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Sample records for alpha-proteobacterium caulobacter crescentus

  1. A modular BAM complex in the outer membrane of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Khatira Anwari

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are organelles derived from an intracellular alpha-proteobacterium. The biogenesis of mitochondria relies on the assembly of beta-barrel proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane, a process inherited from the bacterial ancestor. Caulobacter crescentus is an alpha-proteobacterium, and the BAM (beta-barrel assembly machinery complex was purified and characterized from this model organism. Like the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery complex, we find the BAM complex to be modular in nature. A approximately 150 kDa core BAM complex containing BamA, BamB, BamD, and BamE associates with additional modules in the outer membrane. One of these modules, Pal, is a lipoprotein that provides a means for anchorage to the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. We suggest the modular design of the BAM complex facilitates access to substrates from the protein translocase in the inner membrane.

  2. Genome analysis of DNA repair genes in the alpha proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus

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    Menck Carlos FM

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integrity of DNA molecules is fundamental for maintaining life. The DNA repair proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to tolerate them. DNA repair genes are best known from the gamma-proteobacterium Escherichia coli, which is the most understood bacterial model. However, genome sequencing raises questions regarding uniformity and ubiquity of these DNA repair genes and pathways, reinforcing the need for identifying genes and proteins, which may respond to DNA damage in other bacteria. Results In this study, we employed a bioinformatic approach, to analyse and describe the open reading frames potentially related to DNA repair from the genome of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This was performed by comparison with known DNA repair related genes found in public databases. As expected, although C. crescentus and E. coli bacteria belong to separate phylogenetic groups, many of their DNA repair genes are very similar. However, some important DNA repair genes are absent in the C. crescentus genome and other interesting functionally related gene duplications are present, which do not occur in E. coli. These include DNA ligases, exonuclease III (xthA, endonuclease III (nth, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (ada gene, photolyase-like genes, and uracil-DNA-glycosylases. On the other hand, the genes imuA and imuB, which are involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis, have recently been described in C. crescentus, but are absent in E. coli. Particularly interesting are the potential atypical phylogeny of one of the photolyase genes in alpha-proteobacteria, indicating an origin by horizontal transfer, and the duplication of the Ada orthologs, which have diverse structural configurations, including one that is still unique for C. crescentus. Conclusion The absence and the presence of certain genes are discussed and predictions are made considering the particular

  3. Regulation of chromosomal replication in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Justine

    2012-03-01

    The alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus is characterized by its asymmetric cell division, which gives rise to a replicating stalked cell and a non-replicating swarmer cell. Thus, the initiation of chromosomal replication is tightly regulated, temporally and spatially, to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Waves of DnaA and CtrA activities control when and where the initiation of DNA replication will take place in C. crescentus cells. The conserved DnaA protein initiates chromosomal replication by directly binding to sites within the chromosomal origin (Cori), ensuring that DNA replication starts once and only once per cell cycle. The CtrA response regulator represses the initiation of DNA replication in swarmer cells and in the swarmer compartment of pre-divisional cells, probably by competing with DnaA for binding to Cori. CtrA and DnaA are controlled by multiple redundant regulatory pathways that include DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation, temporally regulated proteolysis and the targeting of regulators to specific locations within the cell. Besides being critical regulators of chromosomal replication, CtrA and DnaA are also master transcriptional regulators that control the expression of many genes, thus connecting DNA replication with other events of the C. crescentus cell cycle.

  4. Uranium Biomineralization by Caulobacter crescentus

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    Jiao, Y.; Yung, M.; Park, D.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that microorganisms are able to mediate removal of U(VI) from solution through reduction to insoluble U(IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions, but microbial transformation of U(VI) under aerobic conditions are less well understood. Here, we describe two processes of U(VI) transformation by the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, known for its ubiquitous presence in aquatic systems and high U(VI) tolerance. U(VI) causes a temporary growth arrest in Caulobacter and growth recovery is not due to a decrease in U solubility, a common detoxification strategy employed by other microorganisms. Through functional reporter assays, we discovered that Caulobacter is able to reduce U(VI) bioavailability through a metabolism-dependent increase of medium pH, representing a novel U detoxification strategy. Upon recovery from growth arrest, Caulobacter proliferates with normal growth kinetics, accompanied by active U(VI) biomineralization. We found that phosphate metabolism is actively involved in the formation of U-P precipitates that are similar to autunite-group minerals. Comparisons of growth and U(VI) precipitation by wild type versus a phosphatase mutant indicates that extra-cytoplasmic phosphatase activity is not only responsible for the formation of cell-surface-bound U-P precipitates, but also plays an important role in cell survival under U stress. Our results highlight the importance of aerobic bacterial metabolism for U biogeochemistry.

  5. Core-oscillator model of Caulobacter crescentus

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    Vandecan, Yves; Biondi, Emanuele; Blossey, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a powerful model organism for studies of bacterial cell cycle regulation. Although the major regulators and their connections in Caulobacter have been identified, it still is a challenge to properly understand the dynamics of its circuitry which accounts for both cell cycle progression and arrest. We show that the key decision module in Caulobacter is built from a limit cycle oscillator which controls the DNA replication program. The effect of an induced cell cycle arrest is demonstrated to be a key feature to classify the underlying dynamics.

  6. Core-oscillator model of Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Vandecan, Yves; Biondi, Emanuele; Blossey, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a powerful model organism for studies of bacterial cell cycle regulation. Although the major regulators and their connections in Caulobacter have been identified, it still is a challenge to properly understand the dynamics of its circuitry which accounts for both cell cycle progression and arrest. We show that the key decision module in Caulobacter is built from a limit cycle oscillator which controls the DNA replication program. The effect of an induced cell cycle arrest is demonstrated to be a key feature to classify the underlying dynamics.

  7. The Aerotactic Response of Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Morse, Michael; Colin, Remy; Wilson, Laurence G; Tang, Jay X

    2016-05-10

    Many motile microorganisms are able to detect chemical gradients in their surroundings to bias their motion toward more favorable conditions. In this study, we observe the swimming patterns of Caulobacter crescentus, a uniflagellated bacterium, in a linear oxygen gradient produced by a three-channel microfluidic device. Using low-magnification dark-field microscopy, individual cells are tracked over a large field of view and their positions within the oxygen gradient are recorded over time. Motor switching events are identified so that swimming trajectories are deconstructed into a series of forward and backward swimming runs. Using these data, we show that C. crescentus displays aerotactic behavior by extending the average duration of forward swimming runs while moving up an oxygen gradient, resulting in directed motility toward oxygen sources. Additionally, the motor switching response is sensitive both to the steepness of the gradient experienced and to background oxygen levels, exhibiting a logarithmic response. PMID:27166815

  8. Metabolism of aromatic compounds by Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, D.K.; Bourquin, A.W.

    1987-05-01

    Cultures of Caulobacter crescentus were found to grow on a variety of aromatic compounds. Degradation of benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, and phenol was found to occur via ..beta..-ketoadipate. The induction of degradative enzymes such as benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase, the ring cleavage enzyme catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, and cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme appeared similar to the control mechanism present in Pseudomonas spp. Both benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase had stringent specificities, as revealed by their action toward substituted benzoates and substituted catechols, respectively.

  9. Caulobacter crescentus as a Whole-Cell Uranium Biosensor▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hillson, Nathan J; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    We engineered a strain of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to fluoresce in the presence of micromolar levels of uranium at ambient temperatures when it is exposed to a hand-held UV lamp. Previous microarray experiments revealed that several Caulobacter genes are significantly upregulated in response to uranium but not in response to other heavy metals. We designated one of these genes urcA (for uranium response in caulobacter). We constructed a reporter that utilizes the urcA promoter to ...

  10. Screen for localized proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Jay H Russell

    Full Text Available Precise localization of individual proteins is required for processes such as motility, chemotaxis, cell-cycle progression, and cell division in bacteria, but the number of proteins that are localized in bacterial species is not known. A screen based on transposon mutagenesis and fluorescence activated cell sorting was devised to identify large numbers of localized proteins, and employed in Caulobacter crescentus. From a sample of the clones isolated in the screen, eleven proteins with no previously characterized localization in C. crescentus were identified, including six hypothetical proteins. The localized hypothetical proteins included one protein that was localized in a helix-like structure, and two proteins for which the localization changed as a function of the cell cycle, suggesting that complex three-dimensional patterns and cell cycle-dependent localization are likely to be common in bacteria. Other mutants produced localized fusion proteins even though the transposon has inserted near the 5' end of a gene, demonstrating that short peptides can contain sufficient information to localize bacterial proteins. The screen described here could be used in most bacterial species.

  11. Getting in the loop: regulation of development in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Curtis, Patrick D; Brun, Yves V

    2010-03-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is an aquatic Gram-negative alphaproteobacterium that undergoes multiple changes in cell shape, organelle production, subcellular distribution of proteins, and intracellular signaling throughout its life cycle. Over 40 years of research has been dedicated to this organism and its developmental life cycles. Here we review a portion of many developmental processes, with particular emphasis on how multiple processes are integrated and coordinated both spatially and temporally. While much has been discovered about Caulobacter crescentus development, areas of potential future research are also highlighted.

  12. Computational Model of the Division Cycle of Caulobacter crescentus

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    Brazhnik, Paul; Li, Shenghua; Sobral, Bruno; Tyson, John J.

    2007-11-01

    Based on published experimental evidence, we propose a molecular mechanism and a quantitative computational model for cell cycle control in Caulobacter crescentus. Our model predicts the detailed temporal dynamics of regulatory gene expression during the cell cycle and differentiation process of wild-type cells as well as several mutant strains. Since many of the proteins involved in regulating the cell cycle of C.crescentus are conserved among other genera of α-proteobacteria, the proposed mechanism may be applicable to these species.

  13. The genetic basis of laboratory adaptation in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Marks, Melissa E; Castro-Rojas, Cyd Marie; Teiling, Clotilde; Du, Lei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Walunas, Theresa L; Crosson, Sean

    2010-07-01

    The dimorphic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has evolved marked phenotypic changes during its 50-year history of culture in the laboratory environment, providing an excellent system for the study of natural selection and phenotypic microevolution in prokaryotes. Combining whole-genome sequencing with classical molecular genetic tools, we have comprehensively mapped a set of polymorphisms underlying multiple derived phenotypes, several of which arose independently in separate strain lineages. The genetic basis of phenotypic differences in growth rate, mucoidy, adhesion, sedimentation, phage susceptibility, and stationary-phase survival between C. crescentus strain CB15 and its derivative NA1000 is determined by coding, regulatory, and insertion/deletion polymorphisms at five chromosomal loci. This study evidences multiple genetic mechanisms of bacterial evolution as driven by selection for growth and survival in a new selective environment and identifies a common polymorphic locus, zwf, between lab-adapted C. crescentus and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that have adapted to a human host during chronic infection.

  14. Extracellular gluco-oligosaccharide degradation by Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Presley, Gerald N; Payea, Matthew J; Hurst, Logan R; Egan, Annie E; Martin, Brandon S; Periyannan, Gopal R

    2014-03-01

    The oligotrophic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has the ability to metabolize various organic molecules, including plant structural carbohydrates, as a carbon source. The nature of β-glucosidase (BGL)-mediated gluco-oligosaccharide degradation and nutrient transport across the outer membrane in C. crescentus was investigated. All gluco-oligosaccharides tested (up to celloheptose) supported growth in M2 minimal media but not cellulose or CM-cellulose. The periplasmic and outer membrane fractions showed highest BGL activity, but no significant BGL activity was observed in the cytosol or extracellular medium. Cells grown in cellobiose showed expression of specific BGLs and TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs). Carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone lowered the rate of cell growth in cellobiose but not in glucose, indicating potential cellobiose transport into the cell by a proton motive force-dependent process, such as TBDR-dependent transport, and facilitated diffusion of glucose across the outer membrane via specific porins. These results suggest that C. crescentus acquires carbon from cellulose-derived gluco-oligosaccharides found in the environment by extracellular and periplasmic BGL activity and TBDR-mediated transport. This report on extracellular degradation of gluco-oligosaccharides and methods of nutrient acquisition by C. crescentus supports a broader suite of carbohydrate metabolic capabilities suggested by the C. crescentus genome sequence that until now have not been reported.

  15. Caulobacter crescentus exploits its helical cell body to swim efficiently

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    Liu, Bin; Mendoza, Marcos; Valenzuela, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    How an organism gets its shape remains an open question of fundamental science. In this study, we measure the 3D shape of a bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, using a computational graphic technique for free-swimming microorganisms to analyze thousands of image frames of the same individual bacterium. Rather than having a crescent shape, the cell body of the organism is found to be twisted with a helical pitch angle around 45 degrees. Moreover, the detailed size and geometry of the cell body, matches the optimized cell body obtained by the slender body theory for swimming at fixed power. This result sheds new light on the shape evolution of microorganisms, and suggests that C. crescentus has adapted to its natural habitat of fresh-water lakes and streams, lacking nutrients.

  16. The coding and noncoding architecture of the Caulobacter crescentus genome.

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    Jared M Schrader

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Caulobacter crescentus undergoes an asymmetric cell division controlled by a genetic circuit that cycles in space and time. We provide a universal strategy for defining the coding potential of bacterial genomes by applying ribosome profiling, RNA-seq, global 5'-RACE, and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS data to the 4-megabase C. crescentus genome. We mapped transcript units at single base-pair resolution using RNA-seq together with global 5'-RACE. Additionally, using ribosome profiling and LC-MS, we mapped translation start sites and coding regions with near complete coverage. We found most start codons lacked corresponding Shine-Dalgarno sites although ribosomes were observed to pause at internal Shine-Dalgarno sites within the coding DNA sequence (CDS. These data suggest a more prevalent use of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence for ribosome pausing rather than translation initiation in C. crescentus. Overall 19% of the transcribed and translated genomic elements were newly identified or significantly improved by this approach, providing a valuable genomic resource to elucidate the complete C. crescentus genetic circuitry that controls asymmetric cell division.

  17. The coding and noncoding architecture of the Caulobacter crescentus genome.

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    Schrader, Jared M; Zhou, Bo; Li, Gene-Wei; Lasker, Keren; Childers, W Seth; Williams, Brandon; Long, Tao; Crosson, Sean; McAdams, Harley H; Weissman, Jonathan S; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-07-01

    Caulobacter crescentus undergoes an asymmetric cell division controlled by a genetic circuit that cycles in space and time. We provide a universal strategy for defining the coding potential of bacterial genomes by applying ribosome profiling, RNA-seq, global 5'-RACE, and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data to the 4-megabase C. crescentus genome. We mapped transcript units at single base-pair resolution using RNA-seq together with global 5'-RACE. Additionally, using ribosome profiling and LC-MS, we mapped translation start sites and coding regions with near complete coverage. We found most start codons lacked corresponding Shine-Dalgarno sites although ribosomes were observed to pause at internal Shine-Dalgarno sites within the coding DNA sequence (CDS). These data suggest a more prevalent use of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence for ribosome pausing rather than translation initiation in C. crescentus. Overall 19% of the transcribed and translated genomic elements were newly identified or significantly improved by this approach, providing a valuable genomic resource to elucidate the complete C. crescentus genetic circuitry that controls asymmetric cell division.

  18. CauloBrowser: A systems biology resource for Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Lasker, Keren; Schrader, Jared M; Men, Yifei; Marshik, Tyler; Dill, David L; McAdams, Harley H; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is a premier model organism for studying the molecular basis of cellular asymmetry. The Caulobacter community has generated a wealth of high-throughput spatiotemporal databases including data from gene expression profiling experiments (microarrays, RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, ribosome profiling, LC-ms proteomics), gene essentiality studies (Tn-seq), genome wide protein localization studies, and global chromosome methylation analyses (SMRT sequencing). A major challenge involves the integration of these diverse data sets into one comprehensive community resource. To address this need, we have generated CauloBrowser (www.caulobrowser.org), an online resource for Caulobacter studies. This site provides a user-friendly interface for quickly searching genes of interest and downloading genome-wide results. Search results about individual genes are displayed as tables, graphs of time resolved expression profiles, and schematics of protein localization throughout the cell cycle. In addition, the site provides a genome viewer that enables customizable visualization of all published high-throughput genomic data. The depth and diversity of data sets collected by the Caulobacter community makes CauloBrowser a unique and valuable systems biology resource.

  19. Analysis of the terminus region of the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome and identification of the dif site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    The terminus region of the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome and the dif chromosome dimer resolution site were characterized. The Caulobacter genome contains skewed sequences that abruptly switch strands at dif and may have roles in chromosome maintenance and segregation. Absence of dif or the Xer...

  20. Physiochemical properties of Caulobacter crescentus holdfast: a localized bacterial adhesive.

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    Berne, Cécile; Ma, Xiang; Licata, Nicholas A; Neves, Bernardo R A; Setayeshgar, Sima; Brun, Yves V; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2013-09-12

    To colonize surfaces, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus employs a polar polysaccharide, the holdfast, located at the end of a thin, long stalk protruding from the cell body. Unlike many other bacteria which adhere through an extended extracellular polymeric network, the holdfast footprint area is tens of thousands times smaller than that of the total bacterium cross-sectional surface, making for some very demanding adhesion requirements. At present, the mechanism of holdfast adhesion remains poorly understood. We explore it here along three lines of investigation: (a) the impact of environmental conditions on holdfast binding affinity, (b) adhesion kinetics by dynamic force spectroscopy, and (c) kinetic modeling of the attachment process to interpret the observed time-dependence of the adhesion force at short and long time scales. A picture emerged in which discrete molecular units called adhesins are responsible for initial holdfast adhesion, by acting in a cooperative manner.

  1. Ultraviolet mutagenesis and inducible DNA repair in Caulobacter crescentus

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    Bender, R.A.

    1984-11-19

    The ability to reactivate ultraviolet (UV) damaged phage phiCbK (W-reactivation) is induced by UV irradiation of Caulobacter crescentus cells. Induction of W-reactivation potential is specific for phage phiCbK, requires protein synthesis, and is greatly reduced in the presence of the rec-526 mutation. The induction signal generated by UV irradiation is transient, lasting about 1 1/2 - 2 h at 30/sup 0/C; if chloramphenicol is present during early times after UV irradiation, induction of W-reactivation does not occur. Induction is maximal when cells are exposed to 5-10 J/m/sup 2/ of UV, a dose that also results in considerable mutagenesis of the cells. Taken together, these observations demonstrate the existence of a UV inducible, protein synthesis requiring, transiently signalled, rec-requiring DNA repair system analogous to W-reactivation in Escherichia coli. In addition, C. crescentus also has an efficient photoreactivation system that reverses UV damage in the presence of strong visible light.

  2. Intergenerational continuity of cell shape dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus

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    Wright, Charles S.; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the intergenerational shape dynamics of single Caulobacter crescentus cells using a novel combination of imaging techniques and theoretical modeling. We determine the dynamics of cell pole-to-pole lengths, cross-sectional widths, and medial curvatures from high accuracy measurements of cell contours. Moreover, these shape parameters are determined for over 250 cells across approximately 10000 total generations, which affords high statistical precision. Our data and model show that constriction is initiated early in the cell cycle and that its dynamics are controlled by the time scale of exponential longitudinal growth. Based on our extensive and detailed growth and contour data, we develop a minimal mechanical model that quantitatively accounts for the cell shape dynamics and suggests that the asymmetric location of the division plane reflects the distinct mechanical properties of the stalked and swarmer poles. Furthermore, we find that the asymmetry in the division plane location is inherited from the previous generation. We interpret these results in terms of the current molecular understanding of shape, growth, and division of C. crescentus.

  3. Correction of the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome annotation.

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    Ely, Bert; Scott, LaTia Etheredge

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial genome annotations are accumulating rapidly in the GenBank database and the use of automated annotation technologies to create these annotations has become the norm. However, these automated methods commonly result in a small, but significant percentage of genome annotation errors. To improve accuracy and reliability, we analyzed the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome utilizing computer programs Artemis and MICheck to manually examine the third codon position GC content, alignment to a third codon position GC frame plot peak, and matches in the GenBank database. We identified 11 new genes, modified the start site of 113 genes, and changed the reading frame of 38 genes that had been incorrectly annotated. Furthermore, our manual method of identifying protein-coding genes allowed us to remove 112 non-coding regions that had been designated as coding regions. The improved NA1000 genome annotation resulted in a reduction in the use of rare codons since noncoding regions with atypical codon usage were removed from the annotation and 49 new coding regions were added to the annotation. Thus, a more accurate codon usage table was generated as well. These results demonstrate that a comparison of the location of peaks third codon position GC content to the location of protein coding regions could be used to verify the annotation of any genome that has a GC content that is greater than 60%.

  4. Proposed Physical Mechanism of Chromosome Segregation in Caulobacter crescentus

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    Banigan, Edward; Gelbart, Michael; Gitai, Zemer; Liu, Andrea; Wingreen, Ned

    2010-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is a fundamental process for all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms that drive chromosome movements in bacteria are especially unclear. In Caulobacter crescentus, recent work has demonstrated that a structure made up of the ParA protein elongates from one cell pole and interacts with ParB, a protein binding to the chromosome near the origin of replication (ori). ParB disassembles ParA, causing ParA to pull ParB, and thus, the ori to the opposite end of the cell. We performed Brownian dynamics simulations of this system in order to uncover the physical mechanism of this motion. We find that motion of the ori is robust to several variations of the model as long as a steady-state concentration gradient of ParA is established in the moving frame of the ParB-decorated chromosome. We suggest that the mechanism is ``self-diffusiophoretic'': by disassembling ParA, ParB creates a concentration gradient of ParA so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the gradient in the desired direction.

  5. Helical motion of the cell body enhances Caulobacter crescentus motility.

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    Liu, Bin; Gulino, Marco; Morse, Michael; Tang, Jay X; Powers, Thomas R; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-08-01

    We resolve the 3D trajectory and the orientation of individual cells for extended times, using a digital tracking technique combined with 3D reconstructions. We have used this technique to study the motility of the uniflagellated bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and have found that each cell displays two distinct modes of motility, depending on the sense of rotation of the flagellar motor. In the forward mode, when the flagellum pushes the cell, the cell body is tilted with respect to the direction of motion, and it precesses, tracing out a helical trajectory. In the reverse mode, when the flagellum pulls the cell, the precession is smaller and the cell has a lower translation distance per rotation period and thus a lower motility. Using resistive force theory, we show how the helical motion of the cell body generates thrust and can explain the direction-dependent changes in swimming motility. The source of the cell body precession is believed to be associated with the flexibility of the hook that connects the flagellum to the cell body.

  6. Correction of the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Ely

    Full Text Available Bacterial genome annotations are accumulating rapidly in the GenBank database and the use of automated annotation technologies to create these annotations has become the norm. However, these automated methods commonly result in a small, but significant percentage of genome annotation errors. To improve accuracy and reliability, we analyzed the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome utilizing computer programs Artemis and MICheck to manually examine the third codon position GC content, alignment to a third codon position GC frame plot peak, and matches in the GenBank database. We identified 11 new genes, modified the start site of 113 genes, and changed the reading frame of 38 genes that had been incorrectly annotated. Furthermore, our manual method of identifying protein-coding genes allowed us to remove 112 non-coding regions that had been designated as coding regions. The improved NA1000 genome annotation resulted in a reduction in the use of rare codons since noncoding regions with atypical codon usage were removed from the annotation and 49 new coding regions were added to the annotation. Thus, a more accurate codon usage table was generated as well. These results demonstrate that a comparison of the location of peaks third codon position GC content to the location of protein coding regions could be used to verify the annotation of any genome that has a GC content that is greater than 60%.

  7. A physical approach to segregation and folding of the Caulobacter crescentus genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.T. Dame; M. Tark-Dame; H Schiessel

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are functionally organized. This organization is dynamic and globally changing throughout the cell cycle. Upon initiation of replication of the chromosome, the two origins segregate and move towards their new location taking along the newly replicated genome. Caulobacter crescentus

  8. Coordination between chromosome replication, segregation, and cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    Progression through the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle is coupled to a cellular differentiation program. The swarmer cell is replicationally quiescent, and DNA replication initiates at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition. There is a very short delay between initiation of DNA replication...

  9. Multiple large filament bundles observed in Caulobacter crescentus by electron cryotomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briegel, A; Dias, DP; Li, Z;

    2006-01-01

    , molecular mechanisms have remained obscure in part for lack of electron microscopy-resolution images where these filaments can be seen acting within their cellular context. Here, electron cryotomography was used to image the widely studied model prokaryote Caulobacter crescentus in an intact, near...

  10. Structure and function of Caulobacter crescentus aldose-aldose oxidoreductase.

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    Taberman, Helena; Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu; Hakulinen, Nina; Penttilä, Merja; Rouvinen, Juha; Parkkinen, Tarja

    2015-12-15

    Aldose-aldose oxidoreductase (Cc AAOR) is a recently characterized enzyme from the bacterial strain Caulobacter crescentus CB15 belonging to the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase/inositol dehydrogenase/rhizopine catabolism protein (Gfo/Idh/MocA) family. Cc AAOR catalyses the oxidation and reduction of a panel of aldose monosaccharides using a tightly bound NADP(H) cofactor that is regenerated in the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, Cc AAOR can also oxidize 1,4-linked oligosaccharides. In the present study, we present novel crystal structures of the dimeric Cc AAOR in complex with the cofactor and glycerol, D-xylose, D-glucose, maltotriose and D-sorbitol determined to resolutions of 2.0, 1.8, 1.7, 1.9 and 1.8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm), respectively. These complex structures allowed for a detailed analysis of the ligand-binding interactions. The structures showed that the C1 carbon of a substrate, which is either reduced or oxidized, is close to the reactive C4 carbon of the nicotinamide ring of NADP(H). In addition, the O1 hydroxy group of the substrate, which is either protonated or deprotonated, is unexpectedly close to both Lys(104) and Tyr(189), which may both act as a proton donor or acceptor. This led us to hypothesize that this intriguing feature could be beneficial for Cc AAOR to catalyse the reduction of a linear form of a monosaccharide substrate and the oxidation of a pyranose form of the same substrate in a reaction cycle, during which the bound cofactor is regenerated.

  11. Bioremediation of soluble heavy metals with recombinant Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Xu, Zhaohui; Lei, Yu; Patel, Jigar

    2010-01-01

    To achieve one-step separation of heavy metal ions from contaminated water, we have developed a novel bioremediation technology based on self-immobilization of the Caulobacter crescentus recombinant strain JS4022/p723-6H, which overexpresses hexahistidine peptide on the surface of the bacterial cells and serves as a whole-cell adsorbent for dissolved heavy metals. Biofilms formed by JS4022/p723-6H are effective at retaining cadmium from bacterial growth media or environmental water samples. Here we provide additional experiment data discussing the application potential of this new technology. Supplementation of calcium to the growth media produced robust JS4022/p723-6H cells by alleviating their sensitivity to chelators. After growth in the presence of 0.3% CaCl(2)·2H(2)O, double the amount of JS4022/p723-6H cells survived the treatment with 2 mM EDTA. Free cells of JS4022/p723-6H effectively sequestered 51% of the total cadmium from a Lake Erie water sample at pH 5.4, compared to 37% retrieved by the control strain. Similar levels of adsorption were observed at pH 4.2 as well. Cells of JS4022/p723-6H were tolerant of acid treatment for 90 min at pH ≥1.1 or 120 min at pH ≥2.5, which provides an avenue for the convenient regeneration of the bacterial cells metal-binding capacity with acidic solutions. Designs of possible bioreactors and an operation system are also presented.

  12. RK2 plasmid dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus cells--two modes of DNA replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Witosinska, Monika; Schweiger, Pawel; Bury, Katarzyna; Jenal, Urs; Konieczny, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Undisturbed plasmid dynamics is required for the stable maintenance of plasmid DNA in bacterial cells. In this work, we analysed subcellular localization, DNA synthesis and nucleoprotein complex formation of plasmid RK2 during the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. Our microscopic observations showed asymmetrical distribution of plasmid RK2 foci between the two compartments of Caulobacter predivisional cells, resulting in asymmetrical allocation of plasmids to progeny cells. Moreover, using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method, we estimated that multiple plasmid particles form a single fluorescent focus and that the number of plasmids per focus is approximately equal in both swarmer and predivisional Caulobacter cells. Analysis of the dynamics of TrfA-oriV complex formation during the Caulobacter cell cycle revealed that TrfA binds oriV primarily during the G1 phase, however, plasmid DNA synthesis occurs during the S and G2 phases of the Caulobacter cell cycle. Both in vitro and in vivo analysis of RK2 replication initiation in C. crescentus cells demonstrated that it is independent of the Caulobacter DnaA protein in the presence of the longer version of TrfA protein, TrfA-44. However, in vivo stability tests of plasmid RK2 derivatives suggested that a DnaA-dependent mode of plasmid replication initiation is also possible.

  13. The curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus enhances surface colonization in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persat, Alexandre; Stone, Howard A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-05-01

    Each bacterial species has a characteristic shape, but the benefits of specific morphologies remain largely unknown. To understand potential functions for cell shape, we focused on the curved bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Paradoxically, C. crescentus curvature is robustly maintained in the wild but straight mutants have no known disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Here we demonstrate that cell curvature enhances C. crescentus surface colonization in flow. Imaging the formation of microcolonies at high spatial and temporal resolution indicates that flow causes curved cells to orient such that they arc over the surface, thereby decreasing the distance between the surface and polar adhesive pili, and orienting pili to face the surface. C. crescentus thus repurposes pilus retraction, typically used for surface motility, for surface attachment. The benefit provided by curvature is eliminated at high flow intensity, raising the possibility that diversity in curvature adapts related species for life in different flow environments.

  14. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis of heavy metal stresses inCaulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ping; Brodie, Eoin L.; Suzuki, Yohey; McAdams, Harley H.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2005-09-21

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and related stalkbacterial species are known for their distinctive ability to live in lownutrient environments, a characteristic of most heavy metal contaminatedsites. Caulobacter crescentus is a model organism for studying cell cycleregulation with well developed genetics. We have identified the pathwaysresponding to heavy metal toxicity in C. crescentus to provide insightsfor possible application of Caulobacter to environmental restoration. Weexposed C. crescentus cells to four heavy metals (chromium, cadmium,selenium and uranium) and analyzed genome wide transcriptional activitiespost exposure using a Affymetrix GeneChip microarray. C. crescentusshowed surprisingly high tolerance to uranium, a possible mechanism forwhich may be formation of extracellular calcium-uranium-phosphateprecipitates. The principal response to these metals was protectionagainst oxidative stress (up-regulation of manganese-dependent superoxidedismutase, sodA). Glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin, glutaredoxinsand DNA repair enzymes responded most strongly to cadmium and chromate.The cadmium and chromium stress response also focused on reducing theintracellular metal concentration, with multiple efflux pumps employed toremove cadmium while a sulfate transporter was down-regulated to reducenon-specific uptake of chromium. Membrane proteins were also up-regulatedin response to most of the metals tested. A two-component signaltransduction system involved in the uranium response was identified.Several differentially regulated transcripts from regions previously notknown to encode proteins were identified, demonstrating the advantage ofevaluating the transcriptome using whole genome microarrays.

  15. Surface-layer protein from Caulobacter crescentus: expression, purification and X-ray crystallographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael D; Chan, Anson C K; Nomellini, John F; Murphy, Michael E P; Smit, John

    2016-09-01

    Protein surface layers are self-assembling, paracrystalline lattices on the surface of many prokaryotes. Surface-layer proteins have not benefited from widespread structural analysis owing to their resistance to crystallization. Here, the successful expression of a truncated version of RsaA, the surface-layer protein from Caulobacter crescentus, from a Caulobacter protein-expression system is reported. The purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the truncated RsaA, the largest surface-layer protein studied to date and the first from a Gram-negative bacterium, are also reported. PMID:27599857

  16. Complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus bacteriophage φCbK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panis, Gaël; Lambert, Christophe; Viollier, Patrick H

    2012-09-01

    φCbK is a B3 morphotype bacteriophage of the Siphoviridae family that infects Caulobacter crescentus, the preeminent model system for bacterial cell cycle studies. The last 4 decades of research with φCbK as a genetic and cytological tool to study the biology of the host warrant an investigation of the phage genome composition. Herein, we report the complete genome sequence of φCbK and highlight unusual features that emerged from its annotation. The complete genome analysis of the φCbK phage provides new insight into its characteristics and potential interactions with its Caulobacter crescentus host, setting the stage for future functional studies with φCbK.

  17. Reduction of Cr(VI) and survival in Cr-contaminated sites by Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, P.; Chakraborty, R.; Brodie, E. L.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Caulobacter spp. is known to be able to live in low-nutrient environments, a characteristic of most heavy metal-contaminated sites. Recent studies have shown that Caulobacter crescentus can grow in chemically defined medium containing up to 1 mM uranium. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis and electron microscopic imaging of heavy metal stresses in Caulobacter crescentus also provided insight and evidence that the bacterium used an array of defensive mechanisms to deal with heavy metal stresses. In addition to up-regulated enzymes protecting against oxidative stress, DNA repair and down-regulated potential chromium transport, one of the major gene groups respond to chromium stress is "electron transport process and cytochrome oxidases", including cytochrome c oxidases, raising the possibility that the cells can employ the cytochromes to reduce chromium. Analysis of the microbial community at the chromium contaminated DOE site at Hanford, WA revealed the presence of Caulobacter spp. As an oligotroph, Caulobacter can play a significant role in chromium reduction in the environment where the nutrients are limited. This result was confirmed by both 16S rDNA based microarray (Phylochip) as well as by MDA-based clone library data. Based on these results we further investigated the capability of this organism to reduce Cr(VI) using the well known model strain Caulobacter crescentus CB15N. Preliminary cell suspension experiments were set up with glucose as the electron donor and Cr(VI) as the electron acceptor in phosphate based M2 salts buffer. After 22 hours almost 27% of Cr(VI) was reduced in the incubations containing active cells relative to the controls containing heat killed cells. Also, in another set of controls with no electron acceptor added, cells showed no increase in cell density during that time demonstrating that the reduction of Cr(VI) by cells of Caulobacter was due to biological activity. Future experiments will investigate the components

  18. Growth medium-dependent glycine incorporation into the peptidoglycan of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin N Takacs

    Full Text Available The peptidoglycan (PG is a macromolecular component of the bacterial cell wall that maintains the shape and integrity of the cell. The PG of Caulobacter crescentus, unlike that of many other Gram-negative bacteria, has repeatedly been shown to contain significant amounts of glycine. This compositional peculiarity has been deemed an intrinsic characteristic of this species. By performing a comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis of the C. crescentus PG by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and mass spectrometry (MS, we show here that glycine incorporation into the C. crescentus PG depends on the presence of exogenous glycine in the growth medium. High levels of glycine were detected at the fifth position of the peptide side chains of PG isolated from C. crescentus cells grown in the complex laboratory medium PYE or in defined medium (M2G supplemented with casamino acids or glycine alone. In contrast, glycine incorporation was undetectable when cells were grown in M2G medium lacking glycine. Remarkably, glycine incorporation into C. crescentus peptidoglycan occurred even in the presence of low millimolar to sub-millimolar concentrations of free glycine. High glycine content in the PG had no obvious effects on growth rates, mode of PG incorporation or cell morphology. Hence, the C. crescentus PG is able to retain its physiological functions in cell growth and morphogenesis despite significant alterations in its composition, in what we deem to be unprecedented plasticity.

  19. Growth medium-dependent glycine incorporation into the peptidoglycan of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Constantin N; Hocking, Jason; Cabeen, Matthew T; Bui, Nhat Khai; Poggio, Sebastian; Vollmer, Waldemar; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The peptidoglycan (PG) is a macromolecular component of the bacterial cell wall that maintains the shape and integrity of the cell. The PG of Caulobacter crescentus, unlike that of many other Gram-negative bacteria, has repeatedly been shown to contain significant amounts of glycine. This compositional peculiarity has been deemed an intrinsic characteristic of this species. By performing a comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis of the C. crescentus PG by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS), we show here that glycine incorporation into the C. crescentus PG depends on the presence of exogenous glycine in the growth medium. High levels of glycine were detected at the fifth position of the peptide side chains of PG isolated from C. crescentus cells grown in the complex laboratory medium PYE or in defined medium (M2G) supplemented with casamino acids or glycine alone. In contrast, glycine incorporation was undetectable when cells were grown in M2G medium lacking glycine. Remarkably, glycine incorporation into C. crescentus peptidoglycan occurred even in the presence of low millimolar to sub-millimolar concentrations of free glycine. High glycine content in the PG had no obvious effects on growth rates, mode of PG incorporation or cell morphology. Hence, the C. crescentus PG is able to retain its physiological functions in cell growth and morphogenesis despite significant alterations in its composition, in what we deem to be unprecedented plasticity.

  20. Control of cell division and the spatial localization of assembled gene products in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments are described that examine the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the regulation of cell division in Caulobacter crescentus; and the spatial localization of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in C. crescentus swarmer and predivisional cells. In the analysis of PBP function, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus PBPs with (/sup 3/H) penicillin G in wild type strain CB15, in a series of conditional cell division mutants and in new temperature sensitive cephalosporin C resistant mutants PC8002 and PC8003. 14 PBPs are characterized and a high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1B) that is required for cell division is identified. PBP 1B competes for ..beta..-lactams that induce filament formation and may be a high affinity binding protein. A second high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1C) is also associated with defective cell division. The examination of PBP patterns in synchronous swarmer cells reveals that the in vivo activity of PBP 1B and PBP 1C increases at the time that the cell division pathway is initiated. None of the PBPs, however, appear to be differentially localized in the C. crescentus cell. In the analysis of MCP localization, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus MCPs with methyl-/sup 3/H. MCPs are examined in flagellated and non-flagellated vesicles prepared from cells by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  1. A moving DNA replication factory in Caulobacter crescentus

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Rasmus B.; Wang, Sherry C.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2001-01-01

    The in vivo intracellular location of components of the Caulobacter replication apparatus was visualized during the cell cycle. Replisome assembly occurs at the chromosomal origin located at the stalked cell pole, coincident with the initiation of DNA replication. The replisome gradually moves to midcell as DNA replication proceeds and disassembles upon completion of DNA replication. Although the newly replicated origin regions of the chromosome are rapidly moved to opposite cell poles by an ...

  2. The core and O-polysaccharide structure of the Caulobacter crescentus lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael D; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Nomellini, John F; Smit, John

    2015-01-30

    Here we describe the analysis of the structure of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Caulobacter crescentus strain JS1025, a derivative of C. crescentus CB15 NA1000 with an engineered amber mutation in rsaA, leading to the loss of the protein S-layer and gene CCNA_00471 encoding a putative GDP-L-fucose synthase. LPS was isolated using an aqueous membrane disruption method. Polysaccharide and core oligosaccharide were produced by mild acid hydrolysis and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical methods. Spectra revealed the presence of two polysaccharides, one of them, a rhamnan, could be removed using periodate oxidation. Another polymer, built from 4-amino-4-deoxy-D-rhamnose (perosamine), mannose, and 3-O-methyl-glucose, should be the O-chain of the LPS according to genetic data. The attribution of the rhamnan as a part of LPS or a separate polymer was not possible. PMID:25498010

  3. Flagellar Motor Switching in Caulobacter Crescentus Obeys First Passage Time Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael; Bell, Jordan; Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay X.

    2015-11-01

    A Caulobacter crescentus swarmer cell is propelled by a helical flagellum, which is rotated by a motor at its base. The motor alternates between rotating in clockwise and counterclockwise directions and spends variable intervals of time in each state. We measure the distributions of these intervals for cells either free swimming or tethered to a glass slide. A peak time of around one second is observed in the distributions for both motor directions with counterclockwise intervals more sharply peaked and clockwise intervals displaying a larger tail at long times. We show that distributions of rotation intervals fit first passage time statistics for a biased random walker and the dynamic binding of CheY-P to FliM motor subunits accounts for this behavior. Our results also suggest that the presence of multiple CheY proteins in C. crescentus may be responsible for differences between its switching behavior and that of the extensively studied E. coli.

  4. The core and O-polysaccharide structure of the Caulobacter crescentus lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael D; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Nomellini, John F; Smit, John

    2015-01-30

    Here we describe the analysis of the structure of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Caulobacter crescentus strain JS1025, a derivative of C. crescentus CB15 NA1000 with an engineered amber mutation in rsaA, leading to the loss of the protein S-layer and gene CCNA_00471 encoding a putative GDP-L-fucose synthase. LPS was isolated using an aqueous membrane disruption method. Polysaccharide and core oligosaccharide were produced by mild acid hydrolysis and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical methods. Spectra revealed the presence of two polysaccharides, one of them, a rhamnan, could be removed using periodate oxidation. Another polymer, built from 4-amino-4-deoxy-D-rhamnose (perosamine), mannose, and 3-O-methyl-glucose, should be the O-chain of the LPS according to genetic data. The attribution of the rhamnan as a part of LPS or a separate polymer was not possible.

  5. OmpW of Caulobacter crescentus Functions as an Outer Membrane Channel for Cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Benz

    Full Text Available Caulobacter crescentus is an oligotrophic bacterium that lives in dilute organic environments such as soil and freshwater. This bacterium represents an interesting model for cellular differentiation and regulation because daughter cells after division have different forms: one is motile while the other is non-motile and can adhere to surfaces. Interestingly, the known genome of C. crescentus does not contain genes predicted to code for outer membrane porins of the OmpF/C general diffusion type present in enteric bacteria or those coding for specific porins selective for classes of substrates. Instead, genes coding for 67 TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors have been identified, suggesting that active transport of specific nutrients may be the norm. Here, we report that high channel-forming activity was observed with crude outer membrane extracts of C. crescentus in lipid bilayer experiments, indicating that the outer membrane of C. crescentus contained an ion-permeable channel with a single-channel conductance of about 120 pS in 1M KCl. The channel-forming protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 20 kDa was purified to homogeneity. Partial protein sequencing of the protein indicated it was a member of the OmpW family of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. This channel was not observed in reconstitution experiments with crude outer membrane extracts of an OmpW deficient C. crescentus mutant. Biophysical analysis of the C. crescentus OmpW suggested that it has features that are special for general diffusion porins of Gram-negative outer membranes because it was not a wide aqueous channel. Furthermore, OmpW of C. crescentus seems to be different to known OmpW porins and has a preference for ions, in particular cations. A putative model for OmpW of C. crescentus was built on the basis of the known 3D-structures of OmpW of Escherichia coli and OprG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using homology modeling. A comparison of the two

  6. OmpW of Caulobacter crescentus Functions as an Outer Membrane Channel for Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Roland; Jones, Michael D; Younas, Farhan; Maier, Elke; Modi, Niraj; Mentele, Reinhard; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Smit, John

    2015-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is an oligotrophic bacterium that lives in dilute organic environments such as soil and freshwater. This bacterium represents an interesting model for cellular differentiation and regulation because daughter cells after division have different forms: one is motile while the other is non-motile and can adhere to surfaces. Interestingly, the known genome of C. crescentus does not contain genes predicted to code for outer membrane porins of the OmpF/C general diffusion type present in enteric bacteria or those coding for specific porins selective for classes of substrates. Instead, genes coding for 67 TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors have been identified, suggesting that active transport of specific nutrients may be the norm. Here, we report that high channel-forming activity was observed with crude outer membrane extracts of C. crescentus in lipid bilayer experiments, indicating that the outer membrane of C. crescentus contained an ion-permeable channel with a single-channel conductance of about 120 pS in 1M KCl. The channel-forming protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 20 kDa was purified to homogeneity. Partial protein sequencing of the protein indicated it was a member of the OmpW family of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. This channel was not observed in reconstitution experiments with crude outer membrane extracts of an OmpW deficient C. crescentus mutant. Biophysical analysis of the C. crescentus OmpW suggested that it has features that are special for general diffusion porins of Gram-negative outer membranes because it was not a wide aqueous channel. Furthermore, OmpW of C. crescentus seems to be different to known OmpW porins and has a preference for ions, in particular cations. A putative model for OmpW of C. crescentus was built on the basis of the known 3D-structures of OmpW of Escherichia coli and OprG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using homology modeling. A comparison of the two known structures

  7. Probing flagellar promoter occupancy in wild-type and mutant Caulobacter crescentus by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Nicole J; Viollier, Patrick H

    2011-06-01

    In the asymmetric predivisional cell of Caulobacter crescentus, TipF and TipN mark the cellular pole for future flagellar development. TipF is essential for motility and contains a cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterase-like (EAL) domain that is necessary for proper function. TipN is localized to the flagellar pole before TipF and is essential for the proper placement of the flagellum in C. crescentus. Using β-galactosidase promoter-probe assays and quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation, we investigated the influence of the C. crescentus flagellar assembly regulator TipF on flagellar gene transcription. We compared the transcriptional activity of class II-fliF-lacZ, class III-flgE-lacZ, and class IV-fljL-lacZ fusions in a ΔtipF mutant with that of other flagellar mutants and the wild-type strain. We subsequently verified the in vivo occupancy of the fliF, flgE, and fljL flagellar promoters by the flagellar regulators CtrA, FlbD, and FliX in addition to RNA polymerase. We deduce that TipF contributes to proper expression of flagellar genes in C. crescentus by acting both within and outside of the canonical flagellar gene expression hierarchy.

  8. Temporal controls of the asymmetric cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Li

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric cell division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus is orchestrated by an elaborate gene-protein regulatory network, centered on three major control proteins, DnaA, GcrA and CtrA. The regulatory network is cast into a quantitative computational model to investigate in a systematic fashion how these three proteins control the relevant genetic, biochemical and physiological properties of proliferating bacteria. Different controls for both swarmer and stalked cell cycles are represented in the mathematical scheme. The model is validated against observed phenotypes of wild-type cells and relevant mutants, and it predicts the phenotypes of novel mutants and of known mutants under novel experimental conditions. Because the cell cycle control proteins of Caulobacter are conserved across many species of alpha-proteobacteria, the model we are proposing here may be applicable to other genera of importance to agriculture and medicine (e.g., Rhizobium, Brucella.

  9. A stochastic spatiotemporal model of a response-regulator network in the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Subramanian, Kartik; Chen, Minghan; Tyson, John J.; Cao, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetric cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus is controlled by an elaborate molecular mechanism governing the production, activation and spatial localization of a host of interacting proteins. In previous work, we proposed a deterministic mathematical model for the spatiotemporal dynamics of six major regulatory proteins. In this paper, we study a stochastic version of the model, which takes into account molecular fluctuations of these regulatory proteins in space and time during early stages of the cell cycle of wild-type Caulobacter cells. We test the stochastic model with regard to experimental observations of increased variability of cycle time in cells depleted of the divJ gene product. The deterministic model predicts that overexpression of the divK gene blocks cell cycle progression in the stalked stage; however, stochastic simulations suggest that a small fraction of the mutants cells do complete the cell cycle normally.

  10. Enhanced neutralization of HIV by antibodies displayed on the S-layer of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Mark; Lewis, Christopher J; Nomellini, John F; Horwitz, Marc S; Smit, John; Cavacini, Lisa A

    2011-12-01

    Innovative methods of prevention are needed to stop the more than two million new HIV-1 infections annually, particularly in women. Local application of anti-HIV antibodies has been shown to be effective at preventing infection in nonhuman primates; however, the concentrations needed are cost prohibitive. Display of antibodies on a particulate platform will likely prolong effectiveness of these anti-HIV agents and lower the cost of goods. Here, we demonstrate that the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and its highly expressed surface-layer (S-layer) protein can provide this antibody display platform. Caulobacters displaying protein G, alone or with CD4 codisplay, successfully captured HIV-1-specific antibodies and demonstrated functional neutralization. Compared to soluble antibodies, a neutralizing anti-HIV antibody displayed on Caulobacter was as effective or more effective at neutralizing diverse HIV-1 isolates. Moreover, when an antibody reactive with an epitope induced by CD4 binding (CD4i) was codisplayed with CD4, there was significant enhancement in HIV-1 neutralization. These results suggest that caulobacters displaying anti-HIV antibodies offer a distinct improvement in the use of antibodies as microbicides. Furthermore, these reagents can specifically evaluate anti-HIV antibodies in concert with other HIV-1 blocking agents to assess the most suitable tools for conversion to scFvs, allowing for direct display within the S-layer protein and further reducing cost of goods. In summary, C. crescentus, which can be easily produced and chemically stabilized at low cost, is well suited for engineering as an effective platform, offering an inexpensive way to produce and deliver HIV-1-specific microbicides.

