba castellanii. Actophorin interacted similarly with muscle and Acanthamoeba Mg2(+)-F-actin but depolymerized muscle Mg2(+)-F-actin more efficiently. Muscle Ca2(+)-F-actin depolymerized about 5 times more rapidly than Mg2(+)-F-actin in the presence of actophorin but Acanthamoeba Ca2(+)-F-actin was highly resistant to actophorin. Muscle actin subunits dissociated more rapidly than Acanthamoeba actin subunits from copolymers of muscle and Acanthamoeba Ca2(+)-actin upon addition of actophorin although Acanthamoeba actin dissociated much more rapidly from copolymers than from its homopolymer. The Kd of the 1:1 complex between actophorin and monomeric actin was somewhat lower for muscle Mg2(+)-ATP-G-actin than for both Acanthamoeba Mg2(+)-ATP-G-actin and muscle Ca2(+)-ATP-G-actin. The data for the interactions of actophorin with Acanthamoeba Ca2(+)-ATP-G-actin or muscle and amoeba Mg2(+)- and Ca2(+)-ADP-G-actin were incompatible with the formation of 1:1 actin: actophorin complexes and, thus, Kd values could not be calculated. While it may not be surprising that actophorin would interact differently with Mg2(+)- and Ca2(+)-actin, it is unexpected that the nature of the tightly bound cation would have such dramatically opposite effects on the ability of actophorin to depolymerize muscle and Acanthamoeba F-actin. Differential severing by actophorin, with Acanthamoeba Ca2(+)-actin being almost totally resistant, is sufficient to explain the results but other possibilities cannot be ruled out.

  10. Muscle lim protein isoform negatively regulates striated muscle actin dynamics and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Arvanitis, Demetrios A; Papalouka, Vasiliki; Terzis, Gerasimos; Roumeliotis, Theodoros I; Spengos, Konstantinos; Garbis, Spiros D; Manta, Panagiota; Kranias, Evangelia G; Sanoudou, Despina

    2014-07-01

    Muscle lim protein (MLP) has emerged as a critical regulator of striated muscle physiology and pathophysiology. Mutations in cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3 (CSRP3), the gene encoding MLP, have been directly associated with human cardiomyopathies, whereas aberrant expression patterns are reported in human cardiac and skeletal muscle diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that MLP has an important role in both myogenic differentiation and myocyte cytoarchitecture, although the full spectrum of its intracellular roles has not been delineated. We report the discovery of an alternative splice variant of MLP, designated as MLP-b, showing distinct expression in neuromuscular disease and direct roles in actin dynamics and muscle differentiation. This novel isoform originates by alternative splicing of exons 3 and 4. At the protein level, it contains the N-terminus first half LIM domain of MLP and a unique sequence of 22 amino acids. Physiologically, it is expressed during early differentiation, whereas its overexpression reduces C2C12 differentiation and myotube formation. This may be mediated through its inhibition of MLP/cofilin-2-mediated F-actin dynamics. In differentiated striated muscles, MLP-b localizes to the sarcomeres and binds directly to Z-disc components, including α-actinin, T-cap and MLP. The findings of the present study unveil a novel player in muscle physiology and pathophysiology that is implicated in myogenesis as a negative regulator of myotube formation, as well as in differentiated striated muscles as a contributor to sarcomeric integrity. © 2014 FEBS.

  11. Actin nemaline myopathy mouse reproduces disease, suggests other actin disease phenotypes and provides cautionary note on muscle transgene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianina Ravenscroft

    Full Text Available Mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1 cause congenital myopathies including nemaline myopathy, actin aggregate myopathy and rod-core disease. The majority of patients with ACTA1 mutations have severe hypotonia and do not survive beyond the age of one. A transgenic mouse model was generated expressing an autosomal dominant mutant (D286G of ACTA1 (identified in a severe nemaline myopathy patient fused with EGFP. Nemaline bodies were observed in multiple skeletal muscles, with serial sections showing these correlated to aggregates of the mutant skeletal muscle α-actin-EGFP. Isolated extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles were significantly weaker than wild-type (WT muscle at 4 weeks of age, coinciding with the peak in structural lesions. These 4 week-old mice were ~30% less active on voluntary running wheels than WT mice. The α-actin-EGFP protein clearly demonstrated that the transgene was expressed equally in all myosin heavy chain (MHC fibre types during the early postnatal period, but subsequently became largely confined to MHCIIB fibres. Ringbinden fibres, internal nuclei and myofibrillar myopathy pathologies, not typical features in nemaline myopathy or patients with ACTA1 mutations, were frequently observed. Ringbinden were found in fast fibre predominant muscles of adult mice and were exclusively MHCIIB-positive fibres. Thus, this mouse model presents a reliable model for the investigation of the pathobiology of nemaline body formation and muscle weakness and for evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions. The occurrence of core-like regions, internal nuclei and ringbinden will allow analysis of the mechanisms underlying these lesions. The occurrence of ringbinden and features of myofibrillar myopathy in this mouse model of ACTA1 disease suggests that patients with these pathologies and no genetic explanation should be screened for ACTA1 mutations.

  12. Actin Nemaline Myopathy Mouse Reproduces Disease, Suggests Other Actin Disease Phenotypes and Provides Cautionary Note on Muscle Transgene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Jackaman, Connie; Sewry, Caroline A.; McNamara, Elyshia; Squire, Sarah E.; Potter, Allyson C.; Papadimitriou, John; Griffiths, Lisa M.; Bakker, Anthony J.; Davies, Kay E.; Laing, Nigel G.; Nowak, Kristen J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) cause congenital myopathies including nemaline myopathy, actin aggregate myopathy and rod-core disease. The majority of patients with ACTA1 mutations have severe hypotonia and do not survive beyond the age of one. A transgenic mouse model was generated expressing an autosomal dominant mutant (D286G) of ACTA1 (identified in a severe nemaline myopathy patient) fused with EGFP. Nemaline bodies were observed in multiple skeletal muscles, with serial sections showing these correlated to aggregates of the mutant skeletal muscle α-actin-EGFP. Isolated extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles were significantly weaker than wild-type (WT) muscle at 4 weeks of age, coinciding with the peak in structural lesions. These 4 week-old mice were ∼30% less active on voluntary running wheels than WT mice. The α-actin-EGFP protein clearly demonstrated that the transgene was expressed equally in all myosin heavy chain (MHC) fibre types during the early postnatal period, but subsequently became largely confined to MHCIIB fibres. Ringbinden fibres, internal nuclei and myofibrillar myopathy pathologies, not typical features in nemaline myopathy or patients with ACTA1 mutations, were frequently observed. Ringbinden were found in fast fibre predominant muscles of adult mice and were exclusively MHCIIB-positive fibres. Thus, this mouse model presents a reliable model for the investigation of the pathobiology of nemaline body formation and muscle weakness and for evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions. The occurrence of core-like regions, internal nuclei and ringbinden will allow analysis of the mechanisms underlying these lesions. The occurrence of ringbinden and features of myofibrillar myopathy in this mouse model of ACTA1 disease suggests that patients with these pathologies and no genetic explanation should be screened for ACTA1 mutations. PMID:22174871

  13. Smooth muscle cells of penis in the rat: noninvasive quantification with shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Jie; Qiao, Xiao-Hui; Gao, Feng; Bai, Ming; Li, Fan; Du, Lian-Fang; Xing, Jin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of cavernosum play an important role in erection. It is of great significance to quantitatively analyze the level of SMCs in penis. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of shear wave elastography (SWE) on evaluating the level of SMCs in penis quantitatively. Twenty healthy male rats were selected. The SWE imaging of penis was carried out and then immunohistochemistry analysis of penis was performed to analyze the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin in penis. The measurement index of SWE examination was tissue stiffness (TS). The measurement index of immunohistochemistry analysis was positive area percentage of alpha smooth muscle actin (AP). Sixty sets of data of TS and AP were obtained. The results showed that TS was significantly correlated with AP and the correlation coefficient was -0.618 (p penis was successfully quantified in vivo with SWE. SWE can be used clinically for evaluating the level of SMCs in penis quantitatively.

  14. The Cell Surface Structure of Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 (TEM8) is Regulated by the Actin Cytoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Mi Young; Chaudhary, Amit; Seaman, Steven; Dunty, Jill; Stevens, Janine; Elzarrad, Mohammed K.; Frankel, Arthur E.; St. Croix, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 (TEM8) is an integrin-like cell surface protein upregulated on tumor blood vessels and a potential vascular target for cancer therapy. Here, we found that the ability of an anti-TEM8 antibody, clone SB5, to recognize the extracellular domain of TEM8 on the cell surface depends on other host-cell factors. By taking advantage of SB5’s ability to distinguish different forms of cell-surface TEM8, we identified alpha-smooth muscle actin and transgelin, an actin binding p...

  15. Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen as marker of myoepithelial and basal cells in the parotid gland, pleomorphic adenomas and adenoid cystic carcinomas. An immunohistological comparison between T and sialosyl-T antigens, alpha-smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin 14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Christensen, M

    1995-01-01

    Controversy centres on the role and identification of myoepithelial (MEC) and basal cells in salivary gland tumours, and recent studies suggest that both basal cells and myoepithelial cells participate in the formation of salivary gland tumours. We have correlated the expression of different well...

  16. Skeletal muscle-specific ablation of gamma(cyto-actin does not exacerbate the mdx phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt W Prins

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously documented a ten-fold increase in gamma(cyto-actin expression in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle and hypothesized that increased gamma(cyto-actin expression may participate in an adaptive cytoskeletal remodeling response. To explore whether increased gamma(cyto-actin fortifies the cortical cytoskeleton in dystrophic skeletal muscle, we generated double knockout mice lacking both dystrophin and gamma(cyto-actin specifically in skeletal muscle (ms-DKO. Surprisingly, dystrophin-deficient mdx and ms-DKO mice presented with comparable levels of myofiber necrosis, membrane instability, and deficits in muscle function. The lack of an exacerbated phenotype in ms-DKO mice suggests gamma(cyto-actin and dystrophin function in a common pathway. Finally, because both mdx and ms-DKO skeletal muscle showed similar levels of utrophin expression and presented with identical dystrophies, we conclude utrophin can partially compensate for the loss of dystrophin independent of a gamma(cyto-actin-utrophin interaction.

  17. Release of muscle α-actin into serum after intensive exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Martínez-Amat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the effects of high-level matches on serum alpha actin and other muscle damage markers in teams of rugby and handball players. Methods: Blood samples were drawn from 23 sportsmen: 13 rugby players and 10 handball players. One sample was drawn with the player at rest before the match and one immediately after the match. Immunoassays were used to determine troponin I, troponin T, LDH, and myoglobin concentrations. Western blot and densitometry were used to measure α-actin concentrations. Muscle injury was defined by a total CK value of > 500 IU/L (Rosalki method. Results: Mean pre- and post-match serum alpha-actin values were, respectively, 7.16 and 26.47 μg/ml in the handball group and 1.24 and 20.04 μg/ml in the rugby team. CPK, LDH and myoglobin but not troponin 1 levels also significantly differed between these time points. According to these results, large amounts of α-actin are released into peripheral blood immediately after intense physical effort. Possible cross-interference between skeletal and cardiac muscle damage can be discriminated by the combined use of α-actin and troponin I. Conclusion: The significant increase in alpha-actin after a high-level match may be a reliable marker for the early diagnosis and hence more effective treatment of muscle injury.

  18. Electron tomography of cryofixed, isometrically contracting insect flight muscle reveals novel actin-myosin interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C; Tregear, Richard T; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E; Reedy, Michael K; Taylor, Kenneth A

    2010-09-09

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the "target zone", situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very different from

  19. Electron tomography of cryofixed, isometrically contracting insect flight muscle reveals novel actin-myosin interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenping Wu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ.We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the "target zone", situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening.We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  20. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A. (UPENN); (Duke); (MRCLMB); (FSU); (Jikei-Med)

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are

  1. Whole animal knockout of smooth muscle alpha-actin does not alter excisional wound healing or the fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasek, James J; Haaksma, Carol J; Schwartz, Robert J; Howard, Eric W

    2013-01-01

    The contractile phenotype and function of myofibroblasts have been proposed to play a critical role in wound closure. It has been hypothesized that smooth muscle α-actin expressed in myofibroblasts is critical for its formation and function. We have used smooth muscle α-actin-null mice to test this hypothesis. Full-thickness excisional wounds closed at a similar rate in smooth muscle α-actin-null and wild-type mice. In addition, fibroblasts in smooth muscle α-actin-null granulation tissue when immunostained with a monoclonal antibody that recognizes all muscle actin isoforms exhibited a myofibroblast-like distribution and a stress fiber-like pattern, showing that these cells acquired the myofibroblast phenotype. Dermal fibroblasts from smooth muscle α-actin-null and wild-type mice formed stress fibers and supermature focal adhesions, and generated similar amounts of contractile force in response to transforming growth factor-β1. Smooth muscle γ-actin and skeletal muscle α-actin were expressed in smooth muscle α-actin-null myofibroblasts, as shown by immunostaining, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and mass spectrometry. These results show that smooth muscle α-actin is not necessary for myofibroblast formation and function and for wound closure, and that smooth muscle γ-actin and skeletal muscle α-actin may be able to functionally compensate for the lack of smooth muscle α-actin in myofibroblasts. © 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.

  2. Reversal of TGF-β1 stimulation of α-smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix components by cyclic AMP in Dupuytren's - derived fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Sandra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myofibroblasts, a derived subset of fibroblasts especially important in scar formation and wound contraction, have been found at elevated levels in affected Dupuytren's tissues. Transformation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is characterized by expression of alpha- smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and increased production of extracellular matrix (ECM components, both events of relevance to connective tissue remodeling. We propose that increasing the activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway will inhibit transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1-induced ECM synthesis and myofibroblast formation and may provide a means to blunt fibrosis. Methods Fibroblasts derived from areas of Dupuytren's contracture cord (DC, from adjacent and phenotypically normal palmar fascia (PF, and from palmar fascia from patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (CTR; CT were treated with TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml and/or forskolin (10 μM (a known stimulator of cAMP. Total RNA and protein extracted was subjected to real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results The basal mRNA expression levels of fibronectin- extra domain A (FN1-EDA, type I (COL1A2 and type III collagen (COL3A1, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF were all significantly increased in DC- and in PF-derived cells compared to CT-derived fibroblasts. The TGF-β1 stimulation of α-SMA, CTGF, COL1A2 and COL3A1 was greatly inhibited by concomitant treatment with forskolin, especially in DC-derived cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 stimulation of FN1-EDA showed similar levels of reduction with the addition of forskolin in all three cell types. Conclusion In sum, increasing cAMP levels show potential to inhibit the formation of myofibroblasts and accumulation of ECM components. Molecular agents that increase cAMP may therefore prove useful in mitigating DC progression or recurrence.

  3. alpha-Actin: disposition, quantities, and estimated effects on lung recoil and compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldmixon, E H; Carlsson, K; Kuhn, C; Butler, J P; Hoppin, F G

    2001-07-01

    We have investigated the basis and implications of pneumoconstriction by measuring disposition and quantities of alpha-smooth muscle actin in rat and guinea pig lungs and modeling its effects on lung recoil and compliance. A robust marker of contractility, alpha-smooth muscle actin appears in smooth muscle or myofibroblast-like cells in pleura, airways, blood vessels, and alveolar ductal tissues. In each site, we measured its transected area by immunofluorescent staining and frequency-modulated scanning confocal microscopy. We incorporated these data in a model of the parenchyma consisting of an extensive elastic network with embedded contractile structures. We conclude that contraction at any one of these sites alone can decrease parenchymal compliance by 20-30% during tidal breathing. This is due mostly to the stiffness of activated contractile elements undergoing passive cycling; constant muscle tension would have little effect. The magnitude of the effect corresponds with known responses of the lung to hypocapnia, consistent with a homeostatic function in which gas exchange is defended by redistributing ventilation away from overventilated units.

  4. β-actin shows limited mobility and is only required for supraphysiological insulin-stimulated glucose transport in young adult soleus muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Agnete Louise Bjerregaard; Knudsen, Jonas Roland; Henriquez-Olguin, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    in soleus but not in EDL of young adult mice. Contraction-stimulated glucose transport trended towards the same pattern, but the glucose transport phenotype disappeared in soleus muscles from mature adult mice. No genotype-related differences were found in body composition, glucose tolerance or by indirect...... in mature skeletal muscle. Neither dependency of glucose transport on β-actin nor actin reorganization upon glucose transport have been tested in mature muscle. To investigate the role of β-actin in fully differentiated muscle, we have performed a detailed characterization of wildtype and muscle-specific β...... calorimetry measurements. To evaluate β-actin mobility in mature muscle, we electroporated GFP-β-actin into FDB muscle fibers and measured FRAP. GFP-β-actin showed limited unstimulated mobility and no changes after insulin stimulation. In conclusion, β-actin is not required for glucose transport regulation...

  5. Characterization of smooth muscle-like cells in circulating human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Seigo; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka; Nakamura, Shinichi; Kataoka, Keiichiro; Aikawa, Masanori; Shimizu, Koichi; Koide, Shunichi; Mitchell, Richard N; Ogawa, Hisao; Libby, Peter

    2006-08-01

    Smooth muscle cells play an important role in human vascular diseases. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that circulating smooth muscle precursor cells contribute to intimal hyperplasia in animal models. We obtained large spindle cells expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), denoted here as "smooth muscle-like cells" (SMLC), from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). SMLC derived from human PBMC proliferated readily and expressed pro-inflammatory genes during early culture. After long-term culture, SMLC could contract and express characteristic smooth muscle cell markers. We found peripheral blood mononuclear cell expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin in the circulating blood that bore CD14 and CD105. Sorted CD14/CD105 double-positive PBMC could differentiate into SMLC. The number of CD14-CD105-bearing PBMC increased significantly in patients with coronary artery disease compared to patients without coronary artery disease. These results support the novel concept that smooth muscle precursor cells exist in circulating human blood and may contribute to the pathogenesis of vascular diseases.

  6. Diffusion of myosin light chain kinase on actin: A mechanism to enhance myosin phosphorylation rates in smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Feng; Brizendine, Richard K; Carter, Michael S; Alcala, Diego B; Brown, Avery E; Chattin, Amy M; Haldeman, Brian D; Walsh, Michael P; Facemyer, Kevin C; Baker, Josh E; Cremo, Christine R

    2015-10-01

    Smooth muscle myosin (SMM) light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates SMM, thereby activating the ATPase activity required for muscle contraction. The abundance of active MLCK, which is tightly associated with the contractile apparatus, is low relative to that of SMM. SMM phosphorylation is rapid despite the low ratio of MLCK to SMM, raising the question of how one MLCK rapidly phosphorylates many SMM molecules. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor single molecules of streptavidin-coated quantum dot-labeled MLCK interacting with purified actin, actin bundles, and stress fibers of smooth muscle cells. Surprisingly, MLCK and the N-terminal 75 residues of MLCK (N75) moved on actin bundles and stress fibers of smooth muscle cell cytoskeletons by a random one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion mechanism. Although diffusion of proteins along microtubules and oligonucleotides has been observed previously, this is the first characterization to our knowledge of a protein diffusing in a sustained manner along actin. By measuring the frequency of motion, we found that MLCK motion is permitted only if acto-myosin and MLCK-myosin interactions are weak. From these data, diffusion coefficients, and other kinetic and geometric considerations relating to the contractile apparatus, we suggest that 1-D diffusion of MLCK along actin (a) ensures that diffusion is not rate limiting for phosphorylation, (b) allows MLCK to locate to areas in which myosin is not yet phosphorylated, and (c) allows MLCK to avoid getting "stuck" on myosins that have already been phosphorylated. Diffusion of MLCK along actin filaments may be an important mechanism for enhancing the rate of SMM phosphorylation in smooth muscle. © 2015 Hong et al.

  7. Localizations of γ-Actins in Skin, Hair, Vibrissa, Arrector Pili Muscle and Other Hair Appendages of Developing Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Kiyokazu; Takano-Ohmuro, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Six isoforms of actins encoded by different genes have been identified in mammals including α-cardiac, α-skeletal, α-smooth muscle (α-SMA), β-cytoplasmic, γ-smooth muscle (γ-SMA), and γ-cytoplasmic actins (γ-CYA). In a previous study we showed the localization of α-SMA and other cytoskeletal proteins in the hairs and their appendages of developing rats (Morioka K., et al. (2011) Acta Histochem. Cytochem. 44, 141–153), and herein we determined the localization of γ type actins in the same tissues and organs by immunohistochemical staining. Our results indicate that the expression of γ-SMA and γ-CYA is suggested to be poor in actively proliferating tissues such as the basal layer of the epidermis and the hair matrix in the hair bulb, and as well as in highly keratinized tissues such as the hair cortex and hair cuticle. In contrast, the expression of γ-actins were high in the spinous layer, granular layer, hair shaft, and inner root sheath, during their active differentiations. In particular, the localization of γ-SMA was very similar to that of α-SMA. It was located not only in the arrector pili muscles and muscles in the dermis, but also in the dermal sheath and in a limited area of the outer root sheath in both the hair and vibrissal follicles. The γ-CYA was suggested to be co-localized with γ-SMA in the dermal sheath, outer root sheath, and arrector pili muscles. Sparsely distributed dermal cells expressed both types of γ-actin. The expression of γ-actins is suggested to undergo dynamic changes according to the proliferation and differentiation of the skin and hair-related cells

  8. Molecular Regulation of Arterial Aneurysms: Role of Actin Dynamics and microRNAs in Vascular Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azra Alajbegovic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aortic aneurysms are defined as an irreversible increase in arterial diameter by more than 50% relative to the normal vessel diameter. The incidence of aneurysm rupture is about 10 in 100,000 persons per year and ruptured arterial aneurysms inevitably results in serious complications, which are fatal in about 40% of cases. There is also a hereditary component of the disease and dilation of the ascending thoracic aorta is often associated with congenital heart disease such as bicuspid aortic valves (BAV. Furthermore, specific mutations that have been linked to aneurysm affect polymerization of actin filaments. Polymerization of actin is important to maintain a contractile phenotype of smooth muscle cells enabling these cells to resist mechanical stress on the vascular wall caused by the blood pressure according to the law of Laplace. Interestingly, polymerization of actin also promotes smooth muscle specific gene expression via the transcriptional co-activator MRTF, which is translocated to the nucleus when released from monomeric actin. In addition to genes encoding for proteins involved in the contractile machinery, recent studies have revealed that several non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs are regulated by this mechanism. The importance of these miRNAs for aneurysm development is only beginning to be understood. This review will summarize our current understanding about the influence of smooth muscle miRNAs and actin polymerization for the development of arterial aneurysms.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Chaponnier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher vertebrates (mammals and birds express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1 sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA and α-cardiac (α-CAA, 2 smooth muscle actins (SMAs, α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3 cytoplasmic actins (CYAs, β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb against an actin isoform (α-SMA was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli  et al., 1986 . We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAbs anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS. In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-regeneration in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes.

  10. Characterization of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype in long-term culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Baldor, L; Low, R; Warshaw, D

    1989-02-01

    Studies of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells, during long-term in vitro subcultivation (up to 100 population doublings), have revealed phenotypic heterogeneity among cells, as characterized by differences in proliferative behavior, cell morphology, and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. In vivo, smooth muscle cells were spindle-shaped and expressed desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (50% of total actin) as their predominant cytoskeletal and contractile proteins. Within 24 h of culture, vimentin rather than desmin was the predominant intermediate filament protein, with little change in alpha-actin content. Upon initial subcultivation, all cells were flattened and fibroblastic in appearance with a concomitant fivefold reduction in alpha-actin content, whereas the beta and gamma nonmuscle actins predominated. In three out of four cell lines studied, fluctuations in proliferative activity were observed during the life span of the culture. These spontaneous fluctuations in proliferation were accompanied by coordinated changes in morphology and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. During periods of enhanced proliferation a significant proportion of cells reverted to their original spindle-shaped morphology with a simultaneous increase in alpha-actin content (20 to 30% of total actin). These results suggest that in long-term culture smooth muscle cells undergo spontaneous modulations in cell phenotype and may serve as a useful model for studying the regulation of intracellular protein expression.

  11. Twelve actin-encoding cDNAs from the American lobster, Homarus americanus: cloning and tissue expression of eight skeletal muscle, one heart, and three cytoplasmic isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Kwang; Kim, Kyoung Sun; Oh, Chul-Woong; Mykles, Donald L; Lee, Sung Gu; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2009-06-01

    Lobster muscles express a diverse array of myofibrillar protein isoforms. Three fiber types (fast, slow-twitch or S1, and slow-tonic or S2) differ qualitatively and quantitatively in myosin heavy and light chains, troponin-T, -I, and -C, paramyosin, and tropomyosin variants. However, little is known about the diversity of actin isoforms present in crustacean tissues. In this report we characterized cDNAs that encode twelve actin isoforms in the American lobster, Homarus americanus: eight from skeletal muscle (Ha-ActinSK1-8), one from heart (Ha-ActinHT1), and three cytoplasmic type actins from hepatopancreas (Ha-ActinCT1-3). All twelve cDNAs were products of distinct genes, as indicated by differences in the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). The open reading frames specified polypeptides 376 or 377 amino acids in length. Although key amino residues are conserved in the lobster actins, variations in nearby sequences may affect actin polymerization and/or interactions with other myofibrillar proteins. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed muscle fiber type- and tissue-specific expression patterns. Ha-Actin-HT1 was expressed exclusively in heart (87% of the total; 12% of the total was Ha-ActinCT1). Ha-ActinCT1 was expressed in all tissues, while CT2 and CT3 were expressed only in hepatopancreas, with Ha-ActinCT2 as the major isoform (93% of the total). Ha-ActinSK1 and SK2 were the major isoforms (88% and 12% of the total, respectively) in the S1 fibers of crusher claw closer muscle. Fast fibers in the cutter claw closer and deep abdominal muscles differed in SK isoforms. Ha-ActinSK3, SK4, and SK5 were the major isoforms in cutter claw closer muscle (12%, 48%, and 37% of the total, respectively). Ha-ActinSK5 and SK8 were the major isoforms in deep abdominal flexor (31% and 65% of the total, respectively) and extensor (46% and 53% of the total, respectively) muscles, with SK6 and SK7 expressed at low levels. These data indicate that fast

  12. Impaired Relaxation of Airway Smooth Muscle in Mice Lacking the Actin-Binding Protein Gelsolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Maya; Zhang, Yi; Danielsson, Jennifer; Joell, Tiarra; Yong, Hwan Mee; Townsend, Elizabeth; Khurana, Seema; An, Steven S; Emala, Charles W

    2017-05-01

    Diverse classes of ligands have recently been discovered that relax airway smooth muscle (ASM) despite a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca 2+ ] i ). However, the cellular mechanisms are not well understood. Gelsolin is a calcium-activated actin-severing and -capping protein found in many cell types, including ASM cells. Gelsolin also binds to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, making this substrate less available for phospholipase Cβ-mediated hydrolysis to inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol. We hypothesized that gelsolin plays a critical role in ASM relaxation and mechanistically accounts for relaxation by ligands that transiently increase [Ca 2+ ] i . Isolated tracheal rings from gelsolin knockout (KO) mice showed impaired relaxation to both a β-agonist and chloroquine, a bitter taste receptor agonist, which relaxes ASM, despite inducing transiently increased [Ca 2+ ] i . A single inhalation of methacholine increased lung resistance to a similar extent in wild-type and gelsolin KO mice, but the subsequent spontaneous relaxation was less in gelsolin KO mice. In ASM cells derived from gelsolin KO mice, serotonin-induced Gq-coupled activation increased both [Ca 2+ ] i and inositol triphosphate synthesis to a greater extent compared to cells from wild-type mice, possibly due to the absence of gelsolin binding to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Single-cell analysis showed higher filamentous:globular actin ratio at baseline and slower cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics in gelsolin KO cells. Gelsolin KO ASM cells also showed an attenuated decrease in cell stiffness to chloroquine and flufenamic acid. These findings suggest that gelsolin plays a critical role in ASM relaxation and that activation of gelsolin may contribute to relaxation induced by ligands that relax ASM despite a transient increase in [Ca 2+ ] i .

  13. SPARC Interacts with Actin in Skeletal Muscle in Vitro and in Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise H; Jepsen, Pia Lørup; Boysen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    to actin. This interaction is present in regenerating myofibers of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, polymyositis, and compartment syndrome. Analysis of the α-, β-, and γ-actin isoforms in SPARC knockout myoblasts reveals a changed expression pattern with dominance of γ-actin. In SPARC knockout...... stimulation protocol, we find a defective force recovery. Therefore, SPARC appears to be an important modulator of the actin cytoskeleton, implicating maintenance of muscular function. This direct interaction with actin suggests a new role of SPARC during tissue remodeling....

  14. Characterization of bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice expressing mCherry fluorescent protein substituted for the murine smooth muscle-alpha-actin gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smooth muscle a actin (SMA) is a cytoskeletal protein expressed by mesenchymal and smooth muscle cell types, including mural cells(vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes). Using Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) recombineering technology, we generated transgenic reporter mice that express a ...

  15. The roles and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, intermediate filaments and microtubules in smooth muscle cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dale D; Gerlach, Brennan D

    2017-04-08

    Smooth muscle cell migration has been implicated in the development of respiratory and cardiovascular systems; and airway/vascular remodeling. Cell migration is a polarized cellular process involving a protrusive cell front and a retracting trailing rear. There are three cytoskeletal systems in mammalian cells: the actin cytoskeleton, the intermediate filament network, and microtubules; all of which regulate all or part of the migrated process. The dynamic actin cytoskeleton spatially and temporally regulates protrusion, adhesions, contraction, and retraction from the cell front to the rear. c-Abl tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in regulating actin dynamics and migration of airway smooth muscle cells and nonmuscle cells. Recent studies suggest that intermediate filaments undergo reorganization during migration, which coordinates focal adhesion dynamics, cell contraction, and nucleus rigidity. In particular, vimentin intermediate filaments undergo phosphorylation and reorientation in smooth muscle cells, which may regulate cell contraction and focal adhesion assembly/disassembly. Motile cells are characterized by a front-rear polarization of the microtubule framework, which regulates all essential processes leading to cell migration through its role in cell mechanics, intracellular trafficking, and signaling. This review recapitulates our current knowledge how the three cytoskeletal systems spatially and temporally modulate the migratory properties of cells. We also summarize the potential role of migration-associated biomolecules in lung and vascular diseases.

  16. Skeletal muscle myopathy mutations at the actin tropomyosin interface that cause gain- or loss-of-function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memo, Massimiliano; Marston, Steven

    2013-08-01

    It is well known that the regulation of muscle contraction relies on the ability of tropomyosin to switch between different positions on the actin filament, but it is still not well understood which amino acids are directly involved in the different states of the interaction. Recently the structure of the actin-tropomyosin interface has been determined both in the absence and presence of myosin heads. Interestingly, a number of mutations in tropomyosin that are associated with skeletal muscle myopathy are located within this interface. We first give an overview of the functional effect of mutations on amino acids that are involved in the contact with actin asp25, which represent a pattern repeated seven times along tropomyosin. It is explained how some of these amino acids (R167 and R244) which are thought to be involved in a salt bridge contact with actin in the closed state can produce a loss-of-function when mutated, while other positively charged tropomyosin amino acids positioned on the downstream side of the contact (K7, K49, R91, K168) can produce a gain-of-function when mutated. We then consider mutations of amino acids involved in another salt bridge contact between the two proteins in the closed state, actin K326N (which binds on five different points of tropomyosin) and tropomyosin ∆E139 and E181K, and we report how all of these mutations produce a gain-of-function. These observations can be important to validate the proposed structures and to understand more deeply how mutations affect the function of these proteins and to enable prediction of their outcomes.

  17. A non-cross-bridge, static tension is present in permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers after active force inhibition or actin extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornachione, Anabelle S; Rassier, Dilson E

    2012-02-01

    When activated muscle fibers are stretched, there is a long-lasting increase in the force. This phenomenon, referred to as "residual force enhancement," has characteristics similar to those of the "static tension," a long-lasting increase in force observed when muscles are stretched in the presence of Ca(2+) but in the absence of myosin-actin interaction. Independent studies have suggested that these two phenomena have a common mechanism and are caused either by 1) a Ca(2+)-induced stiffening of titin or by 2) promoting titin binding to actin. In this study, we performed two sets of experiments in which activated fibers (pCa(2+) 4.5) treated with the myosin inhibitor blebbistatin were stretched from 2.7 to 2.8 μm at a speed of 40 L(o)/s, first, after partial extraction of TnC, which inhibits myosin-actin interactions, or, second, after treatment with gelsolin, which leads to the depletion of thin (actin) filaments. We observed that the static tension, directly related with the residual force enhancement, was not changed after treatments that inhibit myosin-actin interactions or that deplete fibers from troponin C and actin filaments. The results suggest that the residual force enhancement is caused by a stiffening of titin upon muscle activation but not with titin binding to actin. This finding indicates the existence of a Ca(2+)-regulated, titin-based stiffness in skeletal muscles.

  18. Olfactory ensheathing cells of hamsters, rabbits, monkeys, and mice express α-smooth muscle actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawji, Khalil S; Zhang, Shannon X; Tsai, Ying-Yu; Smithson, Laura J; Kawaja, Michael D

    2013-07-12

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are the chief glial population of the mammalian olfactory nervous system, residing in the olfactory mucosa and at the surface of the olfactory bulb. We investigated the neurochemical features of OECs in a variety of mammalian species (including adult hamsters, rabbits, monkeys, and mice, as well as fetal pigs) using three biomarkers: α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), S100β, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Mucosal and bulbar OECs from all five mammalian species express S100β. Both mucosal and bulbar OECs of monkeys express αSMA, yet only bulbar OECs of hamsters and only mucosal OECs of rabbits express αSMA as well. Mucosal OECs, but not bulbar OECs, also express GFAP in hamsters and monkeys; mice, by comparison, have only a sparse population of OECs expressing GFAP. Though αSMA immunostaining is not detected in OECs of adult mice, GFAP-expressing mucosal OECs isolated from adult mice do coexpress αSMA in vitro. Moreover, mucosal OECs from adult mutant mice lacking αSMA expression display perturbed cellular morphology (i.e., fewer cytoplasmic processes extending among the hundreds of olfactory axons in the olfactory nerve fascicles and nuclei having degenerative features). In sum, these findings highlight the efficacy of αSMA and S100β as biomarkers of OECs from a variety of mammalian species. These observations provide definitive evidence that mammalian OECs express the structural protein αSMA (at various levels of detection), which appears to play a pivotal role in their ensheathment of olfactory axons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Interaction of rabbit skeletal muscle troponin T and F-actin at physiological ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeley, D.H.; Smillie, L.B.

    1988-01-01

    Troponin T has been shown to interact significantly with F-actin at 150 mM KC1 by using an F-actin pelleting assay and 125 I-labeled proteins. While troponin T fragment T1 (residues 1-158) fails to pellet with F-actin, fragment T2 (residues 159-259) mimics the binding properties of the intact molecule. The weak competition of T2 binding to F-actin, shown by subfragments of T2, indicates that the interaction site(s) encompass(es) an extensive segment of troponin T. The extent of pelleting of troponin T (or T2) with F-actin is only marginally altered in the binary complex troponin IT (or T2), indicating that the direct interactions either of troponin T (or T2) or of troponin I, or both, with F-actin are weakened when these components are incorporated into a binary complex. The binding of troponin T (or T2) is moderately (-Ca 2+ ) or more extensively reduced (+Ca 2+ ) in the presence of troponin C. The pelleting of Tn-T seen in the presence of Tn-C (-Ca 2+ ) and Tn-I was further reduced when either Tn-I or Tn-C (-Ca 2+ ) was added, respectively, to form a fully reconstituted Tn complex. As noted by others, whole troponin shows little sensitivity to Ca 2+ in its binding to F-actin (-tropomyosin). These and other observations, taken together with the restoration of troponin IC (±Ca 2+ ) binding to F-actin by troponin T, implicate a role for the interaction of troponin T and F-actin in the thin filament assembly

  20. Role of active contraction and tropomodulins in regulating actin filament length and sarcomere structure in developing zebrafish skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise eMazelet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Whilst it is recognised that contraction plays an important part in maintaining the structure and function of mature skeletal muscle, its role during development remains undefined. In this study the role of movement in skeletal muscle maturation was investigated in intact zebrafish embryos using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches. An immotile mutant line (cacnb1ts25 which lacks functional voltage-gated calcium channels (dihydropyridine receptors in the muscle and pharmacological immobilisation of embryos with a reversible anaesthetic (Tricaine, allowed the study of paralysis (in mutants and anaesthetised fish and recovery of movement (reversal of anaesthetic treatment. The effect of paralysis in early embryos (aged between 17-24 hours post fertilisation, hpf on skeletal muscle structure at both myofibrillar and myofilament level was determined using both immunostaining with confocal microscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction. The consequences of paralysis and subsequent recovery on the localisation of the actin capping proteins Tropomodulin 1 &4 (Tmod in fish aged from 17hpf until 42hpf was also assessed. The functional consequences of early paralysis were investigated by examining the mechanical properties of the larval muscle. The length-force relationship, active and passive tension, was measured in immotile, recovered and control skeletal muscle at 5 and 7 day post fertilisation (dpf. Recovery of muscle function was also assessed by examining swimming patterns in recovered and control fish. Inhibition of the initial embryonic movements (up to 24 hpf resulted in an increase in myofibril length and a decrease in width followed by almost complete recovery in both moving and paralysed fish by 42hpf. In conclusion, myofibril organisation is regulated by a dual mechanism involving movement-dependent and movement-independent processes. The initial contractile event itself drives the localisation of Tmod1 to its sarcomeric

  1. A three-dimensional FRET analysis to construct an atomic model of the actin-tropomyosin-troponin core domain complex on a muscle thin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Masao; Makimura, Satoshi; Sugahara, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Ryuta; Bunya, Masashi; Saitoh, Takahiro; Tobita, Hidetaka

    2012-06-29

    It is essential to know the detailed structure of the thin filament to understand the regulation mechanism of striated muscle contraction. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to construct an atomic model of the actin-tropomyosin (Tm)-troponin (Tn) core domain complex. We generated single-cysteine mutants in the 167-195 region of Tm and in TnC, TnI, and the β-TnT 25-kDa fragment, and each was attached with an energy donor probe. An energy acceptor probe was located at actin Gln41, actin Cys374, or the actin nucleotide-binding site. From these donor-acceptor pairs, FRET efficiencies were determined with and without Ca(2+). Using the atomic coordinates for F-actin, Tm, and the Tn core domain, we searched all possible arrangements for Tm or the Tn core domain on F-actin to calculate the FRET efficiency for each donor-acceptor pair in each arrangement. By minimizing the squared sum of deviations for the calculated FRET efficiencies from the observed FRET efficiencies, we determined the location of Tm segment 167-195 and the Tn core domain on F-actin with and without Ca(2+). The bulk of the Tn core domain is located near actin subdomains 3 and 4. The central helix of TnC is nearly perpendicular to the F-actin axis, directing the N-terminal domain of TnC toward the actin outer domain. The C-terminal region in the I-T arm forms a four-helix-bundle structure with the Tm 175-185 region. After Ca(2+) release, the Tn core domain moves toward the actin outer domain and closer to the center of the F-actin axis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tetraspanin CD9 regulates cell contraction and actin arrangement via RhoA in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Herr

    Full Text Available The most prevalent cardiovascular diseases arise from alterations in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC morphology and function. Tetraspanin CD9 has been previously implicated in regulating vascular pathologies; however, insight into how CD9 may regulate adverse VSMC phenotypes has not been provided. We utilized a human model of aortic smooth muscle cells to understand the consequences of CD9 deficiency on VSMC phenotypes. Upon knocking down CD9, the cells developed an abnormally small and rounded morphology. We determined that this morphological change was due to a lack of typical parallel actin arrangement. We also found similar total RhoA but decreased GTP-bound (active RhoA levels in CD9 deficient cells. As a result, cells lacking a full complement of CD9 were less contractile than their control treated counterparts. Upon restoration of RhoA activity in the CD9 deficient cells, the phenotype was reversed and cell contraction was restored. Conversely, inhibition of RhoA activity in the control cells mimicked the CD9-deficient cell phenotype. Thus, alteration in CD9 expression was sufficient to profoundly disrupt cellular actin arrangement and endogenous cell contraction by interfering with RhoA signaling. This study provides insight into how CD9 may regulate previously described vascular smooth muscle cell pathophysiology.

  3. Structural Characterization of the Binding of Myosin·ADP·Pi to Actin in Permeabilized Rabbit Psoas Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sengen; Gu, Jin; Belknap, Betty; White, Howard; Yu, Leepo C.

    2006-01-01

    When myosin is attached to actin in a muscle cell, various structures in the filaments are formed. The two strongly bound states (A·M·ADP and A·M) and the weakly bound A·M·ATP states are reasonably well understood. The orientation of the strongly bound myosin heads is uniform (“stereospecific” attachment), and the attached heads exhibit little spatial fluctuation. In the prehydrolysis weakly bound A·M·ATP state, the orientations of the attached myosin heads assume a wide range of azimuthal and axial angles, indicating considerable flexibility in the myosin head. The structure of the other weakly bound state, A·M·ADP·Pi, however, is poorly understood. This state is thought to be the critical pre-power-stroke state, poised to make the transition to the strongly binding, force-generating states, and hence it is of particular interest for understanding the mechanism of contraction. However, because of the low affinity between myosin and actin in the A·M·ADP·Pi state, the structure of this state has eluded determination both in isolated form and in muscle cells. With the knowledge recently gained in the structures of the weakly binding M·ATP, M·ADP·Pi states and the weakly attached A·M·ATP state in muscle fibers, it is now feasible to delineate the in vivo structure of the attached state of A·M·ADP·Pi. The series of experiments presented in this article were carried out under relaxing conditions at 25°C, where ∼95% of the myosin heads in the skinned rabbit psoas muscle contain the hydrolysis products. The affinity for actin is enhanced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) or by lowering the ionic strength in the bathing solution. Solution kinetics and binding constants were determined in the presence and in the absence of PEG. When the binding between actin and myosin was increased, both the myosin layer lines and the actin layer lines increased in intensity, but the intensity profiles did not change. The configuration (mode) of attachment in

  4. Structural characterization of the binding of Myosin*ADP*Pi to actin in permeabilized rabbit psoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sengen; Gu, Jin; Belknap, Betty; White, Howard; Yu, Leepo C

    2006-11-01

    When myosin is attached to actin in a muscle cell, various structures in the filaments are formed. The two strongly bound states (A*M*ADP and A*M) and the weakly bound A*M*ATP states are reasonably well understood. The orientation of the strongly bound myosin heads is uniform ("stereospecific" attachment), and the attached heads exhibit little spatial fluctuation. In the prehydrolysis weakly bound A*M*ATP state, the orientations of the attached myosin heads assume a wide range of azimuthal and axial angles, indicating considerable flexibility in the myosin head. The structure of the other weakly bound state, A*M*ADP*P(i), however, is poorly understood. This state is thought to be the critical pre-power-stroke state, poised to make the transition to the strongly binding, force-generating states, and hence it is of particular interest for understanding the mechanism of contraction. However, because of the low affinity between myosin and actin in the A*M*ADP*P(i) state, the structure of this state has eluded determination both in isolated form and in muscle cells. With the knowledge recently gained in the structures of the weakly binding M*ATP, M*ADP*P(i) states and the weakly attached A*M*ATP state in muscle fibers, it is now feasible to delineate the in vivo structure of the attached state of A*M*ADP*P(i). The series of experiments presented in this article were carried out under relaxing conditions at 25 degrees C, where approximately 95% of the myosin heads in the skinned rabbit psoas muscle contain the hydrolysis products. The affinity for actin is enhanced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) or by lowering the ionic strength in the bathing solution. Solution kinetics and binding constants were determined in the presence and in the absence of PEG. When the binding between actin and myosin was increased, both the myosin layer lines and the actin layer lines increased in intensity, but the intensity profiles did not change. The configuration (mode) of attachment in

  5. Structural Characterization of the Binding of Myosin*ADP*Pi to Actin in Permeabilized Rabbit Psoas Muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu,S.; Gu, J.; Belknap, B.; White, H.; Yu, L.

    2006-01-01

    When myosin is attached to actin in a muscle cell, various structures in the filaments are formed. The two strongly bound states (A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP and A{center_dot}M) and the weakly bound A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP states are reasonably well understood. The orientation of the strongly bound myosin heads is uniform ('stereospecific' attachment), and the attached heads exhibit little spatial fluctuation. In the prehydrolysis weakly bound A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP state, the orientations of the attached myosin heads assume a wide range of azimuthal and axial angles, indicating considerable flexibility in the myosin head. The structure of the other weakly bound state, A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i}, however, is poorly understood. This state is thought to be the critical pre-power-stroke state, poised to make the transition to the strongly binding, force-generating states, and hence it is of particular interest for understanding the mechanism of contraction. However, because of the low affinity between myosin and actin in the A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} state, the structure of this state has eluded determination both in isolated form and in muscle cells. With the knowledge recently gained in the structures of the weakly binding M{center_dot}ATP, M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} states and the weakly attached A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP state in muscle fibers, it is now feasible to delineate the in vivo structure of the attached state of A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i}. The series of experiments presented in this article were carried out under relaxing conditions at 25{sup o}C, where {approx}95% of the myosin heads in the skinned rabbit psoas muscle contain the hydrolysis products. The affinity for actin is enhanced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) or by lowering the ionic strength in the bathing solution. Solution kinetics and binding constants were determined in the

  6. Effects of BTS (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide), an inhibitor for myosin-actin interaction, on myofibrillogenesis in skeletal muscle cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Maiko; Sato, Naruki; Obinata, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    Actin filaments align around myosin filaments in the correct polarity and in a hexagonal arrangement to form cross-striated structures. It has been postulated that this myosin-actin interaction is important in the initial phase of myofibrillogenesis. It was previously demonstrated that an inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction, BDM (2,3-butanedione monoxime), suppresses myofibril formation in muscle cells in culture. However, further study showed that BDM also exerts several additional effects on living cells. In this study, we further examined the role of actin-myosin interaction in myofibril assembly in primary cultures of chick embryonic skeletal muscle by applying a more specific inhibitor, BTS (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide), of myosin ATPase and actin-myosin interaction. The assembly of sarcomeric structures from myofibrillar proteins was examined by immunocytochemical methods with the application of BTS to myotubes just after fusion. Addition of BTS (10-50 microM) significantly suppressed the organization of actin and myosin into cross-striated structures. BTS also interfered in the organization of alpha-actinin, C-protein (or MyBP-C), and connectin (or titin) into ordered striated structures, though the sensitivity was less. Moreover, when myotubes cultured in the presence of BTS were transferred to a control medium, sarcomeric structures were formed in 2-3 days, indicating that the inhibitory effect of BTS on myotubes is reversible. These results show that actin-myosin interaction plays a critical role in the process of myofibrillogenesis.

  7. GAPDH and β-actin protein decreases with aging, making Stain-Free technology a superior loading control in Western blotting of human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Dybboe, Rie; Hansen, Christina Neigaard

    2015-01-01

    [β-actin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and α-tubulin], as well as TP loaded measured by Stain-Free technology (SF) as normalization tool were tested. This was done using skeletal muscle samples from men subjected to physiological conditions often investigated in applied...... and differences in muscle fiber type. The novel SF technology adds lower variation to the results compared with the existing methods for correcting for loading inaccuracy in Western blotting of human skeletal muscle in applied physiology....

  8. Convergent regulation of skeletal muscle Ca2+ channels by dystrophin, the actin cytoskeleton, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barry D.; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.

    2005-03-01

    The skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel (CaV1.1), which is responsible for initiating muscle contraction, is regulated by phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in a voltage-dependent manner that requires direct physical association between the channel and the kinase mediated through A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). The role of the actin cytoskeleton in channel regulation was investigated in skeletal myocytes cultured from wild-type mice, mdx mice that lack the cytoskeletal linkage protein dystrophin, and a skeletal muscle cell line, 129 CB3. Voltage dependence of channel activation was shifted positively, and potentiation was greatly diminished in mdx myocytes and in 129 CB3 cells treated with the microfilament stabilizer phalloidin. Voltage-dependent potentiation by strong depolarizing prepulses was reduced in mdx myocytes but could be restored by positively shifting the stimulus potentials to compensate for the positive shift in the voltage dependence of gating. Inclusion of PKA in the pipette caused a negative shift in the voltage dependence of activation and restored voltage-dependent potentiation in mdx myocytes. These results show that skeletal muscle Ca2+ channel activity and voltage-dependent potentiation are controlled by PKA and microfilaments in a convergent manner. Regulation of Ca2+ channel activity by hormones and neurotransmitters that use the PKA signal transduction pathway may interact in a critical way with the cytoskeleton and may be impaired by deletion of dystrophin, contributing to abnormal regulation of intracellular calcium concentrations in dystrophic muscle.

  9. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Mediates Nicotine-Induced Actin Cytoskeletal Remodeling and Extracellular Matrix Degradation by Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhizhan; Fonseca, Vera; Hai, Chi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a significant risk factor for atherosclerosis, which involves the invasion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from the media to intima. A hallmark of many invasive cells is actin cytoskeletal remodeling in the form of podosomes, accompanied by extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. A7r5 VSMCs form podosomes in response to PKC activation. In this study, we found that cigarette smoke extract, nicotine, and the cholinergic agonist, carbachol, were similarly effective in inducing the formation of podosome rosettes in A7r5 VSMCs. α-Bungarotoxin and atropine experiments confirmed the involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Western blotting and immunofluorescence experiments revealed the aggregation of nAChRs at podosome rosettes. Cycloheximide experiments and media exchange experiments suggested that autocrine factor(s) and intracellular phenotypic modulation are putative mechanisms. In situ zymography experiments indicated that, in response to PKC activation, nicotine-treated cells degraded ECM near podosome rosettes, and possibly endocytose ECM fragments to intracellular compartments. Invasion assay of human aortic smooth muscle cells indicated that nicotine and PKC activation individually and synergistically enhanced cell invasion through ECM. Results from this study suggest that nicotine enhances the ability of VSMCs to degrade and invade ECM. nAChR activation, actin cytoskeletal remodeling and phenotypic modulation are possible mechanisms. PMID:22940282

  10. Platelet rich plasma promotes skeletal muscle cell migration in association with up-regulation of FAK, paxillin, and F-Actin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Yu, Tung-Yang; Lin, Li-Ping; Lin, Mioa-Sui; Tsai, Ting-Ta; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2017-11-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) contains various cytokines and growth factors which may be beneficial to the healing process of injured muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and molecular mechanism of PRP on migration of skeletal muscle cells. Skeletal muscle cells intrinsic to Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with PRP. The cell migration was evaluated by transwell filter migration assay and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. The spreading of cells was evaluated microscopically. The formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. The protein expressions of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were assessed by Western blot analysis. Transfection of paxillin small-interfering RNA (siRNAs) to muscle cells was performed to validate the role of paxillin in PRP-mediated promotion of cell migration. Dose-dependently PRP promotes migration of and spreading and muscle cells. Protein expressions of paxillin and FAK were up-regulated dose-dependently. F-actin formation was also enhanced by PRP treatment. Furthermore, the knockdown of paxillin expression impaired the effect of PRP to promote cell migration. It was concluded that PRP promoting migration of muscle cells is associated with up-regulation of proteins expression of paxillin and FAK as well as increasing F-actin formation. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2506-2512, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Involvement of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in insulin- and contraction-stimulated intracellular signaling and glucose uptake in mature skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke

    to hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. Blood glucose is taken up into skeletal muscle when glucose transporters move to the muscle cell surface. In muscle cells this process depends on the protein Rac1. Glucose uptake into skeletal muscle can also occur via insulin-independent mechanisms, such as during muscle...... understood. The aim of the current PhD was therefore to investigate the involvement of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in the regulation of insulin- and contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mature skeletal muscle. The central findings of this PhD thesis was that Rac1 was activated by both insulin...... and muscle contraction in mouse and human skeletal muscle. Most importantly, Rac1 was involved in the regulation of both insulin- and contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. Interestingly, Rac1 signaling was defective in skeletal muscle of insulin resistant obese and T2D human subjects as well as in obese...

  12. X-ray diffraction studies of cross-bridges weakly bound to actin in relaxed skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S; Malinchik, S; Gilroy, D; Kraft, T; Brenner, B; Yu, L C

    1997-11-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns were obtained from skinned rabbit psoas muscle under relaxing and rigor conditions over a wide range of ionic strengths (50-170 mM) and temperatures (1 degree C-30 degrees C). For the first time, an intensification of the first actin-based layer line is observed in the relaxed muscle. The intensification, which increases with decreasing ionic strength at various temperatures, including 30 degrees C, parallels the formation of weakly attached cross-bridges in the relaxed muscle. However, the overall intensities of the actin-based layer lines are low. Furthermore, the level of diffuse scattering, presumably a measure of disorder among the cross-bridges, is little affected by changing ionic strength at a given temperature. The results suggest that the intensification of the first actin layer line is most likely due to the cross-bridges weakly bound to actin, and that the orientations of the weakly attached cross-bridges are hardly distinguishable from the detached cross-bridges. This suggests that the orientations of the weakly attached cross-bridges are not precisely defined with respect to the actin helix, i.e., nonstereospecific. Intensities of the myosin-based layer lines are only marginally affected by changing ionic strength, but markedly by temperature. The results could be explained if in a relaxed muscle the cross-bridges are distributed between a helically ordered and a disordered population with respect to myosin filament structure. Within the disordered population, some are weakly attached to actin and others are detached. The fraction of cross-bridges in the helically ordered assembly is primarily a function of temperature, while the distribution between the weakly attached and the detached within the disordered population is mainly affected by ionic strength. Some other notable features in the diffraction patterns include a approximately 1% decrease in the pitch of the myosin helix as the temperature is raised from 4 degrees C

  13. GAPDH and β-actin protein decreases with aging, making Stain-Free technology a superior loading control in Western blotting of human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Dybboe, Rie; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Dela, Flemming; Helge, Jørn W; Guadalupe Grau, Amelia

    2015-02-01

    Reference proteins (RP) or the total protein (TP) loaded is used to correct for uneven loading and/or transfer in Western blotting. However, the signal sensitivity and the influence of physiological conditions may question the normalization methods. Therefore, three widely used reference proteins [β-actin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and α-tubulin], as well as TP loaded measured by Stain-Free technology (SF) as normalization tool were tested. This was done using skeletal muscle samples from men subjected to physiological conditions often investigated in applied physiology where the intervention has been suggested to impede normalization (ageing, muscle atrophy, and different muscle fiber type composition). The linearity of signal and the methodological variation coefficient was obtained. Furthermore, the inter- and intraindividual variation in signals obtained from SF and RP was measured in relation to ageing, muscle atrophy, and different muscle fiber type composition, respectively. A stronger linearity of SF and β-actin compared with GAPDH and α-tubulin was observed. The methodological variation was relatively low in all four methods (4-11%). Protein level of β-actin and GAPDH was lower in older men compared with young men. In conclusion, β-actin, GAPDH, and α-tubulin may not be used for normalization in studies that include subjects with a large age difference. In contrast, the RPs may not be affected in studies that include muscle wasting and differences in muscle fiber type. The novel SF technology adds lower variation to the results compared with the existing methods for correcting for loading inaccuracy in Western blotting of human skeletal muscle in applied physiology. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Identification of an FHL1 protein complex containing gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB by analysis of protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    Full Text Available FHL1 is multifunctional and serves as a modular protein binding interface to mediate protein-protein interactions. In skeletal muscle, FHL1 is involved in sarcomere assembly, differentiation, growth, and biomechanical stress. Muscle abnormalities may play a major role in congenital clubfoot (CCF deformity during fetal development. Thus, identifying the interactions of FHL1 could provide important new insights into its functional role in both skeletal muscle development and CCF pathogenesis. Using proteins derived from rat L6GNR4 myoblastocytes, we detected FHL1 interacting proteins by immunoprecipitation. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS. Dynamic gene expression of FHL1 was studied. Additionally, the expression of the possible interacting proteins gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB, which were isolated from the lower limbs of E14, E15, E17, E18, E20 rat embryos or from adult skeletal muscle was analyzed. Potential interacting proteins isolated from E17 lower limbs were verified by immunoprecipitation, and co-localization in adult gastrocnemius muscle was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. FHL1 expression was associated with skeletal muscle differentiation. E17 was found to be the critical time-point for skeletal muscle differentiation in the lower limbs of rat embryos. We also identified gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB as potential binding partners of FHL1, and both were expressed in adult skeletal muscle. We then demonstrated that FHL1 exists as part of a complex, which binds gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB.