  11. Compaction and transport properties of newly replicated Caulobacter crescentus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Hae; McAdams, Harley H

    2011-12-01

    Upon initiating replication of the Caulobacter chromosome, one copy of the parS centromere remains at the stalked pole; the other moves to the distal pole. We identified the segregation dynamics and compaction characteristics of newly replicated Caulobacter DNA during transport (highly variable from cell to cell) using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The parS centromere and a length (also highly variable) of parS proximal DNA on each arm of the chromosome are segregated with the same relatively slow transport pattern as the parS locus. Newly replicated DNA further than about 100 kb from parS segregates with a different and faster pattern, while loci at 48 kb from parS segregate with the slow pattern in some cells and the fast pattern in others. The observed parS-proximal DNA compaction characteristics have scaling properties that suggest the DNA is branched. HU2-deletion strains exhibited a reduced compaction phenotype except near the parS site where only the ΔHU1ΔHU2 double mutant had a compaction phenotype. The chromosome shows speed-dependent extension during translocation suggesting the DNA polymer is under tension. While DNA segregation is highly reliable and succeeds in virtually all wild-type cells, the high degree of cell to cell variation in the segregation process is noteworthy.

  12. Effects of (p)ppGpp on the progression of the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Diego; Collier, Justine

    2014-07-01

    Bacteria must control the progression of their cell cycle in response to nutrient availability. This regulation can be mediated by guanosine tetra- or pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], which are synthesized by enzymes of the RelA/SpoT homologue (Rsh) family, particularly under starvation conditions. Here, we study the effects of (p)ppGpp on the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus, an oligotrophic bacterium with a dimorphic life cycle. C. crescentus divides asymmetrically, producing a motile swarmer cell that cannot replicate its chromosome and a sessile stalked cell that is replication competent. The swarmer cell rapidly differentiates into a stalked cell in appropriate conditions. An artificial increase in the levels of (p)ppGpp in nonstarved C. crescentus cells was achieved by expressing a truncated relA gene from Escherichia coli, encoding a constitutively active (p)ppGpp synthetase. By combining single-cell microscopy, flow cytometry approaches, and swarming assays, we show that an increase in the intracellular concentration of (p)ppGpp is sufficient to slow down the swarmer-to-stalked cell differentiation process and to delay the initiation of chromosome replication. We also present evidence that the intracellular levels of two master regulators of the cell cycle of C. crescentus, DnaA and CtrA, are modulated in response to (p)ppGpp accumulation, even in the absence of actual starvation. CtrA proteolysis and DnaA synthesis seem indirectly inhibited by (p)ppGpp accumulation. By extending the life span of the motile nonreproductive swarmer cell and thus promoting dispersal and foraging functions over multiplication under starvation conditions, (p)ppGpp may play a central role in the ecological adaptation of C. crescentus to nutritional stresses.

  13. Regulatory Response to Carbon Starvation in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britos, Leticia C.; Abeliuk, Eduardo; Taverner, Thomas; Lipton, Mary S.; McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucy

    2011-04-11

    Bacteria adapt to shifts from rapid to slow growth, and have developed strategies for long-term survival during prolonged starvation and stress conditions. We report the regulatory response of C. crescentus to carbon starvation, based on combined high-throughput proteome and transcriptome analyses. Our results identify cell cycle changes in gene expression in response to carbon starvation that involve the prominent role of the FixK FNR/CAP family transcription factor and the CtrA cell cycle regulator. Notably, the SigT ECF sigma factor mediates the carbon starvation-induced degradation of CtrA, while activating a core set of general starvation-stress genes that respond to carbon starvation, osmotic stress, and exposure to heavy metals. Comparison of the response of swarmer cells and stalked cells to carbon starvation revealed four groups of genes that exhibit different expression profiles. Also, cell pole morphogenesis and initiation of chromosome replication normally occurring at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition are uncoupled in carbon-starved cells.

  14. Regulatory response to carbon starvation in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Britos

    Full Text Available Bacteria adapt to shifts from rapid to slow growth, and have developed strategies for long-term survival during prolonged starvation and stress conditions. We report the regulatory response of C. crescentus to carbon starvation, based on combined high-throughput proteome and transcriptome analyses. Our results identify cell cycle changes in gene expression in response to carbon starvation that involve the prominent role of the FixK FNR/CAP family transcription factor and the CtrA cell cycle regulator. Notably, the SigT ECF sigma factor mediates the carbon starvation-induced degradation of CtrA, while activating a core set of general starvation-stress genes that respond to carbon starvation, osmotic stress, and exposure to heavy metals. Comparison of the response of swarmer cells and stalked cells to carbon starvation revealed four groups of genes that exhibit different expression profiles. Also, cell pole morphogenesis and initiation of chromosome replication normally occurring at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition are uncoupled in carbon-starved cells.

  15. The flagellar motor of Caulobacter crescentus generates more torque when a cell swims backwards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Roland, Thibault; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Chen, Yihao; Berg, Howard C.

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus swims by rotating a single right-handed helical filament. These cells have two swimming modes: a pusher mode, in which clockwise (CW) rotation of the filament thrusts the cell body forwards, and a puller mode, in which counterclockwise (CCW) rotation pulls it backwards. The situation is reversed in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that rotates several left-handed filaments CCW to drive the cell body forwards. The flagellar motor in E. coli generates more torque in the CCW direction than the CW direction in swimming cells. However, C. crescentus and other bacteria with single filaments swim forwards and backwards at similar speeds, prompting the assumption that motor torques in the two modes are the same. Here, we present evidence that motors in C. crescentus develop higher torques in the puller mode than in the pusher mode, and suggest that the anisotropy in torque generation is similar in the two species, despite the differences in filament handedness and motor bias.

  16. Dynamical modeling of the cell cycle and cell fate emergence in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    César Quiñones-Valles

    Full Text Available The division of Caulobacter crescentus, a model organism for studying cell cycle and differentiation in bacteria, generates two cell types: swarmer and stalked. To complete its cycle, C. crescentus must first differentiate from the swarmer to the stalked phenotype. An important regulator involved in this process is CtrA, which operates in a gene regulatory network and coordinates many of the interactions associated to the generation of cellular asymmetry. Gaining insight into how such a differentiation phenomenon arises and how network components interact to bring about cellular behavior and function demands mathematical models and simulations. In this work, we present a dynamical model based on a generalization of the Boolean abstraction of gene expression for a minimal network controlling the cell cycle and asymmetric cell division in C. crescentus. This network was constructed from data obtained from an exhaustive search in the literature. The results of the simulations based on our model show a cyclic attractor whose configurations can be made to correspond with the current knowledge of the activity of the regulators participating in the gene network during the cell cycle. Additionally, we found two point attractors that can be interpreted in terms of the network configurations directing the two cell types. The entire network is shown to be operating close to the critical regime, which means that it is robust enough to perturbations on dynamics of the network, but adaptable to environmental changes.

  17. Biomineralization of Uranium by PhoY Phosphatase Activity Aids Cell Survival in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung, M C [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiao, Y [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-22

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria.

  18. Biomineralization of uranium by PhoY phosphatase activity aids cell survival in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Mimi C; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-08-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria.

  19. Dynamical modeling of the cell cycle and cell fate emergence in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones-Valles, César; Sánchez-Osorio, Ismael; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino

    2014-01-01

    The division of Caulobacter crescentus, a model organism for studying cell cycle and differentiation in bacteria, generates two cell types: swarmer and stalked. To complete its cycle, C. crescentus must first differentiate from the swarmer to the stalked phenotype. An important regulator involved in this process is CtrA, which operates in a gene regulatory network and coordinates many of the interactions associated to the generation of cellular asymmetry. Gaining insight into how such a differentiation phenomenon arises and how network components interact to bring about cellular behavior and function demands mathematical models and simulations. In this work, we present a dynamical model based on a generalization of the Boolean abstraction of gene expression for a minimal network controlling the cell cycle and asymmetric cell division in C. crescentus. This network was constructed from data obtained from an exhaustive search in the literature. The results of the simulations based on our model show a cyclic attractor whose configurations can be made to correspond with the current knowledge of the activity of the regulators participating in the gene network during the cell cycle. Additionally, we found two point attractors that can be interpreted in terms of the network configurations directing the two cell types. The entire network is shown to be operating close to the critical regime, which means that it is robust enough to perturbations on dynamics of the network, but adaptable to environmental changes.

  20. A quantitative study of the division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus stalked cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Progression of a cell through the division cycle is tightly controlled at different steps to ensure the integrity of genome replication and partitioning to daughter cells. From published experimental evidence, we propose a molecular mechanism for control of the cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus. The mechanism, which is based on the synthesis and degradation of three "master regulator" proteins (CtrA, GcrA, and DnaA, is converted into a quantitative model, in order to study the temporal dynamics of these and other cell cycle proteins. The model accounts for important details of the physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of cell cycle control in stalked C. crescentus cell. It reproduces protein time courses in wild-type cells, mimics correctly the phenotypes of many mutant strains, and predicts the phenotypes of currently uncharacterized mutants. Since many of the proteins involved in regulating the cell cycle of C. crescentus are conserved among many genera of alpha-proteobacteria, the proposed mechanism may be applicable to other species of importance in agriculture and medicine.

  1. Molecular recognition of RhlB and RNase D in the Caulobacter crescentus RNA degradosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Jarrod E; Luisi, Ben F; Hardwick, Steven W

    2014-12-01

    The endoribonuclease RNase E is a key enzyme in RNA metabolism for many bacterial species. In Escherichia coli, RNase E contributes to the majority of RNA turnover and processing events, and the enzyme has been extensively characterized as the central component of the RNA degradosome assembly. A similar RNA degradosome assembly has been described in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, with the interacting partners of RNase E identified as the Kreb's cycle enzyme aconitase, a DEAD-box RNA helicase RhlB and the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase. Here we report that an additional degradosome component is the essential exoribonuclease RNase D, and its recognition site within RNase E is identified. We show that, unlike its E. coli counterpart, C. crescentus RhlB interacts directly with a segment of the N-terminal catalytic domain of RNase E. The crystal structure of a portion of C. crescentus RNase E encompassing the helicase-binding region is reported. This structure reveals that an inserted segment in the S1 domain adopts an α-helical conformation, despite being predicted to be natively unstructured. We discuss the implications of these findings for the organization and mechanisms of the RNA degradosome.

  2. Diverse functions for six glycosyltransferases in Caulobacter crescentus cell wall assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhnina, Anastasiya A; Gitai, Zemer

    2013-10-01

    The essential process of peptidoglycan synthesis requires two enzymatic activities, transpeptidation and transglycosylation. While the PBP2 and PBP3 transpeptidases perform highly specialized functions that are widely conserved, the specific roles of different glycosyltransferases are poorly understood. For example, Caulobacter crescentus encodes six glycosyltransferase paralogs of largely unknown function. Using genetic analyses, we found that Caulobacter glycosyltransferases are primarily redundant but that PbpX is responsible for most of the essential glycosyltransferase activity. Cells containing PbpX as their sole glycosyltransferase are viable, and the loss of pbpX leads to a general defect in the integrity of the cell wall structure even in the presence of the other five glycosyltransferases. However, neither PbpX nor any of its paralogs is required for the specific processes of cell elongation or division, while the cell wall synthesis required for stalk biogenesis is only partially disrupted in several of the glycosyltransferase mutants. Despite their genetic redundancy, Caulobacter glycosyltransferases exhibit different subcellular localizations. We suggest that these enzymes have specialized roles and normally function in distinct subcomplexes but retain the ability to substitute for one another so as to ensure the robustness of the peptidoglycan synthesis process.

  3. Synchronization of Caulobacter crescentus for investigation of the bacterial cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Jared M; Shapiro, Lucy

    2015-04-08

    The cell cycle is important for growth, genome replication, and development in all cells. In bacteria, studies of the cell cycle have focused largely on unsynchronized cells making it difficult to order the temporal events required for cell cycle progression, genome replication, and division. Caulobacter crescentus provides an excellent model system for the bacterial cell cycle whereby cells can be rapidly synchronized in a G0 state by density centrifugation. Cell cycle synchronization experiments have been used to establish the molecular events governing chromosome replication and segregation, to map a genetic regulatory network controlling cell cycle progression, and to identify the establishment of polar signaling complexes required for asymmetric cell division. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the rapid synchronization of Caulobacter NA1000 cells. Synchronization can be performed in a large-scale format for gene expression profiling and western blot assays, as well as a small-scale format for microscopy or FACS assays. The rapid synchronizability and high cell yields of Caulobacter make this organism a powerful model system for studies of the bacterial cell cycle.

  4. Phosphate starvation triggers production and secretion of an extracellular lipoprotein in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Sophie Le Blastier

    Full Text Available Life in oligotrophic environments necessitates quick adaptive responses to a sudden lack of nutrients. Secretion of specific degradative enzymes into the extracellular medium is a means to mobilize the required nutrient from nearby sources. The aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus must often face changes in its environment such as phosphate limitation. Evidence reported in this paper indicates that under phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces a membrane surface-anchored lipoprotein named ElpS subsequently released into the extracellular medium. A complete set of 12 genes encoding a type II secretion system (T2SS is located adjacent to the elpS locus in the C. crescentus genome. Deletion of this T2SS impairs release of ElpS in the environment, which surprisingly remains present at the cell surface, indicating that the T2SS is not involved in the translocation of ElpS to the outer membrane but rather in its release. Accordingly, treatment with protease inhibitors prevents release of ElpS in the extracellular medium suggesting that ElpS secretion relies on a T2SS-secreted protease. Finally, secretion of ElpS is associated with an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity in culture supernatants, suggesting a role of the secreted protein in inorganic phosphate mobilization. In conclusion, we have shown that upon phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces an outer membrane bound lipoprotein, ElpS, which is further cleaved and released in the extracellular medium in a T2SS-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ElpS is associated with an alkaline phosphatase activity, thereby allowing the bacterium to gather inorganic phosphates from a poor environment.

  5. The Caulobacter crescentus chromosome replication origin evolved two classes of weak DnaA binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Ouimet, Marie-Claude; Wargachuk, Richard; Marczynski, Gregory T

    2011-10-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus replication initiator DnaA and essential response regulator CtrA compete to control chromosome replication. The C. crescentus replication origin (Cori) contains five strong CtrA binding sites but only two apparent DnaA boxes, termed G-boxes (with a conserved second position G, TGATCCACA). Since clusters of DnaA boxes typify bacterial replication origins, this discrepancy suggested that C. crescentus DnaA recognizes different DNA sequences or compensates with novel DNA-binding proteins. We searched for novel DNA sites by scanning mutagenesis of the most conserved Cori DNA. Autonomous replication assays showed that G-boxes and novel W-boxes (TCCCCA) are essential for replication. Further analyses showed that C. crescentus DnaA binds G-boxes with moderate and W-boxes with very weak affinities significantly below DnaA's capacity for high-affinity Escherichia coli-boxes (TTATCCACA). Cori has five conserved W-boxes. Increasing W-box affinities increases or decreases autonomous replication depending on their strategic positions between the G-boxes. In vitro, CtrA binding displaces DnaA from proximal G-boxes and from distal W-boxes implying CtrA-DnaA competition and DnaA-DnaA cooperation between G-boxes and W-boxes. Similarly, during cell cycle progression, CtrA proteolysis coincides with DnaA binding to Cori. We also observe highly conserved W-boxes in other replication origins lacking E. coli-boxes. Therefore, strategically weak DnaA binding can be a general means of replication control.

  6. Characterization of Uranium Tolerance and Biomineralization Potential of Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its high toxicity and mobility, U(VI) poses a major environmental threat to ecosystems. The ubiquitous aerobic bacterium Caulobacter cresecentus is an attractive candidate for U(VI) bioremediation because of its ability to survive in low-nutrient environments (5, 6), tolerate high U concentrations and mineralize U(VI) aerobically through the formation of uranyl phosphate (U-Pi) precipitates. Despite these attractive environmental properties, both a systems level understanding of the adaptive response pathways involved in U tolerance and the environmental conditions affecting the biomineralization process and stability of biogenic U-Pi minerals remain limited. By measuring changes in both mRNA and protein expression during exposure to high U levels, we have identified the core stress response pathways involved in U tolerance. Pathways associated with heat shock, lipospolysaccharide biosynthesis and transport, outer membrane lipoprotein transport and outermembrane assembly were highly induced at both the RNA and protein levels. Correspondingly, removal of integral components of proteolysis pathways including clpA, clpS and degP significantly reduced U tolerance under biomineralization conditions. Surprisingly, in contrast to many other heavy metals, U did not cause oxidative stress or DNA damage. Together, these analyses indicate that U predominately targets the outermembrane and causes mis-folding of both cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic proteins. Efforts are currently underway to characterize the morphological and structural properties of biogenic U-Pi minerals and the environmental factors that influence their production and stability. Preliminary AFM studies suggest that U-Pi minerals formed under biomineralization conditions appear morphologically distinct from those formed abiotically between U(VI) and inorganic phosphate. Additionally, we observed that biomineralization tolerates a wide pH range (pH 6-9). Our long-range goal is the development of a

  7. Two Outer Membrane Proteins Are Required for Maximal Type I Secretion of the Caulobacter crescentus S-Layer Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Toporowski, Michael C.; Nomellini, John F.; Awram, Peter; Smit, John

    2004-01-01

    Transport of RsaA, the crystalline S-layer subunit protein of Caulobacter crescentus, is mediated by a type I secretion mechanism. Two proteins have been identified that play the role of the outer membrane protein (OMP) component in the RsaA secretion machinery. The genes rsaFa and rsaFb were identified by similarity to the Escherichia coli hemolysin secretion OMP TolC by using the C. crescentus genome sequence. The rsaFa gene is located several kilobases downstream of the other transporter g...

  8. A NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase coordinates metabolism with cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufay, François; Coppine, Jérôme; Mayard, Aurélie; Laloux, Géraldine; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2015-07-01

    Coupling cell cycle with nutrient availability is a crucial process for all living cells. But how bacteria control cell division according to metabolic supplies remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism that coordinates central metabolism with cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This mechanism involves the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase GdhZ and the oxidoreductase-like KidO. While enzymatically active GdhZ directly interferes with FtsZ polymerization by stimulating its GTPase activity, KidO bound to NADH destabilizes lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments. Both GdhZ and KidO share the same regulatory network to concomitantly stimulate the rapid disassembly of the Z-ring, necessary for the subsequent release of progeny cells. Thus, this mechanism illustrates how proteins initially dedicated to metabolism coordinate cell cycle progression with nutrient availability.

  9. Alternative mechanism for bacteriophage adsorption to the motile bacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C; Viollier, Patrick H; Ely, Bert; Poindexter, Jeanne S; Georgieva, Maria; Jensen, Grant J; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2011-06-14

    2D and 3D cryo-electron microscopy, together with adsorption kinetics assays of Cb13 and CbK phage-infected Caulobacter crescentus, provides insight into the mechanisms of infection. Cb13 and CbK actively interact with the flagellum and subsequently attach to receptors on the cell pole. We present evidence that the first interaction of the phage with the bacterial flagellum takes place through a filament on the phage head. This contact with the flagellum facilitates concentration of phage particles around the receptor (i.e., the pilus portals) on the bacterial cell surface, thereby increasing the likelihood of infection. Phage head filaments have not been well characterized and their function is described here. Phage head filaments may systematically underlie the initial interactions of phages with their hosts in other systems and possibly represent a widespread mechanism of efficient phage propagation.

  10. ppGpp and polyphosphate modulate cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutte, Cara C; Henry, Jonathan T; Crosson, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus differentiates from a motile, foraging swarmer cell into a sessile, replication-competent stalked cell during its cell cycle. This developmental transition is inhibited by nutrient deprivation to favor the motile swarmer state. We identify two cell cycle regulatory signals, ppGpp and polyphosphate (polyP), that inhibit the swarmer-to-stalked transition in both complex and glucose-exhausted media, thereby increasing the proportion of swarmer cells in mixed culture. Upon depletion of available carbon, swarmer cells lacking the ability to synthesize ppGpp or polyP improperly initiate chromosome replication, proteolyze the replication inhibitor CtrA, localize the cell fate determinant DivJ, and develop polar stalks. Furthermore, we show that swarmer cells produce more ppGpp than stalked cells upon starvation. These results provide evidence that ppGpp and polyP are cell-type-specific developmental regulators.

  11. Regulation of the activity of the dual-function DnaA protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Fernandez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available DnaA is a conserved essential bacterial protein that acts as the initiator of chromosomal replication as well as a master transcriptional regulator in Caulobacter crescentus. Thus, the intracellular levels of active DnaA need to be tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Our previous work suggested that DnaA may be regulated at the level of its activity by the replisome-associated protein HdaA. Here, we describe the construction of a mutant DnaA protein [DnaA(R357A]. The R357 residue in the AAA+ domain of the C. crescentus DnaA protein is equivalent to the R334 residue of the E. coli DnaA protein, which is required for the Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA (RIDA. We found that the expression of the DnaA(R357A mutant protein in C. crescentus, but not the expression of the wild-type DnaA protein at similar levels, causes a severe phenotype of over-initiation of chromosomal replication and that it blocks cell division. Thus, the mutant DnaA(R357A protein is hyper-active to promote the initiation of DNA replication, compared to the wild-type DnaA protein. DnaA(R357A could not replace DnaA in vivo, indicating that the switch in DnaA activity once chromosomal replication has started may be an essential process in C. crescentus. We propose that the inactivation of DnaA is the main mechanism ensuring that chromosomal replication starts only once per cell cycle. We further observed that the R357A substitution in DnaA does not promote the activity of DnaA as a direct transcriptional activator of four important genes, encoding HdaA, the GcrA master cell cycle regulator, the FtsZ cell division protein and the MipZ spatial regulator of cell division. Thus, the AAA+ domain of DnaA may play a role in temporally regulating the bifunctionality of DnaA by reallocating DnaA molecules from initiating DNA replication to transcribing genes within the unique DnaA regulon of C. crescentus.

  12. Regulation of the activity of the dual-function DnaA protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Carmen; Gonzalez, Diego; Collier, Justine

    2011-01-01

    DnaA is a conserved essential bacterial protein that acts as the initiator of chromosomal replication as well as a master transcriptional regulator in Caulobacter crescentus. Thus, the intracellular levels of active DnaA need to be tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Our previous work suggested that DnaA may be regulated at the level of its activity by the replisome-associated protein HdaA. Here, we describe the construction of a mutant DnaA protein [DnaA(R357A)]. The R357 residue in the AAA+ domain of the C. crescentus DnaA protein is equivalent to the R334 residue of the E. coli DnaA protein, which is required for the Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA (RIDA). We found that the expression of the DnaA(R357A) mutant protein in C. crescentus, but not the expression of the wild-type DnaA protein at similar levels, causes a severe phenotype of over-initiation of chromosomal replication and that it blocks cell division. Thus, the mutant DnaA(R357A) protein is hyper-active to promote the initiation of DNA replication, compared to the wild-type DnaA protein. DnaA(R357A) could not replace DnaA in vivo, indicating that the switch in DnaA activity once chromosomal replication has started may be an essential process in C. crescentus. We propose that the inactivation of DnaA is the main mechanism ensuring that chromosomal replication starts only once per cell cycle. We further observed that the R357A substitution in DnaA does not promote the activity of DnaA as a direct transcriptional activator of four important genes, encoding HdaA, the GcrA master cell cycle regulator, the FtsZ cell division protein and the MipZ spatial regulator of cell division. Thus, the AAA+ domain of DnaA may play a role in temporally regulating the bifunctionality of DnaA by reallocating DnaA molecules from initiating DNA replication to transcribing genes within the unique DnaA regulon of C. crescentus.

  13. The Caulobacter crescentus phage phiCbK: genomics of a canonical phage

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    Gill Jason J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a popular model for the study of cell cycle regulation and senescence. The large prolate siphophage phiCbK has been an important tool in C. crescentus biology, and has been studied in its own right as a model for viral morphogenesis. Although a system of some interest, to date little genomic information is available on phiCbK or its relatives. Results Five novel phiCbK-like C. crescentus bacteriophages, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma, CcrRogue and CcrColossus, were isolated from the environment. The genomes of phage phiCbK and these five environmental phage isolates were obtained by 454 pyrosequencing. The phiCbK-like phage genomes range in size from 205 kb encoding 318 proteins (phiCbK to 280 kb encoding 448 proteins (CcrColossus, and were found to contain nonpermuted terminal redundancies of 10 to 17 kb. A novel method of terminal ligation was developed to map genomic termini, which confirmed termini predicted by coverage analysis. This suggests that sequence coverage discontinuities may be useable as predictors of genomic termini in phage genomes. Genomic modules encoding virion morphogenesis, lysis and DNA replication proteins were identified. The phiCbK-like phages were also found to encode a number of intriguing proteins; all contain a clearly T7-like DNA polymerase, and five of the six encode a possible homolog of the C. crescentus cell cycle regulator GcrA, which may allow the phage to alter the host cell’s replicative state. The structural proteome of phage phiCbK was determined, identifying the portal, major and minor capsid proteins, the tail tape measure and possible tail fiber proteins. All six phage genomes are clearly related; phiCbK, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma and CcrRogue form a group related at the DNA level, while CcrColossus is more diverged but retains significant similarity at the protein level. Conclusions Due to their lack of any apparent relationship to

  14. The complex logic of stringent response regulation in Caulobacter crescentus: starvation signalling in an oligotrophic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutte, Cara C; Crosson, Sean

    2011-05-01

    Bacteria rapidly adapt to nutritional changes via the stringent response, which entails starvation-induced synthesis of the small molecule, ppGpp, by RelA/SpoT homologue (Rsh) enzymes. Binding of ppGpp to RNA polymerase modulates the transcription of hundreds of genes and remodels the physiology of the cell. Studies of the stringent response have primarily focused on copiotrophic bacteria such as Escherichia coli; little is known about how stringent signalling is regulated in species that live in consistently nutrient-limited (i.e. oligotrophic) environments. Here we define the input logic and transcriptional output of the stringent response in the oligotroph, Caulobacter crescentus. The sole Rsh protein, SpoT(CC), binds to and is regulated by the ribosome, and exhibits AND-type control logic in which amino acid starvation is a necessary but insufficient signal for activation of ppGpp synthesis. While both glucose and ammonium starvation upregulate the synthesis of ppGpp, SpoT(CC) detects these starvation signals by two independent mechanisms. Although the logic of stringent response control in C. crescentus differs from E. coli, the global transcriptional effects of elevated ppGpp are similar, with the exception of 16S rRNA transcription, which is controlled independently of spoT(CC). This study highlights how the regulatory logic controlling the stringent response may be adapted to the nutritional niche of a bacterial species.

  15. The functions of DNA methylation by CcrM in Caulobacter crescentus: a global approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Diego; Kozdon, Jennifer B; McAdams, Harley H; Shapiro, Lucy; Collier, Justine

    2014-04-01

    DNA methylation is involved in a diversity of processes in bacteria, including maintenance of genome integrity and regulation of gene expression. Here, using Caulobacter crescentus as a model, we exploit genome-wide experimental methods to uncover the functions of CcrM, a DNA methyltransferase conserved in most Alphaproteobacteria. Using single molecule sequencing, we provide evidence that most CcrM target motifs (GANTC) switch from a fully methylated to a hemi-methylated state when they are replicated, and back to a fully methylated state at the onset of cell division. We show that DNA methylation by CcrM is not required for the control of the initiation of chromosome replication or for DNA mismatch repair. By contrast, our transcriptome analysis shows that >10% of the genes are misexpressed in cells lacking or constitutively over-expressing CcrM. Strikingly, GANTC methylation is needed for the efficient transcription of dozens of genes that are essential for cell cycle progression, in particular for DNA metabolism and cell division. Many of them are controlled by promoters methylated by CcrM and co-regulated by other global cell cycle regulators, demonstrating an extensive cross talk between DNA methylation and the complex regulatory network that controls the cell cycle of C. crescentus and, presumably, of many other Alphaproteobacteria.

  16. Functional characterization of two SOS-regulated genes involved in mitomycin C resistance in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Kulishev, Carina O; Alves, Ingrid R; Valencia, Estela Y; Pidhirnyj, María I; Fernández-Silva, Frank S; Rodrigues, Ticiane R; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Galhardo, Rodrigo S

    2015-09-01

    The SOS response is a universal bacterial regulon involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and other forms of stress. In Caulobacter crescentus, previous work has identified a plethora of genes that are part of the SOS regulon, but the biological roles of several of them remain to be determined. In this study, we report that two genes, hereafter named mmcA and mmcB, are involved in the defense against DNA damage caused by mitomycin C (MMC), but not against lesions induced by other common DNA damaging agents, such as UVC light, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide. mmcA is a conserved gene that encodes a member of the glyoxalases/dioxygenases protein family, and acts independently of known DNA repair pathways. On the other hand, epistasis analysis showed that mmcB acts in the same pathway as imuC (dnaE2), and is required specifically for MMC-induced mutagenesis, but not for that induced by UV light, suggesting a role for MmcB in translesion synthesis-dependent repair of MMC damage. We show that the lack of MMC-induced mutability in the mmcB strain is not caused by lack of proper SOS induction of the imuABC operon, involved in translesion synthesis (TLS) in C. crescentus. Based on this data and on structural analysis of a close homolog, we propose that MmcB is an endonuclease which creates substrates for ImuABC-mediated TLS patches.

  17. The curved shape of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus enhances colonization of surfaces in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persat, Alexandre; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria thrive in all types of fluid environments; flow is thus a ubiquitous aspect of their lives. Bacteria have evolved a variety of cellular components contributing to their growth in specific environments. However, cellular features that help them survive and develop in flow have been rarely characterized. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus may have evolved its curved shape to enhance the colonization of surfaces in flow. C. crescentus curvature is preserved in the wild but straight mutants have no known growth disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Leveraging microfluidics and single-cell imaging, we demonstrate that curvature enhances surface colonization in flow, promoting the formation of larger microcolonies. Cells attach to a surface from a single pole, so that flow affects their orientation. In flow, viscous forces generate a torque on the curved cell body, which reorients the cell in the direction of the flow. The curved cell appears to arc above the surface, optimally orienting its unattached pole towards the surface. This reduces the distance between the surface and the pole, thereby enhancing attachment of its progeny. Additionally, we show that curved shape enhances colony spreading across the direction of the flow, generating more robust biofilm compared to straight mutants.

  18. Behavior of Caulobacter Crescentus Diagnosed Using a 3-Channel Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jay; Morse, Michael; Colin, Remy; Wilson, Laurence

    2015-03-01

    Many motile microorganisms are able to detect chemical gradients in their surroundings in order to bias their motion towards more favorable conditions. We study the biased motility of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacteria, which alternate between forward and backward swimming, driven by its flagella motor, which switches in rotation direction. We observe the swimming patterns of C. crescents in an oxygen gradient, which is established by flowing atmospheric air and pure nitrogen through a 3 parallel channel microfluidic device. In this setup, oxygen diffuses through the PDMS device and the bacterial medium, creating a linear gradient. Using low magnification, dark field microscopy, individual cells are tracked over a large field of view, with particular interest in the cells' motion relative to the oxygen gradient. Utilizing observable differences between backward and forward swimming motion, motor switching events can be identified. By analyzing these run time intervals between motor switches as a function of a cell's local oxygen level, we demonstrate that C. crescentus displays aerotacitc behavior by extending forward swimming run times while moving up an oxygen gradient, resulting in directed motility towards oxygen sources. Additionally, motor switching response is sensitive to both the steepness of the gradient experienced and background oxygen levels with cells exhibiting a logarithmic response to oxygen levels. Work funded by the United States National Science Foundation and by the Rowland Institute at Harvard University.

  19. DipM, a new factor required for peptidoglycan remodelling during cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möll, Andrea; Schlimpert, Susan; Briegel, Ariane; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-07-01

    In bacteria, cytokinesis is dependent on lytic enzymes that facilitate remodelling of the cell wall during constriction. In this work, we identify a thus far uncharacterized periplasmic protein, DipM, that is required for cell division and polarity in Caulobacter crescentus. DipM is composed of four peptidoglycan binding (LysM) domains and a C-terminal lysostaphin-like (LytM) peptidase domain. It binds to isolated murein sacculi in vitro, and is recruited to the site of constriction through interaction with the cell division protein FtsN. Mutational analyses showed that the LysM domains are necessary and sufficient for localization of DipM, while its peptidase domain is essential for function. Consistent with a role in cell wall hydrolysis, DipM was found to interact with purified murein sacculi in vitro and to induce cell lysis upon overproduction. Its inactivation causes severe defects in outer membrane invagination, resulting in a significant delay between cytoplasmic compartmentalization and final separation of the daughter cells. Overall, these findings indicate that DipM is a periplasmic component of the C. crescentus divisome that facilitates remodelling of the peptidoglycan layer and, thus, coordinated constriction of the cell envelope during the division process.

  20. Characterization of Caulobacter crescentus response to low temperature and identification of genes involved in freezing resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzon, Ricardo R; Lang, Elza A S; Braz, Vânia S; Marques, Marilis V

    2008-11-01

    Free-living bacteria must respond to a wide range of temperature changes, and have developed specific mechanisms to survive in extreme environments. In this work we describe a remarkable resistance of mesophilic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to several cycles of freezing at -80 degrees C, which was able to grow at low temperatures. Exponentially growing cells and late stationary-phase cells presented higher freezing resistance at both -20 and -80 degrees C than early stationary-phase cells. Cryotolerance was observed when log-phase cultures grown at 30 degrees C were preincubated at 5, 15 or 20 degrees C before freezing at -20 degrees C. A transposon library was screened to identify mutants sensitive to freezing at -80 degrees C and three strains presenting <10% survival were isolated. Identification of genes disrupted in each mutant showed that they encoded an AddA family DNA helicase, a DEAD/DEAH box RNA helicase and a putative RND (resistance, nodulation, cell division) efflux system component. These strains showed longer generation times than wild-type cells when growing at 15 degrees C, with the RNA helicase mutant presenting a severe growth defect. These analyses suggest that the singular intrinsic resistance to freezing of C. crescentus is in fact a consequence of several independent traits, especially the maintenance of a proper degree of supercoiling of nucleic acids.

  1. CspC and CspD are essential for Caulobacter crescentus stationary phase survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhesteros, Heloise; Mazzon, Ricardo R; da Silva, Carolina A P T; Lang, Elza A S; Marques, Marilis V

    2010-09-01

    The cold shock response in bacteria involves the expression of low-molecular weight cold shock proteins (CSPs) containing a nucleic acid-binding cold shock domain (CSD), which are known to destabilize secondary structures on mRNAs, facilitating translation at low temperatures. Caulobacter crescentus cspA and cspB are induced upon cold shock, while cspC and cspD are induced during stationary phase. In this work, we determined a new coding sequence for the cspC gene, revealing that it encodes a protein containing two CSDs. The phenotypes of C. crescentus csp mutants were analyzed, and we found that cspC is important for cells to maintain viability during extended periods in stationary phase. Also, cspC and cspCD strains presented altered morphology, with frequent non-viable filamentous cells, and cspCD also showed a pronounced cell death at late stationary phase. In contrast, the cspAB mutant presented increased viability in this phase, which is accompanied by an altered expression of both cspC and cspD, but the triple cspABD mutant loses this characteristic. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a hierarchy of importance among the csp genes regarding stationary phase viability, which is probably achieved by a fine tune balance of the levels of these proteins.

  2. A new factor stimulating peptidoglycan hydrolysis to separate daughter cells in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Justine

    2010-07-01

    Cell division in Gram-negative bacteria involves the co-ordinated invagination of the three cell envelope layers to form two new daughter cell poles. This complex process starts with the polymerization of the tubulin-like protein FtsZ into a Z-ring at mid-cell, which drives cytokinesis and recruits numerous other proteins to the division site. These proteins are involved in Z-ring constriction, inner- and outer-membrane invagination, peptidoglycan remodelling and daughter cell separation. Three papers in this issue of Molecular Microbiology, from the teams of Lucy Shapiro, Martin Thanbichler and Christine Jacobs-Wagner, describe a novel protein, called DipM for Division Involved Protein with LysM domains, that is required for cell division in Caulobacter crescentus. DipM localizes to the mid-cell during cell division, where it is necessary for the hydrolysis of the septal peptidoglycan to remodel the cell wall. Loss of DipM results in severe defects in cell envelope constriction, which is deleterious under fast-growth conditions. State-of-the-art microscopy experiments reveal that the peptidoglycan is thicker and that the cell wall is incorrectly organized in DipM-depleted cells compared with wild-type cells, demonstrating that DipM is essential for reorganizing the cell wall at the division site, for envelope invagination and cell separation in Caulobacter.

  3. Global regulation of gene expression and cell differentiation in Caulobacter crescentus in response to nutrient availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Jennifer C; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T; Gober, James W

    2010-02-01

    In a developmental strategy designed to efficiently exploit and colonize sparse oligotrophic environments, Caulobacter crescentus cells divide asymmetrically, yielding a motile swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. After a relatively fixed time period under typical culture conditions, the swarmer cell differentiates into a replicative stalked cell. Since differentiation into the stalked cell type is irreversible, it is likely that environmental factors such as the availability of essential nutrients would influence the timing of the decision to abandon motility and adopt a sessile lifestyle. We measured two different parameters in nutrient-limited chemostat cultures, biomass concentration and the ratio of nonstalked to stalked cells, over a range of flow rates and found that nitrogen limitation significantly extended the swarmer cell life span. The transcriptional profiling experiments described here generate the first comprehensive picture of the global regulatory strategies used by an oligotroph when confronted with an environment where key macronutrients are sparse. The pattern of regulated gene expression in nitrogen- and carbon-limited cells shares some features in common with most copiotrophic organisms, but critical differences suggest that Caulobacter, and perhaps other oligotrophs, have evolved regulatory strategies to deal distinctly with their natural environments. We hypothesize that nitrogen limitation extends the swarmer cell lifetime by delaying the onset of a sequence of differentiation events, which when initiated by the correct combination of external environmental cues, sets the swarmer cell on a path to differentiate into a stalked cell within a fixed time period.

  4. Regulated proteolysis of a transcription factor complex is critical to cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, Kasia G; Cantin, Amber; Wohlever, Matthew; Joshi, Kamal K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Chien, Peter; Laub, Michael T

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle transitions are often triggered by the proteolysis of key regulatory proteins. In Caulobacter crescentus, the G1-S transition involves the degradation of an essential DNA-binding response regulator, CtrA, by the ClpXP protease. Here, we show that another critical cell cycle regulator, SciP, is also degraded during the G1-S transition, but by the Lon protease. SciP is a small protein that binds directly to CtrA and prevents it from activating target genes during G1. We demonstrate that SciP must be degraded during the G1-S transition so that cells can properly activate CtrA-dependent genes following DNA replication initiation and the reaccumulation of CtrA. These results indicate that like CtrA, SciP levels are tightly regulated during the Caulobacter cell cycle. In addition, we show that formation of a complex between CtrA and SciP at target promoters protects both proteins from their respective proteases. Degradation of either protein thus helps trigger the destruction of the other, facilitating a cooperative disassembly of the complex. Collectively, our results indicate that ClpXP and Lon each degrade an important cell cycle regulator, helping to trigger the onset of S phase and prepare cells for the subsequent programmes of gene expression critical to polar morphogenesis and cell division.

  5. Critical clamp loader processing by an essential AAA+ protease in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Robert H; Chien, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Chromosome replication relies on sliding clamps that are loaded by energy-dependent complexes. In Escherichia coli, the ATP-binding clamp loader subunit DnaX exists as both long (τ) and short (γ) forms generated through programmed translational frameshifting, but the need for both forms is unclear. Here, we show that in Caulobacter crescentus, DnaX isoforms are unexpectedly generated through partial proteolysis by the AAA+ protease casein lytic proteinase (Clp) XP. We find that the normally processive ClpXP protease partially degrades DnaX to produce stable fragments upon encountering a glycine-rich region adjacent to a structured domain. Increasing the sequence complexity of this region prevents partial proteolysis and generates a τ-only form of DnaX in vivo that is unable to support viability on its own. Growth is restored when γ is provided in trans, but these strains are more sensitive to DNA damage compared with strains that can generate γ through proteolysis. Our work reveals an unexpected mode of partial processing by the ClpXP protease to generate DnaX isoforms, demonstrates that both τ and γ forms of DnaX are required for Caulobacter viability, and identifies a role for clamp loader diversity in responding to DNA damage. The conservation of distinct DnaX isoforms throughout bacteria despite fundamentally different mechanisms for producing them suggests there may be a conserved need for alternate clamp loader complexes during DNA damaging conditions.

  6. Function and localization dynamics of bifunctional penicillin-binding proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Wolfgang; Möll, Andrea; Kiekebusch, Daniela; Klein, Kathrin E; Thanbichler, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall of bacteria is a complex macromolecule composed of glycan strands that are cross-linked by short peptide bridges. Its biosynthesis involves a conserved group of enzymes, the bifunctional penicillin-binding proteins (bPBPs), which contain both a transglycosylase and a transpeptidase domain, thus being able to elongate the glycan strands and, at the same time, generate the peptide cross-links. The stalked model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus possesses five bPBP paralogs, named Pbp1A, PbpC, PbpX, PbpY, and PbpZ, whose function is still incompletely understood. In this study, we show that any of these proteins except for PbpZ is sufficient for growth and normal morphogenesis when expressed at native or elevated levels, whereas inactivation of all five paralogs is lethal. Growth analyses indicate a central role of PbpX in the resistance of C. crescentus against the noncanonical amino acid d-alanine. Moreover, we show that PbpX and PbpY localize to the cell division site. Their recruitment to the divisome is dependent on the essential cell division protein FtsN and likely involves interactions with FtsL and the putative peptidoglycan hydrolase DipM. The same interaction pattern is observed for Pbp1A and PbpC, although these proteins do not accumulate at midcell. Our findings demonstrate that the bPBPs of C. crescentus are, to a large extent, redundant and have retained the ability to interact with the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machineries responsible for cell elongation, cytokinesis, and stalk growth. Nevertheless, they may preferentially act in specific peptidoglycan biosynthetic complexes, thereby facilitating the independent regulation of distinct growth processes.

  7. Two RND proteins involved in heavy metal efflux in Caulobacter crescentus belong to separate clusters within proteobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Valencia, Estela Y; Vânia S. Braz; Guzzo, Cristiane; Marques, Marilis V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heavy metal Resistance-Nodulation-Division (HME-RND) efflux systems help Gram-negative bacteria to keep the intracellular homeostasis under high metal concentrations. These proteins constitute the cytoplasmic membrane channel of the tripartite RND transport systems. Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 possess two HME-RND proteins, and the aim of this work was to determine their involvement in the response to cadmium, zinc, cobalt and nickel, and to analyze the phylogenetic distribution a...

  8. Quantitative Selection Analysis of Bacteriophage φCbK Susceptibility in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Matthias; Beusch, Christian; Bösch, Yvonne; Cerletti, Dario; Flores-Tinoco, Carlos Eduardo; Del Medico, Luca; Tschan, Flavia; Christen, Beat

    2016-01-29

    Classical molecular genetics uses stringent selective conditions to identify mutants with distinct phenotypic responses. Mutations giving rise to less pronounced phenotypes are often missed. However, to gain systems-level insights into complex genetic interaction networks requires genome-wide assignment of quantitative phenotypic traits. In this paper, we present a quantitative selection approach coupled with transposon sequencing (QS-TnSeq) to globally identify the cellular components that orchestrate susceptibility of the cell cycle model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus toward bacteriophage φCbK infection. We found that 135 genes representing 3.30% of the Caulobacter genome exhibit significant accumulation of transposon insertions upon φCbK selection. More than 85% thereof consist of new factors not previously associated with phage φCbK susceptibility. Using hierarchical clustering of dose-dependent TnSeq datasets, we grouped these genes into functional modules that correlate with different stages of the φCbK infection process. We assign φCbK susceptibility to eight new genes that represent novel components of the pilus secretion machinery. Further, we demonstrate that, from 86 motility genes, only seven genes encoding structural and regulatory components of the flagellar hook increase phage resistance when disrupted by transposons, suggesting a link between flagellar hook assembly and pili biogenesis. In addition, we observe high recovery of Tn5 insertions within regulatory sequences of the genes encoding the essential NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex indicating that intact proton motive force is crucial for effective phage propagation. In sum, QS-TnSeq is broadly applicable to perform quantitative and genome-wide systems-genetics analysis of complex phenotypic traits.

  9. Identification of ClpP substrates in Caulobacter crescentus reveals a role for regulated proteolysis in bacterial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nowsheen H; Vass, Robert H; Stoddard, Patrick R; Shin, Dong K; Chien, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Energy-dependent proteases ensure the timely removal of unwanted proteins in a highly selective fashion. In Caulobacter crescentus, protein degradation by the ClpXP protease is critical for cell cycle progression; however, only a handful of substrates are currently known. Here, we use a trapping approach to identify putative substrates of the ClpP associated proteases in C. crescentus. Biochemical validation of several of these targets reveals specific protease recognition motifs and suggests a need for ClpXP-specific degradation beyond degradation of known cell cycle regulators. We focus on a particular instance of regulated proteolysis in Caulobacter by exploring the role of ClpXP in degrading the stalk synthesis transcription factor TacA. We show that TacA degradation is controlled during the cell cycle dependent on the ClpXP regulator CpdR and that stabilization of TacA increases degradation of another ClpXP substrate, CtrA, while restoring deficiencies associated with prolific CpdR activity. Together, our work reveals a number of new validated ClpXP substrates, clarifies rules of protease substrate selection, and demonstrates how regulated protein degradation is critical for Caulobacter development and cell cycle progression.

  10. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Joshua W; Kambara, Tracy K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage. PMID:25350732

  11. A physical approach to segregation and folding of the Caulobacter crescentus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dame, Remus T; Tark-Dame, Mariliis; Schiessel, Helmut

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial genomes are functionally organized. This organization is dynamic and globally changing throughout the cell cycle. Upon initiation of replication of the chromosome, the two origins segregate and move towards their new location taking along the newly replicated genome. Caulobacter crescentus employs a dedicated active partitioning (Par) system to move one copy of the parS centromere to the distal pole, while the other stays at the stalked pole. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Hong and McAdams describe studies on the speed of segregation of parS and regions up to 150 kb away. They show clear differences in segregation rates between parS and 50 kb flanking regions versus regions further away. To assess segregation rates the authors track fluorescent markers during movement using time-lapse microscopy. The relation between genomic and physical distance of pairs of markers reflects how the genome is folded. This relation permits testing experimental data against models from polymer physics. Such models are helpful in understanding principles of genome folding. Although long used in studies on eukaryotes, this approach has rarely been applied to bacteria. Finally, the authors give the first direct evidence for a role of the bacterial chromatin protein HU in folding the genome in vivo.

  12. Potential role of a bistable histidine kinase switch in the asymmetric division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kartik; Paul, Mark R; Tyson, John J

    2013-01-01

    The free-living aquatic bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, exhibits two different morphologies during its life cycle. The morphological change from swarmer cell to stalked cell is a result of changes of function of two bi-functional histidine kinases, PleC and CckA. Here, we describe a detailed molecular mechanism by which the function of PleC changes between phosphatase and kinase state. By mathematical modeling of our proposed molecular interactions, we derive conditions under which PleC, CckA and its response regulators exhibit bistable behavior, thus providing a scenario for robust switching between swarmer and stalked states. Our simulations are in reasonable agreement with in vitro and in vivo experimental observations of wild type and mutant phenotypes. According to our model, the kinase form of PleC is essential for the swarmer-to-stalked transition and to prevent premature development of the swarmer pole. Based on our results, we reconcile some published experimental observations and suggest novel mutants to test our predictions.

  13. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua W Modell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage.

  14. Potential role of a bistable histidine kinase switch in the asymmetric division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Subramanian

    Full Text Available The free-living aquatic bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, exhibits two different morphologies during its life cycle. The morphological change from swarmer cell to stalked cell is a result of changes of function of two bi-functional histidine kinases, PleC and CckA. Here, we describe a detailed molecular mechanism by which the function of PleC changes between phosphatase and kinase state. By mathematical modeling of our proposed molecular interactions, we derive conditions under which PleC, CckA and its response regulators exhibit bistable behavior, thus providing a scenario for robust switching between swarmer and stalked states. Our simulations are in reasonable agreement with in vitro and in vivo experimental observations of wild type and mutant phenotypes. According to our model, the kinase form of PleC is essential for the swarmer-to-stalked transition and to prevent premature development of the swarmer pole. Based on our results, we reconcile some published experimental observations and suggest novel mutants to test our predictions.

  15. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Joshua W; Kambara, Tracy K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage.

  16. Motor Switching Rates in Caulobacter Crescentus Follow First Passage Time Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jay; Morse, Michael; Bell, Jordan; Li, Guanglai

    2015-03-01

    The flagellar motor of uni-flagellated bacterium Caulobacter crescentus switches stochastically between clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) rotation. We performed measurements of the time intervals between switches in order to gain insight on motor dynamics and regulation. Our measurements were performed both on free swimming cells and tethered cells with their flagella attached to a glass slide. A peak time of approximately one second was observed in both motor directions with counterclockwise intervals more sharply peaked. The distributions of switching times can be fitted using biased first passage time statistics. We present a model of motor switching dynamics, which is controlled by the binding of CheY-P to motor subunits FliM. A lower threshold number of FliM with CheY-P bound triggers a switch in motor rotation from CW to CCW, whereas a higher threshold triggers an opposing switch from CCW to CW. The time intervals between alternating switches may be increased or decreased by regulating CheY-P concentration, resulting in biased directional motion in the cells swimming trajectory over many motor cycles under external spatial or temporal gradients. Work funded by the United States National Science Foundation.

  17. Mutations in the Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis pathway interfere with crescentin-mediated cell curvature in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeen, Matthew T; Murolo, Michelle A; Briegel, Ariane; Bui, N Khai; Vollmer, Waldemar; Ausmees, Nora; Jensen, Grant J; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial cell morphogenesis requires coordination among multiple cellular systems, including the bacterial cytoskeleton and the cell wall. In the vibrioid bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the intermediate filament-like protein crescentin forms a cell envelope-associated cytoskeletal structure that controls cell wall growth to generate cell curvature. We undertook a genetic screen to find other cellular components important for cell curvature. Here we report that deletion of a gene (wbqL) involved in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis pathway abolishes cell curvature. Loss of WbqL function leads to the accumulation of an aberrant O-polysaccharide species and to the release of the S layer in the culture medium. Epistasis and microscopy experiments show that neither S-layer nor O-polysaccharide production is required for curved cell morphology per se but that production of the altered O-polysaccharide species abolishes cell curvature by apparently interfering with the ability of the crescentin structure to associate with the cell envelope. Our data suggest that perturbations in a cellular pathway that is itself fully dispensable for cell curvature can cause a disruption of cell morphogenesis, highlighting the delicate harmony among unrelated cellular systems. Using the wbqL mutant, we also show that the normal assembly and growth properties of the crescentin structure are independent of its association with the cell envelope. However, this envelope association is important for facilitating the local disruption of the stable crescentin structure at the division site during cytokinesis.

  18. Growth control switch by a DNA-damage-inducible toxin-antitoxin system in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Martins, Daniel; Redder, Peter; Frandi, Antonio; Mignolet, Johann; Chapalay, Julien Bortoli; Chambon, Marc; Turcatti, Gerardo; Viollier, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems (TASs) are thought to respond to various stresses, often inducing growth-arrested (persistent) sub-populations of cells whose housekeeping functions are inhibited. Many such TASs induce this effect through the translation-dependent RNA cleavage (RNase) activity of their toxins, which are held in check by their cognate antitoxins in the absence of stress. However, it is not always clear whether specific mRNA targets of orthologous RNase toxins are responsible for their phenotypic effect, which has made it difficult to accurately place the multitude of TASs within cellular and adaptive regulatory networks. Here, we show that the TAS HigBA of Caulobacter crescentus can promote and inhibit bacterial growth dependent on the dosage of HigB, a toxin regulated by the DNA damage (SOS) repressor LexA in addition to its antitoxin HigA, and the target selectivity of HigB's mRNA cleavage activity. HigB reduced the expression of an efflux pump that is toxic to a polarity control mutant, cripples the growth of cells lacking LexA, and targets the cell cycle circuitry. Thus, TASs can have outcome switching activity in bacterial adaptive (stress) and systemic (cell cycle) networks. PMID:27572440

  19. Structural insights into ChpT, an essential dimeric histidine phosphotransferase regulating the cell cycle in Caulobacter crescentus

    OpenAIRE

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Clantin, Bernard; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Verger, Alexis; Biondi, Emanuele G; Villeret, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Two-component and phosphorelay signal-transduction proteins are crucial for bacterial cell-cycle regulation in Caulobacter crescentus. ChpT is an essential histidine phosphotransferase that controls the activity of the master cell-cycle regulator CtrA by phosphorylation. Here, the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of ChpT is reported. ChpT is a homodimer and adopts the domain architecture of the intracellular part of class I histidine kinases. Each subunit consists of two distinct domains: a...

  20. The Caulobacter crescentus Paracrystalline S-Layer Protein Is Secreted by an ABC Transporter (Type I) Secretion Apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Awram, Peter; Smit, John

    1998-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is a gram-negative bacterium that produces a two-dimensional crystalline array on its surface composed of a single 98-kDa protein, RsaA. Secretion of RsaA to the cell surface relies on an uncleaved C-terminal secretion signal. In this report, we identify two genes encoding components of the RsaA secretion apparatus. These components are part of a type I secretion system involving an ABC transporter protein. These genes, lying immediately 3′ of rsaA, were found by screen...

  1. Activation and polar sequestration of PopA, a c-di-GMP effector protein involved in Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozaki, Shogo; Schalch-Moser, Annina; Zumthor, Ludwig;

    2014-01-01

    When Caulobacter crescentus enters S-phase the replication initiation inhibitor CtrA dynamically positions to the old cell pole to be degraded by the polar ClpXP protease. Polar delivery of CtrA requires PopA and the diguanylate cyclase PleD that positions to the same pole. Here we present evidence...

  2. Characterization of a unique Caulobacter crescentus aldose-aldose oxidoreductase having dual activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andberg, Martina; Maaheimo, Hannu; Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Boer, Harry; Toivari, Mervi; Penttilä, Merja; Koivula, Anu

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the characterization of a novel enzyme called aldose-aldose oxidoreductase (Cc AAOR; EC 1.1.99) from Caulobacter crescentus. The Cc AAOR exists in solution as a dimer, belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA family and shows homology with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis. However, unlike other known members of this protein family, Cc AAOR is specific for aldose sugars and can be in the same catalytic cycle both oxidise and reduce a panel of monosaccharides at the C1 position, producing in each case the corresponding aldonolactone and alditol, respectively. Cc AAOR contains a tightly-bound nicotinamide cofactor, which is regenerated in this oxidation-reduction cycle. The highest oxidation activity was detected on D-glucose but significant activity was also observed on D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-galactose, revealing that both hexose and pentose sugars are accepted as substrates by Cc AAOR. The configuration at the C2 and C3 positions of the saccharides was shown to be especially important for the substrate binding. Interestingly, besides monosaccharides, Cc AAOR can also oxidise a range of 1,4-linked oligosaccharides having aldose unit at the reducing end, such as lactose, malto- and cello-oligosaccharides as well as xylotetraose. (1)H NMR used to monitor the oxidation and reduction reaction simultaneously, demonstrated that although D-glucose has the highest affinity and is also oxidised most efficiently by Cc AAOR, the reduction of D-glucose is clearly not as efficient. For the overall reaction catalysed by Cc AAOR, the L-arabinose, D-xylose and D-galactose were the most potent substrates.

  3. Expression and characterization of a GH39 β-xylosidase II from Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Graciano, Luciana; Abrahão, Josielle; Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Henn, Caroline; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2012-12-01

    In the present work, the gene xynB2, encoding a β-xylosidase II of the Glycoside Hydrolase 39 (GH39) family, of Caulobacter crescentus was cloned and successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli DH10B. The recombinant protein (CcXynB2) was purified using nickel-Sepharose affinity chromatography, with a recovery yield of 75.5 %. CcXynB2 appeared as a single band of 60 kDa on a sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel and was recognized by a specific polyclonal antiserum. The predicted CcXynB2 protein showed a high homology with GH39 β-xylosidases of the genus Xanthomonas. CcXynB2 exhibited an optimal activity at 55 °C and a pH of 6. CcXynB2 displayed stability at pH values of 4.5-7.5 for 24 h and thermotolerance up to 50 °C. The K (M) and V (Max) values were 9.3 ± 0.45 mM and 402 ± 19 μmol min(-1) for ρ-nitrophenyl-β-D-xylopyranoside, respectively. The purified recombinant enzyme efficiently produced reducing sugars from birchwood xylan and sugarcane bagasse fibers pre-treated with a purified xylanase. As few bacterial GH39 family β-xylosidases have been characterized, this work provides a good contribution to this group of enzymes.

  4. Superresolution imaging in live Caulobacter crescentus cells using photoswitchable enhanced yellow fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteen, Julie S.; Thompson, Michael A.; Tselentis, Nicole K.; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W. E.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, photoactivation and photoswitching were used to control single-molecule fluorescent labels and produce images of cellular structures beyond the optical diffraction limit (e.g., PALM, FPALM, and STORM). While previous live-cell studies relied on sophisticated photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, we show in the present work that superresolution imaging can be performed with fusions to the commonly used fluorescent protein EYFP. Rather than being photoactivated, however, EYFP can be reactivated with violet light after apparent photobleaching. In each cycle after initial imaging, only a sparse subset fluorophores is reactivated and localized, and the final image is then generated from the measured single-molecule positions. Because these methods are based on the imaging nanometer-sized single-molecule emitters and on the use of an active control mechanism to produce sparse sub-ensembles, we suggest the phrase "Single-Molecule Active-Control Microscopy" (SMACM) as an inclusive term for this general imaging strategy. In this paper, we address limitations arising from physiologically imposed upper boundaries on the fluorophore concentration by employing dark time-lapse periods to allow single-molecule motions to fill in filamentous structures, increasing the effective labeling concentration while localizing each emitter at most once per resolution-limited spot. We image cell-cycle-dependent superstructures of the bacterial actin protein MreB in live Caulobacter crescentus cells with sub-40-nm resolution for the first time. Furthermore, we quantify the reactivation quantum yield of EYFP, and find this to be 1.6 x 10-6, on par with conventional photoswitchable fluorescent proteins like Dronpa. These studies show that EYFP is a useful emitter for in vivo superresolution imaging of intracellular structures in bacterial cells.

  5. Modulation of medium pH by Caulobacter crescentus facilitates recovery from uranium-induced growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dan M; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-09-01

    The oxidized form of uranium [U(VI)] predominates in oxic environments and poses a major threat to ecosystems. Due to its ability to mineralize U(VI), the oligotroph Caulobacter crescentus is an attractive candidate for U(VI) bioremediation. However, the physiological basis for U(VI) tolerance is unclear. Here we demonstrated that U(VI) caused a temporary growth arrest in C. crescentus and three other bacterial species, although the duration of growth arrest was significantly shorter for C. crescentus. During the majority of the growth arrest period, cell morphology was unaltered and DNA replication initiation was inhibited. However, during the transition from growth arrest to exponential phase, cells with shorter stalks were observed, suggesting a decoupling between stalk development and the cell cycle. Upon recovery from growth arrest, C. crescentus proliferated with a growth rate comparable to that of a control without U(VI), although a fraction of these cells appeared filamentous with multiple replication start sites. Normal cell morphology was restored by the end of exponential phase. Cells did not accumulate U(VI) resistance mutations during the prolonged growth arrest, but rather, a reduction in U(VI) toxicity occurred concomitantly with an increase in medium pH. Together, these data suggest that C. crescentus recovers from U(VI)-induced growth arrest by reducing U(VI) toxicity through pH modulation. Our finding represents a unique U(VI) detoxification strategy and provides insight into how microbes cope with U(VI) under nongrowing conditions, a metabolic state that is prevalent in natural environments.

  6. Tn-seq of Caulobacter crescentus under uranium stress reveals genes essential for detoxification and stress tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubiquitous aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is highly resistant to uranium (U) and facilitates U biomineralization and thus holds promise as an agent of U bioremediation. In order to gain an understanding of how C. crescentus tolerates U, we employed transposon (Tn) mutagenesis paired with deep sequencing (Tn-seq) in a global screen for genomic elements required for U resistance. Of the 3,879 annotated genes in the C. crescentus genome, 37 were found to be specifically associated with fitness under U stress, 15 of which were subsequently tested through mutational analysis. Systematic deletion analysis revealed that mutants lacking outer membrane transporters (rsaFa and rsaFb), a stress-responsive transcription factor (cztR), or a ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase (spoT) exhibited a significantly lower survival rate under U stress. RsaFa and RsaFb, which are homologues of TolC in Escherichia coli, have previously been shown to mediate S-layer export. Transcriptional analysis revealed upregulation of rsaFa and rsaFb by 4- and 10-fold, respectively, in the presence of U. We additionally show that rsaFa mutants accumulated higher levels of U than the wild type, with no significant increase in oxidative stress levels. These results suggest a function for RsaFa and RsaFb in U efflux and/or maintenance of membrane integrity during U stress. In addition, we present data implicating CztR and SpoT in resistance to U stress. Together, our findings reveal novel gene targets that are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of U resistance in C. crescentus

  7. The cloning, expression, purification, characterization and modeled structure of Caulobacter crescentus β-Xylosidase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciano, Luciana; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Seixas, Flavio Augusto Vicente; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Sampaio, Silvio César; Silva, José Luis da Conceição; Osaku, Clarice Aoki; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2012-09-01

    The xynB1 gene (CCNA 01040) of Caulobacter crescentus that encodes a bifunctional enzyme containing the conserved β-Xylosidase and α-L-Arabinofuranosidase (β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara) domains was amplified by PCR and cloned into the vector pJet1.2Blunt. The xynB1 gene was subcloned into the vector pPROEX-hta that produces a histidine-fused translation product. The overexpression of recombinant β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara was induced with IPTG in BL21 (DE3) and the resulting intracellular protein was purified with pre-packaged nickel-Sepharose columns. The recombinant β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara exhibited a specific β-Xylosidase I activity of 1.25 U mg(-1) to oNPX and a specific α-L-Arabinofuranosidase activity of 0.47 U mg(-1) to pNPA. The predominant activity of the recombinant enzyme was its β-Xylosidase I activity, and the enzymatic characterization was focused on it. The β-Xylosidase I activity was high over the pH range 3-10, with maximal activity at pH 6. The enzyme activity was optimal at 45 °C, and a high degree of stability was verified over 240 min at this temperature. Moreover, β-Xylosidase activity was inhibited in the presence of the metals Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), and the enzyme exhibited K(M) and V(Max) values of 2.89 ± 0.13 mM and 1.4 ± 0.04 μM min(-1) to oNPX, respectively. The modeled structure of β-xylosidase I showed that its active site is highly conserved compared with other structures of the GH43 family. The increase in the number of contact residues responsible for maintaining the dimeric structure indicates that this dimer is more stable than the tetramer form. PMID:22806729

  8. The cloning, expression, purification, characterization and modeled structure of Caulobacter crescentus β-Xylosidase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciano, Luciana; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Seixas, Flavio Augusto Vicente; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Sampaio, Silvio César; Silva, José Luis da Conceição; Osaku, Clarice Aoki; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2012-09-01

    The xynB1 gene (CCNA 01040) of Caulobacter crescentus that encodes a bifunctional enzyme containing the conserved β-Xylosidase and α-L-Arabinofuranosidase (β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara) domains was amplified by PCR and cloned into the vector pJet1.2Blunt. The xynB1 gene was subcloned into the vector pPROEX-hta that produces a histidine-fused translation product. The overexpression of recombinant β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara was induced with IPTG in BL21 (DE3) and the resulting intracellular protein was purified with pre-packaged nickel-Sepharose columns. The recombinant β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara exhibited a specific β-Xylosidase I activity of 1.25 U mg(-1) to oNPX and a specific α-L-Arabinofuranosidase activity of 0.47 U mg(-1) to pNPA. The predominant activity of the recombinant enzyme was its β-Xylosidase I activity, and the enzymatic characterization was focused on it. The β-Xylosidase I activity was high over the pH range 3-10, with maximal activity at pH 6. The enzyme activity was optimal at 45 °C, and a high degree of stability was verified over 240 min at this temperature. Moreover, β-Xylosidase activity was inhibited in the presence of the metals Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), and the enzyme exhibited K(M) and V(Max) values of 2.89 ± 0.13 mM and 1.4 ± 0.04 μM min(-1) to oNPX, respectively. The modeled structure of β-xylosidase I showed that its active site is highly conserved compared with other structures of the GH43 family. The increase in the number of contact residues responsible for maintaining the dimeric structure indicates that this dimer is more stable than the tetramer form.

  9. Suppression of amber codons in Caulobacter crescentus by the orthogonal Escherichia coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNAHis pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-hyeong; Llopis, Paula Montero; Heinritz, Jennifer; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Söll, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    While translational read-through of stop codons by suppressor tRNAs is common in many bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, this phenomenon has not yet been observed in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Based on a previous report that C. crescentus and Escherichia coli tRNA(His) have distinctive identity elements, we constructed E. coli tRNA(His) CUA, a UAG suppressor tRNA for C. crescentus. By examining the expression of three UAG codon- containing reporter genes (encoding a β-lactamase, the fluorescent mCherry protein, or the C. crescentus xylonate dehydratase), we demonstrated that the E. coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA(His) CUA pair enables in vivo UAG suppression in C. crescentus. E. coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS) or tRNA(His) CUA alone did not achieve suppression; this indicates that the E. coli HisRS/tRNA(His) CUA pair is orthogonal in C. crescentus. These results illustrate that UAG suppression can be achieved in C. crescentus with an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/suppressor tRNA pair.

  10. Suppression of amber codons in Caulobacter crescentus by the orthogonal Escherichia coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNAHis pair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-hyeong Ko

    Full Text Available While translational read-through of stop codons by suppressor tRNAs is common in many bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, this phenomenon has not yet been observed in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Based on a previous report that C. crescentus and Escherichia coli tRNA(His have distinctive identity elements, we constructed E. coli tRNA(His CUA, a UAG suppressor tRNA for C. crescentus. By examining the expression of three UAG codon- containing reporter genes (encoding a β-lactamase, the fluorescent mCherry protein, or the C. crescentus xylonate dehydratase, we demonstrated that the E. coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA(His CUA pair enables in vivo UAG suppression in C. crescentus. E. coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS or tRNA(His CUA alone did not achieve suppression; this indicates that the E. coli HisRS/tRNA(His CUA pair is orthogonal in C. crescentus. These results illustrate that UAG suppression can be achieved in C. crescentus with an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/suppressor tRNA pair.

  11. Structural insights into ChpT, an essential dimeric histidine phosphotransferase regulating the cell cycle in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Clantin, Bernard; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Verger, Alexis; Biondi, Emanuele G; Villeret, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    Two-component and phosphorelay signal-transduction proteins are crucial for bacterial cell-cycle regulation in Caulobacter crescentus. ChpT is an essential histidine phosphotransferase that controls the activity of the master cell-cycle regulator CtrA by phosphorylation. Here, the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of ChpT is reported. ChpT is a homodimer and adopts the domain architecture of the intracellular part of class I histidine kinases. Each subunit consists of two distinct domains: an N-terminal helical hairpin domain and a C-terminal α/β domain. The two N-terminal domains are adjacent within the dimer, forming a four-helix bundle. The ChpT C-terminal domain adopts an atypical Bergerat ATP-binding fold.

  12. High throughput 3D super-resolution microscopy reveals Caulobacter crescentus in vivo Z-ring organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Seamus J; Pengo, Thomas; Meibom, Karin L; Fernandez Fernandez, Carmen; Collier, Justine; Manley, Suliana

    2014-03-25

    We created a high-throughput modality of photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) that enables automated 3D PALM imaging of hundreds of synchronized bacteria during all stages of the cell cycle. We used high-throughput PALM to investigate the nanoscale organization of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ in live Caulobacter crescentus. We observed that FtsZ predominantly localizes as a patchy midcell band, and only rarely as a continuous ring, supporting a model of "Z-ring" organization whereby FtsZ protofilaments are randomly distributed within the band and interact only weakly. We found evidence for a previously unidentified period of rapid ring contraction in the final stages of the cell cycle. We also found that DNA damage resulted in production of high-density continuous Z-rings, which may obstruct cytokinesis. Our results provide a detailed quantitative picture of in vivo Z-ring organization.

  13. The Caulobacter crescentus transducing phage Cr30 is a unique member of the T4-like family of myophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Bert; Gibbs, Whitney; Diez, Simon; Ash, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    Bacteriophage Cr30 has proven useful for the transduction of Caulobacter crescentus. Nucleotide sequencing of Cr30 DNA revealed that the Cr30 genome consists of 155,997 bp of DNA that codes for 287 proteins and five tRNAs. In contrast to the 67 % GC content of the host genome, the GC content of the Cr30 genome is only 38 %. This lower GC content causes both the codon usage pattern and the amino acid composition of the Cr30 proteins to be quite different from those of the host bacteria. As a consequence, the Cr30 mRNAs probably are translated at a rate that is slower than the normal rate for host mRNAs. A phylogenetic comparison of the genome indicates that Cr30 is a member of the T4-like family that is most closely related to a new group of T-like phages exemplified by фM12.

  14. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding the PepF endopeptidase from the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braz Vânia S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The metallopeptidases have a very important role in bacteria, being involved in several processes that rely on protein turnover, such as nutrition, degradation of signal peptides, protein localization and virulence. We have cloned and characterized the gene of the metalloendopeptidase PepF from the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The gene upstream of pepF (orf1 encodes a conserved hypothetical protein found in Mycobacterium and Streptomyces. pepF is co-transcribed with the gene downstream (orf3, which encodes a protein that belongs to the ABC1 protein kinase family, suggesting that these two proteins may share a common function in the cell. The C. crescentus PepF protein possesses the conserved HEXGH motif present in zinc binding domains of PepF homologs. Disruption of the pepF gene by insertion of a vector sequence did not produced any growth defect, but the mutant strain possesses only 30% of the specific activity of endopeptidases present in the wild type strain. Deletions and point mutations in the regulatory region showed that there are two putative promoter regions, and the operon expression is independent of the transcription regulator CtrA. The results indicate that PepF is not essential for either growth or development of this bacterium using peptides as the sole carbon source, suggesting that other peptidases can be sharing this function.

  15. Osmolality-dependent relocation of penicillin-binding protein PBP2 to the division site in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Jason; Priyadarshini, Richa; Takacs, Constantin N; Costa, Teresa; Dye, Natalie A; Shapiro, Lucy; Vollmer, Waldemar; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2012-06-01

    The synthesis of the peptidoglycan cell wall is carefully regulated in time and space. In nature, this essential process occurs in cells that live in fluctuating environments. Here we show that the spatial distributions of specific cell wall proteins in Caulobacter crescentus are sensitive to small external osmotic upshifts. The penicillin-binding protein PBP2, which is commonly branded as an essential cell elongation-specific transpeptidase, switches its localization from a dispersed, patchy pattern to an accumulation at the FtsZ ring location in response to osmotic upshifts as low as 40 mosmol/kg. This osmolality-dependent relocation to the division apparatus is initiated within less than a minute, while restoration to the patchy localization pattern is dependent on cell growth and takes 1 to 2 generations. Cell wall morphogenetic protein RodA and penicillin-binding protein PBP1a also change their spatial distribution by accumulating at the division site in response to external osmotic upshifts. Consistent with its ecological distribution, C. crescentus displays a narrow range of osmotolerance, with an upper limit of 225 mosmol/kg in minimal medium. Collectively, our findings reveal an unsuspected level of environmental regulation of cell wall protein behavior that is likely linked to an ecological adaptation.

  16. Shotgun proteomic analysis unveils survival and detoxification strategies by Caulobacter crescentus during exposure to uranium, chromium, and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Mimi C; Ma, Jincai; Salemi, Michelle R; Phinney, Brett S; Bowman, Grant R; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-04-01

    The ubiquitous bacterium Caulobacter crescentus holds promise to be used in bioremediation applications due to its ability to mineralize U(VI) under aerobic conditions. Here, cell free extracts of C. crescentus grown in the presence of uranyl nitrate [U(VI)], potassium chromate [Cr(VI)], or cadmium sulfate [Cd(II)] were used for label-free proteomic analysis. Proteins involved in two-component signaling and amino acid metabolism were up-regulated in response to all three metals, and proteins involved in aerobic oxidative phosphorylation and chemotaxis were down-regulated under these conditions. Clustering analysis of proteomic enrichment revealed that the three metals also induce distinct patterns of up- or down-regulated expression among different functional classes of proteins. Under U(VI) exposure, a phytase enzyme and an ABC transporter were up-regulated. Heat shock and outer membrane responses were found associated with Cr(VI), while efflux pumps and oxidative stress proteins were up-regulated with Cd(II). Experimental validations were performed on select proteins. We found that a phytase plays a role in U(VI) and Cr(VI) resistance and detoxification and that a Cd(II)-specific transporter confers Cd(II) resistance. Interestingly, analysis of promoter regions in genes associated with differentially expressed proteins suggests that U(VI) exposure affects cell cycle progression.

  17. A novel membrane anchor for FtsZ is linked to cell wall hydrolysis in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Elizabeth L; Razavi, Shiva; Inoue, Takanari; Goley, Erin D

    2016-07-01

    In most bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ forms an annulus at midcell (the Z-ring) which recruits the division machinery and regulates cell wall remodeling. Although both activities require membrane attachment of FtsZ, few membrane anchors have been characterized. FtsA is considered to be the primary membrane tether for FtsZ in bacteria, however in Caulobacter crescentus, FtsA arrives at midcell after stable Z-ring assembly and early FtsZ-directed cell wall synthesis. We hypothesized that additional proteins tether FtsZ to the membrane and demonstrate that in C. crescentus, FzlC is one such membrane anchor. FzlC associates with membranes directly in vivo and in vitro and recruits FtsZ to membranes in vitro. As for most known membrane anchors, the C-terminal peptide of FtsZ is required for its recruitment to membranes by FzlC in vitro and midcell recruitment of FzlC in cells. In vivo, overproduction of FzlC causes cytokinesis defects whereas deletion of fzlC causes synthetic defects with dipM, ftsE and amiC mutants, implicating FzlC in cell wall hydrolysis. Our characterization of FzlC as a novel membrane anchor for FtsZ expands our understanding of FtsZ regulators and establishes a role for membrane-anchored FtsZ in the regulation of cell wall hydrolysis.

  18. Direct interaction of FliX and FlbD is required for their regulatory activity in Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutton Rachel J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The temporal and spatial expression of late flagellar genes in Caulobacter crescentus is activated by the transcription factor FlbD and its partner trans-acting factor FliX. The physical interaction of these two proteins represents an alternative mechanism for regulating the activity of σ54 transcription factors. This study is to characterize the interaction of the two proteins and the consequences of the interaction on their regulatory activity. Results FliX and FlbD form stable complexes, which can stand the interference of 2.65 M NaCl. The stability of FliX and FlbD was affected by the co-existence of each other. Five FliX mutants (R71A, L85K, Δ117-118, T130L, and L136K were created by site-directed mutagenesis in conserved regions of the protein. All mutants were successfully expressed in both wild-type and ΔfliX Caulobacter strains. All but FliXL85K could rescue the motility and cell division defects of a ΔfliX mutant strain. The ability of FliX to regulate the transcription of class II and class III/IV flagellar promoters was fully diminished due to the L85K mutation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiment revealed that FliXL85K was unable to physically interact with FlbD. Conclusions FliX interacts with FlbD and thereby directly regulates the activity of FlbD in response to flagellar assembly. Mutations in highly conserved regions of FliX could severely affect the recognition between FliX and FlbD and hence interrupt the normal progression of flagellar synthesis and other developmental events in Caulobacter.

  19. S-Layer-Mediated Display of the Immunoglobulin G-Binding Domain of Streptococcal Protein G on the Surface of Caulobacter crescentus: Development of an Immunoactive Reagent▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nomellini, John F.; Duncan, Gillian; Dorocicz, Irene R.; Smit, John

    2007-01-01

    The immunoglobulin G (IgG)-binding streptococcal protein G is often used for immunoprecipitation or immunoadsorption-based assays, as it exhibits binding to a broader spectrum of host species IgG and IgG subclasses than the alternative, Staphylococcus aureus protein A. Caulobacter crescentus produces a hexagonally arranged paracrystalline protein surface layer (S-layer) composed of a single secreted protein, RsaA, that is notably tolerant of heterologous peptide insertions while maintaining t...

  20. Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase of Caulobacter crescentus: Cloning, sequencing, and mapping of the gene and periplasmic location of the enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinman, H.M. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (USA)); Ely, B. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia (USA))

    1990-06-01

    To investigate the function of the copper-zinc form of superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) (and its structural relationship to the eucaryotic CuZnSoDs) in the freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crecentus, the gene encoding CuZnSOD (sodC) of C. crescentus CB15 was cloned and sequenced. By hybridization to pulsed-field electrophoresis gels, sodC was mapped near cysE in the C. crescentus chromosome. Through analysis of spheroplasts, the two SODs of C. crescentus were shown to be differently localized, CuZnSOD in the periplasm and FeSOD in the cytoplasm. In its natural habitat, C. crescentus is frequently associated with blue-green algae (cyanobacteria). The oxygen evolved by these photosynthetic algae may create an extracellular oxidative stress against which the periplasmic CuZnSOD may defend more effectively than the cytoplasmic FeSOD. Amino acid sequence alignments of C. crescentus CuZnSOD with eucaryotic CuZnSODs and with CuZnSOD of Photobacterium leiognathi (the only other bacterium from which CuZnSOD has been isolated and sequenced) suggest similar supersecondary structures for bacterial and eucaryotic CuZnSODs but reveal four novel substitutions in C. crescentus CuZnSOD: a phenylalanine critical to intrasubunit hydrophobic bonding replaced by alanine, a histidine ligand of zinc replaced by aspartate, and substitutions of two other previously invariant residues that stabilize zinc or both copper and zinc.

  1. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda

    2014-05-01

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  2. The β-sliding clamp directs the localization of HdaA to the replisome in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Carmen; Grosse, Karin; Sourjik, Victor; Collier, Justine

    2013-11-01

    The initiation of chromosome replication is tightly regulated in bacteria to ensure that it takes place only once per cell cycle. In many proteobacteria, this process requires the ATP-bound form of the DnaA protein. The regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA) facilitates the conversion of DnaA-ATP into replication-inactive DnaA-ADP, thereby preventing overinitiation. Homologues of the HdaA protein, together with the β-clamp of the DNA polymerase (DnaN), are required for this process. Here, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments to demonstrate that HdaA interacts with DnaN in live Caulobacter crescentus cells. We show that a QFKLPL motif in the N-terminal region of HdaA is required for this interaction and that this motif is also needed to recruit HdaA to the subcellular location occupied by the replisome during DNA replication. An HdaA mutant protein that cannot colocalize or interact with DnaN can also not support the essential function of HdaA. These results suggest that the recruitment of HdaA to the replisome is needed during RIDA in C. crescentus, probably as a means to sense whether chromosome replication has initiated before DnaA becomes inactivated. In addition, we show that a conserved R145 residue located in the AAA+ domain of HdaA is also needed for the function of HdaA, although it does not affect the interaction of HdaA with DnaN in vivo. The AAA+ domain of HdaA may therefore be required during RIDA after the initial recruitment of HdaA to the replisome by DnaN.

  3. Extracytoplasmic function (ECF sigma factor σF is involved in Caulobacter crescentus response to heavy metal stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohler Christian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus inhabits low-nutrient environments and can tolerate certain levels of heavy metals in these sites. It has been reported that C. crescentus responds to exposure to various heavy metals by altering the expression of a large number of genes. Results In this work, we show that the ECF sigma factor σF is one of the regulatory proteins involved in the control of the transcriptional response to chromium and cadmium. Microarray experiments indicate that σF controls eight genes during chromium stress, most of which were previously described as induced by heavy metals. Surprisingly, σF itself is not strongly auto-regulated under metal stress conditions. Interestingly, σF-dependent genes are not induced in the presence of agents that generate reactive oxygen species. Promoter analyses revealed that a conserved σF-dependent sequence is located upstream of all genes of the σF regulon. In addition, we show that the second gene in the sigF operon acts as a negative regulator of σF function, and the encoded protein has been named NrsF (Negative regulator of sigma F. Substitution of two conserved cysteine residues (C131 and C181 in NrsF affects its ability to maintain the expression of σF-dependent genes at basal levels. Furthermore, we show that σF is released into the cytoplasm during chromium stress and in cells carrying point mutations in both conserved cysteines of the protein NrsF. Conclusion A possible mechanism for induction of the σF-dependent genes by chromium and cadmium is the inactivation of the putative anti-sigma factor NrsF, leading to the release of σF to bind RNA polymerase core and drive transcription of its regulon.

  4. Functional characterization of UDP-glucose:undecaprenyl-phosphate glucose-1-phosphate transferases of Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kinnari B; Toh, Evelyn; Fernandez, Ximena B; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; Hardy, Gail G; Brun, Yves V; Bernards, Mark A; Valvano, Miguel A

    2012-05-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 WcaJ and the Caulobacter crescentus HfsE, PssY, and PssZ enzymes are predicted to initiate the synthesis of colanic acid (CA) capsule and holdfast polysaccharide, respectively. These proteins belong to a prokaryotic family of membrane enzymes that catalyze the formation of a phosphoanhydride bond joining a hexose-1-phosphate with undecaprenyl phosphate (Und-P). In this study, in vivo complementation assays of an E. coli K-12 wcaJ mutant demonstrated that WcaJ and PssY can complement CA synthesis. Furthermore, WcaJ can restore holdfast production in C. crescentus. In vitro transferase assays demonstrated that both WcaJ and PssY utilize UDP-glucose but not UDP-galactose. However, in a strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium deficient in the WbaP O antigen initiating galactosyltransferase, complementation with WcaJ or PssY resulted in O-antigen production. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) revealed the attachment of both CA and O-antigen molecules to lipid A-core oligosaccharide (OS). Therefore, while UDP-glucose is the preferred substrate of WcaJ and PssY, these enzymes can also utilize UDP-galactose. This unexpected feature of WcaJ and PssY may help to map specific residues responsible for the nucleotide diphosphate specificity of these or similar enzymes. Also, the reconstitution of O-antigen synthesis in Salmonella, CA capsule synthesis in E. coli, and holdfast synthesis provide biological assays of high sensitivity to examine the sugar-1-phosphate transferase specificity of heterologous proteins.

  5. Factors controlling in vitro recrystallization of the Caulobacter crescentus paracrystalline S-layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomellini, J F; Kupcu, S; Sleytr, U B; Smit, J

    1997-10-01

    The S-layer of Caulobacter is a two-dimensional paracrystalline array on the cell surface composed of a single protein, RsaA. We have established conditions for preparation of stable, soluble protein and then efficient in vitro recrystallization of the purified protein. Efficient recrystallization and long range order could not be obtained with pure protein only, though it was apparent that calcium was required for crystallization. Recrystallization was obtained when lipid vesicles were provided, but only when the vesicles contained the specific species of Caulobacter smooth lipopolysaccharide (SLPS) that previous studies implicated as a requirement for attaching the S-layer to the cell surface. The specific type of phospholipids did not appear critical; phospholipids rather different from those present in Caulobacter membranes or archaebacterial tetraether lipids worked equally well. The source of LPS was critical; rough and smooth variants of Salmonella typhimurium LPS as well as the rough form of Caulobacter LPS were ineffective. The requirement for calcium ions for recrystallization was further evaluated; strontium ions could substitute for calcium, and to a lesser extent, cobalt, barium, manganese and magnesium ions also stimulated crystallization. On the other hand, nickel and cadmium provided only weak crystallization stimulation, and zinc, copper, iron, aluminum ions, and the monovalent potassium, sodium, and lithium ions were ineffective. The recrystallization could also be reproduced with Langmuir-Blodgett lipid monolayers at an air-water interface. As with the vesicle experiments, this was only successful when SLPS was incorporated into the lipid mix. The best method for RsaA preparation, leading to apparently monomeric protein that was stable for many months, was an extraction with a low pH aqueous solution. We also achieved recrystallization, albeit at lower efficiency, using RsaA protein solubilized by 8 M urea, a method which allows retrieval of

  6. The small protein MbiA interacts with MreB and modulates cell shape in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhnina, Anastasiya A; Gitai, Zemer

    2012-09-01

    In Caulobacter crescentus, the actin homologue MreB is critical for cell shape maintenance. Despite the central importance of MreB for cell morphology and viability, very little is known about MreB-interacting factors. Here, we use an overexpression approach to identify a novel MreB interactor, MbiA. MbiA interacts with MreB in both biochemical and genetic assays, colocalizes with MreB throughout the cell cycle, and relies on MreB for its localization. MbiA overexpression mimics the loss of MreB function, severely perturbing cell morphology, inhibiting growth and inducing cell lysis. Additionally, mbiA deletion shows a synthetic growth phenotype with a hypomorphic allele of the MreB interactor RodZ, suggesting that these two MreB-interacting proteins either have partially redundant functions or participate in the same functional complex. Our work thus establishes MbiA as a novel cell shape regulator that appears to function through regulating MreB, and opens avenues for discovery of more MreB-regulating factors by showing that overexpression screens are a valuable tool for uncovering potentially redundant cell shape effectors.

  7. Phosphotransferase-dependent accumulation of (p)ppGpp in response to glutamine deprivation in Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, Séverin; Petit, Kenny; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    The alarmone (p)ppGpp is commonly used by bacteria to quickly respond to nutrient starvation. Although (p)ppGpp synthetases such as SpoT have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms stimulating alarmone synthesis upon starvation. Here, we describe an essential role of the nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) in controlling (p)ppGpp accumulation in Caulobacter crescentus. We show that cells sense nitrogen starvation by way of detecting glutamine deprivation using the first enzyme (EINtr) of PTSNtr. Decreasing intracellular glutamine concentration triggers phosphorylation of EINtr and its downstream components HPr and EIIANtr. Once phosphorylated, both HPr∼P and EIIANtr∼P stimulate (p)ppGpp accumulation by modulating SpoT activities. This burst of second messenger primarily impacts the non-replicative phase of the cell cycle by extending the G1 phase. This work highlights a new role for bacterial PTS systems in stimulating (p)ppGpp accumulation in response to metabolic cues and in controlling cell cycle progression and cell growth. PMID:27109061

  8. A DNA damage checkpoint in Caulobacter crescentus inhibits cell division through a direct interaction with FtsW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Joshua W; Hopkins, Alexander C; Laub, Michael T

    2011-06-15

    Following DNA damage, cells typically delay cell cycle progression and inhibit cell division until their chromosomes have been repaired. The bacterial checkpoint systems responsible for these DNA damage responses are incompletely understood. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus responds to DNA damage by coordinately inducing an SOS regulon and inhibiting the master regulator CtrA. Included in the SOS regulon is sidA (SOS-induced inhibitor of cell division A), a membrane protein of only 29 amino acids that helps to delay cell division following DNA damage, but is dispensable in undamaged cells. SidA is sufficient, when overproduced, to block cell division. However, unlike many other regulators of bacterial cell division, SidA does not directly disrupt the assembly or stability of the cytokinetic ring protein FtsZ, nor does it affect the recruitment of other components of the cell division machinery. Instead, we provide evidence that SidA inhibits division by binding directly to FtsW to prevent the final constriction of the cytokinetic ring.

  9. DNA methylation by CcrM activates the transcription of two genes required for the division of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Diego; Collier, Justine

    2013-04-01

    DNA methylation regulates many processes, including gene expression, by superimposing secondary information on DNA sequences. The conserved CcrM enzyme, which methylates adenines in GANTC sequences, is essential to the viability of several Alphaproteobacteria. In this study, we find that Caulobacter crescentus cells lacking the CcrM enzyme accumulate low levels of the two conserved FtsZ and MipZ proteins, leading to a severe defect in cell division. This defect can be compensated by the expression of the ftsZ gene from an inducible promoter or by spontaneous suppressor mutations that promote FtsZ accumulation. We show that CcrM promotes the transcription of the ftsZ and mipZ genes and that the ftsZ and mipZ promoter regions contain a conserved CGACTC motif that is critical to their activities and to their regulation by CcrM. In addition, our results suggest that the ftsZ promoter has the lowest activity when the CGACTC motif is non-methylated, an intermediate activity when it is hemi-methylated and the highest activity when it is fully methylated. The regulation of ftsZ expression by DNA methylation may explain why CcrM is essential in a subset of Alphaproteobacteria.

  10. Bactofilins, a ubiquitous class of cytoskeletal proteins mediating polar localization of a cell wall synthase in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Juliane; Briegel, Ariane; Mörschel, Erhard; Kahnt, Jörg; Leser, Katja; Wick, Stephanie; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-01-20

    The cytoskeleton has a key function in the temporal and spatial organization of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of a new class of polymer-forming proteins, termed bactofilins, that are widely conserved among bacteria. In Caulobacter crescentus, two bactofilin paralogues cooperate to form a sheet-like structure lining the cytoplasmic membrane in proximity of the stalked cell pole. These assemblies mediate polar localization of a peptidoglycan synthase involved in stalk morphogenesis, thus complementing the function of the actin-like cytoskeleton and the cell division machinery in the regulation of cell wall biogenesis. In other bacteria, bactofilins can establish rod-shaped filaments or associate with the cell division apparatus, indicating considerable structural and functional flexibility. Bactofilins polymerize spontaneously in the absence of additional cofactors in vitro, forming stable ribbon- or rod-like filament bundles. Our results suggest that these structures have evolved as an alternative to intermediate filaments, serving as versatile molecular scaffolds in a variety of cellular pathways.

  11. Evaluating secretion and surface attachment of SapA, an S-layer-associated metalloprotease of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandham, Lyngrace; Nomellini, John F; Smit, John

    2012-10-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is used to display foreign peptides at high density as insertions into the surface (S)-layer protein (RsaA). Many recombinant RsaA proteins, however, are cleaved by SapA, a 71-kDa metalloprotease, suggesting a role in maintaining S-layer integrity. When overexpressed on a multicopy plasmid SapA was detected on the surface by fluorescent antibody only if RsaA and the O-side chain of LPS that mediates S-layer attachment were removed by mutation, indicating an outer membrane location beneath the S-layer. Secretion was mediated by the RsaA type 1 transporter since secretion was eliminated in transporter deficient strains or by C-terminal deletions in SapA (the presumed location of type 1 secretion signals). Secretion was required to become an active protease; mass spectrometry suggested this might be due to N-terminal processing during secretion, a feature shared with other type 1-secreted proteases. Overexpression leads to additional processing C-terminal to the protease domain, producing a 45-kDa protein. This was demonstrated to be self-processing. Deletion analysis revealed the C-terminal 100 amino acids were sufficient for anchoring and secretion. When protein G was fused to the last 238 amino acids of SapA it was secreted, surface attached and bound immunoglobulin, indicating potential for foreign protein display.

  12. Crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus polynucleotide phosphorylase reveals a mechanism of RNA substrate channelling and RNA degradosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Steven W; Gubbey, Tobias; Hug, Isabelle; Jenal, Urs; Luisi, Ben F

    2012-04-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is an exoribonuclease that cleaves single-stranded RNA substrates with 3'-5' directionality and processive behaviour. Its ring-like, trimeric architecture creates a central channel where phosphorolytic active sites reside. One face of the ring is decorated with RNA-binding K-homology (KH) and S1 domains, but exactly how these domains help to direct the 3' end of single-stranded RNA substrates towards the active sites is an unsolved puzzle. Insight into this process is provided by our crystal structures of RNA-bound and apo Caulobacter crescentus PNPase. In the RNA-free form, the S1 domains adopt a 'splayed' conformation that may facilitate capture of RNA substrates. In the RNA-bound structure, the three KH domains collectively close upon the RNA and direct the 3' end towards a constricted aperture at the entrance of the central channel. The KH domains make non-equivalent interactions with the RNA, and there is a marked asymmetry within the catalytic core of the enzyme. On the basis of these data, we propose that structural non-equivalence, induced upon RNA binding, helps to channel substrate to the active sites through mechanical ratcheting. Structural and biochemical analyses also reveal the basis for PNPase association with RNase E in the multi-enzyme RNA degradosome assembly of the α-proteobacteria.

  13. Phosphotransferase-dependent accumulation of (p)ppGpp in response to glutamine deprivation in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, Séverin; Petit, Kenny; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-04-25

    The alarmone (p)ppGpp is commonly used by bacteria to quickly respond to nutrient starvation. Although (p)ppGpp synthetases such as SpoT have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms stimulating alarmone synthesis upon starvation. Here, we describe an essential role of the nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTS(Ntr)) in controlling (p)ppGpp accumulation in Caulobacter crescentus. We show that cells sense nitrogen starvation by way of detecting glutamine deprivation using the first enzyme (EI(Ntr)) of PTS(Ntr). Decreasing intracellular glutamine concentration triggers phosphorylation of EI(Ntr) and its downstream components HPr and EIIA(Ntr). Once phosphorylated, both HPr∼P and EIIA(Ntr)∼P stimulate (p)ppGpp accumulation by modulating SpoT activities. This burst of second messenger primarily impacts the non-replicative phase of the cell cycle by extending the G1 phase. This work highlights a new role for bacterial PTS systems in stimulating (p)ppGpp accumulation in response to metabolic cues and in controlling cell cycle progression and cell growth.

  14. Factors controlling in vitro recrystallization of the Caulobacter crescentus paracrystalline S-layer.

    OpenAIRE

    Nomellini, J F; Kupcu, S; Sleytr, U B; Smit, J.

    1997-01-01

    The S-layer of Caulobacter is a two-dimensional paracrystalline array on the cell surface composed of a single protein, RsaA. We have established conditions for preparation of stable, soluble protein and then efficient in vitro recrystallization of the purified protein. Efficient recrystallization and long range order could not be obtained with pure protein only, though it was apparent that calcium was required for crystallization. Recrystallization was obtained when lipid vesicles were provi...

  15. The role of spatial asymmetries in the development of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropini, Carolina; Chen, Erin; Sciochetti, Stephen; Newton, Austin; Laub, Michael; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2010-03-01

    Caulobacter is a model organism for cell cycle regulation and development. Upon division it differentiates into a sessile stalked cell and a motile swarmer cell. Throughout the cell cycle, the localization of several key proteins is highly regulated. We address the importance of spatial localization in signal transduction and development. Flagellar pole development is controlled by the response regulator DivK, whose phosphorylation state is controlled by the kinase DivJ and the phosphatase PleC. PleC localizes to the swarmer pole, while DivJ localizes at the stalked pole. We have constructed strains with a variety of PleC and DivJ localization patterns. Our results indicate that localization is not absolutely necessary in this system, rather localized proteins enhance the robustness to fluctuations. We further investigate the importance of spatial asymmetries in the regulation of the master cell-cycle-regulator CtrA. In its phosphorylated form, CtrA binds to the replication origin in Caulobacter in a highly cooperative fashion, and prevents DNA replication. The CtrA distribution is tightly controlled not only by localized phosphorylation and dephosphorylation but also synthesis and degradation. We find that physiological degradation rates exert only a small perturbation on the distribution generated by asymmetric phosphorylation.

  16. Interplay between the localization and kinetics of phosphorylation in flagellar pole development of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Tropini

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells maintain sophisticated levels of intracellular organization that allow for signal amplification, response to stimuli, cell division, and many other critical processes. The mechanisms underlying localization and their contribution to fitness have been difficult to uncover, due to the often challenging task of creating mutants with systematically perturbed localization but normal enzymatic activity, and the lack of quantitative models through which to interpret subtle phenotypic changes. Focusing on the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, which generates two different types of daughter cells from an underlying asymmetric distribution of protein phosphorylation, we use mathematical modeling to investigate the contribution of the localization of histidine kinases to the establishment of cellular asymmetry and subsequent developmental outcomes. We use existing mutant phenotypes and fluorescence data to parameterize a reaction-diffusion model of the kinases PleC and DivJ and their cognate response regulator DivK. We then present a systematic computational analysis of the effects of changes in protein localization and abundance to determine whether PleC localization is required for correct developmental timing in Caulobacter. Our model predicts the developmental phenotypes of several localization mutants, and suggests that a novel strain with co-localization of PleC and DivJ could provide quantitative insight into the signaling threshold required for flagellar pole development. Our analysis indicates that normal development can be maintained through a wide range of localization phenotypes, and that developmental defects due to changes in PleC localization can be rescued by increased PleC expression. We also show that the system is remarkably robust to perturbation of the kinetic parameters, and while the localization of either PleC or DivJ is required for asymmetric development, the delocalization of one of these two components does

  17. Interplay between the localization and kinetics of phosphorylation in flagellar pole development of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropini, Carolina; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cells maintain sophisticated levels of intracellular organization that allow for signal amplification, response to stimuli, cell division, and many other critical processes. The mechanisms underlying localization and their contribution to fitness have been difficult to uncover, due to the often challenging task of creating mutants with systematically perturbed localization but normal enzymatic activity, and the lack of quantitative models through which to interpret subtle phenotypic changes. Focusing on the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, which generates two different types of daughter cells from an underlying asymmetric distribution of protein phosphorylation, we use mathematical modeling to investigate the contribution of the localization of histidine kinases to the establishment of cellular asymmetry and subsequent developmental outcomes. We use existing mutant phenotypes and fluorescence data to parameterize a reaction-diffusion model of the kinases PleC and DivJ and their cognate response regulator DivK. We then present a systematic computational analysis of the effects of changes in protein localization and abundance to determine whether PleC localization is required for correct developmental timing in Caulobacter. Our model predicts the developmental phenotypes of several localization mutants, and suggests that a novel strain with co-localization of PleC and DivJ could provide quantitative insight into the signaling threshold required for flagellar pole development. Our analysis indicates that normal development can be maintained through a wide range of localization phenotypes, and that developmental defects due to changes in PleC localization can be rescued by increased PleC expression. We also show that the system is remarkably robust to perturbation of the kinetic parameters, and while the localization of either PleC or DivJ is required for asymmetric development, the delocalization of one of these two components does not prevent

  18. Characterization of the Proteins Associated with Caulobacter crescentus Bacteriophage CbK Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Courtney T; Wilson, Kiesha M; Ely, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage genomes contain an abundance of genes that code for hypothetical proteins with either a conserved domain or no predicted function. The Caulobacter phage CbK has an unusual shape, designated morphotype B3 that consists of an elongated cylindrical head and a long flexible tail. To identify CbK proteins associated with the phage particle, intact phage particles were subjected to SDS-PAGE, and the resulting protein bands were digested with trypsin and analyzed using MALDI mass spectroscopy to provide peptide molecular weights. These peptide molecular weights were then compared with the peptides that would be generated from the predicted amino acid sequences that are coded by the CbK genome, and the comparison of the actual and predicted peptide masses resulted in the identification of single genes that could code for the set of peptides derived from each of the 20 phage proteins. We also found that CsCl density gradient centrifugation resulted in the separation of empty phage heads, phage heads containing material organized in a spiral, isolated phage tails, and other particulate material from the intact phage particles. This additional material proved to be a good source of additional phage proteins, and preliminary results suggest that it may include a CbK DNA replication complex.