  15. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J.; Berthiaume, François

    2015-01-01

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β 1 (TGF-β 1 )-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β 1 at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β 1 is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β 1

  16. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J.; Berthiaume, François, E-mail: fberthia@rci.rutgers.edu

    2015-02-27

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β{sub 1} (TGF-β{sub 1})-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β{sub 1} at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β{sub 1} is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}.

  17. Stimulus-specific activation and actin dependency of distinct, spatially separated ERK1/2 fractions in A7r5 smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Vetterkind

    Full Text Available A proliferative response of smooth muscle cells to activation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2 has been linked to cardiovascular disease. In fully differentiated smooth muscle, however, ERK1/2 activation can also regulate contraction. Here, we use A7r5 smooth muscle cells, stimulated with 12-deoxyphorbol 13-isobutylate 20-acetate (DPBA to induce cytoskeletal remodeling or fetal calf serum (FCS to induce proliferation, to identify factors that determine the outcomes of ERK1/2 activation in smooth muscle. Knock down experiments, immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays show that the ERK1/2 scaffold caveolin-1 mediates ERK1/2 activation in response to DPBA, but not FCS, and that ERK1/2 is released from caveolin-1 upon DPBA, but not FCS, stimulation. Conversely, ERK1/2 associated with the actin cytoskeleton is significantly reduced after FCS, but not DPBA stimulation, as determined by Triton X fractionation. Furthermore, cytochalasin treatment inhibits DPBA, but not FCS-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that the actin cytoskeleton is not only a target but also is required for ERK1/2 activation. Our results show that (1 at least two ERK1/2 fractions are regulated separately by specific stimuli, and that (2 the association of ERK1/2 with the actin cytoskeleton regulates the outcome of ERK1/2 signaling.

  18. Acceleration of the sliding movement of actin filaments with the use of a non-motile mutant myosin in in vitro motility assays driven by skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Iwase

    Full Text Available We examined the movement of an actin filament sliding on a mixture of normal and genetically modified myosin molecules that were attached to a glass surface. For this purpose, we used a Dictyostelium G680V mutant myosin II whose release rates of Pi and ADP were highly suppressed relative to normal myosin, leading to a significantly extended life-time of the strongly bound state with actin and virtually no motility. When the mixing ratio of G680V mutant myosin II to skeletal muscle HMM (heavy myosin was 0.01%, the actin filaments moved intermittently. When they moved, their sliding velocities were about two-fold faster than the velocity of skeletal HMM alone. Furthermore, sliding movements were also faster when the actin filaments were allowed to slide on skeletal muscle HMM-coated glass surfaces in the motility buffer solution containing G680V HMM. In this case no intermittent movement was observed. When the actin filaments used were copolymerized with a fusion protein consisting of Dictyostelium actin and Dictyostelium G680V myosin II motor domain, similar faster sliding movements were observed on skeletal muscle HMM-coated surfaces. The filament sliding velocities were about two-fold greater than the velocities of normal actin filaments. We found that the velocity of actin filaments sliding on skeletal muscle myosin molecules increased in the presence of a non-motile G680V mutant myosin motor.

  19. Histone demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein 2 regulates the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin in cirrhotic livers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q. [Department of Microbiology, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of the Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Wang, L.X. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zeng, J.P. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Liu, X.J.; Liang, X.M.; Zhou, Y.B. [Department of Microbiology, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of the Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2013-09-06

    Liver cirrhosis is one of the most common diseases of Chinese patients. Herein, we report the high expression of a newly identified histone 3 lysine 4 demethylase, retinoblastoma binding protein 2 (RBP2), and its role in liver cirrhosis in humans. The siRNA knockdown of RBP2 expression in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) reduced levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin and decreased the proliferation of HSCs; and overexpression of RBP2 increased α-SMA and vimentin levels. Treatment with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) upregulated the expression of RBP2, α-SMA, and vimentin, and the siRNA knockdown of RBP2 expression attenuated TGF-β-mediated upregulation of α-SMA and vimentin expression and HSC proliferation. Furthermore, RBP2 was highly expressed in cirrhotic rat livers. Therefore, RBP2 may participate in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis by regulating the expression of α-SMA and vimentin. RBP2 may be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment of liver cirrhosis.

  20. The actin regulator zyxin reinforces airway smooth muscle and accumulates in airways of fatal asthmatics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia R Rosner

    Full Text Available Bronchospasm induced in non-asthmatic human subjects can be easily reversed by a deep inspiration (DI whereas bronchospasm that occurs spontaneously in asthmatic subjects cannot. This physiological effect of a DI has been attributed to the manner in which a DI causes airway smooth muscle (ASM cells to stretch, but underlying molecular mechanisms-and their failure in asthma-remain obscure. Using cells and tissues from wild type and zyxin-/- mice we report responses to a transient stretch of physiologic magnitude and duration. At the level of the cytoskeleton, zyxin facilitated repair at sites of stress fiber fragmentation. At the level of the isolated ASM cell, zyxin facilitated recovery of contractile force. Finally, at the level of the small airway embedded with a precision cut lung slice, zyxin slowed airway dilation. Thus, at each level zyxin stabilized ASM structure and contractile properties at current muscle length. Furthermore, when we examined tissue samples from humans who died as the result of an asthma attack, we found increased accumulation of zyxin compared with non-asthmatics and asthmatics who died of other causes. Together, these data suggest a biophysical role for zyxin in fatal asthma.

  1. Conservation and divergence between cytoplasmic and muscle-specific actin capping proteins: insights from the crystal structure of cytoplasmic Cap32/34 from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckert Christian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capping protein (CP, also known as CapZ in muscle cells and Cap32/34 in Dictyostelium discoideum, plays a major role in regulating actin filament dynamics. CP is a ubiquitously expressed heterodimer comprising an α- and β-subunit. It tightly binds to the fast growing end of actin filaments, thereby functioning as a “cap” by blocking the addition and loss of actin subunits. Vertebrates contain two somatic variants of CP, one being primarily found at the cell periphery of non-muscle tissues while the other is mainly localized at the Z-discs of skeletal muscles. Results To elucidate structural and functional differences between cytoplasmic and sarcomercic CP variants, we have solved the atomic structure of Cap32/34 (32 = β- and 34 = α-subunit from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium at 2.2 Å resolution and compared it to that of chicken muscle CapZ. The two homologs display a similar overall arrangement including the attached α-subunit C-terminus (α-tentacle and the flexible β-tentacle. Nevertheless, the structures exhibit marked differences suggesting considerable structural flexibility within the α-subunit. In the α-subunit we observed a bending motion of the β-sheet region located opposite to the position of the C-terminal β-tentacle towards the antiparallel helices that interconnect the heterodimer. Recently, a two domain twisting attributed mainly to the β-subunit has been reported. At the hinge of these two domains Cap32/34 contains an elongated and highly flexible loop, which has been reported to be important for the interaction of cytoplasmic CP with actin and might contribute to the more dynamic actin-binding of cytoplasmic compared to sarcomeric CP (CapZ. Conclusions The structure of Cap32/34 from Dictyostelium discoideum allowed a detailed analysis and comparison between the cytoplasmic and sarcomeric variants of CP. Significant structural flexibility could particularly be found within the

  2. X-ray diffraction studies of cross-bridges weakly bound to actin in relaxed skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, S; Malinchik, S; Gilroy, D; Kraft, T; Brenner, B; Yu, L C

    1997-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns were obtained from skinned rabbit psoas muscle under relaxing and rigor conditions over a wide range of ionic strengths (50-170 mM) and temperatures (1 degree C-30 degrees C). For the first time, an intensification of the first actin-based layer line is observed in the relaxed muscle. The intensification, which increases with decreasing ionic strength at various temperatures, including 30 degrees C, parallels the formation of weakly attached cross-bridges in the rel...

  3. Botulinum Toxin Type A Inhibits α-Smooth Muscle Actin and Myosin II Expression in Fibroblasts Derived From Scar Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minliang; Yan, Tongtong; Ma, Kui; Lai, Linying; Liu, Chang; Liang, Liming; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Scar contracture (SC) is one of the most common complications resulting from major burn injuries. Numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Recent reports suggest that botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) is effective at reducing SC clinically, but the molecular mechanism for this action is unknown. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and myosin II are the main components of stress fibers, which are the contractile structures of fibroblasts. The effects of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II in SC are still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II expression in fibroblasts derived from SC and to elucidate its actual mechanism further. Fibroblasts were isolated from tissue specimens of SC. Fibroblasts were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium with different concentrations of BTXA and their proliferation was analyzed through the tetrazolium-based colorimetric method at 1, 4, and 7 days. Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II were checked using Western blot in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations of BTXA at 1, 4, and 7 days. Fibroblasts without BTXA treatment had a higher proliferation than that in other groups, which indicated that the proliferation of fibroblasts was significantly inhibited by BTXA (P < 0.05). Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II between fibroblasts with BTXA and fibroblasts without BTXA are statistically significant (P < 0.05). These results suggest that BTXA effectively inhibited the growth of fibroblasts derived from SC and reduced the expression of α-SMA and myosin II, which provided theoretical support for the application of BTXA to control SC.

  4. Involvement of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in insulin- and contraction-stimulated intracellular signaling and glucose uptake in mature skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke

    Type 2 Diabetes affects ~10 % of western adults and is associated with poor organ sensitivity to insulin that is secreted following a meal. Insulin resistance, particularly in the liver, fat, and skeletal muscle, is a key event in the pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes and contributes to hyperinsuli......Type 2 Diabetes affects ~10 % of western adults and is associated with poor organ sensitivity to insulin that is secreted following a meal. Insulin resistance, particularly in the liver, fat, and skeletal muscle, is a key event in the pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes and contributes...... understood. The aim of the current PhD was therefore to investigate the involvement of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in the regulation of insulin- and contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mature skeletal muscle. The central findings of this PhD thesis was that Rac1 was activated by both insulin...

  5. Heterozygous de novo and inherited mutations in the smooth muscle actin (ACTG2 gene underlie megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Wangler

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS is a rare disorder of enteric smooth muscle function affecting the intestine and bladder. Patients with this severe phenotype are dependent on total parenteral nutrition and urinary catheterization. The cause of this syndrome has remained a mystery since Berdon's initial description in 1976. No genes have been clearly linked to MMIHS. We used whole-exome sequencing for gene discovery followed by targeted Sanger sequencing in a cohort of patients with MMIHS and intestinal pseudo-obstruction. We identified heterozygous ACTG2 missense variants in 15 unrelated subjects, ten being apparent de novo mutations. Ten unique variants were detected, of which six affected CpG dinucleotides and resulted in missense mutations at arginine residues, perhaps related to biased usage of CpG containing codons within actin genes. We also found some of the same heterozygous mutations that we observed as apparent de novo mutations in MMIHS segregating in families with intestinal pseudo-obstruction, suggesting that ACTG2 is responsible for a spectrum of smooth muscle disease. ACTG2 encodes γ2 enteric actin and is the first gene to be clearly associated with MMIHS, suggesting an important role for contractile proteins in enteric smooth muscle disease.

  6. Detection of epithelial to mesenchymal transition in airways of a bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis model derived from an α-smooth muscle actin-Cre transgenic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs has been widely observed in patients suffering interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that AECs could convert into myofibroblasts following exposure to TGF-β1. In this study, we examined whether EMT occurs in bleomycin (BLM induced pulmonary fibrosis, and the involvement of bronchial epithelial cells (BECs in the EMT. Using an α-smooth muscle actin-Cre transgenic mouse (α-SMA-Cre/R26R strain, we labelled myofibroblasts in vivo. We also performed a phenotypic analysis of human BEC lines during TGF-β1 stimulation in vitro. Methods We generated the α-SMA-Cre mouse strain by pronuclear microinjection with a Cre recombinase cDNA driven by the mouse α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA promoter. α-SMA-Cre mice were crossed with the Cre-dependent LacZ expressing strain R26R to produce the double transgenic strain α-SMA-Cre/R26R. β-galactosidase (βgal staining, α-SMA and smooth muscle myosin heavy chains immunostaining were carried out simultaneously to confirm the specificity of expression of the transgenic reporter within smooth muscle cells (SMCs under physiological conditions. BLM-induced peribronchial fibrosis in α-SMA-Cre/R26R mice was examined by pulmonary βgal staining and α-SMA immunofluorescence staining. To confirm in vivo observations of BECs undergoing EMT, we stimulated human BEC line 16HBE with TGF-β1 and examined the localization of the myofibroblast markers α-SMA and F-actin, and the epithelial marker E-cadherin by immunofluorescence. Results βgal staining in organs of healthy α-SMA-Cre/R26R mice corresponded with the distribution of SMCs, as confirmed by α-SMA and SM-MHC immunostaining. BLM-treated mice showed significantly enhanced βgal staining in subepithelial areas in bronchi, terminal bronchioles and walls of pulmonary vessels. Some AECs in certain peribronchial areas or even a small

  7. Actin Polymerization and ATP Hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Edward D.; Carlier, Marie-France; Pantaloni, Dominique

    1987-10-01

    F-actin is the major component of muscle thin filaments and, more generally, of the microfilaments of the dynamic, multifunctional cytoskeletal systems of nonmuscle eukaryotic cells. Polymeric F-actin is formed by reversible noncovalent self-association of monomeric G-actin. To understand the dynamics of microfilament systems in cells, the dynamics of polymerization of pure actin must be understood. The following model has emerged from recent work. During the polymerization process, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) that is bound to G-actin is hydrolyzed to adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) that is bound to F-actin. The hydrolysis reaction occurs on the F-actin subsequent to the polymerization reaction in two steps: cleavage of ATP followed by the slower release of inorganic phosphate (Pi). As a result, at high rates of filament growth a transient cap of ATP-actin subunits exists at the ends of elongating filaments, and at steady state a stabilizing cap of ADP \\cdot Pi-actin subunits exists at the barbed ends of filaments. Cleavage of ATP results in a highly stable filament with bound ADP \\cdot Pi, and release of Pi destabilizes the filament. Thus these two steps of the hydrolytic reaction provide potential mechanisms for regulating the monomer-polymer transition.

  8. Relative expression of α-smooth muscle actin and matrix metalloproteinases-2 in ameloblastoma of a black African sub-population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adisa, Akinyele O; Udeabor, Samuel E; Adeyemi, Bukola F; Alica, Kubesch; Booms, Patrick; Ghanaati, Shahram; Sader, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma although a benign odontogenic tumor, is locally invasive. The abundant presence of myofibroblasts (marked by α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) in the stroma and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the neoplastic or stromal cells have been linked with the tumor's ability for both local and distant spread. We aim to estimate the relative expression of α-SMA and MMP-2 in ameloblastoma from a black African subgroup to gauge their relative potential for enhancing local invasiveness and hence, their prospects as possible chemotherapeutic targets. Twenty-five formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks of ameloblastoma cases from Nigeria were prepared for antibody processing to α-SMA (Dako Monoclonal Mouse Anti-Human α-SMA antibody clone 1A4) and MMP-2 (Abcam Mouse Monoclonal Anti-MMP-2 antibody [CA-4001/CA719E3C] ab3158). The score for percentage positivity of the tumor cells and the score for staining intensities were then multiplied in order to generate an immunoreactive score. α-smooth muscle actin was only expressed in the fibrous connective tissues adjacent to the tumor islands while MMP-2 was expressed in the ameloblasts, stellate reticulum, and the connective tissues in varying proportions. All the variants analyzed expressed α-SMA mildly or moderately, except for the follicular variant that either did not express α-SMA or expressed it mildly. The highest number of strong immunoreactivity to MMP-2 in the ameloblast region was found in the plexiform variant. Chemotherapeutic targeting of both molecules may, therefore, be a vital step in the control of local ameloblastoma invasiveness.

  9. ANG1 treatment reduces muscle pathology and prevents a decline in perfusion in DMD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutpell, Kelly M; Tasevski, Nikola; Wong, Boaz; Hrinivich, William Thomas; Su, Feng; Hadway, Jennifer; Desjardins, Lise; Lee, Ting-Yim; Hoffman, Lisa Marie

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other pro-angiogenic growth factors have been investigated to enhance muscle tissue perfusion and repair in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Current understanding is limited by a lack of functional data following in vivo delivery of these growth factors. We previously used dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography to monitor disease progression in murine models of DMD, but no study to date has utilized this imaging technique to assess vascular therapy in a preclinical model of DMD. In the current study, we locally delivered VEGF and ANG1 alone or in combination to dystrophic hind limb skeletal muscle. Using functional imaging, we found the combination treatment as well as ANG1 alone prevented decline in muscle perfusion whereas VEGF alone had no effect compared to controls. These findings were validated histologically as demonstrated by increased alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive vessels in muscles that received either VEGF+ANG1 or ANG1 alone compared to the sham group. We further show that ANG1 alone slows progression of fibrosis compared to either sham or VEGF treatment. The findings from this study shed new light on the functional effects of vascular therapy and suggest that ANG1 alone may be a candidate therapy in the treatment of DMD.

  10. Smooth muscle actin as a novel serologic marker of severe intestinal damage in rat intestinal ischemia-reperfusion and human necrotising enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evennett, Nicholas; Cerigioni, Elisabetta; Hall, Nigel J; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Despite emergence of markers of intestinal mucosal damage such as intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (i-FABP), there are no specific markers of damage extending into the muscle layers. We hypothesized that smooth muscle actin (SMA) released from the intestinal muscularis would be detectable in plasma after severe intestinal injury. Serial blood samples were collected from rats (n = 10) undergoing intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and controls (n = 5). Additionally, admission and/or preoperative plasma samples were collected from twelve neonates with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and five age- and weight-matched controls. Plasma ileal fatty-acid binding protein (rat) or i-FABP (human) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and plasma SMA was detected by western blotting. Plasma ileal fatty-acid binding protein was low in both the control group and IRI at baseline, but became rapidly elevated in the IRI group even during ischemia. SMA was detected in reperfusion plasma samples of all IRI rats, but in none of the control samples. Plasma i-FABP was higher in infants with NEC than age- and weight-matched controls. Although i-FABP was higher in infants with severe surgical disease compared with focal disease, there was no difference between the operative and nonoperative groups. SMA was detected in the plasma of all four neonates with severe surgical NEC, but not in those with focal disease or those who were successfully conservatively managed. SMA is detectable in plasma after severe intestinal injury and maybe a clinically useful maker of intestinal muscle damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Polymorphism in the Alpha Cardiac Muscle Actin 1 Gene Is Associated to Susceptibility to Chronic Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, Amanda Farage; Teixeira, Priscila Camilo; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Pissetti, Cristina Wide; Saba, Bruno; Wang, Lin Hui Tzu; Kuramoto, Andréia; Nogueira, Luciana Gabriel; Buck, Paula; Dias, Fabrício; Giniaux, Helene; Llored, Agnes; Alves, Sthefanny; Schmidt, Andre; Donadi, Eduardo; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Hirata, Mario; Sampaio, Marcelo; Fragata, Abílio; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Stolf, Antonio Noedir; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inacio; Santos, Ronaldo Honorato Barros; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Chevillard, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Aims Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America, and may lead to a life-threatening inflammatory dilated, chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). One third of T. cruzi-infected individuals progress to CCC while the others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Since mutations in multiple sarcomeric genes, including alpha-cardiac actin (ACTC1) have been involved in hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy, we investigated the involvement of the ACTC1 gene in CCC pathogenesis. Methods and Results We conducted a proteomic and genetic study on a Brazilian study population. The genetic study was done on a main cohort including 118 seropositive asymptomatic subjects and 315 cases and the replication was done on 36 asymptomatic and 102 CCC cases. ACTC1 protein and mRNA levels were lower in myocardial tissue from patients with end-stage CCC than those found in hearts from organ donors. Genotyping a case-control cohort of CCC and ASY subjects for all informative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ACTC1 gene identified rs640249 SNP, located at the 5’ region, as associated to CCC. Associations are borderline after correction for multiple testing. Correlation and haplotype analysis led to the identification of a susceptibility haplotype. Functional assays have shown that the rs640249A/C polymorphism affects the binding of transcriptional factors in the promoter regions of the ACTC1 gene. Confirmation of the detected association on a larger independent replication cohort will be useful. Conclusions Genetic variations at the ACTC1 gene may contribute to progression to chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy among T. cruzi-infected patients, possibly by modulating transcription factor binding to ACTC1 promoter regions. PMID:24367596

  12. Polymorphism in the alpha cardiac muscle actin 1 gene is associated to susceptibility to chronic inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Farage Frade

    Full Text Available AIMS: Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America, and may lead to a life-threatening inflammatory dilated, chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC. One third of T. cruzi-infected individuals progress to CCC while the others remain asymptomatic (ASY. A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Since mutations in multiple sarcomeric genes, including alpha-cardiac actin (ACTC1 have been involved in hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy, we investigated the involvement of the ACTC1 gene in CCC pathogenesis. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a proteomic and genetic study on a Brazilian study population. The genetic study was done on a main cohort including 118 seropositive asymptomatic subjects and 315 cases and the replication was done on 36 asymptomatic and 102 CCC cases. ACTC1 protein and mRNA levels were lower in myocardial tissue from patients with end-stage CCC than those found in hearts from organ donors. Genotyping a case-control cohort of CCC and ASY subjects for all informative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the ACTC1 gene identified rs640249 SNP, located at the 5' region, as associated to CCC. Associations are borderline after correction for multiple testing. Correlation and haplotype analysis led to the identification of a susceptibility haplotype. Functional assays have shown that the rs640249A/C polymorphism affects the binding of transcriptional factors in the promoter regions of the ACTC1 gene. Confirmation of the detected association on a larger independent replication cohort will be useful. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic variations at the ACTC1 gene may contribute to progression to chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy among T. cruzi-infected patients, possibly by modulating transcription factor binding to ACTC1 promoter regions.

  13. Binding of ADAM12, a marker of skeletal muscle regeneration, to the muscle-specific actin-binding protein, alpha -actinin-2, is required for myoblast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galliano, M F; Huet, C; Frygelius, J

    2000-01-01

    of differentiation. Using the yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that the muscle-specific alpha-actinin-2 strongly binds to the cytoplasmic tail of ADAM12. In vitro binding assays with GST fusion proteins confirmed the specific interaction. The major binding site for alpha-actinin-2 was mapped to a short sequence......ADAM12 belongs to the transmembrane metalloprotease ADAM ("a disintegrin and metalloprotease") family. ADAM12 has been implicated in muscle cell differentiation and fusion, but its precise function remains unknown. Here, we show that ADAM12 is dramatically up-regulated in regenerated, newly formed...... in a dominant negative fashion by inhibiting fusion of C2C12 cells, whereas expression of a cytosolic ADAM12 lacking the major alpha-actinin-2 binding site had no effect on cell fusion. Our results suggest that interaction of ADAM12 with alpha-actinin-2 is important for ADAM12 function....

  14. ALKBH4-dependent demethylation of actin regulates actomyosin dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, M.-M.; Shi, Y.; Niu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    -type but not catalytically inactive ALKBH4. Similar to actin and myosin knock-out mice, homozygous Alkbh4 mutant mice display early embryonic lethality. These findings imply that ALKBH4-dependent actin demethylation regulates actomyosin function by promoting actin-non-muscle myosin II interaction.......-dependent processes such as cytokinesis and cell migration. ALKBH4-deficient cells display elevated K84me1 levels. Non-muscle myosin II only interacts with unmethylated actin and its proper recruitment to and interaction with actin depend on ALKBH4. ALKBH4 co-localizes with the actomyosin-based contractile ring...

  15. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies on the intensity changes of the 5.9 and 5.1 nm actin layer lines from frog skeletal muscle during an isometric tetanus using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, K.; Tanaka, H.; Amemiya, Y.; Fujishima, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Hamanaka, T.; Sugi, H.; Mitsui, T.

    1985-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies have been made on the 5.9- and 5.1-nm actin layer lines from frog skeletal muscles during an isometric tetanus at 6 degrees C, using synchrotron radiation. The integrated intensities of these actin layer lines were found to increase during a tetanus by 30-50% for the 5.9-nm reflection and approximately 70% for the 5.1-nm reflection of the resting values. The intensity increase of both reflections was greater than that taking place in the transition from rest to rigor state. The intensity change of the 5.9-nm reflection preceded those of the myosin 42.9-nm off-meridional reflection and of the equatorial reflections, as well as the isometric tension development. The intensity profile of the 5.9-nm layer line during contraction was found to be different from that observed in the rigor state

  16. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  17. Immuno-Expression of Endoglin and Smooth Muscle Actin in the Vessels of Brain Metastases. Is There a Rational for Anti-Angiogenic Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Barresi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite ongoing clinical trials, the efficacy of anti-angiogenic drugs for the treatment of brain metastases (BM is still questionable. The lower response rate to anti-angiogenic therapy in the presence of BM than in metastatic disease involving other sites suggests that BM may be insensitive to these drugs, although the biological reasons underlining this phenomenon are still to be clarified. With the aim of assessing whether the targets of anti-angiogenic therapies are actually present in BM, in the present study, we analyzed the microvessel density (MVD, a measure of neo-angiogenesis, and the vascular phenotype (mature vs. immature in the tumor tissue of a series of BM derived from different primary tumors. By using immunohistochemistry against endoglin, a specific marker for newly formed vessels, we found that neo-angiogenesis widely varies in BM depending on the site of the primary tumor, as well as on its histotype. According to our results, BM from lung cancer displayed the highest MVD counts, while those from renal carcinoma had the lowest. Then, among BM from lung cancer, those from large cell and adenocarcinoma histotypes had significantly higher MVD counts than those originating from squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0043; p = 0.0063. Of note, MVD counts were inversely correlated with the maturation index of the endoglin-stained vessels, reflected by the coverage of smooth muscle actin (SMA positive pericytes (r = −0.693; p < 0.0001. Accordingly, all the endoglin-positive vessels in BM from pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma and renal carcinoma, displayed a mature phenotype, while vessels with an immature phenotype were found in highly vascularized BM from pulmonary large cell and adenocarcinoma. The low MVD and mature phenotype observed in BM from some primary tumors may account for their low sensitivity to anti-angiogenic therapies. Although our findings need to be validated in correlative studies with a clinical response, this should

  18. Angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation of single-level dynamic spiral CT scans in arterial phase and expression of α-smooth muscle actin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan; Min Pengqiu; Chen Weixia; Zhang Lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between the single-level dynamic spiral CT scans (SDCT) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in arterial phase (AP) and the immunohistochemistry expression of α-smooth muscle actin (ASMA). Methods: 33 cases of suspected HCC undergoing spiral CT plain scan of the whole liver, the single-level dynamic scan of the target level of lesion in AP and finally the whole liver scan in portal-venous phase before operations and proved after were included into the study. After the SDCT, a time-density curve (T-DC) was drawn according to the density change of the region of interest (ROI) of the tumor parenchyma with some parameters calculated, and signs of enhancement evaluated. Slices of post-operation specimen underwent hemotoxylin-eosin (HE) and ASMA immunohistochemistry staining. Then the slices were evaluated with emphases on the ASMA-positive neovasculatures in the parenchyma and mesenchyma of carcinomas, and the average count in a low microscopic field (x 100) was recorded (5 low microscopic field were observed and then an average was calculated.). Finally the immunohistochemistry and histologic results were correlated with image findings. Results: According to the PV of the tumor parenchyma, T-DC was divided into type I, II and III in which the criteria were PV>80, 40 HU< PV< 80 HU and PV<40 HU respectively. In the 33 cases, type I, II and III of T-DC were 3, 17 and 13 cases with PV of 103.30, 57.65 and 33.55 HU respectively. In ASMA immunohistochemistry study, ASMA-positive neovasculatures were devided into type A with a thick wall and B with a thin wall. The mean count of neovasculatures of tumor parenchyma in type I, II and III of T-DC were 10, 4.59 and 1 respectively. Statistically, different types of T-DC were significantly correlated with the count of neovasculatures in the parenchyma of carcinomas (r=-0.567, P<0.01). Homogeneous and inhomogeneous enhancement of carcinomas during SDCT in AP were correlated with the

  19. Actin cytoskeleton demonstration in Trichomonas vaginalis and in other trichomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    1996-01-01

    The flagellate form of Trichomonas vaginalis (T v) transforms to amoeboid cells upon adherence to converslips. They grow and their nuclei divide without undergoing cytokinesis, yielding giant cells and a monolayer of T v F-actin was demonstrated in Trichomonas vaginalis by fluorescence microscopy using phalloidin and an anti-actin mAb which labelled the cytoplasm of both the flagellate and amoeboid forms. Comparative electrophoresis and immunoblotting established that the actin band has the same 42 kDa as muscle actin, but 2-D electrophoresis resolved the actin band into four spots; the two major spots observed were superimposable with major muscle actin isoforms. Electron microscopy demonstrated an ectoplasmic microfibrillar layer along the adhesion zone of amoeboid T v adhering to coverslips. Immunogold staining, using anti-actin monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that this layer was mainly composed of actin microfilaments. A comparative immunoblotting study comprising seven trichomonad species showed that all trichomonads studied expressed actin. The mAb Sigma A-4700 specific for an epitope on the actin C-terminal sequence labelled only actin of Trichomonas vaginalis, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum. Trichomitus batrachorum and Hypotrichomonas acosta, but not the actin of Tritrichomonas foetus, Tritrichomonas augusta and Monocercomonas sp. This discrimination between a 'trichomonas branch' and a 'tritrichomonas branch' is congruent with inferred sequence phylogeny from SSu rRNA and with classical phylogeny of trichomonads.

  20. Myo/Nog cells: targets for preventing the accumulation of skeletal muscle-like cells in the human lens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn Gerhart

    Full Text Available Posterior capsule opacification (PCO is a vision impairing condition that arises in some patients following cataract surgery. The fibrotic form of PCO is caused by myofibroblasts that may emerge in the lens years after surgery. In the chick embryo lens, myofibroblasts are derived from Myo/Nog cells that are identified by their expression of the skeletal muscle specific transcription factor MyoD, the bone morphogenetic protein inhibitor Noggin, and the epitope recognized by the G8 monoclonal antibody. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that depletion of Myo/Nog cells will prevent the accumulation of myofibroblasts in human lens tissue. Myo/Nog cells were present in anterior, equatorial and bow regions of the human lens, cornea and ciliary processes. In anterior lens tissue removed by capsulorhexis, Myo/Nog cells had synthesized myofibroblast and skeletal muscle proteins, including vimentin, MyoD and sarcomeric myosin. Alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA was detected in a subpopulation of Myo/Nog cells. Areas of the capsule denuded of epithelial cells were surrounded by Myo/Nog cells. Some of these cell free areas contained a wrinkle in the capsule. Depletion of Myo/Nog cells eliminated cells expressing skeletal muscle proteins in 5-day cultures but did not affect cells immunoreactive for beaded filament proteins that accumulate in differentiating lens epithelial cells. Transforming growth factor-betas 1 and 2 that mediate an epithelial-mesenchymal transition, did not induce the expression of skeletal muscle proteins in lens cells following Myo/Nog cell depletion. This study demonstrates that Myo/Nog cells in anterior lens tissue removed from cataract patients have undergone a partial differentiation to skeletal muscle. Myo/Nog cells appear to be the source of skeletal muscle-like cells in explants of human lens tissue. Targeting Myo/Nog cells with the G8 antibody during cataract surgery may reduce the incidence of PCO.

  1. Inhibitory effects of pectenotoxins from marine algae on the polymerization of various actin isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Suzanne C; Miles, Christopher O; Karim, Amna; Twiner, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    Pectenotoxins (PTXs) are marine toxins produced by dinoflagellates and which accumulate in shellfish. There are at least 14 different analogs of PTX with slight variations in structure leading to different chemical properties and consequently different toxicities. Since preliminary studies have shown that the parent compound PTX1 targets actin, we investigated the effects of two analogs, PTX2 and PTX2 seco acid, on the polymerization and depolymerization of skeletal muscle actin, smooth muscle actin, cardiac muscle actin, and non-muscle actin. Optimized actin assays using fluorescently labeled skeletal muscle actin and SDS-PAGE were jointly used to determine the relative amounts of filamentous and globular actin formed during polymerization and depolymerization experiments. Our findings suggest that PTX2 causes a dose-dependent decrease in both the rate and yield of skeletal muscle actin polymerization (IC50 values of 44 and 177 nM; respectively), with no significant effects on depolymerization. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of PTX2 are conserved towards other actin isoforms (i.e., smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, and non-muscle), as the inhibitory effects on actin polymerization were also observed with similar IC50 values (range: 19-94 nM). No inhibitory effects on polymerization were observed for PTX2 seco acid, suggesting an intact lactone ring is necessary for bioactivity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Smooth muscle actin-expressing stromal fibroblasts in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Increased expression of galectin-1 and induction of poor prognosis factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valach, J.; Fík, Z.; Strnad, Hynek; Chovanec, M.; Plzák, J.; Čada, Z.; Szabo, Pavol; Šáchová, Jana; Hroudová, Miluše; Urbanová, Markéta; Steffl, M.; Pačes, Jan; Mazánek, J.; Vlček, Čestmír; Betka, J.; Kaltner, H.; André, S.; Gabius, H. J.; Kodet, R.; Smetana, K.; Gál, P.; Kolář, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 11 (2012), s. 2499-2508 ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : carcinoma * stroma * actin * lectin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.198, year: 2012

  3. Actin Isoform-specific Conformational Differences Observed with Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange and Mass Spectrometry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokasimov, Ema; Rubenstein, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Actin can exist in multiple conformations necessary for normal function. Actin isoforms, although highly conserved in sequence, exhibit different biochemical properties and cellular roles. We used amide proton hydrogen/deuterium (HD) exchange detected by mass spectrometry to analyze conformational differences between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and muscle actins in the G and F forms to gain insight into these differences. We also utilized HD exchange to study interdomain and allosteric communication in yeast-muscle hybrid actins to better understand the conformational dynamics of actin. Areas showing differences in HD exchange between G- and F-actins are areas of intermonomer contacts, consistent with the current filament models. Our results showed greater exchange for yeast G-actin compared with muscle actin in the barbed end pivot region and areas in subdomains 1 and 2 and for F-actin in monomer-monomer contact areas. These results suggest greater flexibility of the yeast actin monomer and filament compared with muscle actin. For hybrid G-actins, the muscle-like and yeastlike parts of the molecule generally showed exchange characteristics resembling their parent actins. A few exceptions were a peptide on top of subdomain 2 and the pivot region between subdomains 1 and 3 with muscle actin-like exchange characteristics although the areas were yeastlike. These results demonstrate that there is cross-talk between subdomains 1 and 2 and the large and small domains. Hybrid F-actin data showing greater exchange compared with both yeast and muscle actins are consistent with mismatched yeast-muscle interfaces resulting in decreased stability of the hybrid filament contacts. PMID:19605362

  4. Regulation of α-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression in Granulation Tissue Myofibroblasts Is Dependent on the Intronic CArG Element and the Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Control Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasek, James J.; McRae, Joel; Owens, Gary K.; Haaksma, Carol J.

    2005-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are specialized contractile fibroblasts that are critical in wound closure and tissue contracture. Generation of contractile force is correlated with the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA); however, little is known regarding molecular mechanisms that control activation of α-SMA in myofibroblasts in granulation tissue. The aims of the present studies were to identify sufficient promoter regions required for α-SMA expression in myofibroblasts in vivo and to determine whether activation of α-SMA expression in myofibroblasts in vivo is dependent on an intronic CArG [CC(A/T)6GG] and a transforming growth factor-β1 control element (TCE) that are required for α-SMA expression in smooth muscle cells. A Lac Z transgene construct from −2600 through the first intron was expressed in myofibroblasts within granulation tissue of cutaneous wounds in a pattern that closely mimicked endogenous α-SMA expression. Mutation of either the intronic CArG element or the TCE completely inhibited transgene expression in myofibroblasts in granulation tissue and responsiveness to transforming growth factor-β1 in cultured transgenic fibroblasts. These same elements were also critical in regulating α-SMA expression during skeletal muscle repair but not during skeletal muscle development. Taken together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence for the importance of the intronic CArG and TCE cis-elements in the regulation of α-SMA expression in myofibroblasts in granulation tissue. PMID:15855636

  5. Symmetrical retrograde actin flow in the actin fusion structure is involved in osteoclast fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro Takito

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the zipper-like structure (ZLS, a podosome-related structure that transiently appears at the cell contact zone, in osteoclast fusion. Live-cell imaging of osteoclasts derived from RAW264.7 cells transfected with EGFP-actin revealed consistent symmetrical retrograde actin flow in the ZLS, but not in the podosome cluster, the podosome ring or the podosome belt. Confocal imaging showed that the distributions of F-actin, vinculin, paxillin and zyxin in the ZLS were different from those in the podosome belt. Thick actin filament bundles running outside the ZLS appeared to recruit non-muscle myosin IIA. The F-actin-rich domain of the ZLS contained actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3. Inhibition of Arp2/3 activity disorganized the ZLS, disrupted actin flow, deteriorated cell-cell adhesion and inhibited osteoclast hypermultinucleation. In contrast, ML-7, an inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase, had little effect on the structure of ZLS and promoted osteoclast hypermultinucleation. These results reveal a link between actin flow in the ZLS and osteoclast fusion. Osteoclast fusion was promoted by branched actin elongation and negatively regulated by actomyosin contraction.

  6. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  7. Molecular investigations into the mechanics of actin in different nucleotide states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Y; Iverson, Tyler M; Dima, Ruxandra I

    2011-01-13

    Actin plays crucial roles in the mechanical response of cells to applied forces. For example, during cell adhesion, under the action of forces transmitted through integrins, actin filaments (F-actin) induce intracellular mechanical movements leading to changes in the cell shape. Muscle contraction results from the interaction of F-actin with the molecular motor myosin. Thus, understanding the origin of actin's mechanical flexibility is required to understand the basis of fundamental cellular processes. F-actin results from the polymerization of globular actin (G-actin), which contains one tightly bound nucleotide (ATP or ADP). Experiments revealed that G-actin is more flexible than F-actin, but no molecular-level understanding of this differential behavior exists. To probe the basis of the mechanical behavior of actin, we study the force response of G-actin bound with ATP (G-ATP) or ADP (G-ADP). We investigate the global unfolding of G-actin under forces applied at its ends and its mechanical resistance along the actin-actin and actin-myosin bonds in F-actin. Our study reveals that the nucleotide plays an important role in the global unfolding of actin, leading to multiple unfolding scenarios which emphasize the differences between the G-ATP and G-ADP states. Furthermore, our simulations show that G-ATP is more flexible than G-ADP and that the actin-myosin interaction surface responds faster to force than the actin-actin interaction surface. The deformation of G-actin under tension revealed in our simulations correlates very well with experimental data on G-actin domain flexibility.

  8. Treatment of Actinic Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Mature skin is prone to bruising, resulting in a condition known as actinic purpura, characterized by unsightly ecchymosis and purple patches. Similar to other skin conditions, the incidence of actinic purpura increases with advancing age and occurs with equal frequency among men and women. The unsightly appearance of actinic purpura may be a source of emotional distress among the elderly. A new product has been formulated specifically for the treatment of actinic purpura. This product contains retinol, α-hydroxy acids, arnica oil, ceramides, niacinamide, and phytonadione, which effectively treat actinic purpura by improving local circulation, thickening the skin, and repairing the skin barrier. The objective of this paper is to review the beneficial properties of these ingredients and their respective roles in the treatment of actinic purpura. PMID:28979656

  9. Smooth muscle cell differentiation in the processus vaginalis of children with hernia or hydrocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouravas, V K; Koletsa, T; Sfougaris, D K; Philippopoulos, A; Petropoulos, A S; Zavitsanakis, A; Kostopoulos, I

    2010-04-01

    Incomplete obliteration of the processus vaginalis (PV) in children with inguinal hernia or hydrocele has recently been proposed to relate to smooth muscle cell (SMC) persistence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diversity and differentiation of smooth muscle phenotypes in sacs associated with inguinal hernia and hydrocele through the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), h-caldesmon, desmin, and vimentin. Sacs associated with male hernia (n = 22), female hernia (n = 8), and hydrocele (n = 10) were immunohistochemically evaluated using monoclonal antibodies against SMA, h-caldesmon, desmin, and vimentin. Peritoneal samples (male, 4; female, 3) and obliterated PV (male, 3) obtained from age-matched patients served as controls. Expressions according to the groups were compared through chi-squared test, and P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Immunohistochemistry did not shown the presence of SMCs in control samples. The expression of SMA, desmin, and h-caldesmon did not differ among sacs obtained from patients with inguinal hernia and hydrocele. However, strong expression of vimentin in SMCs within sacs obtained from patients with hydrocele in comparison with sacs from male patients with inguinal hernia were observed. Our results indicate that sacs from patients with inguinal hernias and especially from male inguinal hernias have fully differentiated SMCs. On the other hand SMCs in sacs obtained from boys with hydrocele are in an intermediate state of differentiation-dedifferentiation. This phenotypic modulation may represent attempted apoptosis of SMCs, since sacs more sensitive to apoptosis appeared to have more dedifferentiated SMCs. It also probably depicts the differing influence of sympathetic and parasympathetic tonuses during the descent of the testis and the obliteration of PV.

  10. Covalent interactions of acetaldehyde with the actin/microfilament system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, D S; Jennett, R B; Smith, S L; Sorrell, M F; Tuma, D J

    1989-01-01

    The covalent binding of [14C]acetaldehyde to purified rabbit skeletal muscle actin was characterized. As we have found for other cytoskeletal proteins, actin formed stable covalent adducts under reductive and non-reductive conditions. Under non-reductive conditions, individual and competition binding studies versus albumin both showed that the G-form of actin is more reactive toward acetaldehyde than the F-form. When proteins were compared on an 'equi-lysine' basis under non-reducing conditions, G-actin was found to preferentially compete with albumin for binding to acetaldehyde. Time-course dialysis studies indicated that acetaldehyde-actin adducts become more stable with prolonged incubation at 37 degrees C. These data raise the possibility that actin could be a preferential target for adduct formation in cellular systems and will serve as the basis for ongoing studies aimed at defining the role of acetaldehyde-protein adducts in ethanol-induced cell injury.

  11. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine induces α-smooth muscle actin expression in human lung fibroblasts and fibroblast-mediated gel contraction via S1P2 receptor and Rho/Rho-kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X Q; Mao, L J; Fang, Q H; Kobayashi, T; Kim, H J; Sugiura, H; Kawasaki, S; Togo, S; Kamio, K; Liu, X; Rennard, S I

    2014-01-01

    Chronic airway diseases like COPD and asthma are usually accompanied with airway fibrosis. Myofibroblasts, which are characterized by expression of smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), play an important role in a variety of developmental and pathological processes, including fibrosis and wound healing. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), a sphingolipid metabolite, has been implicated in many physiological and pathological conditions. The current study tested the hypothesis that SPC may modulate tissue remodeling by affecting the expression of α-SMA in human fetal lung fibroblast (HFL-1) and fibroblast mediated gel contraction. The results show that SPC stimulates α-SMA expression in HFL-1 and augments HFL-1 mediated collagen gel contraction in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The α-SMA protein expression and fibroblast gel contraction induced by SPC was not blocked by TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody. However, it was significantly blocked by S1P2 receptor antagonist JTE-013, the Rho-specific inhibitor C3 exoenzyme, and a Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632. These findings suggest that SPC stimulates α-SMA protein expression and HFL-1 mediated collagen gel contraction via S1P2 receptor and Rho/Rho kinase pathway, and by which mechanism, SPC may be involved in lung tissue remodeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of all-trans retinoic acids (ATRA) on the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the lung tissues of rats with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Y; Lv, J-Q; Wang, Y-Z; Zhang, J; Zhang, X

    2015-11-13

    The effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in rats with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was studied, and the mechanism of the effect of ATRA on PAH was proposed. Thirty male SD rats were randomly divided into normal control, monocrotaline (MCT) model, and ATRA [30 mg/(kg.day)]intervention groups (N = 10 each). The mean pulmonary arterial pressure was recorded. Right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI) was calculated (weight of right ventricle: total weight of left ventricle and interventricular septum). The percentages of wall thickness of pulmonary arteriole (WT) to external diameter of artery (WT%) and vascular wall area (WA) to total vascular area (WA%) were determined. Real-time fluorescence-based quantitative PCR and western blot analyses were employed to detect the α-SMA mRNA and protein expressions. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure, RVHI, WT%, and WA% were all obviously higher in the model group than in the control and intervention groups. The values of these indicators in the intervention group were also higher than those in the control group (P rats than those in the control and intervention groups. However, the intervention group showed no statistically significant differences in α-SMA mRNA and protein expression levels compared to the control (P rats with MCT-induced PAH, and could be used to treat PAH.

  13. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

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    Edna Blotnick

    Full Text Available Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  14. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotnick, Edna; Sol, Asaf; Muhlrad, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III) and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  15. Hypertrophic stimulation increases beta-actin dynamics in adult feline cardiomyocytes.

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    Sundaravadivel Balasubramanian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The myocardium responds to hemodynamic stress through cellular growth and organ hypertrophy. The impact of cytoskeletal elements on this process, however, is not fully understood. While alpha-actin in cardiomyocytes governs muscle contraction in combination with the myosin motor, the exact role of beta-actin has not been established. We hypothesized that in adult cardiomyocytes, as in non-myocytes, beta-actin can facilitate cytoskeletal rearrangement within cytoskeletal structures such as Z-discs. Using a feline right ventricular pressure overload (RVPO model, we measured the level and distribution of beta-actin in normal and pressure overloaded myocardium. Resulting data demonstrated enriched levels of beta-actin and enhanced translocation to the Triton-insoluble cytoskeletal and membrane skeletal complexes. In addition, RVPO in vivo and in vitro hypertrophic stimulation with endothelin (ET or insulin in isolated adult cardiomyocytes enhanced the content of polymerized fraction (F-actin of beta-actin. To determine the localization and dynamics of beta-actin, we adenovirally expressed GFP-tagged beta-actin in isolated adult cardiomyocytes. The ectopically expressed beta-actin-GFP localized to the Z-discs, costameres, and cell termini. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP measurements of beta-actin dynamics revealed that beta-actin at the Z-discs is constantly being exchanged with beta-actin from cytoplasmic pools and that this exchange is faster upon hypertrophic stimulation with ET or insulin. In addition, in electrically stimulated isolated adult cardiomyocytes, while beta-actin overexpression improved cardiomyocyte contractility, immunoneutralization of beta-actin resulted in a reduced contractility suggesting that beta-actin could be important for the contractile function of adult cardiomyocytes. These studies demonstrate the presence and dynamics of beta-actin in the adult cardiomyocyte and reinforce its usefulness in measuring

  16. ACTIN-DIRECTED TOXIN. ACD toxin-produced actin oligomers poison formin-controlled actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, David B; Kudryashova, Elena; Grinevich, Dmitry O; Suarez, Cristian; Winkelman, Jonathan D; Birukov, Konstantin G; Kotha, Sainath R; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Kovar, David R; Kudryashov, Dmitri S

    2015-07-31

    The actin cross-linking domain (ACD) is an actin-specific toxin produced by several pathogens, including life-threatening spp. of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. Actin cross-linking by ACD is thought to lead to slow cytoskeleton failure owing to a gradual sequestration of actin in the form of nonfunctional oligomers. Here, we found that ACD converted cytoplasmic actin into highly toxic oligomers that potently "poisoned" the ability of major actin assembly proteins, formins, to sustain actin polymerization. Thus, ACD can target the most abundant cellular protein by using actin oligomers as secondary toxins to efficiently subvert cellular functions of actin while functioning at very low doses. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Axonal Actin Transport Driven By Metastable Actin Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Nilaj; Ganguly, Archan; Roy, Subhojit; Jung, Peter

    Actin is one of the key constituents of the neuronal cytoskeleton and is responsible for driving important cellular processes like axon elongation. Axonal actin is synthesized in the cell body and transported at rates of 0.25 - 3 mm/day, as shown by in-vivo pulse-chase radiolabelling studies. However, the underlying transport mechanisms are unknown. Recent experiments in cultured neurons have revealed a dynamic network of metastable actin filaments (actin trails). Actin trails seem to originate from focal actin hotspots which colocalize with stationary endosomes. Interestingly, the number of actin trails extending anterogradely is higher than the ones extending retrogradely. We hypothesize that the bulk axonal transport of actin originates from this directional asymmetry of the number of actin trails. To test this, we constructed a computational model of actin trail growth and simulated the pulse-chase experiment. In our model, local, metastable trails, which grow with their barbed ends anchored to the hotspots, drive the bulk anterograde transport. Our results indicate that the observed bias of the nucleation probabilities and the elongation rate of actin trails are sufficient to drive the bulk transport of actin at rates that agree with in-vivo pulse chase experiments.

  18. Distinct actin oligomers modulate differently the activity of actin nucleators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zheng; Silvan, Unai; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Aebi, Ueli; Schoenenberger, Cora-Ann; Mannherz, Hans Georg

    2015-10-01

    Polymerization of actin monomers into filaments requires the initial formation of nuclei composed of a few actin subunits; however, their instability has hindered their detailed study. Therefore we used chemically crosslinked actin oligomers to analyse their effect on actin polymerization. Actin dimer (upper dimer, UD), trimer and tetramer intermolecularly crosslinked by phenylene-bismaleimide along the genetic helix (between Lys199 and Cys374) were isolated by gel filtration and found to increasingly stimulate actin polymerization as shown by the pyrene assay and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In contrast, the so-called lower actin dimer (LD) characterized by a Cys374-Cys374 crosslink stimulated actin polymerization only at low but inhibited it at high concentrations. UD and trimer stimulated the repolymerization of actin from complexes with thymosin β4 (Tβ4) or profilin, whereas the LD stimulated repolymerization only from the profilin : actin but not the actin : Tβ4 complex. In vivo, actin polymerization is stimulated by nucleation factors. Therefore the interaction and effects of purified LD, UD and trimer on the actin-nucleating activity of gelsolin, mouse diaphanous related (mDia) formin and the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex were analysed. Native gel electrophoresis demonstrated binding of LD, UD and trimer to gelsolin and its fragment G1-3, to the FH2 domains of the formins mDia1 and mDia3, and to Arp2/3 complex. UD and trimer increased the nucleating activity of gelsolin and G1-3, but not of the mDia-FH2 domain nor of the Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, LD at equimolar concentration to Arp2/3 complex stimulated its nucleating activity, but inhibited that of mDia-FH2 domains, gelsolin and G1-3, demonstrating differential regulation of their nucleating activity by dimers containing differently oriented actin subunits. © 2015 FEBS.

  19. Force Transmission in the Actin Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardel, Margaret

    2012-02-01

    The ability of cells to sense and generate mechanical forces is essential to numerous aspects of their physiology, including adhesion, migration, division and differentiation. To a large degree, cellular tension is regulated by the transmission of myosin II-generated forces through the filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton. While transmission of myosin-generated stresses from the molecular to cellular length scale is well understood in the context of highly organized sarcomeres found in striated muscle, non-muscle and smooth muscle cells contain a wide variety of bundles and networks lacking sarcomeric organization. I will describe the in vitro and in vivo approaches we use to study force transmission in such disordered actomyosin assemblies. Our in vivo results are showing that highly organized stress fibers contribute surprisingly little to the overall extent of cellular tension as compared to disordered actomyosin meshworks. Our in vitro results are demonstrating the mechanisms of symmetry breaking in disordered actomyosin bundles that facilitate the formation of contractile bundles with well-defined ``contractile elements.'' These results provide insight into the self-organization of actomyosin cytoskeleton in non-muscle cells that regulate and maintain cellular tension.

  20. Identities among actin-encoding cDNAs of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus and other eukaryote species revealed by nucleotide and amino acid sequence analyses

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    Andréia B. Poletto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Actin-encoding cDNAs of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus were isolated by RT-PCR using total RNA samples of different tissues and further characterized by nucleotide sequencing and in silico amino acid (aa sequence analysis. Comparisons among the actin gene sequences of O. niloticus and those of other species evidenced that the isolated genes present a high similarity to other fish and other vertebrate actin genes. The highest nucleotide resemblance was observed between O. niloticus and O. mossambicus a-actin and b-actin genes. Analysis of the predicted aa sequences revealed two distinct types of cytoplasmic actins, one cardiac muscle actin type and one skeletal muscle actin type that were expressed in different tissues of Nile tilapia. The evolutionary relationships between the Nile tilapia actin genes and diverse other organisms is discussed.

  1. Actin and myosin contribute to mammalian mitochondrial DNA maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, A.; He, J.; Mao, C. C.; Bailey, L. J.; Di Re, M.; Sembongi, H.; Kazak, L.; Dzionek, K.; Holmes, J. B.; Cluett, T. J.; Harbour, M. E.; Fearnley, I. M.; Crouch, R. J.; Conti, M. A.; Adelstein, R. S.; Walker, J. E.; Holt, I. J.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA maintenance and segregation are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton in budding yeast. We found two cytoskeletal proteins among six proteins tightly associated with rat liver mitochondrial DNA: non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA and β-actin. In human cells, transient gene silencing of MYH9 (encoding non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA), or the closely related MYH10 gene (encoding non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIB), altered the topology and increased the copy number of mitochondrial DNA; and the latter effect was enhanced when both genes were targeted simultaneously. In contrast, genetic ablation of non-muscle myosin IIB was associated with a 60% decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, compared to control cells. Gene silencing of β-actin also affected mitochondrial DNA copy number and organization. Protease-protection experiments and iodixanol gradient analysis suggest some β-actin and non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA reside within human mitochondria and confirm that they are associated with mitochondrial DNA. Collectively, these results strongly implicate the actomyosin cytoskeleton in mammalian mitochondrial DNA maintenance. PMID:21398640

  2. BMP9/COX-2 axial mediates high phosphate-induced calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells via Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fang; Wang, Han; Ren, Wen-Yan; Ma, Yan; Liao, Yun-Peng; Zhu, Jia-Hui; Cui, Jin; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Su, Yu-Xi; Gan, Hua; He, Bai-Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Vascular calcification is a notable risk factor for cardiovascular system. High phosphate can induce calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but the detail mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In the present study, we determined the relationship between high phosphate and bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) in VSMCs, the effect of BMP9 on calcification in VSMCs and the effect of COX-2 on BMP9 induced calcification in VSMCs, as well as the possible mechanism underlying this biological process. We found that high phosphate obviously up-regulates the expression of BMP9 in VSMCs. Over-expression of BMP9 decreases the level of alpha-smooth muscle cell actin (α-SMA) apparently, but increases the level of Runx-2, Dlx-5, and ALP in VSMCs. Meanwhile, BMP9 increases the level of OPN and OCN, promotes mineralization in VSMCs and induces calcification in thoracic aorta. High phosphate and over-expression of BMP9 increases the level of COX-2. Over-expression of COX-2 enhances the inhibitory effect of BMP9 on α-SAM and increases the level of OPN and OCN induced by BMP9. However, inhibition of COX-2 decreases the BMP9-induced calcification in VSMCs and thoracic aorta. For mechanism, we found that high phosphate or BMP9 increases the level of β-catenin and p-GSK3β in VSMCs, but no substantial effect on GSK3β. However, COX-2 inhibitor decreases the expression of β-catenin induced by BMP9. Our findings indicated that BMP9 is involved in the phosphate-induced calcification in VSMCs and COX-2 partly mediates the BMP9-induced calcification in VSMCs through activating Wnt/β-catenin pathway. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Actinic reticuloid. Diagnostics

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    E. V. Sokolovskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the case of actinic reticuloid - the rare dermatosis which clinical presentation is similar to atopic dermatitis, T-cell lymphoma. Good treatment effect was obtained by long cycles (2 cycles for 3 months of hydroxychloroquine and sun protective therapy included sunscreens SPF 50, nicotinic acid, sun-safe clothes which blocked ultraviolet radiation without any glucocorticosteroid drugs and cytostatic treatment.

  4. A new model for the interaction of dystrophin with F-actin

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The F-actin binding and cross-linking properties of skeletal muscle dystrophin-glycoprotein complex were examined using high and low speed cosedimentation assays, microcapillary falling ball viscometry, and electron microscopy. Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex binding to F-actin saturated near 0.042 +/- 0.005 mol/ mol, which corresponds to one dystrophin per 24 actin monomers. Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex bound to F-actin with an average apparent Kd for dystrophin of 0.5 microM. These resul...

  5. Actin acting at the Golgi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Gustavo; Serra-Peinado, Carla; Salcedo-Sicilia, Laia; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Enric

    2013-09-01

    The organization, assembly and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton provide force and tracks for a variety of (endo)membrane-associated events such as membrane trafficking. This review illustrates in different cellular models how actin and many of its numerous binding and regulatory proteins (actin and co-workers) participate in the structural organization of the Golgi apparatus and in trafficking-associated processes such as sorting, biogenesis and motion of Golgi-derived transport carriers.