  19. Development of an HIV-1 Microbicide Based on Caulobacter crescentus: Blocking Infection by High-Density Display of Virus Entry Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Farr

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS pandemic remains an enormous global health concern. Despite effective prevention options, 2.6 million new infections occur annually, with women in developing countries accounting for more than half of these infections. New prevention strategies that can be used by women are urgently needed. Topical microbicides specific for HIV-1 represent a promising prevention strategy. Conceptually, using harmless bacteria to display peptides or proteins capable of blocking entry provides an inexpensive approach to microbicide development. To avoid the potential pitfalls of engineering commensal bacteria, our strategy is to genetically display infection inhibitors on a non-native bacterium and rely on topical application of stabilized bacteria before potential virus exposure. Due to the high density cell-surface display capabilities and the inherent low toxicity of the bacterium, the S-layer mediated protein display capabilities of the non-pathogenic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has been exploited for this approach. We have demonstrated that C. crescentus displaying MIP1α or CD4 interfered with the virus entry pathway and provided significant protection from HIV-1 pseudovirus representing clade B in a standard single cycle infection assay. Here we have expanded our C. crescentus based microbicide approach with additional and diverse classes of natural and synthetic inhibitors of the HIV-1 entry pathway. All display constructs provided variable but significant protection from HIV-1 infection; some with protection as high as 70%. Further, we describe protection from infection with additional viral clades. These findings indicate the significant potential for engineering C. crescentus to be an effective and readily adaptable HIV-1 microbicide platform.

  20. Development of an HIV-1 Microbicide Based on Caulobacter crescentus: Blocking Infection by High-Density Display of Virus Entry Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Christina; Nomellini, John F; Ailon, Evan; Shanina, Iryna; Sangsari, Sassan; Cavacini, Lisa A; Smit, John; Horwitz, Marc S

    2013-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic remains an enormous global health concern. Despite effective prevention options, 2.6 million new infections occur annually, with women in developing countries accounting for more than half of these infections. New prevention strategies that can be used by women are urgently needed. Topical microbicides specific for HIV-1 represent a promising prevention strategy. Conceptually, using harmless bacteria to display peptides or proteins capable of blocking entry provides an inexpensive approach to microbicide development. To avoid the potential pitfalls of engineering commensal bacteria, our strategy is to genetically display infection inhibitors on a non-native bacterium and rely on topical application of stabilized bacteria before potential virus exposure. Due to the high density cell-surface display capabilities and the inherent low toxicity of the bacterium, the S-layer mediated protein display capabilities of the non-pathogenic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has been exploited for this approach. We have demonstrated that C. crescentus displaying MIP1α or CD4 interfered with the virus entry pathway and provided significant protection from HIV-1 pseudovirus representing clade B in a standard single cycle infection assay. Here we have expanded our C. crescentus based microbicide approach with additional and diverse classes of natural and synthetic inhibitors of the HIV-1 entry pathway. All display constructs provided variable but significant protection from HIV-1 infection; some with protection as high as 70%. Further, we describe protection from infection with additional viral clades. These findings indicate the significant potential for engineering C. crescentus to be an effective and readily adaptable HIV-1 microbicide platform. PMID:23840383

  1. Identification of the in vivo function of the high-efficiency D-mannonate dehydratase in Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 from the enolase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelecki, Daniel J; Graff, Dylan C; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2014-07-01

    The d-mannonate dehydratase (ManD) subgroup of the enolase superfamily contains members with varying catalytic activities (high-efficiency, low-efficiency, or no activity) that dehydrate d-mannonate and/or d-gluconate to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate [Wichelecki, D. J., et al. (2014) Biochemistry 53, 2722-2731]. Despite extensive in vitro characterization, the in vivo physiological role of a ManD has yet to be established. In this study, we report the in vivo functional characterization of a high-efficiency ManD from Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 (UniProt entry B8GZZ7) by in vivo discovery of its essential role in d-glucuronate metabolism. This in vivo functional annotation may be extended to ~50 additional proteins.

  2. Three-dimensional super-resolution imaging of the midplane protein FtsZ in live Caulobacter crescentus cells using astigmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteen, Julie S; Goley, Erin D; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W E

    2012-03-01

    Single-molecule super-resolution imaging provides a non-invasive method for nanometer-scale imaging and is ideally suited to investigations of quasi-static structures within live cells. Here, we extend the ability to image subcellular features within bacteria cells to three dimensions based on the introduction of a cylindrical lens in the imaging pathway. We investigate the midplane protein FtsZ in Caulobacter crescentus with super-resolution imaging based on fluorescent-protein photoswitching and the natural polymerization/depolymerization dynamics of FtsZ associated with the Z-ring. We quantify these dynamics and determine the FtsZ depolymerization time to be divisional stage.

  3. Activation and polar sequestration of PopA, a c-di-GMP effector protein involved in Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Shogo; Schalch-Moser, Annina; Zumthor, Ludwig; Manfredi, Pablo; Ebbensgaard, Anna; Schirmer, Tilman; Jenal, Urs

    2014-11-01

    When Caulobacter crescentus enters S-phase the replication initiation inhibitor CtrA dynamically positions to the old cell pole to be degraded by the polar ClpXP protease. Polar delivery of CtrA requires PopA and the diguanylate cyclase PleD that positions to the same pole. Here we present evidence that PopA originated through gene duplication from its paralogue response regulator PleD and subsequent co-option as c-di-GMP effector protein. While the C-terminal catalytic domain (GGDEF) of PleD is activated by phosphorylation of the N-terminal receiver domain, functional adaptation has reversed signal transduction in PopA with the GGDEF domain adopting input function and the receiver domain serving as regulatory output. We show that the N-terminal receiver domain of PopA specifically interacts with RcdA, a component required for CtrA degradation. In contrast, the GGDEF domain serves to target PopA to the cell pole in response to c-di-GMP binding. In agreement with the divergent activation and targeting mechanisms, distinct markers sequester PleD and PopA to the old cell pole upon S-phase entry. Together these data indicate that PopA adopted a novel role as topology specificity factor to help recruit components of the CtrA degradation pathway to the protease specific old cell pole of C. crescentus.

  4. A two-component system, an anti-sigma factor and two paralogous ECF sigma factors are involved in the control of general stress response in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Rogério F; Kohler, Christian; Gomes, Suely L

    2011-06-01

    The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor σ(T) is the master regulator of general stress response in Caulobacter crescentus and controls the expression of its paralogue σ(U). In this work we showed that PhyR and NepR act, respectively, as positive and negative regulators of σ(T) expression and function. Biochemical data also demonstrated that NepR directly binds σ(T) and the phosphorylated form of PhyR. We also described the essential role of the histidine kinase gene CC3474, here denominated phyK, for expression of σ(T)-dependent genes and for resistance to stress conditions. Additionally, in vivo evidence of PhyK-dependent phosphorylation of PhyR is presented. This study also identified a conserved cysteine residue (C95) located in the periplasmic portion of PhyK that is crucial for the function of the protein. Furthermore, we showed that PhyK, PhyR and σ(T) regulate the same set of genes and that σ(T) apparently directly controls most of its regulon. In contrast, σ(U) seems to have a very modest contribution to the expression of a subset of σ(T)-dependent genes. In conclusion, this report describes the molecular mechanism involved in the control of general stress response in C. crescentus.

  5. Identification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of esterase A from Caulobacter crescentus CB15, a family VIII lipolytic enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esterase A from C. crescentus CB15 was crystallized in space group C2221 and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.62 Å. The structures and functions of family VIII lipolytic enzymes, which have moderate sequence identity to class C β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins, are largely unknown. Here, the X-ray crystallographic study of a family VIII esterase from Caulobacter crescentus CB15 (CcEstA) is described. Sequence analysis revealed that CcEstA has a conserved serine residue within the S-X-X-K motif which acts as a catalytic nucleophile. Recombinant protein containing an N-terminal His tag was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Functional studies showed that CcEstA acts on α- and β-naphthyl acetate as substrates. In addition, it can catalyze the hydrolysis of ketoprofen ethyl ester, a highly useful product in industrial applications. CcEstA was crystallized using a solution consisting of 1.0 M potassium/sodium tartrate, 0.1 M imidazole pH 8.0, 0.2 M NaCl, and X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.62 Å with an Rmerge of 9.4%. The crystals of CcEstA belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 172.23, b = 176.68, c = 47.93 Å. Structure determination is in progress

  6. The LovK-LovR two-component system is a regulator of the general stress pathway in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean

    2012-06-01

    A conserved set of regulators control the general stress response in Caulobacter crescentus, including σ(T), its anti-σ factor NepR, the anti-anti-σ factor PhyR, and the transmembrane sensor kinase PhyK. We report that the soluble histidine kinase LovK and the single-domain response regulator LovR also function within the C. crescentus general stress pathway. Our genetic data support a model in which LovK-LovR functions upstream of σ(T) by controlling the phosphorylation state and thus anti-anti-σ activity of PhyR. Transcription of lovK and lovR is independently activated by stress through a mechanism that requires sigT and phyR. Conversely, lovK and lovR function together to repress transcription of the general stress regulon. Concordant with a functional role of the LovK-LovR two-component system as a negative regulator of the general stress pathway, lovK-lovR-null mutants exhibit increased cell survival after osmotic stress, while coordinate overexpression of lovK and lovR attenuates cell survival relative to that of the wild type. Notably, lovK can complement the transcriptional and cell survival defects of a phyK-null mutant when lovR is deleted. Moreover, in this same genetic background, σ(T)-dependent transcription is activated in response to osmotic stress. This result suggests that flavin-binding LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) histidine kinases are competent to perceive cytoplasmic signals in addition to the environmental signal blue light. We conclude that the PhyK-PhyR and LovK-LovR two-component signaling systems coordinately regulate stress physiology in C. crescentus.

  7. (p)ppGpp modulates cell size and the initiation of DNA replication in Caulobacter crescentus in response to a block in lipid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Kristina V; Wood, Shannon M; Blair, Jimmy A; Nguyen, Bao T; Herrera, Anabel; Mora, Yannet G Perez; Cuajungco, Math P; Murray, Sean R

    2015-03-01

    Stress conditions, such as a block in fatty acid synthesis, signal bacterial cells to exit the cell cycle. Caulobacter crescentus FabH is a cell-cycle-regulated β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase that initiates lipid biosynthesis and is essential for growth in rich media. To explore how C. crescentus responds to a block in lipid biosynthesis, we created a FabH-depletion strain. We found that FabH depletion blocks lipid biosynthesis in rich media and causes a cell cycle arrest that requires the alarmone (p)ppGpp for adaptation. Notably, basal levels of (p)ppGpp coordinate both a reduction in cell volume and a block in the over-initiation of DNA replication in response to FabH depletion. The gene ctrA encodes a master transcription factor that directly regulates 95 cell-cycle-controlled genes while also functioning to inhibit the initiation of DNA replication. Here, we demonstrate that ctrA transcription is (p)ppGpp-dependent during fatty acid starvation. CtrA fails to accumulate when FabH is depleted in the absence of (p)ppGpp due to a substantial reduction in ctrA transcription. The (p)ppGpp-dependent maintenance of ctrA transcription during fatty acid starvation initiated from only one of the two ctrA promoters. In the absence of (p)ppGpp, the majority of FabH-depleted cells enter a viable but non-culturable state, with multiple chromosomes, and are unable to recover from the miscoordination of cell cycle events. Thus, basal levels of (p)ppGpp facilitate C. crescentus' re-entry into the cell cycle after termination of fatty acid starvation.

  8. Development of an HIV-1 specific microbicide using Caulobacter crescentus S-layer mediated display of CD4 and MIP1alpha.

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    John F Nomellini

    Full Text Available The development of alternative strategies to prevent HIV infection is a global public health priority. Initial efforts in anti-HIV microbicide development have met with poor success as the strategies have relied on a non-specific mechanism of action. Here, we report the development of a microbicide aimed at specifically blocking HIV entry by displaying molecular components of the HIV/host cell attachment complex on the surface of Caulobacter crescentus, a harmless aquatic bacterium. This bacterium can be readily manipulated to present heterologous proteins at high density on its surface by genetic insertion into its crystalline surface layer protein. In separate constructions, we generated bacteria displaying domain 1 of CD4 and MIP1alpha. Each moiety reacted with specific antibodies by Western immunoblot and immuno-fluorescence microscopy. Microbicide functionality was assessed using an HIV pseudotype virus assay system representing Clade B subtypes. Bacteria displaying MIP1alpha reduced infectivity by 35-78% depending on the specific subtype while CD4 display reduced infection by as much as 56%. Combinations of both constructs reduced infectivity by nearly 98%. We demonstrated that HIV infection could be inhibited using a strategy aimed at HIV-specific molecular interactions with Caulobacter surface protein display, and that sufficient protein folding and conformation could be mimicked to bind and block entry. Further, this is the first demonstration that Caulobacter surface protein display may be a useful approach to preventing HIV infection or other viruses as a microbicide. We propose that this harmless bacterium, which is inexpensive to produce and formulate, might be suitable for topical applications as a viable alternative in the search for effective microbicides to counteract the world wide incidence of HIV infection.

  9. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  10. Role of core promoter sequences in the mechanism of swarmer cell-specific silencing of gyrB transcription in Caulobacter crescentus

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    Gober James W

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each Caulobacter crescentus cell division yields two distinct cell types: a flagellated swarmer cell and a non-motile stalked cell. The swarmer cell is further distinguished from the stalked cell by an inability to reinitiate DNA replication, by the physical properties of its nucleoid, and its discrete program of gene expression. Specifically, with regard to the latter feature, many of the genes involved in DNA replication are not transcribed in swarmer cells. Results We show that for one of these genes involved in DNA replication, gyrB, its pattern of temporal expression depends upon an 80 base pair promoter region with strong resemblance to the Caulobacter crescentus σ73 consensus promoter sequence; regulation does not appear to be affected by the general strength of the promoter activity, as mutations that increased its conformity with the consensus did not affect its cell-cycle expression pattern. Transcription from the gyrB promoter in vitro required only the presence of the σ73 RNA polymerase (from E. coli and the requisite nucleoside triphosphates, although a distinct binding activity, present in crude whole-cell extracts, formed a complex gyrB promoter DNA. We also assayed the effect on gyrB expression in strains containing mutations in either smc or dps, two genes encoding proteins that condense DNA. However we found there was no change in the temporal pattern of gyrB transcription in strains containing deletions in either of these genes. Conclusion These experiments demonstrate that gyrB transcription does not require any auxiliary factors, suggesting that temporal regulation is not dependent upon an activator protein. Swarmer-specific silencing may not be attributable to the observed physical difference in the swarmer cell nucleoid, since mutations in either smc or dps, two genes encoding proteins that condense DNA, did not alter the temporal pattern of gyrB transcription in strains containing deletions in either

  11. Cold shock genes cspA and cspB from Caulobacter crescentus are posttranscriptionally regulated and important for cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzon, Ricardo R; Lang, Elza A S; Silva, Carolina A P T; Marques, Marilis V

    2012-12-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSPs) are nucleic acid binding chaperones, first described as being induced to solve the problem of mRNA stabilization after temperature downshift. Caulobacter crescentus has four CSPs: CspA and CspB, which are cold induced, and CspC and CspD, which are induced only in stationary phase. In this work we have determined that the synthesis of both CspA and CspB reaches the maximum levels early in the acclimation phase. The deletion of cspA causes a decrease in growth at low temperature, whereas the strain with a deletion of cspB has a very subtle and transient cold-related growth phenotype. The cspA cspB double mutant has a slightly more severe phenotype than that of the cspA mutant, suggesting that although CspA may be more important to cold adaptation than CspB, both proteins have a role in this process. Gene expression analyses were carried out using cspA and cspB regulatory fusions to the lacZ reporter gene and showed that both genes are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Deletion mapping of the long 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of each gene identified a common region important for cold induction, probably via translation enhancement. In contrast to what was reported for other bacteria, these cold shock genes have no regulatory regions downstream from ATG that are important for cold induction. This work shows that the importance of CspA and CspB to C. crescentus cold adaptation, mechanisms of regulation, and pattern of expression during the acclimation phase apparently differs in many aspects from what has been described so far for other bacteria.

  12. Rapid in vitro assembly of Caulobacter crescentus FtsZ protein at pH 6.5 and 7.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Sara L; Erickson, Harold P

    2013-08-16

    FtsZ from most bacteria assembles rapidly in vitro, reaching a steady-state plateau in 5-10 s after addition of GTP. A recent study used a novel dynamic light-scattering technique to assay the assembly of FtsZ from Caulobacter crescentus (CcFtsZ) and reported that assembly required 10 min, ∼100 times slower than for related bacteria. Previous studies had indicated normal, rapid assembly of CcFtsZ. We have reinvestigated the assembly kinetics using a mutant L72W, where assembly of subunits into protofilaments results in a significant increase in tryptophan fluorescence. We found that assembly reached a plateau in 5-10 s and showed no change in the following 10 min. This was confirmed by 90° light scattering and negative-stain electron microscopy. The very slow kinetics in the dynamic light-scattering study may be related to a refractory state induced when the FtsZ protein is stored without nucleotide, a phenomenon that we had observed in a previous study of EcFtsZ. We conclude that CcFtsZ is not an outlier, but shows rapid assembly kinetics similar to FtsZ from related bacteria.

  13. Cloning and expression of the xynA1 gene encoding a xylanase of the GH10 group in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciano, Luciana; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Vieira, Fabíola Giovanna Nesello; Bosetto, Adilson; Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2015-04-01

    Caulobacter crescentus (NA1000 strain) are aquatic bacteria that can live in environments of low nutritional quality and present numerous genes that encode enzymes involved in plant cell wall deconstruction, including five genes for β-xylosidases (xynB1-xynB5) and three genes for xylanases (xynA1-xynA3). The overall activity of xylanases in the presence of different agro-industrial residues was evaluated, and it was found that the residues from the processing of corn were the most efficient in inducing bacterial xylanases. The xynA1 gene (CCNA_02894) encoding a predicted xylanase of group 10 of glyco-hydrolases (GH10) that was efficiently overexpressed in Escherichia coli LMG194 using 0.02 % arabinose, after cloning into the vector pJet1.2blunt and subcloning into the expression vector pBAD/gIII, provided a fusion protein that contained carboxy-terminal His-tags, named XynA1. The characterization of pure XynA1 showed an enzymatic activity of 18.26 U mL(-1) and a specific activity of 2.22 U mg-(1) in the presence of xylan from beechwood as a substrate. XynA1 activity was inhibited by EDTA and metal ions such as Cu(2+) and Mg(2+). By contrast, β-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol (DTT), and Ca(2+) induced recombinant enzyme activity. Kinetic data for XynA1 revealed K M and V max values of 3.77 mg mL-(1) and 10.20 μM min-(1), respectively. Finally, the enzyme presented an optimum pH of 6 and an optimum temperature of 50 °C. In addition, 80 % of the activity of XynA1 was maintained at 50 °C for 4 h of incubation, suggesting a thermal stability for the biotechnological processes. This work is the first study concerning the cloning, overexpression, and enzymatic characterization of C. crescentus xylanase. PMID:25791579

  14. Analysis of the xynB5 gene encoding a multifunctional GH3-BglX β-glucosidase-β-xylosidase-α-arabinosidase member in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justo, Priscila Innocenti; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Maller, Alexandre; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; da Conceição-Silva, José Luis; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2015-10-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus (NA1000) xynB5 gene (CCNA_03149) encodes a predicted β-glucosidase-β-xylosidase enzyme that was amplified by polymerase chain reaction; the product was cloned into the blunt ends of the pJet1.2 plasmid. Analysis of the protein sequence indicated the presence of conserved glycosyl hydrolase 3 (GH3), β-glucosidase-related glycosidase (BglX) and fibronectin type III-like domains. After verifying its identity by DNA sequencing, the xynB5 gene was linked to an amino-terminal His-tag using the pTrcHisA vector. A recombinant protein (95 kDa) was successfully overexpressed from the xynB5 gene in E. coli Top 10 and purified using pre-packed nickel-Sepharose columns. The purified protein (BglX-V-Ara) demonstrated multifunctional activities in the presence of different substrates for β-glucosidase (pNPG: p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucoside) β-xylosidase (pNPX: p-nitrophenyl-β-D-xyloside) and α-arabinosidase (pNPA: p-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinosidase). BglX-V-Ara presented an optimal pH of 6 for all substrates and optimal temperature of 50 °C for β-glucosidase and α-L-arabinosidase and 60 °C for β-xylosidase. BglX-V-Ara predominantly presented β-glucosidase activity, with the highest affinity for its substrate and catalytic efficiency (Km 0.24 ± 0.0005 mM, Vmax 0.041 ± 0.002 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.27 mM(-1) s(-1)), followed by β-xylosidase (Km 0.64 ± 0.032 mM, Vmax 0.055 ± 0.002 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.14 mM(-1)s(-1)) and finally α-L-arabinosidase (Km 1.45 ± 0.05 mM, Vmax 0.091 ± 0.0004 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.1 mM(-1) s(-1)). To date, this is the first report to demonstrate the characterization of a GH3-BglX family member in C. crescentus that may have applications in biotechnological processes (i.e., the simultaneous saccharification process) because the multifunctional enzyme could play an important role in bacterial hemicellulose degradation. PMID:26264062

  15. Analysis of the xynB5 gene encoding a multifunctional GH3-BglX β-glucosidase-β-xylosidase-α-arabinosidase member in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justo, Priscila Innocenti; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Maller, Alexandre; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; da Conceição-Silva, José Luis; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2015-10-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus (NA1000) xynB5 gene (CCNA_03149) encodes a predicted β-glucosidase-β-xylosidase enzyme that was amplified by polymerase chain reaction; the product was cloned into the blunt ends of the pJet1.2 plasmid. Analysis of the protein sequence indicated the presence of conserved glycosyl hydrolase 3 (GH3), β-glucosidase-related glycosidase (BglX) and fibronectin type III-like domains. After verifying its identity by DNA sequencing, the xynB5 gene was linked to an amino-terminal His-tag using the pTrcHisA vector. A recombinant protein (95 kDa) was successfully overexpressed from the xynB5 gene in E. coli Top 10 and purified using pre-packed nickel-Sepharose columns. The purified protein (BglX-V-Ara) demonstrated multifunctional activities in the presence of different substrates for β-glucosidase (pNPG: p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucoside) β-xylosidase (pNPX: p-nitrophenyl-β-D-xyloside) and α-arabinosidase (pNPA: p-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinosidase). BglX-V-Ara presented an optimal pH of 6 for all substrates and optimal temperature of 50 °C for β-glucosidase and α-L-arabinosidase and 60 °C for β-xylosidase. BglX-V-Ara predominantly presented β-glucosidase activity, with the highest affinity for its substrate and catalytic efficiency (Km 0.24 ± 0.0005 mM, Vmax 0.041 ± 0.002 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.27 mM(-1) s(-1)), followed by β-xylosidase (Km 0.64 ± 0.032 mM, Vmax 0.055 ± 0.002 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.14 mM(-1)s(-1)) and finally α-L-arabinosidase (Km 1.45 ± 0.05 mM, Vmax 0.091 ± 0.0004 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.1 mM(-1) s(-1)). To date, this is the first report to demonstrate the characterization of a GH3-BglX family member in C. crescentus that may have applications in biotechnological processes (i.e., the simultaneous saccharification process) because the multifunctional enzyme could play an important role in bacterial hemicellulose degradation.

  16. Cloning and expression of the xynA1 gene encoding a xylanase of the GH10 group in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciano, Luciana; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Vieira, Fabíola Giovanna Nesello; Bosetto, Adilson; Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2015-04-01

    Caulobacter crescentus (NA1000 strain) are aquatic bacteria that can live in environments of low nutritional quality and present numerous genes that encode enzymes involved in plant cell wall deconstruction, including five genes for β-xylosidases (xynB1-xynB5) and three genes for xylanases (xynA1-xynA3). The overall activity of xylanases in the presence of different agro-industrial residues was evaluated, and it was found that the residues from the processing of corn were the most efficient in inducing bacterial xylanases. The xynA1 gene (CCNA_02894) encoding a predicted xylanase of group 10 of glyco-hydrolases (GH10) that was efficiently overexpressed in Escherichia coli LMG194 using 0.02 % arabinose, after cloning into the vector pJet1.2blunt and subcloning into the expression vector pBAD/gIII, provided a fusion protein that contained carboxy-terminal His-tags, named XynA1. The characterization of pure XynA1 showed an enzymatic activity of 18.26 U mL(-1) and a specific activity of 2.22 U mg-(1) in the presence of xylan from beechwood as a substrate. XynA1 activity was inhibited by EDTA and metal ions such as Cu(2+) and Mg(2+). By contrast, β-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol (DTT), and Ca(2+) induced recombinant enzyme activity. Kinetic data for XynA1 revealed K M and V max values of 3.77 mg mL-(1) and 10.20 μM min-(1), respectively. Finally, the enzyme presented an optimum pH of 6 and an optimum temperature of 50 °C. In addition, 80 % of the activity of XynA1 was maintained at 50 °C for 4 h of incubation, suggesting a thermal stability for the biotechnological processes. This work is the first study concerning the cloning, overexpression, and enzymatic characterization of C. crescentus xylanase.

  17. Dynamical Localization of DivL and PleC in the Asymmetric Division Cycle of Caulobacter crescentus: A Theoretical Investigation of Alternative Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kartik; Paul, Mark R; Tyson, John J

    2015-07-01

    Cell-fate asymmetry in the predivisional cell of Caulobacter crescentus requires that the regulatory protein DivL localizes to the new pole of the cell where it up-regulates CckA kinase, resulting in a gradient of CtrA~P across the cell. In the preceding stage of the cell cycle (the "stalked" cell), DivL is localized uniformly along the cell membrane and maintained in an inactive form by DivK~P. It is unclear how DivL overcomes inhibition by DivK~P in the predivisional cell simply by changing its location to the new pole. It has been suggested that co-localization of DivL with PleC phosphatase at the new pole is essential to DivL's activity there. However, there are contrasting views on whether the bifunctional enzyme, PleC, acts as a kinase or phosphatase at the new pole. To explore these ambiguities, we formulated a mathematical model of the spatiotemporal distributions of DivL, PleC and associated proteins (DivJ, DivK, CckA, and CtrA) during the asymmetric division cycle of a Caulobacter cell. By varying localization profiles of DivL and PleC in our model, we show how the physiologically observed spatial distributions of these proteins are essential for the transition from a stalked cell to a predivisional cell. Our simulations suggest that PleC is a kinase in predivisional cells, and that, by sequestering DivK~P, the kinase form of PleC enables DivL to be reactivated at the new pole. Hence, co-localization of PleC kinase and DivL is essential to establishing cellular asymmetry. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally observed spatial distribution and phosphorylation status of CtrA in wild-type and mutant cells. Based on the model, we explore novel combinations of mutant alleles, making predictions that can be tested experimentally.

  18. Dynamical Localization of DivL and PleC in the Asymmetric Division Cycle of Caulobacter crescentus: A Theoretical Investigation of Alternative Models.

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    Kartik Subramanian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell-fate asymmetry in the predivisional cell of Caulobacter crescentus requires that the regulatory protein DivL localizes to the new pole of the cell where it up-regulates CckA kinase, resulting in a gradient of CtrA~P across the cell. In the preceding stage of the cell cycle (the "stalked" cell, DivL is localized uniformly along the cell membrane and maintained in an inactive form by DivK~P. It is unclear how DivL overcomes inhibition by DivK~P in the predivisional cell simply by changing its location to the new pole. It has been suggested that co-localization of DivL with PleC phosphatase at the new pole is essential to DivL's activity there. However, there are contrasting views on whether the bifunctional enzyme, PleC, acts as a kinase or phosphatase at the new pole. To explore these ambiguities, we formulated a mathematical model of the spatiotemporal distributions of DivL, PleC and associated proteins (DivJ, DivK, CckA, and CtrA during the asymmetric division cycle of a Caulobacter cell. By varying localization profiles of DivL and PleC in our model, we show how the physiologically observed spatial distributions of these proteins are essential for the transition from a stalked cell to a predivisional cell. Our simulations suggest that PleC is a kinase in predivisional cells, and that, by sequestering DivK~P, the kinase form of PleC enables DivL to be reactivated at the new pole. Hence, co-localization of PleC kinase and DivL is essential to establishing cellular asymmetry. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally observed spatial distribution and phosphorylation status of CtrA in wild-type and mutant cells. Based on the model, we explore novel combinations of mutant alleles, making predictions that can be tested experimentally.

  19. Localization of the outer membrane protein OmpA2 in Caulobacter crescentus depends on the position of the gene in the chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginez, Luis David; Osorio, Aurora; Poggio, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is an essential structure involved in nutrient uptake, protection against harmful substances, and cell growth. Different proteins keep the outer membrane from blebbing out by simultaneously interacting with it and with the cell wall. These proteins have been mainly studied in enterobacteria, where OmpA and the Braun and Pal lipoproteins stabilize the outer membrane. Some degree of functional redundancy exists between these proteins, since none of them is essential but the absence of two of them results in a severe phenotype. Caulobacter crescentus has a different strategy to maintain its outer membrane, since it lacks the Braun lipoprotein and Pal is essential. In this work, we characterized OmpA2, an OmpA-like protein, in this bacterium. Our results showed that this protein is required for normal stalk growth and that it plays a minor role in the stability of the outer membrane. An OmpA2 fluorescent fusion protein showed that the concentration of this protein decreases from the stalk to the new pole. This localization pattern is important for its function, and it depends on the position of the gene locus in the chromosome and, as a consequence, in the cell. This result suggests that little diffusion occurs from the moment that the gene is transcribed until the mature protein attaches to the cell wall in the periplasm. This mechanism reveals the integration of different levels of information from protein function down to genome arrangement that allows the cell to self-organize.

  20. DNA binding of the cell cycle transcriptional regulator GcrA depends on N6-adenosine methylation in Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Fumeaux, Coralie; Mohapatra, Saswat S; Bompard, Coralie; Brilli, Matteo; Frandi, Antonio; Castric, Vincent; Villeret, Vincent; Viollier, Patrick H; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2013-05-01

    Several regulators are involved in the control of cell cycle progression in the bacterial model system Caulobacter crescentus, which divides asymmetrically into a vegetative G1-phase (swarmer) cell and a replicative S-phase (stalked) cell. Here we report a novel functional interaction between the enigmatic cell cycle regulator GcrA and the N6-adenosine methyltransferase CcrM, both highly conserved proteins among Alphaproteobacteria, that are activated early and at the end of S-phase, respectively. As no direct biochemical and regulatory relationship between GcrA and CcrM were known, we used a combination of ChIP (chromatin-immunoprecipitation), biochemical and biophysical experimentation, and genetics to show that GcrA is a dimeric DNA-binding protein that preferentially targets promoters harbouring CcrM methylation sites. After tracing CcrM-dependent N6-methyl-adenosine promoter marks at a genome-wide scale, we show that these marks recruit GcrA in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that, in the presence of a methylated target, GcrA recruits the RNA polymerase to the promoter, consistent with its role in transcriptional activation. Since methylation-dependent DNA binding is also observed with GcrA orthologs from other Alphaproteobacteria, we conclude that GcrA is the founding member of a new and conserved class of transcriptional regulators that function as molecular effectors of a methylation-dependent (non-heritable) epigenetic switch that regulates gene expression during the cell cycle.

  1. DNA binding of the cell cycle transcriptional regulator GcrA depends on N6-adenosine methylation in Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Fioravanti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Several regulators are involved in the control of cell cycle progression in the bacterial model system Caulobacter crescentus, which divides asymmetrically into a vegetative G1-phase (swarmer cell and a replicative S-phase (stalked cell. Here we report a novel functional interaction between the enigmatic cell cycle regulator GcrA and the N6-adenosine methyltransferase CcrM, both highly conserved proteins among Alphaproteobacteria, that are activated early and at the end of S-phase, respectively. As no direct biochemical and regulatory relationship between GcrA and CcrM were known, we used a combination of ChIP (chromatin-immunoprecipitation, biochemical and biophysical experimentation, and genetics to show that GcrA is a dimeric DNA-binding protein that preferentially targets promoters harbouring CcrM methylation sites. After tracing CcrM-dependent N6-methyl-adenosine promoter marks at a genome-wide scale, we show that these marks recruit GcrA in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that, in the presence of a methylated target, GcrA recruits the RNA polymerase to the promoter, consistent with its role in transcriptional activation. Since methylation-dependent DNA binding is also observed with GcrA orthologs from other Alphaproteobacteria, we conclude that GcrA is the founding member of a new and conserved class of transcriptional regulators that function as molecular effectors of a methylation-dependent (non-heritable epigenetic switch that regulates gene expression during the cell cycle.

  2. A dynamic complex of signaling proteins uses polar localization to regulate cell-fate asymmetry in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokos, Christos G; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2011-03-15

    Cellular asymmetry is critical to metazoan development and the life cycle of many microbes. In Caulobacter, cell cycle progression and the formation of asymmetric daughter cells depend on the polarly-localized histidine kinase CckA. How CckA is regulated and why activity depends on localization are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the unorthodox kinase DivL promotes CckA activity and that the phosphorylated regulator DivK inhibits CckA by binding to DivL. Early in the cell cycle, CckA is activated by the dephosphorylation of DivK throughout the cell. However, in later stages, when phosphorylated DivK levels are high, CckA activation relies on polar localization with a DivK phosphatase. Localization thus creates a protected zone for CckA within the cell, without the use of membrane-enclosed compartments. Our results reveal the mechanisms by which CckA is regulated in a cell-type-dependent manner. More generally, our findings reveal how cells exploit subcellular localization to orchestrate sophisticated regulatory processes.

  3. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of an l-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii and a d-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mubinur; Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu; Rouvinen, Juha; Hakulinen, Nina

    2016-01-01

    l-Arabinonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.25) and d-xylonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.82) are two enzymes that are involved in a nonphosphorylative oxidation pathway of pentose sugars. l-Arabinonate dehydratase converts l-arabinonate into 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-l-arabinonate, and d-xylonate dehydratase catalyzes the dehydration of d-xylonate to 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-d-xylonate. l-Arabinonate and d-xylonate dehydratases belong to the IlvD/EDD family, together with 6-phosphogluconate dehydratases and dihydroxyacid dehydratases. No crystal structure of any l-arabinonate or d-xylonate dehydratase is available in the PDB. In this study, recombinant l-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (RlArDHT) and d-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus (CcXyDHT) were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by the use of affinity chromatography followed by gel-filtration chromatography. The purified proteins were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. Crystals of RlArDHT that diffracted to 2.40 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate as a precipitating agent. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.07, b = 208.61, c = 147.09 Å, β = 90.43°. Eight RlArDHT molecules (two tetramers) in the asymmetric unit give a V M value of 3.2 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 62%. Crystals of CcXyDHT that diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate and polyethylene glycol 3350. They belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 270.42, b = 236.13, c = 65.17 Å, β = 97.38°. Four CcXyDHT molecules (a tetramer) in the asymmetric unit give a V M value of 4.0 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 69%. PMID:27487924

  4. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of an L-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii and a D-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mubinur; Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu; Rouvinen, Juha; Hakulinen, Nina

    2016-08-01

    L-Arabinonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.25) and D-xylonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.82) are two enzymes that are involved in a nonphosphorylative oxidation pathway of pentose sugars. L-Arabinonate dehydratase converts L-arabinonate into 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-L-arabinonate, and D-xylonate dehydratase catalyzes the dehydration of D-xylonate to 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-D-xylonate. L-Arabinonate and D-xylonate dehydratases belong to the IlvD/EDD family, together with 6-phosphogluconate dehydratases and dihydroxyacid dehydratases. No crystal structure of any L-arabinonate or D-xylonate dehydratase is available in the PDB. In this study, recombinant L-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (RlArDHT) and D-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus (CcXyDHT) were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by the use of affinity chromatography followed by gel-filtration chromatography. The purified proteins were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. Crystals of RlArDHT that diffracted to 2.40 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate as a precipitating agent. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.07, b = 208.61, c = 147.09 Å, β = 90.43°. Eight RlArDHT molecules (two tetramers) in the asymmetric unit give a VM value of 3.2 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 62%. Crystals of CcXyDHT that diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate and polyethylene glycol 3350. They belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 270.42, b = 236.13, c = 65.17 Å, β = 97.38°. Four CcXyDHT molecules (a tetramer) in the asymmetric unit give a VM value of 4.0 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 69%.

  5. The Caulobacter crescentus ctrA P1 promoter is essential for the coordination of cell cycle events that prevent the overinitiation of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredl, Alexander T; Perez Mora, Yannet G; Herrera, Anabel; Cuajungco, Math P; Murray, Sean R

    2012-10-01

    The master regulator CtrA oscillates during the Caulobacter cell cycle due to temporally regulated proteolysis and transcription. It is proteolysed during the G1-S transition and reaccumulates in predivisional cells as a result of transcription from two sequentially activated promoters, P1 and P2. CtrA reinforces its own synthesis by directly mediating the activation of P2 concurrently with repression of P1. To explore the role of P1 in cell cycle control, we engineered a mutation into the native ctrA locus that prevents transcription from P1 but not P2. As expected, the ctrA P1 mutant exhibits striking growth, morphological and DNA replication defects. Unexpectedly, we found CtrA and its antagonist SciP, but not DnaA, GcrA or CcrM accumulation to be dramatically reduced in the ctrA P1 mutant. SciP levels closely paralleled CtrA accumulation, suggesting that CtrA acts as a rheostat to modulate SciP abundance. Furthermore, the reappearance of CtrA and CcrM in predivisional cells was delayed in the P1 mutant by 0.125 cell cycle unit in synchronized cultures. High levels of ccrM transcription despite low levels of CtrA and increased transcription of ctrA P2 in the ctrA P1 mutant are two examples of robustness in the cell cycle. Thus, Caulobacter can adjust regulatory pathways to partially compensate for reduced and delayed CtrA accumulation in the ctrA P1 mutant.

  6. Caulobacter chromosome in vivo configuration matches model predictions for a supercoiled polymer in a cell-like confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Sun-Hae; Toro, Esteban; Mortensen, Kim;

    2013-01-01

    We measured the distance between fluorescent-labeled DNA loci of various interloci contour lengths in Caulobacter crescentus swarmer cells to determine the in vivo configuration of the chromosome. For DNA segments less than about 300 kb, the mean interloci distances, 〈r〉, scale as n0.22, where n...

  7. Motion of single MreB bacterial actin proteins in Caulobacter show treadmilling in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E.; Kim, Soyeon; Gitai, Zemer; Kinkhabwala, Anika; McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucy

    2006-03-01

    Ensemble imaging of a bacterial actin homologue, the MreB protein, suggests that the MreB proteins form a dynamic filamentous spiral along the long axis of the cell in Caulobacter crescentus. MreB contracts and expands along the cell axis and plays an important role in cell shape and polarity maintenance, as well as chromosome segregation and translocation of the origin of replication during cell division. In this study we investigated the real-time polymerization of MreB in Caulobacter crescentus using single-molecule fluorescence imaging. With time-lapse imaging, polymerized MreB could be distinguished from cytoplasmic MreB monomers, because single monomeric MreB showed fast motion characteristic of Brownian diffusion, while single polymerized MreB displayed slow, directed motion. This directional movement of labeled MreB in the growing polymer implies that treadmilling is the predominant mechanism in MreB filament formation. These single-molecule imaging experiments provide the first available information on the velocity of bacterial actin polymerization in a living cell.

  8. Depletion of the xynB2 gene upregulates β-xylosidase expression in C. crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Mingori, Moara Rodrigues; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Seixas, Flávio Augusto Vicente; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is able to express several enzymes involved in the utilization of lignocellulosic biomasses. Five genes, xynB1-5, that encode β-xylosidases are present in the genome of this bacterium. In this study, the xynB2 gene, which encodes β-xylosidase II (CCNA_02442), was cloned under the control of the PxylX promoter to generate the O-xynB2 strain, which overexpresses the enzyme in the presence of xylose. In addition, a null mutant strain, Δ-xynB2, was created by two homologous recombination events where the chromosomal xynB2 gene was replaced by a copy that was disrupted by the spectinomycin-resistant cassette. We demonstrated that C. crescentus cells lacking β-xylosidase II upregulates the xynB genes inducing β-xylosidase activity. Transcriptional analysis revealed that xynB1 (RT-PCR analysis) and xynB2 (lacZ transcription fusion) gene expression was induced in the Δ-xynB2 cells, and high β-xylosidase activity was observed in the presence of different agro-industrial residues in the null mutant strain, a characteristic that can be explored and applied in biotechnological processes. In contrast, overexpression of the xynB2 gene caused downregulation of the expression and activity of the β-xylosidase. For example, the β-xylosidase activity that was obtained in the presence of sugarcane bagasse was 7-fold and 16-fold higher than the activity measured in the C. crescentus parental and O-xynB2 cells, respectively. Our results suggest that β-xylosidase II may have a role in controlling the expression of the xynB1 and xynB2 genes in C. crescentus. PMID:24142353

  9. Depletion of the xynB2 gene upregulates β-xylosidase expression in C. crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Mingori, Moara Rodrigues; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Seixas, Flávio Augusto Vicente; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is able to express several enzymes involved in the utilization of lignocellulosic biomasses. Five genes, xynB1-5, that encode β-xylosidases are present in the genome of this bacterium. In this study, the xynB2 gene, which encodes β-xylosidase II (CCNA_02442), was cloned under the control of the PxylX promoter to generate the O-xynB2 strain, which overexpresses the enzyme in the presence of xylose. In addition, a null mutant strain, Δ-xynB2, was created by two homologous recombination events where the chromosomal xynB2 gene was replaced by a copy that was disrupted by the spectinomycin-resistant cassette. We demonstrated that C. crescentus cells lacking β-xylosidase II upregulates the xynB genes inducing β-xylosidase activity. Transcriptional analysis revealed that xynB1 (RT-PCR analysis) and xynB2 (lacZ transcription fusion) gene expression was induced in the Δ-xynB2 cells, and high β-xylosidase activity was observed in the presence of different agro-industrial residues in the null mutant strain, a characteristic that can be explored and applied in biotechnological processes. In contrast, overexpression of the xynB2 gene caused downregulation of the expression and activity of the β-xylosidase. For example, the β-xylosidase activity that was obtained in the presence of sugarcane bagasse was 7-fold and 16-fold higher than the activity measured in the C. crescentus parental and O-xynB2 cells, respectively. Our results suggest that β-xylosidase II may have a role in controlling the expression of the xynB1 and xynB2 genes in C. crescentus.

  10. New criteria for selecting the origin of DNA replication in Wolbachia and closely related bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C; Sapountzis, Panagiotis;

    2007-01-01

    as their patterns of sequence evolution will aid studies of cell replication and cell density, as well as the potential genetic manipulation of these widespread intracellular bacteria. RESULTS: Using features that have been previously experimentally verified in the alpha-Proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus......BACKGROUND: The annotated genomes of two closely related strains of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis have been reported without the identifications of the putative origin of replication (ori). Identifying the ori of these bacteria and related alpha-Proteobacteria as well......, the origin of DNA replication (ori) regions were identified in silico for Wolbachia strains and eleven other related bacteria belonging to Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, and Rickettsia genera. These features include DnaA-, CtrA- and IHF-binding sites as well as the flanking genes in C. crescentus. The Wolbachia ori...

  11. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2005-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

  12. Isolation and characterization of Caulobacter mutants impaired in adaptation to stationary phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italiani Valéria C. S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The entry into stationary phase causes a change in the pattern of gene expression of bacteria, when the cells must express a whole set of genes involved mainly with resistance to starvation and to environmental stresses. As an attempt to identify genes important for the survival of Caulobacter crescentus in stationary phase, we have screened a library of 5,000 clones generated by random transposon mutagenesis for mutants that showed reduced viability after prolonged growth. Four clones were selected, which displayed either lower viability or a longer time of recovery from stationary phase. The genes disrupted were identified, and the gene products were found to be mainly involved with amino acid metabolism (glutamate N-acetyltransferase, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase and L-aspartate oxidase or with recombination (exonuclease RecJ. Each mutant was tested for resistance to stresses, such as oxidative, saline, acidic, heat and UV exposure, showing different responses. Although the mutations obtained were not in genes involved specifically in stationary phase, our results suggest that amino acids metabolism may play an important role in keeping viability during this growth phase.

  13. Report of the first human case of Caulobacter sp. infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik S; Holt, Hanne M; Thiesson, Helle;

    2007-01-01

    A Caulobacter sp. isolate was recovered from the dialysis fluid of a patient undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Bacterial identification included electron microscopy and 16S rDNA sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of human Caulobacter infection. Special growth requirements suggest...

  14. Bi-modal distribution of the second messenger c-di-GMP controls cell fate and asymmetry during the caulobacter cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sören Abel

    Full Text Available Many bacteria mediate important life-style decisions by varying levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP. Behavioral transitions result from the coordination of complex cellular processes such as motility, surface adherence or the production of virulence factors and toxins. While the regulatory mechanisms responsible for these processes have been elucidated in some cases, the global pleiotropic effects of c-di-GMP are poorly understood, primarily because c-di-GMP networks are inherently complex in most bacteria. Moreover, the quantitative relationships between cellular c-di-GMP levels and c-di-GMP dependent phenotypes are largely unknown. Here, we dissect the c-di-GMP network of Caulobacter crescentus to establish a global and quantitative view of c-di-GMP dependent processes in this organism. A genetic approach that gradually reduced the number of diguanylate cyclases identified novel c-di-GMP dependent cellular processes and unraveled c-di-GMP as an essential component of C. crescentus cell polarity and its bimodal life cycle. By varying cellular c-di-GMP concentrations, we determined dose response curves for individual c-di-GMP-dependent processes. Relating these values to c-di-GMP levels modeled for single cells progressing through the cell cycle sets a quantitative frame for the successive activation of c-di-GMP dependent processes during the C. crescentus life cycle. By reconstructing a simplified c-di-GMP network in a strain devoid of c-di-GMP we defined the minimal requirements for the oscillation of c-di-GMP levels during the C. crescentus cell cycle. Finally, we show that although all c-di-GMP dependent cellular processes were qualitatively restored by artificially adjusting c-di-GMP levels with a heterologous diguanylate cyclase, much higher levels of the second messenger are required under these conditions as compared to the contribution of homologous c-di-GMP metabolizing enzymes. These experiments suggest that a common c-di-GMP pool

  15. Genetic and computational identification of a conserved bacterial metabolic module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara C Boutte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We have experimentally and computationally defined a set of genes that form a conserved metabolic module in the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus and used this module to illustrate a schema for the propagation of pathway-level annotation across bacterial genera. Applying comprehensive forward and reverse genetic methods and genome-wide transcriptional analysis, we (1 confirmed the presence of genes involved in catabolism of the abundant environmental sugar myo-inositol, (2 defined an operon encoding an ABC-family myo-inositol transmembrane transporter, and (3 identified a novel myo-inositol regulator protein and cis-acting regulatory motif that control expression of genes in this metabolic module. Despite being encoded from non-contiguous loci on the C. crescentus chromosome, these myo-inositol catabolic enzymes and transporter proteins form a tightly linked functional group in a computationally inferred network of protein associations. Primary sequence comparison was not sufficient to confidently extend annotation of all components of this novel metabolic module to related bacterial genera. Consequently, we implemented the Graemlin multiple-network alignment algorithm to generate cross-species predictions of genes involved in myo-inositol transport and catabolism in other alpha-proteobacteria. Although the chromosomal organization of genes in this functional module varied between species, the upstream regions of genes in this aligned network were enriched for the same palindromic cis-regulatory motif identified experimentally in C. crescentus. Transposon disruption of the operon encoding the computationally predicted ABC myo-inositol transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti abolished growth on myo-inositol as the sole carbon source, confirming our cross-genera functional prediction. Thus, we have defined regulatory, transport, and catabolic genes and a cis-acting regulatory sequence that form a conserved module required for myo

  16. Función de la proteína CdnL en las bacterias Myxococcus xanthus y Caulobacter crescentus

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego García, Aranzazu

    2015-01-01

    La proteína CarD es un regulador transcripcional de acción global en la bacteria Myxococcus xanthus, que se requiere para la actividad de varios factores σ-ECF (extracytoplasmatic function). CarD presenta una arquitectura de dominios única, con un dominio C-terminal de unión al DNA similar a las proteínas eucarióticas HMGA (high-mobility group A), y un dominio N-terminal, típicamente bacteriano, que define a la familia de proteínas PF02559. Dicha familia incluye el dominio de interacción con ...