  6. A peek into tropomyosin binding and unfolding on the actin filament.

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    Abhishek Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tropomyosin is a prototypical coiled coil along its length with subtle variations in structure that allow interactions with actin and other proteins. Actin binding globally stabilizes tropomyosin. Tropomyosin-actin interaction occurs periodically along the length of tropomyosin. However, it is not well understood how tropomyosin binds actin. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tropomyosin's periodic binding sites make differential contributions to two components of actin binding, cooperativity and affinity, and can be classified as primary or secondary sites. We show through mutagenesis and analysis of recombinant striated muscle alpha-tropomyosins that primary actin binding sites have a destabilizing coiled-coil interface, typically alanine-rich, embedded within a non-interface recognition sequence. Introduction of an Ala cluster in place of the native, more stable interface in period 2 and/or period 3 sites (of seven increased the affinity or cooperativity of actin binding, analysed by cosedimentation and differential scanning calorimetry. Replacement of period 3 with period 5 sequence, an unstable region of known importance for cooperative actin binding, increased the cooperativity of binding. Introduction of the fluorescent probe, pyrene, near the mutation sites in periods 2 and 3 reported local instability, stabilization by actin binding, and local unfolding before or coincident with dissociation from actin (measured using light scattering, and chain dissociation (analyzed using circular dichroism. CONCLUSIONS: This, and previous work, suggests that regions of tropomyosin involved in binding actin have non-interface residues specific for interaction with actin and an unstable interface that is locally stabilized upon binding. The destabilized interface allows residues on the coiled-coil surface to obtain an optimal conformation for interaction with actin by increasing the number of local substates that the side chains can sample. We suggest

  7. Actin binding proteins and spermiogenesis

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    Mruk, Dolores D

    2011-01-01

    Drebrin E, an actin-binding protein lacking intrinsic activity in the regulation of actin dynamics (e.g., polymerization, capping, nucleation, branching, cross-linking, bundling and severing), is known to recruit actin regulatory proteins to a specific cellular site. Herein, we critically evaluate recent findings in the field which illustrate that drebrin E works together with two other actin-binding proteins, namely Arp3 (actin-related protein 3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex that simultaneously controls actin nucleation for polymerization and branching of actin filaments) and Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 that controls capping of the barbed ends of actin filaments, as well as actin filament bundling) to regulate the homeostasis of F-actin filament bundles at the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific atypical adherens junction (AJ) in the seminiferous epithelium. This is mediated by the strict temporal and spatial expression of these three actin-binding proteins at the apical and basal ES at the Sertoli cell-spermatid (step 8–19) and Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface, respectively, during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. In this Commentary, we put forth a possible model by which drebrin E may be acting as a platform upon which proteins (e.g., Arp3) that are needed to alter the conformation of actin filament bundles at the ES can be recruited to the site, thus facilitating changes in cell shape and cell position in the epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. In short, drebrin E may be acting as a “logistic” distribution center to manage different regulatory proteins at the apical ES, thereby regulating the dynamics of actin filament bundles and modulating the plasticity of the apical ES. This would allow adhesion to be altered continuously throughout the epithelial cycle to accommodate spermatid movement in the seminiferous epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. We also

  8. Transgenic overexpression of γ-cytoplasmic actin protects against eccentric contraction-induced force loss in mdx mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background γ-cytoplasmic (γ-cyto) actin levels are elevated in dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine whether further elevation of γ-cyto actin levels improve or exacerbate the dystrophic phenotype of mdx mice. Methods We transgenically overexpressed γ-cyto actin, specifically in skeletal muscle of mdx mice (mdx-TG), and compared skeletal muscle pathology and force-generating capacity between mdx and mdx-TG mice at different ages. We investigated the mechanism by which γ-cyto actin provides protection from force loss by studying the role of calcium channels and stretch-activated channels in isolated skeletal muscles and muscle fibers. Analysis of variance or independent t-tests were used to detect statistical differences between groups. Results Levels of γ-cyto actin in mdx-TG skeletal muscle were elevated 200-fold compared to mdx skeletal muscle and incorporated into thin filaments. Overexpression of γ-cyto actin had little effect on most parameters of mdx muscle pathology. However, γ-cyto actin provided statistically significant protection against force loss during eccentric contractions. Store-operated calcium entry across the sarcolemma did not differ between mdx fibers compared to wild-type fibers. Additionally, the omission of extracellular calcium or the addition of streptomycin to block stretch-activated channels did not improve the force-generating capacity of isolated extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice during eccentric contractions. Conclusions The data presented in this study indicate that upregulation of γ-cyto actin in dystrophic skeletal muscle can attenuate force loss during eccentric contractions and that the mechanism is independent of activation of stretch-activated channels and the accumulation of extracellular calcium. PMID:21995957

  9. Transgenic overexpression of γ-cytoplasmic actin protects against eccentric contraction-induced force loss in mdx mice

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    Baltgalvis Kristen A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background γ-cytoplasmic (γ-cyto actin levels are elevated in dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine whether further elevation of γ-cyto actin levels improve or exacerbate the dystrophic phenotype of mdx mice. Methods We transgenically overexpressed γ-cyto actin, specifically in skeletal muscle of mdx mice (mdx-TG, and compared skeletal muscle pathology and force-generating capacity between mdx and mdx-TG mice at different ages. We investigated the mechanism by which γ-cyto actin provides protection from force loss by studying the role of calcium channels and stretch-activated channels in isolated skeletal muscles and muscle fibers. Analysis of variance or independent t-tests were used to detect statistical differences between groups. Results Levels of γ-cyto actin in mdx-TG skeletal muscle were elevated 200-fold compared to mdx skeletal muscle and incorporated into thin filaments. Overexpression of γ-cyto actin had little effect on most parameters of mdx muscle pathology. However, γ-cyto actin provided statistically significant protection against force loss during eccentric contractions. Store-operated calcium entry across the sarcolemma did not differ between mdx fibers compared to wild-type fibers. Additionally, the omission of extracellular calcium or the addition of streptomycin to block stretch-activated channels did not improve the force-generating capacity of isolated extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice during eccentric contractions. Conclusions The data presented in this study indicate that upregulation of γ-cyto actin in dystrophic skeletal muscle can attenuate force loss during eccentric contractions and that the mechanism is independent of activation of stretch-activated channels and the accumulation of extracellular calcium.

  10. Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin on actin during thin filament activation.

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    Lehman, William; Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Our thesis is that thin filament function can only be fully understood and muscle regulation then elucidated if atomic structures of the thin filament are available to reveal the positions of tropomyosin on actin in all physiological states. After all, it is tropomyosin influenced by troponin that regulates myosin-crossbridge cycling on actin and therefore controls contraction in all muscles. In addition, we maintain that a complete appreciation of thin filament activation also requires that the mechanical properties of tropomyosin itself are recognized and then related to the effect of myosin-association on actin. Taking the Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin into account, coupled with our electron microscopy structures and computational chemistry, we propose a comprehensive mechanism for tropomyosin regulatory movement over the actin filament surface that explains the cooperative muscle activation process. In fact, well-known point mutations of critical amino acids on the actin-tropomyosin binding interface disrupt Gestalt-binding and are associated with a number of inherited myopathies. Moreover, dysregulation of tropomyosin may also be a factor that interferes with the gatekeeping operation of non-muscle tropomyosin in the controlling interactions of a wide variety of cellular actin-binding proteins. The clinical relevance of Gestalt-binding is discussed in articles by the Marston and the Gunning groups in this special journal issue devoted to the impact of tropomyosin on biological systems.

  11. Development of a Vascularized Skin Construct Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cells from Debrided Burned Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    and expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA). It has been shown previously that αSMA is present in the microfilament bundles of pericytes [45] and...muscle cells, is present in microfilamentous bundles of pericytes,” Journal of Histochemistry & Cytochemistry, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 315–321, 1989. [46

  12. Cell Elasticity Is Regulated by the Tropomyosin Isoform Composition of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Iman; Heu, Celine; Cheng, Hong; Freittag, Hannah; Desouza, Melissa; Stehn, Justine R.; Bryce, Nicole S.; Whan, Renee M.; Hardeman, Edna C.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm), in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin) pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments. PMID:25978408

  13. Cell elasticity is regulated by the tropomyosin isoform composition of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Jalilian

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm, in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments.

  14. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siccardi, Stefano, E-mail: ssiccardi@2ssas.it [The Unconventional Computing Centre, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom); Tuszynski, Jack A., E-mail: jackt@ualberta.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Adamatzky, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.adamatzky@uwe.ac.uk [The Unconventional Computing Centre, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-08

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications. - Highlights: • We simulate interaction between voltage pulses using on actin filaments. • We use a coupled nonlinear transmission line model. • We design Boolean logical gates via interactions between the voltage pulses. • We construct one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses.

  15. PTEN gene silencing contributes to airway remodeling and induces airway smooth muscle cell proliferation in mice with allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xin; Yan, Jing; Han, Xin-Rui; Zheng, Gui-Hong; Tang, Ran; Liu, Li-Fang; Wu, Dong-Mei; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Yuan-Lin

    2018-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a complex genetic disorder that involves interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Usage of PTEN may be a good therapeutic strategy for the management of allergic inflammation. Thus, the present study aims to explore the effects of phosphatase and tensin homolog ( PTEN ) gene silencing on airway remodeling and proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) in a mouse model of allergic asthma. A total of 56 healthy female BABL/c mice (weighing between 16 to 22 grams) were selected and were assigned on random into ovalbumin (OVA; mice were stimulated with OVA to induce allergic asthma), OVA + si-PTEN, normal saline (NS; mice were treated with normal saline) and NS + si-PTEN groups. Masson staining was employed in order to observe lung tissue sections. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the expression of α-SMA + . Gene silencing was conducted in the NS + si-PTEN and OVA + si-PTEN groups. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expressions of PTEN in ASMCs of each group. CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were performed to determine the cell proliferation rate and cell cycle. Airway remodeling and changes of smooth muscle layer were found in allergic asthmatic mice with thick airway walls. The expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA + ) was significantly higher in ASMCs of the OVA, OVA + si-PTEN and NS + si-PTEN groups compared with ASMCs of the NS group. The mRNA and protein expressions of PTEN reduced in the OVA, OVA + si-PTEN and NS + si-PTEN groups. The rate of ASMCs proliferation in OVA, OVA + si-PTEN and NS + si-PTEN groups were significantly higher than the NS group. The proportion of ASMCs in S and G2 stages increased, while the number of cells in the G1 stage decreased after PTEN gene silencing. These results demonstrated that PTEN gene silencing might promote proliferation of ASMCs and airway remodeling in a

  16. F-actin cytoskeleton reorganization is associated with hepatic stellate cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    CUI, XIAODONG; ZHANG, XIAOYUN; YIN, QINGLING; MENG, AIXIA; SU, SHAOJUAN; JING, XU; LI, HONG; GUAN, XIUMEI; LI, XIN; LIU, SHUNMEI; CHENG, MIN

    2014-01-01

    The activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is involved in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Previous studies have indicated that the acquisition of certain properties by activated HSCs is highly dependent on the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, direct evidence showing that the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is responsible for HSC activation is lacking. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of cytoskeletal reorganization during HSC activation and to clarify the underlying mechanism. HSC-T6 cells were treated either with the F-actin stabilizer jasplakinolide (Jas) or the depolymerizer cytochalasin D (Cyto D). The actin cytoskeleton was evaluated via assessment of stress fiber formation. Furthermore, the activation properties of HSCs, including proliferation, adhesion, migration and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen 1, were investigated in vitro. The results showed that Jas and Cyto D affected the actin distribution in HSC-T6 cells. Treatment with Jas resulted in thick actin bundles and a patchy appearance in the cytoplasm in HSC-T6 cells. In parallel, polymerization of actin microfilaments induced by Jas upregulated the expression of α-SMA and collagen 1, and also enhanced the migration and adhesion properties of HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, the activation of HSC-T6 cells induced by the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton was associated with the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton is associated with HSC activation and that the p38 MAPK pathway is involved in this process. The inhibition of F-actin reorganization may thus be a potential key factor or molecular target for the control of liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. PMID:24626324

  17. F‑actin cytoskeleton reorganization is associated with hepatic stellate cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Yin, Qingling; Meng, Aixia; Su, Shaojuan; Jing, Xu; Li, Hong; Guan, Xiumei; Li, Xin; Liu, Shunmei; Cheng, Min

    2014-05-01

    The activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is involved in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Previous studies have indicated that the acquisition of certain properties by activated HSCs is highly dependent on the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, direct evidence showing that the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is responsible for HSC activation is lacking. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of cytoskeletal reorganization during HSC activation and to clarify the underlying mechanism. HSC-T6 cells were treated either with the F-actin stabilizer jasplakinolide (Jas) or the depolymerizer cytochalasin D (Cyto D). The actin cytoskeleton was evaluated via assessment of stress fiber formation. Furthermore, the activation properties of HSCs, including proliferation, adhesion, migration and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen 1, were investigated in vitro. The results showed that Jas and Cyto D affected the actin distribution in HSC-T6 cells. Treatment with Jas resulted in thick actin bundles and a patchy appearance in the cytoplasm in HSC-T6 cells. In parallel, polymerization of actin microfilaments induced by Jas upregulated the expression of α-SMA and collagen 1, and also enhanced the migration and adhesion properties of HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, the activation of HSC-T6 cells induced by the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton was associated with the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton is associated with HSC activation and that the p38 MAPK pathway is involved in this process. The inhibition of F-actin reorganization may thus be a potential key factor or molecular target for the control of liver fibrosis or cirrhosis.

  18. Axonal regeneration and neuronal function are preserved in motor neurons lacking ß-actin in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Cheever

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The proper localization of ß-actin mRNA and protein is essential for growth cone guidance and axon elongation in cultured neurons. In addition, decreased levels of ß-actin mRNA and protein have been identified in the growth cones of motor neurons cultured from a mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA, suggesting that ß-actin loss-of-function at growth cones or pre-synaptic nerve terminals could contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. However, the role of ß-actin in motor neurons in vivo and its potential relevance to disease has yet to be examined. We therefore generated motor neuron specific ß-actin knock-out mice (Actb-MNsKO to investigate the function of ß-actin in motor neurons in vivo. Surprisingly, ß-actin was not required for motor neuron viability or neuromuscular junction maintenance. Skeletal muscle from Actb-MNsKO mice showed no histological indication of denervation and did not significantly differ from controls in several measurements of physiologic function. Finally, motor axon regeneration was unimpaired in Actb-MNsKO mice, suggesting that ß-actin is not required for motor neuron function or regeneration in vivo.

  19. Rapid and dynamic arginylation of the leading edge β-actin is required for cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlyk, Iuliia; Leu, Nicolae A; Vedula, Pavan; Kurosaka, Satoshi; Kashina, Anna

    2018-04-01

    β-actin plays key roles in cell migration. Our previous work demonstrated that β-actin in migratory non-muscle cells is N-terminally arginylated and that this arginylation is required for normal lamellipodia extension. Here, we examined the function of β-actin arginylation in cell migration. We found that arginylated β-actin is concentrated at the leading edge of lamellipodia and that this enrichment is abolished after serum starvation as well as in contact-inhibited cells in confluent cultures, suggesting that arginylated β-actin at the cell leading edge is coupled to active migration. Arginylated actin levels exhibit dynamic changes in response to cell stimuli, lowered after serum starvation and dramatically elevating within minutes after cell stimulation by readdition of serum or lysophosphatidic acid. These dynamic changes require active translation and are not seen in confluent contact-inhibited cell cultures. Microinjection of arginylated actin antibodies into cells severely and specifically inhibits their migration rates. Together, these data strongly suggest that arginylation of β-actin is a tightly regulated dynamic process that occurs at the leading edge of locomoting cells in response to stimuli and is integral to the signaling network that regulates cell migration. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Carboxy-Terminal Third Of Dystrophin Enhances Actin Binding Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Davin M.; Lin, Ava Yun; Thomas, David D.; Ervasti, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Dystrophin is an actin-binding protein thought to stabilize cardiac and skeletal muscle cell membranes during contraction. Here, we investigated the contributions of each dystrophin domain to actin binding function. Cosedimentation assays and pyrene-actin fluorescence experiments confirmed that a fragment spanning two-thirds of the dystrophin molecule (from N-terminal ABD1 through ABD2) bound actin filaments with high affinity and protected filaments from forced depolymerization, but was less effective in both assays compared to full-length dystrophin. While a construct encoding the C-terminal third of dystrophin displayed no specific actin binding activity or competition with full-length dystrophin, our data show that it confers an unexpected regulation of actin binding by the N-terminal two-thirds of dystrophin when present in cis. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy experiments demonstrated that the presence of the C-terminal third of dystrophin in cis also influences actin interaction in terms of restricting actin’s rotational amplitude. We propose that the C-terminal region of dystrophin allosterically stabilizes an optimal actin binding conformation of dystrophin. PMID:22226838

  1. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  2. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  3. An atomic model of the tropomyosin cable on F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2014-08-05

    Tropomyosin regulates a wide variety of actin filament functions and is best known for the role that it plays together with troponin in controlling muscle activity. For effective performance on actin filaments, adjacent 42-nm-long tropomyosin molecules are joined together by a 9- to 10-residue head-to-tail overlapping domain to form a continuous cable that wraps around the F-actin helix. Yet, despite the apparent simplicity of tropomyosin's coiled-coil structure and its well-known periodic association with successive actin subunits along F-actin, the structure of the tropomyosin cable on actin is uncertain. This is because the conformation of the overlap region that joins neighboring molecules is poorly understood, thus leaving a significant gap in our understanding of thin-filament structure and regulation. However, recent molecular-dynamics simulations of overlap segments defined their overall shape and provided unique and sufficient cues to model the whole actin-tropomyosin filament assembly in atomic detail. In this study, we show that these MD structures merge seamlessly onto the ends of tropomyosin coiled-coils. Adjacent tropomyosin molecules can then be joined together to provide a comprehensive model of the tropomyosin cable running continuously on F-actin. The resulting complete model presented here describes for the first time (to our knowledge) an atomic-level structure of αα-striated muscle tropomyosin bound to an actin filament that includes the critical overlap domain. Thus, the model provides a structural correlate to evaluate thin-filament mechanics, self-assembly mechanisms, and the effect of disease-causing mutations. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Arabidopsis actin-depolymerizing factor7 severs actin filaments and regulates actin cable turnover to promote normal pollen tube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiyan; Xie, Yurong; Jiang, Yuxiang; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2013-09-01

    Actin filaments are often arranged into higher-order structures, such as the longitudinal actin cables that generate the reverse fountain cytoplasmic streaming pattern present in pollen tubes. While several actin binding proteins have been implicated in the generation of these cables, the mechanisms that regulate their dynamic turnover remain largely unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana actin-depolymerizing factor7 (ADF7) is required for turnover of longitudinal actin cables. In vitro biochemical analyses revealed that ADF7 is a typical ADF that prefers ADP-G-actin over ATP-G-actin. ADF7 inhibits nucleotide exchange on actin and severs filaments, but its filament severing and depolymerizing activities are less potent than those of the vegetative ADF1. ADF7 primarily decorates longitudinal actin cables in the shanks of pollen tubes. Consistent with this localization pattern, the severing frequency and depolymerization rate of filaments significantly decreased, while their maximum lifetime significantly increased, in adf7 pollen tube shanks. Furthermore, an ADF7-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion with defective severing activity but normal G-actin binding activity could not complement adf7, providing compelling evidence that the severing activity of ADF7 is vital for its in vivo functions. These observations suggest that ADF7 evolved to promote turnover of longitudinal actin cables by severing actin filaments in pollen tubes.

  5. Shear stress modulation of smooth muscle cell marker genes in 2-D and 3-D depends on mechanotransduction by heparan sulfate proteoglycans and ERK1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Dong Shi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available During vascular injury, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts (FBs/MFBs are exposed to altered luminal blood flow or transmural interstitial flow. We investigate the effects of these two types of fluid flows on the phenotypes of SMCs and MFBs and the underlying mechanotransduction mechanisms.Exposure to 8 dyn/cm(2 laminar flow shear stress (2-dimensional, 2-D for 15 h significantly reduced expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA, smooth muscle protein 22 (SM22, SM myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC, smoothelin, and calponin. Cells suspended in collagen gels were exposed to interstitial flow (1 cmH(2O, approximately 0.05 dyn/cm(2, 3-D, and after 6 h of exposure, expression of SM-MHC, smoothelin, and calponin were significantly reduced, while expression of alpha-SMA and SM22 were markedly enhanced. PD98059 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor and heparinase III (an enzyme to cleave heparan sulfate significantly blocked the effects of laminar flow on gene expression, and also reversed the effects of interstitial flow on SM-MHC, smoothelin, and calponin, but enhanced interstitial flow-induced expression of alpha-SMA and SM22. SMCs and MFBs have similar responses to fluid flow. Silencing ERK1/2 completely blocked the effects of both laminar flow and interstitial flow on SMC marker gene expression. Western blotting showed that both types of flows induced ERK1/2 activation that was inhibited by disruption of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs.The results suggest that HSPG-mediated ERK1/2 activation is an important mechanotransduction pathway modulating SMC marker gene expression when SMCs and MFBs are exposed to flow. Fluid flow may be involved in vascular remodeling and lesion formation by affecting phenotypes of vascular wall cells. This study has implications in understanding the flow-related mechanobiology in vascular lesion formation, tumor cell invasion, and stem cell differentiation.

  6. Actin microfilament dynamics in locomoting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Julie A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    1991-07-01

    The dynamic behaviour of actin filaments has been directly observed in living, motile cells using fluorescence photoactivation. In goldfish epithelial keratocytes, the actin microfilaments in the lamellipodium remain approximately fixed relative to the substrate as the cell moves over them, regardless of cell speed. The rate of turnover of actin subunits in the lamellipodium is remarkably rapid. Cell movement is directly and tightly coupled to the formation of new actin filaments at the leading edge.

  7. Actin' as a Death Signal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2012-01-01

    Cell death needs to be detected by immune cells. In this issue of Immunity, Ahrens et al. (2012) and Zhang et al. (2012) show that actin filaments become exposed on necrotic cells and act as ligands for the C-type lectin receptor Clec9a

  8. Effect of Chronic High Altitude Hypoxia on Foetal and Maternal Juxta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary venous SMCs were also obtained from dissected 5th to 7th generation levels pulmonary veins (<0.5 mm). Fluorescence tagged antibodies against alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha SMA) and calponin respectively were used as markers to identify cellular structural differences by routine immunohistochemistry.

  9. Semaphorin 4A enhances lung fibrosis through activation of Akt via ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-28

    Nov 28, 2015 ... Myofibroblasts are a trans-differentiated fibroblast phenotype, identified by alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression. (Hinz et al. 2001; Hinz and Gabbiani 2003). They are avid extracellular matrix synthesizers and have enhanced collagen contraction ability. Myofibroblasts are more resistant to apopto ...

  10. Effects of F/G-actin ratio and actin turn-over rate on NADPH oxidase activity in microglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Izabela; Pedersen, Line Hjortshøj; Byg, Luise

    2010-01-01

    Most in vivo studies that have addressed the role of actin dynamics in NADPH oxidase function in phagocytes have used toxins to modulate the polymerization state of actin and mostly effects on actin has been evaluated by end point measurements of filamentous actin, which says little about actin d...... dynamics, and without consideration for the subcellular distribution of the perturbed actin cytoskeleton....

  11. Distortion of the Actin A-Triad Results in Contractile Disinhibition and Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera C. Viswanathan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Striated muscle contraction is regulated by the movement of tropomyosin over the thin filament surface, which blocks or exposes myosin binding sites on actin. Findings suggest that electrostatic contacts, particularly those between K326, K328, and R147 on actin and tropomyosin, establish an energetically favorable F-actin-tropomyosin configuration, with tropomyosin positioned in a location that impedes actomyosin associations and promotes relaxation. Here, we provide data that directly support a vital role for these actin residues, termed the A-triad, in tropomyosin positioning in intact functioning muscle. By examining the effects of an A295S α-cardiac actin hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-causing mutation, over a range of increasingly complex in silico, in vitro, and in vivo Drosophila muscle models, we propose that subtle A-triad-tropomyosin perturbation can destabilize thin filament regulation, which leads to hypercontractility and triggers disease. Our efforts increase understanding of basic thin filament biology and help unravel the mechanistic basis of a complex cardiac disorder.

  12. The actin multigene family of Paramecium tetraurelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Erika

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Paramecium tetraurelia pilot genome project, the subsequent sequencing of a Megabase chromosome as well as the Paramecium genome project aimed at gaining insight into the genome of Paramecium. These cells display a most elaborate membrane trafficking system, with distinct, predictable pathways in which actin could participate. Previously we had localized actin in Paramecium; however, none of the efforts so far could proof the occurrence of actin in the cleavage furrow of a dividing cell, despite the fact that actin is unequivocally involved in cell division. This gave a first hint that Paramecium may possess actin isoforms with unusual characteristics. The genome project gave us the chance to search the whole Paramecium genome, and, thus, to identify and characterize probably all actin isoforms in Paramecium. Results The ciliated protozoan, P. tetraurelia, contains an actin multigene family with at least 30 members encoding actin, actin-related and actin-like proteins. They group into twelve subfamilies; a large subfamily with 10 genes, seven pairs and one trio with > 82% amino acid identity, as well as three single genes. The different subfamilies are very distinct from each other. In comparison to actins in other organisms, P. tetraurelia actins are highly divergent, with identities topping 80% and falling to 30%. We analyzed their structure on nucleotide level regarding the number and position of introns. On amino acid level, we scanned the sequences for the presence of actin consensus regions, for amino acids of the intermonomer interface in filaments, for residues contributing to ATP binding, and for known binding sites for myosin and actin-specific drugs. Several of those characteristics are lacking in several subfamilies. The divergence of P. tetraurelia actins and actin-related proteins between different P. tetraurelia subfamilies as well as with sequences of other organisms is well represented in a phylogenetic

  13. ACTG2 variants impair actin polymerization in sporadic Megacystis Microcolon Intestinal Hypoperistalsis Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halim, Danny; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Signorile, Luca; Verdijk, Rob M.; van der Werf, Christine S.; Sribudiani, Yunia; Brouwer, Rutger W. W.; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; Dahl, Niklas; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Baumann, Clarisse; Kerner, John; van Bever, Yolande; Galjart, Niels; Wijnen, Rene M. H.; Tibboel, Dick; Burns, Alan J.; Muller, Franoise; Brooks, Alice S.; Alves, Maria M.

    2016-01-01

    Megacystis Microcolon Intestinal Hypoperistalsis Syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare congenital disorder, in which heterozygous missense variants in the Enteric Smooth Muscle actin gamma-2 (ACTG2) gene have been recently identified. To investigate the mechanism by which ACTG2 variants lead to MMIHS, we

  14. Mechanosensitive kinetic preference of actin-binding protein to actin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-04-01

    The kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments is altered by external forces on the filament. Such an altered kinetic preference is largely responsible for remodeling the actin cytoskeletal structure in response to intracellular forces. During remodeling, actin-binding proteins and actin filaments interact under isothermal conditions, because the cells are homeostatic. In such a temperature homeostatic state, we can rigorously and thermodynamically link the chemical potential of actin-binding proteins to stresses on the actin filaments. From this relationship, we can construct a physical model that explains the force-dependent kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments. To confirm the model, we have analyzed the mechanosensitive alternation of the kinetic preference of Arp2/3 and cofilin to actin filaments. We show that this model captures the qualitative responses of these actin-binding proteins to the forces, as observed experimentally. Moreover, our theoretical results demonstrate that, depending on the structural parameters of the binding region, actin-binding proteins can show different kinetic responses even to the same mechanical signal tension, in which the double-helix nature of the actin filament also plays a critical role in a stretch-twist coupling of the filament.

  15. Actin dynamics in mouse fibroblasts in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moes, Maarten J. A.; Bijvelt, Jose J.; Boonstra, Johannes

    2007-09-01

    After stimulating with the growth factor PDGF, cells exhibit abundant membrane ruffling and other morphological changes under normal gravity conditions. These morphological changes are largely determined by the actin microfilament system. Now these actin dynamics were studied under microgravity conditions in mouse fibroblasts during the DELTA mission. The aim of the present study was to describe the actin morphology in detail, to establish the effect of PDGF on actin morphology and to study the role of several actin-interacting proteins involved in introduced actin dynamics in microgravity. Identical experiments were conducted at 1G on earth as a reference. No results in microgravity were obtained due to a combination of malfunctioning hardware and unfulfilled temperature requirements.

  16. Actin organization and dynamics in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berepiki, Adokiye; Lichius, Alexander; Read, Nick D

    2011-11-02

    Growth and morphogenesis of filamentous fungi is underpinned by dynamic reorganization and polarization of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin has crucial roles in exocytosis, endocytosis, organelle movement and cytokinesis in fungi, and these processes are coupled to the production of distinct higher-order structures (actin patches, cables and rings) that generate forces or serve as tracks for intracellular transport. New approaches for imaging actin in living cells are revealing important similarities and differences in actin architecture and organization within the fungal kingdom, and have yielded key insights into cell polarity, tip growth and long-distance intracellular transport. In this Review, we discuss the contribution that recent live-cell imaging and mutational studies have made to our understanding of the dynamics and regulation of actin in filamentous fungi.

  17. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariadi, Rizal F; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-03-18

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions.

  18. Conformational and dynamic differences between actin filaments polymerized from ATP- or ADP-actin monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyitrai, M; Hild, G; Hartvig, N; Belágyi, J; Somogyi, B

    2000-12-29

    Conformational and dynamic properties of actin filaments polymerized from ATP- or ADP-actin monomers were compared by using fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The fluorescence intensity of IAEDANS attached to the Cys(374) residue of actin was smaller in filaments from ADP-actin than in filaments from ATP-actin monomers, which reflected a nucleotide-induced conformational difference in subdomain 1 of the monomer. Radial coordinate calculations revealed that this conformational difference did not modify the distance of Cys(374) from the longitudinal filament axis. Temperature-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements between donor and acceptor molecules on Cys(374) of neighboring actin protomers revealed that the inter-monomer flexibility of filaments assembled from ADP-actin monomers were substantially greater than the one of filaments from ATP-actin monomers. Flexibility was reduced by phalloidin in both types of filaments.

  19. GPCRs and actin-cytoskeleton dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; González-Espinosa, Claudia; Espinosa-Riquer, Zyanya P; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    A multitude of physiological processes regulated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling are accomplished by the participation of active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton. In general, it is common that a cross talk occurs among networks of microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments in order to reach specific cell responses. In particular, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics regulate processes such as cell shape, cell division, cell motility, and cell polarization, among others. This chapter describes the current knowledge about the regulation of actin-cytoskeleton dynamic by diverse GPCR signaling pathways, and also includes some protocols combining immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy for the visualization of the different rearrangements of the actin-cytoskeleton. We report how both the S1P-GPCR/G12/13/Rho/ROCK and glucagon-GPCR/Gs/cAMP axes induce differential actin-cytoskeleton rearrangements in epithelial cells. We also show that specific actin-binding molecules, like phalloidin and LifeAct, are very useful to analyze F-actin reorganization by confocal microscopy, and also that both molecules show similar results in fixed cells, whereas the anti-actin antibody is useful to detect both the G- and F-actin, as well as their compartmentalization. Thus, it is highly recommended to utilize different approaches to investigate the regulation of actin dynamics by GPCR signaling, with the aim to get a better picture of the phenomenon under study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Co-transcriptional nuclear actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Actin is a key player for nuclear structure and function regulating both chromosome organization and gene activity. In the cell nucleus actin interacts with many different proteins. Among these proteins several studies have identified classical nuclear factors involved in chromatin structure and function, transcription and RNA processing as well as proteins that are normally involved in controlling the actin cytoskeleton. These discoveries have raised the possibility that nuclear actin performs its multi task activities through tight interactions with different sets of proteins. This high degree of promiscuity in the spectrum of protein-to-protein interactions correlates well with the conformational plasticity of actin and the ability to undergo regulated changes in its polymerization states. Several of the factors involved in controlling head-to-tail actin polymerization have been shown to be in the nucleus where they seem to regulate gene activity. By focusing on the multiple tasks performed by actin and actin-binding proteins, possible models of how actin dynamics controls the different phases of the RNA polymerase II transcription cycle are being identified.

  1. Bioinformatics study of the mangrove actin genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wasilah, M.; Sumardi

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the bioinformatics methods to analyze eight actin genes from mangrove plants on DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, subcellular localization, similarity, and phylogenetic. The physical and chemical properties of eight mangroves showed variation among the genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of eight mangrove actin genes followed the order of a helix > random coil > extended chain structure for BgActl, KcActl, RsActl, and A. corniculatum Act. In contrast to this observation, the remaining actin genes were random coil > extended chain structure > a helix. This study, therefore, shown the prediction of secondary structure was performed for necessary structural information. The values of chloroplast or signal peptide or mitochondrial target were too small, indicated that no chloroplast or mitochondrial transit peptide or signal peptide of secretion pathway in mangrove actin genes. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity and functional of properties of the different amino acids in mangrove actin genes. To clarify the relationship among the mangrove actin gene, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Three groups of mangrove actin genes were formed, the first group contains B. gymnorrhiza BgAct and R. stylosa RsActl. The second cluster which consists of 5 actin genes the largest group, and the last branch consist of one gene, B. sexagula Act. The present study, therefore, supported the previous results that plant actin genes form distinct clusters in the tree.

  2. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Spracklen, Andrew J.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Lovander, Kaylee E.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools – Utrophin, Lifeact, an...

  3. Titin Based Viscosity in Ventricular Physiology: An Integrative Investigation of PEVK-Actin Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Charles S; Methawasin, Methajit; Nelson, O Lynne; Radke, Michael H; Hidalgo, Carlos G; Gotthardt, Michael; Granzier, Henk L

    2011-01-01

    Viscosity is proposed to modulate diastolic function, but only limited understanding of the source(s) of viscosity exists. In-vitro experiments have shown that the proline-glutamic acid-valine-lysine (PEVK) rich element of titin interacts with actin, causing a viscous force in the sarcomere. It is unknown whether this mechanism contributes to viscosity in-vivo. We tested the hypothesis that PEVK-actin interaction causes cardiac viscosity and is important in-vivo via an integrative physiological study on a unique PEVK-knockout (KO) model. Both skinned cardiomyocytes and papillary muscle fibers were isolated from wildtype (WT) and PEVK KO mice and passive viscosity was examined using stretch-hold-release and sinusoidal analysis. Viscosity was reduced by ~60% in KO myocytes and ~50% in muscle fibers at room temperature. The PEVK-actin interaction was not modulated by temperature or diastolic calcium, but was increased by lattice compression. Stretch-hold and sinusoidal frequency protocols on intact isolated mouse hearts showed a smaller, 30–40% reduction in viscosity, possibly due to actomyosin interactions, and showed that microtubules did not contribute to viscosity. Transmitral Doppler echocardiography similarly revealed a 40% decrease in LV chamber viscosity in the PEVK KO in-vivo. This integrative study is the first to quantify the influence of a specific molecular (PEVK-actin) viscosity in-vivo and shows that PEVK-actin interactions are an important physiological source of viscosity. PMID:21708170

  4. Apical and basal epitheliomuscular F-actin dynamics during Hydra bud evagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufschnaiter, Roland; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bending of 2D cell sheets is a fundamental morphogenetic mechanism during animal development and reproduction. A critical player driving cell shape during tissue bending is the actin cytoskeleton. Much of our current knowledge about actin dynamics in whole organisms stems from studies of embryonic development in bilaterian model organisms. Here, we have analyzed actin-based processes during asexual bud evagination in the simple metazoan Hydra. We created transgenic Hydra strains stably expressing the actin marker Lifeact-GFP in either ectodermal or endodermal epitheliomuscular cells. We then combined live imaging with conventional phalloidin staining to directly follow actin reorganization. Bending of the Hydra epithelial double layer is initiated by a group of epitheliomuscular cells in the endodermal layer. These cells shorten their apical-basal axis and arrange their basal muscle processes in a circular configuration. We propose that this rearrangement generates the initial forces to bend the endoderm towards the ectoderm. Convergent tissue movement in both epithelial layers towards the centre of evagination then leads to elongation and extension of the bud along its new body axis. Tissue movement into the bud is associated with lateral intercalation of epithelial cells, remodelling of apical septate junctions, and rearrangement of basal muscle processes. The work presented here extends the analysis of morphogenetic mechanisms beyond embryonic tissues of model bilaterians. PMID:28630355

  5. Pharmacological treatment of actinic keratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Zwierzyńska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Actinic keratosis (AK is a disease characterized by hyperkeratotic lesions on skin damaged by ultraviolet. radiation. These lesions may progress to squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma. Currently pharmacotherapy and different surgical procedures are used in AK therapy. The most common treatment options are 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, diclofenac, ingenol mebutate, and first and third generation retinoids (retinol, adapalene, tazarotene. Furthermore, research is being carried out in order to test new medications including nicotinamide, resiquimod, piroxicam, potassium dobesilate and oleogel based on a triterpene extract (betulin, betulinic acid. Recently, the preventive effect of acetylsalicylic acid and celecoxib has also been investigated.

  6. Eye features in three Danish patients with multisystemic smooth muscle dysfunction syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Hans Ulrik; Fledelius, Hans C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2012-01-01

    A de novo mutation of the ACTA2 gene encoding the smooth muscle cell α-actin has been established in patients with multisystemic smooth muscle dysfunction syndrome associated with patent ductus arteriosus and mydriasis present at birth....

  7. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Andrew J; Fagan, Tiffany N; Lovander, Kaylee E; Tootle, Tina L

    2014-09-15

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools--Utrophin, Lifeact, and F-tractin--for characterizing the actin remodeling events occurring within the germline-derived nurse cells during Drosophila mid-oogenesis or follicle development. Specifically, we used the UAS/GAL4 system to express these tools at different levels and in different cells, and analyzed these tools for effects on fertility, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and ability to label filamentous actin (F-actin) structures by both fixed and live imaging. While both Utrophin and Lifeact robustly label F-actin structures within the Drosophila germline, when strongly expressed they cause sterility and severe actin defects including cortical actin breakdown resulting in multi-nucleate nurse cells, early F-actin filament and aggregate formation during stage 9 (S9), and disorganized parallel actin filament bundles during stage 10B (S10B). However, by using a weaker germline GAL4 driver in combination with a higher temperature, Utrophin can label F-actin with minimal defects. Additionally, strong Utrophin expression within the germline causes F-actin formation in the nurse cell nuclei and germinal vesicle during mid-oogenesis. Similarly, Lifeact expression results in nuclear F-actin only within the germinal vesicle. F-tractin expresses at a lower level than the other two labeling tools, but labels cytoplasmic F-actin structures well without causing sterility or striking actin defects. Together these studies reveal how critical it is to evaluate the utility of each actin labeling tool

  8. Mechanical hysteresis in actin networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sayantan; Foucard, Louis C; Levine, Alex J; Gardel, Margaret L

    2018-03-14

    Understanding the response of complex materials to external force is central to fields ranging from materials science to biology. Here, we describe a novel type of mechanical adaptation in cross-linked networks of F-actin, a ubiquitous protein found in eukaryotic cells. We show that shear stress changes the network's nonlinear mechanical response even long after that stress is removed. The duration, magnitude and direction of forcing history all change this mechanical response. While the mechanical hysteresis is long-lived, it can be simply erased by force application in the opposite direction. We further show that the observed mechanical adaptation is consistent with stress-dependent changes in the nematic order of the constituent filaments. Thus, this mechanical hysteresis arises from the changes in non-linear response that originates from stress-induced changes to filament orientation. This demonstrates that F-actin networks can exhibit analog read-write mechanical hysteretic properties, which can be used for adaptation to mechanical stimuli.

  9. Unconventional actin conformations localize on intermediate filaments in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Unconventional actin conformations colocalize with vimentin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. → These conformations are detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 ('lower dimer') and 2G2 ('nuclear actin'), but not C4 (monomeric actin). → Mitotic unconventional actin cables are independent of filamentous actin or microtubules. → Unconventional actin colocalizes with vimentin on a nocodazole-induced perinuclear dense mass of cables. -- Abstract: Different structural conformations of actin have been identified in cells and shown to reside in distinct subcellular locations of cells. In this report, we describe the localization of actin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. Actin was detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 and 2G2, but not with the anti-actin antibody C4. Actin contained in this structure is independent of microtubules and actin filaments, and colocalizes with vimentin. Taking advantage of intermediate filament collapse into a perinuclear dense mass of cables when microtubules are depolymerized, we were able to relocalize actin to such structures. We hypothesize that phosphorylation of intermediate filaments at mitosis entry triggers the recruitment of different actin conformations to mitotic intermediate filaments. Storage and partition of the nuclear actin and antiparallel 'lower dimer' actin conformations between daughter cells possibly contribute to gene transcription and transient actin filament dynamics at G1 entry.

  10. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike [Raleigh, NC; Huber, Steven C [Savoy, IL; Larabell, Carolyn A [Berkeley, CA

    2011-10-18

    Synthetic peptides derived from sucrose synthase, and having homology to actin and actin-related proteins, sharing a common motif, useful for causing acting bundling and preventing actin depolymerization. Peptides exhibiting the common motif are described, as well as specific synthetic peptides which caused bundled actin and inhibit actin depolymerization. These peptides can be useful for treating a subject suffering from a disease characterized by cells having neoplastic growth, for anti-cancer therapeutics, delivered to subjects solely, or concomitantly or sequentially with other known cancer therapeutics. These peptides can also be used for stabilizing microfilaments in living cells and inhibiting growth of cells.

  11. Actin in dividing cells: contractile ring filaments bind heavy meromyosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, T E

    1973-06-01

    Many microfilaments and microtubules are well preserved after glycerol-extraction of HeLa cells at room temperature (22 degrees ). Incubation in heavy meromyosin from rabbit skeletal muscle results in conspicuous and characteristic "decoration" of microfilaments of the contractile ring. Decoration is completely prevented by 10 mM ATP or 2 mM pyrophosphate, and fails to occur if heavy meromyosin is either omitted or replaced by egg albumin, a nonspecific protein. Decorated microfilaments have a substructure consisting of polarized, repeating arrowheads 27-35 nm apart. The specificity of these results strongly suggests that microfilaments of the contractile ring in HeLa cells are closely related to muscle actin. Very thin undecorated strands among the microfilaments of the contractile ring possibly represent a myosin component. These findings are discussed in terms of: the actomyosin-like properties of the contractile ring as a mechanochemical organelle that causes cell cleavage; the probable universal occurrence of actin-like protein in all dividing animal cells; and the contractile ring's combined sensitivity to cytochalasin B and its affinity for heavy meromyosin, a combination unique among microfilamentous organelles.

  12. Specification of Architecture and Function of Actin Structures by Actin Nucleation Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skau, Colleen T; Waterman, Clare M

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential for diverse processes in mammalian cells; these processes range from establishing cell polarity to powering cell migration to driving cytokinesis to positioning intracellular organelles. How these many functions are carried out in a spatiotemporally regulated manner in a single cytoplasm has been the subject of much study in the cytoskeleton field. Recent work has identified a host of actin nucleation factors that can build architecturally diverse actin structures. The biochemical properties of these factors, coupled with their cellular location, likely define the functional properties of actin structures. In this article, we describe how recent advances in cell biology and biochemistry have begun to elucidate the role of individual actin nucleation factors in generating distinct cellular structures. We also consider how the localization and orientation of actin nucleation factors, in addition to their kinetic properties, are critical to their ability to build a functional actin cytoskeleton.

  13. Orientation and mobility of actin in different intermediate states of the ATP hydrolysis cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaimina, S S; Wrzosek, A; Dabrowska, R; Borovikov, Yu S

    2005-10-01

    Using polarization fluorimetry, we have investigated conformational changes of FITC-phalloidin-labeled F-actin in ghost muscle fibers. These changes were induced by myosin subfragment-1 (S1) in the absence and presence of MgADP, MgAMP-PNP, MgATPgammaS, or MgATP. Modeling of various intermediate states was accompanied by discrete changes in actomyosin orientation and mobility of fluorescent dye dipoles. This suggests multistep changes of orientation and mobility of actin monomers during the ATPase cycle. The most pronounced differences in orientation (~4 degrees ) and in mobility (~43%) of actin were found between the actomyosin states induced by MgADP and MgATP.

  14. Modulation of microfilament protein composition by transfected cytoskeletal actin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, S.Y.; Erba, H.; Latter, G.; Kedes, L.; Leavitt, J.

    1988-04-01

    HuT-14T is a highly tumorigenic fibroblast cell line which exhibits a reduced steady-state level of ..beta..-actin due to coding mutations in one of two ..beta..-actin alleles. The normal rate of total actin synthesis could be restored in some clones of cells following transfection of the functional ..beta..-actin gene but not following transfection of the functional ..gamma..-actin gene. In ..gamma..-actin gene-transfected substrains that have increased rates of ..gamma..-actin synthesis, ..beta..-actin synthesis is further reduced in a manner consistent with an autoregulatory mechanism, resulting in abnormal ratios of actin isoforms. Thus, both ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin proteins can apparently regulate the synthesis of their coexpressed isoforms. In addition, decreased synthesis of normal ..beta..-actin seems to correlate with a concomitant down-regulation of tropomyosin isoforms.

  15. Dynamics of an F-actin aggresome generated by the actin-stabilizing toxin jasplakinolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Aguado, Carmen; Mato, Eugenia; Sánchez-Ruíz, Yován; Esteban, Inmaculada; Alberch, Jordi; Knecht, Erwin; Egea, Gustavo

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we report the formation of several cytoplasmic inclusion bodies composed of filamentous actin (F-actin) and generated by experimental treatments using depolymerizing or stabilizing actin toxins in neuronal and non-neuronal mammalian cell lines. The actin-stabilizing toxin jasplakinolide (Jpk) induced, in a microtubule-dependent manner, a single, large F-actin aggregate, which contained beta- and gamma-actin, ADF/cofilin, cortactin, and the actin nucleator Arp2/3. This aggregate was tightly associated with the Golgi complex and mitochondria, and was surrounded by vimentin intermediate filaments, microtubules and MAP4. Therefore, the Jpk-induced single, large F-actin aggregate fits the established criteria for being considered an aggresome. Lysosomes and/or autophagic vacuoles, proteasomes and microtubules were found to directly participate in the dissolution of this F-actin aggresome. Finally, the model reported here is simple, highly reproducible and reversible, and it provides an opportunity to test pharmacological agents that interfere with the formation, maintenance and/or disappearance of F-actin-enriched pathological inclusion bodies.

  16. Nuclear Actin and Myosins in Adenovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsova, Beata; Serebryannyy, Leonid A.; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus serotypes have been shown to cause drastic changes in nuclear organization, including the transcription machinery, during infection. This ability of adenovirus to subvert transcription in the host cell facilitates viral replication. Because nuclear actin and nuclear myosin I, myosin V and myosin VI have been implicated as direct regulators of transcription and important factors in the replication of other viruses, we sought to determine how nuclear actin and myosins are involved in adenovirus infection. We first confirmed reorganization of the host’s transcription machinery to viral replication centers. We found that nuclear actin also reorganizes to sites of transcription through the intermediate but not the advanced late phase of viral infection. Furthermore, nuclear myosin I localized with nuclear actin and sites of transcription in viral replication centers. Intriguingly, nuclear myosins V and VI, which also reorganized to viral replication centers, exhibited different localization patterns, suggesting specialized roles for these nuclear myosins. Finally, we assessed the role of actin in adenovirus infection and found both cytoplasmic and nuclear actin likely play roles in adenovirus infection and replication. Together our data suggest the involvement of actin and multiple myosins in the nuclear replication and late viral gene expression of adenovirus. PMID:26226218

  17. Actinic Granuloma with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruedee Phasukthaworn

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinic granuloma is an uncommon granulomatous disease, characterized by annular erythematous plaque with central clearing predominately located on sun-damaged skin. The pathogenesis is not well understood, ultraviolet radiation is recognized as precipitating factor. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic annular erythematous plaques on the forehead and both cheeks persisting for 2 years. The clinical presentation and histopathologic findings support the diagnosis of actinic granuloma. During that period of time, she also developed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The association between actinic granuloma and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis needs to be clarified by further studies.

  18. Swinholide A is a microfilament disrupting marine toxin that stabilizes actin dimers and severs actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubb, M R; Spector, I; Bershadsky, A D; Korn, E D

    1995-02-24

    Swinholide A, isolated from the marien sponge Theonella swinhoei, is a 44-carbon ring dimeric dilactone macrolide with a 2-fold axis of symmetry. Recent studies have elucidated its unusual structure and shown that it has potent cytotoxic activity. We now report that swinholide A disrupts the actin cytoskeleton of cells grown in culture, sequesters actin dimers in vitro in both polymerizing and non-polymerizing buffers with a binding stoichiometry of one swinholide A molecule per actin dimer, and rapidly severs F-actin in vitro with high cooperativity. These unique properties are sufficient to explain the cytotoxicity of swinholide A. They also suggest that swinholide A might be a model for studies of the mechanism of action of F-actin severing proteins and be therapeutically useful in conditions where filamentous actin contributes to pathologically high viscosities.

  19. Conformational changes in actin induced by its interaction with gelsolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaitlina, S; Hinssen, H

    1997-08-01

    Actin cleaved by the protease from Escherichia coli A2 strain between Gly42 and Val43 (ECP-actin) is no longer polymerizable when it contains Ca2+ as a tightly bound cation, but polymerizes when Mg2+ is bound. We have investigated the interactions of gelsolin with this actin with regard to conformational changes in the actin molecule induced by the binding of gelsolin. ECP-(Ca)actin interacts with gelsolin in a manner similar to that in which it reacts with intact actin, and forms a stoichiometric 2:1 complex. Despite the nonpolymerizability of ECP-(Ca)actin, this complex can act as a nucleus for the polymerization of intact actin, thus indicating that upon interaction with gelsolin, ECP-(Ca)actin undergoes a conformational change that enables its interaction with another actin monomer. By gel filtration and fluorometry it was shown that the binding of at least one of the ECP-cleaved actins to gelsolin is considerably weaker than of intact actin, suggesting that conformational changes in subdomain 2 of actin monomer may directly or allosterically affect actin-gelsolin interactions. On the other hand, interaction with gelsolin changes the conformation of actin within the DNase I-binding loop, as indicated by inhibition of limited proteolysis of actin by ECP and subtilisin. Cross-linking experiments with gelsolin-nucleated actin filaments using N,N-phenylene-bismaleimide (which cross-links adjacent actin monomers between Cys374 and Lys191) reveal that gelsolin causes a significant increase in the yield of the 115-kDa cross-linking product, confirming the evidence that gelsolin stabilizes or changes the conformation of the C-terminal region of the actin molecule, and these changes are propagated from the capped end along the filament. These results allow us to conclude that nucleation of actin polymerization by gelsolin is promoted by conformational changes within subdomain 2 and at the C-terminus of the actin monomer.

  20. Filamin actin-binding and titin-binding fulfill distinct functions in Z-disc cohesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicanor González-Morales

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins contribute to the contractile properties of muscles, most notably myosin thick filaments, which are anchored at the M-line, and actin thin filaments, which are anchored at the Z-discs that border each sarcomere. In humans, mutations in the actin-binding protein Filamin-C result in myopathies, but the underlying molecular function is not well understood. Here we show using Drosophila indirect flight muscle that the filamin ortholog Cheerio in conjunction with the giant elastic protein titin plays a crucial role in keeping thin filaments stably anchored at the Z-disc. We identify the filamin domains required for interaction with the titin ortholog Sallimus, and we demonstrate a genetic interaction of filamin with titin and actin. Filamin mutants disrupting the actin- or the titin-binding domain display distinct phenotypes, with Z-discs breaking up in parallel or perpendicularly to the myofibril, respectively. Thus, Z-discs require filamin to withstand the strong contractile forces acting on them.

  1. Structural differences explain diverse functions of Plasmodium actins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Vahokoski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Actins are highly conserved proteins and key players in central processes in all eukaryotic cells. The two actins of the malaria parasite are among the most divergent eukaryotic actins and also differ from each other more than isoforms in any other species. Microfilaments have not been directly observed in Plasmodium and are presumed to be short and highly dynamic. We show that actin I cannot complement actin II in male gametogenesis, suggesting critical structural differences. Cryo-EM reveals that Plasmodium actin I has a unique filament structure, whereas actin II filaments resemble canonical F-actin. Both Plasmodium actins hydrolyze ATP more efficiently than α-actin, and unlike any other actin, both parasite actins rapidly form short oligomers induced by ADP. Crystal structures of both isoforms pinpoint several structural changes in the monomers causing the unique polymerization properties. Inserting the canonical D-loop to Plasmodium actin I leads to the formation of long filaments in vitro. In vivo, this chimera restores gametogenesis in parasites lacking actin II, suggesting that stable filaments are required for exflagellation. Together, these data underline the divergence of eukaryotic actins and demonstrate how structural differences in the monomers translate into filaments with different properties, implying that even eukaryotic actins have faced different evolutionary pressures and followed different paths for developing their polymerization properties.

  2. Hamster thecal cells express muscle characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self, D.A.; Schroeder, P.C.; Gown, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Contraction of the follicular wall about the time of ovulation appears to be a coordinated event; however, the cells that mediate it remain poorly studied. We examined the theca externa cells in the wall of hamster follicles for the presence of a functional actomyosin system, both in developing follicles and in culture. We used a monoclonal antibody (HHF35) that recognizes the alpha and gamma isoelectric variants of actin normally found in muscle, but not the beta variant associated with non-muscle sources, to evaluate large preovulatory follicles for actin content and composition. Antibody staining of sectioned ovaries showed intense circumferential reactivity in the outermost wall of developing follicles. Immunoblots from two-dimensional gels of theca externa lysates demonstrated the presence of the two muscle-specific isozymes of actin. Immunofluorescence of cultured follicular cells pulse-labeled with [3H] thymidine (for autoradiographic detection of DNA replication) revealed the presence, in many dividing cells, of actin filaments aligned primarily along the longitudinal axis of the cells. In cultures exposed to the calcium ionophore A23187 (10(-4) M) for varying periods (5 min to 1 h), contraction of many individual muscle-actin-positive cells was observed. Immunofluorescence of these cells, fixed immediately after ionophore-induced contraction, revealed compaction of the actin filaments. Our findings demonstrate that the cells of the theca externa contain muscle actins from an early stage and that these cells are capable of contraction even while proliferating in subconfluent cultures. They suggest that follicular growth may include a naturally occurring developmental sequence in which a contractile cell type proliferates in the differentiated state

  3. Mechanics model for actin-based motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  4. Actin expression in trypanosomatids (Euglenozoa: Kinetoplastea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Ligia Cristina Kalb; Pinho, Rosana Elisa Gonçalves Gonçalves; Lima, Carla Vanessa de Paula; Fragoso, Stênio Perdigão; Soares, Maurilio José

    2013-01-01

    Heteroxenic and monoxenic trypanosomatids were screened for the presence of actin using a mouse polyclonal antibody produced against the entire sequence of the Trypanosoma cruzi actin gene, encoding a 41.9 kDa protein. Western blot analysis showed that this antibody reacted with a polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa in the whole-cell lysates of parasites targeting mammals (T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major), insects (Angomonas deanei, Crithidia fasciculata, Herpetomonas samuelpessoai and Strigomonas culicis) and plants (Phytomonas serpens). A single polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa was detected in the whole-cell lysates of T. cruzi cultured epimastigotes, metacyclic trypomastigotes and amastigotes at similar protein expression levels. Confocal microscopy showed that actin was expressed throughout the cytoplasm of all the tested trypanosomatids. These data demonstrate that actin expression is widespread in trypanosomatids. PMID:23903980

  5. Actin expression in trypanosomatids (Euglenozoa: Kinetoplastea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Cristina Kalb Souza

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Heteroxenic and monoxenic trypanosomatids were screened for the presence of actin using a mouse polyclonal antibody produced against the entire sequence of the Trypanosoma cruzi actin gene, encoding a 41.9 kDa protein. Western blot analysis showed that this antibody reacted with a polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa in the whole-cell lysates of parasites targeting mammals (T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, insects (Angomonas deanei, Crithidia fasciculata, Herpetomonas samuelpessoai and Strigomonas culicis and plants (Phytomonas serpens. A single polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa was detected in the whole-cell lysates of T. cruzi cultured epimastigotes, metacyclic trypomastigotes and amastigotes at similar protein expression levels. Confocal microscopy showed that actin was expressed throughout the cytoplasm of all the tested trypanosomatids. These data demonstrate that actin expression is widespread in trypanosomatids.