  17. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively chemolithoautotrophic and methylotrophic alpha Proteobacterium Starkeya novella type strain (ATCC 8093T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappler, Ulrike [University of Queensland, The, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Beatson, Scott [University of Queensland, The, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Berry, Kerrie W. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2012-01-01

    Starkeya novella (Starkey 1934) Kelly et al. 2000 is a member of the family Xanthobacteraceae in the order Rhizobiales , which is thus far poorly characterized at the genome level. Cultures from this spe- cies are most interesting due to their facultatively chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, which allows them to both consume carbon dioxide and to produce it. This feature makes S. novella an interesting model or- ganism for studying the genomic basis of regulatory networks required for the switch between con- sumption and production of carbon dioxide, a key component of the global carbon cycle. In addition, S. novella is of interest for its ability to grow on various inorganic sulfur compounds and several C1- compounds such as methanol. Besides Azorhizobium caulinodans, S. novella is only the second spe- cies in the family Xanthobacteraceae with a completely sequenced genome of a type strain. The cur- rent taxonomic classification of this group is in significant conflict with the 16S rRNA data. The ge- nomic data indicate that the physiological capabilities of the organism might have been underestimat- ed. The 4,765,023 bp long chromosome with its 4,511 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes was se- quenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008.

  18. Genome Sequence of Selenium-Solubilizing Bacterium Caulobacter vibrioides T5M6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yihua; Qin, Yanan; Kot, Witold;

    2016-01-01

    Caulobacter vibrioides T5M6 is a Gram-negative strain that strongly solubilizes selenium (Se) mineral into Se(IV) and was isolated from a selenium mining area in Enshi, southwest China. This strain produces the phytohormone IAA and promotes plant growth. Here we present the genome of this strain ...

  19. New criteria for selecting the origin of DNA replication in Wolbachia and closely related bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldo Laura

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The annotated genomes of two closely related strains of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis have been reported without the identifications of the putative origin of replication (ori. Identifying the ori of these bacteria and related alpha-Proteobacteria as well as their patterns of sequence evolution will aid studies of cell replication and cell density, as well as the potential genetic manipulation of these widespread intracellular bacteria. Results Using features that have been previously experimentally verified in the alpha-Proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the origin of DNA replication (ori regions were identified in silico for Wolbachia strains and eleven other related bacteria belonging to Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, and Rickettsia genera. These features include DnaA-, CtrA- and IHF-binding sites as well as the flanking genes in C. crescentus. The Wolbachia ori boundary genes were found to be hemE and COG1253 protein (CBS domain protein. Comparisons of the putative ori region among related Wolbachia strains showed higher conservation of bases within binding sites. Conclusion The sequences of the ori regions described here are only similar among closely related bacteria while fundamental characteristics like presence of DnaA and IHF binding sites as well as the boundary genes are more widely conserved. The relative paucity of CtrA binding sites in the ori regions, as well as the absence of key enzymes associated with DNA replication in the respective genomes, suggest that several of these obligate intracellular bacteria may have altered replication mechanisms. Based on these analyses, criteria are set forth for identifying the ori region in genome sequencing projects.

  20. Quantification of ploidy in proteobacteria revealed the existence of monoploid, (mero-oligoploid and polyploid species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Pecoraro

    Full Text Available Bacteria are generally assumed to be monoploid (haploid. This assumption is mainly based on generalization of the results obtained with the most intensely studied model bacterium, Escherichia coli (a gamma-proteobacterium, which is monoploid during very slow growth. However, several species of proteobacteria are oligo- or polyploid, respectively. To get a better overview of the distribution of ploidy levels, genome copy numbers were quantified in four species of three different groups of proteobacteria. A recently developed Real Time PCR approach, which had been used to determine the ploidy levels of halophilic archaea, was optimized for the quantification of genome copy numbers of bacteria. Slow-growing (doubling time 103 minutes and fast-growing (doubling time 25 minutes E. coli cultures were used as a positive control. The copy numbers of the origin and terminus region of the chromosome were determined and the results were in excellent agreement with published data. The approach was also used to determine the ploidy levels of Caulobacter crescentus (an alpha-proteobacterium and Wolinella succinogenes (an epsilon-proteobacterium, both of which are monoploid. In contrast, Pseudomonas putida (a gamma-proteobacterium contains 20 genome copies and is thus polyploid. A survey of the proteobacteria with experimentally-determined genome copy numbers revealed that only three to four of 11 species are monoploid and thus monoploidy is not typical for proteobacteria. The ploidy level is not conserved within the groups of proteobacteria, and there are no obvious correlations between the ploidy levels with other parameters like genome size, optimal growth temperature or mode of life.

  1. A prevalent alpha-proteobacterium Paracoccus sp. in a population of the Cayenne ticks (Amblyomma cajennense from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Machado-Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is the most common tick-borne disease in South America, the presence of Rickettsia sp. in Amblyomma ticks is a possible indication of its endemicity in certain geographic regions. In the present work, bacterial DNA sequences related to Rickettsia amblyommii genes in A. dubitatum ticks, collected in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso, were discovered. Simultaneously, Paracoccus sp. was detected in aproximately 77% of A. cajennense specimens collected in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This is the first report of Paracoccus sp. infection in a specific tick population, and raises the possibility of these bacteria being maintained and/or transmitted by ticks. Whether Paracoccus sp. represents another group of pathogenic Rhodobacteraceae or simply plays a role in A. cajennense physiology, is unknown. The data also demonstrate that the rickettsial 16S rRNA specific primers used forRickettsia spp. screening can also detect Paracoccus alpha-proteobacteria infection in biological samples. Hence, a PCRRFLP strategy is presented to distinguish between these two groups of bacteria.

  2. 基于新月柄杆菌RsaA外运机制的EspA及EspA-IL-24融合蛋白胞外分泌表达研究%Study on Extracellular Expression of EspA and EspA-IL-24 Proteins in Escherichia coli Following RsaA Exportation Mechanism of Caulobacter crescentus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁亚蕾; 周立雄; 毛旭虎; 张卫军; 程琰; 余抒; 邹全明

    2008-01-01

    目的:实现大肠杆菌分泌蛋白(Esp)A及EspA与白细胞介素(IL)-24融合蛋白的胞外分泌表达,进一步验证基于新月柄杆菌RsaA外运机制的原核胞外分泌表达载体系统的有效性和通用性,并改造优化该系统.方法:利用分子克隆手段,按RsaA分泌系统操纵子组织方式,将获得的RsaA系统元件编码序列和异源调控序列克隆至pQE30骨架质粒,构建新的胞外分泌表达质粒pQABP2S;以大肠杆菌为宿主菌诱导表达EspA及EspA-IL-24融合蛋白,并通过Western blot检测目标蛋白在培养上清中的表达.结果:获得了新的胞外分泌表达载体pQABP2S;与对照相比,该载体宿主系统培养上清中目标蛋白EspA及EspA-IL-24的表达量明显增加.结论:在大肠杆菌中通过RsaA分泌系统可实现分子大小不同的EspA及EspA-IL-24融合蛋白的特异性分泌表达,进一步证实该分泌表达策略的有效性和通用性;调整调控序列以优化分泌系统的尝试,为此类基因工程技术平台的开发提供了借鉴.

  3. 新月柄杆菌RsaA分泌系统用于大肠杆菌胞外递送重组蛋白的初步研究%Preliminary Study on Exportation of Heterologous Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli Utilizing RsaA Secretion System of Caulobacter crescentus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁亚蕾; 周立雄; 肖斌; 张卫军; 曾浩; 毛旭虎; 邹全明

    2008-01-01

    目的:构建基于新月柄杆菌RsaA外运机制的以大肠杆菌为宿主的原核胞外分泌表达载体系统.方法:利用分子克隆手段,按RsaA分泌系统操纵子组织方式,将RsaA系统外运功能基因配合以异源调控序列克隆至pQE30骨架质粒.以绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)为报告分子、大肠杆菌M15为宿主菌,诱导表达后通过Western Blotting检测培养上清中GFP的表达.结果:获得了与设计完全一致的pQABPS载体,利用该载体系统,在培养上清中报告分子GFP的表达明显增加,且是通过特异的RsaA外运机制被分泌至胞外的,而非渗漏表达或简单的信号肽引导.结论:在大肠杆菌中重现了RsaA分泌系统的外运功能,为该系统在基因工程领域的应用研究打下了良好基础.

  4. Balanced transcription of cell division genes in Bacillus subtilis as revealed by single cell analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, Erik Nico; Veening, Jan-Willem; Stewart, Eric J.; Errington, Jeff; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria is carried out by a set of conserved proteins that all have to function at the correct place and time. A cell cycle-dependent transcriptional programme drives cell division in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus. Whether such a programme exists in the Gram-positive mode

  5. Establishment of oxidative D-xylose metabolism in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnen, J.P.; Winde, J.H.de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative D-xylose catabolic pathway of Caulobacter crescentus, encoded by the xylXABCD operon, was expressed in the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12. This engineered transformant strain was able to grow on D-xylose as a sole carbon source with a biomass yield of 53% (based on g [d

  6. A role for the weak DnaA binding sites in bacterial replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    between species. In the study by Taylor et al. (2011), new and unexpectedly weak DnaA-boxes were identified within the Caulobacter crescentus origin of replication (Cori). The position of weak and stronger DnaA-boxes follows a pattern seen in Escherichia coli oriC. This raises the possibility...

  7. The morphogenetic MreBCD proteins of Escherichia coli form an essential membrane-bound complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gerdes, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    MreB proteins of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Caulobacter crescentus form actin-like cables lying beneath the cell surface. The cables are required to guide longitudinal cell wall synthesis and their absence leads to merodiploid spherical and inflated cells prone to cell lysis. In B...

  8. Cell wall growth during elongation and division : one ring to bind them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The role of the cell division protein FtsZ in bacterial cell wall (CW) synthesis is believed to be restricted to localizing proteins involved in the synthesis of the septal wall. Elsewhere, compelling evidence is provided that in Caulobacter crescentus, FtsZ plays an additional role in CW synthesis

  9. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.;

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure...

  10. Entropy-driven spatial organization of highly confined polymers: Lessons for the bacterial chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Suckjoon; Mulder, Bela

    2006-08-01

    Despite recent progress in visualization experiments, the mechanism underlying chromosome segregation in bacteria still remains elusive. Here we address a basic physical issue associated with bacterial chromosome segregation, namely the spatial organization of highly confined, self-avoiding polymers (of nontrivial topology) in a rod-shaped cell-like geometry. Through computer simulations, we present evidence that, under strong confinement conditions, topologically distinct domains of a polymer complex effectively repel each other to maximize their conformational entropy, suggesting that duplicated circular chromosomes could partition spontaneously. This mechanism not only is able to account for the spatial separation per se but also captures the major features of the spatiotemporal organization of the duplicating chromosomes observed in Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus. bacterial chromosome segregation | Caulobacter crescentus | Escherichia coli | polymer physics

  11. Single-Molecule and Superresolution Imaging in Live Bacteria Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Biteen, Julie S; Moerner, W. E.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule imaging enables biophysical measurements devoid of ensemble averaging, gives enhanced spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit, and permits superresolution reconstructions. Here, single-molecule and superresolution imaging are applied to the study of proteins in live Caulobacter crescentus cells to illustrate the power of these methods in bacterial imaging. Based on these techniques, the diffusion coefficient and dynamics of the histidine protein kinase PleC, the locali...

  12. Spatial complexity and control of a bacterial cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, Justine; Shapiro, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    A major breakthrough in understanding the bacterial cell cycle is the discovery that bacteria exhibit a high degree of intracellular organization. Chromosomal loci and many protein complexes are positioned at particular subcellular sites. In this review, we examine recently discovered control mechanisms that make use of dynamically localized protein complexes to orchestrate the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle. Protein localization, notably of signal transduction proteins, chromosome partiti...

  13. Coordination of division and development influences complex multicellular behavior in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwoo Kim

    Full Text Available The α-Proteobacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens has proteins homologous to known regulators that govern cell division and development in Caulobacter crescentus, many of which are also conserved among diverse α-Proteobacteria. In light of recent work demonstrating similarity between the division cycle of C. crescentus and that of A. tumefaciens, the functional conservation for this presumptive control pathway was examined. In C. crescentus the CtrA response regulator serves as the master regulator of cell cycle progression and cell division. CtrA activity is controlled by an integrated pair of multi-component phosphorelays: PleC/DivJ-DivK and CckA-ChpT-CtrA. Although several of the conserved orthologues appear to be essential in A. tumefaciens, deletions in pleC or divK were isolated and resulted in cell division defects, diminished swimming motility, and a decrease in biofilm formation. A. tumefaciens also has two additional pleC/divJhomologue sensor kinases called pdhS1 and pdhS2, absent in C. crescentus. Deletion of pdhS1 phenocopied the ΔpleC and ΔdivK mutants. Cells lacking pdhS2 morphologically resembled wild-type bacteria, but were decreased in swimming motility and elevated for biofilm formation, suggesting that pdhS2 may serve to regulate the motile to non-motile switch in A. tumefaciens. Genetic analysis suggests that the PleC/DivJ-DivK and CckA-ChpT-CtrA phosphorelays in A. tumefaciens are vertically-integrated, as in C. crescentus. A gain-of-function mutation in CckA (Y674D was identified as a spontaneous suppressor of the ΔpleC motility phenotype. Thus, although the core architecture of the A. tumefaciens pathway resembles that of C. crescentus there are specific differences including additional regulators, divergent pathway architecture, and distinct target functions.

  14. Transcription rate and transcript length drive formation of chromosomal interaction domain boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tung Bk; Laub, Michael T

    2016-07-15

    Chromosomes in all organisms are highly organized and divided into multiple chromosomal interaction domains, or topological domains. Regions of active, high transcription help establish and maintain domain boundaries, but precisely how this occurs remains unclear. Here, using fluorescence microscopy and chromosome conformation capture in conjunction with deep sequencing (Hi-C), we show that in Caulobacter crescentus, both transcription rate and transcript length, independent of concurrent translation, drive the formation of domain boundaries. We find that long, highly expressed genes do not form topological boundaries simply through the inhibition of supercoil diffusion. Instead, our results support a model in which long, active regions of transcription drive local decompaction of the chromosome, with these more open regions of the chromosome forming spatial gaps in vivo that diminish contacts between DNA in neighboring domains. These insights into the molecular forces responsible for domain formation in Caulobacter likely generalize to other bacteria and possibly eukaryotes. PMID:27288403

  15. Requirement of the Carboxyl Terminus of a Bacterial Chemoreceptor for Its Targeted Proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, M. R. K.; Maddock, Janine R.; Shapiro, Lucille

    1993-03-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus yields two different progeny at each cell division; a chemotactically competent swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. The chemotaxis proteins are synthesized in the predivisional cell and then partition only to the swarmer cell upon division. The chemoreceptors that were newly synthesized were located at the nascent swarmer pole of the predivisional cell, an indication that asymmetry was established prior to cell division. When the swarmer cell differentiated into a stalked cell, the chemoreceptor was specifically degraded by virtue of an amino acid sequence located at its carboxyl terminus. Thus, a temporally and spatially restricted proteolytic event was a component of this differentiation process.

  16. Curvature and shape determination of growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial cells come in a variety of shapes, determined by the stress-bearing cell wall. Though many molecular details about the cell wall are known, our understanding of how a particular shape is produced during cell growth is at its infancy. Experiments on curved Escherichia coli grown in microtraps, and on naturally curved Caulobacter crescentus, reveal different modes of growth: one preserving arc length and the other preserving radius of curvature. We present a simple model for curved cell growth that relates these two growth modes to distinct but related growth rules—“hooplike growth” and “self-similar growth”—and discuss the implications for microscopic growth mechanisms.

  17. Accumulation of Microswimmers near a Surface Mediated by Collision and Rotational Brownian Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay X.

    2009-08-01

    In this Letter we propose a kinematic model to explain how collisions with a surface and rotational Brownian motion give rise to accumulation of microswimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from an oblique angle. It then swims away from the surface, facilitated by rotational Brownian motion. Simulations based on this model reproduce the density distributions measured for the small bacteria E. coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming between two walls.

  18. Accumulation of Microswimmers due to Their Collisions with a Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guanglai

    2008-01-01

    In this letter we propose a kinematic model to show how collisions with a surface and rotational Brownian motion give rise to the accumulation of micro-swimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from any incident angle. It then swims away from the surface after some time, facilitated by rotational Brownian motion. Simulations based on this model reproduce the density distributions measured for the small bacteria E. coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming in confinement.

  19. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria.

  20. Branched signal wiring of an essential bacterial cell-cycle phosphotransfer protein

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, Jimmy A.; Xu, Qingping; Childers, W. Seth; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Kern, Justin W.; Eckart, Michael; Deacon, Ashley M.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    Vital to bacterial survival is the faithful propagation of cellular signals, and in Caulobacter crescentus ChpT is an essential mediator within the cell cycle circuit. ChpT functions as a histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (HPt) that shuttles a phosphoryl group from the receiver domain of CckA, the upstream hybrid histidine kinase (HK), to one of two downstream response regulators (RRs)—CtrA or CpdR—that controls cell cycle progression. To understand how ChpT interacts with multiple...

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10309-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pickettii 12J chromos... 68 4e-12 CU207211_2890( CU207211 |pid:none) Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans ch... 67 ...Y344466 |pid:none) Tigriopus californicus isolate Abg... 99 3e-33 CP001340_503( CP001340 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus...iquinol-cytochrome c reductase iron-sul... 103 1e-20 CP000449_185( CP000449 |pid:none) Maricaulis maris MCS1...vvsqnqpavvvkwrgkplfirhrsaeeisesqavqlstlpdpq adnrsfkstrmdyfswclhsfrlypnfrww*lqwlvlsmswfsl**rwsy*kgscpneln rst...ontig-U10309-1Q.Seq.d Length = 1136 Score = 1536 bits (775), Expect = 0.0 Identities = 775/775 (100%) Strand = Plus / Plus

  2. Tethered motion of uniflagellated bacteria at the liquid-solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jordan; Tang, Jay

    Direct evidence of the bacterial flagellar motor's rotation was first noted when multiflagellated bacterial cells were observed (under the optical microscope) to rotate when tethered to glass by a single flagellum. The tethered cell assay has continued to play a significant role throughout the subsequent studies of motor characteristics and behavior. Such studies have expanded to include uniflagellated bacteria, such as Vibrio alginolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Caulobacter crescentus. Here we show that such cells are not necessarily tethered by their flagellum, but rather elsewhere on the cell body. The observed cell body rotation is actually due to the flagellum either ``rolling'' against the glass surface, or pushing the cell body at the flagellar base. These motions are directly observed for Vibrio alginolyticus with darkfield microscopy. Additionally, our recently measured distributions of intervals between motor switches for tethered Caulobacter crescentus also confirm this more complicated mode of tethering. Therefore, the rotational speed of tethered uniflagellated bacteria may not equate to that of the motor itself, as is commonly assumed.

  3. Bacterial Swimming and Accumulation at the Fluid Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jay

    2012-02-01

    Micro-organisms often reside and thrive at the fluid boundaries. The tendency of accumulation is particularly strong for flagellated bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Vibro alginolyticus, and Caulobacter crescentus. We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of Caulobacter crescentus near a solid surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on darkfield microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within micrometers from the surface, even though individual swimmers are not trapped long enough to display circular trajectories. We attributed this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with the rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed simulations based on this model, which reproduces the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do. Our ongoing experimental effort also includes observation of similar phenomena at the interfaces of either water-oil or water-air, noting even stronger trapping of the swimming bacteria than near a solid surface. These studies reveal a rich range of fluid physics for further analysis.

  4. Dynamics of the bacterial intermediate filament crescentin in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osigwe Esue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crescentin, the recently discovered bacterial intermediate filament protein, organizes into an extended filamentous structure that spans the length of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and plays a critical role in defining its curvature. The mechanism by which crescentin mediates cell curvature and whether crescentin filamentous structures are dynamic and/or polar are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using light microscopy, electron microscopy and quantitative rheology, we investigated the mechanics and dynamics of crescentin structures. Live-cell microscopy reveals that crescentin forms structures in vivo that undergo slow remodeling. The exchange of subunits between these structures and a pool of unassembled subunits is slow during the life cycle of the cell however; in vitro assembly and gelation of C. crescentus crescentin structures are rapid. Moreover, crescentin forms filamentous structures that are elastic, solid-like, and, like other intermediate filaments, can recover a significant portion of their network elasticity after shear. The assembly efficiency of crescentin is largely unaffected by monovalent cations (K(+, Na(+, but is enhanced by divalent cations (Mg(2+, Ca(2+, suggesting that the assembly kinetics and micromechanics of crescentin depend on the valence of the ions present in solution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that crescentin forms filamentous structures that are elastic, labile, and stiff, and that their low dissociation rate from established structures controls the slow remodeling of crescentin in C. crescentus.

  5. Complete genome of Phenylobacterium zucineum – a novel facultative intracellular bacterium isolated from human erythroleukemia cell line K562

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Jie

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenylobacterium zucineum is a recently identified facultative intracellular species isolated from the human leukemia cell line K562. Unlike the known intracellular pathogens, P. zucineum maintains a stable association with its host cell without affecting the growth and morphology of the latter. Results Here, we report the whole genome sequence of the type strain HLK1T. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (3,996,255 bp and a circular plasmid (382,976 bp. It encodes 3,861 putative proteins, 42 tRNAs, and a 16S-23S-5S rRNA operon. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that it is phylogenetically closest to Caulobacter crescentus, a model species for cell cycle research. Notably, P. zucineum has a gene that is strikingly similar, both structurally and functionally, to the cell cycle master regulator CtrA of C. crescentus, and most of the genes directly regulated by CtrA in the latter have orthologs in the former. Conclusion This work presents the first complete bacterial genome in the genus Phenylobacterium. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that the CtrA regulon is well conserved between C. crescentus and P. zucineum.

  6. The diversity and evolution of cell cycle regulation in alpha-proteobacteria: a comparative genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengoni Alessio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, CtrA coordinates DNA replication, cell division, and polar morphogenesis and is considered the cell cycle master regulator. CtrA activity varies during cell cycle progression and is modulated by phosphorylation, proteolysis and transcriptional control. In a phosphorylated state, CtrA binds specific DNA sequences, regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression and silences the origin of replication. Although the circuitry regulating CtrA is known in molecular detail in Caulobacter, its conservation and functionality in the other alpha-proteobacteria are still poorly understood. Results Orthologs of Caulobacter factors involved in the regulation of CtrA were systematically scanned in genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. In particular, orthologous genes of the divL-cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay, the divJ-pleC-divK two-component system, the cpdR-rcdA-clpPX proteolysis system, the methyltransferase ccrM and transcriptional regulators dnaA and gcrA were identified in representative genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. CtrA, DnaA and GcrA binding sites and CcrM putative methylation sites were predicted in promoter regions of all these factors and functions controlled by CtrA in all alphas were predicted. Conclusions The regulatory cell cycle architecture was identified in all representative alpha-proteobacteria, revealing a high diversification of circuits but also a conservation of logical features. An evolutionary model was proposed where ancient alphas already possessed all modules found in Caulobacter arranged in a variety of connections. Two schemes appeared to evolve: a complex circuit in Caulobacterales and Rhizobiales and a simpler one found in Rhodobacterales.

  7. High-resolution mapping of the spatial organization of a bacterial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tung B K; Imakaev, Maxim V; Mirny, Leonid A; Laub, Michael T

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomes must be highly compacted and organized within cells, but how this is achieved in vivo remains poorly understood. We report the use of chromosome conformation capture coupled with deep sequencing (Hi-C) to map the structure of bacterial chromosomes. Analysis of Hi-C data and polymer modeling indicates that the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome consists of multiple, largely independent spatial domains that are probably composed of supercoiled plectonemes arrayed into a bottle brush-like fiber. These domains are stable throughout the cell cycle and are reestablished concomitantly with DNA replication. We provide evidence that domain boundaries are established by highly expressed genes and the formation of plectoneme-free regions, whereas the histone-like protein HU and SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) promote short-range compaction and the colinearity of chromosomal arms, respectively. Collectively, our results reveal general principles for the organization and structure of chromosomes in vivo. PMID:24158908

  8. Proteotoxic stress induces a cell-cycle arrest by stimulating Lon to degrade the replication initiator DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Liu, Jing; Chien, Peter; Laub, Michael T

    2013-08-01

    The decision to initiate DNA replication is a critical step in the cell cycle of all organisms. Cells often delay replication in the face of stressful conditions, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate in Caulobacter crescentus that proteotoxic stress induces a cell-cycle arrest by triggering the degradation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator. A depletion of available Hsp70 chaperone, DnaK, either through genetic manipulation or heat shock, induces synthesis of the Lon protease, which can directly degrade DnaA. Unexpectedly, we find that unfolded proteins, which accumulate following a loss of DnaK, also allosterically activate Lon to degrade DnaA, thereby ensuring a cell-cycle arrest. Our work reveals a mechanism for regulating DNA replication under adverse growth conditions. Additionally, our data indicate that unfolded proteins can actively and directly alter substrate recognition by cellular proteases. PMID:23911325

  9. Themes and Variations: Regulation of RpoN-Dependent Flagellar Genes across Diverse Bacterial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagellar biogenesis in bacteria is a complex process in which the transcription of dozens of structural and regulatory genes is coordinated with the assembly of the flagellum. Although the overall process of flagellar biogenesis is conserved among bacteria, the mechanisms used to regulate flagellar gene expression vary greatly among different bacterial species. Many bacteria use the alternative sigma factor σ54 (also known as RpoN to transcribe specific sets of flagellar genes. These bacteria include members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni, Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Vibrio and Pseudomonas species, and Alphaproteobacteria (e.g., Caulobacter crescentus. This review characterizes the flagellar transcriptional hierarchies in these bacteria and examines what is known about how flagellar gene regulation is linked with other processes including growth phase, quorum sensing, and host colonization.

  10. Cloning and functional analysis of the sequences flanking mini-Tn5 in the magnetosomes deleted mutant NM4 of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Feng; LI Ying; JIANG Wei; WANG Zhenfang; LI Jilun

    2005-01-01

    A magnetosome deleted mutant NM4 of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 was generated by mini-Tn5 transposon mutagenesis, and a 5045-bp fragment flanking mini-Tn5 in NM4 was cloned by Anchored PCR. Sequencing analysis showed that this fragment involved six putative open reading frames (ORFs); the mini-Tn5 was inserted into ORF4. Functional complementary test indicated that the 5045-bp fragment was required for biosynthesis of magnetosomes in M. gryphiswaldense MSR-1. The protein encoded by ORF4 had 25% of identity with the chemotaxis protein CheYIII of Caulobacter crescentus CB15, and the protein encoded by ORF4 contained a conserved signal receiver domain that can receive the signal from the sensor partner of the bacterial two-component systems. It was suggested that the protein encoded by ORF4 may take part in the signal transduction relating to biosynthesis of magnetosomes.

  11. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  12. Noise in Exponential Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles; Henry, Jon; Burov, Stas; Lin, Yihan; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron; Scherer, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    The interplay between growth and division of cells is has been studied in the context of exponential growth of bacterial cells (in suitable conditions) for decades. However, bulk culture studies obscure phenomena that manifest in single cells over many generations. We introduce a unique technology combining microfluidics, single-cell imaging, and quantitative analysis. This enables us to track the growth of single Caulobacter crescentus stalked cells over hundreds of generations. The statistics that we extract indicate a size thresholding mechanism for cell division and a non-trivial scaling collapse of division time distributions at different temperatures. In this talk I shall discuss these observations and a stochastic model of growth and division that captures all our observations with no free parameters.

  13. Effects of hydrodynamic interactions in bacterial swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Lun Wu, Xiao

    2008-03-01

    The lack of precise experimental data has prevented the investigation of the effects of long range hydrodynamic interactions in bacterial swimming. We perform measurements on various strains of bacteria with the aid of optical tweezers to shed light on this aspect of bacterial motility. Geometrical parameters recorded by fluorescence microscopy are used with theories which model flagella propulsion (Resistive force theory & Lighthill's formulation which includes long range interactions). Comparison of the predictions of these theories with experimental data, observed directly from swimming bacterium, led to the conclusion that while long range inetractions were important for single polar flagellated strains (Vibrio Alginolyticus & Caulobacter Crescentus), local force theory was adequate to describe the swimming of multi-flagellated Esherichia Coli. We performed additional measurements on E. Coli minicells (miniature cells with single polar flagellum) to try and determine the cause of this apparent effect of shielding of long range interactions in multiple flagellated bacteria.

  14. Bacteriocuprein superoxide dismutases in pseudomonads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinman, H.M.

    1985-06-01

    Two new instances of the rare bacteriocuprein form of superoxide dismutase have been discovered in Pseudomonas diminuta and P. maltophilia. Each species contains a manganese superoxide dismutase as well. Eight other strains of Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas spp. lacked bacteriocupreins and contained either a manganese or an iron superoxide dismutase. Native molecular weights and isoelectric points were determined for all these bacterial dismutases. A monospecific polyclonal antibody was prepared against the bacteriocuprein from Photobacterium leiognathi; it was not cross-reactive with the bacteriocuprein from either Pseudomonas strain. Bacteriocupreins have previously been identified in only two procaryotes, P. leiognathi and Caulobacter crescentus. The discovery of the Pseudomonas bacteriocupreins reveals a broader distribution, raising the possibility that bacteriocupreins are a continuous line of descent among procryotes and not isolated evolutionary occurrences, as previous data suggested.

  15. Accumulation of swimming bacteria near a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Bensson, James; Nisimova, Liana; Munger, Daniel; Mahautmr, Panrapee; Tang, Jay X.; Maxey, Martin R.; Brun, Yves V.

    2011-10-01

    We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of Caulobacter crescentus near a surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on dark field microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within a micrometer from the surface. We attribute this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with the rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed a simulation based on this model, which reproduced the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do.

  16. Aging of prokaryotic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Simon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Until recently it was thought that aging is a characteristic feature only of cells and organisms of eukaryotic origin. Recent studies on Caulobacter crescentus showed that their dimorphic life cycle associated with asymmetric cell division leads to a gradual increase in the time needed for the development of new bacteria generations, which may reflect aging of this organism. Moreover, as shown in Escherichia coli, accelerated exhaustion of proliferative capacity and bacteria death are caused by inheritance of certain structures from the mother cell during cell division. A similar phenomenon, called ‘conditional senescence’, has been observed during the stationary phase of growth in liquid cultures. The aim of this paper is to present the current state of knowledge on the causes, mechanisms and evolutionary significance of aging in bacteria. Some issues associated with bacterial aging will be discussed in the context of similar phenomena occurring in eukaryotic cells.

  17. UV-induced dark repair mechanisms in bacteria associated with drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungfer, Christina; Schwartz, Thomas; Obst, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus and Aquabacterium commune, both isolated from drinking water, as well as environmental isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecium were treated with different UV fluences to study their capacity to restore induced DNA damages. Here, the induction of a key mechanism of bacterial dark repair, the so-called recA system, was analysed. With newly designed probes, the specific recA mRNA was detected by Northern blot. Additionally, the RecA protein was measured by the Western blot technique using a specific antibody. In drinking water bacteria as well as in opportunistic microorganisms, a specific induction of dark repair mechanisms was found even at UV fluences higher than 400J/m(2), the German standard for UV disinfection. This induction depended on the incubation time after UV treatment. Nevertheless, the UV-induced recA expressions were found to differ in the bacteria under investigation.

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12020-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :none) Caulobacter crescentus NA1000, ... 151 5e-35 CP000614_1881( CP000614 |pid:none) Burkholderia vietnam...um discoideum histidine kinase DhkG (d... 46 3.7 1 ( AF088979 ) Dictyostelium discoideum beige protein...ccus opacus B4 DNA, comp... 160 1e-37 AL939110_99( AL939110 |pid:none) Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) co...:none) Burkholderia sp. 383 chromosome ... 96 3e-18 AL939126_48( AL939126 |pid:none) Streptomyces coelico...:none) Psychromonas ingrahamii 37, com... 96 4e-18 CP001157_559( CP001157 |pid:none) Azotobacter vinelandii DJ, co

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15518-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pid:none) Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans ch... 70 3e-10 CP001392_2585( CP001392 |pid:none) Diaphorobacter sp. ...52 AE005673_923( AE005673 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus CB15, com... 151 3e-49 CP000449_864( CP000449 |pid:none) Maricau...tig-U15518-1Q.Seq.d (2022 letters) Database: CSM 8402 sequences; 8,075,542 total letters Score E Sequences producing significa...re = 3515 bits (1773), Expect = 0.0 Identities = 1831/1845 (99%) Strand = Plus / Plus Query: 112 gagttagactca...arch space: 15905079540 effective search space used: 15905079540 T: 0 A: 40 X1: 6 (11.9 bits) X2: 15

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05994-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ; ... 229 1e-58 CU207211_3071( CU207211 |pid:none) Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans ch... 229 1e-58 FN392321_754...1( BT076534 |pid:none) Caligus rogercresseyi clone crog-e... 338 2e-91 (A6RW56) RecName: Full=ATP-dependent rRNA helicase...54202_287( CR954202 |pid:none) Ostreococcus tauri strain OTTH05... 327 4e-88 (Q2H1Q8) RecName: Full=ATP-dependent rRNA helicase...4e-59 AE005673_832( AE005673 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus CB15, com... 231 4e-59 CP000937_1787( CP000937 |pid:none) Francise...l=ATP-dependent RNA helicase drs1; ... 226 1e-57 AP006627_3931( AP006627 |pid:none) Bacillus claus

  1. From Endosymbiont to Host-Controlled Organelle: The Hijacking of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis and Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabaldon, T.; Huynen, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles that originated from the endosymbiosis of an alpha-proteobacterium. To gain insight into the evolution of the mitochondrial proteome as it proceeded through the transition from a free-living cell to a specialized organelle, we compared a reconstructed ancestral

  2. From endosymbiont to host-controlled organelle: the hijacking of mitochondrial protein synthesis and metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabaldon, T.; Huynen, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles that originated from the endosymbiosis of an alpha-proteobacterium. To gain insight into the evolution of the mitochondrial proteome as it proceeded through the transition from a free-living cell to a specialized organelle, we compared a reconstructed ancestral

  3. The CckA-ChpT-CtrA phosphorelay system is regulated by quorum sensing and controls flagellar motility in the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindong Zan

    Full Text Available Bacteria respond to their environment via signal transduction pathways, often two-component type systems that function through phosphotransfer to control expression of specific genes. Phosphorelays are derived from two-component systems but are comprised of additional components. The essential cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay in Caulobacter crescentus has been well studied and is important in orchestrating the cell cycle, polar development and flagellar biogenesis. Although cckA, chpT and ctrA homologues are widespread among the Alphaproteobacteria, relatively few is known about their function in the large and ecologically significant Roseobacter clade of the Rhodobacterales. In this study the cckA-chpT-ctrA system of the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 was investigated. Our results reveal that the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes positively control flagellar biosynthesis. In contrast to C. crescentus, the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes in Ruegeria sp. KLH11 are non-essential and do not affect bacterial growth. Gene fusion and transcript analyses provide evidence for ctrA autoregulation and the control of motility-related genes. In KLH11, flagellar motility is controlled by the SsaRI system and acylhomoserine lactone (AHL quorum sensing. SsaR and long chain AHLs are required for cckA, chpT and ctrA gene expression, providing a regulatory link between flagellar locomotion and population density in KLH11.

  4. Accumulation of swimming bacteria near an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jay; Li, Guanglai

    2012-11-01

    Microbes inhabit planet earth over billions of years and have adapted to diverse physical environment of water, soil, and particularly at or near interfaces. We focused our attention on the locomotion of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at the interface of water/solid or water/air. We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of C. crescentus near a surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on dark field microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within a micrometer from the surface. We attribute this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed a simulation based on this model, which reproduced the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do. The overarching goal of our study is to describe interfacial microbial behavior through detailed analysis of their motion. We acknowledge support by NSF PHY 1058375.

  5. Human Cells Require Non-stop Ribosome Rescue Activity in Mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A Feaga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use trans-translation and the alternative rescue factors ArfA (P36675 and ArfB (Q9A8Y3 to hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on ribosomes that stall near the 3' end of an mRNA during protein synthesis. The eukaryotic protein ICT1 (Q14197 is homologous to ArfB. In vitro ribosome rescue assays of human ICT1 and Caulobacter crescentus ArfB showed that these proteins have the same activity and substrate specificity. Both ArfB and ICT1 hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on nonstop ribosomes or ribosomes stalled with ≤6 nucleotides extending past the A site, but are unable to hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA when the mRNA extends ≥14 nucleotides past the A site. ICT1 provided sufficient ribosome rescue activity to support viability in C. crescentus cells that lacked both trans-translation and ArfB. Likewise, expression of ArfB protected human cells from death when ICT1 was silenced with siRNA. These data indicate that ArfB and ICT1 are functionally interchangeable, and demonstrate that ICT1 is a ribosome rescue factor. Because ICT1 is essential in human cells, these results suggest that ribosome rescue activity in mitochondria is required in humans.

  6. Phase resetting reveals network dynamics underlying a bacterial cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihan Lin

    Full Text Available Genomic and proteomic methods yield networks of biological regulatory interactions but do not provide direct insight into how those interactions are organized into functional modules, or how information flows from one module to another. In this work we introduce an approach that provides this complementary information and apply it to the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, a paradigm for cell-cycle control. Operationally, we use an inducible promoter to express the essential transcriptional regulatory gene ctrA in a periodic, pulsed fashion. This chemical perturbation causes the population of cells to divide synchronously, and we use the resulting advance or delay of the division times of single cells to construct a phase resetting curve. We find that delay is strongly favored over advance. This finding is surprising since it does not follow from the temporal expression profile of CtrA and, in turn, simulations of existing network models. We propose a phenomenological model that suggests that the cell-cycle network comprises two distinct functional modules that oscillate autonomously and couple in a highly asymmetric fashion. These features collectively provide a new mechanism for tight temporal control of the cell cycle in C. crescentus. We discuss how the procedure can serve as the basis for a general approach for probing network dynamics, which we term chemical perturbation spectroscopy (CPS.

  7. Structural insights into bacterial flagellar hooks similarities and specificities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-Ho; Barker, Clive S.; Bulieris, Paula V.; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    Across bacteria, the protein that makes the flagellar hook, FlgE, has a high variability in amino acid residue composition and sequence length. We hereby present the structure of two fragments of FlgE protein from Campylobacter jejuni and from Caulobacter crescentus, which were obtained by X-ray crystallography, and a high-resolution model of the hook from Caulobacter. By comparing these new structures of FlgE proteins, we show that bacterial hook can be divided in two distinct parts. The first part comprises domains that are found in all FlgE proteins and that will make the basic structure of the hook that is common to all flagellated bacteria. The second part, hyper-variable both in size and structure, will be bacteria dependent. To have a better understanding of the C. jejuni hook, we show that a special strain of Salmonella enterica, which was designed to encode a gene of flgE that has the extra domains found in FlgE from C. jejuni, is fully motile. It seems that no matter the size of the hook protein, the hook will always have a structure made of 11 protofilaments. PMID:27759043

  8. Cyclic di-GMP acts as a cell cycle oscillator to drive chromosome replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, C; Ozaki, S; Steiner, S; Böhm, R; Abel, S; Dubey, B N; Schirmer, T; Hiller, S; Jenal, U

    2015-07-01

    Fundamental to all living organisms is the capacity to coordinate cell division and cell differentiation to generate appropriate numbers of specialized cells. Whereas eukaryotes use cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases to balance division with cell fate decisions, equivalent regulatory systems have not been described in bacteria. Moreover, the mechanisms used by bacteria to tune division in line with developmental programs are poorly understood. Here we show that Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium with an asymmetric division cycle, uses oscillating levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) to drive its cell cycle. We demonstrate that c-di-GMP directly binds to the essential cell cycle kinase CckA to inhibit kinase activity and stimulate phosphatase activity. An upshift of c-di-GMP during the G1-S transition switches CckA from the kinase to the phosphatase mode, thereby allowing replication initiation and cell cycle progression. Finally, we show that during division, c-di-GMP imposes spatial control on CckA to install the replication asymmetry of future daughter cells. These studies reveal c-di-GMP to be a cyclin-like molecule in bacteria that coordinates chromosome replication with cell morphogenesis in Caulobacter. The observation that c-di-GMP-mediated control is conserved in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens suggests a general mechanism through which this global regulator of bacterial virulence and persistence coordinates behaviour and cell proliferation.

  9. Bacterial Swimming at Air/Water and Oil/Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael; Huang, Athena; Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay

    2012-02-01

    The microbes inhabiting the planet over billions of years have adapted to diverse physical environments of water, soil, and interfaces between water and either solid or air. Following recent studies on bacterial swimming and accumulation near solid surfaces, we turn our attention to the behavior of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at water/air and water/oil interfaces. The latter is motivated by relevance to microbial degradation of crude oil in light of the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Our ongoing study suggests that Caulobacter swarmer cells tend to get physically trapped at both water/air and water/oil interfaces, accumulating at the surface to a greater degree than boundary confinement properties like that of solid surfaces would predict. At the water/air interface, swimmers move in tight circles at half the speed of swimmers in the bulk fluid. At the water/oil interface, swimming circles are even tighter with further reduced swimming speed. We report experimental data and present preliminary analysis of the findings based on low Reynolds number hydrodynamics, the known surface tension, and surface viscosity at the interface. The analysis will help determine properties of the bacterium such as their surface charge and hydrophobicity.

  10. A pseudokinase couples signaling pathways to enable asymmetric cell division in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Seth Childers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria face complex decisions when initiating developmental events such as sporulation, nodulation, virulence, and asymmetric cell division. These developmental decisions require global changes in genomic readout, and bacteria typically employ intricate (yet poorly understood signaling networks that enable changes in cell function. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus divides asymmetrically to yield two functionally distinct cells: a motile, chemotactic swarmer cell, and a sessile stalked cell with replication and division capabilities. Work from several Caulobacter labs has revealed that differentiation requires concerted regulation by several two-component system (TCS signaling pathways that are differentially positioned at the poles of the predivisional cell (Figure 1. The strict unidirectional flow from histidine kinase (HK to the response regulator (RR, observed in most studied TCS, is difficult to reconcile with the notion that information can be transmitted between two or more TCS signaling pathways. In this study, we uncovered a mechanism by which daughter cell fate, which is specified by the DivJ-DivK-PleC system and effectively encoded in the phosphorylation state of the single-domain RR DivK, is communicated to the CckA-ChpT-CtrA signaling pathway that regulates more than 100 genes for polar differentiation, replication initiation and cell division. Using structural biology and biochemical findings we proposed a mechanistic basis for TCS pathway coupling in which the DivL pseudokinase is repurposed as a sensor rather than participant in phosphotransduction.

  11. A model for the condensation of the bacterial chromosome by the partitioning protein ParB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broedersz, Chase; Wingreen, Ned

    2013-03-01

    The molecular machinery responsible for faithful segregation of the chromosome in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus and Bacillus subtilis includes the ParABS a.k.a. Spo0J/Soj partitioning system. In Caulobacter, prior to division, hundreds of ParB proteins bind to the DNA near the origin of replication, and localize to one pole of the cell. Subsequently, the ParB-DNA complex is translocated to the far pole by the binding and retraction of the ParA spindle-like apparatus. Remarkably, the localization of ParB proteins to specific regions of the chromosome appears to be controlled by only a few centromeric parS binding sites. Although lateral interactions between DNA-bound ParB are likely to be important for their localization, the long-range order of ParB domains on the chromosome appears to be inconsistent with a picture in which protein-protein interactions are limited to neighboring DNA-bound proteins. We developed a coarse-grained Brownian dynamics model that allows for lateral and 3D protein-protein interactions among bound ParB proteins. Our model shows how such interactions can condense and organize the DNA spatially, and can control the localization and the long-range order of the DNA-bound proteins.

  12. Sequential evolution of bacterial morphology by co-option of a developmental regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Brown, Pamela J. B.; Ducret, Adrien; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-02-01

    What mechanisms underlie the transitions responsible for the diverse shapes observed in the living world? Although bacteria exhibit a myriad of morphologies, the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of bacterial cell shape are not understood. We investigated morphological diversity in a group of bacteria that synthesize an appendage-like extension of the cell envelope called the stalk. The location and number of stalks varies among species, as exemplified by three distinct subcellular positions of stalks within a rod-shaped cell body: polar in the genus Caulobacter and subpolar or bilateral in the genus Asticcacaulis. Here we show that a developmental regulator of Caulobacter crescentus, SpmX, is co-opted in the genus Asticcacaulis to specify stalk synthesis either at the subpolar or bilateral positions. We also show that stepwise evolution of a specific region of SpmX led to the gain of a new function and localization of this protein, which drove the sequential transition in stalk positioning. Our results indicate that changes in protein function, co-option and modularity are key elements in the evolution of bacterial morphology. Therefore, similar evolutionary principles of morphological transitions apply to both single-celled prokaryotes and multicellular eukaryotes.

  13. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Marilyn G; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-11-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, producing D-gluconate and D-sorbitol when a mixture of D-glucose and D-fructose was used as substrate. However, the activity in Cc aaor expressing strain was >100-fold lower compared to strains expressing Zm gfor. Interestingly, C. crescentus AAOR was clearly more efficient than the Zm GFOR in converting in vitro a single sugar substrate D-xylose (10 mM) to xylitol without an added cofactor, whereas this type of activity was very low with Zm GFOR. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of D-xylose, the S. cerevisiae strain expressing Cc aaor produced nearly equal concentrations of D-xylonate and xylitol (12.5 g D-xylonate l(-1) and 11.5 g D-xylitol l(-1) from 26 g D-xylose l(-1)), whereas the control strain and strain expressing Zm gfor produced only D-xylitol (5 g l(-1)). Deletion of the gene encoding the major aldose reductase, Gre3p, did not affect xylitol production in the strain expressing Cc aaor, but decreased xylitol production in the strain expressing Zm gfor. In addition, expression of Cc aaor together with the D-xylonolactone lactonase encoding the gene xylC from C. crescentus slightly increased the final concentration and initial volumetric production rate of both D-xylonate and D-xylitol. These results suggest that C. crescentus AAOR is a novel type of oxidoreductase able to convert the single aldose substrate D-xylose to both its oxidized and reduced product.

  14. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Marilyn G; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-11-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, producing D-gluconate and D-sorbitol when a mixture of D-glucose and D-fructose was used as substrate. However, the activity in Cc aaor expressing strain was >100-fold lower compared to strains expressing Zm gfor. Interestingly, C. crescentus AAOR was clearly more efficient than the Zm GFOR in converting in vitro a single sugar substrate D-xylose (10 mM) to xylitol without an added cofactor, whereas this type of activity was very low with Zm GFOR. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of D-xylose, the S. cerevisiae strain expressing Cc aaor produced nearly equal concentrations of D-xylonate and xylitol (12.5 g D-xylonate l(-1) and 11.5 g D-xylitol l(-1) from 26 g D-xylose l(-1)), whereas the control strain and strain expressing Zm gfor produced only D-xylitol (5 g l(-1)). Deletion of the gene encoding the major aldose reductase, Gre3p, did not affect xylitol production in the strain expressing Cc aaor, but decreased xylitol production in the strain expressing Zm gfor. In addition, expression of Cc aaor together with the D-xylonolactone lactonase encoding the gene xylC from C. crescentus slightly increased the final concentration and initial volumetric production rate of both D-xylonate and D-xylitol. These results suggest that C. crescentus AAOR is a novel type of oxidoreductase able to convert the single aldose substrate D-xylose to both its oxidized and reduced product. PMID:26264136

  15. Dibenzofuran degradation by Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 under environmental stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Coronado E.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomonas wittichii is a gram-negative Alpha-proteobacterium, capable of degrading xenobiotic compounds such as dibenzofuran (DBF), dibenzo-p-dioxin, carbazole, 2-hydroxybiphenyl or nitro diphenyl ether herbicides. The metabolism of strain RW1 has been the subject of previous studies and a number of genes involved in DBF degradation have been characterized. It is known that RW1 posseses a unique initial DBF dioxygenase (encoded by the dxnAl gene) that catalyzes the first step in the degrad...