  6. Cytoskeletal actin dynamics shape a ramifying actin network underpinning immunological synapse formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzsche, Marco; Fernandes, Ricardo A.; Chang, Veronica T.

    2017-01-01

    optical microscopes to analyze resting and activated T cells, we show that, following contact formation with activating surfaces, these cells sequentially rearrange their cortical actin across the entire cell, creating a previously unreported ramifying actin network above the immunological synapse....... This network shows all the characteristics of an inward-growing transportation network and its dynamics correlating with T cell receptor rearrangements. This actin reorganization is accompanied by an increase in the nanoscale actin meshwork size and the dynamic adjustment of the turnover times and filament...... as well as a central ramified transportation network apparently directed at the consolidation of the contact and the delivery of effector functions....

  7. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto (IBS); (BBRI); (UPENN-MED)

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  8. Integration of linear and dendritic actin nucleation in Nck-induced actin comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borinskaya, Sofya; Velle, Katrina B; Campellone, Kenneth G; Talman, Arthur; Alvarez, Diego; Agaisse, Hervé; Wu, Yi I; Loew, Leslie M; Mayer, Bruce J

    2016-01-15

    The Nck adaptor protein recruits cytosolic effectors such as N-WASP that induce localized actin polymerization. Experimental aggregation of Nck SH3 domains at the membrane induces actin comet tails--dynamic, elongated filamentous actin structures similar to those that drive the movement of microbial pathogens such as vaccinia virus. Here we show that experimental manipulation of the balance between unbranched/branched nucleation altered the morphology and dynamics of Nck-induced actin comets. Inhibition of linear, formin-based nucleation with the small-molecule inhibitor SMIFH2 or overexpression of the formin FH1 domain resulted in formation of predominantly circular-shaped actin structures with low mobility (actin blobs). These results indicate that formin-based linear actin polymerization is critical for the formation and maintenance of Nck-dependent actin comet tails. Consistent with this, aggregation of an exclusively branched nucleation-promoting factor (the VCA domain of N-WASP), with density and turnover similar to those of N-WASP in Nck comets, did not reconstitute dynamic, elongated actin comets. Furthermore, enhancement of branched Arp2/3-mediated nucleation by N-WASP overexpression caused loss of the typical actin comet tail shape induced by Nck aggregation. Thus the ratio of linear to dendritic nucleation activity may serve to distinguish the properties of actin structures induced by various viral and bacterial pathogens. © 2016 Borinskaya et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Resemblance of actin-binding protein/actin gels to covalently crosslinked networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmey, Paul A.; Hvidt, Søren; Lamb, Jennifer; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1990-05-01

    THE maintainance of the shape of cells is often due to their surface elasticity, which arises mainly from an actin-rich cytoplasmic cortex1,2. On locomotion, phagocytosis or fission, however, these cells become partially fluid-like. The finding of proteins that can bind to actin and control the assembly of, or crosslink, actin filaments, and of intracellular messages that regulate the activities of some of these actin-binding proteins, indicates that such 'gel sol' transformations result from the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich networks3. Alternatively, on the basis of a study of the mechanical properties of mixtures of actin filaments and an Acanthamoeba actin-binding protein, α-actinin, it has been proposed that these transformations can be accounted for by rapid exchange of crosslinks between actin filaments4: the cortical network would be solid when the deformation rate is greater than the rate of crosslink exchange, but would deform or 'creep' when deformation is slow enough to permit crosslinker molecules to rearrange. Here we report, however, that mixtures of actin filaments and actin-binding protein (ABP), an actin crosslinking protein of many higher eukaryotes, form gels Theologically equivalent to covalently crosslinked networks. These gels do not creep in response to applied stress on a time scale compatible with most cell-surface movements. These findings support a more complex and controlled mechanism underlying the dynamic mechanical properties of cortical cytoplasm, and can explain why cells do not collapse under the constant shear forces that often exist in tissues.

  10. Rac1 signalling towards GLUT4/glucose uptake in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiu, Tim T; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Sylow, Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Small Rho family GTPases are important regulators of cellular traffic. Emerging evidence now implicates Rac1 and Rac-dependent actin reorganisation in insulin-induced recruitment of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) to the cell surface of muscle cells and mature skeletal muscle. This review summarises...... the current thinking on the regulation of Rac1 by insulin, the role of Rac-dependent cortical actin remodelling in GLUT4 traffic, and the impact of Rac1 towards insulin resistance in skeletal muscle....

  11. Role of cyclic nucleotide-dependent actin cytoskeletal dynamics:Ca(2+](i and force suppression in forskolin-pretreated porcine coronary arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M Hocking

    Full Text Available Initiation of force generation during vascular smooth muscle contraction involves a rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+]i and phosphorylation of myosin light chains (MLC. However, reversal of these two processes alone does not account for the force inhibition that occurs during relaxation or inhibition of contraction, implicating that other mechanisms, such as actin cytoskeletal rearrangement, play a role in the suppression of force. In this study, we hypothesize that forskolin-induced force suppression is dependent upon changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. To focus on the actin cytoskeletal changes, a physiological model was developed in which forskolin treatment of intact porcine coronary arteries (PCA prior to treatment with a contractile agonist resulted in complete suppression of force. Pretreatment of PCA with forskolin suppressed histamine-induced force generation but did not abolish [Ca(2+]i rise or MLC phosphorylation. Additionally, forskolin pretreatment reduced filamentous actin in histamine-treated tissues, and prevented histamine-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory proteins HSP20, VASP, cofilin, and paxillin. Taken together, these results suggest that forskolin-induced complete force suppression is dependent upon the actin cytoskeletal regulation initiated by the phosphorylation changes of the actin regulatory proteins and not on the MLC dephosphorylation. This model of complete force suppression can be employed to further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for smooth muscle tone, and may offer cues to pathological situations, such as hypertension and vasospasm.

  12. Connecdenn 3/DENND1C binds actin linking Rab35 activation to the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marat, Andrea L; Ioannou, Maria S; McPherson, Peter S

    2012-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab35 regulates endosomal membrane trafficking but also recruits effectors that modulate actin assembly and organization. Differentially expressed in normal and neoplastic cells (DENN)-domain proteins are a newly identified class of Rab guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that are grouped into eight families, each activating a common Rab. The members of one family, connecdenn 1-3/DENND1A-C, are all GEFs for Rab35. Why Rab35 requires multiple GEFs is unknown. We demonstrate that connecdenn 3 uses a unique C-terminal motif, a feature not found in connecdenn 1 or 2, to directly bind actin. This interaction couples Rab35 activation to the actin cytoskeleton, resulting in dramatic changes in cell shape, notably the formation of protrusive membrane extensions. These alterations are specific to Rab35 activated by connecdenn 3 and require both the actin-binding motif and N-terminal DENN domain, which harbors the GEF activity. It was previously demonstrated that activated Rab35 recruits the actin-bundling protein fascin to actin, but the relevant GEF for this activity was unknown. We demonstrate that connecdenn 3 and Rab35 colocalize with fascin and actin filaments, suggesting that connecdenn 3 is the relevant GEF. Thus, whereas connecdenn 1 and 2 activate Rab35 for endosomal trafficking, connecdenn 3 uniquely activates Rab35 for its role in actin regulation.

  13. Separation of actin-dependent and actin-independent lipid rafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klappe, Karin; Hummel, Ina; Kok, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been isolated on the basis of their resistance to various detergents and more recently by using detergent-free procedures. The actin cytoskeleton is now recognized as a dynamic regulator of lipid raft stability. We carefully analyzed the effects of the cortical actin-disrupting

  14. Green fluorescent protein-mtalin causes defects in actin organization and cell expansion in Arabidopsis and inhibits actin depolymerizing factor's actin depolymerizing activity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Anthony, R.G.; Hussey, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to an actin binding domain is a commonly used method for live cell imaging of the actin cytoskeleton. One of these chimeric proteins is GFP-mTalin (GFP fused to the actin binding domain of mouse talin). Although it has been demonstrated that

  15. EZH2-mediated α-actin methylation needs lncRNA TUG1, and promotes the cortex cytoskeleton formation in VSMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Kong, Peng; Zhang, Fan; Shu, Ya-Nan; Nie, Xi; Dong, Li-Hua; Lin, Yan-Ling; Xie, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Li-Li; Zhang, Xiang-Jian; Han, Mei

    2017-06-15

    Recent studies have revealed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) participate in vascular homeostasis and pathophysiological conditions development. But still very few literatures elucidate the regulatory mechanism of non-coding RNAs in this biological process. Here we identified lncRNA taurine up-regulated gene 1 (TUG1) in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and got 4612bp nucleotide sequence. The expression level of TUG1 RNA was increased in synthetic VSMCs by real-time PCR analysis. Meanwhile, the expression of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) (TUG1 binding protein) increased in cytoplasm of VSMCs under the same conditions. Immunofluoresce analysis displayed the colocalization of EZH2 with α-actin in cytoplasm and F-actin in cell edge ruffles. This leads us to hypothesize the existence of cytoplasmic TUG1/EZH2/α-actin complex. Using RNA pull down assay, we found that TUG1 interacted with both EZH2 and α-actin. Disruption of TUG1 abolished the interaction of EZH2 with α-actin, and accelerated depolymerization of F-actin in VSMCs. Based on EZH2 methyltransferase activity and the potential methylation sites in α-actin structure, we revealed that α-actin was lysine-methylated. Furthermore, the methylation of α-actin was inhibited by knockdown of TUG1. In conclusion, these findings partly suggested that EZH2-mediated methylation of α-actin may be dependent on TUG1, and thereby promotes cortex F-actin polymerization in synthetic VSMCs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Glutamyl phosphate is an activated intermediate in actin crosslinking by actin crosslinking domain (ACD toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kudryashova

    Full Text Available Actin Crosslinking Domain (ACD is produced by several life-threatening Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria as part of larger toxins and delivered into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic host cells via Type I or Type VI secretion systems. Upon delivery, ACD disrupts the actin cytoskeleton by catalyzing intermolecular amide bond formation between E270 and K50 residues of actin, leading to the formation of polymerization-deficient actin oligomers. Ultimately, accumulation of the crosslinked oligomers results in structural and functional failure of the actin cytoskeleton in affected cells. In the present work, we advanced in our understanding of the ACD catalytic mechanism by discovering that the enzyme transfers the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP to the E270 actin residue, resulting in the formation of an activated acyl phosphate intermediate. This intermediate is further hydrolyzed and the energy of hydrolysis is utilized for the formation of the amide bond between actin subunits. We also determined the pH optimum for the reaction and the kinetic parameters of ACD catalysis for its substrates, ATP and actin. ACD showed sigmoidal, non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics for actin (K(0.5 = 30 µM reflecting involvement of two actin molecules in a single crosslinking event. We established that ACD can also utilize Mg(2+-GTP to support crosslinking, but the kinetic parameters (K(M = 8 µM and 50 µM for ATP and GTP, respectively suggest that ATP is the primary substrate of ACD in vivo. The optimal pH for ACD activity was in the range of 7.0-9.0. The elucidated kinetic mechanism of ACD toxicity adds to understanding of complex network of host-pathogen interactions.

  17. Glutamyl phosphate is an activated intermediate in actin crosslinking by actin crosslinking domain (ACD) toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashova, Elena; Kalda, Caitlin; Kudryashov, Dmitri S

    2012-01-01

    Actin Crosslinking Domain (ACD) is produced by several life-threatening Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria as part of larger toxins and delivered into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic host cells via Type I or Type VI secretion systems. Upon delivery, ACD disrupts the actin cytoskeleton by catalyzing intermolecular amide bond formation between E270 and K50 residues of actin, leading to the formation of polymerization-deficient actin oligomers. Ultimately, accumulation of the crosslinked oligomers results in structural and functional failure of the actin cytoskeleton in affected cells. In the present work, we advanced in our understanding of the ACD catalytic mechanism by discovering that the enzyme transfers the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP to the E270 actin residue, resulting in the formation of an activated acyl phosphate intermediate. This intermediate is further hydrolyzed and the energy of hydrolysis is utilized for the formation of the amide bond between actin subunits. We also determined the pH optimum for the reaction and the kinetic parameters of ACD catalysis for its substrates, ATP and actin. ACD showed sigmoidal, non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics for actin (K(0.5) = 30 µM) reflecting involvement of two actin molecules in a single crosslinking event. We established that ACD can also utilize Mg(2+)-GTP to support crosslinking, but the kinetic parameters (K(M) = 8 µM and 50 µM for ATP and GTP, respectively) suggest that ATP is the primary substrate of ACD in vivo. The optimal pH for ACD activity was in the range of 7.0-9.0. The elucidated kinetic mechanism of ACD toxicity adds to understanding of complex network of host-pathogen interactions.

  18. Antibodies to actin in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritzmann Mathias

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA, autoreactive antibodies directed against red blood cells are up-regulated, leading to erythrocyte death. Mycoplasma suis infections in pigs induce AIHA of both the warm and cold types. The aim of this study was to identify the target autoantigens of warm autoreactive IgG antibodies. Sera from experimentally M. suis-infected pigs were screened for autoreactivity. Results Actin-reactive antibodies were found in the sera of 95% of all animals tested. The reactivity was species-specific, i.e. reactivity with porcine actin was significantly higher than with rabbit actin. Sera of animals previously immunised with the M. suis adhesion protein MSG1 showed reactivity with actin prior to infection with M. suis indicating that molecular mimicry is involved in the specific autoreactive mechanism. A potentially cross-reactive epitope was detected. Conclusions This is the first report of autoreactive anti-actin antibodies involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

  19. Design and evaluation of Actichip, a thematic microarray for the study of the actin cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalmel Frédéric

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in supporting and regulating numerous cellular processes. Mutations or alterations in the expression levels affecting the actin cytoskeleton system or related regulatory mechanisms are often associated with complex diseases such as cancer. Understanding how qualitative or quantitative changes in expression of the set of actin cytoskeleton genes are integrated to control actin dynamics and organisation is currently a challenge and should provide insights in identifying potential targets for drug discovery. Here we report the development of a dedicated microarray, the Actichip, containing 60-mer oligonucleotide probes for 327 genes selected for transcriptome analysis of the human actin cytoskeleton. Results Genomic data and sequence analysis features were retrieved from GenBank and stored in an integrative database called Actinome. From these data, probes were designed using a home-made program (CADO4MI allowing sequence refinement and improved probe specificity by combining the complementary information recovered from the UniGene and RefSeq databases. Actichip performance was analysed by hybridisation with RNAs extracted from epithelial MCF-7 cells and human skeletal muscle. Using thoroughly standardised procedures, we obtained microarray images with excellent quality resulting in high data reproducibility. Actichip displayed a large dynamic range extending over three logs with a limit of sensitivity between one and ten copies of transcript per cell. The array allowed accurate detection of small changes in gene expression and reliable classification of samples based on the expression profiles of tissue-specific genes. When compared to two other oligonucleotide microarray platforms, Actichip showed similar sensitivity and concordant expression ratios. Moreover, Actichip was able to discriminate the highly similar actin isoforms whereas the two other platforms did not. Conclusion Our

  20. Selective, retrieval-independent disruption of methamphetamine-associated memory by actin depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erica J; Aceti, Massimiliano; Griggs, Erica M; Fuchs, Rita A; Zigmond, Zachary; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A

    2014-01-15

    Memories associated with drugs of abuse, such as methamphetamine (METH), increase relapse vulnerability to substance use disorder. There is a growing consensus that memory is supported by structural and functional plasticity driven by F-actin polymerization in postsynaptic dendritic spines at excitatory synapses. However, the mechanisms responsible for the long-term maintenance of memories, after consolidation has occurred, are largely unknown. Conditioned place preference (n = 112) and context-induced reinstatement of self-administration (n = 19) were used to assess the role of F-actin polymerization and myosin II, a molecular motor that drives memory-promoting dendritic spine actin polymerization, in the maintenance of METH-associated memories and related structural plasticity. Memories formed through association with METH but not associations with foot shock or food reward were disrupted by a highly-specific actin cycling inhibitor when infused into the amygdala during the postconsolidation maintenance phase. This selective effect of depolymerization on METH-associated memory was immediate, persistent, and did not depend upon retrieval or strength of the association. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II also resulted in a disruption of METH-associated memory. Thus, drug-associated memories seem to be actively maintained by a unique form of cycling F-actin driven by myosin II. This finding provides a potential therapeutic approach for the selective treatment of unwanted memories associated with psychiatric disorders that is both selective and does not rely on retrieval of the memory. The results further suggest that memory maintenance depends upon the preservation of polymerized actin. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Design and evaluation of Actichip, a thematic microarray for the study of the actin cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jean; Mehlen, André; Vetter, Guillaume; Yatskou, Mikalai; Muller, Arnaud; Chalmel, Frédéric; Poch, Olivier; Friederich, Evelyne; Vallar, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in supporting and regulating numerous cellular processes. Mutations or alterations in the expression levels affecting the actin cytoskeleton system or related regulatory mechanisms are often associated with complex diseases such as cancer. Understanding how qualitative or quantitative changes in expression of the set of actin cytoskeleton genes are integrated to control actin dynamics and organisation is currently a challenge and should provide insights in identifying potential targets for drug discovery. Here we report the development of a dedicated microarray, the Actichip, containing 60-mer oligonucleotide probes for 327 genes selected for transcriptome analysis of the human actin cytoskeleton. Results Genomic data and sequence analysis features were retrieved from GenBank and stored in an integrative database called Actinome. From these data, probes were designed using a home-made program (CADO4MI) allowing sequence refinement and improved probe specificity by combining the complementary information recovered from the UniGene and RefSeq databases. Actichip performance was analysed by hybridisation with RNAs extracted from epithelial MCF-7 cells and human skeletal muscle. Using thoroughly standardised procedures, we obtained microarray images with excellent quality resulting in high data reproducibility. Actichip displayed a large dynamic range extending over three logs with a limit of sensitivity between one and ten copies of transcript per cell. The array allowed accurate detection of small changes in gene expression and reliable classification of samples based on the expression profiles of tissue-specific genes. When compared to two other oligonucleotide microarray platforms, Actichip showed similar sensitivity and concordant expression ratios. Moreover, Actichip was able to discriminate the highly similar actin isoforms whereas the two other platforms did not. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that

  2. Nuclear Actin and Lamins in Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulka, Jakub; Fraiberk, Martin; Forstova, Jitka

    2012-01-01

    Lamins are the best characterized cytoskeletal components of the cell nucleus that help to maintain the nuclear shape and participate in diverse nuclear processes including replication or transcription. Nuclear actin is now widely accepted to be another cytoskeletal protein present in the nucleus that fulfills important functions in the gene expression. Some viruses replicating in the nucleus evolved the ability to interact with and probably utilize nuclear actin for their replication, e.g., for the assembly and transport of capsids or mRNA export. On the other hand, lamins play a role in the propagation of other viruses since nuclear lamina may represent a barrier for virions entering or escaping the nucleus. This review will summarize the current knowledge about the roles of nuclear actin and lamins in viral infections. PMID:22590674

  3. HIV infection of T cells: actin-in and actin-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Belkina, Natalya V; Shaw, Stephen

    2009-04-14

    Three studies shed light on the decade-old observation that the actin cytoskeleton is hijacked to facilitate entry of HIV into its target cells. Polymerization of actin is required to assemble high concentrations of CD4 and CXCR4 at the plasma membrane, which promote viral binding and entry in both the simple model of infection by free virus and the more physiologically relevant route of infection through the virological synapse. Three types of actin-interacting proteins-filamin, ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM), and cofilin-are now shown to play critical roles in this process. Filamin binds to both CD4 and CXCR4 in a manner promoted by signaling of the HIV gp120 glycoprotein. ERM proteins attach actin filaments to the membrane and may promote polymerization of actin. Early in the process of viral entry, cofilin is inactivated, which is proposed to facilitate the early assembly of actin filaments, but cofilin is reported to be activated soon thereafter to facilitate postentry events. This complex role of cofilin may help to reconcile the paradox that actin polymerization promotes initial binding and fusion steps but inhibits some subsequent early postentry events.

  4. The role of actin and myosin during spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Kovacs, Tamas; Hu, Yan-Jun; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2011-08-01

    Spermatogenesis is a transitionary process in which the diploid spermatogonia transform into haploid mature spermatozoa. Actin and myosin have been implicated in various aspects during spermatogenesis. Actin is present in the form of monomer, oligomer and polymer within cells, the latter is called microfilament. There are five actin-containing structures during spermatogenesis, i.e., ectoplasmic specialization, acroplaxome, manchette in mammals, actin cones in Drosophila and acroframosome in Caridean shrimp. They are involved in the shaping and differentiating of spermatids. Along with spermatogenesis, the actin cytoskeletons show active remodeling in this process. Some actin binding or actin regulated proteins have been demonstrated to regulate dynamic changes of the actin-containing structures. Myosin, actin-dependent molecular motor, plays an important role during spermatogenesis, such as involving in acrosome biogenesis, vesicle transport, gene transcription and nuclear shaping. The actin cytoskeleton and actin binding/regulated proteins cooperate to facilitate spermatogenesis. In this review, we summarize the existing knowledge about the cytoskeletal structures consisting of actin, actin binding/regulated proteins and myosin during spermatogenesis.

  5. Nucleotide exchange and rheometric studies with F-actin prepared from ATP- or ADP-monomeric actin

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, J.; Zaner, K.S.; Schick, K.L.; Gershman, L.C.; Selden, L.A.; Kinosian, H.J.; Travis, J.L.; Estes, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been reported that polymer actin made from monomer containing ATP (ATP-actin) differed in EM appearance and rheological characteristics from polymer made from ADP-containing monomers (ADP-actin). Further, it was postulated that the ATP-actin polymer was more rigid due to storage of the energy released by ATP hydrolysis during polymerization (Janmey et al. 1990. Nature 347:95-99). Electron micrographs of our preparations of ADP-actin and ATP-actin polymers show no major differe...

  6. Anti-actin IgA antibodies in severe coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, A; Muratori, P; Cassani, F; Pappas, G; Muratori, L; Agostinelli, D; Veronesi, L; Bortolotti, R; Petrolini, N; Bianchi, F B; Volta, U

    2004-08-01

    Anti-actin IgA antibodies have been found in sera of coeliacs. Our aim was to define the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-actin IgA in coeliacs before and after gluten withdrawal. One hundred and two biopsy-proven coeliacs, 95 disease controls and 50 blood donors were studied. Anti-actin IgA were evaluated by different methods: (a) antimicrofilament positivity on HEp-2 cells and on cultured fibroblasts by immunofluorescence; (b) anti-actin positivity by enzyme-linked immuosorbent assay (ELISA); and (c) presence of the tubular/glomerular pattern of anti-smooth muscle antibodies on rat kidney sections by immunofluorescence. Antimicrofilament IgA were present in 27% of coeliacs and in none of the controls. Antimicrofilament antibodies were found in 25 of 54 (46%) coeliacs with severe villous atrophy and in three of 48 (6%) with mild damage (P < 0.0001). In the 20 patients tested, antimicrofilaments IgA disappeared after gluten withdrawal in accordance with histological recovery. Our study shows a significant correlation between antimicrofilament IgA and the severity of intestinal damage in untreated coeliacs. The disappearance of antimicrofilament IgA after gluten withdrawal predicts the normalization of intestinal mucosa and could be considered a useful tool in the follow-up of severe coeliac disease.

  7. Towards the Structure Determination of a Modulated Protein Crystal: The Semicrystalline State of Profilin:Actin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, G.; Lovelace, J.; Snell, E. H.; Bellamy, H.

    2003-01-01

    microfilament system to be restructured in a controlled manner via polymerization, depolymerization, severing, cross-linking, and anchorage. The structure the semicrystalline state of profilin:actin will challenge and validate current models of muscle contraction and cell motility. The methodology and theory under development will be easily extendable to other systems.

  8. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    regulating stretch-stimulated glucose transport is not well understood. We recently reported that the actin cytoskeleton regulating GTPase, Rac1 was activated in mouse muscle in response to stretching. Rac1 is a regulator of contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose transport but its role in stretch......-stimulated glucose transport and signaling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton...... in isolated soleus and EDL muscles. In addition, Rac1's role in contraction-stimulated glucose transport during conditions without mechanical load on the muscles was evaluated in loosely hanging muscles and muscles in which crossbridge formation was blocked by the myosin ATPase inhibitors BTS and Blebbistatin...

  9. Actin dynamics and the elasticity of cytoskeletal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The structural integrity of a cell depends on its cytoskeleton, which includes an actin network. This network is transient and depends upon the continual polymerization and depolymerization of actin. The degradation of an actin network, and a corresponding reduction in cell stiffness, can indicate the presence of disease. Numerical simulations will be invaluable for understanding the physics of these systems and the correlation between actin dynamics and elasticity. Here we develop a model that is capable of generating actin network structures. In particular, we develop a model of actin dynamics which considers the polymerization, depolymerization, nucleation, severing, and capping of actin filaments. The structures obtained are then fed directly into a mechanical model. This allows us to qualitatively assess the effects of changing various parameters associated with actin dynamics on the elasticity of the material.

  10. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PALLADIN’S ACTIN BINDING DOMAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Moriah R.; Dixon, Richard D.S.; Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Murphy, Grant S.; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Beam, Matthew T.; Srinath, Pavan; Patel, Julie; Mohiuddin, Jahan; Otey, Carol A.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the NMR structure of the actin-binding domain contained in the cell adhesion protein palladin. Previously we demonstrated that one of the immunoglobulin domains of palladin (Ig3) is both necessary and sufficient for direct F-actin binding in vitro. In this study, we identify two basic patches on opposite faces of Ig3 that are critical for actin binding and crosslinking. Sedimentation equilibrium assays indicate that the Ig3 domain of palladin does not self-associate. These combined data are consistent with an actin crosslinking mechanism that involves concurrent attachment of two actin filaments by a single palladin molecule by an electrostatic mechanism. Palladin mutations that disrupt actin binding show altered cellular distributions and morphology of actin in cells, revealing a functional requirement for the interaction between palladin and actin in vivo. PMID:23806659

  11. Prostaglandins temporally regulate cytoplasmic actin bundle formation during Drosophila oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Andrew J.; Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Chen, Xiang; Spracklen, Cassandra N.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs)—lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes—regulate actin dynamics in cell culture and platelets, but their roles during development are largely unknown. Here we define a new role for Pxt, the Drosophila COX-like enzyme, in regulating the actin cytoskeleton—temporal restriction of actin remodeling during oogenesis. PGs are required for actin filament bundle formation during stage 10B (S10B). In addition, loss of Pxt results in extensive early actin remodeling, including actin filaments and aggregates, within the posterior nurse cells of S9 follicles; wild-type follicles exhibit similar structures at a low frequency. Hu li tai shao (Hts-RC) and Villin (Quail), an actin bundler, localize to all early actin structures, whereas Enabled (Ena), an actin elongation factor, preferentially localizes to those in pxt mutants. Reduced Ena levels strongly suppress early actin remodeling in pxt mutants. Furthermore, loss of Pxt results in reduced Ena localization to the sites of bundle formation during S10B. Together these data lead to a model in which PGs temporally regulate actin remodeling during Drosophila oogenesis by controlling Ena localization/activity, such that in S9, PG signaling inhibits, whereas at S10B, it promotes Ena-dependent actin remodeling. PMID:24284900

  12. ACTIN BINDING PROTEIN 29 from Lilium pollen plays an important role in dynamic actin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yun; Huang, Xi; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Qinwen; Hussey, Patrick J; Ren, Haiyun

    2007-06-01

    Villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily proteins have been shown to function in tip-growing plant cells. However, genes encoding gelsolin/fragmin do not exist in the Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa) databases, and it is possible that these proteins are encoded by villin mRNA splicing variants. We cloned a 1006-bp full-length cDNA from Lilium longiflorum that encodes a 263-amino acid predicted protein sharing 100% identity with the N terminus of 135-ABP (Lilium villin) except for six C-terminal amino acids. The deduced 29-kD protein, Lilium ACTIN BINDING PROTEIN29 (ABP29), contains only the G1 and G2 domains and is the smallest identified member of the villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily. The purified recombinant ABP29 accelerates actin nucleation, blocks barbed ends, and severs actin filaments in a Ca(2+)- and/or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-regulated manner in vitro. Microinjection of the protein into stamen hair cells disrupted transvacuolar strands whose backbone is mainly actin filament bundles. Transient expression of ABP29 by microprojectile bombardment of lily pollen resulted in actin filament fragmentation and inhibited pollen germination and tube growth. Our results suggest that ABP29 is a splicing variant of Lilium villin and a member of the villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily, which plays important roles in rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton during pollen germination and tube growth.

  13. Actin, actin-related proteins and profilin in diatoms: a comparative genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumeier, Charlotte; Polinski, Ellen; Menzel, Diedrik

    2015-10-01

    Diatoms are heterokont unicellular algae with a widespread distribution throughout all aquatic habitats. Research on diatoms has advanced significantly over the last decade due to available genetic transformation methods and publicly available genome databases. Yet up to now, proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton in diatoms are largely unknown. Consequently, this work focuses on actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs) encoded in the diatom genomes of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Thalassiosira oceanica, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries. Our comparative genomic study revealed that most diatoms possess only a single conventional actin and a small set of ARPs. Among these are the highly conserved cytoplasmic Arp1 protein and the nuclear Arp4 as well as Arp6. Diatom genomes contain genes coding for two structurally different homologues of Arp4 that might serve specific functions. All diatom species examined here lack ARP2 and ARP3 proteins, suggesting that diatoms are not capable of forming the Arp2/3 complex, which is essential in most eukaryotes for actin filament branching and plus-end dynamics. Interestingly, none of the sequenced representatives of the Bacillariophyta phylum code for profilin. Profilin is an essential actin-binding protein regulating the monomer actin pool and is involved in filament plus-end dynamics. This is the first report of organisms not containing profilin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Tailor-made ezrin actin binding domain to probe its interaction with actin in-vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Shrivastava

    Full Text Available Ezrin, a member of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin protein family, is an Actin-plasma membrane linker protein mediating cellular integrity and function. In-vivo study of such interactions is a complex task due to the presence of a large number of endogenous binding partners for both Ezrin and Actin. Further, C-terminal actin binding capacity of the full length Ezrin is naturally shielded by its N-terminal, and only rendered active in the presence of Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 or phosphorylation at the C-terminal threonine. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the design, expression and purification of constructs, combining the Ezrin C-terminal actin binding domain, with functional elements such as fusion tags and fluorescence tags to facilitate purification and fluorescence microscopy based studies. For the first time, internal His tag was employed for purification of Ezrin actin binding domain based on in-silico modeling. The functionality (Ezrin-actin interaction of these constructs was successfully demonstrated by using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy. This design can be extended to other members of the ERM family as well.

  15. The origin and evolution of green algal and plant actins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, S S; Möpps, B; Weber, K; Bhattacharya, D

    1999-02-01

    The Viridiplantae are subdivided into two groups: the Chlorophyta, which includes the Chlorophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Prasinophyceae; and the Streptophyta, which includes the Charophyceae and all land plants. Within the Streptophyta, the actin genes of the angiosperms diverge nearly simultaneously from each other before the separation of monocots and dicots. Previous evolutionary analyses have provided limited insights into the gene duplications that have produced these complex gene families. We address the origin and diversification of land plant actin genes by studying the phylogeny of actins within the green algae, ferns, and fern allies. Partial genomic sequences or cDNAs encoding actin were characterized from Cosmarium botrytis (Zygnematales), Selaginella apoda (Selaginellales), Anemia phyllitidis (Polypodiales), and Psilotum triquetrum (Psilotales). Selaginella contains at least two actin genes. One sequence (Ac2) diverges within a group of fern sequences that also includes the Psilotum Ac1 actin gene and one gymnosperm sequence (Cycas revoluta Cyc3). This clade is positioned outside of the angiosperm actin gene radiation. The second Selaginella sequence (Ac1) is the sister to all remaining land plant actin sequences, although the internal branches in this portion of the tree are very short. Use of complete actin-coding regions in phylogenetic analyses provides support for the separation of angiosperm actins into two classes. N-terminal "signature" sequence analyses support these groupings. One class (VEG) includes actin genes that are often expressed in vegetative structures. The second class (REP) includes actin genes that trace their ancestry within the vegetative actins and contains members that are largely expressed in reproductive structures. Analysis of intron positions within actin genes shows that sequences from both Selaginella and Cosmarium contain the conserved 20-3, 152-1, and 356-3 introns found in many members of the

  16. Prevalence and phenotypes of congenital myopathy due to α-actin 1 gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Werlauff, Ulla; Duno, Morten

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Congenital myopathy due to mutations in the α-actin 1 gene (ACTA1) was identified in 1999, but knowledge of prevalence and phenotype in patients who survive 5 years is lacking. METHODS: A national cohort of 91 patients aged ≥5 years and diagnosed with congenital myopathy was assessed...... for ACTA1 mutations and investigated clinically. RESULTS: Four patients with ACTA1 mutations were identified, yielding a prevalence of 4.4%. Patients were 10-23 years of age, and all but 1 were ambulatory. Vital capacity ranged from 47% to 70% predicted, and 1 patient needed nocturnal bi-level positive...... airway pressure. Limb flexor/extensor muscles and upper and lower extremities were affected equally. Pronounced neck flexor weakness was noted. CONCLUSIONS: Congenital myopathy caused by ACTA1 mutations is fatal in infancy in most cases. This study shows that the prevalence of α-actin myopathy in older...

  17. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  18. Role of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in the development of hepatic fibrosis in cats with polycystic kidney disease (PKD)

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksić-Kovačević Sanja; Kukolj V.; Kureljušić B.; Marinković D.; Knežević Đ.; Ignjatović I.; Jovanović M.; Knežević Milijana; Gledić D.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a significant role in hepatic fibrogenesis. In the following study we described the distribution of cells that express alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin in the cat liver with various degrees of fibrosis, as well as the significance of hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts in the genesis of fibrosis in cats with polycistic kidney disease. Liver samples from 15 necropsied Persian cats were examined microscopically, using H and E and Masso...

  19. Disassembly of the actin network inhibits insulin-dependent stimulation of glucose transport and prevents recruitment of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, T; Vranic, M; Klip, A

    1994-11-25

    In muscle and fat tissues, insulin stimulates glucose transport through the translocation of glucose transporter proteins from an intracellular storage pool to the plasma membrane. The mechanism of this translocation is unknown. We have examined the possible role of the actin microfilament network in the stimulation of glucose transport by insulin and on the distribution of glucose transporters, in differentiated L6 rat skeletal muscle cells. Insulin (10(-7) M for 30 min) caused a major reorganization of the actin network of differentiated L6 myotubes. Cytochalasin D, a widely used inhibitor of actin filament formation, caused a dose- and time-dependent disassembly of the actin network, which was associated with an 80% inhibition of the insulin stimulation of glucose transport, without affecting the basal rate of glucose uptake. L6 myotubes express three glucose transporter isoforms, named GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. Disassembly of the actin network by cytochalasin D did not affect the number of basal glucose transporters in the plasma membrane but reduced the content of all three glucose transporters in intracellular membranes and prevented their appearance at the plasma membrane response to insulin. The inhibitory effect of cytochalasin D treatment on the insulin stimulation of glucose transport occurred downstream of tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 and of binding of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to the insulin receptor substrate-1. Using immunoprecipitation of intact membranes, we detected specific association of the actin-binding protein spectrin with GLUT4 glucose transporter-containing vesicles. We conclude that an intact actin network is required for the correct intracellular localization of glucose transporters, as well as for their incorporation into the plasma membrane in response to insulin. A direct interaction may exist between the actin network and the glucose transporter vesicles which may be mediated through a spectrin

  20. Antibodies to filamentous actin (F-actin) in type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, A; Muratori, L; Muratori, P; Pappas, G; Guidi, M; Cassani, F; Volta, U; Ferri, A; Lenzi, M; Bianchi, F B

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic significance of anti-filamentous actin antibodies (A-FAA) assessed with a commercial ELISA in comparison with immunofluorescence reactivity and patterns of anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMA); and to correlate A-FAA positivity with clinical, immunogenetic, laboratory, and histological features in patients with autoimmune hepatitis type 1 (AIH-1). We studied 78 consecutive untreated AIH-1 patients and 160 controls: 22 with autoimmune hepatitis type 2 (AIH-2), 51 with hepatitis C, 17 with coeliac disease (CD), 20 with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and 50 blood donors. SMA was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on frozen sections of rat tissues, and A-FAA with a modified commercial ELISA. SMA was detected by IIF in 61 (78%) of 78 AIH-1 patients, of whom 47 (60%) had the SMA-T/G and 14 (18%) the SMA-V pattern. Of the pathological controls, 32 (20%) had the SMA-V pattern (25 with hepatitis C, 2 with AIH-2, 2 with PBC, 3 with CD). A-FAA were present in 55 AIH-1 patients (70.5%; 46 with SMA-T/G, 7 with SMA-V, and 2 SMA-negative), and in 10 controls (6%), of whom five had hepatitis C, two AIH-2, two PBC and one CD. The association between A-FAA and the SMA-T/G pattern was statistically significant (p<0.0001). A-FAA levels were higher in SMA-T/G positive than SMA-V positive AIH-1 patients and controls (p<0.0001). A-FAA positivity was significantly associated with higher gamma-globulin and IgG levels, but did not correlate with other considered parameters. The modified A-FAA ELISA strictly correlates with the SMA-T/G pattern and is a reliable and operator independent assay for AIH-1. Detection of A-FAA, even if devoid of prognostic relevance, may be useful when interpretative doubts of standard IIF arise.

  1. Antibodies to filamentous actin (F‐actin) in type 1 autoimmune hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, A; Muratori, L; Muratori, P; Pappas, G; Guidi, M; Cassani, F; Volta, U; Ferri, A; Lenzi, M; Bianchi, F B

    2006-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the diagnostic significance of anti‐filamentous actin antibodies (A‐FAA) assessed with a commercial ELISA in comparison with immunofluorescence reactivity and patterns of anti‐smooth muscle antibodies (SMA); and to correlate A‐FAA positivity with clinical, immunogenetic, laboratory, and histological features in patients with autoimmune hepatitis type 1 (AIH‐1). Methods We studied 78 consecutive untreated AIH‐1 patients and 160 controls: 22 with autoimmune hepatitis type 2 (AIH‐2), 51 with hepatitis C, 17 with coeliac disease (CD), 20 with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and 50 blood donors. SMA was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on frozen sections of rat tissues, and A‐FAA with a modified commercial ELISA. Results SMA was detected by IIF in 61 (78%) of 78 AIH‐1 patients, of whom 47 (60%) had the SMA‐T/G and 14 (18%) the SMA‐V pattern. Of the pathological controls, 32 (20%) had the SMA‐V pattern (25 with hepatitis C, 2 with AIH‐2, 2 with PBC, 3 with CD). A‐FAA were present in 55 AIH‐1 patients (70.5%; 46 with SMA‐T/G, 7 with SMA‐V, and 2 SMA‐negative), and in 10 controls (6%), of whom five had hepatitis C, two AIH‐2, two PBC and one CD. The association between A‐FAA and the SMA‐T/G pattern was statistically significant (p<0.0001). A‐FAA levels were higher in SMA‐T/G positive than SMA‐V positive AIH‐1 patients and controls (p<0.0001). A‐FAA positivity was significantly associated with higher γ‐globulin and IgG levels, but did not correlate with other considered parameters. Conclusion The modified A‐FAA ELISA strictly correlates with the SMA‐T/G pattern and is a reliable and operator independent assay for AIH‐1. Detection of A‐FAA, even if devoid of prognostic relevance, may be useful when interpretative doubts of standard IIF arise. PMID:16505279

  2. Evaluation of muscle function of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo and tibialis anterior muscle in situ in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Nalinda B; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-02-09

    Body movements are mainly provided by mechanical function of skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle is composed of numerous bundles of myofibers that are sheathed by intramuscular connective tissues. Each myofiber contains many myofibrils that run longitudinally along the length of the myofiber. Myofibrils are the contractile apparatus of muscle and they are composed of repeated contractile units known as sarcomeres. A sarcomere unit contains actin and myosin filaments that are spaced by the Z discs and titin protein. Mechanical function of skeletal muscle is defined by the contractile and passive properties of muscle. The contractile properties are used to characterize the amount of force generated during muscle contraction, time of force generation and time of muscle relaxation. Any factor that affects muscle contraction (such as interaction between actin and myosin filaments, homeostasis of calcium, ATP/ADP ratio, etc.) influences the contractile properties. The passive properties refer to the elastic and viscous properties (stiffness and viscosity) of the muscle in the absence of contraction. These properties are determined by the extracellular and the intracellular structural components (such as titin) and connective tissues (mainly collagen) (1-2). The contractile and passive properties are two inseparable aspects of muscle function. For example, elbow flexion is accomplished by contraction of muscles in the anterior compartment of the upper arm and passive stretch of muscles in the posterior compartment of the upper arm. To truly understand muscle function, both contractile and passive properties should be studied. The contractile and/or passive mechanical properties of muscle are often compromised in muscle diseases. A good example is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle wasting disease caused by dystrophin deficiency (3). Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the muscle cell membrane (sarcolemma) during muscle contraction (4). In the

  3. PI(3,5)P2 controls endosomal branched actin dynamics by regulating cortactin–actin interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nan Hyung; Qi, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Branched actin critically contributes to membrane trafficking by regulating membrane curvature, dynamics, fission, and transport. However, how actin dynamics are controlled at membranes is poorly understood. Here, we identify the branched actin regulator cortactin as a direct binding partner of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) and demonstrate that their interaction promotes turnover of late endosomal actin. In vitro biochemical studies indicated that cortactin binds PI(3,5)P2 via its actin filament-binding region. Furthermore, PI(3,5)P2 competed with actin filaments for binding to cortactin, thereby antagonizing cortactin activity. These findings suggest that PI(3,5)P2 formation on endosomes may remove cortactin from endosome-associated branched actin. Indeed, inhibition of PI(3,5)P2 production led to cortactin accumulation and actin stabilization on Rab7+ endosomes. Conversely, inhibition of Arp2/3 complex activity greatly reduced cortactin localization to late endosomes. Knockdown of cortactin reversed PI(3,5)P2-inhibitor–induced actin accumulation and stabilization on endosomes. These data suggest a model in which PI(3,5)P2 binding removes cortactin from late endosomal branched actin networks and thereby promotes net actin turnover. PMID:26323691

  4. Profilin connects actin assembly with microtubule dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nejedla, M.; Sadi, S.; Sulimenko, Vadym; de Almeida, F.N.; Blom, H.; Dráber, Pavel; Aspenstrom, P.; Karlsson, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 15 (2016), s. 2381-2393 ISSN 1059-1524 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-25159S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cross-linked profilin * arp2/3 complex * f-actin * microfilament system * migrating cell s * focal adhesions * cultured- cell s * messenger-rna * living cell s * protein Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.685, year: 2016

  5. Late complications of rxtherapy: actinic sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffat, J.D.

    1975-09-09

    Relation of two cases of benign tumors: a vertebral osteoblastoma and a cerebellar medulloblastoma which, after operation, have had radiotherapy. 20 years later for one case and 14 years for the other one actinic sarcomas will appear, and, in spite of usual therapy, the death is coming rapidly. We are certainly in presence of two exceptional cases, but each physician must be conscious, before to attempt a treatment, that very distant complication can eventually occur.

  6. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Fibroblast-mediated contraction in actinically exposed and actinically protected aging skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, M.W.; Morykwas, M.J.; Wheatley, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The changes in skin morphology over time are a consequence of both chronologic aging and the accumulation of environmental exposure. Through observation, we know that actinic radiation intensifies the apparent aging of skin. We have investigated the effects of aging and actinic radiation on the ability of fibroblasts to contract collagen-fibroblast lattices. Preauricular and postauricular skin samples were obtained from eight patients aged 49 to 74 undergoing rhytidectomy. The samples were kept separate, and the fibroblasts were grown in culture. Lattices constructed with preauricular fibroblasts consistently contracted more than lattices containing postauricular fibroblasts. The difference in amount of contraction in 7 days between sites was greatest for the younger patients and decreased linearly as donor age increased (r = -0.96). This difference may be due to preauricular fibroblasts losing their ability to contract a lattice as aging skin is exposed to more actinic radiation

  8. Aspects of smooth muscle function in molluscan catch muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, B M

    1976-10-01

    1) Catch in Mytilus ABRM may be a specialization of a mechanism common to all muscles that gives rise to stretch resistance in the resting state. Catch appears to be due to actin myosin interaction. Since this interaction is regulated by nerves, it provides a convenient model for studying resting stretch resistance. 2) Studies of the structure of Mytilus ABRM revela two types of intercellular connections: a) direct connections between muscle fibers [these nexal (gap) junctions interconnect the muscle cells electrically]; b) muscle fiber-collagen-muscle fiber connections [these provide mechanical connections between muscle cells via collagen fibers]. The structure of Mytilus ABRM supports speculation that smooth muscle filaments are organized into contractile units. 3) A rise in cAMP levels occurs in response to the relaxing transmitter, serotonin. It is not certain whether the cAMP system directly controls the ability of the contractile proteins to interact or whether it regulates intracellular levels of Ca2+. 4) Calcium ions in activation are derived from two sources: an internal source, probably the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and an external source, across the muscle membrane. 5) The nature of catch remains in question, although most evidence favors the linkage hypothesis.

  9. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after ... It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  10. Stress generation by myosin minifilaments in actin bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasanayake, Nilushi L; Carlsson, Anders E

    2013-06-01

    Forces and stresses generated by the action of myosin minifilaments are analyzed in idealized computer-generated actin bundles, and compared to results for isotropic actin networks. The bundles are generated as random collections of actin filaments in two dimensions with constrained orientations, crosslinked and attached to two fixed walls. Myosin minifilaments are placed on actin filament pairs and allowed to move and deform the network so that it exerts forces on the walls. The vast majority of simulation runs end with contractile minifilament stress, because minifilaments rotate into energetically stable contractile configurations. This process is aided by the bending and stretching of actin filaments, which accomodate minifilament rotation. Stresses for bundles are greater than those for isotropic networks, and antiparallel filaments generate more tension than parallel filaments. The forces transmitted by the actin network to the walls of the simulation cell often exceed the tension in the minifilament itself.

  11. Single Muscle Fiber Proteomics Reveals Fiber-Type-Specific Features of Human Muscle Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Murgia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a key tissue in human aging, which affects different muscle fiber types unequally. We developed a highly sensitive single muscle fiber proteomics workflow to study human aging and show that the senescence of slow and fast muscle fibers is characterized by diverging metabolic and protein quality control adaptations. Whereas mitochondrial content declines with aging in both fiber types, glycolysis and glycogen metabolism are upregulated in slow but downregulated in fast muscle fibers. Aging mitochondria decrease expression of the redox enzyme monoamine oxidase A. Slow fibers upregulate a subset of actin and myosin chaperones, whereas an opposite change happens in fast fibers. These changes in metabolism and sarcomere quality control may be related to the ability of slow, but not fast, muscle fibers to maintain their mass during aging. We conclude that single muscle fiber analysis by proteomics can elucidate pathophysiology in a sub-type-specific manner.

  12. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchel Alioscha-Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale. Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in

  13. Myosin Vs organize actin cables in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Libera; Chang, Fred; Martin, Sophie G

    2012-12-01

    Myosin V motors are believed to contribute to cell polarization by carrying cargoes along actin tracks. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Myosin Vs transport secretory vesicles along actin cables, which are dynamic actin bundles assembled by the formin For3 at cell poles. How these flexible structures are able to extend longitudinally in the cell through the dense cytoplasm is unknown. Here we show that in myosin V (myo52 myo51) null cells, actin cables are curled, bundled, and fail to extend into the cell interior. They also exhibit reduced retrograde flow, suggesting that formin-mediated actin assembly is impaired. Myo52 may contribute to actin cable organization by delivering actin regulators to cell poles, as myoV defects are partially suppressed by diverting cargoes toward cell tips onto microtubules with a kinesin 7-Myo52 tail chimera. In addition, Myo52 motor activity may pull on cables to provide the tension necessary for their extension and efficient assembly, as artificially tethering actin cables to the nuclear envelope via a Myo52 motor domain restores actin cable extension and retrograde flow in myoV mutants. Together these in vivo data reveal elements of a self-organizing system in which the motors shape their own tracks by transporting cargoes and exerting physical pulling forces.

  14. Probing actin polymerization by intermolecular cross-linking

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    We have used N,N'-1,4-phenylenebismaleimide, a bifunctional sulfhydryl cross-linking reagent, to probe the oligomeric state of actin during the early stages of its polymerization into filaments. We document that one of the first steps in the polymerization of globular monomeric actin (G-actin) under a wide variety of ionic conditions is the dimerization of a significant fraction of the G-actin monomer pool. As polymerization proceeds, the yield of this initial dimer ("lower" dimer with an app...

  15. Characterization of actin filament severing by actophorin from Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Actophorin is an abundant 15-kD actinbinding protein from Acanthamoeba that is thought to form a nonpolymerizable complex with actin monomers and also to reduce the viscosity of polymerized actin by severing filaments (Cooper et al., 1986. J. Biol. Chem. 261:477-485). Homologous proteins have been identified in sea urchin, chicken, and mammalian tissues. Chemical crosslinking produces a 1:1 covalent complex of actin and actophorin. Actophorin and profilin compete for crosslinking to actin monomers. The influence of actophorin on the steady-state actin polymer concentration gave a Kd of 0.2 microM for the complex of actophorin with actin monomers. Several new lines of evidence, including assays for actin filament ends by elongation rate and depolymerization rate, show that actophorin severs actin filaments both at steady state and during spontaneous polymerization. This is confirmed by direct observation in the light microscope and by showing that the effects of actophorin on the low shear viscosity of polymerized actin cannot be explained by monomer sequestration. The severing activity of actophorin is strongly inhibited by stoichiometric concentrations of phalloidin or millimolar concentrations of inorganic phosphate. PMID:1757465

  16. Electrostatics Control Actin Filament Nucleation and Elongation Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H.; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L.; Lamb, Don C.; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment. PMID:23486468

  17. Electrostatics control actin filament nucleation and elongation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L; Lamb, Don C; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-04-26

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment.

  18. Drosophila small heat shock protein CryAB ensures structural integrity of developing muscles, and proper muscle and heart performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Inga; Jabłońska, Jadwiga; Zmojdzian, Monika; Taghli-Lamallem, Ouarda; Renaud, Yoan; Junion, Guillaume; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Huelsmann, Sven; Jagla, Krzysztof; Jagla, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    Molecular chaperones, such as the small heat shock proteins (sHsps), maintain normal cellular function by controlling protein homeostasis in stress conditions. However, sHsps are not only activated in response to environmental insults, but also exert developmental and tissue-specific functions that are much less known. Here, we show that during normal development the Drosophila sHsp CryAB [L(2)efl] is specifically expressed in larval body wall muscles and accumulates at the level of Z-bands and around myonuclei. CryAB features a conserved actin-binding domain and, when attenuated, leads to clustering of myonuclei and an altered pattern of sarcomeric actin and the Z-band-associated actin crosslinker Cheerio (filamin). Our data suggest that CryAB and Cheerio form a complex essential for muscle integrity: CryAB colocalizes with Cheerio and, as revealed by mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, binds to Cheerio, and the muscle-specific attenuation of cheerio leads to CryAB-like sarcomeric phenotypes. Furthermore, muscle-targeted expression of CryAB(R120G), which carries a mutation associated with desmin-related myopathy (DRM), results in an altered sarcomeric actin pattern, in affected myofibrillar integrity and in Z-band breaks, leading to reduced muscle performance and to marked cardiac arrhythmia. Taken together, we demonstrate that CryAB ensures myofibrillar integrity in Drosophila muscles during development and propose that it does so by interacting with the actin crosslinker Cheerio. The evidence that a DRM-causing mutation affects CryAB muscle function and leads to DRM-like phenotypes in the fly reveals a conserved stress-independent role of CryAB in maintaining muscle cell cytoarchitecture. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Daylight photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, Stine; Wulf, H C; Szeimies, R-M

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive therapy for non-melanoma skin cancers including actinic keratoses (AKs) because it allows treatment of large areas; it has a high response rate and results in an excellent cosmesis. However, conventional PDT for AKs is associated with inconveniently long...... clinic visits and discomfort during therapy. In this article, we critically review daylight-mediated PDT, which is a simpler and more tolerable treatment procedure for PDT. We review the effective light dose, efficacy and safety, the need for prior application of sunscreen, and potential clinical scope...

  20. Dynamic buckling of actin within filopodia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, Natascha; Oddershede, Lene B; Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Filopodia are active tubular structures protruding from the cell surface which allow the cell to sense and interact with the surrounding environment through repetitive elongation-retraction cycles. The mechanical behavior of filopodia has been studied by measuring the traction forces exerted...... on external substrates.(1) These studies have revealed that internal actin flow can transduce a force across the cell surface through transmembrane linkers like integrins. In addition to the elongation-retraction behavior filopodia also exhibit a buckling and rotational behavior. Filopodial buckling...

  1. Cyclic muscle twitch contraction inhibits immobilization-induced muscle contracture and fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Ayana; Sakamoto, Junya; Honda, Yuichiro; Kataoka, Hideki; Nakano, Jiro; Okita, Minoru

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the effects of cyclic muscle twitch contraction caused by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on immobilization-induced muscle contracture and fibrosis in rats. Twenty-nine rats were divided into control, immobilization, and immobilization with muscle contraction groups. The ankle joints of the immobilization and muscle contraction rats were fixed in full plantar flexion with a plaster cast for 4 weeks. In the muscle contraction group, cyclic muscle twitch contraction of the soleus muscle was induced using a commercial device (1 Hz, 4 ± 2 mA, 60 min/day, 5 times/week) with the ankle joint immobilized. The dorsiflexion range of ankle joint motion in the muscle contraction group was significantly greater than that in the immobilization group. The expressions of fibrosis-related genes (i.e., hypoxia inducible factor-1α, transforming growth factor-β1, α-smooth muscle actin, and types I and III collagen) were significantly decreased in the muscle contraction group compared to the immobilization group. The fluorescence intensities of type I and type III collagen in the perimysium and endomysium in the muscle contraction group were significantly decreased compared to the immobilization group. These results suggest that cyclic muscle twitch contraction induced by NMES might alleviate skeletal muscle fibrosis, reducing immobilization-induced muscle contracture.

  2. The role of titin in eccentric muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Walter

    2014-08-15

    Muscle contraction and force regulation in skeletal muscle have been thought to occur exclusively through the relative sliding of and the interaction between the contractile filaments actin and myosin. While this two-filament sarcomere model has worked well in explaining the properties of isometrically and concentrically contracting muscle, it has failed miserably in explaining experimental observations in eccentric contractions. Here, I suggest, and provide evidence, that a third filament, titin, is involved in force regulation of sarcomeres by adjusting its stiffness in an activation-dependent (calcium) and active force-dependent manner. Upon muscle activation, titin binds calcium at specific sites, thereby increasing its stiffness, and cross-bridge attachment to actin is thought to free up binding sites for titin on actin, thereby reducing titin's free-spring length, thus increasing its stiffness and force upon stretch of active muscle. This role of titin as a third force regulating myofilament in sarcomeres, although not fully proven, would account for many of the unexplained properties of eccentric muscle contraction, while simultaneously not affecting the properties predicted by the two-filament cross-bridge model in isometric and concentric muscle function. Here, I identify the problems of the two-filament sarcomere model and demonstrate the advantages of the three-filament model by providing evidence of titin's contribution to active force in eccentric muscle function. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Comparative Biomechanics of Thick Filaments and Thin Filaments with Functional Consequences for Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The scaffold of striated muscle is predominantly comprised of myosin and actin polymers known as thick filaments and thin filaments, respectively. The roles these filaments play in muscle contraction are well known, but the extent to which variations in filament mechanical properties influence muscle function is not fully understood. Here we review information on the material properties of thick filaments, thin filaments, and their primary constituents; we also discuss ways in which mechanical properties of filaments impact muscle performance.

  4. Plasmin enzymatic activity in the presence of actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusova E. I.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the changes in the plasmin activity towards substrates with high and low molecular mass in the presence of actin. Methods. The proteins used for this investigation were obtained by affinity chromatography and gel-filtration. The plasmin enzymatic activity was determined by a turbidimetric assay and a chromogenic substrate-based assay. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and biotin-avidin-phosphatase system were used to study the interaction of plasminogen and its fragments with actin. Results. It was shown that G-actin causes 1.5-fold decrease in the rate of polymeric fibrin hydrolysis by plasmin and Glu-plasminogen activated by the tissue plasminogen activator. However, actin did not impede plasmin autolysis and had no influence on its amidase activity. We have studied an interaction of biotinylated Glu-plasminogen and its fragments (kringle 1-3, kringle 4 and mini-plasminogen with immobilized G-actin. Glu-plasminogen and kringle 4 had a high affinity towards actin (C50 is 113 and 117 nM correspondingly. Mini-plasminogen and kringe 4 did not bind to actin. A similar affinity of Glu-plasminogen and kringle 1-3 towards actin proves the involvement of the kringle 1-3 lysine-binding sites of the native plasminogen form in the actin interaction. Conclusions. Actin can modulate plasmin specificity towards high molecular mass substrates through its interaction with lysine-binding sites of the enzyme kringle domains. Actin inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity of plasmin is due to its competition with fibrin for thelysine binding sites of plasminogen/plasmin.

  5. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M.; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby entering the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come. PMID:24735648

  6. The evolution of compositionally and functionally distinct actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Whitaker, Shane; Popp, David; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    The actin filament is astonishingly well conserved across a diverse set of eukaryotic species. It has essentially remained unchanged in the billion years that separate yeast, Arabidopsis and man. In contrast, bacterial actin-like proteins have diverged to the extreme, and many of them are not readily identified from sequence-based homology searches. Here, we present phylogenetic analyses that point to an evolutionary drive to diversify actin filament composition across kingdoms. Bacteria use a one-filament-one-function system to create distinct filament systems within a single cell. In contrast, eukaryotic actin is a universal force provider in a wide range of processes. In plants, there has been an expansion of the number of closely related actin genes, whereas in fungi and metazoa diversification in tropomyosins has increased the compositional variety in actin filament systems. Both mechanisms dictate the subset of actin-binding proteins that interact with each filament type, leading to specialization in function. In this Hypothesis, we thus propose that different mechanisms were selected in bacteria, plants and metazoa, which achieved actin filament compositional variation leading to the expansion of their functional diversity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Tropomyosin isoforms bias actin track selection by vertebrate myosin Va

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sckolnick, Maria; Krementsova, Elena B.; Warshaw, David M.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms decorate actin with distinct spatial and temporal localization patterns in cells and thus may function to sort actomyosin processes by modifying the actin track affinity for specific myosin isoforms. We examined the effect of three Tpm isoforms on the ability of myosin Va (myoVa) to engage with actin in vitro in the absence or presence of the cargo adapter melanophilin (Mlph), which links myoVa to Rab27a-melanosomes for in vivo transport. We show that both the myosin motor domain and the cargo adapter Mlph, which has an actin-binding domain that acts as a tether, are sensitive to the Tpm isoform. Actin–Tpm3.1 and actin–Tpm1.8 were equal or better tracks compared to bare actin for myoVa-HMM based on event frequency, run length, and speed. The full-length myoVa-Mlph complex showed high-frequency engagement with actin-Tpm3.1 but not with actin-Tpm1.8. Actin–Tpm4.2 excluded both myoVa-HMM and full-length myoVa-Mlph from productive interactions. Of importance, Tpm3.1 is enriched in the dendritic protrusions and cortical actin of melanocytes, where myoVa-Mlph engages in melanosome transport. These results support the hypothesis that Tpm isoforms constitute an “actin–Tpm code” that allows for spatial and temporal sorting of actomyosin function in the cell. PMID:27535431

  8. Deafness and espin-actin self-organization in stereocilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Espins are F-actin-bundling proteins associated with large parallel actin bundles found in hair cell stereocilia in the ear, as well as brush border microvilli and Sertoli cell junctions. We examine actin bundle structures formed by different wild-type espin isoforms, fragments, and naturally-occurring human espin mutants linked to deafness and/or vestibular dysfunction. The espin-actin bundle structure consisted of a hexagonal arrangement of parallel actin filaments in a non-native twist state. We delineate the structural consequences caused by mutations in espin's actin-bundling module. For espin mutation with a severely damaged actin-bundling module, which are implicated in deafness in mice and humans, oriented nematic-like actin filament structures, which strongly impinges on bundle mechanical stiffness. Finally, we examine what makes espin different, via a comparative study of bundles formed by espin and those formed by fascin, a prototypical bundling protein found in functionally different regions of the cell, such as filopodia.

  9. Actin-mediated cytoplasmic organization of plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der H.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, I present results that give insight in the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the production of an organized cytoplasm in plant cells, which is, for instance, required for proper cell morphogenesis.

    Chapter 1 is a review in which we discuss the possible role of actin-based

  10. Actin-Based Feedback Circuits in Cell Migration and Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinxin

    In this thesis, we study the switch and pulse functions of actin during two important cellular processes, cell migration and endocytosis. Actin is an abundant protein that can polymerize to form a dendritic network. The actin network can exert force to push or bend the cell membrane. During cell migration, the actin network behaves like a switch, assembling mostly at one end or at the other end. The end with the majority of the actin network is the leading edge, following which the cell can persistently move in the same direction. The other end, with the minority of the actin network, is the trailing edge, which is dragged by the cell as it moves forward. When subjected to large fluctuations or external stimuli, the leading edge and the trailing edge can interchange and change the direction of motion, like a motion switch. Our model of the actin network in a cell reveals that mechanical force is crucial for forming the motion switch. We find a transition from single state symmetric behavior to switch behavior, when tuning parameters such as the force. The model is studied by both stochastic simulations, and a set of rate equations that are consistent with the simulations. Endocytosis is a process by which cells engulf extracellular substances and recycle the cell membrane. In yeast cells, the actin network is transiently needed to overcome the pressure difference across the cell membrane caused by turgor pressure. The actin network behaves like a pulse, which assembles and then disassembles within about 30 seconds. Using a stochastic model, we reproduce the pulse behaviors of the actin network and one of its regulatory proteins, Las17. The model matches green fluorescence protein (GFP) experiments for wild-type cells. The model also predicts some phenotypes that modify or diminish the pulse behavior. The phenotypes are verified with both experiments performed at Washington University and with other groups' experiments. We find that several feedback mechanisms are

  11. Actin dynamics, architecture, and mechanics in cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchoin, Laurent; Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Sykes, Cécile; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Tight coupling between biochemical and mechanical properties of the actin cytoskeleton drives a large range of cellular processes including polarity establishment, morphogenesis, and motility. This is possible because actin filaments are semi-flexible polymers that, in conjunction with the molecular motor myosin, can act as biological active springs or "dashpots" (in laymen's terms, shock absorbers or fluidizers) able to exert or resist against force in a cellular environment. To modulate their mechanical properties, actin filaments can organize into a variety of architectures generating a diversity of cellular organizations including branched or crosslinked networks in the lamellipodium, parallel bundles in filopodia, and antiparallel structures in contractile fibers. In this review we describe the feedback loop between biochemical and mechanical properties of actin organization at the molecular level in vitro, then we integrate this knowledge into our current understanding of cellular actin organization and its physiological roles.

  12. Structural modeling and molecular dynamics simulation of the actin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splettstoesser, Thomas; Holmes, Kenneth C; Noé, Frank; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-07-01

    Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Actin polymerization contributes to neutrophil chemotactic dysfunction following thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasslen, S R; Ahrenholz, D H; Solem, L D; Nelson, R D

    1992-11-01

    The agent(s) and mechanism(s) responsible for suppression of neutrophil chemotaxis in association with major thermal injury have not been identified. We have proposed that the reduced random motility characterizing patients' cells may contribute to their generalized chemotactic dysfunction. Here we report that actin polymerization may be responsible for the loss of neutrophil motility associated with major thermal injury. Using a fluorescent ligand specific for polymerized or filamentous actin (NBD-phallacidin) in conjunction with flow cytometry, we have discovered that peripheral blood and exudate neutrophils from patients with major thermal injury contain increased levels of actin in a stably polymerized form. Because cyclic polymerization and depolymerization of actin is essential to cell motility, we suggest that actin polymerization may contribute in a major way to the attenuation of neutrophil random and chemotactic functions induced by major thermal injury.

  14. Measuring Actin Flow in 3D Cell Protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Actin dynamics is important in determining cell shape, tension, and migration. Methods such as fluorescent speckle microscopy and spatial temporal image correlation spectroscopy have been used to capture high-resolution actin turnover dynamics within cells in two dimensions. However, these methods are not directly applicable in 3D due to lower resolution and poor contrast. Here, we propose to capture actin flow in 3D with high spatial-temporal resolution by combining nanoscale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation and fluctuation spectroscopy techniques. To measure the actin flow along cell protrusions in cell expressing actin-eGFP cultured in a type I collagen matrix, the laser was orbited around the protrusion and its trajectory was modulated in a clover-shaped pattern perpendicularly to the protrusion. Orbits were also alternated at two positions closely spaced along the protrusion axis. The pair cross-correlation function was applied to the fluorescence fluctuation from these two positions to capture the flow of actin. Measurements done on nonmoving cellular protrusion tips showed no pair-correlation at two orbital positions indicating a lack of flow of F-actin bundles. However, in some protrusions, the pair-correlation approach revealed directional flow of F-actin bundles near the protrusion surface with flow rates in the range of ∼1 μm/min, comparable to results in two dimensions using fluorescent speckle microscopy. Furthermore, we found that the actin flow rate is related to the distance to the protrusion tip. We also observed collagen deformation by concomitantly detecting collagen fibers with reflectance detection during these actin motions. The implementation of the nanoscale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation method with a cloverleaf-shaped trajectory in conjunction with the pair cross-correlation function method provides a quantitative way of capturing dynamic flows and organization of proteins during cell migration in 3D in conditions of

  15. Extracellular Actin Is a Receptor for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B. A. Raymond

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, an agriculturally important porcine pathogen, disrupts the mucociliary escalator causing ciliostasis, loss of cilial function, and epithelial cell death within the porcine lung. Losses to swine production due to growth rate retardation and reduced feed conversion efficiency are severe, and antibiotics are used heavily to control mycoplasmal pneumonia. Notably, little is known about the repertoire of host receptors that M. hyopneumoniae targets to facilitate colonization. Here we show, for the first time, that actin exists extracellularly on porcine epithelial monolayers (PK-15 using surface biotinylation and 3D-Structured Illumination Microscopy (3D-SIM, and that M. hyopneumoniae binds to the extracellular β-actin exposed on the surface of these cells. Consistent with this hypothesis we show: (i monoclonal antibodies that target β-actin significantly block the ability of M. hyopneumoniae to adhere and colonize PK-15 cells; (ii microtiter plate binding assays show that M. hyopneumoniae cells bind to monomeric G-actin in a dose dependent manner; (iii more than 100 M. hyopneumoniae proteins were recovered from affinity-chromatography experiments using immobilized actin as bait; and (iv biotinylated monomeric actin binds directly to M. hyopneumoniae proteins in ligand blotting studies. Specifically, we show that the P97 cilium adhesin possesses at least two distinct actin-binding regions, and binds monomeric actin with nanomolar affinity. Taken together, these observations suggest that actin may be an important receptor for M. hyopneumoniae within the swine lung and will aid in the future development of intervention strategies against this devastating pathogen. Furthermore, our observations have wider implications for extracellular actin as an important bacterial receptor.

  16. Extracellular Actin Is a Receptor for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Benjamin B A; Madhkoor, Ranya; Schleicher, Ina; Uphoff, Cord C; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Rohde, Manfred; Padula, Matthew P; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2018-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae , an agriculturally important porcine pathogen, disrupts the mucociliary escalator causing ciliostasis, loss of cilial function, and epithelial cell death within the porcine lung. Losses to swine production due to growth rate retardation and reduced feed conversion efficiency are severe, and antibiotics are used heavily to control mycoplasmal pneumonia. Notably, little is known about the repertoire of host receptors that M. hyopneumoniae targets to facilitate colonization. Here we show, for the first time, that actin exists extracellularly on porcine epithelial monolayers (PK-15) using surface biotinylation and 3D-Structured Illumination Microscopy (3D-SIM), and that M. hyopneumoniae binds to the extracellular β-actin exposed on the surface of these cells. Consistent with this hypothesis we show: (i) monoclonal antibodies that target β-actin significantly block the ability of M. hyopneumoniae to adhere and colonize PK-15 cells; (ii) microtiter plate binding assays show that M. hyopneumoniae cells bind to monomeric G-actin in a dose dependent manner; (iii) more than 100 M. hyopneumoniae proteins were recovered from affinity-chromatography experiments using immobilized actin as bait; and (iv) biotinylated monomeric actin binds directly to M. hyopneumoniae proteins in ligand blotting studies. Specifically, we show that the P97 cilium adhesin possesses at least two distinct actin-binding regions, and binds monomeric actin with nanomolar affinity. Taken together, these observations suggest that actin may be an important receptor for M. hyopneumoniae within the swine lung and will aid in the future development of intervention strategies against this devastating pathogen. Furthermore, our observations have wider implications for extracellular actin as an important bacterial receptor.

  17. Muscle protein analysis. II. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of normal and diseased human skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giometti, C.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Barany, M.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1980-07-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the major proteins of normal and pathological human-muscle samples. The normal human-muscle pattern contains four myosin light chains: three that co-migrate with the myosin light chains from rabbit fast muscle (extensor digitorum longus), and one that co-migrates with the light chain 2 from rabbit slow muscle (soleus). Of seven Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples, four yielded patterns with decreased amounts of actin and myosin relative to normal muscle, while three samples gave patterns comparable to that for normal muscle. Six samples from patients with myotonic dystrophy also gave normal patterns. In nemaline rod myopathy, in contrast, the pattern was deficient in two of the fast-type myosin light chains.

  18. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  19. Cyclic hardening in bundled actin networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoller, K M; Fernández, P; Arevalo, R C; Blair, D L; Bausch, A R

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear deformations can irreversibly alter the mechanical properties of materials. Most soft materials, such as rubber and living tissues, display pronounced softening when cyclically deformed. Here we show that, in contrast, reconstituted networks of crosslinked, bundled actin filaments harden when subject to cyclical shear. As a consequence, they exhibit a mechano-memory where a significant stress barrier is generated at the maximum of the cyclic shear strain. This unique response is crucially determined by the network architecture: at lower crosslinker concentrations networks do not harden, but soften showing the classic Mullins effect known from rubber-like materials. By simultaneously performing macrorheology and confocal microscopy, we show that cyclic shearing results in structural reorganization of the network constituents such that the maximum applied strain is encoded into the network architecture.

  20. Ultrastructural localization of actin and actin-binding proteins in the nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dingová, Hana; Fukalová, Jana; Maninová, Miloslava; Philimonenko, Vlada; Hozák, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 3 (2009), s. 425-434 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545 Grant - others:MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nuclear actin * ultrastructure * actin–binding proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2009

  1. Titin-Actin Interaction: PEVK-Actin-Based Viscosity in a Large Animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles S. Chung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin exhibits an interaction between its PEVK segment and the actin filament resulting in viscosity, a speed dependent resistive force, which significantly influences diastolic filling in mice. While diastolic disease is clinically pervasive, humans express a more compliant titin (N2BA:N2B ratio ~0.5–1.0 than mice (N2BA:N2B ratio ~0.2. To examine PEVK-actin based viscosity in compliant titin-tissues, we used pig cardiac tissue that expresses titin isoforms similar to that in humans. Stretch-hold experiments were performed at speeds from 0.1 to 10 lengths/s from slack sarcomere lengths (SL to SL of 2.15 μm. Viscosity was calculated from the slope of stress-relaxation vs stretch speed. Recombinant PEVK was added to compete off native interactions and this found to reduce the slope by 35%, suggesting that PEVK-actin interactions are a strong contributor of viscosity. Frequency sweeps were performed at frequencies of 0.1–400 Hz and recombinant protein reduced viscous moduli by 40% at 2.15 μm and by 50% at 2.25 μm, suggesting a SL-dependent nature of viscosity that might prevent SL ``overshoot’’ at long diastolic SLs. This study is the first to show that viscosity is present at physiologic speeds in the pig and supports the physiologic relevance of PEVK-actin interactions in humans in both health and disease.

  2. Triggering actin comets versus membrane ruffles: distinctive effects of phosphoinositides on actin reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Tasuku; Falkenburger, Björn H; Pohlmeyer, Christopher; Inoue, Takanari

    2011-12-13

    A limited set of phosphoinositide membrane lipids regulate diverse cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, and migration. We developed two techniques based on rapamycin-induced protein dimerization to rapidly change the concentration of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)]. First, using a membrane-recruitable form of PI(4)P 5-kinase, we increased PI(4,5)P(2) synthesis from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] and found that COS-7, HeLa, and human embryonic kidney 293 cells formed bundles of motile actin filaments known as actin comets. In contrast, a second technique that increased the concentration of PI(4,5)P(2) without consuming PI(4)P induced membrane ruffles. These distinct phenotypes were mediated by dynamin-mediated vesicular trafficking and mutually inhibitory crosstalk between the small guanosine triphosphatases Rac and RhoA. Our results indicate that the effect of PI(4,5)P(2) on actin reorganization depends on the abundance of other phosphoinositides, such as PI(4)P. Thus, combinatorial regulation of phosphoinositide concentrations may contribute to the diversity of phosphoinositide functions.

  3. Generation of life in a test tube: Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, Bruno Straub, and the discovery of actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jack A

    2018-06-01

    This is a story about a great scientist, luck, great discovery that changed the future direction of muscle research, war, a clandestine war mission, postwar politics, and an attempt to rewrite scientific history. Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, at 44 yr of age, won the Nobel Prize in 1937 for his work on vitamin C and the establishment of the groundwork of the citric acid cycle. He now wanted to investigate one of the fundamental aspects of life and settled on the study of muscle contraction. The Szent-Gyorgyi laboratory in Hungary during World War II demonstrated that contraction could be reproduced in vitro by threads consisting of just two proteins, myosin and the newly discovered protein by Bruno Straub that they called actin. Szent-Gyorgyi called seeing the contraction of these threads, which occurred in the presence of ATP and ions, "the most thrilling moment" of his scientific life. This major discovery of the generation of "life" in a test tube was totally unknown for years by the rest of the world because of the war. When the discovery was finally communicated to the world, it was not immediately accepted by all as being relevant to the physiology of muscle contraction. Nonetheless, this discovery opened up the modern phase of muscle research. Serendipity played an important role in the great discovery, and much later politics would lead to a shocking controversy around the true discoverer of actin.

  4. The length-tension curve in muscle depends on lattice spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C. D.; Salcedo, M. K.; Irving, T. C.; Regnier, M.; Daniel, T. L.

    2013-07-10

    Classic interpretations of the striated muscle length–tension curve focus on how force varies with overlap of thin (actin) and thick (myosin) filaments. New models of sarcomere geometry and experiments with skinned synchronous insect flight muscle suggest that changes in the radial distance between the actin and myosin filaments, the filament lattice spacing, are responsible for between 20% and 50% of the change in force seen between sarcomere lengths of 1.4 and 3.4 µm. Thus, lattice spacing is a significant force regulator, increasing the slope of muscle's force–length dependence.

  5. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian; Richter, Erik A; Jensen, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    An alternative to the canonical insulin signalling pathway for glucose transport is muscle contraction/exercise. Mechanical stress is an integrated part of the muscle contraction/relaxation cycle, and passive stretch stimulates muscle glucose transport. However, the signalling mechanism regulating stretch-stimulated glucose transport is not well understood. We recently reported that the actin cytoskeleton regulating GTPase, Rac1, was activated in mouse muscle in response to stretching. Rac1 is a regulator of contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose transport, however, its role in stretch-stimulated glucose transport and signalling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. In addition, the role of Rac1 in contraction-stimulated glucose transport during conditions without mechanical load on the muscles was evaluated in loosely hanging muscles and muscles in which cross-bridge formation was blocked by the myosin ATPase inhibitors BTS and Blebbistatin. Knockout as well as pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 reduced stretch-stimulated glucose transport by 30–50% in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle. The actin depolymerizing agent latrunculin B similarly decreased glucose transport in response to stretching by 40–50%. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose transport by 30–40% in tension developing muscle but did not affect contraction-stimulated glucose transport in muscles in which force development was prevented. Our findings suggest that Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton regulate stretch-stimulated glucose transport and that Rac1 is a required part of the mechanical stress-component of the contraction-stimulus to glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Key

  6. Crosstalk between Rac1-mediated actin regulation and ROS production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Alejandro; González-Billault, Christian

    2018-02-20

    The small RhoGTPase Rac1 is implicated in a variety of events related to actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. Remarkably, another event that is completely different from those related to actin regulation has the same relevance; the Rac1-mediated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through NADPH oxidases (NOX). Each outcome involves different Rac1 downstream effectors; on one hand, events related to the actin cytoskeleton require Rac1 to bind to WAVEs proteins and PAKs that ultimately promote actin branching and turnover, on the other, NOX-derived ROS production demands active Rac1 to be bound to a cytosolic activator of NOX. How Rac1-mediated signaling ends up promoting actin-related events, NOX-derived ROS, or both is poorly understood. Rac1 regulators, including scaffold proteins, are known to exert tight control over its functions. Hence, evidence of Rac1 regulatory events leading to both actin remodeling and NOX-mediated ROS generation are discussed. Moreover, cellular functions linked to physiological and pathological conditions that exhibit crosstalk between Rac1 outcomes are analyzed, while plausible roles in neuronal functions (and dysfunctions) are highlighted. Together, discussed evidence shed light on cellular mechanisms which requires Rac1 to direct either actin- and/or ROS-related events, helping to understand crucial roles of Rac1 dual functionality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The regulation of catch in molluscan muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, B M

    1967-07-01

    Molluscan catch muscles are smooth muscles. As with mammalian smooth muscles, there is no transverse ordering of filaments or dense bodies. In contrast to mammalian smooth muscles, two size ranges of filaments are present. The thick filaments are long as well as large in diameter and contain paramyosin. The thin filaments contain actin and appear to run into and join the dense bodies. Vesicles are present which may be part of a sarcoplasmic reticulum. Neural activation of contraction in Mytilus muscle is similar to that observed in mammalian smooth muscles, and in some respects to frog striated muscle. The relaxing nerves, which reduce catch, are unique to catch muscles. 5-Hydroxytryptamine, which appears to mediate relaxation, specifically blocks catch tension but increases the ability of the muscle to fire spikes. It is speculated that Mytilus muscle actomyosin is activated by a Ca(++)-releasing mechanism, and that 5-hydroxytryptamine may reduce catch and increase excitability by influencing the rate of removal of intracellular free Ca(++).

  8. Regulation of myotube formation by the actin-binding factor drebrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancini Annalisa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myogenic differentiation involves cell-cycle arrest, activation of the muscle-specific transcriptome, and elongation, alignment and fusion of myoblasts into multinucleated myotubes. This process is controlled by promyogenic transcription factors and regulated by signaling pathways in response to extracellular cues. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK pathway promotes the activity of several such transcription factors, including MyoD and MEF2, thereby controlling the muscle-specific transcription program. However, few p38-regulated genes that play a role in the regulation of myogenesis have been identified. Methods RNA interference (RNAi, chemical inhibition and immunofluorescence approaches were used to assess the role of drebrin in differentiation of primary mouse myoblasts and C2C12 cells. Results In a search for p38-regulated genes that promote myogenic differentiation, we identified Dbn1, which encodes the actin-binding protein drebrin. Drebrin is an F-actin side-binding protein that remodels actin to facilitate the change of filopodia into dendritic spines during synaptogenesis in developing neurons. Dbn1 mRNA and protein are induced during differentiation of primary mouse and C2C12 myoblasts, and induction is substantially reduced by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Primary myoblasts and C2C12 cells depleted of drebrin by RNAi display reduced levels of myogenin and myosin heavy chain and form multinucleated myotubes very inefficiently. Treatment of myoblasts with BTP2, a small-molecule inhibitor of drebrin, produces a phenotype similar to that produced by knockdown of drebrin, and the inhibitory effects of BTP2 are rescued by expression of a mutant form of drebrin that is unable to bind BTP2. Drebrin in myoblasts is enriched in cellular projections and cell cortices and at regions of cell-cell contact, all sites where F-actin, too, was concentrated. Conclusions Our findings reveal that Dbn1 expression is

  9. NMR spectroscopy of muscle proteins; Spektroskopia MRJ bialek miesniowych

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slosarek, G. [Inst. Fizyki, Univ. A. Mickiewicza, Poznan (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Author reviews various experimental techniques used for study of the structure of muscle proteins. Difficulties of application of NMR are described. Studies of the influence of Ca{sup 2+} on flexibility of actin polymer are presented. 11 refs, 3 figs.

  10. Treadmilling of actin filaments via Brownian dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Kunkun; Shillcock, Julian C.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Actin polymerization is coupled to the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). Therefore, each protomer within an actin filament can attain three different nucleotide states corresponding to bound ATP, ADP / Pi, and ADP....... These protomer states form spatial patterns on the growing (or shrinking) filaments. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, the growth behavior of long filaments is studied, together with the associated protomer patterns, as a function of ATP-actin monomer concentration, CT, within the surrounding solution...

  11. Highly Dynamic Host Actin Reorganization around Developing Plasmodium Inside Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Santos, Carina S. S.; Itoe, Maurice A.; Afonso, Cristina; Henriques, Ricardo; Gardner, Rui; Sepúlveda, Nuno; Simões, Pedro D.; Raquel, Helena; Almeida, António Paulo; Moita, Luis F.; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mota, Maria M.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium sporozoites are transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes and infect hepatocytes, where a single sporozoite replicates into thousands of merozoites inside a parasitophorous vacuole. The nature of the Plasmodium-host cell interface, as well as the interactions occurring between these two organisms, remains largely unknown. Here we show that highly dynamic hepatocyte actin reorganization events occur around developing Plasmodium berghei parasites inside human hepatoma cells. Actin reorganization is most prominent between 10 to 16 hours post infection and depends on the actin severing and capping protein, gelsolin. Live cell imaging studies also suggest that the hepatocyte cytoskeleton may contribute to parasite elimination during Plasmodium development in the liver. PMID:22238609

  12. Actin purification from a gel of rat brain extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levilliers, N; Peron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1984-01-01

    Actin, 99% pure, has been recovered from rat brain with a high yield (greater than 15 mg/100 g brain). We have shown that: 1. a low ionic strength extract from rat brain tissue is capable of giving rise to a gel; 2. actin is the main gel component and its proportion is one order of magnitude higher than in the original extract; 3. actin can be isolated from this extract by a three-step procedure involving gelation, dissociation of the gel in 0.6 M KCl, followed by one or two depolymerization-polymerization cycles.

  13. Detection of a troponin I-like protein in non-striated muscle of the tardigrades (water bears).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinata, Takashi; Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2011-03-01

    Tardigrades, also known as water bears, have somatic muscle fibers that are responsible for movement of their body and legs. These muscle fibers contain thin and thick filaments in a non-striated pattern. However, the regulatory mechanism of muscle contraction in tardigrades is unknown. In the absence of extensive molecular and genomic information, we detected a protein of 31 kDa in whole lysates of tardigrades that cross-reacted with the antibody raised against nematode troponin I (TnI). TnI is a component of the troponin complex that regulates actin-myosin interaction in a Ca(2+)-dependent and actin-linked manner. This TnI-like protein was co-extracted with actin in a buffer containing ATP and EGTA, which is known to induce relaxation of a troponin-regulated contractile system. The TnI-like protein was specifically expressed in the somatic muscle fibers in adult animals and partially co-localized with actin filaments in a non-striated manner. Interestingly, the pharyngeal muscle did not express this protein. These observations suggest that the non-striated somatic muscle of tardigrades has an actin-linked and troponin-regulated system for muscle contraction.

  14. Purification of a cortical complex containing two unconventional actins from Acanthamoeba by affinity chromatography on profilin-agarose

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    We identified four polypeptides of 47, 44, 40, and 35 kD that bind to profilin-Sepharose and elute with high salt. When purified by conventional chromatography using an antibody to the 47-kD polypeptide, these four polypeptides copurified as a stoichiometric complex together with three additional polypeptides of 19, 18, and 13 kD that varied in their proportions to the other polypeptides. Partial protein sequences showed that the 47-kD polypeptide is a homologue of S. pombe act2 and the 44-kD polypeptide is a homologue of S. cerevisiae ACT2, both unconventional actins. The 40-kD polypeptide contains a sequence similar to the WD40 motif of the G beta subunit of a trimeric G-protein from Dictyostelium discoideum. From partial sequences, the 35-, 19-, and 18-kD polypeptides appear to be novel proteins. On gel filtration the complex of purified polypeptides cochromatograph with a Stokes' radius of 4.8 nm, a value consistent with a globular particle of 220 kD containing one copy of each polypeptide. Cell extracts also contain components of the complex that do not bind the profilin column. Affinity purified antibodies localize 47- and 18/19-kD polypeptides in the cortex and filopodia of Acanthamoeba. Antibodies to the 47-kD unconventional actin cross-react on immunoblots with polypeptides of similar size in Dictyostelium, rabbit muscle, and conventional preparations of rabbit muscle actin but do not react with actin. PMID:7929556

  15. Electrostatic interactions between the Bni1p Formin FH2 domain and actin influence actin filament nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph L; Courtemanche, Naomi; Parton, Daniel L; McCullagh, Martin; Pollard, Thomas D; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-01-06

    Formins catalyze nucleation and growth of actin filaments. Here, we study the structure and interactions of actin with the FH2 domain of budding yeast formin Bni1p. We built an all-atom model of the formin dimer on an Oda actin filament 7-mer and studied structural relaxation and interprotein interactions by molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations produced a refined model for the FH2 dimer associated with the barbed end of the filament and showed electrostatic interactions between the formin knob and actin target-binding cleft. Mutations of two formin residues contributing to these interactions (R1423N, K1467L, or both) reduced the interaction energies between the proteins, and in coarse-grained simulations, the formin lost more interprotein contacts with an actin dimer than with an actin 7-mer. Biochemical experiments confirmed a strong influence of these mutations on Bni1p-mediated actin filament nucleation, but not elongation, suggesting that different interactions contribute to these two functions of formins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Summary Points. • Muscle pain, known as myalgia, can be in one targeted area or across many muscles, occurring with overexertion or overuse of these muscles. • Pain can be classified as acute or chronic pain and further categorized as nociceptive or neuropathic. • Causes of muscle pain include stress, physical ...

  17. Microfilament dynamics during cell movement and chemotaxis monitored using a GFP-actin fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, M; Jungbluth, A; Heidecker, M; Mühlbauer, B; Heizer, C; Schwartz, J M; Marriott, G; Gerisch, G

    1997-03-01

    The microfilament system in the cortex of highly motile cells, such as neutrophils and cells of the eukaryotic microorganism Dictyostelium discoideum, is subject to rapid re-organization, both spontaneously and in response to external signals. In particular, actin polymerization induced by a gradient of chemoattractant leads to local accumulation of filamentous actin and protrusion of a 'leading edge' of the cell in the direction of the gradient. In order to study the dynamics of actin in these processes, actin was tagged at its amino terminus with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and observed with fluorescence microscopy in living cells of D. discoideum. Purified GFP-actin was capable of copolymerizing with actin. In the transfected cells of D. discoideum studied, GFP-actin made up 10-20% of the total actin. Microfilaments containing GFP-actin were capable of generating force with myosin in an in vitro assay. Observations of single living cells using fluorescence microscopy showed that the fusion protein was enriched in cell projections, including filopodia and leading edges, and that the fusion protein reflected the dynamics of the microfilament system in cells that were freely moving, being chemotactically stimulated, or aggregated. When confocal sections of fixed cells containing GFP-actin were labeled with fluorescent phalloidin, which binds only to filamentous actin, there was a correlation between the areas of GFP-actin and phalloidin fluorescence, but there were distinct sites in which GFP-actin was more prominent. Double labeling with GFP-actin and other probes provides an indication of the various states of actin in motile cells. A major portion of the actin assemblies visualized using GFP-actin are networks or bundles of filamentous actin. Other clusters of GFP-actin might represent stores of monomeric actin in the form of complexes with actin-sequestering proteins.

  18. Enhancement of Force Generated by Individual Myosin Heads in Skinned Rabbit Psoas Muscle Fibers at Low Ionic Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Sugi, Haruo; Abe, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2013-01-01

    Although evidence has been presented that, at low ionic strength, myosin heads in relaxed skeletal muscle fibers form linkages with actin filaments, the effect of low ionic strength on contraction characteristics of Ca(2+)-activated muscle fibers has not yet been studied in detail. To give information about the mechanism of muscle contraction, we have examined the effect of low ionic strength on the mechanical properties and the contraction characteristics of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fiber...

  19. Thymosin beta4 sequesters actin in cystic fibrosis sputum and decreases sputum cohesivity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubin, Bruce K.; Kater, Arnon P.; Goldstein, Allan L.

    2006-01-01

    Filamentous actin (F-actin) forms polymers that contribute to the abnormal biophysical properties of sputum. Thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4) is the major monomeric actin-sequestering peptide in cells and can depolymerize F-actin. Tbeta4 could potentially decrease sputum viscoelasticity and adhesivity and

  20. Nanosecond electric pulses trigger actin responses in plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghoefer, Thomas; Eing, Christian; Flickinger, Bianca; Hohenberger, Petra; Wegner, Lars H.; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We have analyzed the cellular effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields on plant cells using fluorescently tagged marker lines in the tobacco cell line BY-2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy. We observe a disintegration of the cytoskeleton in the cell cortex, followed by contraction of actin filaments towards the nucleus, and disintegration of the nuclear envelope. These responses are accompanied by irreversible permeabilization of the plasma membrane manifest as uptake of Trypan Blue. By pretreatment with the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin, the detachment of transvacuolar actin from the cell periphery can be suppressed, and this treatment can also suppress the irreversible perforation of the plasma membrane. We discuss these findings in terms of a model, where nanosecond pulsed electric fields trigger actin responses that are key events in the plant-specific form of programmed cell death.

  1. Interaction Between Troponin and Myosin Enhances Contractile Activity of Myosin in Cardiac Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Schoffstall, Brenda; LaBarbera, Vincent A.; Brunet, Nicolas M.; Gavino, Belinda J.; Herring, Lauren; Heshmati, Sara; Kraft, Brittany H.; Inchausti, Vanessa; Meyer, Nancy L.; Moonoo, Danamarie; Takeda, Aya K.; Chase, Prescott Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling in striated muscle cells is critically dependent upon thin filament proteins tropomyosin (Tm) and troponin (Tn) to regulate mechanical output. Using in vitro measurements of contractility, we demonstrate that even in the absence of actin and Tm, human cardiac Tn (cTn) enhances heavy meromyosin MgATPase activity by up to 2.5-fold in solution. In addition, cTn without Tm significantly increases, or superactivates sliding speed of filamentous actin (F-actin) in skeletal motility a...

  2. A novel three-filament model of force generation in eccentric contraction of skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappacher-Tilp, Gudrun; Leonard, Timothy; Desch, Gertrud; Herzog, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We propose and examine a three filament model of skeletal muscle force generation, thereby extending classical cross-bridge models by involving titin-actin interaction upon active force production. In regions with optimal actin-myosin overlap, the model does not alter energy and force predictions of cross-bridge models for isometric contractions. However, in contrast to cross-bridge models, the three filament model accurately predicts history-dependent force generation in half sarcomeres for eccentric and concentric contractions, and predicts the activation-dependent forces for stretches beyond actin-myosin filament overlap.

  3. The Closed State of the Thin Filament Is Not Occupied in Fully Activated Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershitsky, Sergey Y; Koubassova, Natalia A; Ferenczi, Michael A; Kopylova, Galina V; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Tsaturyan, Andrey K

    2017-04-11

    Muscle contraction is powered by actin-myosin interaction controlled by Ca 2+ via the regulatory proteins troponin (Tn) and tropomyosin (Tpm), which are associated with actin filaments. Tpm forms coiled-coil dimers, which assemble into a helical strand that runs along the whole ∼1 μm length of a thin filament. In the absence of Ca 2+ , Tn that is tightly bound to Tpm binds actin and holds the Tpm strand in the blocked, or B, state, where Tpm shields actin from the binding of myosin heads. Ca 2+ binding to Tn releases the Tpm from actin so that it moves azimuthally around the filament axis to a closed, or C, state, where actin is partially available for weak binding of myosin heads. Upon transition of the weak actin-myosin bond into a strong, stereo-specific complex, the myosin heads push Tpm strand to the open, or O, state allowing myosin binding sites on several neighboring actin monomers to become open for myosin binding. We used low-angle x-ray diffraction at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility to check whether the O- to C-state transition in fully activated fibers of fast skeletal muscle of the rabbit occurs during transition from isometric contraction to shortening under low load. No decrease in the intensity of the second actin layer line at reciprocal radii in the range of 0.15-0.275 nm -1 was observed during shortening suggesting that an azimuthal Tpm movement from the O- to C-state does not occur, although during shortening muscle stiffness is reduced compared to the isometric state, and the intensities of other actin layer lines demonstrate a ∼2-fold decrease in the fraction of myosin heads strongly bound to actin. The data show that a small fraction of actin-bound myosin heads is sufficient for supporting the O-state and, therefore the C-state is not occupied in fully activated skeletal muscle that produces mechanical work at low load. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel three-filament model of force generation in eccentric contraction of skeletal muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Schappacher-Tilp

    Full Text Available We propose and examine a three filament model of skeletal muscle force generation, thereby extending classical cross-bridge models by involving titin-actin interaction upon active force production. In regions with optimal actin-myosin overlap, the model does not alter energy and force predictions of cross-bridge models for isometric contractions. However, in contrast to cross-bridge models, the three filament model accurately predicts history-dependent force generation in half sarcomeres for eccentric and concentric contractions, and predicts the activation-dependent forces for stretches beyond actin-myosin filament overlap.

  5. The role of actin networks in cellular mechanosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatov, Mikheil

    Physical processes play an important role in many biological phenomena, such as wound healing, organ development, and tumor metastasis. During these processes, cells constantly interact with and adapt to their environment by exerting forces to mechanically probe the features of their surroundings and generating appropriate biochemical responses. The mechanisms underlying how cells sense the physical properties of their environment are not well understood. In this thesis, I present my studies to investigate cellular responses to the stiffness and topography of the environment. In order to sense the physical properties of their environment, cells dynamically reorganize the structure of their actin cytoskeleton, a dynamic network of biopolymers, altering the shape and spatial distribution of protein assemblies. Several observations suggest that proteins that crosslink actin filaments may play an important role in cellular mechanosensitivity. Palladin is an actin-crosslinking protein that is found in the lamellar actin network, stress fibers and focal adhesions, cellular structures that are critical for mechanosensing of the physical environment. By virtue of its close interactions with these structures in the cell, palladin may play an important role in cell mechanics. However, the role of actin crosslinkers in general, and palladin in particular, in cellular force generation and mechanosensing is not well known. I have investigated the role of palladin in regulating the plasticity of the actin cytoskeleton and cellular force generation in response to alterations in substrate stiffness. I have shown that the expression levels of palladin modulate the forces exerted by cells and their ability to sense substrate stiffness. Perturbation experiments also suggest that palladin levels in cells altered myosin motor activity. These results suggest that the actin crosslinkers, such as palladin, and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant

  6. The role of antihistamines in chronic actinic dermatitis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Orlov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inveterate actinic dermatitis is an immunologically mediated photodermatosis characterized by itchy eczematous dermhelminthiasis exposed to sunlight. The disease proceeds in the same way as the atopic eczema or atopic dermatitis. The treatment of patients with inveterate actinic dermatitis is similar to the treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis and eczema. Administration of the modern antihistaminic preparation desloratadine (Aerius in the treatment has a positive effect on the skin process relief and on some cellular and humoral immunity factors.

  7. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomibuchi, Yuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Uyeda, Taro Q.P. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki, E-mail: tw007@nasu.bio.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Department of Judo Therapy, Faculty of Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The effect of mutation of Tyr143 that becomes more exposed on assembly was examined. •Mutation of tyrosine-143 of Dictyostelium actin changed actin polymerizability. •The bulkiness or aromatic nature of Tyr143 is important for the weak binding. •The weak interaction between myosin and actin strengthened by Tyr143Trp mutation. -- Abstract: Actin filaments (F-actin) interact with myosin and activate its ATPase to support force generation. By comparing crystal structures of G-actin and the quasi-atomic model of F-actin based on high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, the tyrosine-143 was found to be exposed more than 60 Å{sup 2} to the solvent in F-actin. Because tyrosine-143 flanks the hydrophobic cleft near the hydrophobic helix that binds to myosin, the mutant actins, of which the tyrosine-143 was replaced with tryptophan, phenylalanine, or isoleucine, were generated using the Dictyostelium expression system. It polymerized significantly poorly when induced by NaCl, but almost normally by KCl. In the presence of phalloidin and KCl, the extents of the polymerization of all the mutant actins were comparable to that of the wild-type actin so that the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity could be reliably compared. The affinity of skeletal heavy meromyosin to F-actin and the maximum ATPase activity (V{sub max}) were estimated by a double reciprocal plot. The Tyr143Trp-actin showed the higher affinity (smaller K{sub app}) than that of the wild-type actin, with the V{sub max} being almost unchanged. The K{sub app} and V{sub max} of the Tyr143Phe-actin were similar to those of the wild-type actin. However, the activation by Tyr143Ile-actin was much smaller than the wild-type actin and the accurate determination of K{sub app} was difficult. Comparison of the myosin ATPase activated by the various mutant actins at the same concentration of F-actin showed that the extent of activation correlates well with the solvent-accessible surface areas (ASA

  8. Amphidinolide H, a novel type of actin-stabilizing agent isolated from dinoflagellate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shin-ya; Feng Jue; Kira, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2004-01-01

    The effect of novel cytotoxic marine macrolide, amphidinolide H (Amp-H), on actin dynamics was investigated in vitro. Amp-H attenuated actin depolymerization induced by diluting F-actin. This effect remained after washing out of unbound Amp-H by filtration. In the presence of either Amp-H or phalloidin, lag phase, which is the rate-limiting step of actin polymerization, was shortened. Phalloidin decreased the polymerization-rate whereas Amp-H did not. Meanwhile, the effects of both compounds were the same when barbed end of actin was capped by cytochalasin D. Quartz crystal microbalance system revealed interaction of Amp-H with G-actin and F-actin. Amp-H also enhanced the binding of phalloidin to F-actin. We concluded that Amp-H stabilizes actin in a different manner from that of phalloidin and serves as a novel pharmacological tool for analyzing actin-mediated cell function

  9. Overexpression of Striated Muscle Activator of Rho Signaling (STARS) Increases C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Marita A; Della Gatta, Paul A; Ahmad Mir, Bilal; Kowalski, Greg M; Kloehn, Joachim; McConville, Malcom J; Russell, Aaron P; Lamon, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration depend on the activation of satellite cells, which leads to myocyte proliferation, differentiation and fusion with existing muscle fibers. Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly coordinated by a continuum of molecular signaling pathways. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) is an actin binding protein that regulates the transcription of genes involved in muscle cell growth, structure and function via the stimulation of actin polymerization and activation of serum-response factor (SRF) signaling. STARS mediates cell proliferation in smooth and cardiac muscle models; however, whether STARS overexpression enhances cell proliferation and differentiation has not been investigated in skeletal muscle cells. We demonstrate for the first time that STARS overexpression enhances differentiation but not proliferation in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Increased differentiation was associated with an increase in the gene levels of the myogenic differentiation markers Ckm, Ckmt2 and Myh4, the differentiation factor Igf2 and the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) Myf5 and Myf6. Exposing C2C12 cells to CCG-1423, a pharmacological inhibitor of SRF preventing the nuclear translocation of its co-factor MRTF-A, had no effect on myotube differentiation rate, suggesting that STARS regulates differentiation via a MRTF-A independent mechanism. These findings position STARS as an important regulator of skeletal muscle growth and regeneration.

  10. Actin polymerization drives polar growth in Arabidopsis root hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Luis Alfredo Bañuelos; Sanchez, Rosana; Hernandez-Barrera, Alejandra; Zepeda-Jazo, Isaac; Sánchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen; Torres, Luis Cárdenas

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the actin cytoskeleton is a prime regulator of cell polarity, growth, and cytoplasmic streaming. Tip growth, as observed in root hairs, caulonema, and pollen tubes, is governed by many factors, including calcium gradients, exocytosis and endocytosis, reactive oxygen species, and the cytoskeleton. Several studies indicate that the polymerization of G-actin into F-actin also contributes to tip growth. The structure and function of F-actin within the apical dome is variable, ranging from a dense meshwork to sparse single filaments. The presence of multiple F-actin structures in the elongating apices of tip-growing cells suggests that this cytoskeletal array is tightly regulated. We recently reported that sublethal concentrations of fluorescently labeled cytochalasin could be used to visualize the distribution of microfilament plus ends using fluorescence microscopy, and found that the tip region of the growing root hair cells of a legume plant exhibits a clear response to the nodulation factors secreted by Rhizobium. (1) In this current work, we expanded our analysis using confocal microscopy and demonstrated the existence of highly dynamic fluorescent foci along Arabidopsis root hair cells. Furthermore, we show that the strongest fluorescence signal accumulates in the tip dome of the growing root hair and seems to be in close proximity to the apical plasma membrane. Based on these findings, we propose that actin polymerization within the dome of growing root hair cells regulates polar growth.

  11. Rheology of Membrane-Attached Minimal Actin Cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noeding, Helen; Schoen, Markus; Kramer, Corinna; Doerrer, Nils; Kuerschner, Aileen; Geil, Burkhard; Mey, Ingo P; Heussinger, Claus; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2018-03-28

    The actin cortex is a thin cross-linked network attached to the plasma membrane, being responsible for the cell's shape during migration, division and growth. In a reductionist approach, we created a minimal actin cortex (MAC) attached to a lipid membrane to correlate the filamentous actin architecture with its viscoelastic properties. The system is composed of a supported 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer doped with the receptor lipid phosphatidylinositol(4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) to which a constitutively active mutant of ezrin, being a direct membrane-cytoskeleton linker, is bound. The formation of the MAC on the supported lipid bilayer is analyzed as a function of increasing PtdIns(4,5)P2/ezrin pinning points revealing an increase in the intersections between actin filaments, i.e., the node density of the MAC. Bead tracking microrheology on the membrane attached actin network provides information about its viscoelastic properties. The results show that ezrin serves as a dynamic cross-linker for the actin cortex attached to the lipid bilayer and that the stiffness of the network is influenced by the pinning point density, relating the plateau storage modulus G0 to the node density of the MAC.

  12. Liquid droplets of cross-linked actin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirich, Kimberly; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayan; Gardel, Margaret

    Soft materials constructed from biomolecules self-assemble into a myriad of structures that work in concert to support cell physiology. One critical soft material is the actin cytoskeleton, a viscoelastic gel composed of cross-linked actin filaments. Although actin networks are primarily known for their elastic properties, which are crucial to regulating cell mechanics, the viscous behavior has been theorized to enable shape changes and flows. We experimentally demonstrate a fluid phase of cross-linked actin, where cross-linker condenses dilute short actin filaments into spindle-shaped droplets, or tactoids. Tactoids have shape dynamics consistent with a continuum model of liquid crystal droplets. The cross-linker, which acts as a long range attractive interaction, analogous to molecular cohesion, controls the tactoid shape and dynamics, which reports on the liquid's interfacial tension and viscosity. We investigate how the cross-linker properties and filament length influence the liquid properties. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism to control organization of the actin cytoskeleton and provide insight into design principles for complex, macromolecular liquid phases.

  13. Nucleotide effects on the structure and dynamics of actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiange; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Sept, David

    2007-08-15

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate or ATP is the primary energy source within the cell, releasing its energy via hydrolysis into adenosine 5'-diphosphate or ADP. Actin is an important ATPase involved in many aspects of cellular function, and the binding and hydrolysis of ATP regulates its polymerization into actin filaments as well as its interaction with a host of actin-associated proteins. Here we study the dynamics of monomeric actin in ATP, ADP-Pi, and ADP states via molecular dynamics simulations. As observed in some crystal structures we see that the DNase-I loop is an alpha-helix in the ADP state but forms an unstructured coil domain in the ADP-Pi and ATP states. We also find that this secondary structure change is reversible, and by mimicking nucleotide exchange we can observe the transition between the helical and coil states. Apart from the DNase-I loop, we also see several key structural differences in the nucleotide binding cleft as well as in the hydrophobic cleft between subdomains 1 and 3 where WH2-containing proteins have been shown to interact. These differences provide a structural basis for understanding the observed differences between the various nucleotide states of actin and provide some insight into how ATP regulates the interaction of actin with itself and other proteins.

  14. Functional characterisation of filamentous actin probe expression in neuronal cells.

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    Shrujna Patel

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded filamentous actin probes, Lifeact, Utrophin and F-tractin, are used as tools to label the actin cytoskeleton. Recent evidence in several different cell types indicates that these probes can cause changes in filamentous actin dynamics, altering cell morphology and function. Although these probes are commonly used to visualise actin dynamics in neurons, their effects on axonal and dendritic morphology has not been systematically characterised. In this study, we quantitatively analysed the effect of Lifeact, Utrophin and F-tractin on neuronal morphogenesis in primary hippocampal neurons. Our data show that the expression of actin-tracking probes significantly impacts on axonal and dendrite growth these neurons. Lifeact-GFP expression, under the control of a pBABE promoter, caused a significant decrease in total axon length, while another Lifeact-GFP expression, under the control of a CAG promoter, decreased the length and complexity of dendritic trees. Utr261-EGFP resulted in increased dendritic branching but Utr230-EGFP only accumulated in cell soma, without labelling any neurites. Lifeact-7-mEGFP and F-tractin-EGFP in a pEGFP-C1 vector, under the control of a CMV promoter, caused only minor changes in neuronal morphology as detected by Sholl analysis. The results of this study demonstrate the effects that filamentous actin tracking probes can have on the axonal and dendritic compartments of neuronal cells and emphasise the care that must be taken when interpreting data from experiments using these probes.

  15. Nuclear actin filaments recruit cofilin and actin-related protein 3, and their formation is connected with a mitotic block

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalendová, Alžběta; Kalasová, Ilona; Yamazaki, S.; Uličná, Lívia; Harata, M.; Hozák, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 142, č. 2 (2014), s. 139-152 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA MŠk LD12063; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : nuclear actin * transcription * mitosis * actin-related protein 3 * cofilin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.927, year: 2013

  16. Phosphate and ADP Differently Inhibit Coordinated Smooth Muscle Myosin Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Lennart; Balassy, Zsombor; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Mackey, Michael C.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments propelled in vitro by groups of skeletal muscle myosin motors exhibit distinct phases of active sliding or arrest, whose occurrence depends on actin length (L) within a range of up to 1.0 μm. Smooth muscle myosin filaments are exponentially distributed with ≈150 nm average length in vivo—suggesting relevance of the L-dependence of myosin group kinetics. Here, we found L-dependent actin arrest and sliding in in vitro motility assays of smooth muscle myosin. We perturbed individual myosin kinetics with varying, physiological concentrations of phosphate (Pi, release associated with main power stroke) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, release associated with minor mechanical step). Adenosine triphosphate was kept constant at physiological concentration. Increasing [Pi] lowered the fraction of time for which actin was actively sliding, reflected in reduced average sliding velocity (ν) and motile fraction (fmot, fraction of time that filaments are moving); increasing [ADP] increased the fraction of time actively sliding and reduced the velocity while sliding, reflected in reduced ν and increased fmot. We introduced specific Pi and ADP effects on individual myosin kinetics into our recently developed mathematical model of actin propulsion by myosin groups. Simulations matched our experimental observations and described the inhibition of myosin group kinetics. At low [Pi] and [ADP], actin arrest and sliding were reflected by two distinct chemical states of the myosin group. Upon [Pi] increase, the probability of the active state decreased; upon [ADP] increase, the probability of the active state increased, but the active state became increasingly similar to the arrested state. PMID:25650929

  17. Probing GFP-actin diffusion in living cells using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelke, Hanna; Heinrich, Doris; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2010-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells is continuously remodeled by polymerization and depolymerization of actin. Consequently, the relative content of polymerized filamentous actin (F-actin) and monomeric globular actin (G-actin) is subject to temporal and spatial fluctuations. Since fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) can measure the diffusion of fluorescently labeled actin it seems likely that FCS allows us to determine the dynamics and hence indirectly the structural properties of the cytoskeleton components with high spatial resolution. To this end we investigate the FCS signal of GFP-actin in living Dictyostelium discoideum cells and explore the inherent spatial and temporal signatures of the actin cytoskeleton. Using the free green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reference, we find that actin diffusion inside cells is dominated by G-actin and slower than diffusion in diluted cell extract. The FCS signal in the dense cortical F-actin network near the cell membrane is probed using the cytoskeleton protein LIM and is found to be slower than cytosolic G-actin diffusion. Furthermore, we show that polymerization of the cytoskeleton induced by Jasplakinolide leads to a substantial decrease of G-actin diffusion. Pronounced fluctuations in the distribution of the FCS correlation curves can be induced by latrunculin, which is known to induce actin waves. Our work suggests that the FCS signal of GFP-actin in combination with scanning or spatial correlation techniques yield valuable information about the local dynamics and concomitant cytoskeletal properties

  18. ACTIN BINDING PROTEIN29 from Lilium Pollen Plays an Important Role in Dynamic Actin Remodeling[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yun; Huang, Xi; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Qinwen; Hussey, Patrick J.; Ren, Haiyun

    2007-01-01

    Villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily proteins have been shown to function in tip-growing plant cells. However, genes encoding gelsolin/fragmin do not exist in the Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa) databases, and it is possible that these proteins are encoded by villin mRNA splicing variants. We cloned a 1006-bp full-length cDNA from Lilium longiflorum that encodes a 263–amino acid predicted protein sharing 100% identity with the N terminus of 135-ABP (Lilium villin) except for six C-terminal amino acids. The deduced 29-kD protein, Lilium ACTIN BINDING PROTEIN29 (ABP29), contains only the G1 and G2 domains and is the smallest identified member of the villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily. The purified recombinant ABP29 accelerates actin nucleation, blocks barbed ends, and severs actin filaments in a Ca2+- and/or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate–regulated manner in vitro. Microinjection of the protein into stamen hair cells disrupted transvacuolar strands whose backbone is mainly actin filament bundles. Transient expression of ABP29 by microprojectile bombardment of lily pollen resulted in actin filament fragmentation and inhibited pollen germination and tube growth. Our results suggest that ABP29 is a splicing variant of Lilium villin and a member of the villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily, which plays important roles in rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton during pollen germination and tube growth. PMID:17586658

  19. The Structural Biology of Muscle: Spatial and Temporal Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Kenneth C.

    Understanding muscle contraction has resulted from the synergy of a ­number of approaches for which structure has provided an integrating framework. Nearly 60 years ago interference and phase contrast light microscopy established the sliding filament model of muscle contraction. A little later H.E. Huxley exploited electron microscopy to visualize the macromolecular architecture of the sarcomere: the thick (myosin) and thin (actin) filaments with connecting myosin cross-bridges. These observations allowed him to outline a structural basis for muscle contraction: a rowing-like progression of the myosin cross-bridges along the actin filament. X-ray fibre diffraction from insect flight muscle first demonstrated that the cross-bridges could indeed take up two configurations that might represent the ends of an active stroke. Later intense X-ray synchrotron radiation allowed the recording of the movements of the cross-bridges during a contraction with high precision. In 1993 Rayments's group ushered in a much more detailed understanding of myosin function by solving the structure of the myosin cross-bridge by X-ray crystallography. It showed that the cross-bridge consists of a large catalytic domain, often called the motor domain, containing the ATP binding site and the actin binding site. At the C-terminus of the motor domain is a long lever arm. The catalytic mechanism is similar to the G-proteins: the active site contains a P-loop and switch 1 and switch 2 elements. The lever arm was later found in two different conformations (so called pre-power-stroke and post-rigor) showing how switch 2 movement is coupled to a swing of the lever arm. Further crystallographic studies coupled with high resolution em reconstructions of decorated actin (the rigor complex) showed how ATP binding sequesters switch 1 thereby opening the large cleft in the motor domain and breaking the strong binding to actin. Conversely, the strong binding to actin causes a movement of switch 1 with

  20. Participation of actin on Giardia lamblia growth and encystation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Castillo-Romero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microfilaments play a determinant role in different cell processes such as: motility, cell division, phagocytosis and intracellular transport; however, these structures are poorly understood in the parasite Giardia lamblia. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By confocal microscopy using TRITC-phalloidin, we found structured actin distributed in the entire trophozoite, the label stand out at the ventral disc, median body, flagella and around the nuclei. During Giardia encystation, a sequence of morphological changes concurrent to modifications on the distribution of structured actin and in the expression of actin mRNA were observed. To elucidate whether actin participates actively on growth and encystation, cells were treated with Cytochalasin D, Latrunculin A and Jasplakinolide and analyzed by confocal and scanning electron microscopy. All drugs caused a growth reduction (27 to 45% and changes on the distribution of actin. Besides, 60 to 80% of trophozoites treated with the drugs, exhibited damage at the caudal region, alterations in the flagella and wrinkles-like on the plasma membrane. The drugs also altered the cyst-yield and the morphology, scanning electron microscopy revealed diminished cytokinesis, cysts with damages in the wall and alterations in the size and on the intermembranal space. Furthermore, the drugs caused a significant reduction of the intensity of fluorescence-labeled CWP1 on ESV and on cyst wall, this was coincident with a reduction of CWP1 gene expression (34%. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: All our results, indicated an important role of actin in the morphology, growth and encystation and indirectly suggested an actin role in gene expression.