  16. Mathematical modeling of bacterial track-altering motors: Track cleaving through burnt-bridge ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtylla, Blerta; Keener, James P.

    2015-04-01

    The generation of directed movement of cellular components frequently requires the rectification of Brownian motion. Molecular motor enzymes that use ATP to walk on filamentous tracks are typically involved in cell transport, however, a track-altering motor can arise when an enzyme interacts with and alters its track. In Caulobacter crescentus and other bacteria, an active DNA partitioning (Par) apparatus is employed to segregate replicated chromosome regions to specific locations in dividing cells. The Par apparatus is composed of two proteins: ParA, an ATPase that can form polymeric structures on the nucleoid, and ParB, a protein that can bind and destabilize ParA structures. It has been proposed that the ParB-mediated alteration of ParA structures could be responsible for generating the directed movement of DNA during bacterial division. How precisely these actions are coordinated and translated into directed movement is not clear. In this paper we consider the C. crescentus segregation apparatus as an example of a track altering motor that operates using a so-called burnt-bridge mechanism. We develop and analyze mathematical models that examine how diffusion and ATP-hydrolysis-mediated monomer removal (or cleaving) can be combined to generate directed movement. Using a mean first passage approach, we analytically calculate the effective ParA track-cleaving velocities, effective diffusion coefficient, and other higher moments for the movement a ParB protein cluster that breaks monomers away at random locations on a single ParA track. Our model results indicate that cleaving velocities and effective diffusion constants are sensitive to ParB-induced ATP hydrolysis rates. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with stochastic simulation results.

  17. The cGMP signaling pathway affects feeding behavior in the necromenic nematode Pristionchus pacificus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina M Kroetz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genetic tractability and the species-specific association with beetles make the nematode Pristionchus pacificus an exciting emerging model organism for comparative studies in development and behavior. P. pacificus differs from Caenorhabditis elegans (a bacterial feeder by its buccal teeth and the lack of pharyngeal grinders, but almost nothing is known about which genes coordinate P. pacificus feeding behaviors, such as pharyngeal pumping rate, locomotion, and fat storage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed P. pacificus pharyngeal pumping rate and locomotion behavior on and off food, as well as on different species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Caulobacter crescentus. We found that the cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG Ppa-EGL-4 in P. pacificus plays an important role in regulating the pumping rate, mouth form dimorphism, the duration of forward locomotion, and the amount of fat stored in intestine. In addition, Ppa-EGL-4 interacts with Ppa-OBI-1, a recently identified protein involved in chemosensation, to influence feeding and locomotion behavior. We also found that C. crescentus NA1000 increased pharyngeal pumping as well as fat storage in P. pacificus. CONCLUSIONS: The PKG EGL-4 has conserved functions in regulating feeding behavior in both C. elegans and P. pacificus nematodes. The Ppa-EGL-4 also has been co-opted during evolution to regulate P. pacificus mouth form dimorphism that indirectly affect pharyngeal pumping rate. Specifically, the lack of Ppa-EGL-4 function increases pharyngeal pumping, time spent in forward locomotion, and fat storage, in part as a result of higher food intake. Ppa-OBI-1 functions upstream or parallel to Ppa-EGL-4. The beetle-associated omnivorous P. pacificus respond differently to changes in food state and food quality compared to the exclusively bacteriovorous C. elegans.

  18. Essential Genome of the Metabolically Versatile Alphaproteobacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechter, Kieran B.; Gallagher, Larry; Pyles, Harley; Manoil, Colin S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodopseudomonas palustris is an alphaproteobacterium that has served as a model organism for studies of photophosphorylation, regulation of nitrogen fixation, production of hydrogen as a biofuel, and anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. This bacterium is able to transition between anaerobic photoautotrophic growth, anaerobic photoheterotrophic growth, and aerobic heterotrophic growth. As a starting point to explore the genetic basis for the metabolic versatility of R. palustris, we used transposon mutagenesis and Tn-seq to identify 552 genes as essential for viability in cells growing aerobically on semirich medium. Of these, 323 have essential gene homologs in the alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and 187 have essential gene homologs in Escherichia coli. There were 24 R. palustris genes that were essential for viability under aerobic growth conditions that have low sequence identity but are likely to be functionally homologous to essential E. coli genes. As expected, certain functional categories of essential genes were highly conserved among the three organisms, including translation, ribosome structure and biogenesis, secretion, and lipid metabolism. R. palustris cells divide by budding in which a sessile cell gives rise to a motile swarmer cell. Conserved cell cycle genes required for this developmental process were essential in both C. crescentus and R. palustris. Our results suggest that despite vast differences in lifestyles, members of the alphaproteobacteria have a common set of essential genes that is specific to this group and distinct from that of gammaproteobacteria like E. coli. IMPORTANCE Essential genes in bacteria and other organisms are those absolutely required for viability. Rhodopseudomonas palustris has served as a model organism for studies of anaerobic aromatic compound degradation, hydrogen gas production, nitrogen fixation, and photosynthesis. We used the technique of Tn-seq to determine the essential genes of

  19. Timescales and Frequencies of Reversible and Irreversible Adhesion Events of Single Bacterial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michelle D; Zucker, Lauren I; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    In the environment, most bacteria form surface-attached cell communities called biofilms. The attachment of single cells to surfaces involves an initial reversible stage typically mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a permanent adhesion stage usually mediated by polysaccharide adhesives. Here, we determine the absolute and relative timescales and frequencies of reversible and irreversible adhesion of single cells of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to a glass surface in a microfluidic device. We used fluorescence microscopy of C. crescentus expressing green fluorescent protein to track the swimming behavior of individual cells prior to adhesion, monitor the cell at the surface, and determine whether the cell reversibly or irreversibly adhered to the surface. A fluorescently labeled lectin that binds specifically to polar polysaccharides, termed holdfast, discriminated irreversible adhesion events from reversible adhesion events where no holdfast formed. In wild-type cells, the holdfast production time for irreversible adhesion events initiated by surface contact (23 s) was 30-times faster than the holdfast production time that occurs through developmental regulation (13 min). Irreversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (3.3 events/min) are 15-times more frequent than in pilus-minus mutant cells (0.2 events/min), indicating the pili are critical structures in the transition from reversible to irreversible surface-stimulated adhesion. In reversible adhesion events, the dwell time of cells at the surface before departing was the same for wild-type cells (12 s) and pilus-minus mutant cells (13 s), suggesting the pili do not play a significant role in reversible adhesion. Moreover, reversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (6.8 events/min) occur twice as frequently as irreversible adhesion events (3.3 events/min), demonstrating that most cells contact the surface multiple times before transitioning from reversible to

  20. Structure of a putative trans-editing enzyme for prolyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 1.7 Å resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional structure of the APE2540 protein from A. pernix K1 has been determined by the multiple anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å resolution. The structure includes two monomers in the asymmetric unit and shares structural similarity with the YbaK protein or cysteinyl-tRNAPro deacylase from H. influenzae. The crystal structure of APE2540, the putative trans-editing enzyme ProX from Aeropyrum pernix K1, was determined in a high-throughput manner. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.4, b = 58.9, c = 53.6 Å, β = 106.8°. The structure was solved by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å and refined to an R factor of 16.8% (Rfree = 20.5%). The crystal structure includes two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer consists of eight β-strands and seven α-helices. A structure-homology search revealed similarity between the trans-editing enzyme YbaK (or cysteinyl-tRNAPro deacylase) from Haemophilus influenzae (HI1434; 22% sequence identity) and putative ProX proteins from Caulobacter crescentus (16%) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (21%)

  1. The bacterial cell cycle regulator GcrA is a σ70 cofactor that drives gene expression from a subset of methylated promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakonsen, Diane L; Yuan, Andy H; Laub, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Cell cycle progression in most organisms requires tightly regulated programs of gene expression. The transcription factors involved typically stimulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences in promoters and recruiting RNA polymerase. Here, we found that the essential cell cycle regulator GcrA in Caulobacter crescentus activates the transcription of target genes in a fundamentally different manner. GcrA forms a stable complex with RNA polymerase and localizes to almost all active σ(70)-dependent promoters in vivo but activates transcription primarily at promoters harboring certain DNA methylation sites. Whereas most transcription factors that contact σ(70) interact with domain 4, GcrA interfaces with domain 2, the region that binds the -10 element during strand separation. Using kinetic analyses and a reconstituted in vitro transcription assay, we demonstrated that GcrA can stabilize RNA polymerase binding and directly stimulate open complex formation to activate transcription. Guided by these studies, we identified a regulon of ∼ 200 genes, providing new insight into the essential functions of GcrA. Collectively, our work reveals a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation, and we discuss the potential benefits of activating transcription by promoting RNA polymerase isomerization rather than recruitment exclusively.

  2. Efficient Multiscale Models of Polymer Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Martinez, Alvaro; Bartol, Thomas M; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Tartakovsky, Daniel M

    2016-07-12

    Protein polymerization and bundling play a central role in cell physiology. Predictive modeling of these processes remains an open challenge, especially when the proteins involved become large and their concentrations high. We present an effective kinetics model of filament formation, bundling, and depolymerization after GTP hydrolysis, which involves a relatively small number of species and reactions, and remains robust over a wide range of concentrations and timescales. We apply this general model to study assembly of FtsZ protein, a basic element in the division process of prokaryotic cells such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, or Caulobacter crescentus. This analysis demonstrates that our model outperforms its counterparts in terms of both accuracy and computational efficiency. Because our model comprises only 17 ordinary differential equations, its computational cost is orders-of-magnitude smaller than the current alternatives consisting of up to 1000 ordinary differential equations. It also provides, to our knowledge, a new insight into the characteristics and functioning of FtsZ proteins at high concentrations. The simplicity and versatility of our model render it a powerful computational tool, which can be used either as a standalone descriptor of other biopolymers' assembly or as a component in more complete kinetic models. PMID:27410746

  3. Rapid pairing and resegregation of distant homologous loci enables double-strand break repair in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) can lead to the loss of genetic information and cell death. Although DSB repair via homologous recombination has been well characterized, the spatial organization of this process inside cells remains poorly understood, and the mechanisms used for chromosome resegregation after repair are unclear. In this paper, we introduced site-specific DSBs in Caulobacter crescentus and then used time-lapse microscopy to visualize the ensuing chromosome dynamics. Damaged loci rapidly mobilized after a DSB, pairing with their homologous partner to enable repair, before being resegregated to their original cellular locations, independent of DNA replication. Origin-proximal regions were resegregated by the ParABS system with the ParA structure needed for resegregation assembling dynamically in response to the DSB-induced movement of an origin-associated ParB away from one cell pole. Origin-distal regions were resegregated in a ParABS-independent manner and instead likely rely on a physical, spring-like force to segregate repaired loci. Collectively, our results provide a mechanistic basis for the resegregation of chromosomes after a DSB. PMID:26240183

  4. Nutritional Control of DNA Replication Initiation through the Proteolysis and Regulated Translation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, David J; Heinen, Christian; Schramm, Frederic D; Thüring, Marietta; Aakre, Christopher D; Murray, Sean M; Laub, Michael T; Jonas, Kristina

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria can arrest their own growth and proliferation upon nutrient depletion and under various stressful conditions to ensure their survival. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppressing growth and arresting the cell cycle under such conditions remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify post-transcriptional mechanisms that help enforce a cell-cycle arrest in Caulobacter crescentus following nutrient limitation and during entry into stationary phase by limiting the accumulation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator protein. DnaA is rapidly degraded by the Lon protease following nutrient limitation. However, the rate of DnaA degradation is not significantly altered by changes in nutrient availability. Instead, we demonstrate that decreased nutrient availability downregulates dnaA translation by a mechanism involving the 5' untranslated leader region of the dnaA transcript; Lon-dependent proteolysis of DnaA then outpaces synthesis, leading to the elimination of DnaA and the arrest of DNA replication. Our results demonstrate how regulated translation and constitutive degradation provide cells a means of precisely and rapidly modulating the concentration of key regulatory proteins in response to environmental inputs. PMID:26134530

  5. The bacterial cell cycle regulator GcrA is a σ70 cofactor that drives gene expression from a subset of methylated promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakonsen, Diane L; Yuan, Andy H; Laub, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Cell cycle progression in most organisms requires tightly regulated programs of gene expression. The transcription factors involved typically stimulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences in promoters and recruiting RNA polymerase. Here, we found that the essential cell cycle regulator GcrA in Caulobacter crescentus activates the transcription of target genes in a fundamentally different manner. GcrA forms a stable complex with RNA polymerase and localizes to almost all active σ(70)-dependent promoters in vivo but activates transcription primarily at promoters harboring certain DNA methylation sites. Whereas most transcription factors that contact σ(70) interact with domain 4, GcrA interfaces with domain 2, the region that binds the -10 element during strand separation. Using kinetic analyses and a reconstituted in vitro transcription assay, we demonstrated that GcrA can stabilize RNA polymerase binding and directly stimulate open complex formation to activate transcription. Guided by these studies, we identified a regulon of ∼ 200 genes, providing new insight into the essential functions of GcrA. Collectively, our work reveals a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation, and we discuss the potential benefits of activating transcription by promoting RNA polymerase isomerization rather than recruitment exclusively. PMID:26545812

  6. A bacterial toxin inhibits DNA replication elongation through a direct interaction with the β sliding clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher D; Phung, Tuyen N; Huang, David; Laub, Michael T

    2013-12-12

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are ubiquitous on bacterial chromosomes, yet the mechanisms regulating their activity and the molecular targets of toxins remain incompletely defined. Here, we identify SocAB, an atypical TA system in Caulobacter crescentus. Unlike canonical TA systems, the toxin SocB is unstable and constitutively degraded by the protease ClpXP; this degradation requires the antitoxin, SocA, as a proteolytic adaptor. We find that the toxin, SocB, blocks replication elongation through an interaction with the sliding clamp, driving replication fork collapse. Mutations that suppress SocB toxicity map to either the hydrophobic cleft on the clamp that binds DNA polymerase III or a clamp-binding motif in SocB. Our findings suggest that SocB disrupts replication by outcompeting other clamp-binding proteins. Collectively, our results expand the diversity of mechanisms employed by TA systems to regulate toxin activity and inhibit bacterial growth, and they suggest that inhibiting clamp function may be a generalizable antibacterial strategy. PMID:24239291

  7. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Badri N; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-09-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling.

  8. Non-destructive monitoring of microbial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces using on-line devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nivens, D.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Chemistry Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Inst. for Applied Microbiology); Chambers, J.Q. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); White, D.C. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Inst. for Applied Microbiology Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Microbiology Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion, biofouling, and related problems have been an impetus for investigating interactions between microorganisms and solid surfaces. In recent years, a number of studies have been performed to assess the damages caused by microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). In a number of these studies, electrochemical techniques have monitored the performance of metal surfaces exposed to bacteria. However, most of these methods can only indirectly detect the presence of biofilms. In this paper, two non-destructive on-line monitoring devices, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR) and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) were used to directly monitor biofilm formation. These devices have been developed to study the initial fouling process and subsequent biofilm development and not merely the effects of the living film on the host material. The ATR-FT/IR technique provides information about biomass, exopolymer production, and the nutritional status of microbial biofilms. The QCM provides a direct measure of biomass. ATR-FT/IR and QCM detect 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 4} Caulobacter crescentus cells/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Both techniques can be coupled with electrochemical methods for deeper insight into mechanisms of MIC. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Badri N.; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di–guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling. PMID:27652341

  10. Contribution of cell body to the thrust production of flagellate bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Powers, Thomas R.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2013-11-01

    We trace individual motile microorganisms using a digital 3D tracking microscope in which the microscope stage follows the motion of the target. Using this technology, we not only trace a single cell over extended duration but also obtain the cell kinematics with high spatial and temporal resolution. We apply this tracking microscope to a study of Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium that moves up to 100 microns (or 50 body lengths) per second and reverses its direction of motion by switching the rotation direction of its single helical flagellum. We show that when the cell reverses the rotation direction of the right-handed flagellum, e.g., switching from CW (a pusher) to CCW (a puller), its cell-kinematics is not completely reversible. In case of a puller, the cell almost spins along its long axis. However, in case of a pusher, besides spinning, the cell body precesses along its swimming direction, following a helical trajectory. These two types of cell-kinematics contribute to different cell motilities: the pusher rotates slower for the same swimming speed. We present a resistive force theory to account for this behavior, and by computing the torque on the cell body, we show that the finite precession angle of the bacterial pusher is optimized for swimming with fixed torque.

  11. Accumulation of microswimmers near surface due to steric confinement and rotational Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay

    2009-03-01

    Microscopic swimmers display some intriguing features dictated by Brownian motion, low Reynolds number fluid mechanics, and boundary confinement. We re-examine the reported accumulation of swimming bacteria or bull spermatozoa near the boundaries of a fluid chamber, and propose a kinematic model to explain how collision with surface, confinement and rotational Brownian motion give rise to the accumulation of micro-swimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from any incident angle. It then takes off and swims away from the surface after some time due to rotational Brownian motion. Based on this analysis, we obtain through computer simulation steady state density distributions that reproduce the ones measured for the small bacteria E coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming near surfaces. These results suggest strongly that Brownian dynamics and surface confinement are the dominant factors for the accumulation of microswimmers near a surface.

  12. LDSS-P: an advanced algorithm to extract functional short motifs associated with coordinated gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichida, Hiroyuki; Long, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functional elements in promoter sequences is a major goal in computational and experimental genome biology. Here, we describe an algorithm, Local Distribution of Short Sequences for Prokaryotes (LDSS-P), to identify conserved short motifs located at specific positions in the promoters of co-expressed prokaryotic genes. As a test case, we applied this algorithm to a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti. The LDSS-P profiles that overlap with the 5′ section of the extracytoplasmic function RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoE2 consensus sequences displayed a sharp peak between -34 and -32 from TSS positions. The corresponding genes overlap significantly with RpoE2 targets identified from previous experiments. We further identified several groups of genes that are co-regulated with characterized marker genes. Our data indicate that in S. meliloti, and possibly in other Rhizobiaceae species, the master cell cycle regulator CtrA may recognize an expanded motif (AACCAT), which is positionally shifted from the previously reported CtrA consensus sequence in Caulobacter crescentus. Bacterial one-hybrid experiments showed that base substitution in the expanded motif either increase or decrease the binding by CtrA. These results show the effectiveness of LDSS-P as a method to delineate functional promoter elements. PMID:27190233

  13. Intracellular chemical gradients: morphing principle in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Robert G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in computational biology allow systematic investigations to ascertain whether internal chemical gradients can be maintained in bacteria – an open question at the resolution limit of fluorescence microscopy. While it was previously believed that the small bacterial cell size and fast diffusion in the cytoplasm effectively remove any such gradient, a new computational study published in BMC Biophysics supports the emerging view that gradients can exist. The study arose from the recent observation that phosphorylated CtrA forms a gradient prior to cell division in Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium known for its complicated cell cycle. Tropini et al. (2012 postulate that such gradients can provide an internal chemical compass, directing protein localization, cell division and cell development. More specifically, they describe biochemical and physical constraints on the formation of such gradients and explore a number of existing bacterial cell morphologies. These chemical gradients may limit in vitro analyses, and may ensure timing control and robustness to fluctuations during critical stages in cell development.

  14. Dissecting the specificity of protein-protein interaction in bacterial two-component signaling: orphans and crosstalks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Procaccini

    Full Text Available Predictive understanding of the myriads of signal transduction pathways in a cell is an outstanding challenge of systems biology. Such pathways are primarily mediated by specific but transient protein-protein interactions, which are difficult to study experimentally. In this study, we dissect the specificity of protein-protein interactions governing two-component signaling (TCS systems ubiquitously used in bacteria. Exploiting the large number of sequenced bacterial genomes and an operon structure which packages many pairs of interacting TCS proteins together, we developed a computational approach to extract a molecular interaction code capturing the preferences of a small but critical number of directly interacting residue pairs. This code is found to reflect physical interaction mechanisms, with the strongest signal coming from charged amino acids. It is used to predict the specificity of TCS interaction: Our results compare favorably to most available experimental results, including the prediction of 7 (out of 8 known interaction partners of orphan signaling proteins in Caulobacter crescentus. Surveying among the available bacterial genomes, our results suggest 15∼25% of the TCS proteins could participate in out-of-operon "crosstalks". Additionally, we predict clusters of crosstalking candidates, expanding from the anecdotally known examples in model organisms. The tools and results presented here can be used to guide experimental studies towards a system-level understanding of two-component signaling.

  15. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Seth Childers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK∼P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interaction between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.

  16. Structure of a putative trans-editing enzyme for prolyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 1.7 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Kazutaka; Kato-Murayama, Miyuki; Katsura, Kazushige; Uchikubo-Kamo, Tomomi; Yamaguchi-Hirafuji, Machiko; Kawazoe, Masahito; Akasaka, Ryogo; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Hori-Takemoto, Chie [RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama (Japan); Terada, Takaho [RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama (Japan); RIKEN Harima Institute at SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan); Shirouzu, Mikako [RIKEN Harima Institute at SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan); Yokoyama, Shigeyuki, E-mail: yokoyama@biochem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama (Japan); RIKEN Harima Institute at SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the APE2540 protein from A. pernix K1 has been determined by the multiple anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å resolution. The structure includes two monomers in the asymmetric unit and shares structural similarity with the YbaK protein or cysteinyl-tRNA{sup Pro} deacylase from H. influenzae. The crystal structure of APE2540, the putative trans-editing enzyme ProX from Aeropyrum pernix K1, was determined in a high-throughput manner. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.4, b = 58.9, c = 53.6 Å, β = 106.8°. The structure was solved by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å and refined to an R factor of 16.8% (R{sub free} = 20.5%). The crystal structure includes two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer consists of eight β-strands and seven α-helices. A structure-homology search revealed similarity between the trans-editing enzyme YbaK (or cysteinyl-tRNA{sup Pro} deacylase) from Haemophilus influenzae (HI1434; 22% sequence identity) and putative ProX proteins from Caulobacter crescentus (16%) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (21%)

  17. Inducible SOS Response System of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina Janion

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal DNA is exposed to continuous damage and repair. Cells contain a number of proteins and specific DNA repair systems that help maintain its correct structure. The SOS response was the first DNA repair system described in Escherichia coli induced upon treatment of bacteria with DNA damaging agents arrest DNA replication and cell division. Induction of the SOS response involves more than forty independent SOS genes, most of which encode proteins engaged in protection, repair, replication, mutagenesis and metabolism of DNA. Under normal growth conditions the SOS genes are expressed at a basal level, which increases distinctly upon induction of the SOS response. The SOS-response has been found in many bacterial species (e.g., Salmonella typhimurium, Caulobacter crescentus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but not in eukaryotic cells. However, species from all kingdoms contain some SOS-like proteins taking part in DNA repair that exhibit amino acid homology and enzymatic activities related to those found in E. coli. but are not organized in an SOS system. This paper presents a brief up-to-date review describing the discovery of the SOS system, the physiology of SOS induction, methods for its determination, and the role of some SOS-induced genes.

  18. On the link between cell cycle and infection of the Alphaproteobacterium Brucella abortus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Deghelt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the Brucella genus are responsible for brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis. These bacteria are known to have a peculiar intracellular trafficking, with a first long and non-proliferative endosomal stage and a second proliferation stage, often associated with its localization of the bacteria in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. However, the status of the bacterial cell cycle during the non-proliferative phase was still unknown. In a recent study [Nat. Communic. 5:4366], we followed the cell cycle of B. abortus in culture and inside the host cells. In culture, B. abortus initiates the replication of its large chromosome before the small chromosome. The origin and terminator regions of these two chromosomes display distinct localization and dynamics within B. abortus. In HeLa cells and RAW264.7 macrophages, the bacteria in G1 (i.e. before the initiation of chromosomes replication are preferentially found during the endosomal stage of the infection. During this period, growth is also arrested. The cell cycle arrest and resume during the B. abortus trafficking in host cell suggest that like the model Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, these bacteria are able to block their cell cycle at the G1 phase when starvation is sensed.

  19. How to make a spiral bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, Charles W.; Inclan, Yuki F.; Quan, Julie; Mukherjee, Sulav; Oster, George; Koehl, M. A. R.

    2005-09-01

    The motility of some kinds of bacteria depends on their spiral form, as does the virulence of certain pathogenic species. We propose a novel mechanism for the development of spiral shape in bacteria and the supercoiling of chains ('filaments') of many cells. Recently discovered actin-like proteins lying just under the cell wall form fibers that play a role in maintaining cell shape. Some species have a single actin-like fiber helically wrapped around the cell, while others have two fibers wrapped in the same direction. Here, we show that if these fibers elongate more slowly than growth lengthens the cell, the cell both twists and bends, taking on a spiral shape. We tested this mechanism using a mathematical model of expanding fiber-wound structures and via experiments that measure the shape changes of elongating physical models. Comparison of the model with in vivo experiments on stationary phase Caulobacter crescentus filaments provide the first evidence that mechanical stretching of cytoskeletal fibers influences cell morphology. Any hydraulic cylinder can spiral by this mechanism if it is reinforced by stretch-resistant fibers wrapped helically in the same direction, or shortened by contractile elements. This might be useful in the design of man-made actuators.

  20. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  1. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  2. A Conserved Mode of Protein Recognition and Binding in a ParD−ParE Toxin−Antitoxin Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2010-05-06

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This TA system forms an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding subdomain that is conserved between distantly related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite a low level of overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system.

  3. Nutritional Control of DNA Replication Initiation through the Proteolysis and Regulated Translation of DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can arrest their own growth and proliferation upon nutrient depletion and under various stressful conditions to ensure their survival. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppressing growth and arresting the cell cycle under such conditions remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify post-transcriptional mechanisms that help enforce a cell-cycle arrest in Caulobacter crescentus following nutrient limitation and during entry into stationary phase by limiting the accumulation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator protein. DnaA is rapidly degraded by the Lon protease following nutrient limitation. However, the rate of DnaA degradation is not significantly altered by changes in nutrient availability. Instead, we demonstrate that decreased nutrient availability downregulates dnaA translation by a mechanism involving the 5' untranslated leader region of the dnaA transcript; Lon-dependent proteolysis of DnaA then outpaces synthesis, leading to the elimination of DnaA and the arrest of DNA replication. Our results demonstrate how regulated translation and constitutive degradation provide cells a means of precisely and rapidly modulating the concentration of key regulatory proteins in response to environmental inputs.

  4. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of xylonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujin Cao

    Full Text Available Xylonate is a valuable chemical for versatile applications. Although the chemical synthesis route and microbial conversion pathway were established decades ago, no commercial production of xylonate has been obtained so far. In this study, the industrially important microorganism Escherichia coli was engineered to produce xylonate from xylose. Through the coexpression of a xylose dehydrogenase (xdh and a xylonolactonase (xylC from Caulobacter crescentus, the recombinant strain could convert 1 g/L xylose to 0.84 g/L xylonate and 0.10 g/L xylonolactone after being induced for 12 h. Furthermore, the competitive pathway for xylose catabolism in E. coli was blocked by disrupting two genes (xylA and xylB encoding xylose isomerase and xylulose kinase. Under fed-batch conditions, the finally engineered strain produced up to 27.3 g/L xylonate and 1.7 g/L xylonolactone from 30 g/L xylose, about 88% of the theoretical yield. These results suggest that the engineered E. coli strain has a promising perspective for large-scale production of xylonate.

  5. Computational and genetic reduction of a cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seán M Murray

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available What are the minimal requirements to sustain an asymmetric cell cycle? Here we use mathematical modelling and forward genetics to reduce an asymmetric cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components. In the Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle progression is believed to be controlled by a cyclical genetic circuit comprising four essential master regulators. Unexpectedly, our in silico modelling predicted that one of these regulators, GcrA, is in fact dispensable. We confirmed this experimentally, finding that ΔgcrA cells are viable, but slow-growing and elongated, with the latter mostly due to an insufficiency of a key cell division protein. Furthermore, suppressor analysis showed that another cell cycle regulator, the methyltransferase CcrM, is similarly dispensable with simultaneous gcrA/ccrM disruption ameliorating the cytokinetic and growth defect of ΔgcrA cells. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, gcrA and ccrM are consistently present or absent together, rather than either gene being present alone, suggesting that gcrA/ccrM constitutes an independent, dispensable genetic module. Together our approaches unveil the essential elements of a primordial asymmetric cell cycle that should help illuminate more complex cell cycles.

  6. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Thomas H.; Seth Childers, W.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Eckart, Michael R.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  7. Filament depolymerization can pull a chromosome during bacterial mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banigan, Edward; Gelbart, Michael; Gitai, Zemer; Liu, Andrea; Wingreen, Ned

    2011-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole and binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, thus pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that is disassembling it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple and physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is ``self-diffusiophoretic'': by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the concentration of ParA is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is controlled by the product of an effective relaxation time for the chromosome and the rate of ParA disassembly. Our results provide a physical explanation of the mechanism of depolymerization-driven translocation and suggest physical explanations for recent experimental observations.

  8. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Characterization of Calcified Microorganisms at the Nanometer-Scale in Experimental and Field Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, K.; Yoon, T.; Menguy, N.; Tyliszczak, T.; Brown, G. E.

    2004-12-01

    Calcium phosphates and calcium carbonates are the most prevalent minerals involved in microbial fossilization. Structural characterization of both the organic and mineral components in such samples is, however, usually difficult at the appropriate spatial resolution, i.e., at the submicrometer scale. We have used a combination of Scanning Transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), a synchrotron-based technique, and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) to characterize both the Ca-containing biominerals and the functional groups present in the organic components associated with them (STXM). These data, in turn, provide a better understanding of the mechanisms, products, and biomolecules involved in microbial calcification. We have studied the experimental biomineralization of the model strain Caulobacter crescentus by calcium phosphates, and the calcification of natural biofilms by aragonite in an alkaline lake in Turkey. The precipitation of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate by microorganisms likely involves different mechanisms. The resulting biominerals were found to have unique features with dimensions in the nanometer-range, preferential crystallographic orientations or unusual morphologies, which provide potential biosignatures. By using C K-edge NEXAFS spectroscopy at a submicrometer scale, we were also able to document the evolution of the organic molecules during the fossilization process and to characterize those involved as templates in the formation of calcium phosphate and carbonate minerals.

  9. Tracing the run-flip motion of an individual bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Morse, Michael; Tang, Jay; Powers, Thomas; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a digital 3D tracking microscope in which the microscope stage follows the motion of an individual motile microorganism so that the target remains focused at the center of the view-field. The tracking mechanism is achieved by a high-speed feedback control through real-time image analysis and the trace of the microorganism is recorded with submicron accuracy. We apply this tracking microscope to a study of the motion of an individual Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium that moves up to 100 microns (or 50 body lengths) per second and reverses its direction of motion occasionally by switching the rotation direction of its single helical flagellum. By tracking the motion of a single cell over many seconds, we show how a flip event occurs with submicron resolution and how the speed of a single cell varies over time and with the rotational rate of the flagellum. We also present statistics for the run-reverse dynamics of an ensemble of cells.

  10. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  11. Chromosome driven spatial patterning of proteins in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Saberi

    Full Text Available The spatial patterning of proteins in bacteria plays an important role in many processes, from cell division to chemotaxis. In the asymmetrically dividing bacteria Caulobacter crescentus, a scaffolding protein, PopZ, localizes to both poles and aids the differential patterning of proteins between mother and daughter cells during division. Polar patterning of misfolded proteins in Escherichia coli has also been shown, and likely plays an important role in cellular ageing. Recent experiments on both of the above systems suggest that the presence of chromosome free regions along with protein multimerization may be a mechanism for driving the polar localization of proteins. We have developed a simple physical model for protein localization using only these two driving mechanisms. Our model reproduces all the observed patterns of PopZ and misfolded protein localization--from diffuse, unipolar, and bipolar patterns and can also account for the observed patterns in a variety of mutants. The model also suggests new experiments to further test the role of the chromosome in driving protein patterning, and whether such a mechanism is responsible for helping to drive the differentiation of the cell poles.

  12. Experimental evolution of aging in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stearns Stephen C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging refers to a decline in reproduction and survival with increasing age. According to evolutionary theory, aging evolves because selection late in life is weak and mutations exist whose deleterious effects manifest only late in life. Whether the assumptions behind this theory are fulfilled in all organisms, and whether all organisms age, has not been clear. We tested the generality of this theory by experimental evolution with Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium whose asymmetric division allows mother and daughter to be distinguished. Results We evolved three populations for 2000 generations in the laboratory under conditions where selection was strong early in life, but very weak later in life. All populations evolved faster growth rates, mostly by decreasing the age at first division. Evolutionary changes in aging were inconsistent. The predominant response was the unexpected evolution of slower aging, revealing the limits of theoretical predictions if mutations have unanticipated phenotypic effects. However, we also observed the spread of a mutation causing earlier aging of mothers whose negative effect was reset in the daughters. Conclusion Our results confirm that late-acting deleterious mutations do occur in bacteria and that they can invade populations when selection late in life is weak. They suggest that very few organisms – perhaps none- can avoid the accumulation of such mutations over evolutionary time, and thus that aging is probably a fundamental property of all cellular organisms.

  13. A novel roseobacter phage possesses features of podoviruses, siphoviruses, prophages and gene transfer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yuanchao; Huang, Sijun; Voget, Sonja; Simon, Meinhard; Chen, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria in the Roseobacter lineage have been studied extensively due to their significant biogeochemical roles in the marine ecosystem. However, our knowledge on bacteriophage which infects the Roseobacter clade is still very limited. Here, we report a new bacteriophage, phage DSS3Φ8, which infects marine roseobacter Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. DSS3Φ8 is a lytic siphovirus. Genomic analysis showed that DSS3Φ8 is most closely related to a group of siphoviruses, CbK-like phages, which infect freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. DSS3Φ8 contains a smaller capsid and has a reduced genome size (146 kb) compared to the CbK-like phages (205–279 kb). DSS3Φ8 contains the DNA polymerase gene which is closely related to T7-like podoviruses. DSS3Φ8 also contains the integrase and repressor genes, indicating its potential to involve in lysogenic cycle. In addition, four GTA (gene transfer agent) genes were identified in the DSS3Φ8 genome. Genomic analysis suggests that DSS3Φ8 is a highly mosaic phage that inherits the genetic features from siphoviruses, podoviruses, prophages and GTAs. This is the first report of CbK-like phages infecting marine bacteria. We believe phage isolation is still a powerful tool that can lead to discovery of new phages and help interpret the overwhelming unknown sequences in the viral metagenomics.

  14. Low pH D-xylonate production with Pichia kudriavzevii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivari, Mervi; Vehkomäki, Maija-Leena; Nygård, Yvonne; Penttilä, Merja; Ruohonen, Laura; Wiebe, Marilyn G

    2013-04-01

    D-xylonic acid is one of the top 30 most desirable chemicals to be derived from biomass sugars identified by the US Department of Energy, being applicable as a non-food substitute for D-gluconic acid and as a platform chemical. We engineered the non-conventional yeast Pichia kudriavzevii VTT C-79090T to express a D-xylose dehydrogenase coding gene from Caulobacter crescentus. With this single modification the recombinant P. kudriavzevii strain produced up to 171 g L(-1) of D-xylonate from 171 g L(-1) D-xylose at a rate of 1.4 g L(-1) h(-1) and yield of 1.0 g [g substrate consumed](-1), which was comparable with D-xylonate production by Gluconobacter oxydans or Pseudomonas sp. The productivity of the strain was also remarkable at low pH, producing 146 g L(-1) D-xylonate at 1.2 g L(-1) h(-1) at pH 3.0. This is the best low pH production reported for D-xylonate. These results encourage further development towards industrial scale production.

  15. High yield production of D-xylonic acid from D-xylose using engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaiwei; Valdehuesa, Kris Niño G; Nisola, Grace M; Ramos, Kristine Rose M; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2012-07-01

    An engineered Escherichia coli was constructed to produce D-xylonic acid, one of the top 30 high-value chemicals identified by US Department of Energy. The native pathway for D-xylose catabolism in E. coli W3110 was blocked by disrupting xylose isomerase (XI) and xylulose kinase (XK) genes. The native pathway for xylonic acid catabolism was also blocked by disrupting two genes both encoding xylonic acid dehydratase (yagE and yjhG). Through the introduction of a D-xylose dehydrogenase from Caulobacter crescentus, a D-xylonic acid producing E. coli was constructed. The recombinant E. coli produced up to 39.2 g L(-1) D-xylonic acid from 40 g L(-1) D-xylose in M9 minimal medium. The average productivity was as high as 1.09 g L(-1) h(-1) and no gluconic acid byproduct was produced. These results suggest that the engineered E. coli has a promising application for the industrial-scale production of D-xylonic acid.

  16. A novel roseobacter phage possesses features of podoviruses, siphoviruses, prophages and gene transfer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yuanchao; Huang, Sijun; Voget, Sonja; Simon, Meinhard; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria in the Roseobacter lineage have been studied extensively due to their significant biogeochemical roles in the marine ecosystem. However, our knowledge on bacteriophage which infects the Roseobacter clade is still very limited. Here, we report a new bacteriophage, phage DSS3Φ8, which infects marine roseobacter Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. DSS3Φ8 is a lytic siphovirus. Genomic analysis showed that DSS3Φ8 is most closely related to a group of siphoviruses, CbK-like phages, which infect freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. DSS3Φ8 contains a smaller capsid and has a reduced genome size (146 kb) compared to the CbK-like phages (205-279 kb). DSS3Φ8 contains the DNA polymerase gene which is closely related to T7-like podoviruses. DSS3Φ8 also contains the integrase and repressor genes, indicating its potential to involve in lysogenic cycle. In addition, four GTA (gene transfer agent) genes were identified in the DSS3Φ8 genome. Genomic analysis suggests that DSS3Φ8 is a highly mosaic phage that inherits the genetic features from siphoviruses, podoviruses, prophages and GTAs. This is the first report of CbK-like phages infecting marine bacteria. We believe phage isolation is still a powerful tool that can lead to discovery of new phages and help interpret the overwhelming unknown sequences in the viral metagenomics. PMID:27460944

  17. The bacterial tubulin FtsZ requires its intrinsically disordered linker to direct robust cell wall construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Kousik; Miguel, Amanda; Desmarais, Samantha M; Meier, Elizabeth L; Casey Huang, Kerwyn; Goley, Erin D

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial GTPase FtsZ forms a cytokinetic ring at midcell, recruits the division machinery and orchestrates membrane and peptidoglycan cell wall invagination. However, the mechanism for FtsZ regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism is unknown. The FtsZ GTPase domain is separated from its membrane-anchoring C-terminal conserved (CTC) peptide by a disordered C-terminal linker (CTL). Here we investigate CTL function in Caulobacter crescentus. Strikingly, production of FtsZ lacking the CTL (ΔCTL) is lethal: cells become filamentous, form envelope bulges and lyse, resembling treatment with β-lactam antibiotics. This phenotype is produced by FtsZ polymers bearing the CTC and a CTL shorter than 14 residues. Peptidoglycan synthesis still occurs downstream of ΔCTL; however, cells expressing ΔCTL exhibit reduced peptidoglycan crosslinking and longer glycan strands than wild type. Importantly, midcell proteins are still recruited to sites of ΔCTL assembly. We propose that FtsZ regulates peptidoglycan metabolism through a CTL-dependent mechanism that extends beyond simple protein recruitment. PMID:26099469

  18. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Badri N; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-09-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling. PMID:27652341

  19. Cell Cycle Control by the Master Regulator CtrA in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In all domains of life, proper regulation of the cell cycle is critical to coordinate genome replication, segregation and cell division. In some groups of bacteria, e.g. Alphaproteobacteria, tight regulation of the cell cycle is also necessary for the morphological and functional differentiation of cells. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an alphaproteobacterium that forms an economically and ecologically important nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with specific legume hosts. During this symbiosis S. meliloti undergoes an elaborate cellular differentiation within host root cells. The differentiation of S. meliloti results in massive amplification of the genome, cell branching and/or elongation, and loss of reproductive capacity. In Caulobacter crescentus, cellular differentiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle via the activity of the master regulator CtrA, and recent research in S. meliloti suggests that CtrA might also be key to cellular differentiation during symbiosis. However, the regulatory circuit driving cell cycle progression in S. meliloti is not well characterized in both the free-living and symbiotic state. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of CtrA in S. meliloti. We demonstrated that depletion of CtrA cause cell elongation, branching and genome amplification, similar to that observed in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. We also showed that the cell cycle regulated proteolytic degradation of CtrA is essential in S. meliloti, suggesting a possible mechanism of CtrA depletion in differentiated bacteroids. Using a combination of ChIP-Seq and gene expression microarray analysis we found that although S. meliloti CtrA regulates similar processes as C. crescentus CtrA, it does so through different target genes. For example, our data suggest that CtrA does not control the expression of the Fts complex to control the timing of cell division during the cell cycle, but instead it negatively regulates the septum-inhibiting Min system. Our

  20. Biosynthesis of D-1,2,4-butanetriol from D-xylose by recombinant Escherichia coli%重组大肠杆菌利用D-木糖合成D-1,2,4-丁三醇

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马鹏飞; 蒙坚; 周静; 高海军

    2015-01-01

    1,2,4-Butanetriol (BT) is an important organic synthetic intermediate. In this study, the metabolic network of Escherichia coli was reconstructed by heterogeneously expressing a keto acid decarboxylase (mdlC) from Pseudomonas putida ATCC12633 and a D-xylose dehydrogenase (xdh) from Caulobacter crescentus CB15, and knocking out xylA, yjhH and yagE which were the genes of xylose utilization pathway and intermediary metabolite pathway for D-1,2,4-butanetriol synthesis. The recombinant strain could synthesize D-1,2,4-butanetriol directly using D-xylose as precursor. Culture conditions such as temperature, medium volume, pH of fermentation broth were investigated at the titer of D-1,2,4-butanetriol of 3.96 g·L−1 under suitable fermentation conditions. The relationship between glucose utilization and D-1,2,4-butanetriol synthesis was discussed. After modifying the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) by knocking out ptsG the reconstructed E.coli could utilize glucose and xylose simultaneously, leading to a higher D-1,2,4-butanetriol productivity.%1,2,4-丁三醇(1,2,4-butanetriol, BT)是一种重要的有机合成中间体。通过克隆表达恶臭假单胞菌(Pseudomonas putida ATCC12633)2-酮酸脱羧酶(mdlC)和新月柄杆菌(Caulobacter crescentus CB15)D-木糖脱氢酶(xdh),敲除木糖利用和 D-1,2,4-丁三醇合成中间代谢物分解途径中关键基因木糖异构酶(xylA)和2-酮酸醛缩酶(yjhH和yagE),重构大肠杆菌代谢网络,得到了能够将D-木糖转化为D-1,2,4-丁三醇的重组菌株。考察了温度、装液量、pH控制等条件对重组菌株合成D-1,2,4-丁三醇的影响,在适宜条件下发酵36 h后D-1,2,4-丁三醇产量达到3.96 g·L−1。探讨了葡萄糖利用与丁三醇合成的关系,通过敲除编码酶 IICBGlc的 ptsG 基因改造重组菌株的磷酸烯醇式丙酮酸葡萄糖转移酶(phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system, PTS)系

  1. Elucidation of a novel lipid A α-(1,1)-GalA transferase gene (rgtF) from Mesorhizobium loti: Heterologous expression of rgtF causes Rhizobium etli to synthesize lipid A with α-(1,1)-GalA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dusty B; Muszynski, Artur; Carlson, Russell W

    2013-05-01

    An unusual α-(1,1)-galacturonic acid (GalA) lipid A modification has been reported in the lipopolysaccharide of a number of interesting Gram-negative bacteria, including the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azospirillum lipoferum, Mesorhizobium huakuii and M. loti, the stalk-forming bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. However, the α-(1,1)-GalA transferase (GalAT) gene, which we have named RgtF, was not identified. Species of the Rhizobium genera produce lipid A with α-(1,4')-GalA but not α-(1,1)-GalA. The Rhizobium GalAT, RgtD, is the lipid A α-(1-4')-GalAT which utilizes the lipid donor dodecaprenyl-phosphate GalA (Dod-P-GalA) for GalA transfer. An additional Rhizobium GalAT, RgtE, is required for the biosynthesis of Dod-P-GalA. We predicted candidate rgtF genes in bacterial species known to produce lipid A with α-(1,1)-GalA. In order to determine the predicted rgtF gene function, we cloned the M. loti rgtF gene into an expression plasmid and introduced that plasmid into Rhizobium etli strains that do not contain the rgtF gene nor produce lipid A α-(1,1)-GalA. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis combined with NMR studies revealed that the lipid As from these rgtF-complemented strains were modified with an additional α-(1,1)-GalA attached to the proximal glucosamine. PMID:23283001

  2. Plant carbohydrate scavenging through tonB-dependent receptors: a feature shared by phytopathogenic and aquatic bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servane Blanvillain

    Full Text Available TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs are outer membrane proteins mainly known for the active transport of iron siderophore complexes in Gram-negative bacteria. Analysis of the genome of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, predicts 72 TBDRs. Such an overrepresentation is common in Xanthomonas species but is limited to only a small number of bacteria. Here, we show that one Xcc TBDR transports sucrose with a very high affinity, suggesting that it might be a sucrose scavenger. This TBDR acts with an inner membrane transporter, an amylosucrase and a regulator to utilize sucrose, thus defining a new type of carbohydrate utilization locus, named CUT locus, involving a TBDR for the transport of substrate across the outer membrane. This sucrose CUT locus is required for full pathogenicity on Arabidopsis, showing its importance for the adaptation to host plants. A systematic analysis of Xcc TBDR genes and a genome context survey suggested that several Xcc TBDRs belong to other CUT loci involved in the utilization of various plant carbohydrates. Interestingly, several Xcc TBDRs and CUT loci are conserved in aquatic bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus, Colwellia psychrerythraea, Saccharophagus degradans, Shewanella spp., Sphingomonas spp. or Pseudoalteromonas spp., which share the ability to degrade a wide variety of complex carbohydrates and display TBDR overrepresentation. We therefore propose that TBDR overrepresentation and the presence of CUT loci designate the ability to scavenge carbohydrates. Thus CUT loci, which seem to participate to the adaptation of phytopathogenic bacteria to their host plants, might also play a very important role in the biogeochemical cycling of plant-derived nutrients in marine environments. Moreover, the TBDRs and CUT loci identified in this study are clearly different from those characterized in the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which allow glycan foraging

  3. Accommodation of GDP-Linked Sugars in the Active Site of GDP-Perosamine Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Paul D.; Carney, Amanda E.; Holden, Hazel M. (UW)

    2009-01-12

    Perosamine (4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-mannose), or its N-acetylated form, is one of several dideoxy sugars found in the O-antigens of such infamous Gram-negative bacteria as Vibrio cholerae O1 and Escherichia coli O157:H7. It is added to the bacterial O-antigen via a nucleotide-linked version, namely GDP-perosamine. Three enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of GDP-perosamine starting from mannose 1-phosphate. The focus of this investigation is GDP-perosamine synthase from Caulobacter crescentus, which catalyzes the final step in GDP-perosamine synthesis, the conversion of GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose to GDP-perosamine. The enzyme is PLP-dependent and belongs to the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily. It contains the typically conserved active site lysine residue, which forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor. Two crystal structures were determined for this investigation: a site-directed mutant protein (K186A) complexed with GDP-perosamine and the wild-type enzyme complexed with an unnatural ligand, GDP-3-deoxyperosamine. These structures, determined to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, revealed the manner in which products, and presumably substrates, are accommodated within the active site pocket of GDP-perosamine synthase. Additional kinetic analyses using both the natural and unnatural substrates revealed that the K{sub m} for the unnatural substrate was unperturbed relative to that of the natural substrate, but the k{sub cat} was lowered by a factor of approximately 200. Taken together, these studies shed light on why GDP-perosamine synthase functions as an aminotransferase whereas another very similar PLP-dependent enzyme, GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose 3-dehydratase or ColD, catalyzes a dehydration reaction using the same substrate.