  1. Enhanced gravitropism of roots with a disrupted cap actin cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Guichuan; Mohamalawari, Deepti R.; Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2003-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be a major player in plant gravitropism. However, understanding the role of actin in this process is far from complete. To address this problem, we conducted an analysis of the effect of Latrunculin B (Lat B), a potent actin-disrupting drug, on root gravitropism using various parameters that included detailed curvature kinetics, estimation of gravitropic sensitivity, and monitoring of curvature development after extended clinorotation. Lat B treatment resulted in a promotion of root curvature after a 90 degrees reorientation in three plant species tested. More significantly, the sensitivity of maize (Zea mays) roots to gravity was enhanced after actin disruption, as determined from a comparison of presentation time of Lat B-treated versus untreated roots. A short 10-min gravistimulus followed by extended rotation on a 1-rpm clinostat resulted in extensive gravitropic responses, manifested as curvature that often exceeded 90 degrees. Application of Lat B to the cap or elongation zone of maize roots resulted in the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, which was confined to the area of localized Lat B application. Only roots with Lat B applied to the cap displayed the strong curvature responses after extended clinorotation. Our study demonstrates that disrupting the actin cytoskeleton in the cap leads to the persistence of a signal established by a previous gravistimulus. Therefore, actin could function in root gravitropism by providing a mechanism to regulate the proliferation of a gravitropic signal originating from the cap to allow the root to attain its correct orientation or set point angle.

  2. Disturbance of smooth muscle regulatory function by Eisenia foetida toxin lysenin: insight into the mechanism of smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuryło, Edward A; Kulikova, Natalia; Sobota, Andrzej

    2008-05-01

    Lysenin, a toxin present in the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia foetida, is known to cause a long-lasting contraction of rat aorta smooth muscle strips. We addressed the mechanisms underlying its action on smooth muscle cells and present the first report demonstrating a completely new property of lysenin unrelated to its basic sphingomyelin-binding ability. Here we report lysenin enhancement effect on smooth muscle actomyosin ATPase activity and the ability of networking the actin filaments. The maximum enhancement of the ATPase activity of actomyosin at 120 mM KCl was observed at a molar ratio of lysenin to actin of about 1:10(5), while at 70 mM KCl at the ratio of about 1:10(6). The effect of lysenin became most pronounced only when both smooth muscle regulatory proteins, tropomyosin and caldesmon, were present. Co-sedimentation experiments indicated that lysenin did not displace neither tropomyosin nor caldesmon from the thin filament. Thus, the lysenin-dependent abolishment of the inhibitory effect of caldesmon on the ATPase activity was related rather to the modification of the filament structure. The ability of the toxin to exert its stimulatory effect at extremely low concentrations (as low as one molecule of lysenin per 10(6) actin molecules) may result from the long-range cooperative transitions in the entire thin filament with an involvement of smooth muscle tropomyosin, while the role of caldesmon may be limited exclusively to the inhibition of ATPase activity.

  3. Alternative exon-encoding regions of Locusta migratoria muscle myosin modulate the pH dependence of ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Lu, Z; He, J; Chen, Q; Wang, X; Kang, L; Li, X-D

    2016-12-01

    Whereas the vertebrate muscle myosin heavy chains (MHCs) are encoded by a family of Mhc genes, most insects examined to date contain a single Mhc gene and produce all of the different MHC isoforms by alternative RNA splicing. Here, we found that the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, has one Mhc gene, which contains 41 exons, including five alternative exclusive exons and one differently included penultimate exon, and potentially encodes 360 MHC isoforms. From the adult L. migratoria, we identified 14 MHC isoforms (including two identical isoforms): four from flight muscle (the thorax dorsal longitudinal muscle), three from jump muscle (the hind leg extensor tibiae muscle) and seven from the abdominal intersegmental muscle. We purified myosins from flight muscle and jump muscle and characterized their motor activities. At neutral pH, the flight and the jump muscle myosins displayed similar levels of in vitro actin-gliding activity, whereas the former had a slightly higher actin-activated ATPase activity than the latter. Interestingly, the pH dependences of the actin-activated ATPase activity of these two myosins are different. Because the dominant MHC isoforms in these two muscles are identical except for the two alternative exon-encoding regions, we propose that these two alternative regions modulate the pH dependence of L. migratoria muscle myosin. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  4. Troponin C Mutations Partially Stabilize the Active State of Regulated Actin and Fully Stabilize the Active State When Paired with Δ14 TnT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, Tamatha; Johnson, Dylan; Pinto, Jose R; Chalovich, Joseph M

    2017-06-13

    Striated muscle contraction is regulated by the actin-associated proteins tropomyosin and troponin. The extent of activation of myosin ATPase activity is lowest in the absence of both Ca 2+ and activating cross-bridges (i.e., S1-ADP or rigor S1). Binding of activating species of myosin to actin at a saturating Ca 2+ concentration stabilizes the most active state (M state) of the actin-tropomyosin-troponin complex (regulated actin). Ca 2+ binding alone produces partial stabilization of the active state. The extent of stabilization at a saturating Ca 2+ concentration depends on the isoform of the troponin subunits, the phosphorylation state of troponin, and, in the case of cardiac muscle, the presence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-producing mutants of troponin T and troponin I. Cardiac dysfunction is also associated with mutations of troponin C (TnC). Troponin C mutants A8V, C84Y, and D145E increase the Ca 2+ sensitivity of ATPase activity. We show that these mutants change the distribution of regulated actin states. The A8V and C84Y TnC mutants decreased the inactive B state distribution slightly at low Ca 2+ concentrations, but the D145E mutants had no effect on that state. All TnC mutants increased the level of the active M state compared to that of the wild type, at a saturating Ca 2+ concentration. Troponin complexes that contained two mutations that stabilize the active M state, A8V TnC and Δ14 TnT, appeared to be completely in the active state in the presence of only Ca 2+ . Because Ca 2+ gives full activation, in this situation, troponin must be capable of positioning tropomyosin in the active M state without the need for rigor myosin binding.

  5. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Månsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs.

  6. Cortactin Adopts a Globular Conformation and Bundles Actin into Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowieson, Nathan P.; King, Gordon; Cookson, David; Ross, Ian; Huber, Thomas; Hume, David A.; Kobe, Bostjan; Martin, Jennifer L. (Queensland); (Aust. Synch.)

    2008-08-21

    Cortactin is a filamentous actin-binding protein that plays a pivotal role in translating environmental signals into coordinated rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. The dynamic reorganization of actin in the cytoskeleton drives processes including changes in cell morphology, cell migration, and phagocytosis. In general, structural proteins of the cytoskeleton bind in the N-terminal region of cortactin and regulatory proteins in the C-terminal region. Previous structural studies have reported an extended conformation for cortactin. It is therefore unclear how cortactin facilitates cross-talk between structural proteins and their regulators. In the study presented here, circular dichroism, chemical cross-linking, and small angle x-ray scattering are used to demonstrate that cortactin adopts a globular conformation, thereby bringing distant parts of the molecule into close proximity. In addition, the actin bundling activity of cortactin is characterized, showing that fully polymerized actin filaments are bundled into sheet-like structures. We present a low resolution structure that suggests how the various domains of cortactin interact to coordinate its array of binding partners at sites of actin branching.

  7. Oral acetylsalicylic acid and prevalence of actinic keratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Schmitt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the influence of a regular oral use of acetylsalicylic acid in the prevalence of actinic keratosis. Methods: A case-control study with dermatologic outpatients above 50 years of age assessed between 2009 and 2011. Cases were defined as those who had been under regular use of oral acetylsalicylic acid for more than six consecutive months. The assessment focused on: age, sex, skin-type, tobacco smoking, use of medication, occurrence of individual or family skin cancer, and sunscreen and sun exposure habits. Actinic keratoses were counted in the medial region of the face and upper limbs. Counts were adjusted by co-variables based on a generalized linear model. Results: A total of 74 cases and 216 controls were assessed. The median time of acetylsalicylic acid use was 36 months. Cases differed from controls as to the highest age, highest prevalence of use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and fewer keratosis on the face and on the upper limbs (p<0.05. The multivariate model showed that the use of acetylsalicylic acid was associated to lower counts of face actinic keratosis and upper-limb erythematous actinic keratosis (p<0.05, regardless of other risk factors. Conclusion: The regular use of oral acetylsalicylic acid for more than six months was associated to a lower prevalence of actinic keratosis, especially facial and erythematous ones.

  8. Microscale Mechanics of Actin Networks During Dynamic Assembly and Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurmessa, Bekele; Robertson-Anderson, Rae; Ross, Jennifer; Nguyen, Dan; Saleh, Omar

    Actin is one of the key components of the cytoskeleton, enabling cells to move and divide while maintaining shape by dynamic polymerization, dissociation and crosslinking. Actin polymerization and network formation is driven by ATP hydrolysis and varies depending on the concentrations of actin monomers and crosslinking proteins. The viscoelastic properties of steady-state actin networks have been well-characterized, yet the mechanical properties of these non-equilibrium systems during dynamic assembly and disassembly remain to be understood. We use semipermeable microfluidic devices to induce in situ dissolution and re-polymerization of entangled and crosslinked actin networks, by varying ATP concentrations in real-time, while measuring the mechanical properties during disassembly and re-assembly. We use optical tweezers to sinusoidally oscillate embedded microspheres and measure the resulting force at set time-intervals and in different regions of the network during cyclic assembly/disassembly. We determine the time-dependent viscoelastic properties of non-equilibrium network intermediates and the reproducibility and homogeneity of network formation and dissolution. Results inform the role that cytoskeleton reorganization plays in the dynamic multifunctional mechanics of cells. NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255446) and a Scialog Collaborative Innovation Award funded by Research Corporation for Scientific Advancement (Grant No. 24192).

  9. All-Round Manipulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton by HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina Stella, Alberto; Turville, Stuart

    2018-02-05

    While significant progress has been made in terms of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy, treatment does not represent a cure and remains inaccessible to many people living with HIV. Continued mechanistic research into the viral life cycle and its intersection with many aspects of cellular biology are not only fundamental in the continued fight against HIV, but also provide many key observations of the workings of our immune system. Decades of HIV research have testified to the integral role of the actin cytoskeleton in both establishing and spreading the infection. Here, we review how the virus uses different strategies to manipulate cellular actin networks and increase the efficiency of various stages of its life cycle. While some HIV proteins seem able to bind to actin filaments directly, subversion of the cytoskeleton occurs indirectly by exploiting the power of actin regulatory proteins, which are corrupted at multiple levels. Furthermore, this manipulation is not restricted to a discrete class of proteins, but rather extends throughout all layers of the cytoskeleton. We discuss prominent examples of actin regulators that are exploited, neutralized or hijacked by the virus, and address how their coordinated deregulation can lead to changes in cellular behavior that promote viral spreading.

  10. Incorporation of β-actin loading control into zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindasamy, Natasha; Yan, MengJie; Jurasz, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Gelatin zymography and immunoblot are widely used gel electrophoresis techniques to study matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. Zymography is exquisitely sensitive but offers no loading control to ensure equal sample loading. Immunoblot is a 100-1000-fold less sensitive, but allows for the probing of a sample loading control such as β-actin to ensure accurate protein loading. In this report, we describe two simple protocols that combine gelatin zymography to study MMP-2 and -9 levels with an in-gel β-actin immunoblot loading control, thus combining sensitivity and accuracy in a single assay. The protocols incorporate the loading of molecular weight markers to demarcate MMP-2/-9 from the β-actin. The first protocol utilizes the overlay of a 10% zymography gel over a 5% Tris-Glycine separating gel from which the β-actin is transferred. The second protocol involves the direct transfer of the β-actin from a single 10% zymography gel.

  11. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine.

  12. Localization of actin in pollen tubes of Ornithogalum virens L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Stępka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The germinating pollen grain (in vivo on the stigma or in vitro in germination medium forms a pollen tube which transports the vegetative nucleus and generative cell/two sperm cells participating in the process of double fertilization. The growth of the tube and the transport of organelles and the cells occur due to two major motor systems existing in the pollen tubes of higher plants: the tubuline-dynein/kinesin and the actin-myosin system. In pollen tubes of Ornithogalum virens the actin filaments were labelled with TRITC-phalloidin (2 µg/ml in the PIPES buffer and the 10% sucrose, without the fixative and DMSO. Omission of the fixative and permeabilizing agent (DMSO allowed better preservation of the structure, and the "fluorescence" of actin was observed in living pollen tubes. Observations in CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscope showed that actin is distributed in the vicinity of the cell membrane. This could support the view that actin filaments and the plasmalemma form the pollen tube cortex along which the cytoplasmic movement of organelles, and cell transport occurs.

  13. Novel Actin-like Filament Structure from Clostridium tetani*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K.; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines. PMID:22514279

  14. Novel actin-like filament structure from Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C

    2012-06-15

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines.

  15. Addition of electrophilic lipids to actin alters filament structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayarre, Javier; Sanchez, David; Sanchez-Gomez, Francisco J.; Terron, Maria C.; Llorca, Oscar; Perez-Sala, Dolores

    2006-01-01

    Pathophysiological processes associated with oxidative stress lead to the generation of reactive lipid species. Among them, lipids bearing unsaturated aldehyde or ketone moieties can form covalent adducts with cysteine residues and modulate protein function. Through proteomic techniques we have identified actin as a target for the addition of biotinylated analogs of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins 15-deoxy-Δ 12,14 -PGJ 2 (15d-PGJ 2 ) and PGA 1 in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This modification could take place in vitro and mapped to the protein C-terminal end. Other electrophilic lipids, like the isoprostane 8-iso-PGA 1 and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, also bound to actin. The C-terminal region of actin is important for monomer-monomer interactions and polymerization. Electron microscopy showed that actin treated with 15d-PGJ 2 or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed filaments which were less abundant and displayed shorter length and altered structure. Streptavidin-gold staining allowed mapping of biotinylated 15d-PGJ 2 at sites of filament disruption. These results shed light on the structural implications of actin modification by lipid electrophiles

  16. Oral acetylsalicylic acid and prevalence of actinic keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Juliano; Miot, Hélio

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the influence of a regular oral use of acetylsalicylic acid in the prevalence of actinic keratosis. A case-control study with dermatologic outpatients above 50 years of age assessed between 2009 and 2011. Cases were defined as those who had been under regular use of oral acetylsalicylic acid for more than six consecutive months. The assessment focused on: age, sex, skin-type, tobacco smoking, use of medication, occurrence of individual or family skin cancer, and sunscreen and sun exposure habits. Actinic keratoses were counted in the medial region of the face and upper limbs. Counts were adjusted by co-variables based on a generalized linear model. A total of 74 cases and 216 controls were assessed. The median time of acetylsalicylic acid use was 36 months. Cases differed from controls as to the highest age, highest prevalence of use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and fewer keratosis on the face and on the upper limbs (pacetylsalicylic acid was associated to lower counts of face actinic keratosis and upper-limb erythematous actinic keratosis (pacetylsalicylic acid for more than six months was associated to a lower prevalence of actinic keratosis, especially facial and erythematous ones.

  17. Multiple roles for the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Milberg, Oleg; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis is the main mechanism utilized by specialized secretory cells to deliver molecules to the cell surface by virtue of membranous containers (i.e. secretory vesicles). The process involves a series of highly coordinated and sequential steps, which include the biogenesis of the vesicles, their delivery to the cell periphery, their fusion with the plasma membrane and the release of their content into the extracellular space. Each of these steps is regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the involvement of actin and its associated molecules during each of the exocytic steps in vertebrates, and suggest that the overall role of the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis is linked to the architecture and the physiology of the secretory cells under examination. Specifically, in neurons, neuroendocrine, endocrine, and hematopoietic cells, which contain small secretory vesicles that undergo rapid exocytosis (on the order of milliseconds), the actin cytoskeleton plays a role in pre-fusion events, where it acts primarily as a functional barrier and facilitates docking. In exocrine and other secretory cells, which contain large secretory vesicles that undergo slow exocytosis (seconds to minutes), the actin cytoskeleton plays a role in post-fusion events, where it regulates the dynamics of the fusion pore, facilitates the integration of the vesicles into the plasma membrane, provides structural support, and promotes the expulsion of large cargo molecules. PMID:22986507

  18. Aging of Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Natasa; Lim, Jae-Young; Miljkovic, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Aging has become an important topic for scientific research because life expectancy and the number of men and women in older age groups have increased dramatically in the last century. This is true in most countries of the world including the Republic of Korea and the United States. From a rehabilitation perspective, the most important associated issue is a progressive decline in functional capacity and independence. Sarcopenia is partly responsible for this decline. Many changes underlying the loss of muscle mass and force-generating capacity of skeletal muscle can be understood at the cellular and molecular levels. Muscle size and architecture are both altered with advanced adult age. Further, changes in myofibers include impairments in several physiological domains including muscle fiber activation, excitation-contraction coupling, actin-myosin cross-bridge interaction, energy production, and repair and regeneration. A thorough understanding of these alterations can lead to the design of improved preventative and rehabilitative interventions, such as personalized exercise training programs. PMID:25932410

  19. Effects of cyclic stretch on proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells and their differentiation to smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazanfari, Samane; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types such as vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated influence of cyclic stretch on proliferation of hMSCs for different loading conditions, alignment of actin filaments, and consequent differentiation to SMCs. Isolated cells from bone marrow were exposed to cyclic stretch utilizing a customized device. Cell proliferation was examined by MTT assay, alignment of actin fibers by a designed image processing code, and cell differentiation by fluorescence staining. Results indicated promoted proliferation of hMSCs by cyclic strain, enhanced by elevated strain amplitude and number of cycles. Such loading regulated smooth muscle α-actin, and reoriented actin fibers. Cyclic stretch led to differentiation of hMSCs to SMCs without addition of growth factor. It was concluded that applying appropriate loading treatment on hMSCs could enhance proliferation capability, and produce functional SMCs for engineered tissues.

  20. Rac1 Is a Novel Regulator of Contraction-Stimulated Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas E.; Kleinert, Maximilian; Mouatt, Joshua R.; Maarbjerg, Stine J.; Jeppesen, Jacob; Prats, Clara; Chiu, Tim T.; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Klip, Amira; Schjerling, Peter; Richter, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase, Rac1, is necessary for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Muscle contraction increases glucose transport and represents an alternative signaling pathway to insulin. Whether Rac1 is activated by muscle contraction and regulates contraction-induced glucose uptake is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of in vivo exercise and ex vivo muscle contractions on Rac1 signaling and its regulatory role in glucose uptake in mice and humans. Muscle Rac1-GTP binding was increased after exercise in mice (∼60–100%) and humans (∼40%), and this activation was AMP-activated protein kinase independent. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscle by 55% in soleus and by 20–58% in extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P Rac1 knockout mice. Furthermore, depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton decreased contraction-stimulated glucose uptake by 100% and 62% (P Rac1 is activated during muscle contraction in murine and human skeletal muscle and suggest that Rac1 and possibly the actin cytoskeleton are novel regulators of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:23274900

  1. Spatially restricted actin-regulatory signaling contributes to synapse morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Daniel A.; Cahill, Michael E.; Tulisiak, Christopher T.; Geinisman, Yuri; Penzes, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton in dendritic spines is organized into microdomains, but how signaling molecules that regulate actin are spatially governed is incompletely understood. Here we examine how the localization of the RacGEF kalirin-7, a well-characterized regulator of actin in spines, varies as a function of postsynaptic density (PSD) area and spine volume. Using serial section electron microscopy (EM), we find that extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, expression of kalirin-7 varies directly with synapse size and spine volume. Moreover, we find that overall expression levels of kalirin-7 differ in spines bearing perforated and non-perforated synapses, due primarily to extrasynaptic pools of kalirin-7 expression in the former. Overall, our findings indicate that kalirin-7 is differentially compartmentalized in spines as a function of both synapse morphology and spine size. PMID:22458534

  2. Spiral actin-polymerization waves can generate amoeboidal cell crawling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreher, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Kruse, K.

    2014-05-01

    Amoeboidal cell crawling on solid substrates is characterized by protrusions that seemingly appear randomly along the cell periphery and drive the cell forward. For many cell types, it is known that the protrusions result from polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, little is known about how the formation of protrusions is triggered and whether the appearance of subsequent protrusions is coordinated. Recently, the spontaneous formation of actin-polymerization waves was observed. These waves have been proposed to orchestrate the cytoskeletal dynamics during cell crawling. Here, we study the impact of cytoskeletal polymerization waves on cell migration using a phase-field approach. In addition to directionally moving cells, we find states reminiscent of amoeboidal cell crawling. In this framework, new protrusions are seen to emerge from a nucleation process, generating spiral actin waves in the cell interior. Nucleation of new spirals does not require noise, but occurs in a state that is apparently displaying spatio-temporal chaos.

  3. Condensation of F-Actin by Dimensional Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Robijn; Christian, Cyron; Mueller, Kei; Bausch, Andreas; Wall, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We present a Brownian Dynamics simulation of the equilibrium condensation of F-actin in the presence of linker molecules. The filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, using finite element analysis. At low linker concentrations, the systems forms a gel whose physical properties do not depend on the linker molecules. If the linker concentration is increased then for isotropic linkers only a single mode of condensation is encountered: bundle formation. If the linker molecules impose a preferential angle between F-actin filaments, then condensation takes place either into a either a hexatic or squaratic two-dimensional liquid crystal phase or into a heterogeneous cluster. Condensation is driven by competition between linker and filament entropy, which imposes dimensional reduction on the F-actin aggregate.

  4. Formation of actin networks in microfluidic concentration gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalja eStrelnikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of cytoskeletal networks are contributors in a number of mechanical responses of cells including cellular deformation and locomotion, and are crucial for the proper action of living cells. Local chemical gradients modulate cytoskeletal functionality including the interactions of the cytoskeleton with other cellular components. Actin is a major constituent of the cytoskeleton. Introducing a microfluidic-based platform, we explored the impact of concentration gradients on the formation and structural properties of actin networks. Microfluidics-controlled flow-free steady state experimental conditions allow for the generation of chemical gradients of different profiles, such as linear or step-like. We discovered specific features of actin networks emerging in defined gradients. In particular, we analyzed the effects of spatial conditions on network properties, bending rigidities of network links, and the network elasticity.

  5. Identification of Actin-Binding Proteins from Maize Pollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staiger, C.J.

    2004-01-13

    Specific Aims--The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of how actin filament organization and dynamics are controlled in flowering plants. Specifically, we proposed to identify unique proteins with novel functions by investigating biochemical strategies for the isolation and characterization of actin-binding proteins (ABPs). In particular, our hunt was designed to identify capping proteins and nucleation factors. The specific aims included: (1) to use F-actin affinity chromatography (FAAC) as a general strategy to isolate pollen ABPs (2) to produce polyclonal antisera and perform subcellular localization in pollen tubes (3) to isolate cDNA clones for the most promising ABPs (4) to further purify and characterize ABP interactions with actin in vitro. Summary of Progress By employing affinity chromatography on F-actin or DNase I columns, we have identified at least two novel ABPs from pollen, PrABP80 (gelsolin-like) and ZmABP30, We have also cloned and expressed recombinant protein, as well as generated polyclonal antisera, for 6 interesting ABPs from Arabidopsis (fimbrin AtFIM1, capping protein a/b (AtCP), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (AtCAP), AtCapG & AtVLN1). We performed quantitative analyses of the biochemical properties for two of these previously uncharacterized ABPs (fimbrin and capping protein). Our studies provide the first evidence for fimbrin activity in plants, demonstrate the existence of barbed-end capping factors and a gelsolin-like severing activity, and provide the quantitative data necessary to establish and test models of F-actin organization and dynamics in plant cells.

  6. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Arnette

    Full Text Available The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms.

  7. Modelling phagosomal lipid networks that regulate actin assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Roland

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When purified phagosomes are incubated in the presence of actin under appropriate conditions, microfilaments start growing from the membrane in a process that is affected by ATP and the lipid composition of the membrane. Isolated phagosomes are metabolically active organelles that contain enzymes and metabolites necessary for lipid interconversion. Hence, addition of ATP, lipids, and actin to the system alter the steady-state composition of the phagosomal membrane at the same time that the actin nucleation is initiated. Our aim was to model all these processes in parallel. Results We compiled detailed experimental data on the effects of different lipids and ATP on actin nucleation and we investigated experimentally lipid interconversion and ATP metabolism in phagosomes by using suitable radioactive compounds. In a first step, a complex lipid network interconnected by chemical reactions catalyzed by known enzymes was modelled in COPASI (Complex Pathway Simulator. However, several lines of experimental evidence indicated that only the phosphatidylinositol branch of the network was active, an observation that dramatically reduced the number of parameters in the model. The results also indicated that a lipid network-independent ATP-consuming activity should be included in the model. When this activity was introduced, the set of differential equations satisfactorily reproduced the experimental data. On the other hand, a molecular mechanism connecting membrane lipids, ATP, and the actin nucleation process is still missing. We therefore adopted a phenomenological (black-box approach to represent the empirical observations. We proposed that lipids and ATP influence the dynamic interconversion between active and inactive actin nucleation sites. With this simple model, all the experimental data were satisfactorily fitted with a single positive parameter per lipid and ATP. Conclusion By establishing an active 'dialogue' between an

  8. Health related quality of life in patients with actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennvall, Gunnel Ragnarson; Norlin, J M; Malmberg, I

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common skin condition that may progress to non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). The disease may influence Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), but studies of HRQoL in patients with AK are limited. The purpose of the study was to analyze HRQoL in patients......-center setting. Dermatologists assessed AK severity and patients completed: Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life Questionnaire (AKQoL), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), and EQ-5D-5 L including EQ-VAS. Differences between categorical subgroups were tested with Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The relationship between...

  9. Actin and Arp2/3 localize at the centrosome of interphase cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan, E-mail: jan.gettemans@vib-ugent.be

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Actin was detected at the centrosome with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. {yields} Centrosomal actin was found in interphase but not mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Neither the anti-actin antibody C4 that binds to globular, monomer actin, nor the anti-actin antibody 2G2 that recognizes the nuclear conformation of actin detect actin at the centrosome. {yields} The Arp2/3 complex transiently localizes at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. -- Abstract: Although many actin binding proteins such as cortactin and the Arp2/3 activator WASH localize at the centrosome, the presence and conformation of actin at the centrosome has remained elusive. Here, we report the localization of actin at the centrosome in interphase but not in mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. Centrosomal actin was detected with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. In addition, we report the transient presence of the Arp2/3 complex at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. Overexpression of an Arp2/3 component resulted in expansion of the pericentriolar matrix and selective accumulation of the Arp2/3 component in the pericentriolar matrix. Altogether, we hypothesize that the centrosome transiently recruits Arp2/3 to perform processes such as centrosome separation prior to mitotic entry, whereas the observed constitutive centrosomal actin staining in interphase cells reinforces the current model of actin-based centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge in migrating cells.

  10. Actin in Mung Bean Mitochondria and Implications for Its Function[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yih-Shan; Cheng, Ning; Hsiao, Lin-June; Annamalai, Arunachalam; Jauh, Guang-Yuh; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Dai, Hwa; Chiang, Kwen-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Here, a large fraction of plant mitochondrial actin was found to be resistant to protease and high-salt treatments, suggesting it was protected by mitochondrial membranes. A portion of this actin became sensitive to protease or high-salt treatment after removal of the mitochondrial outer membrane, indicating that some actin is located inside the mitochondrial outer membrane. The import of an actin–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein into the mitochondria in a transgenic plant, actin:GFP, was visualized in living cells and demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunoblot analyses. Polymerized actin was found in mitochondria of actin:GFP plants and in mung bean (Vigna radiata). Notably, actin associated with mitochondria purified from early-developing cotyledons during seed germination was sensitive to high-salt and protease treatments. With cotyledon ageing, mitochondrial actin became more resistant to both treatments. The progressive import of actin into cotyledon mitochondria appeared to occur in concert with the conversion of quiescent mitochondria into active forms during seed germination. The binding of actin to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was demonstrated by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Porin and ADP/ATP carrier proteins were also found in mtDNA-protein complexes. Treatment with an actin depolymerization reagent reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential and triggered the release of cytochrome C. The potential function of mitochondrial actin and a possible actin import pathway are discussed. PMID:21984697

  11. Mechanical stimulation induces formin-dependent assembly of a perinuclear actin rim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiaowei; Li, Qingsen; Mogilner, Alex; Bershadsky, Alexander D; Shivashankar, G V

    2015-05-19

    Cells constantly sense and respond to mechanical signals by reorganizing their actin cytoskeleton. Although a number of studies have explored the effects of mechanical stimuli on actin dynamics, the immediate response of actin after force application has not been studied. We designed a method to monitor the spatiotemporal reorganization of actin after cell stimulation by local force application. We found that force could induce transient actin accumulation in the perinuclear region within ∼ 2 min. This actin reorganization was triggered by an intracellular Ca(2+) burst induced by force application. Treatment with the calcium ionophore A23187 recapitulated the force-induced perinuclear actin remodeling. Blocking of actin polymerization abolished this process. Overexpression of Klarsicht, ANC-1, Syne Homology (KASH) domain to displace nesprins from the nuclear envelope did not abolish Ca(2+)-dependent perinuclear actin assembly. However, the endoplasmic reticulum- and nuclear membrane-associated inverted formin-2 (INF2), a potent actin polymerization activator (mutations of which are associated with several genetic diseases), was found to be important for perinuclear actin assembly. The perinuclear actin rim structure colocalized with INF2 on stimulation, and INF2 depletion resulted in attenuation of the rim formation. Our study suggests that cells can respond rapidly to external force by remodeling perinuclear actin in a unique Ca(2+)- and INF2-dependent manner.

  12. Two Functionally Distinct Sources of Actin Monomers Supply the Leading Edge of Lamellipodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Vitriol

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lamellipodia, the sheet-like protrusions of motile cells, consist of networks of actin filaments (F-actin regulated by the ordered assembly from and disassembly into actin monomers (G-actin. Traditionally, G-actin is thought to exist as a homogeneous pool. Here, we show that there are two functionally and molecularly distinct sources of G-actin that supply lamellipodial actin networks. G-actin originating from the cytosolic pool requires the monomer-binding protein thymosin β4 (Tβ4 for optimal leading-edge localization, is targeted to formins, and is responsible for creating an elevated G/F-actin ratio that promotes membrane protrusion. The second source of G-actin comes from recycled lamellipodia F-actin. Recycling occurs independently of Tβ4 and appears to regulate lamellipodia homeostasis. Tβ4-bound G-actin specifically localizes to the leading edge because it does not interact with Arp2/3-mediated polymerization sites found throughout the lamellipodia. These findings demonstrate that actin networks can be constructed from multiple sources of monomers with discrete spatiotemporal functions.

  13. Alpha-actinin in different invertebrate muscle cell types of Drosophila melanogaster, the earthworm Eisenia foetida, and the snail Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, M; Astier, C; Fraile, B; Paniagua, R

    1999-01-01

    The presence and distribution of alpha-actinin has been studied in several invertebrate muscle cell types. These comprised transversely striated muscle (flight muscle) from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, transversely striated muscle (heart muscle) from the snail Helix aspersa, obliquely striated muscle (body wall muscle) from the earthworm Eisenia foetida, smooth muscle (retractor muscle) from H. aspersa, and smooth muscle (outer muscular layer of the pseudoheart) from E. foetida. The study was carried by means of Western blot analysis, ELISA, and immunohistochemical electron microscopy, using anti alpha-actinin antibody. Immunoreaction for a protein with the same molecular weight as that of mammalian alpha-actinin was detected in all muscle types studied, although the amount and intensity of immunoreaction varied among them. In the insect muscle, immunolabelling was found along the whole Z-line. In both the transversely striated muscle from the snail and the obliquely striated muscle from the earthworm, immunolabelling did not occupy the whole Z-line but showed discontinuous, orderly arranged patches along the Z-line course. In the two smooth muscles studied (snail and earthworm), immunolabelling was limited to small patches which did not show an apparently ordered distribution. Since it is assumed that alpha-actinin is located at the anchorage sites for actin filaments, present observations suggest that, only in the Drosophila muscle, actin filaments are parallelly arranged in all their course, whereas in the other invertebrate muscles studied these filaments converge on discontinuously distributed anchorage sites.

  14. The actin cytoskeleton in root hairs: all is fine at the tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous actin forms characteristic bundles in plant cells that facilitate cytoplasmic streaming. In contrast, networks of actin exhibiting fast turnover are found especially near sites of rapid cell expansion. These networks may serve various functions including delivering and retaining vesicles

  15. eNOS S-nitrosylates β-actin on Cys374 and regulates PKC-θ at the immune synapse by impairing actin binding to profilin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena García-Ortiz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton coordinates the organization of signaling microclusters at the immune synapse (IS; however, the mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We show here that nitric oxide (NO generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS controls the coalescence of protein kinase C-θ (PKC-θ at the central supramolecular activation cluster (c-SMAC of the IS. eNOS translocated with the Golgi to the IS and partially colocalized with F-actin around the c-SMAC. This resulted in reduced actin polymerization and centripetal retrograde flow of β-actin and PKC-θ from the lamellipodium-like distal (d-SMAC, promoting PKC-θ activation. Furthermore, eNOS-derived NO S-nitrosylated β-actin on Cys374 and impaired actin binding to profilin-1 (PFN1, as confirmed with the transnitrosylating agent S-nitroso-L-cysteine (Cys-NO. The importance of NO and the formation of PFN1-actin complexes on the regulation of PKC-θ was corroborated by overexpression of PFN1- and actin-binding defective mutants of β-actin (C374S and PFN1 (H119E, respectively, which reduced the coalescence of PKC-θ at the c-SMAC. These findings unveil a novel NO-dependent mechanism by which the actin cytoskeleton controls the organization and activation of signaling microclusters at the IS.

  16. Inferring crossbridge properties from skeletal muscle energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, C J; Woledge, R C; Curtin, N A

    2010-01-01

    Work is generated in muscle by myosin crossbridges during their interaction with the actin filament. The energy from which the work is produced is the free energy change of ATP hydrolysis and efficiency quantifies the fraction of the energy supplied that is converted into work. The purpose of this review is to compare the efficiency of frog skeletal muscle determined from measurements of work output and either heat production or chemical breakdown with the work produced per crossbridge cycle predicted on the basis of the mechanical responses of contracting muscle to rapid length perturbations. We review the literature to establish the likely maximum crossbridge efficiency for frog skeletal muscle (0.4) and, using this value, calculate the maximum work a crossbridge can perform in a single attachment to actin (33 x 10(-21) J). To see whether this amount of work is consistent with our understanding of crossbridge mechanics, we examine measurements of the force responses of frog muscle to fast length perturbations and, taking account of filament compliance, determine the crossbridge force-extension relationship and the velocity dependences of the fraction of crossbridges attached and average crossbridge strain. These data are used in combination with a Huxley-Simmons-type model of the thermodynamics of the attached crossbridge to determine whether this type of model can adequately account for the observed muscle efficiency. Although it is apparent that there are still deficiencies in our understanding of how to accurately model some aspects of ensemble crossbridge behaviour, this comparison shows that crossbridge energetics are consistent with known crossbridge properties.

  17. The role of mechanics in actin stress fiber kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, E L; Genin, G M

    2013-10-01

    The dynamic responses of actin stress fibers within a cell's cytoskeleton are central to the development and maintenance of healthy tissues and organs. Disturbances to these underlie a broad range of pathologies. Because of the importance of these responses, extensive experiments have been conducted in vitro to characterize actin cytoskeleton dynamics of cells cultured upon two-dimensional substrata, and the first experiments have been conducted for cells within three-dimensional tissue models. Three mathematical models exist for predicting the dynamic behaviors observed. Surprisingly, despite differing viewpoints on how actin stress fibers are stabilized or destabilized, all of these models are predictive of a broad range of available experimental data. Coarsely, the models of Kaunas and co-workers adopt a strategy whereby mechanical stretch can hasten the depolymerization actin stress fibers that turn over constantly, while the models of Desphande and co-workers adopt a strategy whereby mechanical stress is required to activate the formation of stress fibers and subsequently stabilize them. In three-dimensional culture, elements of both approaches appear necessary to predict observed phenomena, as embodied by the model of Lee et al. After providing a critical review of existing models, we propose lines of experimentation that might be able to test the different principles underlying their kinetic laws. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fragmentation of Human Erythrocyte Actin following Exposure to Hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Risso, A.; Santamaria, B.; Pistarino, E.; Cosulich, M. E.; Pompach, Petr; Bezouška, Karel; Antonutto, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 1 (2010), s. 6-13 ISSN 0001-5792 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : beta-Actin * Erythrocytes * Hypoxia Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2010

  19. T cell antigen receptor activation and actin cytoskeleton remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sudha; Curado, Silvia; Mayya, Viveka

    2013-01-01

    T cells constitute a crucial arm of the adaptive immune system and their optimal function is required for a healthy immune response. After the initial step of T cell-receptor (TCR) triggering by antigenic peptide complexes on antigen presenting cell (APC), the T cell exhibits extensive cytoskeletal remodeling. This cytoskeletal remodeling leads to formation of an “immunological synapse” [1] characterized by regulated clustering, segregation and movement of receptors at the interface. Synapse formation regulates T cell activation and response to antigenic peptides and proceeds via feedback between actin cytoskeleton and TCR signaling. Actin polymerization participates in various events during the synapse formation, maturation, and eventually its disassembly. There is increasing knowledge about the actin effectors that couple TCR activation to actin rearrangements [2, 3], and how defects in these effectors translate into impairment of T cell activation. In this review we aim to summarize and integrate parts of what is currently known about this feedback process. In addition, in light of recent advancements in our understanding of TCR triggering and translocation at the synapse, we speculate on the organizational and functional diversity of microfilament architecture in the T cell. PMID:23680625

  20. Interconnection between actin cytoskeleton and plant defense signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janda, Martin; Matoušková, J.; Burketová, Lenka; Valentová, O.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 11 (2014) ISSN 1559-2316 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/1654 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Actin * Cytoskeleton * Pathogen Subject RIV: ED - Physiology http://gateway.isiknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=MEDLINE&DestLinkType=FullRecord&UT=25482795

  1. Control of the actin cytoskeleton in plant cell growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussey, P.J.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Deeks, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Plant cells grow through increases in volume and cell wall surface area. The mature morphology of a plant cell is a product of the differential rates of expansion between neighboring zones of the cell wall during this process. Filamentous actin arrays are associated with plant cell growth, and the

  2. The actin Cytoskeleton in Root Hairs: a cell elongation device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in root hair development. It is involved in both the delivery of growth materials to the expanding tip of root hairs and the regulation of the area of tip growth. This review starts with a discussion of the techniques that are available to visualize the

  3. Force Exertion and Transmission in Cross-Linked Actin Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Samantha

    Cells are responsive to external cues in their environment telling them to proliferate or migrate within their surrounding tissue. Sensing of cues that are mechanical in nature, such stiffness of a tissue or forces transmitted from other cells, is believed to involve the cytoskeleton of a cell. The cytoskeleton is a complex network of proteins consisting of polymers that provide structural support, motor proteins that remodel these structures, and many others. We do not yet have a complete understanding of how cytoskeletal components respond to either internal or external mechanical force and stiffness. Such an understanding should involve mechanisms by which constituent molecules, such as motor proteins, are responsive to mechanics. Additionally, physical models of how forces are transmitted through biopolymer networks are necessary. My research has focused on networks formed by the cytoskeletal filament actin and the molecular motor protein myosin II. Actin filaments form networks and bundles that form a structural framework of the cell, and myosin II slides actin filaments. In this thesis, we show that stiffness of an elastic load that opposes myosin-generated actin sliding has a very sharp effect on the myosin force output in simulations. Secondly, we show that the stiffness and connectivity of cytoskeletal filaments regulates the contractility and anisotropy of network deformations that transmit force on material length scales. Together, these results have implications for predicting and interpreting the deformations and forces in biopolymeric active materials.

  4. Onchocercal DNA amplification using beta actin gene primers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onchocercal DNA amplification using beta actin gene primers compared with first internal transcribed spacer sequences for monitoring onchocerciasis eradication strategy. ... Out of the 12 amplicons in agarose gel, there were 6 sharp and 6 faint bands of 100bp molecular weight as documented. The sharp bands included 3 ...

  5. The roles of the actin cytoskeleton in fear memory formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael eLamprecht

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation and storage of fear memory is needed to adapt behavior and avoid danger during subsequent fearful events. However, fear memory may also play a significant role in stress and anxiety disorders. When fear becomes disproportionate to that necessary to cope with a given stimulus, or begins to occur in inappropriate situations, a fear or anxiety disorder exists. Thus, the study of cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning fear memory may shed light on the formation of memory and on anxiety and stress related disorders. Evidence indicates that fear learning leads to changes in neuronal synaptic transmission and morphology in brain areas underlying fear memory formation including the amygdala and hippocampus. The actin cytoskeleton has been shown to participate in these key neuronal processes. Recent findings show that the actin cytoskeleton is needed for fear memory formation and extinction. Moreover, the actin cytoskeleton is involved in synaptic plasticity and in neuronal morphogenesis in brain areas that mediate fear memory. The actin cytoskeleton may therefore mediate between synaptic transmission during fear learning and long-term cellular alterations mandatory for fear memory formation.

  6. Transportation of Nanoscale Cargoes by Myosin Propelled Actin Filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persson, Malin; Gullberg, Maria; Tolf, Conny; Lindberg, A. Michael; Mansson, Alf; Kocer, Armagan

    2013-01-01

    Myosin II propelled actin filaments move ten times faster than kinesin driven microtubules and are thus attractive candidates as cargo-transporting shuttles in motor driven lab-on-a-chip devices. In addition, actomyosin-based transportation of nanoparticles is useful in various fundamental studies.

  7. Real-world approach to actinic keratosis management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirschka, Thomas; Gupta, Girish; Micali, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a chronic skin disease in which multiple clinical and subclinical lesions co-exist across large areas of sun-exposed skin, resulting in field cancerisation. Lesions require treatment because of their potential to transform into invasive squamous cell carcinoma. This arti...

  8. Decidable and undecidable arithmetic functions in actin filament networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is very sensitive to its environment, and reacts to stimuli with appropriate motions. Both the sensory and motor stages of these reactions are explained by hydrodynamic processes, based on fluid dynamics, with the participation of actin filament networks. This paper is devoted to actin filament networks as a computational medium. The point is that actin filaments, with contributions from many other proteins like myosin, are sensitive to extracellular stimuli (attractants as well as repellents), and appear and disappear at different places in the cell to change aspects of the cell structure—e.g. its shape. By assembling and disassembling actin filaments, some unicellular organisms, like Amoeba proteus, can move in response to various stimuli. As a result, these organisms can be considered a simple reversible logic gate—extracellular signals being its inputs and motions its outputs. In this way, we can implement various logic gates on amoeboid behaviours. These networks can embody arithmetic functions within p-adic valued logic. Furthermore, within these networks we can define the so-called diagonalization for deducing undecidable arithmetic functions.

  9. Roles of cortical actin microfilament patterning in division plane orientation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojo, Kei H; Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Yoshida, Yuya; Yasuhara, Hiroki; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2013-09-01

    In land plant cells, division planes are precisely predicted by the microtubule preprophase band and cortical actin microfilament pattern called the actin-depleted zone or actin microfilament twin peaks. However, the function of cortical actin microfilament patterning is not clear. In this study, we report that treatment with the inhibitor 2,3,5-triiodobenzonic acid (TIBA) or jasplakinolide increased the amount of thick actin microfilaments in tobacco BY-2 cells at interphase. However, during the division of BY-2 cells, these inhibitors did not induce visible alteration of actin microfilament thickness but altered cortical actin microfilament patterning without significant disorganization of the microtubule preprophase band. TIBA treatment induced a single intensity peak of actin microfilament distribution around the cell center, whereas jasplakinolide caused the appearance of triple peaks relative to the distribution of actin microfilament around the cell center, in approximately one-third of the cells at metaphase. Dual observations of microtubules and actin microfilaments revealed that abnormal cortical actin microfilament patterning with single or triple peaks is correlated with oblique mitotic spindles in BY-2 cells. In addition, oblique cell plates were frequently observed in BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis thaliana root cells treated with TIBA or jasplakinolide. These results provide evidence for the critical roles of cortical actin microfilament patterning in spindle and cell plate orientation.

  10. DeActs : genetically encoded tools for perturbing the actin cytoskeleton in single cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harterink, Martin; Santos Esteves da Silva, Marta; Will, Lena; Turan, Julia; Ibrahim, Adiljan; Lang, Alexander E; Van Battum, Eljo Y; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Kapitein, Lukas C; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Barres, Ben A; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Zuchero, J Bradley

    2017-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential for many fundamental biological processes, but tools for directly manipulating actin dynamics are limited to cell-permeable drugs that preclude single-cell perturbations. Here we describe DeActs, genetically encoded actin-modifying polypeptides, which effectively

  11. Multidrug Resistance-Related Protein 1 (MRP1) Function and Localization Depend on Cortical Actin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Ina; Klappe, Karin; Ercan, Cigdem; Kok, Jan Willem

    MRP1 (ABCC1) is known to be localized in lipid rafts. Here we show in two different cell lines that localization of Mrp1/MRP1 (Abcc1/ABCC1) in lipid rafts and its function as an efflux pump are dependent on cortical actin. Latrunculin B disrupts both cortical actin and actin stress fibers. This

  12. Probing cytoplasmic organization and the actin cytoskeleton of plant cells with optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Honing, van der H.S.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2010-01-01

    In interphase plant cells, the actin cytoskeleton is essential for intracellular transport and organization. To fully understand how the actin cytoskeleton functions as the structural basis for cytoplasmic organization, both molecular and physical aspects of the actin organization have to be

  13. Arginylation of Myosin Heavy Chain Regulates Skeletal Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabelle S. Cornachione

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 deletion driven by the skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm promoter. Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal; however, their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Mass spectrometry of isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins, including myosin heavy chain, arginylated on specific sites. Atomic force microscopy measurements of contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of myosin filaments, could be fully rescued by rearginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin.

  14. HSP20 phosphorylation and airway smooth muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Ba

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Ba1, Cherie A Singer1, Manoj Tyagi2, Colleen Brophy3, Josh E Baker4, Christine Cremo4, Andrew Halayko5, William T Gerthoffer21Department of Pharmacology, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, USA; 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA; 3Harrington Department of Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, USA; 5Departments of Physiology and Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CanadaAbstract: HSP20 (HSPB6 is a small heat shock protein expressed in smooth muscles that is hypothesized to inhibit contraction when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. To investigate this hypothesis in airway smooth muscle (ASM we showed that HSP20 was constitutively expressed as well as being inducible in cultured hASM cells by treatment with 1 µM isoproterenol or 10 µM salmeterol. In contrast, a mixture of proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor α, and interferon γ inhibited expression of HSP20 by about 50% in 48 hours. To determine whether phosphorylation of HSP20 is sufficient to induce relaxation, canine tracheal smooth muscle was treated with a cell permeant phosphopeptide that mimics the phosphorylation of HSP20. The HSP20 phosphopeptide antagonized carbacholinduced contraction by 60% with no change in myosin light chain phosphorylation. Recombinant full length HSP20 inhibited skeletal actin binding to smooth muscle myosin subfragment 1 (S1, and recombinant cell permeant TAT-HSP20 S16D mutant reduced F-actin filaments in cultured hASM cells. Carbachol stimulation of canine tracheal smooth muscle tissue caused redistribution of HSP20 from large macromolecular complexes (200–500 kDa to smaller complexes (<60 kDa. The results are consistent with HSP20 expression and macromolecular structure being dynamically regulated in airway

  15. Analysis of actin FLAP dynamics in the leading lamella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor R Kuznetsov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The transport of labeled G-actin from the mid-lamella region to the leading edge in a highly motile malignant rat fibroblast line has been studied using fluorescence localization after photobleaching or FLAP, and the transit times recorded in these experiments were so fast that simple diffusion was deemed an insufficient explanation (see Zicha et al., Science, v. 300, pp. 142-145 [1].We re-examine the Zicha FLAP experiments using a two-phase reactive interpenetrating flow formalism to model the cytoplasm and the transport dynamics of bleached and unbleached actin. By allowing an improved treatment of effects related to the retrograde flow of the cytoskeleton and of the geometry and finite thickness of the lamella, this new analysis reveals a mechanism that can realistically explain the timing and the amplitude of all the FLAP signals observed in [1] without invoking special transport modalities.We conclude that simple diffusion is sufficient to explain the observed transport rates, and that variations in the transport of labeled actin through the lamella are minor and not likely to be the cause of the observed physiological variations among different segments of the leading edge. We find that such variations in labeling can easily arise from differences and changes in the microscopic actin dynamics inside the edge compartment, and that the key dynamical parameter in this regard is the so-called "dilatation rate" (the velocity of cytoskeletal retrograde flow divided by a characteristic dimension of the edge compartment where rapid polymerization occurs. If our dilatation hypothesis is correct, the transient kinetics of bleached actin relocalization constitute a novel and very sensitive method for probing the cytoskeletal dynamics in leading edge micro-environments which are otherwise very difficult to directly interrogate.

  16. Analysis of actin FLAP dynamics in the leading lamella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Igor R; Herant, Marc; Dembo, Micah

    2010-04-15

    The transport of labeled G-actin from the mid-lamella region to the leading edge in a highly motile malignant rat fibroblast line has been studied using fluorescence localization after photobleaching or FLAP, and the transit times recorded in these experiments were so fast that simple diffusion was deemed an insufficient explanation (see Zicha et al., Science, v. 300, pp. 142-145 [1]). We re-examine the Zicha FLAP experiments using a two-phase reactive interpenetrating flow formalism to model the cytoplasm and the transport dynamics of bleached and unbleached actin. By allowing an improved treatment of effects related to the retrograde flow of the cytoskeleton and of the geometry and finite thickness of the lamella, this new analysis reveals a mechanism that can realistically explain the timing and the amplitude of all the FLAP signals observed in [1] without invoking special transport modalities. We conclude that simple diffusion is sufficient to explain the observed transport rates, and that variations in the transport of labeled actin through the lamella are minor and not likely to be the cause of the observed physiological variations among different segments of the leading edge. We find that such variations in labeling can easily arise from differences and changes in the microscopic actin dynamics inside the edge compartment, and that the key dynamical parameter in this regard is the so-called "dilatation rate" (the velocity of cytoskeletal retrograde flow divided by a characteristic dimension of the edge compartment where rapid polymerization occurs). If our dilatation hypothesis is correct, the transient kinetics of bleached actin relocalization constitute a novel and very sensitive method for probing the cytoskeletal dynamics in leading edge micro-environments which are otherwise very difficult to directly interrogate.

  17. Differential sensitivity to detergents of actin cytoskeleton from nerve endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubí, Roger; Matas, Lluís A; Pou, Marta; Aguilera, José; Gil, Carles

    2013-11-01

    Detergent-resistant membranes (DRM), an experimental model used to study lipid rafts, are typically extracted from cells by means of detergent treatment and subsequent ultracentrifugation in density gradients, Triton X-100 being the detergent of choice in most of the works. Since lipid rafts are membrane microdomains rich in cholesterol, depletion of this component causes solubilization of DRM with detergent. In previous works from our group, the lack of effect of cholesterol depletion on DRM solubilization with Triton X-100 was detected in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. In consequence, the aim of the present work is to explore reasons for this observation, analyzing the possible role of the actin cytoskeleton, as well as the use of an alternative detergent, Brij 98, to overcome the insensitivity to Triton X-100 of cholesterol-depleted DRM. Brij 98 yields Brij-DRM that are highly dependent on cholesterol, since marker proteins (Flotillin-1 and Thy-1), as well as actin, appear solubilized after MCD treatment. Pretreatment with Latrunculin A results in a significant increase in Flotillin-1, Thy-1 and actin solubilization by Triton X-100 after cholesterol depletion. Studies with transmission electron microscopy show that combined treatment with MCD and Latrunculin A leads to a significant increase in solubilization of DRM with Triton X-100. Thus, Triton-DRM resistance to cholesterol depletion can be explained, at least partially, thanks to the scaffolding action of the actin cytoskeleton, without discarding differential effects of Brij 98 and Triton X-100 on specific membrane components. In conclusion, the detergent of choice is important when events that depend on the actin cytoskeleton are going to be studied. © 2013.

  18. Muscle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, G; Bugiardini, E; Cardani, R

    2012-04-01

    Muscle biopsy is required to provide a definitive diagnosis in many neuromuscular disorders. It can be performed through an open or needle technique under local anesthesia. The major limitations of the needle biopsy technique are the sample size, which is smaller than that obtained with open biopsy, and the impossibility of direct visualization of the sampling site. However, needle biopsy is a less invasive procedure than open biopsy and is particularly indicated for diagnosis of neuromuscular disease in infancy and childhood. The biopsied muscle should be one affected by the disease but not be too weak or too atrophic. Usually, in case of proximal muscle involvement, the quadriceps and the biceps are biopsied, while under suspicion of mitochondrial disorder, the deltoid is preferred. The samples must be immediately frozen or fixed after excision to prevent loss of enzymatic reactivity, DNA depletion or RNA degradation. A battery of stainings is performed on muscle sections from every frozen muscle biopsy arriving in the pathology laboratory. Histological, histochemical, and histoenzymatic stainings are performed to evaluate fiber atrophy, morphological, and structural changes and metabolic disorders. Moreover, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis may be used for expression analysis of muscle proteins to obtain a specific diagnosis. There are myopathies that do not need muscle biopsy since a genetic test performed on a blood sample is enough for definitive diagnosis. Muscle biopsy is a useful technique which can make an enormous contribution in the field of neuromuscular disorders but should be considered and interpreted together with the patient's family and clinical history.

  19. Physics of muscle contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruel, M.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we report, clarify and broaden various recent efforts to complement the chemistry-centered models of force generation in (skeletal) muscles by mechanics-centered models. The physical mechanisms of interest can be grouped into two classes: passive and active. The main passive effect is the fast force recovery which does not require the detachment of myosin cross-bridges from actin filaments and can operate without a specialized supply of metabolic fuel (ATP). In mechanical terms, it can be viewed as a collective folding-unfolding phenomenon in the system of interacting bi-stable units and modeled by near equilibrium Langevin dynamics. The active force generation mechanism operates at slow time scales, requires detachment and is crucially dependent on ATP hydrolysis. The underlying mechanical processes take place far from equilibrium and are represented by stochastic models with broken time reversal symmetry implying non-potentiality, correlated noise or multiple reservoirs. The modeling approaches reviewed in this paper deal with both active and passive processes and support from the mechanical perspective the biological point of view that phenomena involved in slow (active) and fast (passive) force generation are tightly intertwined. They reveal, however, that biochemical studies in solution, macroscopic physiological measurements and structural analysis do not provide by themselves all the necessary insights into the functioning of the organized contractile system. In particular, the reviewed body of work emphasizes the important role of long-range interactions and criticality in securing the targeted mechanical response in the physiological regime of isometric contractions. The importance of the purely mechanical micro-scale modeling is accentuated at the end of the paper where we address the puzzling issue of the stability of muscle response on the so called ‘descending limb’ of the isometric tetanus.

  20. Roles of the actin cytoskeleton and an actin-binding protein in wheat resistance against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaohe; Ma, Qing; Hao, Xinyuan; Li, Hongli

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating resistance mechanisms of plant cells against pathogens is essential to develop novel strategies of disease control. The actin cytoskeleton was found intimately involved in plant defense. In order to reveal how actin would be involved in the interaction between wheat and the stripe rust Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, prior to fungal inoculation, wheat leaves were treated with cytochalasin A, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. Our results showed reduced incidence of hypersensitive cell death and delayed accumulation of H(2)O(2) in wheat leaves treated with cytochalasin A compared to the control. We also found that the TaPRO profilin gene exhibited significantly different expression levels in host leaves when comparing compatible and incompatible interactions. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression transcript of TaPRO was lower at each time point in incompatible interactions when compared to compatible ones, and the largest difference between the two interactions occurred at 12 h post-inoculation. Both pharmacological and gene expression results collectively support the notion that the compromise of the actin microfilament is linked to the compatible interaction between the stripe rust fungus and the leaves of its wheat host.

  1. Lifeact-mEGFP reveals a dynamic apical F-actin network in tip growing plant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vidali

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Actin is essential for tip growth in plants. However, imaging actin in live plant cells has heretofore presented challenges. In previous studies, fluorescent probes derived from actin-binding proteins often alter growth, cause actin bundling and fail to resolve actin microfilaments.In this report we use Lifeact-mEGFP, an actin probe that does not affect the dynamics of actin, to visualize actin in the moss Physcomitrella patens and pollen tubes from Lilium formosanum and Nicotiana tobaccum. Lifeact-mEGFP robustly labels actin microfilaments, particularly in the apex, in both moss protonemata and pollen tubes. Lifeact-mEGFP also labels filamentous actin structures in other moss cell types, including cells of the gametophore.Lifeact-mEGFP, when expressed at optimal levels does not alter moss protonemal or pollen tube growth. We suggest that Lifeact-mEGFP represents an exciting new versatile probe for further studies of actin's role in tip growing plant cells.

  2. Racl Signaling Is Required for Insulin-Stimulated Glucose Uptake and Is Dysregulated in Insulin-Resistant Murine and Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, L.; Jensen, T. E.; Kleinert, M.

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase Racl is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in cultured muscle cells. However, involvement of Racl and its downstream signaling in glucose transport in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant mature skeletal muscle has not previously been i...

  3. Ultra-fast optical manipulation of single proteins binding to the actin cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Marco; Gardini, Lucia; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-02-01

    In the last decade, forces and mechanical stresses acting on biological systems are emerging as regulatory factors essential for cell life. Emerging evidences indicate that factors such as applied forces or the rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) determine the shape and function of cells and organisms1. Classically, the regulation of biological systems is described through a series of biochemical signals and enzymatic reactions, which direct the processes and cell fate. However, mechanotransduction, i.e. the conversion of mechanical forces into biochemical and biomolecular signals, is at the basis of many biological processes fundamental for the development and differentiation of cells, for their correct function and for the development of pathologies. We recently developed an in vitro system that allows the investigation of force-dependence of the interaction of proteins binding the actin cytoskeleton, at the single molecule level. Our system displays a delay of only ~10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. Our assay allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds and conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  4. Wave biomechanics of the skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    Results of acoustic measurements in skeletal muscle are generalized. It is shown that assessment of the pathologies and functional condition of the muscular system is possible with the use of shear waves. The velocity of these waves in muscles is much smaller than the velocity of sound; therefore, a higher symmetry type is formed for them. In the presence of a preferential direction (along muscle fibers), it is characterized by only two rather than five (as in usual media with the same anisotropy) moduli of elasticity. A covariant form of the corresponding wave equation is presented. It is shown that dissipation properties of skeletal muscles can be controlled by contracting them isometrically. Pulsed loads (shocks) and vibrations are damped differently, depending on their frequency spectrum. Characteristic frequencies on the order of tens and hundreds of hertz are attenuated due to actin-myosin bridges association/dissociation dynamics in the contracted muscle. At higher (kilohertz) frequencies, when the muscle is tensed, viscosity of the tissue increases by a factor of several tens because of the increase in friction experienced by fibrillar structures as they move relative to the surrounding liquid; the tension of the fibers changes the hydrodynamic conditions of the flow around them. Finally, at higher frequencies, the attenuation is associated with the rheological properties of biological molecules, in particular, with their conformational dynamics in the wave field. Models that describe the controlled shock dissipation mechanisms are proposed. Corresponding solutions are found, including those that allow for nonlinear effects.

  5. Therapeutic effect of Aloe vera and silver nanoparticles on acid-induced oral ulcer in gamma-irradiated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Batal, Ahmed Ibrahim; Ahmed, Salwa Farid

    2018-02-05

    Radiation combined injury, a life-threatening condition, has higher mortality than simple radiation injury. The aim of the present study was to analyze the efficiency of Aloe vera and silver nanoparticles in improving the healing of ulcerated oral mucosa after irradiation. Thirty male Albino mice were divided into five groups: control, radiation, Aloe vera (AV), silver nanoparticles (NS), and AV+NS. The mice were exposed to whole body 6Gy gamma-radiation. After one hour, 20% acetic acid was injected into the submucosal layer of the lower lip for ulcer induction. The animals received topical treatment with the assigned substances for 5 days. Lip specimens were subjected to hematoxylin and eosin and anti alpha-smooth muscle actin immunohistochemical staining. Results demonstrated occurance of ulcer three days post irradiation in all groups except in the AV+NS group where only epithelial detachment was developed. After seven days, data revealed persistent ulcer in radiation group, and almost normal epithelium in the AV+NS group. A significant reduction of epithelial thickness was detected in all groups at the third day as compared to control. At the seventh day, only the AV+NS group restored the epithelial thickness. Area percent of alpha-smooth muscle actin expression was significantly decreased in radiation group at the third day followed by significant increase at the seventh day. However, all treatment groups showed significant increase in alpha-smooth muscle actin at the third day, which decreased to normal level at the seventh day. Our study demonstrated the efficiency of Aloe vera and silver nanoparticles in enhancing ulcer healing after irradiation.

  6. Different wound healing properties of dermis, adipose, and gingiva mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boink, Mireille A; van den Broek, Lenie J; Roffel, Sanne; Nazmi, Kamran; Bolscher, Jan G M; Gefen, Amit; Veerman, Enno C I; Gibbs, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with better scar quality than skin wounds. Deep skin wounds where adipose tissue is exposed, have a greater risk of forming hypertrophic scars. Differences in wound healing and final scar quality might be related to differences in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and their ability to respond to intrinsic (autocrine) and extrinsic signals, such as human salivary histatin, epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor beta1. Dermis-, adipose-, and gingiva-derived MSC were compared for their regenerative potential with regards to proliferation, migration, and matrix contraction. Proliferation was assessed by cell counting and migration using a scratch wound assay. Matrix contraction and alpha smooth muscle actin was assessed in MSC populated collagen gels, and also in skin and gingival full thickness tissue engineered equivalents (reconstructed epithelium on MSC populated matrix). Compared to skin-derived MSC, gingiva MSC showed greater proliferation and migration capacity, and less matrix contraction in full thickness tissue equivalents, which may partly explain the superior oral wound healing. Epidermal keratinocytes were required for enhanced adipose MSC matrix contraction and alpha smooth muscle actin expression, and may therefore contribute to adverse scarring in deep cutaneous wounds. Histatin enhanced migration without influencing proliferation or matrix contraction in all three MSC, indicating that salivary peptides may have a beneficial effect on wound closure in general. Transforming growth factor beta1 enhanced contraction and alpha smooth muscle actin expression in all three MSC types when incorporated into collagen gels. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the superior oral wound healing will aid us to develop advanced strategies for optimal skin regeneration, wound healing and scar formation. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  7. Recruitment Kinetics of Tropomyosin Tpm3.1 to Actin Filament Bundles in the Cytoskeleton Is Independent of Actin Filament Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appaduray, Mark A; Masedunskas, Andrius; Bryce, Nicole S; Lucas, Christine A; Warren, Sean C; Timpson, Paul; Stear, Jeffrey H; Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic network of filaments that is involved in virtually every cellular process. Most actin filaments in metazoa exist as a co-polymer of actin and tropomyosin (Tpm) and the function of an actin filament is primarily defined by the specific Tpm isoform associated with it. However, there is little information on the interdependence of these co-polymers during filament assembly and disassembly. We addressed this by investigating the recovery kinetics of fluorescently tagged isoform Tpm3.1 into actin filament bundles using FRAP analysis in cell culture and in vivo in rats using intracellular intravital microscopy, in the presence or absence of the actin-targeting drug jasplakinolide. The mobile fraction of Tpm3.1 is between 50% and 70% depending on whether the tag is at the C- or N-terminus and whether the analysis is in vivo or in cultured cells. We find that the continuous dynamic exchange of Tpm3.1 is not significantly impacted by jasplakinolide, unlike tagged actin. We conclude that tagged Tpm3.1 may be able to undergo exchange in actin filament bundles largely independent of the assembly and turnover of actin.

  8. DAAM is required for thin filament formation and Sarcomerogenesis during muscle development in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Molnár

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available During muscle development, myosin and actin containing filaments assemble into the highly organized sarcomeric structure critical for muscle function. Although sarcomerogenesis clearly involves the de novo formation of actin filaments, this process remained poorly understood. Here we show that mouse and Drosophila members of the DAAM formin family are sarcomere-associated actin assembly factors enriched at the Z-disc and M-band. Analysis of dDAAM mutants revealed a pivotal role in myofibrillogenesis of larval somatic muscles, indirect flight muscles and the heart. We found that loss of dDAAM function results in multiple defects in sarcomere development including thin and thick filament disorganization, Z-disc and M-band formation, and a near complete absence of the myofibrillar lattice. Collectively, our data suggest that dDAAM is required for the initial assembly of thin filaments, and subsequently it promotes filament elongation by assembling short actin polymers that anneal to the pointed end of the growing filaments, and by antagonizing the capping protein Tropomodulin.

  9. Dynamics of actin cables in polarized growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBergs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly polarized growth of filamentous fungi requires a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the hyphal tip. This transport is managed by vesicle trafficking via the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and their associated motor proteins. Particularly, actin cables originating from the hyphal tip are essential for hyphal growth. Although specific marker proteins to visualize actin cables have been developed in filamentous fungi, the exact organization and dynamics of actin cables has remained elusive. Here we visualized actin cables using tropomyosin (TpmA and Lifeact fused to fluorescent proteins in Aspergillus nidulans and studied the dynamics and regulation. GFP tagged TpmA visualized dynamic actin cables formed from the hyphal tip with cycles of elongation and shrinkage. The elongation and shrinkage rates of actin cables were similar and approximately 0.6 μm/s. Comparison of actin markers revealed that high concentrations of Lifeact reduced actin dynamics. Simultaneous visualization of actin cables and microtubules suggests temporally and spatially coordinated polymerization and depolymerization between the two cytoskeletons. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ordered polarized growth regulated by actin cables and microtubules.

  10. The conserved Tarp actin binding domain is important for chlamydial invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J Jewett

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein (Tarp is conserved among all pathogenic chlamydial species. Previous reports identified single C. trachomatis Tarp actin binding and proline rich domains required for Tarp mediated actin nucleation. A peptide antiserum specific for the Tarp actin binding domain was generated and inhibited actin polymerization in vitro and C. trachomatis entry in vivo, indicating an essential role for Tarp in chlamydial pathogenesis. Sequence analysis of Tarp orthologs from additional chlamydial species and C. trachomatis serovars indicated multiple putative actin binding sites. In order to determine whether the identified actin binding domains are functionally conserved, GST-Tarp fusions from multiple chlamydial species were examined for their ability to bind and nucleate actin. Chlamydial Tarps harbored variable numbers of actin binding sites and promoted actin nucleation as determined by in vitro polymerization assays. Our findings indicate that Tarp mediated actin binding and nucleation is a conserved feature among diverse chlamydial species and this function plays a critical role in bacterial invasion of host cells.

  11. Cross-reacting material 197 (CRM197) affects actin cytoskeleton of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özerman Edis, Bilge; Varol, Başak; Hacıosmanoğlu, Ebru; Ünlü, Ayhan; Bektaş, Muhammet

    2017-10-01

    CRM197, cross-reacting material 197, is a mutant of diphtheria toxin (DTx). CRM197 is used in pharmacology as a carrier protein. It has been recently shown that CRM197 causes breakdown in actin filaments. In order to show intracellular localization of CRM197 and visualize cell structure via actin cytoskeleton, endothelial cells were cultured and subjected to CRM197 in vitro. To address the interaction between CRM197 and actin both experimental and theoretical studies were carried out. Colocalization of CRM197 with actin filaments was determined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Following 24-hour incubation, the loss of cell-cell contact between cells was prominent. CRM197 was shown to bind to G-actin by gel filtration chromatography, and this binding was confirmed by Western blot analysis of eluted samples obtained following chromatography. Based on crystal structure, docked model of CRM197-actin complex was generated. Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that Lys42, Cys218, Cys233 of CRM197 interacts with Gly197, Arg62 and Ser60 of G-actin, respectively. CRM197 binding to G-actin, colocalization of CRM197 with actin filament, and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement resulting in the loss of cell-cell contact show that actin comes into sight as target molecule for CRM197.

  12. Probing the flexibility of tropomyosin and its binding to filamentous actin using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Barua, Bipasha; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E

    2013-10-15

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is a coiled-coil protein that binds to filamentous actin (F-actin) and regulates its interactions with actin-binding proteins like myosin by moving between three positions on F-actin (the blocked, closed, and open positions). To elucidate the molecular details of Tm flexibility in relation to its binding to F-actin, we conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations for both Tm alone and Tm-F-actin complex in the presence of explicit solvent (total simulation time >400 ns). Based on the simulations, we systematically analyzed the local flexibility of the Tm coiled coil using multiple parameters. We found a good correlation between the regions with high local flexibility and a number of destabilizing regions in Tm, including six clusters of core alanines. Despite the stabilization by F-actin binding, the distribution of local flexibility in Tm is largely unchanged in the absence and presence of F-actin. Our simulations showed variable fluctuations of individual Tm periods from the closed position toward the open position. In addition, we performed Tm-F-actin binding calculations based on the simulation trajectories, which support the importance of Tm flexibility to Tm-F-actin binding. We identified key residues of Tm involved in its dynamic interactions with F-actin, many of which have been found in recent mutational studies to be functionally important, and the rest of which will make promising targets for future mutational experiments. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Variable actin dynamics requirement for the exit of different cargo from the trans-Golgi network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Colonna, Cecilia; Cortegano, Miguel; Calvo, María; Martínez, Susana E; Egea, Gustavo

    2007-08-07

    Efficient post-Golgi trafficking depends on microtubules, but actin filaments and actin-associated proteins are also postulated. Here we examined, by inverse fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, the role of actin dynamics in the exit from the TGN of fluorescent-tagged apical or basolateral and raft or non-raft-associated cargoes. Either the actin-stabilizing jasplakinolide or the actin-depolymerising latrunculin B variably but significantly inhibited post-Golgi traffic of non-raft associated apical p75NTR and basolateral VSV-G cargoes. The TGN-exit of the apical-destined VSV-G mutant was impaired only by latrunculin B. Strikingly, the raft-associated GPI-anchor protein was not affected by either actin toxin. Results indicate that actin dynamics participates in the TGN egress of both apical- and basolateral-targeted proteins but is not needed for apical raft-associated cargo.

  14. ADF/cofilin-mediated actin retrograde flow directs neurite formation in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Kevin C; Hellal, Farida; Neukirchen, Dorothee; Jacob, Sonja; Tahirovic, Sabina; Dupraz, Sebastian; Stern, Sina; Garvalov, Boyan K; Gurniak, Christine; Shaw, Alisa E; Meyn, Liane; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Bamburg, James R; Small, J Victor; Witke, Walter; Bradke, Frank

    2012-12-20

    Neurites are the characteristic structural element of neurons that will initiate brain connectivity and elaborate information. Early in development, neurons are spherical cells but this symmetry is broken through the initial formation of neurites. This fundamental step is thought to rely on actin and microtubule dynamics. However, it is unclear which aspects of the complex actin behavior control neuritogenesis and which molecular mechanisms are involved. Here, we demonstrate that augmented actin retrograde flow and protrusion dynamics facilitate neurite formation. Our data indicate that a single family of actin regulatory proteins, ADF/Cofilin, provides the required control of actin retrograde flow and dynamics to form neurites. In particular, the F-actin severing activity of ADF/Cofilin organizes space for the protrusion and bundling of microtubules, the backbone of neurites. Our data reveal how ADF/Cofilin organizes the cytoskeleton to drive actin retrograde flow and thus break the spherical shape of neurons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. VRP09 Reduction of Corneal Scarring Following Blast and Burn Injuries to Cornea Using siRNAs Targeting TGFb and CTGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    aSMA ) synthesis. Second, we proposed to develop an advanced ex vivo organ culture system using viable explants of rabbit corneas, and assess the...effect of the most effective triple siRNA combination for reduction of target genes, collagen and alpha smooth muscle actin ( aSMA ) in rabbit corneas...targeting three key genes (TGFb, TGFbRII, and CTGF) that synergistically reduces the level of mRNAs for type I collagen gene and aSMA by >95% without

  16. Decellularized matrix from tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells promotes neovascularization with galectin-1 dependent endothelial interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S; Kristiansen, Malthe; Kristensen, Lars P

    2011-01-01

    . Histological analysis showed that cells of the most vascularized tumorigenic clone, -BD11 had a pericyte-like alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA+) and CD146+ positive phenotype. Upon serum withdrawal in culture, -BD11 cells formed cord-like structures mimicking capillary morphogenesis. In contrast, cells...... of the poorly tumorigenic clone, -BC8 did not stain for ASMA, tumours were less vascularized and serum withdrawal in culture led to cell death. By exploring the heterogeneity in hMSC-TERT20 clones we aimed to understand molecular mechanisms by which mesenchymal stem cells may promote neovascularization....

  17. The histopathology of a human mesenchymal stem cell experimental tumor model: support for an hMSC origin for Ewing's sarcoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, J S; Abdallah, B M; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2008-01-01

    -forming potential of early passage hMSC-TERT20 cells, tumors derived from late passage cells expressed early biomarkers of osteogenesis. However, hMSC-TERT20 cells were heterogeneous for alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA) expression and one out of six hMSC-TERT20 derived single cell clones was strongly ASMA positive....... Tumors from this ASMA+ clone had distinctive vascular qualities with hot spots of high CD34+ murine endothelial cell density, together with CD34- regions with a branching periodic acid Schiff reaction pattern. Such clone-specific differences in host vascular response provide novel models to explore...

  18. Superficial perineal leiomyosarcoma in an adolescent female and a review of the literature including vulvar leiomyosarcomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, A; Backman Nøhr, S

    1992-01-01

    Superficial perineal leiomyosarcomas are rare, with only three previously reported examples. We encountered a superficial (deep subcutaneous) perineal leiomyosarcoma in a 17-year-old female. At follow-up two years after a wide excision, there were no signs of recurrence. The tumour was well...... differentiated and showed immunoreactivity for alpha-smooth muscle actin and desmin. A review of the literature on superficial leiomyosarcomas indicates that superficial perineal leiomyosarcomas may be more aggressive than superficial leiomyosarcomas in general. As the presented tumour occurred in a female...

  19. A Gly65Val substitution in an actin, GhACT_LI1, disrupts cell polarity and F-actin organization resulting in dwarf, lintless cotton plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Gregory N; Fang, David D; Turley, Rickie B; Florane, Christopher B; Li, Ping; Mattison, Christopher P; Naoumkina, Marina

    2017-04-01

    Actin polymerizes to form part of the cytoskeleton and organize polar growth in all eukaryotic cells. Species with numerous actin genes are especially useful for the dissection of actin molecular function due to redundancy and neofunctionalization. Here, we investigated the role of a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) actin gene in the organization of actin filaments in lobed cotyledon pavement cells and the highly elongated single-celled trichomes that comprise cotton lint fibers. Using mapping-by-sequencing, virus-induced gene silencing, and molecular modeling, we identified the causative mutation of the dominant dwarf Ligon lintless Li 1 short fiber mutant as a single Gly65Val amino acid substitution in a polymerization domain of an actin gene, GhACT_LI1 (Gh_D04G0865). We observed altered cell morphology and disrupted organization of F-actin in Li 1 plant cells by confocal microscopy. Mutant leaf cells lacked interdigitation of lobes and F-actin did not uniformly decorate the nuclear envelope. While wild-type lint fiber trichome cells contained long longitudinal actin cables, the short Li 1 fiber cells accumulated disoriented transverse cables. The polymerization-defective Gly65Val allele in Li 1 plants likely disrupts processive elongation of F-actin, resulting in a disorganized cytoskeleton and reduced cell polarity, which likely accounts for the dominant gene action and diverse pleiotropic effects associated with the Li 1 mutation. Lastly, we propose a model to account for these effects, and underscore the roles of actin organization in determining plant cell polarity, shape and plant growth. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Sound attenuation of polymerizing actin reflects supramolecular structures: viscoelastic properties of actin gels modified by cytochalasin D, profilin and alpha-actinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, O; Schüler, H; Hofmann, P; Langer, D; Dancker, P; Bereiter-Hahn, J

    2001-05-01

    Polymerization and depolymerization of cytoskeletal elements maintaining cytoplasmic stiffness are key factors in the control of cell crawling. Rheometry is a significant tool in determining the mechanical properties of the single elements in vitro. Viscoelasticity of gels formed by these polymers strongly depends on both the length and the associations of the filaments (e.g. entanglements, annealings and side-by-side associations). Ultrasound attenuation is related to viscosity, sound velocity and supramolecular structures in the sample. In combination with a small glass fibre (2 mm x 50 microm), serving as a viscosity sensor, an acoustic microscope was used to measure the elasticity and acoustic attenuation of actin solutions. Changes in acoustic attenuation of polymerizing actin by far exceed the values expected from calculations based on changes in viscosity and sound velocity. During the lag-phase of actin polymerization, attenuation slightly decreases, depending on actin concentration. After the half-maximum viscosity is accomplished and elasticity turns into steady state, attenuation distinctly rises. Changes in ultrasound attenuation depend on actin concentration, and they are modulated by the addition of alpha-actinin, cytochalasin D and profilin. Thus absorption and scattering of sound on the polymerization of actin is related to the packing density of the actin net, entanglements and the length of the actin filaments. Shortening of actin filaments by cytochalasin D was also confirmed by electron micrographs and falling-ball viscosimetry. In addition to viscosity and elasticity, the attenuation of sound proved to be a valuable parameter in characterizing actin polymerization and the supramolecular associations of F-actin.

  1. Getting Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re thinking about aren't possible for kids. Superheroes, of course, aren't real, and professional athletes ... can make you stronger. Why? Because you're using your muscles when you do it. Eat Strong ...

  2. Muscle cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lower leg/calf Back of the thigh (hamstrings) Front of the thigh (quadriceps) Cramps in the ... Names Cramps - muscle Images Chest stretch Groin stretch Hamstring stretch Hip stretch Thigh stretch Triceps stretch References ...

  3. Actin microfilaments in presumptive statocytes of root caps and coleoptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. G.; Sack, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    Rhodamine-phalloidin was used to determine the distribution of actin microfilament bundles (mfb) in cells thought to be the site of gravity perception (statocytes) in coleoptiles and root caps of Zea mays and Hordeum vulgare. In coleoptile cells, amyloplasts were usually observed in close proximity to thick mfb, which often appeared to divide into finer mfb adjacent to individual amyloplasts. The nucleus in these cells was surrounded by an extensive network of mfb, which were connected to thicker transvacuolar mfb. Columella cells of the root cap contained an extensive reticulum of fine mfb throughout the protoplast, but lacked the much thicker mfb seen in coleoptile cells. The distribution and extent of mfb observed in fixed cells correlates with patterns of streaming and amyloplast movement seen in living cells. A possible role for actin mfb in the perception of gravity is discussed.

  4. Actin depolymerization enhances adipogenic differentiation in human stromal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Hu, Huimin; Qiu, Weimin

    2018-01-01

    Human stromal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiate into adipocytes that play a role in skeletal tissue homeostasis and whole body energy metabolism. During adipocyte differentiation, hMSCs exhibit significant changes in cell morphology suggesting changes in cytoskeletal organization. Here, we examined...... differentiation as evidenced by decreased number of mature adipocytes and decreased adipocyte specific gene expression (ADIPOQ, LPL, PPARG, FABP4). In contrast, disruption of actin cytoskeleton by Cytochalasin D enhanced adipocyte differentiation. Follow up studies revealed that the effects of CFL1 on adipocyte...... differentiation depended on the activity of LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) which is the major upstream kinase of CFL1. Inhibiting LIMK by its specific chemical inhibitor LIMKi inhibited the phosphorylation of CFL1 and actin polymerization, and enhanced the adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, treating h...

  5. Osmosensation in vasopressin neurons: changing actin density to optimize function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Bourque, Charles W

    2010-02-01

    The proportional relation between circulating vasopressin concentration and plasma osmolality is fundamental for body fluid homeostasis. Although changes in the sensitivity of this relation are associated with pathophysiological conditions, central mechanisms modulating osmoregulatory gain are unknown. Here, we review recent data that sheds important light on this process. The cell autonomous osmosensitivity of vasopressin neurons depends on cation channels comprising a variant of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel. Hyperosmotic activation is mediated by a mechanical process where sensitivity increases in proportion with actin filament density. Moreover, angiotensin II amplifies osmotic activation by a rapid stimulation of actin polymerization, suggesting that neurotransmitter-induced changes in cytoskeletal organization in osmosensory neurons can mediate central changes in osmoregulatory gain. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Lamin A/C and polymeric actin in genome organization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondřej, V.; Lukášová, Emilie; Kroupová, Jana; Matula, P.; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2008), s. 356-361 ISSN 1016-8478 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : lamin A/C * polymeric actin * chromosome territories Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.023, year: 2008

  7. Dynamics and Morphology of Microvilli Driven by Actin Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov, Nir S.

    2006-07-01

    Many different cell types have dynamic protrusions, called microvilli, on their surface. We model these structures as arising from the balance between the force of actin polymerization and the restoring force of the membrane. From this simple model we calculate the distribution function of microvilli heights for several cells. We further describe the phase diagram and the resulting morphology of the microvilli aggregates on the cell surface.

  8. Actinic inspection of multilayer defects on EUV masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barty, A; Liu, Y; Gullikson, E; Taylor, J S; Wood, O

    2005-01-01

    The production of defect-free mask blanks, and the development of techniques for inspecting and qualifying EUV mask blanks, remains a key challenge for EUV lithography. In order to ensure a reliable supply of defect-free mask blanks, it is necessary to develop techniques to reliably and accurately detect defects on un-patterned mask blanks. These inspection tools must be able to accurately detect all critical defects whilst simultaneously having the minimum possible false-positive detection rate. There continues to be improvement in high-speed non-actinic mask blank inspection tools, and it is anticipated that these tools can and will be used by industry to qualify EUV mask blanks. However, the outstanding question remains one of validating that non-actinic inspection techniques are capable of detecting all printable EUV defects. To qualify the performance of non-actinic inspection tools, a unique dual-mode EUV mask inspection system has been installed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In high-speed inspection mode, whole mask blanks are scanned for defects using 13.5-nm wavelength light to identify and map all locations on the mask that scatter a significant amount of EUV light. In imaging, or defect review mode, a zone plate is placed in the reflected beam path to image a region of interest onto a CCD detector with an effective resolution on the mask of 100-nm or better. Combining the capabilities of the two inspection tools into one system provides the unique capability to determine the coordinates of native defects that can be used to compare actinic defect inspection with visible light defect inspection tools under commercial development, and to provide data for comparing scattering models for EUV mask defects

  9. Mutual regulation of plant phospholipase D and the actin cytoskeleton

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pleskot, Roman; Potocký, Martin; Pejchar, Přemysl; Linek, J.; Bezvoda, R.; Martinec, Jan; Valentová, O.; Novotná, Z.; Žárský, Viktor

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 3 (2010), s. 494-507 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA601110916; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034; GA ČR GA522/05/0340 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : phospholipase D * actin * signaling Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 6.948, year: 2010

  10. Differential scanning calorimetry study of glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibres in intermediate state of ATP hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Nelli

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermal denaturation experiments were extended to study the thermal behaviour of the main motor proteins (actin and myosin in their native environment in striated muscle fibres. The interaction of actin with myosin in the highly organized muscle structure is affected by internal forces; therefore their altered conformation and interaction may differ from those obtained in solution. The energetics of long functioning intermediate states of ATP hydrolysis cycle was studied in muscle fibres by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Results SETARAM Micro DSC-II was used to monitor the thermal denaturation of the fibre system in rigor and in the presence of nucleotide and nucleotide analogues. The AM.ADP.Pi state of the ATP hydrolysis cycle has a very short lifetime therefore, we mimicked the different intermediate states with AMP.PNP and/or inorganic phosphate analogues Vi and AlF4 or BeFx. Studying glycerol-extracted muscle fibres from the rabbit psoas muscle by DSC, three characteristic thermal transitions were detected in rigor. The thermal transitions can be assigned to myosin heads, myosin rods and actin with transition temperatures (Tm of 52.9 ± 0.7°C, 57.9 ± 0.7°C, 63.7 ± 1.0°C. In different intermediate states of the ATP hydrolysis mimicked by nucleotide analogues a fourth thermal transition was also detected which is very likely connected with nucleotide binding domain of myosin and/or actin filaments. This transition temperature Tm4 depended on the mimicked intermediate states, and varied in the range of 66°C – 77°C. Conclusion According to DSC measurements, strongly and weakly binding states of myosin to actin were significantly different. In the presence of ADP only a moderate change of the DSC pattern was detected in comparison with rigor, whereas in ADP.Pi state trapped by Vi, AlF4 or BeFx a remarkable stabilization was detected on the myosin head and actin filament which is reflected in a 3.0 – 10.0

  11. Memory Dynamics in Cross-linked Actin Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheff, Danielle; Majumdar, Sayantan; Gardel, Margaret

    Cells demonstrate the remarkable ability to adapt to mechanical stimuli through rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, a cross-linked network of actin filaments. In addition to its importance in cell biology, understanding this mechanical response provides strategies for creation of novel materials. A recent study has demonstrated that applied stress can encode mechanical memory in these networks through changes in network geometry, which gives rise to anisotropic shear response. Under later shear, the network is stiffer in the direction of the previously applied stress. However, the dynamics behind the encoding of this memory are unknown. To address this question, we explore the effect of varying either the rigidity of the cross-linkers or the length of actin filament on the time scales required for both memory encoding and over which it later decays. While previous experiments saw only a long-lived memory, initial results suggest another mechanism where memories relax relatively quickly. Overall, our study is crucial for understanding the process by which an external stress can impact network arrangement and thus the dynamics of memory formation.

  12. Treadmilling of actin filaments via Brownian dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kunkun; Shillcock, Julian; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-10-01

    Actin polymerization is coupled to the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). Therefore, each protomer within an actin filament can attain three different nucleotide states corresponding to bound ATP, ADP/Pi, and ADP. These protomer states form spatial patterns on the growing (or shrinking) filaments. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, the growth behavior of long filaments is studied, together with the associated protomer patterns, as a function of ATP-actin monomer concentration, CT, within the surrounding solution. For concentrations close to the critical concentration CT=CT,cr, the filaments undergo treadmilling, i.e., they grow at the barbed and shrink at the pointed end, which leads to directed translational motion of the whole filament. The corresponding nonequilibrium states are characterized by several global fluxes and by spatial density and flux profiles along the filaments. We focus on a certain set of transition rates as deduced from in vitro experiments and find that the associated treadmilling (or turnover) rate is about 0.08 monomers per second.

  13. How cellular membrane properties are affected by the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemière, J; Valentino, F; Campillo, C; Sykes, C

    2016-11-01

    Lipid membranes define the boundaries of living cells and intracellular compartments. The dynamic remodelling of these membranes by the cytoskeleton, a very dynamic structure made of active biopolymers, is crucial in many biological processes such as motility or division. In this review, we present some aspects of cellular membranes and how they are affected by the presence of the actin cytoskeleton. We show that, in parallel with the direct study of membranes and cytoskeleton in vivo, biomimetic in vitro systems allow reconstitution of biological processes in a controlled environment. In particular, we show that liposomes, or giant unilamellar vesicles, encapsulating a reconstituted actin network polymerizing at their membrane are suitable models of living cells and can be used to decipher the relative contributions of membrane and actin on the mechanical properties of the cellular interface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. The Evolution of the Actin Binding NET Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eHawkins

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The arabidopsis Networked protein superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in arabidopsis which group into 4 distinct clades or subfamilies. NET homologues are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi, furthermore in Plantae NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single subfamily of the NET proteins are found encoded in the club moss genome; an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from subfamilies 4 and 3 with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 subfamilies, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 subfamilies are only found as independent sequences in angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four subfamilies are conserved across monocots and eudicots with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point due in part to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and complexity of plant species through evolution in the ‘March of Progress’.

  15. Increased IGF-IEc expression and mechano-growth factor production in intestinal muscle of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease and smooth muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Vu, Kent; Hazelgrove, Krystina; Kuemmerle, John F

    2015-12-01

    The igf1 gene is alternatively spliced as IGF-IEa and IGF-IEc variants in humans. In fibrostenotic Crohn's disease, the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1 induces IGF-IEa expression and IGF-I production in intestinal smooth muscle and results in muscle hyperplasia and collagen I production that contribute to stricture formation. Mechano-growth factor (MGF) derived from IGF-IEc induces skeletal and cardiac muscle hypertrophy following stress. We hypothesized that increased IGF-IEc expression and MGF production mediated smooth muscle hypertrophy also characteristic of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease. IGF-IEc transcripts and MGF protein were increased in muscle cells isolated from fibrostenotic intestine under regulation by endogenous TGF-β1. Erk5 and MEF2C were phosphorylated in vivo in fibrostenotic muscle; both were phosphorylated and colocalized to nucleus in response to synthetic MGF in vitro. Smooth muscle-specific protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, γ-smooth muscle actin, and smoothelin was increased in affected intestine. Erk5 inhibition or MEF2C siRNA blocked smooth muscle-specific gene expression and hypertrophy induced by synthetic MGF. Conditioned media of cultured fibrostenotic muscle induced muscle hypertrophy that was inhibited by immunoneutralization of endogenous MGF or pro-IGF-IEc. The results indicate that TGF-β1-dependent IGF-IEc expression and MGF production in patients with fibrostenotic Crohn's disease regulates smooth muscle cell hypertrophy a critical factor that contributes to intestinal stricture formation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. The role of actin in root hair morphogenesis : studies with lipochito-oligosaccharide as a growth stimulator and cytochalasin as an actin perturbing drug

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, D.D.; Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Bisseling, T.; Emons, A.M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Root hairs develop from bulges on root epidermal cells and elongate by tip growth, in which Golgi vesicles are targeted, released and inserted into the plasma membrane on one side of the cell. We studied the role of actin in vesicle delivery and retention by comparing the actin filament

  17. Actin cytoskeleton and small heat shock proteins: how do they interact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, Nicole; Arrigo, André-Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Actin and small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are ubiquitous and multifaceted proteins that exist in 2 reversible forms, monomers and multimers, ie, the microfilament of the cytoskeleton and oligomers of the sHsps, generally, supposed to be in a spherical and hollow form. Two situations are described in the literature, where the properties of actin are modulated by sHsps; the actin polymerization is inhibited in vitro by some sHsps acting as capping proteins, and the actin cytoskeleton is protected by some sHsps against the disruption induced by various stressful conditions. We propose that a direct actin-sHsp interaction occurs to inhibit actin polymerization and to participate in the in vivo regulation of actin filament dynamics. Protection of the actin cytoskeleton would result from an F-actin–sHsp interaction in which microfilaments would be coated by small oligomers of phosphorylated sHsps. Both proteins share common structural motives suggesting direct binding sites, but they remain to be demonstrated. Some sHsps would behave with the actin cytoskeleton as actin-binding proteins capable of either capping a microfilament when present as a nonphosphorylated monomer or stabilizing and protecting the microfilament when organized in small, phosphorylated oligomers. PMID:12380684

  18. The actin cytoskeleton may control the polar distribution of an auxin transport protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muday, G. K.; Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The gravitropic bending of plants has long been linked to the changes in the transport of the plant hormone auxin. To understand the mechanism by which gravity alters auxin movement, it is critical to know how polar auxin transport is initially established. In shoots, polar auxin transport is basipetal (i.e., from the shoot apex toward the base). It is driven by the basal localization of the auxin efflux carrier complex. One mechanism for localizing this efflux carrier complex to the basal membrane may be through attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. The efflux carrier protein complex is believed to consist of several polypeptides, including a regulatory subunit that binds auxin transport inhibitors, such as naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Several lines of experimentation have been used to determine if the NPA binding protein interacts with actin filaments. The NPA binding protein has been shown to partition with the actin cytoskeleton during detergent extraction. Agents that specifically alter the polymerization state of the actin cytoskeleton change the amount of NPA binding protein and actin recovered in these cytoskeletal pellets. Actin-affinity columns were prepared with polymers of actin purified from zucchini hypocotyl tissue. NPA binding activity was eluted in a single peak from the actin filament column. Cytochalasin D, which fragments the actin cytoskeleton, was shown to reduce polar auxin transport in zucchini hypocotyls. The interaction of the NPA binding protein with the actin cytoskeleton may localize it in one plane of the plasma membrane, and thereby control the polarity of auxin transport.

  19. FIMBRIN1 is involved in lily pollen tube growth by stabilizing the actin fringe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hui; Zhu, Jinsheng; Cai, Chao; Pei, Weike; Wang, Jiaojiao; Dong, Huaijian; Ren, Haiyun

    2012-11-01

    An actin fringe structure in the subapex plays an important role in pollen tube tip growth. However, the precise mechanism by which the actin fringe is generated and maintained remains largely unknown. Here, we cloned a 2606-bp full-length cDNA encoding a deduced 77-kD fimbrin-like protein from lily (Lilium longiflorum), named FIMBRIN1 (FIM1). Ll-FIM1 was preferentially expressed in pollen and concentrated at actin fringe in the subapical region, as well as in longitudinal actin-filament bundles in the shank of pollen tubes. Microinjection of Ll-FIM1 antibody into lily pollen tubes inhibited tip growth and disrupted the actin fringe. Furthermore, we verified the function of Ll-FIM1 in the fim5 mutant of its closest relative, Arabidopsis thaliana. Pollen tubes of fim5 mutants grew with a larger diameter in early stages but could recover into normal forms in later stages, despite significantly slower growth rates. The actin fringe of the fim5 mutants, however, was impaired during both early and late stages. Impressively, stable expression of fim5pro:GFP:Ll-FIM1 rescued the actin fringe and the growth rate of Arabidopsis fim5 pollen tubes. In vitro biochemical analysis showed that Ll-FIM1 could bundle actin filaments. Thus, our study has identified a fimbrin that may stabilize the actin fringe by cross-linking actin filaments into bundles, which is important for proper tip growth of lily pollen tubes.

  20. Latrunculin B-induced plant dwarfism: Plant cell elongation is F-actin-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, F; Jasik, J; Edelmann, H G; Salajová, T; Volkmann, D

    2001-03-01

    Marine macrolides latrunculins are highly specific toxins which effectively depolymerize actin filaments (generally F-actin) in all eukaryotic cells. We show that latrunculin B is effective on diverse cell types in higher plants and describe the use of this drug in probing F-actin-dependent growth and in plant development-related processes. In contrast to other eukaryotic organisms, cell divisions occurs in plant cells devoid of all actin filaments. However, the alignment of the division planes is often distorted. In addition to cell division, postembryonic development and morphogenesis also continue in the absence of F-actin. These experimental data suggest that F-actin is of little importance in the morphogenesis of higher plants, and that plants can develop more or less normally without F-actin. In contrast, F-actin turns out to be essential for cell elongation. When latrunculin B was added during germination, morphologically normal Arabidopsis and rye seedlings developed but, as a result of the absence of cell elongation, these were stunted, resembling either genetic dwarfs or environmental bonsai plants. In conclusion, F-actin is essential for the plant cell elongation, while this F-actin-dependent cell elongation is not an essential feature of plant-specific developmental programs.

  1. Binding and assembly of actin filaments by plasma membranes from dictyostelium discoideum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.A.; Luna, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of native, 125 I-Bolton-Hunter-labeled actin to purified Dictyostelium discoideum plasma membranes was measured using a sedimentation assay. Binding was saturable only in the presence of the actin capping protein, gelsolin. The binding curves were sigmoidal, indicating positive cooperativity at low actin concentrations. This cooperativity appeared to be due to actin-actin associations during polymerization, since phalloidin converted the curve to a hyperbolic shape. This membrane-bound actin stained with rhodamine-phalloidin and was cross-linked by m-maleimidobenzoyl succinimide ester, a bifunctional cross-linker, into multimers with the same pattern observed for cross-linked F-actin. The authors conclude that D. discoideum plasma membranes bind actin specifically and saturably and that these membranes organize actin into filaments below the normal critical concentration for polymerization. This interaction probably occurs between multiple binding sites on the membrane and the side of the actin filament, and may be related to the clustering of membrane proteins

  2. Altered cell mechanics from the inside: dispersed single wall carbon nanotubes integrate with and restructure actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Brian D; Shams, Hengameh; Horst, Travis A; Basu, Saurav; Rape, Andrew D; Wang, Yu-Li; Rohde, Gustavo K; Mofrad, Mohammad R K; Islam, Mohammad F; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2012-05-23

    With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  3. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  4. The persistence of active smooth muscle in the female rat cervix through pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, David J; Darios, Emma S; Watts, Stephanie W

    2015-02-01

    A controversy exists as to whether functional smooth muscle exists in the cervix before and during pregnancy, potentially continuous with the uterus. We hypothesized that cervical smooth muscle persists through pregnancy and is functional. Uteri and cervices were taken from female virgin, 11 day, and 20 day (near labor) pregnant rats. All experiments used the uterus as a positive control. Three different smooth muscle proteins (smooth muscle α-actin, SM-22α, and calponin-1) allowed immunohistochemical detection of the continuous nature of the smooth muscle from the vagina, cervix, and uterus. Tissues were also hung in isolated tissue baths for the measurement of isometric smooth muscle contraction. Uterine and cervical homogenates were also used in Western analyses to measure protein expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed there to be smooth muscle as validated by an expression of all 3 markers in the cervix. This smooth muscle was continuous with that of the vagina and uterus. Smooth muscle α-actin was detected in virgin tissue (291.3 ± 32.2 arbitrary densitometry units/β-actin), day 11 (416.8 ± 19.5), and day 20 pregnant tissue (293.0 ± 34.4). The virgin, day 11, and day 20 cervices contracted 2.18 ± 0.24 g, 1.46 ± 0.08 g, and 3.88 ± 0.49 g (respectively) to depolarizing KCl. Cervices contracted at day 20 to the cholinergic muscarinic agonist carbamylcholine (maximum, 133% ± 18.2% KCl contraction, n = 4). These findings strongly support that smooth muscle is present in the cervix through pregnancy and continuous with the uterus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Relaxin stimulates MMP-2 and α-smooth muscle actin expression by human periodontal ligament cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, S.; Bildt, M.M.; Groot, J. de; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Von den Hoff, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    The main cells in the periodontal ligament (PDL) are the fibroblasts, which play an important role in periodontal remodelling. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are largely responsible for the degradation of extracellular matrix proteins in the PDL. Previous studies have indicated that MMP production

  6. The 5’cap of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) is required for virion attachment to the actin/ER network during early infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nynne Meyn; Tilsner, Jens; Bell, Karen

    to the motile cortical actin/ER network within minutes of injection. Granule movement on actin/ER was arrested by actin inhibitors indicating actindependent RNA movement. The 5’ methylguanosine TMV cap was shown to be required for vRNA anchoring to the ER. TMV vRNA lacking the 5’cap failed to form granules...... the fluorescent vRNA pool nor co-injected GFP left the injected trichome, indicating that the synthesis of unlabelled progeny viral (v)RNA is required to initiate cell-cell movement, and that virus movement is not accompanied by passive plasmodesmatal gating. Cy3-vRNA formed granules that became anchored...... on the same ER-bound granules, indicating that TMV virions may become attached to the ER prior to uncoating of the viral genome....

  7. Crystal structures of expressed non-polymerizable monomeric actin in the ADP and ATP states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rould, Mark A; Wan, Qun; Joel, Peteranne B; Lowey, Susan; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2006-10-20

    Actin filament growth and disassembly, as well as affinity for actin-binding proteins, is mediated by the nucleotide-bound state of the component actin monomers. The structural differences between ATP-actin and ADP-actin, however, remain controversial. We expressed a cytoplasmic actin in Sf9 cells, which was rendered non-polymerizable by virtue of two point mutations in subdomain 4 (A204E/P243K). This homogeneous monomer, called AP-actin, was crystallized in the absence of toxins, binding proteins, or chemical modification, with ATP or ADP at the active site. The two surface mutations do not perturb the structure. Significant differences between the two states are confined to the active site region and sensor loop. The active site cleft remains closed in both states. Minor structural shifts propagate from the active site toward subdomain 2, but dissipate before reaching the DNase binding loop (D-loop), which remains disordered in both the ADP and ATP states. This result contrasts with previous structures of actin made monomeric by modification with tetramethylrhodamine, which show formation of an alpha-helix at the distal end of the D-loop in the ADP-bound but not the ATP-bound form (Otterbein, L. R., Graceffa, P., and Dominguez, R. (2001) Science 293, 708-711). Our reanalysis of the TMR-modified actin structures suggests that the nucleotide-dependent formation of the D-loop helix may result from signal propagation through crystal packing interactions. Whereas the observed nucleotide-dependent changes in the structure present significantly different surfaces on the exterior of the actin monomer, current models of the actin filament lack any actin-actin interactions that involve the region of these key structural changes.

  8. Recent improvements in small angle x-ray diffraction for the study of muscle physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reconditi, Massimo

    2006-10-01

    The molecular mechanism of muscle contraction is one of the most important unresolved problems in biology and biophysics. Notwithstanding the great advances of recent years, it is not yet known in detail how the molecular motor in muscle, the class II myosin, converts the free energy of ATP hydrolysis into work by interacting with its track, the actin filament; neither is it understood how the high efficiency in energy conversion depends on the cooperative action of myosin motors working in parallel along the actin filament. Research in muscle contraction involves the combination of mechanical, biochemical and structural methods in studies that span from tissue to single molecule. Therefore, more than for any other research field, progress in the comprehension of muscle contraction at the molecular level is related to, and in turn contributes to, the advancement of methods in biophysics. This review will focus on the progress achieved by time-resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from muscle, an approach made possible by the highly ordered arrangement of both the contractile proteins myosin and actin in the ca 2 µm long structural unit, the sarcomere, that repeats along the whole length of the muscle cell. Among time-resolved structural techniques, SAXS has proved to be the most powerful method of investigation, as it allows the molecular motor to be studied in situ, in intact single muscle cells, where it is possible to combine the structural study with fast mechanical methods that synchronize the action of the molecular motors. The latest development of this technique allows Angstrom-scale measurements of the axial movement of the motors that pull the actin filament towards the centre of the sarcomere, by exploiting the x-ray interference between the two arrays of myosin motors in the two halves of the sarcomere.

  9. Recent improvements in small angle x-ray diffraction for the study of muscle physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reconditi, Massimo [Universita di Firenze, Lab di Fisiologia - DBAG, c/o Dip. di Fisica, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2006-10-15

    The molecular mechanism of muscle contraction is one of the most important unresolved problems in biology and biophysics. Notwithstanding the great advances of recent years, it is not yet known in detail how the molecular motor in muscle, the class II myosin, converts the free energy of ATP hydrolysis into work by interacting with its track, the actin filament; neither is it understood how the high efficiency in energy conversion depends on the cooperative action of myosin motors working in parallel along the actin filament. Research in muscle contraction involves the combination of mechanical, biochemical and structural methods in studies that span from tissue to single molecule. Therefore, more than for any other research field, progress in the comprehension of muscle contraction at the molecular level is related to, and in turn contributes to, the advancement of methods in biophysics. This review will focus on the progress achieved by time-resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from muscle, an approach made possible by the highly ordered arrangement of both the contractile proteins myosin and actin in the ca 2 {mu}m long structural unit, the sarcomere, that repeats along the whole length of the muscle cell. Among time-resolved structural techniques, SAXS has proved to be the most powerful method of investigation, as it allows the molecular motor to be studied in situ, in intact single muscle cells, where it is possible to combine the structural study with fast mechanical methods that synchronize the action of the molecular motors. The latest development of this technique allows Angstrom-scale measurements of the axial movement of the motors that pull the actin filament towards the centre of the sarcomere, by exploiting the x-ray interference between the two arrays of myosin motors in the two halves of the sarcomere.

  10. Caldesmon inhibits the actin-myosin interaction by changing its spatial orientation and mobility during the ATPase activity cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Natalia; Pronina, Olga E; Dabrowska, Renata; Borovikov, Yurii S

    2007-06-01

    Orientation and mobility of acrylodan fluorescent probe specifically bound to caldesmon Cys580 incorporated into muscle ghost fibers decorated with myosin S1 and containing tropomyosin was studied in the presence or absence of MgADP, MgAMP-PNP, MgATPgammaS or MgATP. Modeling of various intermediate states of actomyosin has shown discrete changes in orientation and mobility of the dye dipoles which is the evidence for multistep changes in the structural changes of caldesmon during the ATPase hydrolysis cycle. It is suggested that S1 interaction with actin results in nucleotide-dependent displacement of the C-terminal part of caldesmon molecule and changes in its mobility. Thus inhibition of the actomyosin ATPase activity may be due to changes in caldesmon position on the thin filament and its interaction with actin. Our new findings described in the present paper as well as those published recently elsewhere might conciliate the two existing models of molecular mechanism of inhibition of the actomyosin ATPase by caldesmon.

  11. The effect of microwave on the interaction of flavour compounds with G-actin from grass carp (Catenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiaowei; Yang, Qiuli; Sun, Yangying; Pan, Daodong; Cao, Jinxuan

    2017-09-01

    In order to investigate the influence of non-thermal effects of microwaves on the flavour of fish and meat products, the G-actin of grass carp in ice baths was exposed to different microwave powers (0, 100, 300 or 500 W); the surface hydrophobicity, sulfhydryl contents, secondary structures and adsorption capacity of G-actin to ketones were determined. As microwave power increased from 0 to 300 W, the surface hydrophobicity, total and reactive sulfhydryls increased; α-helix, β-sheet and random coil fractions turned into β-turn fractions. As microwave power increased from 300 to 500 W, however, hydrophobicity and sulfhydryl contents decreased; β-turn and random coil fractions turned into α-helix and β-sheet fractions. The tendencies of adsorbed capacity of ketones were similar to hydrophobicity and sulfhydryl contents. The increased adsorbing of ketones could be attributed to the unfolding of secondary structures by revealing new binding sites, including thiol groups and hydrophobic binding sites. The decreased binding capacity was related to the refolding and aggregation of protein. The results suggested that microwave powers had obvious effects on the flavour retention and proteins structures in muscle foods. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Effects of transforming growth factor-β1 treatment on muscle regeneration and adipogenesis in glycerol-injured muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, Mohamed A A; Warita, Katsuhiko; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z

    2017-11-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 is associated with fibrosis in many organs. Recent studies demonstrated that delivery of TGF-β1 into chemically injured muscle enhances fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the effects of exogenous TGF-β1 on muscle regeneration and adipogenesis in glycerol-injured muscle of normal mice. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were injured by glycerol injection. TGF-β1 was either co-injected with glycerol, as an 'early treatment' group, or injected at day 4 after glycerol, as a 'late treatment' group and the TA muscles were collected at day 7 after initial injury. Myotube density was significantly lower in the early treatment group than in the glycerol-injured group (without TGF-β1 treatment). Moreover, the Oil red O-positive area was significantly smaller in the early treatment group than in the late treatment group and glycerol-injured group. Furthermore, TGF-β1 treatment increased endomysial fibrosis and induced immunostaining of α-smooth muscle actin. The greater inhibitory effects of early TGF-β1 treatment than that of late TGF-β1 treatment during regeneration in glycerol-injured muscle suggest a more potent effect of TGF-β1 on the initial stage of muscle regeneration and adipogenesis. Combination of TGF-β1 with glycerol might be an alternative to enhance muscle fibrosis for future studies. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. Plant pathogenic bacteria target the actin microfilament network involved in the trafficking of disease defense components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenska, Joanna; Kang, Yongsung; Greenberg, Jean T

    2014-01-01

    Cells of infected organisms transport disease defense-related molecules along actin filaments to deliver them to their sites of action to combat the pathogen. To accommodate higher demand for intracellular traffic, plant F-actin density increases transiently during infection or treatment of Arabidopsis with pathogen-associated molecules. Many animal and plant pathogens interfere with actin polymerization and depolymerization to avoid immune responses. Pseudomonas syringae, a plant extracellular pathogen, injects HopW1 effector into host cells to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton and reduce vesicle movement in order to elude defense responses. In some Arabidopsis accessions, however, HopW1 is recognized and causes resistance via an actin-independent mechanism. HopW1 targets isoform 7 of vegetative actin (ACT7) that is regulated by phytohormones and environmental factors. We hypothesize that dynamic changes of ACT7 filaments are involved in plant immunity. PMID:25551177

  14. System-wide organization of actin cytoskeleton determines organelle transport in hypocotyl plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jacqueline; Ivakov, Alexander; Somssich, Marc; Persson, Staffan; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2017-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is an essential intracellular filamentous structure that underpins cellular transport and cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. However, the system-level properties of actin-based cellular trafficking remain tenuous, largely due to the inability to quantify key features of the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we developed an automated image-based, network-driven framework to accurately segment and quantify actin cytoskeletal structures and Golgi transport. We show that the actin cytoskeleton in both growing and elongated hypocotyl cells has structural properties facilitating efficient transport. Our findings suggest that the erratic movement of Golgi is a stable cellular phenomenon that might optimize distribution efficiency of cell material. Moreover, we demonstrate that Golgi transport in hypocotyl cells can be accurately predicted from the actin network topology alone. Thus, our framework provides quantitative evidence for system-wide coordination of cellular transport in plant cells and can be readily applied to investigate cytoskeletal organization and transport in other organisms. PMID:28655850

  15. Inhibiting actin depolymerization enhances osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in human stromal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Shi, Kaikai; Frary, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton through actin dynamics is involved in a number of biological processes, but its role in human stromal (skeletal) stem cells (hMSCs) differentiation is poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that stabilizing actin filaments by inhibiting gene...... expression of the two main actin depolymerizing factors (ADFs): Cofilin 1 (CFL1) and Destrin (DSTN) in hMSCs, enhanced cell viability and differentiation into osteoblastic cells (OB) in vitro, as well as heterotopic bone formation in vivo. Similarly, treating hMSC with Phalloidin, which is known to stabilize...... polymerized actin filaments, increased hMSCs viability and OB differentiation. Conversely, Cytocholasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, reduced cell viability and inhibited OB differentiation of hMSC. At a molecular level, preventing Cofilin phosphorylation through inhibition of LIM domain kinase 1...

  16. Lithium preserves F-actin from the disarrangement induced by either DNase I or cytochalasin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DalleDonne, I; Milzani, A; Fascio, U; Ratti, A; Colombo, R

    1993-01-01

    Light scattering at 546 nm, which is mainly related to the presence of rodlike particles longer than 50 nm, showed that Li+ accelerates the formation of actin filaments. Intermolecular cross-linking with N,N'-1,4-phenylene-bismaleimide proved that the observed enhancement in the light-scattering intensity is caused by the increase in the concentration of actin oligomers, which gradually elongate to form longer filaments. DNase-I-related F-actin disassembly was reduced in the presence of lithium ions, as demonstrated by fluorimetric and viscometric experiments. Li(+)-F-actin showed an apparently similar behaviour when exposed to cytochalasin D. We confirm that Li+ acts on actin polymerization by stabilizing actin nuclei and polymers. The stabilization of cytoskeletal polymers really appears as one of the mechanisms by which lithium ions influence some of the cell activities.

  17. The interaction between the adaptor protein APS and Enigma is involved in actin organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barres, Romain; Gonzalez, Teresa; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick

    2005-01-01

    and APS were partially co-localised with F-actin in small ruffling structures. Insulin increased the complex formation between APS and Enigma and their co-localisation in large F-actin containing ruffles. While in NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells the co-expression of both Enigma and APS did not modify the actin...... cytoskeleton organisation, expression of Enigma alone led to the formation of F-actin clusters. Similar alteration in actin cytoskeleton organisation was observed in cells expressing both Enigma and APS with a mutation in the NPTY motif. These results identify Enigma as a novel APS-binding protein and suggest...... that the APS/Enigma complex plays a critical role in actin cytoskeleton organisation....

  18. Cell stress promotes the association of phosphorylated HspB1 with F-actin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P Clarke

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that the small heat shock protein, HspB1, has a direct influence on the dynamics of cytoskeletal elements, in particular, filamentous actin (F-actin polymerization. In this study we have assessed the influence of HspB1 phosphorylation on its interaction(s with F-actin. We first determined the distribution of endogenous non-phosphorylated HspB1, phosphorylated HspB1 and F-actin in neuroendocrine PC12 cells by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. We then investigated a potential direct interaction between HspB1 with F-actin by precipitating F-actin directly with biotinylated phalloidin followed by Western analyses; the reverse immunoprecipitation of HspB1 was also carried out. The phosphorylation influence of HspB1 in this interaction was investigated by using pharmacologic inhibition of p38 MAPK. In control cells, HspB1 interacts with F-actin as a predominantly non-phosphorylated protein, but subsequent to stress there is a redistribution of HspB1 to the cytoskeletal fraction and a significantly increased association of pHspB1 with F-actin. Our data demonstrate HspB1 is found in a complex with F-actin both in phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms, with an increased association of pHspB1 with F-actin after heat stress. Overall, our study combines both cellular and biochemical approaches to show cellular localization and direct demonstration of an interaction between endogenous HspB1 and F-actin using methodolgy that specifically isolates F-actin.