  4. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Skerker

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein-protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK-CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this

  5. ParABS system in chromosome partitioning in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A Iniesta

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is an essential cellular function in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. The ParABS system is a fundamental player for a mitosis-like process in chromosome partitioning in many bacterial species. This work shows that the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus also uses the ParABS system for chromosome segregation. Its large prokaryotic genome of 9.1 Mb contains 22 parS sequences near the origin of replication, and it is shown here that M. xanthus ParB binds preferentially to a consensus parS sequence in vitro. ParB and ParA are essential for cell viability in M. xanthus as in Caulobacter crescentus, but unlike in many other bacteria. Absence of ParB results in anucleate cells, chromosome segregation defects and loss of viability. Analysis of ParA subcellular localization shows that it clusters at the poles in all cells, and in some, in the DNA-free cell division plane between two chromosomal DNA masses. This ParA localization pattern depends on ParB but not on FtsZ. ParB inhibits the nonspecific interaction of ParA with DNA, and ParA colocalizes with chromosomal DNA only when ParB is depleted. The subcellular localization of ParB suggests a single ParB-parS complex localized at the edge of the nucleoid, next to a polar ParA cluster, with a second ParB-parS complex migrating after the replication of parS takes place to the opposite nucleoid edge, next to the other polar ParA cluster.

  6. A structural model of anti-anti-[sigma] inhibition by a two-component receiver domain: the PhyR stress response regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2012-05-09

    PhyR is a hybrid stress regulator conserved in {alpha}-proteobacteria that contains an N-terminal {sigma}-like (SL) domain and a C-terminal receiver domain. Phosphorylation of the receiver domain is known to promote binding of the SL domain to an anti-{sigma} factor. PhyR thus functions as an anti-anti-{sigma} factor in its phosphorylated state. We present genetic evidence that Caulobacter crescentus PhyR is a phosphorylation-dependent stress regulator that functions in the same pathway as {sigma}{sup T} and its anti-{sigma} factor, NepR. Additionally, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PhyR at 1.25 {angstrom} resolution, which provides insight into the mechanism of anti-anti-{sigma} regulation. Direct intramolecular contact between the PhyR receiver and SL domains spans regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4}, likely serving to stabilize the SL domain in a closed conformation. The molecular surface of the receiver domain contacting the SL domain is the structural equivalent of {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, which is known to undergo dynamic conformational change upon phosphorylation in a diverse range of receiver proteins. We propose a structural model of PhyR regulation in which receiver phosphorylation destabilizes the intramolecular interaction between SL and receiver domains, thereby permitting regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4} in the SL domain to open about a flexible connector loop and bind anti-{sigma} factor.

  7. Functional Identification of Incorrectly Annotated Prolidases from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.; Patskovsky, Y; Xu, C; Meyer, A; Sauder, J; Burley, S; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    The substrate profiles for two proteins from Caulobacter crescentus CB15 (Cc2672 and Cc3125) and one protein (Sgx9359b) derived from a DNA sequence (gi|44368820) isolated from the Sargasso Sea were determined using combinatorial libraries of dipeptides and N-acyl derivatives of amino acids. These proteins are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and are currently misannotated in NCBI as catalyzing the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Pro dipeptides. Cc2672 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides and the N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of lysine and arginine. This enzyme will also hydrolyze longer peptides that terminate in either lysine or arginine. The N-methyl phosphonate derivative of l-lysine was a potent competitive inhibitor of Cc2672 with a Ki value of 120 nM. Cc3125 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides but will not hydrolyze tripeptides or the N-formyl and N-acetyl derivatives of lysine or arginine. The substrate profile for Sgx9359b is similar to that of Cc2672 except that compounds with a C-terminal lysine are not recognized as substrates. The X-ray structure of Sgx9359b was determined to a resolution of 2.3 Angstroms. The protein folds as a (e/a)8-barrel and self-associates to form a homooctamer. The active site is composed of a binuclear metal center similar to that found in phosphotriesterase and dihydroorotase. In one crystal form, arginine was bound adventitiously to the eight active sites within the octamer. The orientation of the arginine in the active site identified the structural determinants for recognition of the a-carboxylate and the positively charged side chains of arginine-containing substrates. This information was used to identify 18 other bacterial sequences that possess identical or similar substrate profiles.

  8. Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1磁小体缺失突变株NM4 Tn5侧翼序列的克隆及功能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李峰; 李颖; 姜伟; 王珍芳; 李季伦

    2005-01-01

    利用mini-Tn5 lacZ2对格瑞菲斯瓦尔德磁螺菌(Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense)MSR-1进行转座插入突变, 获得磁小体缺失突变株NM4.通过锚定PCR(anchored PCR)从NM4中克隆出Tn5插入位点的侧翼序列, 获得长5045 bp的DNA 片段, 其中含有6个ORFs, Tn5插入在ORF4中.功能互补实验证明该片段与磁小体的合成有关.对ORF4编码的蛋白进行同源比较和功能分析, 发现ORF4编码的蛋白与Caulobacter crescentus CB15的长为200 AA的趋化蛋白CheYIII的同源性为25% (30/116), 且ORF4编码的蛋白也具有与CheYIII相同的接收磷酸基团的REC结构域, 可进行信号传递, 因此推测ORF4编码的蛋白可能参与磁小体合成过程中的某种(低氧分压或铁离子浓度)信号的转导.

  9. An Analysis of the Solution Structure and Signaling Mechanism of LovK, a Sensor Histidine Kinase Integrating Light and Redox Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, Erin B.; McDonald, Claudia A.; Palfey, Bruce A.; Crosson, Sean (Michigan-Med); (UC)

    2010-12-07

    Flavin-binding LOV domains are broadly conserved in plants, fungi, archaea, and bacteria. These {approx}100-residue photosensory modules are generally encoded within larger, multidomain proteins that control a range of blue light-dependent physiologies. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus encodes a soluble LOV-histidine kinase, LovK, that regulates the adhesive properties of the cell. Full-length LovK is dimeric as are a series of systematically truncated LovK constructs containing only the N-terminal LOV sensory domain. Nonconserved sequence flanking the LOV domain functions to tune the signaling lifetime of the protein. Size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) demonstrate that the LOV sensor domain does not undergo a large conformational change in response to photon absorption. However, limited proteolysis identifies a sequence flanking the C-terminus of the LOV domain as a site of light-induced change in protein conformation and dynamics. On the basis of SAXS envelope reconstruction and bioinformatic prediction, we propose this dynamic region of structure is an extended C-terminal coiled coil that links the LOV domain to the histidine kinase domain. To test the hypothesis that LOV domain signaling is affected by cellular redox state in addition to light, we measured the reduction potential of the LovK FMN cofactor. The measured potential of -258 mV is congruent with the redox potential of Gram-negative cytoplasm during logarithmic growth (-260 to -280 mV). Thus, a fraction of LovK in the cytosol may be in the reduced state under typical growth conditions. Chemical reduction of the FMN cofactor of LovK attenuates the light-dependent ATPase activity of the protein in vitro, demonstrating that LovK can function as a conditional photosensor that is regulated by the oxidative state of the cellular environment.

  10. A structural model of anti-anti-[sigma];#963; inhibition by a two-component receiver domain: the PhyR stress response regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2012-03-30

    PhyR is a hybrid stress regulator conserved in {alpha}-proteobacteria that contains an N-terminal {sigma}-like (SL) domain and a C-terminal receiver domain. Phosphorylation of the receiver domain is known to promote binding of the SL domain to an anti-{sigma} factor. PhyR thus functions as an anti-anti-{sigma} factor in its phosphorylated state. We present genetic evidence that Caulobacter crescentus PhyR is a phosphorylation-dependent stress regulator that functions in the same pathway as {sigma}{sup T} and its anti-{sigma} factor, NepR. Additionally, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PhyR at 1.25 {angstrom} resolution, which provides insight into the mechanism of anti-anti-{sigma} regulation. Direct intramolecular contact between the PhyR receiver and SL domains spans regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4}, likely serving to stabilize the SL domain in a closed conformation. The molecular surface of the receiver domain contacting the SL domain is the structural equivalent of {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, which is known to undergo dynamic conformational change upon phosphorylation in a diverse range of receiver proteins. We propose a structural model of PhyR regulation in which receiver phosphorylation destabilizes the intramolecular interaction between SL and receiver domains, thereby permitting regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4} in the SL domain to open about a flexible connector loop and bind anti-{sigma} factor.

  11. Enhancement of flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Sha, Sha; Pelcovits, Robert; Tang, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of the swimming speed of many species of flagellated bacteria in polymer solutions have shown that with the addition of high molecular weight polymers, the speed initially increases as a function of the kinematic viscosity. It peaks at around 1.5-2 cP with typically 10-30% higher values than in cell media without added polymers (~ 1 cP). Past the peak, the average speed gradually decreases as the solution becomes more viscous. Swimming motility persists until solution viscosity reaches 5-10 cP. Models have been proposed to account for this behavior, and the magnitude of the peak becomes a crucial test of theoretical predictions. The status of the field is complicated in light of a recent report (Martinez et al., PNAS, 2014), stressing that low-molecular weight impurities account for the peaked speed-viscosity curves in some cases. We measured the swimming speed of a uni-flagellated bacterium, caulobacter crescentus, in solutions of a number of polymers of several different sizes. Our findings confirm the peaked speed-viscosity curve, only as the molecular weight of the flexible polymers used surpassed ~ 50,000 da. The threshold molecular weight required to augment swimming speed varies somewhat with the polymer species, but it generally corresponds to radius of gyration over tens of nanometers. This general feature is consistent with the model of Powers et al. (Physics of Fluid, 2009), predicting that nonlinear viscoelasticity of the fluid enhances swimming motility. Work Supported by the NSF Fluid Physics Program (Award number CBET 1438033).

  12. Comparative 3-D Modeling of tmRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wower Iwona

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trans-translation releases stalled ribosomes from truncated mRNAs and tags defective proteins for proteolytic degradation using transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA. This small stable RNA represents a hybrid of tRNA- and mRNA-like domains connected by a variable number of pseudoknots. Comparative sequence analysis of tmRNAs found in bacteria, plastids, and mitochondria provides considerable insights into their secondary structures. Progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of template switching, which constitutes an essential step in trans-translation, is hampered by our limited knowledge about the three-dimensional folding of tmRNA. Results To facilitate experimental testing of the molecular intricacies of trans-translation, which often require appropriately modified tmRNA derivatives, we developed a procedure for building three-dimensional models of tmRNA. Using comparative sequence analysis, phylogenetically-supported 2-D structures were obtained to serve as input for the program ERNA-3D. Motifs containing loops and turns were extracted from the known structures of other RNAs and used to improve the tmRNA models. Biologically feasible 3-D models for the entire tmRNA molecule could be obtained. The models were characterized by a functionally significant close proximity between the tRNA-like domain and the resume codon. Potential conformational changes which might lead to a more open structure of tmRNA upon binding to the ribosome are discussed. The method, described in detail for the tmRNAs of Escherichia coli, Bacillus anthracis, and Caulobacter crescentus, is applicable to every tmRNA. Conclusion Improved molecular models of biological significance were obtained. These models will guide in the design of experiments and provide a better understanding of trans-translation. The comparative procedure described here for tmRNA is easily adopted for the modeling the members of other RNA families.

  13. Model-based deconvolution of cell cycle time-series data reveals gene expression details at high resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Siegal-Gaskins

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, gene expression is regulated across the cell cycle to ensure "just-in-time" assembly of select cellular structures and molecular machines. However, present in all time-series gene expression measurements is variability that arises from both systematic error in the cell synchrony process and variance in the timing of cell division at the level of the single cell. Thus, gene or protein expression data collected from a population of synchronized cells is an inaccurate measure of what occurs in the average single-cell across a cell cycle. Here, we present a general computational method to extract "single-cell"-like information from population-level time-series expression data. This method removes the effects of 1 variance in growth rate and 2 variance in the physiological and developmental state of the cell. Moreover, this method represents an advance in the deconvolution of molecular expression data in its flexibility, minimal assumptions, and the use of a cross-validation analysis to determine the appropriate level of regularization. Applying our deconvolution algorithm to cell cycle gene expression data from the dimorphic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, we recovered critical features of cell cycle regulation in essential genes, including ctrA and ftsZ, that were obscured in population-based measurements. In doing so, we highlight the problem with using population data alone to decipher cellular regulatory mechanisms and demonstrate how our deconvolution algorithm can be applied to produce a more realistic picture of temporal regulation in a cell.

  14. Catalytic Mechanism of Perosamine N-Acetyltransferase Revealed by High-Resolution X-ray Crystallographic Studies and Kinetic Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoden, James B.; Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Cook, Paul D.; Menden, Patrick; Cleland, W.W.; Holden, Hazel M. (UW); (Mount Union); (UW-MED)

    2012-09-17

    N-Acetylperosamine is an unusual dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of some Gram-negative bacteria, including the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. The last step in its biosynthesis is catalyzed by PerB, an N-acetyltransferase belonging to the left-handed {beta}-helix superfamily of proteins. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of PerB from Caulobacter crescentus. For this study, three structures were determined to 1.0 {angstrom} resolution or better: the enzyme in complex with CoA and GDP-perosamine, the protein with bound CoA and GDP-N-acetylperosamine, and the enzyme containing a tetrahedral transition state mimic bound in the active site. Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme folds into two distinct regions. The N-terminal domain is globular and dominated by a six-stranded mainly parallel {beta}-sheet. It provides most of the interactions between the protein and GDP-perosamine. The C-terminal domain consists of a left-handed {beta}-helix, which has nearly seven turns. This region provides the scaffold for CoA binding. On the basis of these high-resolution structures, site-directed mutant proteins were constructed to test the roles of His 141 and Asp 142 in the catalytic mechanism. Kinetic data and pH-rate profiles are indicative of His 141 serving as a general base. In addition, the backbone amide group of Gly 159 provides an oxyanion hole for stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state. The pH-rate profiles are also consistent with the GDP-linked amino sugar substrate entering the active site in its unprotonated form. Finally, for this investigation, we show that PerB can accept GDP-3-deoxyperosamine as an alternative substrate, thus representing the production of a novel trideoxysugar.

  15. Filament depolymerization can explain chromosome pulling during bacterial mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Banigan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole, binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that disassembles it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple, physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is "self-diffusiophoretic": by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is most robust when ParB binds side-on to ParA filaments. In this case, robust translocation occurs over a wide parameter range and is controlled by a single dimensionless quantity: the product of the rate of ParA disassembly and a characteristic relaxation time of the chromosome. This time scale measures the time it takes for the chromosome to recover its average shape after it is has been pulled. Our results suggest explanations for observed phenomena such as segregation failure, filament-length-dependent translocation velocity, and chromosomal compaction.

  16. Microbial D-xylonate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivari, Mervi H; Nygård, Yvonne; Penttilä, Merja; Ruohonen, Laura; Wiebe, Marilyn G

    2012-10-01

    D-Xylonic acid is a versatile platform chemical with reported applications as complexing agent or chelator, in dispersal of concrete, and as a precursor for compounds such as co-polyamides, polyesters, hydrogels and 1,2,4-butanetriol. With increasing glucose prices, D-xylonic acid may provide a cheap, non-food derived alternative for gluconic acid, which is widely used (about 80 kton/year) in pharmaceuticals, food products, solvents, adhesives, dyes, paints and polishes. Large-scale production has not been developed, reflecting the current limited market for D-xylonate. D-Xylonic acid occurs naturally, being formed in the first step of oxidative metabolism of D-xylose by some archaea and bacteria via the action of D-xylose or D-glucose dehydrogenases. High extracellular concentrations of D-xylonate have been reported for various bacteria, in particular Gluconobacter oxydans and Pseudomonas putida. High yields of D-xylonate from D-xylose make G. oxydans an attractive choice for biotechnical production. G. oxydans is able to produce D-xylonate directly from plant biomass hydrolysates, but rates and yields are reduced because of sensitivity to hydrolysate inhibitors. Recently, D-xylonate has been produced by the genetically modified bacterium Escherichia coli and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis. Expression of NAD(+)-dependent D-xylose dehydrogenase of Caulobacter crescentus in either E. coli or in a robust, hydrolysate-tolerant, industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain has resulted in D-xylonate titres, which are comparable to those seen with G. oxydans, at a volumetric rate approximately 30% of that observed with G. oxydans. With further development, genetically modified microbes may soon provide an alternative for production of D-xylonate at industrial scale.

  17. Cell cycle-dependent adaptor complex for ClpXP-mediated proteolysis directly integrates phosphorylation and second messenger signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen C; Joshi, Kamal K; Zik, Justin J; Trinh, Katherine; Kamajaya, Aron; Chien, Peter; Ryan, Kathleen R

    2014-09-30

    The cell-division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus depends on periodic activation and deactivation of the essential response regulator CtrA. Although CtrA is critical for transcription during some parts of the cell cycle, its activity must be eliminated before chromosome replication because CtrA also blocks the initiation of DNA replication. CtrA activity is down-regulated both by dephosphorylation and by proteolysis, mediated by the ubiquitous ATP-dependent protease ClpXP. Here we demonstrate that proteins needed for rapid CtrA proteolysis in vivo form a phosphorylation-dependent and cyclic diguanylate (cdG)-dependent adaptor complex that accelerates CtrA degradation in vitro by ClpXP. The adaptor complex includes CpdR, a single-domain response regulator; PopA, a cdG-binding protein; and RcdA, a protein whose activity cannot be predicted. When CpdR is unphosphorylated and when PopA is bound to cdG, they work together with RcdA in an all-or-none manner to reduce the Km of CtrA proteolysis 10-fold. We further identified a set of amino acids in the receiver domain of CtrA that modulate its adaptor-mediated degradation in vitro and in vivo. Complex formation between PopA and CtrA depends on these amino acids, which reside on alpha-helix 1 of the CtrA receiver domain, and on cdG binding by PopA. These results reveal that each accessory factor plays an essential biochemical role in the regulated proteolysis of CtrA and demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first example of a multiprotein, cdG-dependent proteolytic adaptor.

  18. Study of Class I and Class III Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Synthases with Substrates Containing a Modified Side Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kaimin; Cao, Ruikai; Hua, Duy H; Li, Ping

    2016-04-11

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are carbon and energy storage polymers produced by a variety of microbial organisms under nutrient-limited conditions. They have been considered as an environmentally friendly alternative to oil-based plastics due to their renewability, versatility, and biodegradability. PHA synthase (PhaC) plays a central role in PHA biosynthesis, in which its activity and substrate specificity are major factors in determining the productivity and properties of the produced polymers. However, the effects of modifying the substrate side chain are not well understood because of the difficulty to accessing the desired analogues. In this report, a series of 3-(R)-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A (HACoA) analogues were synthesized and tested with class I synthases from Chromobacterium sp. USM2 (PhaCCs and A479S-PhaCCs) and Caulobacter crescentus (PhaCCc) as well as class III synthase from Allochromatium vinosum (PhaECAv). It was found that, while different PHA synthases displayed distinct preference with regard to the length of the alkyl side chains, they could withstand moderate side chain modifications such as terminal unsaturated bonds and the azide group. Specifically, the specific activity of PhaCCs toward propynyl analogue (HHxyCoA) was only 5-fold less than that toward the classical substrate HBCoA. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of PhaECAv toward azide analogue (HABCoA) was determined to be 2.86 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which was 6.2% of the value of HBCoA (4.62 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)) measured in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). These side chain modifications may be employed to introduce new material functions to PHAs as well as to study PHA biogenesis via click-chemistry, in which the latter remains unknown and is important for metabolic engineering to produce PHAs economically. PMID:26974339

  19. Exploring mitochondrial evolution and metabolism organization principles by comparative analysis of metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiao; Wang, Zhuo; Hao, Pei; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yi-Xue

    2010-06-01

    The endosymbiotic theory proposed that mitochondrial genomes are derived from an alpha-proteobacterium-like endosymbiont, which was concluded from sequence analysis. We rebuilt the metabolic networks of mitochondria and 22 relative species, and studied the evolution of mitochondrial metabolism at the level of enzyme content and network topology. Our phylogenetic results based on network alignment and motif identification supported the endosymbiotic theory from the point of view of systems biology for the first time. It was found that the mitochondrial metabolic network were much more compact than the relative species, probably related to the higher efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation of the specialized organelle, and the network is highly clustered around the TCA cycle. Moreover, the mitochondrial metabolic network exhibited high functional specificity to the modules. This work provided insight to the understanding of mitochondria evolution, and the organization principle of mitochondrial metabolic network at the network level.

  20. Wolbachia infections in natural Anopheles populations affect egg laying and negatively correlate with Plasmodium development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, W. Robert; Marcenac, Perrine; Childs, Lauren M.; Buckee, Caroline O.; Baldini, Francesco; Sawadogo, Simon P.; Dabiré, Roch K.; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Catteruccia, Flaminia

    2016-01-01

    The maternally inherited alpha-proteobacterium Wolbachia has been proposed as a tool to block transmission of devastating mosquito-borne infectious diseases like dengue and malaria. Here we study the reproductive manipulations induced by a recently identified Wolbachia strain that stably infects natural mosquito populations of a major malaria vector, Anopheles coluzzii, in Burkina Faso. We determine that these infections significantly accelerate egg laying but do not induce cytoplasmic incompatibility or sex-ratio distortion, two parasitic reproductive phenotypes that facilitate the spread of other Wolbachia strains within insect hosts. Analysis of 221 blood-fed A. coluzzii females collected from houses shows a negative correlation between the presence of Plasmodium parasites and Wolbachia infection. A mathematical model incorporating these results predicts that infection with these endosymbionts may reduce malaria prevalence in human populations. These data suggest that Wolbachia may be an important player in malaria transmission dynamics in Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27243367

  1. Frequency of infection with A and B supergroup Wolbachia in insects and pests associated with mulberry and silkworm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B M Prakash; H P Puttaraju

    2007-06-01

    Wolbachia is a ubiquitous, Gram-negative, vertically transmitted, alpha-proteobacterium that causes an array of reproductive abnormalities including cytoplasmic incompatibility, feminization of genetic males, parthenogenesis in a number of insect species, among others. Wolbachia is now being exploited as an agent for pest and vector control. Previous surveys indicated that it is commonly seen in 16–76% of arthropods. In this paper, using polymerase chain reaction assay based on specific amplification of the ftsZ-A and -B supergroup Wolbachia gene fragments, we found that 30% of insects and pests screened were positive for Wolbachia. Among them 66.7% harbour double Wolbachia infection, while 33.3% harbour single Wolbachia infection. These results indicate widespread infection with both double and single Wolbachia, and provide a wealth of information to exploit this endobacterium for the management of pests and vectors.

  2. Genetic Diversity Affects the Daily Transcriptional Oscillations of Marine Microbial Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, Irina N; Robidart, Julie C; DeLong, Edward F; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Marine microbial communities are genetically diverse but have robust synchronized daily transcriptional patterns at the genus level that are similar across a wide variety of oceanic regions. We developed a microarray-inspired gene-centric approach to resolve transcription of closely-related but distinct strains/ecotypes in high-throughput sequence data. Applying this approach to the existing metatranscriptomics datasets collected from two different oceanic regions, we found unique and variable patterns of transcription by individual taxa within the abundant picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, the alpha Proteobacterium Pelagibacter and the eukaryotic picophytoplankton Ostreococcus. The results demonstrate that marine microbial taxa respond differentially to variability in space and time in the ocean. These intra-genus individual transcriptional patterns underlie whole microbial community responses, and the approach developed here facilitates deeper insights into microbial population dynamics.

  3. Single Fluorescent Molecules as Nano-Illuminators for Biological Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E.

    2011-03-01

    Since the first optical detection and spectroscopy of a single molecule in a solid (Phys. Rev. Lett. {62}, 2535 (1989)), much has been learned about the ability of single molecules to probe local nanoenvironments and individual behavior in biological and nonbiological materials in the absence of ensemble averaging that can obscure heterogeneity. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic imaging of individual fluorophores leads naturally to superlocalization, or determination of the position of the molecule with precision beyond the optical diffraction limit, simply by digitization of the point-spread function from the single emitter. For example, the shape of single filaments in a living cell can be extracted simply by allowing a single molecule to move through the filament (PNAS {103}, 10929 (2006)). The addition of photoinduced control of single-molecule emission allows imaging beyond the diffraction limit (super-resolution) and a new array of acronyms (PALM, STORM, F-PALM etc.) and advances have appeared. We have used the native blinking and switching of a common yellow-emitting variant of green fluorescent protein (EYFP) reported more than a decade ago (Nature {388}, 355 (1997)) to achieve sub-40 nm super-resolution imaging of several protein structures in the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus: the quasi-helix of the actin-like protein MreB (Nat. Meth. {5}, 947 (2008)), the cellular distribution of the DNA binding protein HU (submitted), and the recently discovered division spindle composed of ParA filaments (Nat. Cell Biol. {12}, 791 (2010)). Even with these advances, better emitters would provide more photons and improved resolution, and a new photoactivatable small-molecule emitter has recently been synthesized and targeted to specific structures in living cells to provide super-resolution images (JACS {132}, 15099 (2010)). Finally, a new optical method for extracting three-dimensional position information based on

  4. Phylogenomics and signature proteins for the alpha Proteobacteria and its main groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok Amy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha proteobacteria are one of the largest and most extensively studied groups within bacteria. However, for these bacteria as a whole and for all of its major subgroups (viz. Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales and Caulobacterales, very few or no distinctive molecular or biochemical characteristics are known. Results We have carried out comprehensive phylogenomic analyses by means of Blastp and PSI-Blast searches on the open reading frames in the genomes of several α-proteobacteria (viz. Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Brucella suis, Caulobacter crescentus, Gluconobacter oxydans, Mesorhizobium loti, Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, Silicibacter sp. TM1040, Rhodospirillum rubrum and Wolbachia (Drosophila endosymbiont. These studies have identified several proteins that are distinctive characteristics of all α-proteobacteria, as well as numerous proteins that are unique repertoires of all of its main orders (viz. Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales and Caulobacterales and many families (viz. Rickettsiaceae, Anaplasmataceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Bradyrhiozobiaceae, Brucellaceae and Bartonellaceae. Many other proteins that are present at different phylogenetic depths in α-proteobacteria provide important information regarding their evolution. The evolutionary relationships among α-proteobacteria as deduced from these studies are in excellent agreement with their branching pattern in the phylogenetic trees and character compatibility cliques based on concatenated sequences for many conserved proteins. These studies provide evidence that the major groups within α-proteobacteria have diverged in the following order: (Rickettsiales(Rhodospirillales (Sphingomonadales (Rhodobacterales (Caulobacterales-Parvularculales (Rhizobiales. We also describe two conserved inserts in DNA

  5. Functional Annotation of Two New Carboxypeptidases from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.; Xu, C; Kumaran, D; Brown, A; Sauder, M; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    Two proteins from the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The first protein, Cc0300, was from Caulobacter crescentus CB-15 (Cc0300), while the second one (Sgx9355e) was derived from an environmental DNA sequence originally isolated from the Sargasso Sea (gi|44371129). The catalytic functions and the substrate profiles for the two enzymes were determined with the aid of combinatorial dipeptide libraries. Both enzymes were shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Xaa dipeptides in which the amino acid at the N-terminus was relatively unimportant. These enzymes were specific for hydrophobic amino acids at the C-terminus. With Cc0300, substrates terminating in isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, valine, methionine, and tryptophan were hydrolyzed. The same specificity was observed with Sgx9355e, but this protein was also able to hydrolyze peptides terminating in threonine. Both enzymes were able to hydrolyze N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of the hydrophobic amino acids and tripeptides. The best substrates identified for Cc0300 were l-Ala-l-Leu with kcat and kcat/Km values of 37 s-1 and 1.1 x 105 M-1 s-1, respectively, and N-formyl-l-Tyr with kcat and kcat/Km values of 33 s-1 and 3.9 x 105 M-1 s-1, respectively. The best substrate identified for Sgx9355e was l-Ala-l-Phe with kcat and kcat/Km values of 0.41 s-1 and 5.8 x 103 M-1 s-1. The three-dimensional structure of Sgx9355e was determined to a resolution of 2.33 Angstroms with l-methionine bound in the active site. The a-carboxylate of the methionine is ion-paired to His-237 and also hydrogen bonded to the backbone amide groups of Val-201 and Leu-202. The a-amino group of the bound methionine interacts with Asp-328. The structural determinants for substrate recognition were identified and compared with other enzymes in this superfamily that hydrolyze dipeptides with different specificities.

  6. Molecular and functional characterization of the Salmonella invasion gene invA: homology of InvA to members of a new protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, J E; Ginocchio, C; Costeas, P

    1992-07-01

    One of the earliest steps in the pathogenic cycle of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella spp. is the invasion of the cells of the intestinal epithelium. We have previously identified a genetic locus, inv, that allows Salmonella spp. to enter cultured epithelial cells. invA is a member of this locus, and it is the first gene of an operon consisting of at least two additional invasion genes. We have constructed strains carrying nonpolar mutations in invA and examined the individual contribution of this gene to the invasion phenotype of Salmonella typhimurium. Nonpolar S. typhimurium invA mutants were deficient in invasion of cultured epithelial cells although they were fully capable of attaching to the same cells. In addition, unlike wild-type S. typhimurium, invA mutants did not alter the normal architecture of the microvilli of polarized epithelial cells nor did they cause any alterations in the distribution of actin microfilaments of infected cells. The invasion phenotype of invA mutants was readily rescued by wild-type S. typhimurium when cultured epithelial cells were simultaneously infected with both strains. On the contrary, in a similar experiment, the adherent Escherichia coli strain RDEC-1 was not internalized into cultured cells when coinfected with wild-type S. typhimurium. The invA locus was found to be located at about 59 min on the Salmonella chromosome, 7% linked to mutS. The nucleotide sequence of invA showed an open reading frame capable of encoding a polypeptide of 686 amino acids with eight possible membrane-spanning regions and a predicted molecular weight of 75,974. A protein of this size was visualized when invA was expressed in a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase-based expression system. The predicted sequence of InvA was found to be homologous to Caulobacter crescentus FlbF, Yersinia LcrD, Shigella flexneri VirH, and E. coli FlhA proteins. These proteins may form part of a family of proteins with a common function, quite possibly

  7. The biology of habitat dominance; can microbes behave as weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, Jonathan A; Bell, Andrew N W; Bhaganna, Prashanth; Mswaka, Allen Y; Timson, David J; Hallsworth, John E

    2013-09-01

    , such as Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Pseudoxylaria spp., exhibit characteristics of both weed and non-weed species. We propose that the concept of nonweeds represents a 'dustbin' group that includes species such as Synodropsis spp., Polypaecilum pisce, Metschnikowia orientalis, Salmonella spp., and Caulobacter crescentus. We show that microbial weeds are conceptually distinct from plant weeds, microbial copiotrophs, r-strategists, and other ecophysiological groups of microorganism. Microbial weed species are unlikely to emerge from stationary-phase or other types of closed communities; it is open habitats that select for weed phenotypes. Specific characteristics that are common to diverse types of open habitat are identified, and implications of weed biology and open-habitat ecology are discussed in the context of further studies needed in the fields of environmental and applied microbiology. PMID:23336673

  8. In situ characterization of aluminum-containing mineral-microorganism aqueous suspensions using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae Hyun; Johnson, Stephen B; Benzerara, Karim; Doyle, Colin S; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shuh, David K; Brown, Gordon E

    2004-11-23

    In situ characterization of colloidal particles under hydrous conditions is one of the key requirements for understanding their state of aggregation and impact on the transport of pollutants in aqueous environments. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) is one of the few techniques that can satisfy this need by providing element- and chemical-state-specific 2-D maps at a spatial resolution better than 50 nm using soft X-rays from synchrotron radiation wiggler or undulator sources tuned to the absorption edges of different elements. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra can also be collected simultaneously at a similar spatial resolution and can provide phase identification in many cases. In this study, we report STXM images and XANES spectroscopy measurements at or above the Al K-edge (E = 1559.6 eV) of various Al-containing minerals and synthetic oxides [alpha-Al2O3 (corundum), gamma-Al2O3, gamma-AlOOH (boehmite), alpha-Al(OH)3 (bayerite), KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2 (muscovite), (Al,Mg)8(Si4O10)4(OH)8.nH2O (montmorillonite), and Mg6Al2(OH)16CO3.4H2O (hydrotalcite)] and demonstrate the capability of this spectromicroscopic tool to identify different Al-containing mineral colloids in multiphase mixtures in aqueous solution. We also demonstrate that STXM imaging at or above the C K-edge (E = 284.2 eV) and Al K-edge can provide unique information on the interactions between bacteria and Al-containing nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions. STXM images of a mixture of Caulobacter crescentus and montmorillonite and corundum particles just above the C and Al K-edges show that the mineral particles and bacteria are closely associated in aggregates, which is likely due to the binding of bacteria to clay and corundum particles by extracellular polysaccharides.

  9. 系列混合碳源条件下颗粒化EBPR系统茵群结构变化规律研究%A study of microbial diversity of granule-based enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems cultivated with ratiometric propionate and acetate as mixed carbon sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋涛; 孙培德; 金均

    2012-01-01

    A series of mixed carbon sources with different ratios of propionate and acetate was applied in granule-based enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) sludge in SBR reactor. Microbial diversity change during the granular process and functional bacteria competition under different carbon sources were studied. Significant microbial diversity change in EBPR system was exhibited during granulation. Uncultured bacteria previously dominated in the system disappeared rapidly, while uncultured rhodocyclaceae bacterium and portions of candidatus competibacter phosphatis, denitrifying bacterium, acinetobacter and uncultured alpha proteobacterium were gradually washed out. Uncultured chlorobi bacterium and uncultured alpha proteobacterium were the primary phosphorus removal bacteria in developed granular EBPR system. The change of bacteria population ofcandidatus competibacterphosphatis and uncultured chlorobi bacterium was evidenced as a result of microbial diversity under different ratios of mixed carbon sources. The population of candidatus competibacter phosphatis increased monotonically with acetate concentration, decreaseing the system phosphorus removal efficiency. Meanwhile, the population of uncultured chlorobi bacterium had a positive correlation with propionate concentration, which maintained good phosphorus removal efficiency of the EBPR system.%在SBR反应器中接种富含聚磷菌的活性污泥,采用一系列不同丙酸/乙酸比例混合的碳源进行EBPR系统污泥的颗粒化培养,并考察了颗粒化进程中的系统菌群结构变化,以及不同混合碳源条件对系统功能菌种竞争的影响.结果表明,污泥颗粒化过程对EBPR系统菌群结构产生了较大的筛选作用.原本在系统中占优势的一类Uncultured bacterium被迅速淘汰;Uncultured Rhodocyclaceae bacterium、部分Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis、部分Denitrifying bacterium、Acinetobacter及部分Uncultured alpha proteobacterium分别逐渐被淘

  10. Bacterial study of Vostok drilling fluid: the tool to make ice core finding confident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhina, I. A.; Petit, J. R.; Lukin, V. V.; Bulat, S. A.

    2003-04-01

    Decontamination of Vostok ice core is a critical issue in molecular biology studies. Core surface contains a film of hardly removable 'dirty' drilling fluid representing a mixture of polyhydrocarbons (PHC) including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and freon. To make ice microbial finding more confident the original Vostok drilling fluid sampled from different depths (110m - 3600m) was analyzed for bacterial content by ribosomal DNA sequencing. Total, 33 clones of 16S ribosomal DNA were recovered from four samples of drilling fluid at 110, 2750, 3400, and 3600m leading to identification of 8 bacterial species. No overlapping was observed even for neighboring samples (3400m and 3600m). At present four major bacteria with the titer more than 103-104 cells per ml (as estimated from PCR results) are identified. Among them we found: unknown representative of Desulfobacteraceae which are able to oxidize sulphates and degrade benzenes (110m); PAH-degrading alpha-proteobacterium Sphingomonas natatoria (3400m); alpha-proteobacterium representing closely-related group of Sphingomonas sp. (e.g., S. aurantiaca) which are able to degrade PAH as well, and human pathogen closely related to Haloanella gallinarum of CFB group (3600m). Four additional species were revealed as single clones and showed relatedness to human pathogens and saprophytes as well as soil bacteria. These bacteria may represent drilling fluid contaminants introduced during its sampling or DNA extraction procedure. Of four major bacteria revealed, one species, Sphingomonas natatoria, has been met by us in the Vostok core from 3607 m depth (AF532054) whereas another Sphingomonas sp. which we refer to as S. aurantiaca was found in Antarctic microbial endolithic community (AF548567), hydrocarbon-containing soil near Scott Base in Antarctica (AF184221) and even isolated from 3593m Vostok accretion ice (AF324199) and Taylor Dome core (AF395031). The source for major human pathogen-related bacteria is rather uncertain

  11. Synthetic strategies for controlling inter- and intramolecular interactions: Applications in single-molecule fluorescence imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and palladium catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Nicholas R.

    proximity of the Cy3 and Cy5 fluorophores, behaves as an optical photoswitch in the presence of a thiol reagent. This unique property was employed to achieve sub-diffraction-limited imaging of the stalks of Caulobacter crescentus cells with 30-nm resolution using STORM (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy). Lastly, the synthesis of the first selenium analogue of firefly luciferin is described, and this analogue is shown to be a competent substrate for firefly luciferase (fLuc). Remarkably, it exhibits red-shifted bioluminescence emission relative to the native sulfur analogue. The in vivo performance of the selenium and sulfur analogues in imaging are compared by tail-vein injection into nude mice bearing subcutaneous tumor xenografts of a human breast cancer cell line that was stably transduced to express fLuc. Part II of this thesis begins by addressing design considerations in the development of palladium catalysts that effect oxidative transformations under mild conditions (i.e., 1 atm air, room temperature) using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant. A newly synthesized cationic palladium complex, [(2,9-dimethylphenanthroline)Pd(OAc)]2[OTf]2, is shown to catalyze aerobic alcohol oxidation under such conditions with an unprecedented initial turnover frequency, but the presence of partially reduced oxygen species results in competitive ligand oxidation with concomitant decrease in catalyst activity. To remedy this, oxidatively resistant ligands, which are essential for the development of next-generation, high-turnover-frequency palladium catalysts that utilize oxygen as a terminal oxidant, have been prepared and effectively employed. In addition, the first general palladium-catalyzed route to the carbonylation of diols is reported. In this system, carbon monoxide (1 atm) serves the carbonyl source, (2,9-dimethylphenanthroline)Pd(OAc) 2 acts as the catalyst, and N-chlorosuccinimide and iodosobenzene are the oxidants for 1,2- and 1,3-diols, respectively. This

  12. Signature proteins that are distinctive of alpha proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Radhey S

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The alpha (α proteobacteria, a very large and diverse group, are presently characterized solely on the basis of 16S rRNA trees, with no known molecular characteristic that is unique to this group. The genomes of three α-proteobacteria, Rickettsia prowazekii (RP, Caulobacter crescentus (CC and Bartonella quintana (BQ, were analyzed in order to search for proteins that are unique to this group. Results Blast analyses of protein sequences from the above genomes have led to the identification of 61 proteins which are distinctive characteristics of α-proteobacteria and are generally not found in any other bacteria. These α-proteobacterial signature proteins are generally of hypothetical functions and they can be classified as follows: (i Six proteins (CC2102, CC3292, CC3319, CC1887, CC1725 and CC1365 which are uniquely present in most sequenced α-proteobacterial genomes; (ii Ten proteins (CC1211, CC1886, CC2245, CC3470, CC0520, CC0365, CC0366, CC1977, CC3010 and CC0100 which are present in all α-proteobacteria except the Rickettsiales; (iii Five proteins (CC2345, CC3115, CC3401, CC3467 and CC1021 not found in the intracellular bacteria belonging to the order Rickettsiales and the Bartonellaceae family; (iv Four proteins (CC1652, CC2247, CC3295 and CC1035 that are absent from various Rickettsiales as well as Rhodobacterales; (v Three proteins (RP104, RP105 and RP106 that are unique to the order Rickettsiales and four proteins (RP766, RP192, RP030 and RP187 which are specific for the Rickettsiaceae family; (vi Six proteins (BQ00140, BQ00720, BQ03880, BQ12030, BQ07670 and BQ11900 which are specific to the order Rhizobiales; (vii Four proteins (BQ01660, BQ02450, BQ03770 and BQ13470 which are specific for the order Rhizobiales excluding the family Bradyrhizobiaceae; (viii Nine proteins (BQ12190, BQ11460, BQ11450, BQ11430, BQ11380, BQ11160, BQ11120, BQ11100 and BQ11030 which are distinctive of the Bartonellaceae family;(ix Six

  13. The Genome of the Obligately Intracellular Bacterium Ehrlichia canis Reveals Themes of Complex Membrane Structure and Immune Evasion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Doyle, C Kuyler [Center for Biodenfense and Emerging Infectious Diseases; Lykidis, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Francino, M P [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S [ORNL; Shin, M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Malfatti, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Yu, X J [Center for Biodenfense and Emerging Infectious Diseases; Walker, D H [Center for Biodenfense and Emerging Infectious Diseases; McBride, J W [Center for Biodenfense and Emerging Infectious Diseases; Kyripides, N C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2006-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis, a small obligately intracellular, tick-transmitted, gram-negative, {alpha}-proteobacterium, is the primary etiologic agent of globally distributed canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Complete genome sequencing revealed that the E. canis genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 1,315,030 bp predicted to encode 925 proteins, 40 stable RNA species, 17 putative pseudogenes, and a substantial proportion of noncoding sequence (27%). Interesting genome features include a large set of proteins with transmembrane helices and/or signal sequences and a unique serine-threonine bias associated with the potential for O glycosylation that was prominent in proteins associated with pathogen-host interactions. Furthermore, two paralogous protein families associated with immune evasion were identified, one of which contains poly(G-C) tracts, suggesting that they may play a role in phase variation and facilitation of persistent infections. Genes associated with pathogen-host interactions were identified, including a small group encoding proteins (n = 12) with tandem repeats and another group encoding proteins with eukaryote-like ankyrin domains (n = 7).

  14. Genomic Sequencing and Biological Characteristics of a Novel Escherichia Coli Bacteriophage 9g, a Putative Representative of a New Siphoviridae Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene E. Kulikov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage 9g was isolated from horse feces using Escherichia coli C600 as a host strain. Phage 9g has a slightly elongated capsid 62 × 76 nm in diameter and a non-contractile tail about 185 nm long. The complete genome sequence of this bacteriophage consists of 56,703 bp encoding 70 predicted open reading frames. The closest relative of phage 9g is phage PhiJL001 infecting marine alpha-proteobacterium associated with Ircinia strobilina sponge, sharing with phage 9g 51% of amino acid identity in the main capsid protein sequence. The DNA of 9g is resistant to most restriction endonucleases tested, indicating the presence of hypermodified bases. The gene cluster encoding a biosynthesis pathway similar to biosynthesis of the unusual nucleoside queuosine was detected in the phage 9g genome. The genomic map organization is somewhat similar to the typical temperate phage gene layout but no integrase gene was detected. Phage 9g efficiently forms stable associations with its host that continues to produce the phage over multiple passages, but the phage can be easily eliminated via viricide treatment indicating that no true lysogens are formed. Since the sequence, genomic organization and biological properties of bacteriophage 9g are clearly distinct from other known Enterobacteriaceae phages, we propose to consider it as the representative of a novel genus of the Siphoviridae family.

  15. A novel thermoalkalostable esterase from Acidicaldus sp. strain USBA-GBX-499 with enantioselectivity isolated from an acidic hot springs of Colombian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Gina; Chow, Jennifer; Bongen, Patrick; Lauinger, Benjamin; Pietruszka, Jörg; Streit, Wolfgang R; Baena, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    Several thermo- and mesoacidophilic bacterial strains that revealed high lipolytic activity were isolated from water samples derived from acidic hot springs in Los Nevados National Natural Park (Colombia). A novel lipolytic enzyme named 499EST was obtained from the thermoacidophilic alpha-Proteobacterium Acidicaldus USBA-GBX-499. The gene estA encoded a 313-amino-acid protein named 499EST. The deduced amino acid sequence showed the highest identity (58 %) with a putative α/β hydrolase from Acidiphilium sp. (ZP_08632277.1). Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis indicated that 499EST is a new member of the bacterial esterase/lipase family IV. The esterase reveals its optimum catalytic activity at 55 °C and pH 9.0. Kinetic studies showed that 499EST preferentially hydrolyzed middle-length acyl chains (C6-C8), especially p-nitrophenyl (p-NP) caproate (C6). Its thermostability and activity were strongly enhanced by adding 6 mM FeCl3. High stability in the presence of water-miscible solvents such as dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol was observed. This enzyme also exhibits stability under harsh environmental conditions and enantioselectivity towards naproxen and ibuprofen esters, yielding the medically relevant (S)-enantiomers. In conclusion, according to our knowledge, 499EST is the first thermoalkalostable esterase derived from a Gram-negative thermoacidophilic bacterium.

  16. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-21

    Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  17. Bacteria associated with the bleached and cave coral Oculina patagonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Omry; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2008-04-01

    The relative abundance of bacteria in the mucus and tissues of Oculina patagonica taken from bleached and cave (azooxanthellae) corals was determined by analyses of the 16S rRNA genes from cloned libraries of extracted DNA and from isolated colonies. The results were compared to previously published data on healthy O. patagonica. The bacterial community of bleached, cave, and healthy corals were completely different from each other. A tight cluster (>99.5% identity) of bacteria, showing 100% identity to Acinetobacter species, dominated bleached corals, comprising 25% of the 316 clones sequenced. The dominant bacterial cluster found in cave corals, representing 29% of the 97 clones sequenced, showed 98% identity to an uncultured bacterium from the Great Barrier Reef. Vibrio splendidus was the most dominant species in healthy O. patagonica. The culturable bacteria represented 0.1-1.0% of the total bacteria (SYBR Gold staining) of the corals. The most abundant culturable bacteria in bleached, cave, and healthy corals were clusters that most closely matched Microbulbifer sp., an alpha-proteobacterium previously isolated from healthy corals and an alpha-protobacterium (AB026194), respectively. Three generalizations emerge from this study on O. patagonica: (1) More bacteria are associated with coral tissue than mucus; (2) tissue and mucus populations are different; (3) bacterial populations associated with corals change dramatically when corals lack their symbiotic zooxanthellae, either as a result of the bleaching disease or when growing in the absence of light.

  18. Role of the Irr protein in the regulation of iron metabolism in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Peuser

    Full Text Available In Rhizobia the Irr protein is an important regulator for iron-dependent gene expression. We studied the role of the Irr homolog RSP_3179 in the photosynthetic alpha-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. While Irr had little effect on growth under iron-limiting or non-limiting conditions its deletion resulted in increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and singlet oxygen. This correlates with an elevated expression of katE for catalase in the Irr mutant compared to the wild type under non-stress conditions. Transcriptome studies revealed that Irr affects the expression of genes for iron metabolism, but also has some influence on genes involved in stress response, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, transport, and photosynthesis. Most genes showed higher expression levels in the wild type than in the mutant under normal growth conditions indicating an activator function of Irr. Irr was however not required to activate genes of the iron metabolism in response to iron limitation, which showed even stronger induction in the absence of Irr. This was also true for genes mbfA and ccpA, which were verified as direct targets for Irr. Our results suggest that in R. sphaeroides Irr diminishes the strong induction of genes for iron metabolism under iron starvation.

  19. Molecular characterization of a mosaic locus in the genome of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xuefeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huanglongbing (HLB is a highly destructive disease of citrus production worldwide. 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', an unculturable alpha proteobacterium, is a putative pathogen of HLB. Information about the biology and strain diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is currently limited, inhibiting the scope of HLB research and control. Results A genomic region (CLIBASIA_05640 to CLIBASIA_05650 of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' showing hyper-sequence variation or locus mosaicism was identified and investigated using 262 bacterial strains (188 from China and 74 from Florida. Based on the characteristic electrophoretic profiles of PCR amplicons generated by a specific primer set, eight electrophoretic types (E-types were identified, six E-types (A, B, C, D, E, and F in China and four E-types (A, C, G, and H in Florida. The 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains from China consisted predominately of E-type A (71.3% and E-type B (19.7%. In contrast, the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains from Florida was predominated by E-type G (82.4%. Diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in China was also evidenced. Strains from the high altitude Yunnan Province consisted of five E-types with E-type B being the majority (62.8%, whereas strains from the low altitude coastal Guangdong Province consisted of only two E-types with E-type A as the majority (97.0%. Sequence analyses revealed that variation of DNA amplicons was due to insertion/deletion events at CLIBASIA_05650 and the downstream intergenic region. Conclusions This study demonstrated the genomic mosaicism of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' resulted from active DNA insertion/deletion activities. Analyses of strain variation depicted the significant inter- and intra-continent diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus'.