  19. Actin expression is induced and three isoforms are differentially expressed during germination in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Camino, Claudia; Conde, Renaud; Ovsenek, Nick; Villanueva, Marco A

    2005-02-01

    Previous analysis of actin in a dicotyledonous plant, Phaseolus vulgaris (or common bean), showed very low actin levels in cotyledons but they were concentrated in the embryo axis. Upon imbibition, actin expression increased 5-fold and a maximum of four actin isoforms were observed, two of them transient and two major ones were steadily expressed. In this work, analysis of the actin expression in a monocotyledonous plant, Zea mays (or maize), and over a longer period of germination/growth, showed that striking similarities exist. Actin is present in all the seed components, but it is mainly concentrated in the embryo axis. The expression of maize actin was induced during post-imbibition at both the protein and mRNA levels. Sharp increases in actin appeared from 24-48 h and again from 72-96 h. A more modest and steady actin mRNA increase in expression was observed; however, it did not appear as dramatic as in the case of common bean due to the presence of readily detectable amounts of message in the dry maize seed. The isoform distribution in the dry seed showed a pattern of at least three isovariants of pIs approximately 5.0, 5.1, and 5.2, which were differentially expressed at the various post-imbibition times analysed. Two of the actin isoforms at 48 h post-imbibition cross-reacted with a phosphotyrosine-specific antibody and they are the product of three expressed genes as shown by in vitro translation assays. These data indicate that maize actin protein and mRNA expression is induced upon the trigger of germination, and the isoform expression kinetics and patterns resemble those from bean, suggesting that, in both species, actin expression at these early germination/growth stages is a highly regulated event.

  20. A mitochondria-anchored isoform of the actin-nucleating spire protein regulates mitochondrial division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Uri; Bartholomew, Sadie; Golani, Gonen; Christenson, Eric; Kozlov, Michael; Higgs, Henry; Spudich, James; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial division, essential for survival in mammals, is enhanced by an inter-organellar process involving ER tubules encircling and constricting mitochondria. The force for constriction is thought to involve actin polymerization by the ER-anchored isoform of the formin protein inverted formin 2 (INF2). Unknown is the mechanism triggering INF2-mediated actin polymerization at ER-mitochondria intersections. We show that a novel isoform of the formin-binding, actin-nucleating protein Spire, Spire1C, localizes to mitochondria and directly links mitochondria to the actin cytoskeleton and the ER. Spire1C binds INF2 and promotes actin assembly on mitochondrial surfaces. Disrupting either Spire1C actin- or formin-binding activities reduces mitochondrial constriction and division. We propose Spire1C cooperates with INF2 to regulate actin assembly at ER-mitochondrial contacts. Simulations support this model's feasibility and demonstrate polymerizing actin filaments can induce mitochondrial constriction. Thus, Spire1C is optimally positioned to serve as a molecular hub that links mitochondria to actin and the ER for regulation of mitochondrial division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08828.001 PMID:26305500

  1. A mathematical model of actin filament turnover for fitting FRAP data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halavatyi, Aliaksandr A; Nazarov, Petr V; Al Tanoury, Ziad; Apanasovich, Vladimir V; Yatskou, Mikalai; Friederich, Evelyne

    2010-03-01

    A novel mathematical model of the actin dynamics in living cells under steady-state conditions has been developed for fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments. As opposed to other FRAP fitting models, which use the average lifetime of actins in filaments and the actin turnover rate as fitting parameters, our model operates with unbiased actin association/dissociation rate constants and accounts for the filament length. The mathematical formalism is based on a system of stochastic differential equations. The derived equations were validated on synthetic theoretical data generated by a stochastic simulation algorithm adapted for the simulation of FRAP experiments. Consistent with experimental findings, the results of this work showed that (1) fluorescence recovery is a function of the average filament length, (2) the F-actin turnover and the FRAP are accelerated in the presence of actin nucleating proteins, (3) the FRAP curves may exhibit both a linear and non-linear behaviour depending on the parameters of actin polymerisation, and (4) our model resulted in more accurate parameter estimations of actin dynamics as compared with other FRAP fitting models. Additionally, we provide a computational tool that integrates the model and that can be used for interpretation of FRAP data on actin cytoskeleton.

  2. TWISTED DWARF1 Mediates the Action of Auxin Transport Inhibitors on Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Aurelien; Zwiewka, Marta; Sovero, Valpuri; Ge, Pei; Aryal, Bibek; Hao, Pengchao; Linnert, Miriam; Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias; Michel, Max; Weiergräber, Oliver H.; Pollmann, Stephan; Azzarello, Elisa; Fukao, Yoichiro; Hoffmann, Céline; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and architecture is regulated by the polar distribution of the hormone auxin. Polarity and flexibility of this process is provided by constant cycling of auxin transporter vesicles along actin filaments, coordinated by a positive auxin-actin feedback loop. Both polar auxin transport and vesicle cycling are inhibited by synthetic auxin transport inhibitors, such as 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), counteracting the effect of auxin; however, underlying targets and mechanisms are unclear. Using NMR, we map the NPA binding surface on the Arabidopsis thaliana ABCB chaperone TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1). We identify ACTIN7 as a relevant, although likely indirect, TWD1 interactor, and show TWD1-dependent regulation of actin filament organization and dynamics and that TWD1 is required for NPA-mediated actin cytoskeleton remodeling. The TWD1-ACTIN7 axis controls plasma membrane presence of efflux transporters, and as a consequence act7 and twd1 share developmental and physiological phenotypes indicative of defects in auxin transport. These can be phenocopied by NPA treatment or by chemical actin (de)stabilization. We provide evidence that TWD1 determines downstream locations of auxin efflux transporters by adjusting actin filament debundling and dynamizing processes and mediating NPA action on the latter. This function appears to be evolutionary conserved since TWD1 expression in budding yeast alters actin polarization and cell polarity and provides NPA sensitivity. PMID:27053424

  3. Actin, RhoA, and Rab11 participation during encystment in Entamoeba invadens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Martínez, M; Hernández-Ramírez, V I; Lagunes-Guillén, A E; Chávez-Munguía, B; Talamás-Rohana, P

    2013-01-01

    In the genus Entamoeba, actin reorganization is necessary for cyst differentiation; however, its role is still unknown. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of actin and encystation-related proteins during Entamoeba invadens encystation. Studied proteins were actin, RhoA, a small GTPase involved through its effectors in the rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton; Rab11, a protein involved in the transport of encystation vesicles; and enolase, as an encystment vesicles marker. Results showed a high level of polymerized actin accompanied by increased levels of RhoA-GTP during cell rounding and loss of vacuoles. Cytochalasin D, an actin polymerization inhibitor, and Y27632, an inhibitor of RhoA activity, reduced encystment in 80%. These inhibitors also blocked cell rounding, disposal of vacuoles, and the proper formation of the cysts wall. At later times, F-actin and Rab11 colocalized with enolase, suggesting that Rab11 could participate in the transport of the cyst wall components through the F-actin cytoskeleton. These results suggest that actin cytoskeleton rearrangement is playing a decisive role in determining cell morphology changes and helping with the transport of cell wall components to the cell surface during encystment of E. invadens.

  4. Mechanism of deep-sea fish α-actin pressure tolerance investigated by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiko Wakai

    Full Text Available The pressure tolerance of monomeric α-actin proteins from the deep-sea fish Coryphaenoides armatus and C. yaquinae was compared to that of non-deep-sea fish C. acrolepis, carp, and rabbit/human/chicken actins using molecular dynamics simulations at 0.1 and 60 MPa. The amino acid sequences of actins are highly conserved across a variety of species. The actins from C. armatus and C. yaquinae have the specific substitutions Q137K/V54A and Q137K/L67P, respectively, relative to C. acrolepis, and are pressure tolerant to depths of at least 6000 m. At high pressure, we observed significant changes in the salt bridge patterns in deep-sea fish actins, and these changes are expected to stabilize ATP binding and subdomain arrangement. Salt bridges between ATP and K137, formed in deep-sea fish actins, are expected to stabilize ATP binding even at high pressure. At high pressure, deep-sea fish actins also formed a greater total number of salt bridges than non-deep-sea fish actins owing to the formation of inter-helix/strand and inter-subdomain salt bridges. Free energy analysis suggests that deep-sea fish actins are stabilized to a greater degree by the conformational energy decrease associated with pressure effect.

  5. Directional Transport of a Bead Bound to Lamellipodial Surface Is Driven by Actin Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Nobezawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The force driving the retrograde flow of actin cytoskeleton is important in the cellular activities involving cell movement (e.g., growth cone motility in axon guidance, wound healing, or cancer metastasis. However, relative importance of the forces generated by actin polymerization and myosin II in this process remains elusive. We have investigated the retrograde movement of the poly-D-lysine-coated bead attached with the optical trap to the edge of lamellipodium of Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. The velocity of the attached bead drastically decreased by submicromolar concentration of cytochalasin D, latrunculin A, or jasplakinolide, indicating the involvement of actin turnover. On the other hand, the velocity decreased only slightly in the presence of 50 μM (−-blebbistatin and Y-27632. Comparative fluorescence microscopy of the distribution of actin filaments and that of myosin II revealed that the inhibition of actin turnover by cytochalasin D, latrunculin A, or jasplakinolide greatly diminished the actin filament network. On the other hand, inhibition of myosin II activity by (−-blebbistatin or Y-27632 little affected the actin network but diminished stress fibers. Based on these results, we conclude that the actin polymerization/depolymerization plays the major role in the retrograde movement, while the myosin II activity is involved in the maintenance of the dynamic turnover of actin in lamellipodium.

  6. A mechanical-biochemical feedback loop regulates remodeling in the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; Smith, Mark A; Blankman, Elizabeth; Chapin, Laura M; Balcioglu, Hayri E; Wang, Shuyuan; Beckerle, Mary C; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2014-12-09

    Cytoskeletal actin assemblies transmit mechanical stresses that molecular sensors transduce into biochemical signals to trigger cytoskeletal remodeling and other downstream events. How mechanical and biochemical signaling cooperate to orchestrate complex remodeling tasks has not been elucidated. Here, we studied remodeling of contractile actomyosin stress fibers. When fibers spontaneously fractured, they recoiled and disassembled actin synchronously. The disassembly rate was accelerated more than twofold above the resting value, but only when contraction increased the actin density to a threshold value following a time delay. A mathematical model explained this as originating in the increased overlap of actin filaments produced by myosin II-driven contraction. Above a threshold overlap, this mechanical signal is transduced into accelerated disassembly by a mechanism that may sense overlap directly or through associated elastic stresses. This biochemical response lowers the actin density, overlap, and stresses. The model showed that this feedback mechanism, together with rapid stress transmission along the actin bundle, spatiotemporally synchronizes actin disassembly and fiber contraction. Similar actin remodeling kinetics occurred in expanding or contracting intact stress fibers but over much longer timescales. The model accurately described these kinetics, with an almost identical value of the threshold overlap that accelerates disassembly. Finally, we measured resting stress fibers, for which the model predicts constant actin overlap that balances disassembly and assembly. The overlap was indeed regulated, with a value close to that predicted. Our results suggest that coordinated mechanical and biochemical signaling enables extended actomyosin assemblies to adapt dynamically to the mechanical stresses they convey and direct their own remodeling.

  7. AFAP-1L1-mediated actin filaments crosslinks hinder Trypanosoma cruzi cell invasion and intracellular multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Karine Canuto Loureiro; Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; da Silva, Aline Alves; Quintal, Amanda Pifano Neto; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Host actin cytoskeleton polymerization has been shown to play an important role during Trypanosoma cruzi internalization into mammalian cell. The structure and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in cells are regulated by a vast number of actin-binding proteins. Here we aimed to verify the impact of AFAP-1L1, during invasion and multiplication of T. cruzi. Knocking-down AFAP-1L1 increased parasite cell invasion and intracellular multiplication. Thus, we have shown that the integrity of the machinery formed by AFAP-1L1 in actin cytoskeleton polymerization is important to hinder parasite infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. G-actin sequestering protein thymosin-β4 regulates the activity of myocardin-related transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Ken'ichiro

    2013-08-02

    Myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are robust coactivators of serum response factor (SRF). MRTFs contain three copies of the RPEL motif at their N-terminus, and they bind to monomeric globular actin (G-actin). Previous studies illustrate that G-actin binding inhibits MRTF activity by preventing the MRTFs nuclear accumulation. In the living cells, the majority of G-actin is sequestered by G-actin binding proteins that prevent spontaneous actin polymerization. Here, we demonstrate that the most abundant G-actin sequestering protein thymosin-β4 (Tβ4) was involved in the regulation of subcellular localization and activity of MRTF-A. Tβ4 competed with MRTF-A for G-actin binding; thus, interfering with G-actin-MRTF-A complex formation. Tβ4 overexpression induced the MRTF-A nuclear accumulation and activation of MRTF-SRF signaling. The activation rate of MRTF-A by the Tβ4 mutant L17A, whose affinity for G-actin is very low, was lower than that by wild-type Tβ4. In contrast, the β-actin mutant 3DA, which has a lower affinity for Tβ4, more effectively suppressed MRTF-A activity than wild-type β-actin. Furthermore, ectopic Tβ4 increased the endogenous expression of SRF-dependent actin cytoskeletal genes. Thus, Tβ4 is an important MRTF regulator that controls the G-actin-MRTFs interaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Colocalization of synapsin and actin during synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloom, Ona; Evergren, Emma; Tomilin, Nikolay

    2003-01-01

    activity, however, synapsin was detected in the pool of vesicles proximal to the active zone. In addition, actin and synapsin were found colocalized in a dynamic filamentous cytomatrix at the sites of synaptic vesicle recycling, endocytic zones. Synapsin immunolabeling was not associated with clathrin......-coated intermediates but was found on vesicles that appeared to be recycling back to the cluster. Disruption of synapsin function by microinjection of antisynapsin antibodies resulted in a prominent reduction of the cytomatrix at endocytic zones of active synapses. Our data suggest that in addition to its known...

  10. Embryonic muscle development of Convoluta pulchra (Turbellaria-acoelomorpha, platyhelminthes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladurner, P; Rieger, R

    2000-06-15

    We studied the embryonic development of body-wall musculature in the acoel turbellarian Convoluta pulchra by fluorescence microscopy using phalloidin-bound stains for F-actin. During stage 1, which we define as development prior to 50% of the time between egg-laying and hatching, actin was visible only in zonulae adhaerentes of epidermal cells. Subsequent development of muscle occurred in two distinct phases: first, formation of an orthogonal grid of early muscles and, second, differentiation of other myoblasts upon this grid. The first elements of the primary orthogonal muscle grid appeared as short, isolated, circular muscle fibers (stage 2; 50% developmental time), which eventually elongated to completely encircle the embryo (stage 3; at 60% of total developmental time). The first primary longitudinal fibers appeared later, along with some new primary circular fibers, by 60-63% of total developmental time (stage 4). From 65 to 100% of total developmental time (stages 5 to 7), secondary fibers, using primary fibers as templates, arose; the number of circular and longitudinal muscles thus increased, and at the same time parenchymal muscles began appearing. Hatchlings (stage 8) possessed about 25 circular and 30 longitudinal muscles as well as strong parenchymal muscles. The remarkable feature of the body wall of many adult acoel flatworms is that longitudinal muscles bend medially and cross each other behind the level of the mouth. We found that this development starts shortly after the appearance of the ventral mouth opening within the body wall muscle grid. The adult organization of the body-wall musculature consists of a grid of several hundred longitudinal and circular fibers and a few diagonal muscles. Musculature of the reproductive organs developed after hatching. Thus, extensive myogenesis must occur also during postembryonic development. Comparison between the turbellarians and the annelids suggests that formation of a primary orthogonal muscle grid and

  11. Rac1 is a novel regulator of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2013-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase, Rac1, is necessary for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Muscle contraction increases glucose transport and represents an alternative signaling pathway to insulin. Whether Rac1 is activated by muscle contraction and regulates...... contraction-induced glucose uptake is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of in vivo exercise and ex vivo muscle contractions on Rac1 signaling and its regulatory role in glucose uptake in mice and humans. Muscle Rac1-GTP binding was increased after exercise in mice (~60-100%) and humans (~40......%), and this activation was AMP-activated protein kinase independent. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscle by 55% in soleus and by 20-58% in extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P

  12. Calcium-induced contraction and contractile protein of gallbladder smooth muscle after high-cholesterol feeding of prairie dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y. F.; Weisbrodt, N. W.; Moody, F. G.; Coelho, J. C.; Gouma, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Feeding a high-cholesterol diet to prairie dogs causes a reduction in contractile responses of gallbladder smooth muscle from these animals. In this study, the influence of cholesterol feeding on the contractile response to calcium and on the concentration of the contractile proteins actin and

  13. Human myosin VIIa is a very slow processive motor protein on various cellular actin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Osamu; Komatsu, Satoshi; Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Mizutani, Takeomi; Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2017-06-30

    Human myosin VIIa (MYO7A) is an actin-linked motor protein associated with human Usher syndrome (USH) type 1B, which causes human congenital hearing and visual loss. Although it has been thought that the role of human myosin VIIa is critical for USH1 protein tethering with actin and transportation along actin bundles in inner-ear hair cells, myosin VIIa's motor function remains unclear. Here, we studied the motor function of the tail-truncated human myosin VIIa dimer (HM7AΔTail/LZ) at the single-molecule level. We found that the HM7AΔTail/LZ moves processively on single actin filaments with a step size of 35 nm. Dwell-time distribution analysis indicated an average waiting time of 3.4 s, yielding ∼0.3 s -1 for the mechanical turnover rate; hence, the velocity of HM7AΔTail/LZ was extremely slow, at 11 nm·s -1 We also examined HM7AΔTail/LZ movement on various actin structures in demembranated cells. HM7AΔTail/LZ showed unidirectional movement on actin structures at cell edges, such as lamellipodia and filopodia. However, HM7AΔTail/LZ frequently missed steps on actin tracks and exhibited bidirectional movement at stress fibers, which was not observed with tail-truncated myosin Va. These results suggest that the movement of the human myosin VIIa motor protein is more efficient on lamellipodial and filopodial actin tracks than on stress fibers, which are composed of actin filaments with different polarity, and that the actin structures influence the characteristics of cargo transportation by human myosin VIIa. In conclusion, myosin VIIa movement appears to be suitable for translocating USH1 proteins on stereocilia actin bundles in inner-ear hair cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Low-dimensional manifold of actin polymerization dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Carlos; Jarzynski, Christopher; Papoian, Garegin

    2017-12-01

    Actin filaments are critical components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton, playing important roles in a number of cellular functions, such as cell migration, organelle transport, and mechanosensation. They are helical polymers with a well-defined polarity, composed of globular subunits that bind nucleotides in one of three hydrolysis states (ATP, ADP-Pi, or ADP). Mean-field models of the dynamics of actin polymerization have succeeded in, among other things, determining the nucleotide profile of an average filament and resolving the mechanisms of accessory proteins. However, these models require numerical solution of a high-dimensional system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. By truncating a set of recursion equations, the Brooks-Carlsson (BC) model reduces dimensionality to 11, but it still remains nonlinear and does not admit an analytical solution, hence, significantly hindering understanding of its resulting dynamics. In this work, by taking advantage of the fast timescales of the hydrolysis states of the filament tips, we propose two model reduction schemes: the quasi steady-state approximation model is five-dimensional and nonlinear, whereas the constant tip (CT) model is five-dimensional and linear, resulting from the approximation that the tip states are not dynamic variables. We provide an exact solution of the CT model and use it to shed light on the dynamical behaviors of the full BC model, highlighting the relative ordering of the timescales of various collective processes, and explaining some unusual dependence of the steady-state behavior on initial conditions.

  15. Encoding mechano-memories in filamentous-actin networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sayantan; Foucard, Louis; Levine, Alex; Gardel, Margaret L.

    History-dependent adaptation is a central feature of learning and memory. Incorporating such features into `adaptable materials' that can modify their mechanical properties in response to external cues, remains an outstanding challenge in materials science. Here, we study a novel mechanism of mechano-memory in cross-linked F-actin networks, the essential determinants of the mechanical behavior of eukaryotic cells. We find that the non-linear mechanical response of such networks can be reversibly programmed through induction of mechano-memories. In particular, the direction, magnitude, and duration of previously applied shear stresses can be encoded into the network architecture. The `memory' of the forcing history is long-lived, but it can be erased by force applied in the opposite direction. These results demonstrate that F-actin networks can encode analog read-write mechano-memories which can be used for adaptation to mechanical stimuli. We further show that the mechano-memory arises from changes in the nematic order of the constituent filaments. Our results suggest a new mechanism of mechanical sensing in eukaryotic cells and provide a strategy for designing a novel class of materials. S.M. acknowledges U. Chicago MRSEC for support through a Kadanoff-Rice fellowship.

  16. Photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis in organ transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basset-Seguin, N; Baumann Conzett, K; Gerritsen, M J P

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of actinic keratoses (AK) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in organ transplant recipients (OTRs) is significantly higher than in immunocompetent patients. Rates of progression and recurrence following treatment are higher too, in part due to the effects of the immunosu......Background The incidence of actinic keratoses (AK) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in organ transplant recipients (OTRs) is significantly higher than in immunocompetent patients. Rates of progression and recurrence following treatment are higher too, in part due to the effects...... for treating this patient population that take into account the need for more frequent treatment and the increased pain associated with treating larger areas. Objectives Recently, a pan-European group of dermatologists with expertise in this area met to share current best practice in PDT for the treatment...... of AK in OTRs. Methods The group identified areas where PDT currently is not meeting the needs of these patients and discussed how these gaps might be addressed. Results/Conclusions This position article summarizes those discussions and makes recommendations concerning a standardized protocol...

  17. Nano-assembly of nanodiamonds by conjugation to actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradac, Carlo; Say, Jana M; Rastogi, Ishan D; Cordina, Nicole M; Volz, Thomas; Brown, Louise J

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) are remarkable objects. They possess unique mechanical and optical properties combined with high surface areas and controllable surface reactivity. They are non-toxic and hence suited for use in biological environments. NDs are also readily available and commercially inexpensive. Here, the exceptional capability of controlling and tailoring their surface chemistry is demonstrated. Small, bright diamond nanocrystals (size ˜30 nm) are conjugated to protein filaments of actin (length ˜3-7 µm). The conjugation to actin filaments is extremely selective and highly target-specific. These unique features, together with the relative simplicity of the conjugation-targeting method, make functionalised nanodiamonds a powerful and versatile platform in biomedicine and quantum nanotechnologies. Applications ranging from using NDs as superior biological markers to, potentially, developing novel bottom-up approaches for the fabrication of hybrid quantum devices that would bridge across the bio/solid-state interface are presented and discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Chronic actinic dermatitis - A study of clinical features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somani Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic actinic dermatitis (CAD, one of the immune mediated photo-dermatoses, comprises a spectrum of conditions including persistent light reactivity, photosensitive eczema and actinic reticuloid. Diagnostic criteria were laid down about 20 years back, but clinical features are the mainstay in diagnosis. In addition to extreme sensitivity to UVB, UVA and/or visible light, about three quarters of patients exhibit contact sensitivity to several allergens, which may contribute to the etiopathogenesis of CAD. This study was undertaken to examine the clinical features of CAD in India and to evaluate the relevance of patch testing and photo-aggravation testing in the diagnosis of CAD. Methods: The clinical data of nine patients with CAD were analyzed. Histopathology, patch testing and photo-aggravation testing were also performed. Results: All the patients were males. The average age of onset was 57 years. The first episode was usually noticed in the beginning of summer. Later the disease gradually tended to be perennial, without any seasonal variations. The areas affected were mainly the photo-exposed areas in all patients, and the back in three patients. Erythroderma was the presenting feature in two patients. The palms and soles were involved in five patients. Patch testing was positive in seven of nine patients. Conclusions: The diagnosis of CAD mainly depended upon the history and clinical features. The incidence of erythroderma and palmoplantar eczema was high in our series. Occupation seems to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of CAD.

  19. Roles of Asp179 and Glu270 in ADP-Ribosylation of Actin by Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Belyy

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin composed of the enzymatically active component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ia is an ADP-ribosyltransferase, which modifies Arg177 of actin. The previously determined crystal structure of the actin-Ia complex suggested involvement of Asp179 of actin in the ADP-ribosylation reaction. To gain more insights into the structural requirements of actin to serve as a substrate for toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in which wild type actin was replaced by actin variants with substitutions in residues located on the Ia-actin interface. Expression of the actin mutant Arg177Lys resulted in complete resistance towards Ia. Actin mutation of Asp179 did not change Ia-induced ADP-ribosylation and growth inhibition of S. cerevisiae. By contrast, substitution of Glu270 of actin inhibited the toxic action of Ia and the ADP-ribosylation of actin. In vitro transcribed/translated human β-actin confirmed the crucial role of Glu270 in ADP-ribosylation of actin by Ia.

  20. Contribution of elastic tissues to the mechanics and energetics of muscle function during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Muscle force production occurs within an environment of tissues that exhibit spring-like behavior, and this elasticity is a critical determinant of muscle performance during locomotion. Muscle force and power output both depend on the speed of contraction, as described by the isotonic force-velocity curve. By influencing the speed of contractile elements, elastic structures can have a profound effect on muscle force, power and work. In very rapid movements, elastic mechanisms can amplify muscle power by storing the work of muscle contraction slowly and releasing it rapidly. When energy must be dissipated rapidly, such as in landing from a jump, energy stored rapidly in elastic elements can be released more slowly to stretch muscle contractile elements, reducing the power input to muscle and possibly protecting it from damage. Elastic mechanisms identified so far rely primarily on in-series tendons, but many structures within muscles exhibit spring-like properties. Actomyosin cross-bridges, actin and myosin filaments, titin, and the connective tissue scaffolding of the extracellular matrix all have the potential to store and recover elastic energy during muscle contraction. The potential contribution of these elements can be assessed from their stiffness and estimates of the strain they undergo during muscle function. Such calculations provide boundaries for the possible roles these springs might play in locomotion, and may help to direct future studies of the uses of elastic elements in muscle. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Quantitative kinetic study of the actin-bundling protein L-plastin and of its impact on actin turn-over.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Al Tanoury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Initially detected in leukocytes and cancer cells derived from solid tissues, L-plastin/fimbrin belongs to a large family of actin crosslinkers and is considered as a marker for many cancers. Phosphorylation of L-plastin on residue Ser5 increases its F-actin binding activity and is required for L-plastin-mediated cell invasion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study the kinetics of L-plastin and the impact of L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation on L-plastin dynamics and actin turn-over in live cells, simian Vero cells were transfected with GFP-coupled WT-L-plastin, Ser5 substitution variants (S5/A, S5/E or actin and analyzed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP. FRAP data were explored by mathematical modeling to estimate steady-state reaction parameters. We demonstrate that in Vero cell focal adhesions L-plastin undergoes rapid cycles of association/dissociation following a two-binding-state model. Phosphorylation of L-plastin increased its association rates by two-fold, whereas dissociation rates were unaffected. Importantly, L-plastin affected actin turn-over by decreasing the actin dissociation rate by four-fold, increasing thereby the amount of F-actin in the focal adhesions, all these effects being promoted by Ser5 phosphorylation. In MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA treatment induced L-plastin translocation to de novo actin polymerization sites in ruffling membranes and spike-like structures and highly increased its Ser5 phosphorylation. Both inhibition studies and siRNA knock-down of PKC isozymes pointed to the involvement of the novel PKC-delta isozyme in the PMA-elicited signaling pathway leading to L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the L-plastin contribution to actin dynamics regulation was substantiated by its association with a protein complex comprising cortactin, which is known to be involved in this process. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether these findings

  2. Quantitative Kinetic Study of the Actin-Bundling Protein L-Plastin and of Its Impact on Actin Turn-Over

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Tanoury, Ziad; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Halavatyi, Aliaksandr; Hoffmann, Céline; Moes, Michèle; Hadzic, Ermin; Catillon, Marie; Yatskou, Mikalai; Friederich, Evelyne

    2010-01-01

    Background Initially detected in leukocytes and cancer cells derived from solid tissues, L-plastin/fimbrin belongs to a large family of actin crosslinkers and is considered as a marker for many cancers. Phosphorylation of L-plastin on residue Ser5 increases its F-actin binding activity and is required for L-plastin-mediated cell invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the kinetics of L-plastin and the impact of L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation on L-plastin dynamics and actin turn-over in live cells, simian Vero cells were transfected with GFP-coupled WT-L-plastin, Ser5 substitution variants (S5/A, S5/E) or actin and analyzed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). FRAP data were explored by mathematical modeling to estimate steady-state reaction parameters. We demonstrate that in Vero cell focal adhesions L-plastin undergoes rapid cycles of association/dissociation following a two-binding-state model. Phosphorylation of L-plastin increased its association rates by two-fold, whereas dissociation rates were unaffected. Importantly, L-plastin affected actin turn-over by decreasing the actin dissociation rate by four-fold, increasing thereby the amount of F-actin in the focal adhesions, all these effects being promoted by Ser5 phosphorylation. In MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment induced L-plastin translocation to de novo actin polymerization sites in ruffling membranes and spike-like structures and highly increased its Ser5 phosphorylation. Both inhibition studies and siRNA knock-down of PKC isozymes pointed to the involvement of the novel PKC-δ isozyme in the PMA-elicited signaling pathway leading to L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the L-plastin contribution to actin dynamics regulation was substantiated by its association with a protein complex comprising cortactin, which is known to be involved in this process. Conclusions/Significance Altogether these findings quantitatively

  3. Comparative decline of the protein profiles of nebulin in response to denervation in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Jih-Hua [Department of Internal Medicine, Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Nen-Chung [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Sy-Ping [Department of Nursing, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Geraldine, Pitchairaj [Department of Animal Science, School of Life Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu (India); Jayakumar, Thanasekaran, E-mail: tjaya_2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Pharmacology and Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fong, Tsorng-Harn, E-mail: thfong@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-09

    The sliding filament model of the sarcomere was developed more than half a century ago. This model, consisting only of thin and thick filaments, has been efficacious in elucidating many, but not all, features of skeletal muscle. Work during the 1980s revealed the existence of two additional filaments: the giant filamentous proteins titin and nebulin. Nebulin, a giant myofibrillar protein, acts as a protein ruler to maintain the lattice arrays of thin filaments and plays a role in signal transduction and contractile regulation. However, the change of nebulin and its effect on thin filaments in denervation-induced atrophic muscle remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to examine the content and pattern of nebulin, myosin heavy chain (MHC), actin, and titin in innervated and denervated tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of rats using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), densitometry and electron microscopic (EM) analyses. The results revealed that denervation induced muscle atrophy is accompanied by decreased nebulin content in a time-dependent manner. For instant, the levels of nebulin in denervated muscles were markedly (P < 0.05) decreased, about 24.6% and 40.2% in comparison with innervated muscle after denervation of 28 and 56 days, respectively. The nebulin/MHC, nebulin/actin, and nebulin/titin ratios were decreased, suggesting a concomitant reduction of nebulin in denervated muscle. Moreover, a western blotting assay proved that nebulin declined faster than titin on 28 and 56 days of denervated muscle. In addition, EM study revealed that the disturbed arrangements of myofilaments and a disorganized contractile apparatus were also observed in denervated muscle. Overall, the present study provides evidence that nebulin is more sensitive to the effect of denervation than MHC, actin, and titin. Nebulin decline indeed resulted in disintegrate of thin filaments and shortening of sarcomeres. - Highlights: • We successfully

  4. Effect of cytochalasins on F-actin and morphology of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, J W; Falsig Pedersen, S; Walmod, P S

    2000-01-01

    that, in intact cells, different cytochalasins can have varying effects on cell morphology and F-actin content and organization. To examine this problem in more detail, we analyzed the effects of cytochalasins on the cell morphology of and F-actin content and organization in Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT...

  5. Disassembly of actin structures by nanosecond pulsed electric field is a downstream effect of cell swelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N; Semenov, Iurii; Kuipers, Marjorie A; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-12-01

    Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton structures was reported as one of the characteristic effects of nanosecond-duration pulsed electric field (nsPEF) in both mammalian and plant cells. We utilized CHO cells that expressed the monomeric fluorescent protein (mApple) tagged to actin to test if nsPEF modifies the cell actin directly or as a consequence of cell membrane permeabilization. A train of four 600-ns pulses at 19.2 kV/cm (2 Hz) caused immediate cell membrane poration manifested by YO-PRO-1 dye uptake, gradual cell rounding and swelling. Concurrently, bright actin features were replaced by dimmer and uniform fluorescence of diffuse actin. To block the nsPEF-induced swelling, the bath buffer was isoosmotically supplemented with an electropore-impermeable solute (sucrose). A similar addition of a smaller, electropore-permeable solute (adonitol) served as a control. We demonstrated that sucrose efficiently blocked disassembly of actin features by nsPEF, whereas adonitol did not. Sucrose also attenuated bleaching of mApple-tagged actin in nsPEF-treated cells (as integrated over the cell volume), although did not fully prevent it. We conclude that disintegration of the actin cytoskeleton was a result of cell swelling, which, in turn, was caused by cell permeabilization by nsPEF and transmembrane diffusion of solutes which led to the osmotic imbalance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Disruption of microtubule network rescues aberrant actin comets in dynamin2-depleted cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Henmi

    Full Text Available A large GTPase dynamin, which is required for endocytic vesicle formation, regulates the actin cytoskeleton through its interaction with cortactin. Dynamin2 mutants impair the formation of actin comets, which are induced by Listeria monocytogenes or phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. However, the role of dynamin2 in the regulation of the actin comet is still unclear. Here we show that aberrant actin comets in dynamin2-depleted cells were rescued by disrupting of microtubule networks. Depletion of dynamin2, but not cortactin, significantly reduced the length and the speed of actin comets induced by Listeria. This implies that dynamin2 may regulate the actin comet in a cortactin-independent manner. As dynamin regulates microtubules, we investigated whether perturbation of microtubules would rescue actin comet formation in dynamin2-depleted cells. Treatment with taxol or colchicine created a microtubule-free space in the cytoplasm, and made no difference between control and dynamin2 siRNA cells. This suggests that the alteration of microtubules by dynamin2 depletion reduced the length and the speed of the actin comet.

  7. An antifungal protein from Ginkgo biloba binds actin and can trigger cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ningning; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Mühlhäuser, Philipp; Liu, Qiong; Riemann, Michael; Ulrich, Anne S; Nick, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Ginkbilobin is a short antifungal protein that had been purified and cloned from the seeds of the living fossil Ginkgo biloba. Homologues of this protein can be detected in all seed plants and the heterosporic fern Selaginella and are conserved with respect to domain structures, peptide motifs, and specific cysteine signatures. To get insight into the cellular functions of these conserved motifs, we expressed green fluorescent protein fusions of full-length and truncated ginkbilobin in tobacco BY-2 cells. We show that the signal peptide confers efficient secretion of ginkbilobin. When this signal peptide is either cleaved or masked, ginkbilobin binds and visualizes the actin cytoskeleton. This actin-binding activity of ginkbilobin is mediated by a specific subdomain just downstream of the signal peptide, and this subdomain can also coassemble with actin in vitro. Upon stable overexpression of this domain, we observe a specific delay in premitotic nuclear positioning indicative of a reduced dynamicity of actin. To elucidate the cellular response to the binding of this subdomain to actin, we use chemical engineering based on synthetic peptides comprising different parts of the actin-binding subdomain conjugated with the cell-penetrating peptide BP100 and with rhodamine B as a fluorescent reporter. Binding of this synthetic construct to actin efficiently induces programmed cell death. We discuss these findings in terms of a working model, where ginkbilobin can activate actin-dependent cell death.

  8. Plastins regulate ectoplasmic specialization via its actin bundling activity on microfilaments in the rat testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastins are a family of actin binding proteins (ABPs known to cross-link actin microfilaments in mammalian cells, creating actin microfilament bundles necessary to confer cell polarity and cell shape. Plastins also support cell movement in response to changes in environment, involved in cell/tissue growth and development. They also confer plasticity to cells and tissues in response to infection or other pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation. In the testis, the cell-cell anchoring junction unique to the testis that is found at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB and at the Sertoli-spermatid (e.g., 8-19 spermatids in the rat testis is the basal and the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES, respectively. The ES is an F-actin-rich anchoring junction constituted most notably by actin microfilament bundles. A recent report using RNAi that specifically knocks down plastin 3 has yielded some insightful information regarding the mechanism by which plastin 3 regulates the status of actin microfilament bundles at the ES via its intrinsic actin filament bundling activity. Herein, we provide a brief review on the role of plastins in the testis in light of this report, which together with recent findings in the field, we propose a likely model by which plastins regulate ES function during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis via their intrinsic activity on actin microfilament organization in the rat testis.

  9. F-actin distribution and function during sexual differentiation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J; Nielsen, O; Egel, R

    1998-01-01

    Sexual differentiation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is induced from the G1 phase of the cell cycle by nitrogen starvation and the presence of mating pheromones. We describe the distribution of F-actin during sexual differentiation. Cortical F-actin dots have previously been shown to be restricted...

  10. In vitro actin motility velocity varies linearly with the number of myosin impellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Burghardt, T P

    2017-03-15

    Cardiac myosin is the motor powering the heart. It moves actin with 3 step-size varieties generated by torque from the myosin heavy chain lever-arm rotation under the influence of myosin essential light chain whose N-terminal extension binds actin. Proposed mechanisms adapting myosin mechanochemical characteristics on the fly sometimes involve modulation of step-size selection probability via motor strain sensitivity. Strain following the power stroke, hypothetically imposed by the finite actin detachment rate 1/t on , is shown to have no effect on unloaded velocity when multiple myosins are simultaneously strongly actin bound in an in vitro motility assay. Actin filaments slide ∼2 native step-sizes while more than 1 myosin strongly binds actin probably ruling out an actin detachment limited model for imposing strain. It suggests that single myosin estimates for t on are too large, not applicable to the ensemble situation, or both. Parallel motility data quantitation involving instantaneous particle velocities (frame velocity) and actin filament track averaged velocities (track velocity) give an estimate of the random walk step-size, δ. Comparing δ for slow and fast motility components suggests the higher speed component has cardiac myosin upshifting to longer steps. Variable step-size characteristics imply cardiac myosin maintains a velocity dynamic range not involving strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Allyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Actin-Dependent Intracellular Transport in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørnar Sporsheim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatile allyl isothiocyanate (AITC derives from the biodegradation of the glucosinolate sinigrin and has been associated with growth inhibition in several plants, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this feature remain scarcely investigated in plants. In this study, we present evidence of an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport in A. thaliana. A transgenic line of A. thaliana expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP-tagged actin filaments was used to show attenuation of actin filament movement by AITC. This appeared gradually in a time- and dose-dependent manner and resulted in actin filaments appearing close to static. Further, we employed four transgenic lines with YFP-fusion proteins labeling the Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, vacuoles and peroxisomes to demonstrate an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport of or, in these structures, consistent with the decline in actin filament movement. Furthermore, the morphologies of actin filaments, ER and vacuoles appeared aberrant following AITC-exposure. However, AITC-treated seedlings of all transgenic lines tested displayed morphologies and intracellular movements similar to that of the corresponding untreated and control-treated plants, following overnight incubation in an AITC-absent environment, indicating that AITC-induced decline in actin-related movements is a reversible process. These findings provide novel insights into the cellular events in plant cells following exposure to AITC, which may further expose clues to the physiological significance of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system.

  12. Differential mapping of the free barbed and pointed ends of actin filaments in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofer, Noa; Abu Shah, Enas; Keren, Kinneret

    2014-06-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a pivotal role in many cellular processes. Detailed analysis of the architecture of cellular actin networks provides valuable insight into the dynamic self-organization underlying these processes. In particular, since most of the actin turnover occurs at the tips of actin filaments, it is insightful to map the distribution of filament ends. Here we report a method for differentially labeling the pointed and the barbed ends of actin filaments in cellular networks by permeabilizing cells, following a brief fixation, and introducing labeled actin monomers in the presence or absence of capping protein, respectively. This method quantitatively maps the distributions of free barbed ends and free pointed ends in adherent cells, providing information on the polarity of cytoskeletal structures and mapping active sites available for actin assembly or disassembly. We demonstrate the use of this method by mapping the distribution of actin filament ends in motile fish epithelial keratocytes and in several mammalian cell lines, and show that free barbed ends are enriched near the tip of protruding lamellipodia while free pointed ends concentrate toward the rear. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. When fat is not bad: the regulation of actin dynamics by phospholipid signaling molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pleskot, Roman; Pejchar, Přemysl; Staiger, Ch. J.; Potocký, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, JAN 2014 (2014) ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19073S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : actin * actin-binding proteins * capping protein Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.948, year: 2014

  14. Aspects of plant cell growth and the actin cytoskeleton : lessons from root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The main topic the thesis addresses is the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the growth process of plant cells. Plant growth implies a combination of cell division and cell expansion. The cytoskeleton, which exists of microtubules and actin filaments, plays a major role in both processes.

  15. Actin based processes that could determine the cytoplasmic architecture of plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der H.S.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ketelaar, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Actin polymerisation can generate forces that are necessary for cell movement, such as the propulsion of a class of bacteria, including Listeria, and the protrusion of migrating animal cells. Force generation by the actin cytoskeleton in plant cells has not been studied. One process in plant cells

  16. Actin filaments as the fast pathways for calcium ions involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigated the polyelectrolyte properties of actin filaments which are in interaction with myosin motors, basic participants in mechano-electrical transduction in the stereocilia of the inner ear. Here, we elaborated a model in which actin filaments play the role of guides or pathways for localized flow of calcium ions.

  17. Disruption of microtubule network rescues aberrant actin comets in dynamin2-depleted cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henmi, Yuji; Tanabe, Kenji; Takei, Kohji

    2011-01-01

    A large GTPase dynamin, which is required for endocytic vesicle formation, regulates the actin cytoskeleton through its interaction with cortactin. Dynamin2 mutants impair the formation of actin comets, which are induced by Listeria monocytogenes or phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. However, the role of dynamin2 in the regulation of the actin comet is still unclear. Here we show that aberrant actin comets in dynamin2-depleted cells were rescued by disrupting of microtubule networks. Depletion of dynamin2, but not cortactin, significantly reduced the length and the speed of actin comets induced by Listeria. This implies that dynamin2 may regulate the actin comet in a cortactin-independent manner. As dynamin regulates microtubules, we investigated whether perturbation of microtubules would rescue actin comet formation in dynamin2-depleted cells. Treatment with taxol or colchicine created a microtubule-free space in the cytoplasm, and made no difference between control and dynamin2 siRNA cells. This suggests that the alteration of microtubules by dynamin2 depletion reduced the length and the speed of the actin comet.

  18. The Actin-Binding Protein α-Adducin Is Required for Maintaining Axon Diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sampaio, Paula; Sousa, Vera Filipe; Nogueira-Rodrigues, Joana; Pinto-Costa, Rita; Peters, Luanne Laurel; Brites, Pedro; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-04-19

    The actin-binding protein adducin was recently identified as a component of the neuronal subcortical cytoskeleton. Here, we analyzed mice lacking adducin to uncover the function of this protein in actin rings. α-adducin knockout mice presented progressive axon enlargement in the spinal cord and optic and sciatic nerves, followed by axon degeneration and loss. Using stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy, we show that a periodic subcortical actin cytoskeleton is assembled in every neuron type inspected including retinal ganglion cells and dorsal root ganglia neurons. In neurons devoid of adducin, the actin ring diameter increased, although the inter-ring periodicity was maintained. In vitro, the actin ring diameter adjusted as axons grew, suggesting the lattice is dynamic. Our data support a model in which adducin activity is not essential for actin ring assembly and periodicity but is necessary to control the diameter of both actin rings and axons and actin filament growth within rings. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Actin-Binding Protein α-Adducin Is Required for Maintaining Axon Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Carvalho Leite

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The actin-binding protein adducin was recently identified as a component of the neuronal subcortical cytoskeleton. Here, we analyzed mice lacking adducin to uncover the function of this protein in actin rings. α-adducin knockout mice presented progressive axon enlargement in the spinal cord and optic and sciatic nerves, followed by axon degeneration and loss. Using stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy, we show that a periodic subcortical actin cytoskeleton is assembled in every neuron type inspected including retinal ganglion cells and dorsal root ganglia neurons. In neurons devoid of adducin, the actin ring diameter increased, although the inter-ring periodicity was maintained. In vitro, the actin ring diameter adjusted as axons grew, suggesting the lattice is dynamic. Our data support a model in which adducin activity is not essential for actin ring assembly and periodicity but is necessary to control the diameter of both actin rings and axons and actin filament growth within rings.

  20. EhCoactosin stabilizes actin filaments in the protist parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitesh Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is a protist parasite that is the causative agent of amoebiasis, and is a highly motile organism. The motility is essential for its survival and pathogenesis, and a dynamic actin cytoskeleton is required for this process. EhCoactosin, an actin-binding protein of the ADF/cofilin family, participates in actin dynamics, and here we report our studies of this protein using both structural and functional approaches. The X-ray crystal structure of EhCoactosin resembles that of human coactosin-like protein, with major differences in the distribution of surface charges and the orientation of terminal regions. According to in vitro binding assays, full-length EhCoactosin binds both F- and G-actin. Instead of acting to depolymerize or severe F-actin, EhCoactosin directly stabilizes the polymer. When EhCoactosin was visualized in E. histolytica cells using either confocal imaging or total internal reflectance microscopy, it was found to colocalize with F-actin at phagocytic cups. Over-expression of this protein stabilized F-actin and inhibited the phagocytic process. EhCoactosin appears to be an unusual type of coactosin involved in E. histolytica actin dynamics.

  1. Sites of actin filament initiation and reorganization in cold-treated tobacco cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, J.; Schwarzerová, K.; Zelenková, S.; Petrášek, Jan; Janotová, I.; Čapková, Věra; Opatrný, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 5 (2004), s. 641-653 ISSN 0140-7791 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5038207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Nicotiana tabacum * actin * actin filaments Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.634, year: 2004

  2. Total Synthesis of (-)-Doliculide, Structure-Activity Relationship Studies and Its Binding to F-Actin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matcha, Kiran; Madduri, Ashoka V. R.; Roy, Sayantani; Ziegler, Slava; Waldmann, Herbert; Hirsch, Anna K. H.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.

    2012-01-01

    Actin, an abundant protein in most eukaryotic cells, is one of the targets in cancer research. Recently, a great deal of attention has been paid to the synthesis and function of actin-targeting compounds and their use as effective molecular probes in chemical biology. In this study, we have

  3. Non-lytic, actin-based exit of intracellular parasites from C. elegans intestinal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Estes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The intestine is a common site for invasion by intracellular pathogens, but little is known about how pathogens restructure and exit intestinal cells in vivo. The natural microsporidian parasite N. parisii invades intestinal cells of the nematode C. elegans, progresses through its life cycle, and then exits cells in a transmissible spore form. Here we show that N. parisii causes rearrangements of host actin inside intestinal cells as part of a novel parasite exit strategy. First, we show that N. parisii infection causes ectopic localization of the normally apical-restricted actin to the basolateral side of intestinal cells, where it often forms network-like structures. Soon after this actin relocalization, we find that gaps appear in the terminal web, a conserved cytoskeletal structure that could present a barrier to exit. Reducing actin expression creates terminal web gaps in the absence of infection, suggesting that infection-induced actin relocalization triggers gap formation. We show that terminal web gaps form at a distinct stage of infection, precisely timed to precede spore exit, and that all contagious animals exhibit gaps. Interestingly, we find that while perturbations in actin can create these gaps, actin is not required for infection progression or spore formation, but actin is required for spore exit. Finally, we show that despite large numbers of spores exiting intestinal cells, this exit does not cause cell lysis. These results provide insight into parasite manipulation of the host cytoskeleton and non-lytic escape from intestinal cells in vivo.

  4. NHERF1 regulates actin cytoskeleton organization through modulation of α-actinin-4 stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Licui; Zheng, Junfang; Wang, Qiqi; Song, Ran; Liu, Hua; Meng, Ran; Tao, Tao; Si, Yang; Jiang, Wenguo; He, Junqi

    2016-02-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is composed of a highly dynamic network of filamentous proteins, yet the molecular mechanism that regulates its organization and remodeling remains elusive. In this study, Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF)-1 loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments reveal that polymerized actin cytoskeleton (F-actin) in HeLa cells is disorganized by NHERF1, whereas actin protein expression levels exhibit no detectable change. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying actin cytoskeleton disorganization by NHERF1, a combined 2-dimensional electrophoresis-matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry approach was used to screen for proteins regulated by NHERF1 in HeLa cells. α-Actinin-4, an actin cross-linking protein, was identified. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation studies showed the α-actinin-4 carboxyl-terminal region specifically interacted with the NHERF1 postsynaptic density 95/disc-large/zona occludens-1 domain. The NHERF1/α-actinin-4 interaction increased α-actinin-4 ubiquitination and decreased its expression levels, resulting in actin cytoskeleton disassembly. Our study identified α-actinin-4 as a novel NHERF1 interaction partner and provided new insights into the regulatory mechanism of the actin cytoskeleton by NHERF1. © FASEB.

  5. Gastric mucosal smooth muscles may explain oscillations in glandular pressure: role of vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnerstad, I; Ekblad, E; Sundler, F; Holm, L

    1998-02-01

    Oscillating (3-7 cycles/min) high pressures in gastric glands during acid secretion suggest the existence of rhythmically contracting mucosal muscles. The aim of this study was to study vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the gastrointestinal tract, in relation to mucosal muscles, glandular pressure, and blood flow. Rat, dog, and human mucosae were examined immunocytochemically for smooth muscle actin and VIP. Glandular pressure was measured using microelectrodes, red blood cell velocity (V[RBC]) was measured using a cross-correlation technique, and blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry in exposed gastric mucosa of thiobutabarbital sodium-anesthetized rats. Actin immunostaining showed muscle strands arising from muscularis mucosae, extending toward the gastric pits. VIP-immunoreactive nerve fibers were found in close relation to these muscles. VIP, administered intra-arterially close to the stomach (2 microg/kg bolus, followed by 10 microg x kg[-1] x h[-1]), significantly decreased glandular pressure from 18.2 +/- 1.6 to 8.9 +/- 1.6 mm Hg and almost eliminated the pressure oscillations. VIP infusion also abolished the oscillations in V(RBC) and significantly increased blood flow by approximately 35%. Contracting mucosal muscles may be responsible for oscillations in glandular pressure and possibly also in V(RBC). VIP probably relaxes these muscles.

  6. Clearance of a Hirano body-like F-actin aggresome generated by jasplakinolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Knecht, Erwin; Egea, Gustavo

    2008-07-01

    We have reported in a variety of mammalian cells the reversible formation of a filamentous actin (F-actin)-enriched aggresome generated by the actin toxin jasplakinolide (Lázaro-Diéguez et al., J Cell Sci 2008; 121:1415-25). Notably, this F-actin aggresome (FAG) resembles in many aspects the pathological Hirano body, which frequently appears in some diseases such as Alzheimer's and alcoholism. Using selective inhibitors, we examined the molecular and subcellular mechanisms that participate in the clearance of the FAG. Chaperones, microtubules, proteasomes and autophagosomes all actively participate to eliminate the FAG. Here we compile and compare these results and discuss the involvement of each process. Because of its simplicity and high reproducibility, our cellular model could help to test pharmacological agents designed to interfere with the mechanisms involved in the clearance of intracellular bodies and, in particular, of those enriched in F-actin.

  7. G-Protein Gα13Functions with Abl Kinase to Regulate Actin Cytoskeletal Reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Wang, Dawei; Xing, Bowen; Tan, Ying-Cai; Huang, Jianyun; Liu, Bingqian; Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Espenel, Cedric; Kreitzer, Geri; Guo, Lin; Zhang, J Jillian; Huang, Xin-Yun

    2017-12-08

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are essential cellular signal transducers. One of the G-proteins, Gα 13 , is critical for actin cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Previously, we have shown that Gα 13 is essential for both G-protein-coupled receptor and receptor tyrosine kinase-induced actin cytoskeletal reorganization such as dynamic dorsal ruffle turnover and cell migration. However, the mechanism by which Gα 13 signals to actin cytoskeletal reorganization is not completely understood. Here we show that Gα 13 directly interacts with Abl tyrosine kinase, which is a critical regulator of actin cytoskeleton. This interaction is critical for Gα 13 -induced dorsal ruffle turnover, endothelial cell remodeling, and cell migration. Our data uncover a new molecular signaling pathway by which Gα 13 controls actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Engineering an artificial amoeba propelled by nanoparticle-triggered actin polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Jinsoo; Schmidt, Jacob; Chien Aichi; Montemagno, Carlo D [Department of Bioengineering, University of California Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, 7523 Boelter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1600 (United States)], E-mail: montemcd@ucmail.uc.edu

    2009-02-25

    We have engineered an amoeba system combining nanofabricated inorganic materials with biological components, capable of propelling itself via actin polymerization. The nanofabricated materials have a mechanism similar to the locomotion of the Listeria monocytogenes, food poisoning bacteria. The propulsive force generation utilizes nanoparticles made from nickel and gold functionalized with the Listeria monocytogenes transmembrane protein, ActA. These Listeria-mimic nanoparticles were in concert with actin, actin binding proteins, ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and encapsulated within a lipid vesicle. This system is an artificial cell, such as a vesicle, where artificial nanobacteria and actin polymerization machinery are used in driving force generators inside the cell. The assembled structure was observed to crawl on a glass surface analogously to an amoeba, with the speed of the movement dependent on the amount of actin monomers and ATP present.

  9. A Nanodiamond-peptide Bioconjugate for Fluorescence and ODMR Microscopy of a Single Actin Filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genjo, Takuya; Sotoma, Shingo; Tanabe, Ryotaro; Igarashi, Ryuji; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the importance of conformational changes in actin filaments induced by mechanical stimulation of a cell has been increasingly recognized, especially in terms of mechanobiology. Despite its fundamental importance, however, long-term observation of a single actin filament by fluorescent microscopy has been difficult because of the low photostability of traditional fluorescent molecules. This paper reports a novel molecular labeling system for actin filaments using fluorescent nanodiamond (ND) particles harboring nitrogen-vacancy centers; ND has flexible chemical modifiability, extremely high photostability and biocompatibility, and provides a variety of physical information quantitatively via optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements. We performed the chemical surface modification of an ND with the actin filament-specific binding peptide Lifeact and observed colocalization of pure Lifeact-modified ND and actin filaments by the ODMR selective imaging protocol, suggesting the capability of long-term observation and quantitative analysis of a single molecule by using an ND particle.

  10. Time-sequential observation of spindle and phragmoplast orientation in BY-2 cells with altered cortical actin microfilament patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojo, Kei H; Yasuhara, Hiroki; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2014-06-18

    Precise division plane determination is essential for plant development. At metaphase, a dense actin microfilament meshwork appears on both sides of the cell center, forming a characteristic cortical actin microfilament twin peak pattern in BY-2 cells. We previously reported a strong correlation between altered cortical actin microfilament patterning and an oblique mitotic spindle orientation, implying that these actin microfilament twin peaks play a role in the regulation of mitotic spindle orientation. In the present study, time-sequential observation was used to reveal the progression from oblique phragmoplast to oblique cell plate orientation in cells with altered cortical actin microfilament patterning. In contrast to cells with normal actin microfilament twin peaks, oblique phragmoplast reorientation was rarely observed in cells with altered cortical actin microfilament patterning. These results support the important roles of cortical actin microfilament patterning in division plane orientation.

  11. Superinfection exclusion in alphabaculovirus infections is concomitant with actin reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beperet, Inés; Irons, Sarah L; Simón, Oihane; King, Linda A; Williams, Trevor; Possee, Robert D; López-Ferber, Miguel; Caballero, Primitivo

    2014-03-01

    Superinfection exclusion is the ability of an established virus to interfere with a second virus infection. This effect was studied in vitro during lepidopteran-specific nucleopolyhedrovirus (genus Alphabaculovirus, family Baculoviridae) infection. Homologous interference was detected in Sf9 cells sequentially infected with two genotypes of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), each one expressing a different fluorescent protein. This was a progressive process in which a sharp decrease in the signs of infection caused by the second virus was observed, affecting not only the number of coinfected cells observed, but also the level of protein expression due to the second virus infection. Superinfection exclusion was concurrent with reorganization of cytoplasmic actin to F-actin in the nucleus, followed by budded virus production (16 to 20 h postinfection). Disruption of actin filaments by cell treatment with cytochalasin D resulted in a successful second infection. Protection against het