  20. The complete genome sequence of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', the bacterium associated with potato zebra chip disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lin

    Full Text Available Zebra Chip (ZC is an emerging plant disease that causes aboveground decline of potato shoots and generally results in unusable tubers. This disease has led to multi-million dollar losses for growers in the central and western United States over the past decade and impacts the livelihood of potato farmers in Mexico and New Zealand. ZC is associated with 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', a fastidious alpha-proteobacterium that is transmitted by a phloem-feeding psyllid vector, Bactericera cockerelli Sulc. Research on this disease has been hampered by a lack of robust culture methods and paucity of genome sequence information for 'Ca. L. solanacearum'. Here we present the sequence of the 1.26 Mbp metagenome of 'Ca. L. solanacearum', based on DNA isolated from potato psyllids. The coding inventory of the 'Ca. L. solanacearum' genome was analyzed and compared to related Rhizobiaceae to better understand 'Ca. L. solanacearum' physiology and identify potential targets to develop improved treatment strategies. This analysis revealed a number of unique transporters and pathways, all potentially contributing to ZC pathogenesis. Some of these factors may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Taxonomically, 'Ca. L. solanacearum' is related to 'Ca. L. asiaticus', a suspected causative agent of citrus huanglongbing, yet many genome rearrangements and several gene gains/losses are evident when comparing these two Liberibacter. species. Relative to 'Ca. L. asiaticus', 'Ca. L. solanacearum' probably has reduced capacity for nucleic acid modification, increased amino acid and vitamin biosynthesis functionalities, and gained a high-affinity iron transport system characteristic of several pathogenic microbes.

  1. Screening a wide host-range, waste-water metagenomic library in tryptophan auxotrophs of Rhizobium leguminosarum and of Escherichia coli reveals different classes of cloned trp genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youguo; Wexler, Margaret; Richardson, David J; Bond, Philip L; Johnston, Andrew W B

    2005-12-01

    A metagenomic cosmid library was constructed, in which the insert DNA was derived from bacteria in a waste-water treatment plant and the vector was the wide host-range cosmid pLAFR3. The library was screened for clones that could correct defined tryptophan auxotrophs of the alpha-proteobacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum and of Escherichia coli. A total of 26 different cosmids that corrected at least one trp mutant in one or both of these species were obtained. Several cosmids corrected the auxotrophy of one or more R. leguminosarum trp mutants, but not the corresponding mutants in E. coli. Conversely, one cosmid corrected trpA, B, C, D and E mutants of E. coli but none of the trp mutants of R. leguminosarum. Two of the Trp+ cosmids were examined in more detail. One contained a trp operon that resembled that of the pathogen Chlamydophila caviae, containing the unusual kynU gene, which specifies kynureninase. The other, whose trp genes functioned in R. leguminosarum but not in E. coli, contained trpDCFBA in an operon that is likely co-transcribed with five other genes, most of which had no known link with tryptophan synthesis. The sequences of these TRP proteins, and the products of nine other genes encoded by this cosmid, failed to affiliate them with any known bacterial lineage. For one metagenomic cosmid, lac reporter fusions confirmed that its cloned trp genes were transcribed in R. leguminosarum, but not in E. coli. Thus, rhizobia, with their many sigma-factors, may be well-suited hosts for metagenomic libraries, cloned in wide host-range vectors. PMID:16309391

  2. Bacterial signaling and motility: Sure bets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2008-01-01

    cells or swarms propagate and move outward like hunting wolf packs in search of additional macromolecules or prey. Upon starvation, cells aggregate at discrete foci to form mounds and then macroscopic fruiting bodies, each with hundreds of thousands of cells. The rod-shaped cells in the fruiting bodies eventually morph into spherical spores that are metabolically inactive and partially resistant to desiccation and temperature. When nutrients become available, spores can germinate and reenter the vegetative cell cycle. Two talks highlighted in this meeting review will tackle the mysteries of the gliding motility of M. xanthus in greater detail. In addition to M. xanthus, Caulobacter crescentus has extensively been investigated as a bacterial model of cell differentiation and development.

  3. Twenty-One Genome Sequences from Pseudomonas Species and 19 Genome Sequences from Diverse Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere and Endosphere of Populus deltoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Martin, Stanton [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    To aid in the investigation of the Populus deltoides microbiome we generated draft genome sequences for twenty one Pseudomonas and twenty one other diverse bacteria isolated from Populus deltoides roots. Genome sequences for isolates similar to Acidovorax, Bradyrhizobium, Brevibacillus, Burkholderia, Caulobacter, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Novosphingobium, Pantoea, Phyllobacterium, Polaromonas, Rhizobium, Sphingobium and Variovorax were generated.

  4. AcEST: DK943627 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tor SUI1 homolog OS=... 39 0.008 sp|Q9QZW9|MNX1_MOUSE Motor neuron and pancreas homeobox protein ... 31 1.7 ...n protein ftsZ OS=Caulobacter c... 30 2.9 sp|P50219|MNX1_HUMAN Motor neuron and p

  5. Identification of a bacteria-like ferrochelatase in Strongyloides venezuelensis, an animal parasitic nematode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Nagayasu

    Full Text Available Heme is an essential molecule for vast majority of organisms serving as a prosthetic group for various hemoproteins. Although most organisms synthesize heme from 5-aminolevulinic acid through a conserved heme biosynthetic pathway composed of seven consecutive enzymatic reactions, nematodes are known to be natural heme auxotrophs. The completely sequenced Caenorhabditis elegans genome, for example, lacks all seven genes for heme biosynthesis. However, genome/transcriptome sequencing of Strongyloides venezuelensis, an important model nematode species for studying human strongyloidiasis, indicated the presence of a gene for ferrochelatase (FeCH, which catalyzes the terminal step of heme biosynthesis, whereas the other six heme biosynthesis genes are apparently missing. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that nematode FeCH genes, including that of S. venezuelensis (SvFeCH have a fundamentally different evolutionally origin from the FeCH genes of non-nematode metazoa. Although all non-nematode metazoan FeCH genes appear to be inherited vertically from an ancestral opisthokont, nematode FeCH may have been acquired from an alpha-proteobacterium, horizontally. The identified SvFeCH sequence was found to function as FeCH as expected based on both in vitro chelatase assays using recombinant SvFeCH and in vivo complementation experiments using an FeCH-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Messenger RNA expression levels during the S. venezuelensis lifecycle were examined by real-time RT-PCR. SvFeCH mRNA was expressed at all the stages examined with a marked reduction at the infective third-stage larvae. Our study demonstrates the presence of a bacteria-like FeCH gene in the S. venezuelensis genome. It appeared that S. venezuelensis and some other animal parasitic nematodes reacquired the once-lost FeCH gene. Although the underlying evolutionary pressures that necessitated this reacquisition remain to be investigated, it is interesting that the presence of Fe

  6. [Technical support in the testing of microoganisms for their ability to accumulate strontium and cesium from aqueous solutions]. Final reports, Task order No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-15

    This report describes the binding of cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solution in a variety of microorganisms. Data is provided on the absorption by Ashbya gossyppi, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Candida sp. Ml13, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Scenedesmus obliqus, Streptococcus mutans, Anabaena flosaquae, Escherichia coli, Streptomyces viridochromogenes, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Rhizopus oryzae, Bacillus megaterium, Micrococcus luteus, Zoogloea ramigera, Coelastrum proboscideum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii, Paecilomyces marquandi, and Caulobacter fusiformis.

  7. System-level design of bacterial cell cycle control

    OpenAIRE

    McAdams, Harley H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the cell cycle control logic in Caulobacter has progressed to the point where we now have an integrated view of the operation of an entire bacterial cell cycle system functioning as a state machine. Oscillating levels of a few temporally-controlled master regulator proteins in a cyclical circuit drive cell cycle progression. To a striking degree, the cell cycle regulation is a whole cell phenomenon. Phospho-signaling proteins and proteases dynamically deployed to specific loc...

  8. The long-term effect of uranium and pH on the community composition of an artificial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzoska, Ryann M; Bollmann, Annette

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, microorganisms are living in diverse communities, which are impacted by the prevailing environmental conditions. Here, we present a study investigating the effect of low pH and elevated uranium concentration on the dynamics of an artificial microbial consortium. The members (Caulobacter sp. OR37, Asinibacterium sp. OR53, Ralstonia sp. OR214 and Rhodanobacter sp. OR444) were isolated from a uranium contaminated and acidic subsurface sediment. In pure culture, Ralstonia sp. OR214 had the highest growth rate at neutral and low pH and only Caulobacter sp. OR37 and Asinibacterium sp. OR53 grew in the presence uranium. The four strains were mixed in equal ratios, incubated at neutral and low pH and in the presence uranium and transferred to fresh medium once per week for 30 weeks. After 30 weeks, Ralstonia sp. OR214 was dominant at low and neutral pH and Caulobacter sp. OR37 and Asinibacterium sp. OR53 were dominant in the presence of uranium. After 12 weeks, the cultures were also transferred to new conditions to access the response of the consortia to changing conditions. The transfers showed an irreversible effect of uranium, but not of low pH on the consortia. Overall, the strains initially tolerant to the respective conditions persisted over time in high abundances in the consortia.

  9. Low Earth orbit journey and ground simulations studies point out metabolic changes in the ESA life support organism Rhodospirillum rubrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroleo, Felice; Leys, Natalie; Benotmane, Rafi; Vanhavere, Filip; Janssen, Ann; Hendrickx, Larissa; Wattiez, Ruddy; Mergeay, Max

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a project of closed regenerative life support system for future space flights developed by the European Space Agency. It consists of interconnected processes (i.e. bioreactors, higher plant compartments, filtration units,..) targeting the total recycling of organic waste into oxygen, water and food. Within the MELiSSA loop, the purple non-sulfur alpha-proteobacterium R. rubrum ATCC25903 is used to convert fatty acids released from the upstream raw waste digesting reactor to CO2 and biomass, and to complete the mineralization of aminoacids into NH4+ that will be forwarded to the nitrifying compartment. Among the numerous challenges of the project, the functional stability of the bioreactors in long term and under space flight conditions is of paramount importance for the efficiency of the life support system and consequently the crew safety. Therefore, the physiological and metabolic changes induced by space flight were investigated for R. rubrum. The bacterium grown on solid medium during 2 different 10-day space flights to the ISS (MES- SAGE2, BASE-A experiments) were compared to cells grown on Earth 1 g gravity or modeled microgravity and normal Earth radiation or simulated space flight radiation conditions in order to relate each single stress to its respective cellular response. For simulating the radiation environment, pure gamma and neutron sources were combined, while simulation of changes in gravity where performed using the Random Positioning Machine technology. Transcriptome analysis using R. rubrum total genome DNA-chip showed up-regulation of genes involved in oxidative stress response after a 10-day mission inside the ISS, without loss of viability. As an example, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, thioredoxin reductase and bacterioferritin genes are least 2 fold induced although the radiation dose experienced by the bacterium (4 mSv) is very low compared to its radiotolerance (D10 = 100 Sv

  10. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized 1 from citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rDNA microarray and 16S rDNA clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria from 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs while 20 orders from phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs compared to asymptomatic midribs. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants, but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis was further verified by sequencing 16S rDNA clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of Las in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate Las as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. Citrus is the most important commercial fruit crop in Florida. In recent years, citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also called citrus greening, has severely affected Florida's citrus production and hence has drawn an enormous amount of attention. HLB is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus (6,13), characterized by blotchy mottling with green islands on leaves, as well as stunting, fruit decline, and small, lopsided fruits with poor coloration. The disease tends to be associated with a phloem-limited fastidious {alpha}-proteobacterium given a provisional Candidatus status (Candidatus Liberobacter spp. later changed to Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) in nomenclature (18,25,34). Previous studies indicate that HLB infection causes disorder in the phloem and severely impairs the translocation of assimilates in

  11. 非抗虫转基因棉花对土壤细菌群落多样性的影响%Effects of Insect Non-resistant Transgenic Cottons on Bacterial Community Diversity in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵云丽; 李刚; 修伟明; 多立安; 曹璇; 雒珺瑜; 崔金杰; 杨殿林; 赵建宁

    2015-01-01

    There are increasing public concerns over the ecological risks of transgenic plants. Under field conditions, the diversity and com-position of bacterial community in soils grown with three insect non-resistant transgenic cottons(high-yield transgenic cotton expressing the RNA recognition motif 2 gene, disease-resistant transgenic cotton expressing the gastrodia antifungal protein and high-quality transgenic cotton expressing the [1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate(ACC)oxidase])and one conventional cotton CCRI 12(as control)were evalu-ated at the boll-opening stage by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE). The results showed that planting three transgenic cottons did not show significant effects on Shannon-wiener index(H), evenness(EH)and richness(S)of soil bacteria. High degree of similarity in community structure was observed between transgenic and conventional cottons, indicating no influence of transgenic cottons on bacterial community diversity in the short term. High-yield RRM2 transgenic cotton, disease-resistant GAFP transgenic cotton, high-quality ACO2 transgenic cotton and conventional cotton had 67%similarity in community levels and were thus regarded as one group. According to the se-quence analysis of DGGE dominant bands, microorganisms which presented the highest homology belonged to families of Flavobacteria, Bacteriovorax, Segetibacter, alpha proteobacterium, Geobacte, Paenisporosarcina, and Acidobacterium, respectively, and all of them were not cultivatable.%田间试验条件下,为了探究非抗虫转基因棉花对土壤细菌群落多样性的影响,应用PCR-DGGE技术对转RRM2基因高产棉、转GAFP基因抗病棉、转ACO2基因优质棉及非转基因常规棉(中棉所12)种植后在吐絮期的土壤细菌群落多样性进行分析。结果表明,与常规棉相比,3种转基因棉的种植均未对土壤细菌香农-威纳指数(H)、均匀度(EH)和丰富度(S)造成显著影

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11744-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :none) Gallus gallus mRNA for hypothetica... 117 1e-24 CP000618_240( CP000618 |pid:none) Burkholderia vietnam...2e-24 CP000614_1232( CP000614 |pid:none) Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 c... 117 2e-24 BA000035_2538( BA000035 |pid...:none) Caulobacter sp. K31, complete g... 116 2e-24 AL939124_94( AL939124 |pid:none) Streptomyces coelico...:none) Acaryochloris marina MBIC11017,... 112 6e-23 CP000853_2273( CP000853 |pid:none) Alkaliphilus oremlandii...............................done Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N ( BJ419515 ) Dictyostelium disco

  13. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Laub

    2008-12-29

    Our team of investigators from MIT (Michael Laub) and Stanford (Harley McAdams and Lucy Shapiro) conducted a multi-faceted, systematic experimental analysis of the 106 Caulobacter two-component signal transduction system proteins (62 histidine kinases and 44 response regulators) to understand how they coordinate cell cycle progression, metabolism, and response to environmental changes. These two-component signaling proteins were characterized at the genetic, biochemical, and genomic levels. The results generated by our laboratories have provided numerous insights into how Caulobacter cells sense and respond to a myriad of signals. As nearly all bacteria use two-component signaling for cell regulation, the results from this project help to deepen our general understanding of bacterial signal transduction. The tools and approaches developed can be applied to other bacteria. In particular, work from the Laub laboratory now enables the systematic, rational rewiring of two-component signaling proteins, a major advance that stands to impact synthetic biology and the development of biosensors and other designer molecular circuits. Results are summarized from our work. Each section lists publications and publicly-available resources which result from the work described.

  14. Analysis of intestinal bacterial community diversity of adult Dastarcus helophoroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z Q; He, C; Li, M L

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), and a culture-dependent technique were used to study the diversity of the intestinal bacterial community in adult Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae). Universal bacterial primers targeting 200 bp regions of the 16S rDNA gene were used in the PCR-DGGE assay, and 14 bright bands were obtained. The intestinal bacteria detected by PCR-DGGE were classified to Enterococcus (Lactobacillales: Enterococcaceae), Bacillus (Bacillales: Bacillaceae), Cellvibrio (Pseudomonadales: Pseudomonadaceae), Caulobacter (Caulobacterales: Caulobacteraceae), and uncultured bacteria, whereas those isolated by the culture-dependent technique belonged to Staphylococcus (Bacillales: Staphylococcaceae), Pectobacterium Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae), and Enterobacter (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae). These intestinal bacteria represented the groups Lactobacillales (Enterococcus), Pseudomonadales (Cellvibrio), Caulobacterales (Caulobacter), Bacilli (Bacillus and Staphylococcus), and Gammaproteobacteria (Pectobacterium and Enterobacter). Our results demonstrated that PCR-DGGE analysis and the culture-dependent technique were useful in determining the intestinal bacteria of D. helophoroides and the two methods should be integrated to characterize the microbial community and diversity. PMID:25373236

  15. Molecular mechanisms for the evolution of bacterial morphologies and growth modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia M Randich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria exhibit a rich diversity of morphologies. Within this diversity, there is a uniformity of shape for each species that is replicated faithfully each generation, suggesting that bacterial shape is as selectable as any other biochemical adaptation. We describe the spatiotemporal mechanisms that target peptidoglycan synthesis to different subcellular zones to generate the rod-shape of model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We then demonstrate, using the related genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis as examples, how the modularity of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery permits repositioning of the machinery to achieve different growth modes and morphologies. Finally, we highlight cases in which the mechanisms that underlie morphological evolution are beginning to be understood, and how they depend upon the expansion and diversification of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery.

  16. Biodiversity characterization of cellulolytic bacteria present on native Chaco soil by comparison of ribosomal RNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, Paola; Sede, Silvana M; Campos, Eleonora; Rorig, Marcela; Principi, Dario; Tosto, Daniela; Hopp, H Esteban; Grasso, Daniel; Cataldi, Angel

    2012-04-01

    Sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was used to study bacterial diversity of a pristine forest soil and of two cultures of the same soil enriched with cellulolytic bacteria. Our analysis revealed high bacterial diversity in the native soil sample, evidencing at least 10 phyla, in which Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria accounted for more than 76% of all sequences. In both enriched samples, members of Proteobacteria were the most frequently represented. The majority of bacterial genera in both enriched samples were identified as Brevundimonas and Caulobacter, but members of Devosia, Sphingomonas, Variovorax, Acidovorax, Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter and Delftia were also found. In addition, it was possible to identify cellulolytic taxa such as Acidothermus, Micromonospora, Streptomyces, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas, which indicates that this ecosystem could be an attractive source for study of novel enzymes for cellulose degradation. PMID:22202170

  17. A novel gene: sawD related to the differentiation of streptomyces ansochromogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, L; Wei, C; Yuqing, T; Huarong, T; Chater, K F; Buttner, M J

    1999-01-01

    A 1.3 kb DNA fragment was cloned from a total DNA library of Streptomyces ansochromogenes using Southern hybridization. Nucleotide sequencing analysis indicated that the 1320 bp DNA fragment contained a complete open reading frame (ORF). In search of databases, the deduced product of ORF containing 213 amino acids is homologous to the serine protease of Caulobacter cresceatus, and a conserved serine-catalytic active site (GPSAG) exists. The gene was designated as sawD. The function of this gene was studied with the strategy of gene disruption, and the result showed that the sawD may be related to sporulation and especially to the spore septation in Streptomyces ansochromogenes. The preliminary result indicated that sawD mutant could produce abundant pigment in contrast with the wild type, it seems that sawD gene may be involved in pigment biosynthesis, and this gene is also dispensable for biosynthesis of nikkomycin in Streptomyces ansochromogenes.

  18. Phylosenetic identification and microbial diversity in snow of the summit (8201 m) of Cho Oyu Mountain,Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG XiaoMei; WANG Jian; CHEN Fang; YU Jun; HUA Sang; ASAN Ciren; LUOSANG JiangBai; WANG Wei; YU Liang; ZHENG XiaoGuang

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial diversity and abundance in snow of the summit (8201 m) of Cho Oyu mountain, Tibet,were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing followed by scanning electronic microscopy analysis. Most of bacteria were found to be of spherical or oval shape (>95%). Bacterial 16S rDNA sequences were classified into 5 genera (Caulobacter, Ralstonia, Cupriavidus, Pelomonas and Pseudornonas).Gammaproteobacteria were the most abundant (91.25%) among the library that consists of 594 clones. The sequences found in this study are highly similar to those previously retrieved from other cold en-vironments, such as ice core, sea ice, permafrost and snow. The results showed that the cold and barren environments strongly influence the survival of bacteria. The high similarity among sequences retrieved from snow sample and other places, such as ocean, soil and water, suggested that the bacte-ria in snow, soil and water environments have the same origin.

  19. Characterization of Co(III) EDTA-Reducing Bacteria in Metal- and Radionuclide-Contaminated Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Weimin [Arizona State University; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2010-01-01

    The Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG5) site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a potential to be a field site for evaluating the effectiveness of various bioremediation approaches and strategies. The site has been well studied in terms of its geological and geochemical properties over the past decade. However, despite the importance of microorganisms in bioremediation processes, the microbiological populations at the WAG5 site and their potential in bioremediation have not been similarly evaluated. In this study, we initiated research to characterize the microbial populations in WAG5 groundwater. Approximately 100 isolates from WAG5 groundwater were isolated and selected based on colony morphology. Fifty-five unique isolates were identified by BOX-PCR and subjected to further characterization. 16S rRNA sequences indicated that these isolates belong to seventeen bacterial genera including Alcaligenes (1 isolate), Aquamonas (1), Aquaspirillum (1), Bacillus (10), Brevundimonas (5), Caulobacter (7), Dechloromonas (2), Janibacter (1), Janthinobacterium (2), Lactobacillus (1), Paenibacillus (4), Pseudomonas (9), Rhodoferax (1), Sphingomonas (1), Stenotrophomonas (6), Variovorax (2), and Zoogloea (1). Metal respiration assays identified several isolates, which phylogenically belong or are close to Caulobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas, capable of reducing Co(III)EDTA- to Co(II)EDTA{sup 2-} using the defined M1 medium under anaerobic conditions. In addition, using WAG5 groundwater directly as the inoculants, we found that organisms associated with WAG5 groundwater can reduce both Fe(III) and Co(III) under anaerobic conditions. Further assays were then performed to determine the optimal conditions for Co(III) reduction. These assays indicated that addition of various electron donors including ethanol, lactate, methanol, pyruvate, and acetate resulted in metal reduction. These experiments will provide useful background information for future

  20. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized 1 from citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rDNA microarray and 16S rDNA clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria from 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs while 20 orders from phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs compared to asymptomatic midribs. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants, but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis was further verified by sequencing 16S rDNA clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of Las in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate Las as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. Citrus is the most important commercial fruit crop in Florida. In recent years, citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also called citrus greening, has severely affected Florida's citrus production and hence has drawn an enormous amount of attention. HLB is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus (6,13), characterized by blotchy mottling with green islands on leaves, as well as stunting, fruit decline, and small, lopsided fruits with poor coloration. The disease tends to be associated with a phloem-limited fastidious {alpha}-proteobacterium given a provisional Candidatus status (Candidatus Liberobacter spp. later changed to Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) in nomenclature (18,25,34). Previous studies indicate that HLB infection causes disorder in the phloem and severely impairs the translocation of assimilates in

  1. 超级细菌“胶水”使伤口缝合不用针线

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    美国《发现》杂志近日报道,美国印第安纳大学和布朗大学的研究人员发现了一种超级细菌“胶水”。这种“胶水”是由一种被称为新月柄杆菌(Caulobacter crescentus)的水生细菌生成。测量显示,粘合效果可达到目前最好的人工胶水的2~3倍。这种“生物胶水”所能承受的拉力相当于将3~4辆小汽车的重量全部集中在一枚硬币上时所产生的压力。目前,构成“生物胶水”的具体成份是某种多糖物质。试验发现,如果将少量超级“胶水”滴在仪器上,几乎找不到有效的方法来彻底清除它们。

  2. Crude oil treatment leads to shift of bacterial communities in soils from the deep active layer and upper permafrost along the China-Russia Crude Oil Pipeline route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizhong Yang

    Full Text Available The buried China-Russia Crude Oil Pipeline (CRCOP across the permafrost-associated cold ecosystem in northeastern China carries a risk of contamination to the deep active layers and upper permafrost in case of accidental rupture of the embedded pipeline or migration of oil spills. As many soil microbes are capable of degrading petroleum, knowledge about the intrinsic degraders and the microbial dynamics in the deep subsurface could extend our understanding of the application of in-situ bioremediation. In this study, an experiment was conducted to investigate the bacterial communities in response to simulated contamination to deep soil samples by using 454 pyrosequencing amplicons. The result showed that bacterial diversity was reduced after 8-weeks contamination. A shift in bacterial community composition was apparent in crude oil-amended soils with Proteobacteria (esp. α-subdivision being the dominant phylum, together with Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The contamination led to enrichment of indigenous bacterial taxa like Novosphingobium, Sphingobium, Caulobacter, Phenylobacterium, Alicylobacillus and Arthrobacter, which are generally capable of degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The community shift highlighted the resilience of PAH degraders and their potential for in-situ degradation of crude oil under favorable conditions in the deep soils.

  3. Characterization of bacterial communities associated with Brassica napus L. growing on a Zn-contaminated soil and their effects on root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbán, Blanca; Croes, Sarah; Weyens, Nele; Lobo, M Carmen; Pérez-Sanz, Araceli; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) and plants can enhance biomass production and metal tolerance of the host plants. This work aimed at isolating and characterizing the cultivable bacterial community associated with Brassica napus growing on a Zn-contaminated site, for selecting cultivable PGPB that might enhance biomass production and metal tolerance of energy crops. The effects of some of these bacterial strains on root growth of B. napus exposed to increasing Zn and Cd concentrations were assessed. A total of 426 morphologically different bacterial strains were isolated from the soil, the rhizosphere, and the roots and stems of B. napus. The diversity of the isolated bacterial populations was similar in rhizosphere and roots, but lower in soil and stem compartments. Burkoholderia, Alcaligenes, Agrococcus, Polaromonas, Stenotrophomonas, Serratia, Microbacterium, and Caulobacter were found as root endophytes exclusively. The inoculation of seeds with Pseudomonas sp. strains 228 and 256, and Serratia sp. strain 246 facilitated the root development of B. napus at 1,000 µM Zn. Arthrobacter sp. strain 222, Serratia sp. strain 246, and Pseudomonas sp. 228 and 262 increased the root length at 300 µM Cd. PMID:27159736

  4. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Peptide F1 against Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jianyin; Chen, Feilong; Duan, Shan; Gao, Xiangyang; Liu, Guo; Chen, Yunjiao; Dixon, William; Xiao, Hang; Cao, Yong

    2015-08-19

    Antimicrobial peptides have received increasing attention in the agricultural and food industries due to their potential to control pathogens. However, to facilitate the development of novel peptide-based antimicrobial agents, details regarding the molecular mechanisms of these peptides need to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial mechanism of peptide F1, a bacteriocin found in Tibetan kefir, against Escherichia coli at protein levels using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. In response to treatment with peptide F1, 31 of the 280 identified proteins in E. coli showed alterations in their expression, including 10 down-regulated proteins and 21 up-regulated proteins. These 31 proteins all possess different molecular functions and are involved in different molecular pathways, as is evident in referencing the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Specifically, pathways that were significantly altered in E. coli in response to peptide F1 treatment include the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and the cell cycle-caulobacter pathways, which was also associated with inhibition of the cell growth, induction of morphological changes, and cell death. The results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides.

  5. Huanglongbing, a systemic disease, restructures the bacterial community associated with citrus roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Duan, Yongping; Wang, Nian

    2010-06-01

    To examine the effect of pathogens on the diversity and structure of plant-associated bacterial communities, we carried out a molecular analysis using citrus and huanglongbing as a host-disease model. 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis of citrus roots revealed shifts in microbial diversity in response to pathogen infection. The clone library of the uninfected root samples has a majority of phylotypes showing similarity to well-known plant growth-promoting bacteria, including Caulobacter, Burkholderia, Lysobacter, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, and Paenibacillus. Infection by "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" restructured the native microbial community associated with citrus roots and led to the loss of detection of most phylotypes while promoting the growth of bacteria such as Methylobacterium and Sphingobacterium. In pairwise comparisons, the clone library from uninfected roots contained significantly higher 16S rRNA gene diversity, as reflected in the higher Chao 1 richness estimation (P citrus by "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" has a profound effect on the structure and composition of the bacterial community associated with citrus roots.

  6. [Qualitative and quantitative determination of bacterial populations in an aquatic environment. 7. Development of bacterial growth on raw materials exposed to potable water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dott, W; Schoenen, D

    1985-05-01

    Refined steel plates coated with different materials that contained available organic compounds led to a microbial growth on the surface. Even plastics and bitumen which were used in the sphere of drinking water showed after an exposure time of three months up to 192 ml slime per square meter. The number of viable bacteria within the Aufwuchs was in the range of 10(7) cfu/ml. The production of slime increased with time. The relation of carbohydrate and protein content significantly changed from 2 at the beginning to 30 after 12 months of incubation the bitumen coating test plates. This indicates an increase synthesis of carbohydrate containing extracellular polymeric substances during the late phase of growth. The bacteria isolated from the Aufwuchs mainly belonged to the genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Acinetobacter, Caulobacter, sheated bacteria and other gramnegative physiologically nonreactiv roads. During exposure of the plates the relation changed within the bacterial communities of the main groups. Comparing the bacteria communities of inlet and outflow water it became evident that the later one was influenced by bacteria of the Aufwuchs. PMID:4024773

  7. Isolation and characterization of culturable seed-associated bacterial endophytes from gnotobiotically grown Marama bean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimwamurombe, Percy Maruwa; Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Marama bean (Tylosema esculentum) is an indigenous non-nodulating legume to the arid agro-ecological parts of Southern Africa. It is a staple food for the Khoisan and Bantu people from these areas. It is intriguing how it is able to synthesize the high-protein content in the seeds since its natural habitat is nitrogen deficient. The aim of the study was to determine the presence of seed transmittable bacterial endophytes that may have growth promoting effects, which may be particularly important for the harsh conditions. Marama bean seeds were surface sterilized and gnotobiotically grown to 2 weeks old seedlings. From surface-sterilized shoots and roots, 123 distinct bacterial isolates were cultured using three media, and identified by BOX-PCR fingerprinting and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes. Phylogenetic analyses of 73 putative endophytes assigned them to bacterial species from 14 genera including Proteobacteria (Rhizobium, Massilia, Kosakonia, Pseudorhodoferax, Caulobacter, Pantoea, Sphingomonas, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium), Firmicutes (Bacillus), Actinobacteria (Curtobacterium, Microbacterium) and Bacteroidetes (Mucilaginibacter, Chitinophaga). Screening for plant growth-promoting activities revealed that the isolates showed production of IAA, ACC deaminase, siderophores, endoglucanase, protease, AHLs and capacities to solubilize phosphate and fix nitrogen. This is the first report that marama bean seeds may harbor endophytes that can be cultivated from seedlings; in this community of bacteria, physiological characteristics that are potentially plant growth promoting are widespread. PMID:27118727

  8. 小水榕茎部内生菌的分离及鉴定%Isolation and Identification of Endophytic Bacteria in Anubias barteri's Stem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王继华; 罗梦晓; 马综艺; 王丽; 李思莹; 陈惠荣; 曹干

    2015-01-01

    采用稀释涂板法,对小水榕茎部的内生菌进行分离、纯化及16S rDNA鉴定,通过同源性比对构建系统发育树。结果表明:分离到的24株内生菌分别属于5个类群(Alphaproteobacteria、 Gammaproteobacteria、 Firmicutes、Bacteroidetes、 Filimonas)的11个属(Phenylobacterium、 Rhizobium、 Caulobacter、 Sphingobium、 Paenibacillus、Staphylococcus、 Bacillus、 Pseudomona、 Chitinophaga sancti、 Filimonas、 Agrobacterium),其中Alphaproteobacteria、Firmicutes为优势种群,占总数的45.8%;所有菌株与其同源菌株的相似性均在98%以上。本研究有助于揭示小水榕茎部内生菌的多样性,为发掘其应用潜力提供参考资料。%A total of 24 isolates of Endophytic bacteria from the inside of the stem of Anubias barteri was isolated by spread-plate method. These isolates were aligned by using the sequences of 16S rDNA and then the phylogenetic tree was constructed. The result showed that 24 isolates belong to 11 genus (Phenylobacterium, Rhizobium, Caulobacter, Sphingobium, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Chitinophaga sancti, Filimonas, Agrobacterium) of 5 groups (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Filimonas). The identity of all isolates were more than 98% same as the sequence of bacteria's in NCBI and 45.8% of them were Firmicutes that were dominant species. The result was beneficial for further study of the diversity of endophytic bacteria in Anubias barteri's stem.

  9. Identification and characterization of metabolic properties of bacterial populations recovered from arsenic contaminated ground water of North East India (Assam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soma; Sar, Pinaki

    2013-12-01

    Diversity of culturable bacterial populations within the Arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater of North Eastern state (Assam) of India is studied. From nine As contaminated samples 89 bacterial strains are isolated. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis reveals predominance of Brevundimonas (35%) and Acidovorax (23%) along with Acinetobacter (10%), Pseudomonas (9%) and relatively less abundant (<5%) Undibacterium, Herbaspirillum, Rhodococcus, Staphylococcus, Bosea, Bacillus, Ralstonia, Caulobacter and Rhizobiales members. High As(III) resistance (MTC 10-50 mM) is observed for the isolates obtained from As(III) enrichment, particularly for 3 isolates of genus Brevundimonas (MTC 50 mM). In contrast, high resistance to As(V) (MTC as high as 550 mM) is present as a ubiquitous property, irrespective of isolates' enrichment condition. Bacterial genera affiliated to other groups showed relatively lower degree of As resistance [MTCs of 15-20 mM As(III) and 250-350 mM As(V)]. As(V) reductase activity is detected in strains with high As(V) as well as As(III) resistance. A strong correlation could be established among isolates capable of reductase activity and siderophore production as well as As(III) tolerance. A large number of isolates (nearly 50%) is capable of anaerobic respiration using alternate inorganic electron acceptors [As(V), Se(VI), Fe(III), [NO(3)(2), SO(4)(2), S(2)O(3)(2). Ability to utilize different carbon sources ranging from C2-C6 compounds along with some complex sugars is also observed. Particularly, a number of strains is found to possess ability to grow chemolithotrophically using As(III) as the electron donor. The study reports for the first time the identity and metabolic abilities of bacteria in As contaminated ground water of North East India, useful to elucidate the microbial role in influencing mobilization of As in the region. PMID:24210546

  10. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the identification of environmental organisms: the Planctomycetes paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrou, Caroline; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identification technique for Planctomycetes organisms, which are used here as bacteria of suitable diversity at genus and species level for testing resolution of the method. Planctomyces maris ATCC 29201, Planctomyces brasiliensis ATCC 49424(T) , P. brasiliensis ATCC 49425, Planctomyces limnophilus ATCC 43296(T) , Blastopirellula marina ATCC 49069(T) , Rhodopirellula baltica DSM 10527(T) and Gemmata obscuriglobus DSM 5831(T) were cultured on half-strength marine broth and agar, or alternatively on caulobacter broth and agar. The resulting pellets of organisms (liquid) or colonies (solid agar) were directly applied to a MALDI-TOF plate. This yielded a reproducible, unique protein profiles comprising 23-39 peaks ranging in size from 2403 to 12 091 Da. These peaks were unambiguously distinguished from any of the 3038 bacterial spectra in the Brüker database. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight patterns were similar for isolates grown in solid and in liquid medium, albeit the patterns from solid growth were more easily interpretable. After the incorporation of the herein determined profiles into the Brüker database, Planctomycetes isolates were blindly identified within 10 min, with an identification score in the range of 1.8 to 2.3. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight-based clustering of these Planctomycetes organisms was consistent with 16S rDNA-based phylogeny. However, the incorporation of additional non-Planctomycetes MALDI-TOF profiles in the analysis resulted in inconsequential clustering. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF protein profiling is a new approach for the rapid and accurate identification of cultured environmental organisms, as illustrated in this study through the analysis of Planctomycetes. PMID:23766281

  11. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina L Callender

    Full Text Available Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI, and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas, metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude and mineralization (five-fold. Genomic techniques proved useful in

  12. Anterior foregut microbiota of the glassy-winged sharpshooter explored using deep 16S rRNA gene sequencing from individual insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Elizabeth E; Backus, Elaine A

    2014-01-01

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) is an invasive insect species that transmits Xylella fastidiosa, the bacterium causing Pierce's disease of grapevine and other leaf scorch diseases. X. fastidiosa has been shown to colonize the anterior foregut (cibarium and precibarium) of sharpshooters, where it may interact with other naturally-occurring bacterial species. To evaluate such interactions, a comprehensive list of bacterial species associated with the sharpshooter cibarium and precibarium is needed. Here, a survey of microbiota associated with the GWSS anterior foregut was conducted. Ninety-six individual GWSS, 24 from each of 4 locations (Bakersfield, CA; Ojai, CA; Quincy, FL; and a laboratory colony), were characterized for bacteria in dissected sharpshooter cibaria and precibaria by amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene using Illumina MiSeq technology. An average of approximately 150,000 sequence reads were obtained per insect. The most common genus detected was Wolbachia; sequencing of the Wolbachia ftsZ gene placed this strain in supergroup B, one of two Wolbachia supergroups most commonly associated with arthropods. X. fastidiosa was detected in all 96 individuals examined. By multilocus sequence typing, both X. fastidiosa subspecies fastidiosa and subspecies sandyi were present in GWSS from California and the colony; only subspecies fastidiosa was detected in GWSS from Florida. In addition to Wolbachia and X. fastidiosa, 23 other bacterial genera were detected at or above an average incidence of 0.1%; these included plant-associated microbes (Methylobacterium, Sphingomonas, Agrobacterium, and Ralstonia) and soil- or water-associated microbes (Anoxybacillus, Novosphingobium, Caulobacter, and Luteimonas). Sequences belonging to species of the family Enterobacteriaceae also were detected but it was not possible to assign these to individual genera. Many of these species likely interact with X. fastidiosa in the cibarium and

  13. Anterior foregut microbiota of the glassy-winged sharpshooter explored using deep 16S rRNA gene sequencing from individual insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E Rogers

    Full Text Available The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS is an invasive insect species that transmits Xylella fastidiosa, the bacterium causing Pierce's disease of grapevine and other leaf scorch diseases. X. fastidiosa has been shown to colonize the anterior foregut (cibarium and precibarium of sharpshooters, where it may interact with other naturally-occurring bacterial species. To evaluate such interactions, a comprehensive list of bacterial species associated with the sharpshooter cibarium and precibarium is needed. Here, a survey of microbiota associated with the GWSS anterior foregut was conducted. Ninety-six individual GWSS, 24 from each of 4 locations (Bakersfield, CA; Ojai, CA; Quincy, FL; and a laboratory colony, were characterized for bacteria in dissected sharpshooter cibaria and precibaria by amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene using Illumina MiSeq technology. An average of approximately 150,000 sequence reads were obtained per insect. The most common genus detected was Wolbachia; sequencing of the Wolbachia ftsZ gene placed this strain in supergroup B, one of two Wolbachia supergroups most commonly associated with arthropods. X. fastidiosa was detected in all 96 individuals examined. By multilocus sequence typing, both X. fastidiosa subspecies fastidiosa and subspecies sandyi were present in GWSS from California and the colony; only subspecies fastidiosa was detected in GWSS from Florida. In addition to Wolbachia and X. fastidiosa, 23 other bacterial genera were detected at or above an average incidence of 0.1%; these included plant-associated microbes (Methylobacterium, Sphingomonas, Agrobacterium, and Ralstonia and soil- or water-associated microbes (Anoxybacillus, Novosphingobium, Caulobacter, and Luteimonas. Sequences belonging to species of the family Enterobacteriaceae also were detected but it was not possible to assign these to individual genera. Many of these species likely interact with X. fastidiosa in the

  14. Bacterial Colonization of Cod (Gadus morhua L.) and Halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) Eggs in Marine Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Geir Høvik; Olafsen, Jan A.

    1989-01-01

    Aquaculture has brought about increased interest in mass production of marine fish larvae. Problems such as poor egg quality and mass mortality of fish larvae have been prevalent. The intensive incubation techniques that often result in bacterial overgrowth on fish eggs could affect the commensal relationship between the indigenous microflora and opportunistic pathogens and subsequently hamper egg development, hatching, larval health, and ongrowth. Little information about the adherent microflora on fish eggs is available, and the present study was undertaken to describe the microbial ecology during egg development and hatching of two fish species of potential commercial importance in marine aquaculture. Attachment and development of the bacterial flora on cod (Gadus morhua L.) eggs from fertilization until hatching was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The adherent microflora on cod (G. morhua L.) and halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) eggs during incubation was characterized and grouped by cluster analysis. Marked bacterial growth could be demonstrated 2 h after fertilization, and at hatching eggs were heavily overgrown. Members of the genera Pseudomonas, Alteromonas, Aeromonas, and Flavobacterium were found to dominate on the surface of both cod and halibut eggs. The filamentous bacterium Leucothrix mucor was found on eggs from both species. While growth of L. mucor on halibut eggs was sparse, cod eggs with a hairy appearance due to overgrowth by this bacterium close to hatching were frequently observed. Vibrio fischeri could be detected on cod eggs only, and pathogenic vibrios were not detected. Members of the genera Moraxella and Alcaligenes were found only on halibut eggs. Caulobacter and Seliberia spp. were observed attached to eggs dissected from cod ovaries under sterile conditions, indicating the presence of these bacteria in ovaries before spawning. Adherent strains did not demonstrate antibiotic resistance above a normal level. Attempts to

  15. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Katrina L; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  16. Efficacy of Various Chemical Disinfectants on Biofilms Formed in Spacecraft Potable Water System Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Willy; Garcia, Veronica; Castro, Victoria; Ott, Mark; Duane

    2009-01-01

    As the provision of potable water is critical for successful habitation of the International Space Station (ISS), life support systems were installed in December 2008 to recycle both humidity from the atmosphere and urine to conserve available water in the vehicle. Pre-consumption testing from the dispensing needle at the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) indicated that bacterial concentrations exceeded the current ISS specifications of 50 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Subsequent investigations revealed that a corrugated stainless steel flex hose upstream of the dispensing needle in the PWD was filled with non-sterile water and left at room temperature for over one month before launch. To simulate biofilm formation that was suspected in the flight system, sterile flex hoses were seeded with a consortium of bacterial isolates previously recovered from other ISS water systems, which included Ralstonia pickettii, Burkholderia multivorans, Caulobacter vibrioides., and Cupriavidus pauculus. After 5 days of incubation, these hoses were challenged with various chemical disinfectants including hydrogen peroxide, colloidal silver, and buffered pH solutions to determine the ability of the disinfectants to decrease and maintain bacterial concentrations below ISS specifications. Disinfection efficacy over time was measured by collecting daily heterotrophic plate counts following exposure to the disinfectants. A single flush with either 6% hydrogen peroxide solution or a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide and 400 ppb colloidal silver effectively reduced the bacterial concentrations to less than 1 CFU/ml for a period of up to 2 months. Testing results indicated that hydrogen peroxide and mixtures of hydrogen peroxide and colloidal silver have tremendous potential as alternative disinfectants for ISS water systems.

  17. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from sugarcane plants growing in pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnaz, Samina; Baig, Deeba Noreen; Lazarovits, George

    2010-12-01

    Bacteria were isolated from roots of sugarcane varieties grown in the fields of Punjab. They were identified by using API20E/NE bacterial identification kits and from sequences of 16S rRNA and amplicons of the cpn60 gene. The majority of bacteria were found to belong to the genera of Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, and Klebsiella, but members of genera Azospirillum, Rhizobium, Rahnella, Delftia, Caulobacter, Pannonibacter, Xanthomonas, and Stenotrophomonas were also found. The community, however, was dominated by members of the Pseudomonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, as representatives of these genera were found in samples from every variety and location examined. All isolates were tested for the presence of five enzymes and seven factors known to be associated with plant growth promotion. Ten isolates showed lipase activity and eight were positive for protease activity. Cellulase, chitinase, and pectinase were not detected in any strain. Nine strains showed nitrogen fixing ability (acetylene reduction assay) and 26 were capable of solubilizing phosphate. In the presence of 100 mg/l tryptophan, all strains except one produced indole acetic acid in the growth medium. All isolates were positive for ACC deaminase activity. Six strains produced homoserine lactones and three produced HCN and hexamate type siderophores. One isolate was capable of inhibiting the growth of 24 pathogenic fungal strains of Colletotrichum, Fusarium, Pythium, and Rhizoctonia spp. In tests of their abilities to grow under a range of temperature, pH, and NaCl concentrations, all isolates grew well on plates with 3% NaCl and most of them grew well at 4 to 41degrees C and at pH 11.

  18. Autochthonous bioaugmentation with environmental samples rich in hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria for bench-scale bioremediation of oily seawater and desert soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nedaa; Dashti, Narjes; Salamah, Samar; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Sorkhoh, Naser; Radwan, Samir

    2016-05-01

    Oil-contaminated seawater and desert soil batches were bioaugmented with suspensions of pea (Pisum sativum) rhizosphere and soil with long history of oil pollution. Oil consumption was measured by gas-liquid chromatography. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria in the bioremediation batches were counted using a mineral medium with oil vapor as a sole carbon source and characterized by their 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-gene sequences. Most of the oil was consumed during the first 2-4 months, and the oil-removal rate decreased or ceased thereafter due to nutrient and oxygen depletion. Supplying the batches with NaNO3 (nitrogen fertilization) at a late phase of bioremediation resulted in reenhanced oil consumption and bacterial growth. In the seawater batches bioaugmented with rhizospheric suspension, the autochthonous rhizospheric bacterial species Microbacterium oxidans and Rhodococcus spp. were established and contributed to oil-removal. The rhizosphere-bioaugmented soil batches selectively favored Arthrobacter nitroguajacolicus, Caulobacter segnis, and Ensifer adherens. In seawater batches bioaugmented with long-contaminated soil, the predominant oil-removing bacterium was the marine species Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. In soil batches on the other hand, the autochthonous inhabitants of the long-contaminated soil, Pseudomonas and Massilia species were established and contributed to oil removal. It was concluded that the use of rhizospheric bacteria for inoculating seawater and desert soil and of bacteria in long-contaminated soil for inoculating desert soil follows the concept of "autochthonous bioaugmentation." Inoculating seawater with bacteria in long-contaminated soil, on the other hand, merits the designation "allochthonous bioaugmentation." PMID:26801925

  19. Transcriptome changes and cAMP oscillations in an archaeal cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soppa Jörg

    2007-06-01

    allowed to identify a strategy of transcript level regulation that is different from all previously characterized species. The transcript levels of only 3% of all genes are regulated, a fraction that is considerably lower than has been reported for four eukaryotic species (6% – 28% and for the bacterium C. crescentus (19%. It was shown that cAMP is present in significant concentrations in an archaeon, and the phylogenetic profile of the adenylate cyclase indicates that this signaling molecule is widely distributed in archaea. The occurrence of cell cycle-dependent oscillations of the cAMP concentration in an archaeon and in several eukaryotic species indicates that cAMP level changes might be a phylogenetically old signal for cell cycle progression.

  20. New high through put approach to study ancient microbial phylogenetic diversity in permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirina, E.; Cole, J.; Chai, B.; Gilichinksy, D.; Tiedje, J.

    2003-04-01

    The study of microbial diversity in the deep ancient permafrost can help to answer many questions: (1) what kind of mechanisms keeps microbial cells alive, (2) how many of phylogenetic groups exist in situ and never had been cultivated, (3) what is the difference between modern and ancient microorganisms? From this point, distinct environments were examined: Arctic and Antarctic modern soil and permafrost. 16S rDNA genes were amplified from genomic DNA extracted from both original frozen samples and the same samples incubated at 10oC for 8 weeks under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to determine those capable to grow. High throughput DNA sequencing was performed on the cloned PCR products to obtain partial 16S rDNA gene sequences. The unique script was written to automatically compare over 2,000 partial sequences with those rrn sequences in the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) release 8.1 using the SEQUENCE MATCH. Sequences were grouped into categories from the RDPs phylogenetic hierarchy based on the closest database matches. Investigation revealed significant microbial diversity; two phylogenetic groups were predominant in all samples: Proteobacteria and Gram Positive Bacteria. Microbial community composition within those groups is different from sample to sample. However, similar genera, such as Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Citrobacter, Caulobacter, Comamonas, Flavobacterium, Nocardioides, Pseudomonas, Rhodocyclus, Rhodococcus, Sphingobacterium, Sphingomonas, Streptococcus, Terrabacter appeared in both polar regions. The greatest microbial diversity was detected in Arctic surface samples. According to RDPs phylogenetic hierarchy those organisms are related to Proteobacteria_SD, Gram Positive Bacteria_SD, Leptospirillum-Nitrospira, Nitrospina_SD, Flexibacter-Cytophaga-Bacteroides, Planctomyces and Relatives. Both the aerobic and anaerobic low temperatures soil incubation yielded some microbes not detected in the original samples. It should be possible, using

  1. Aeration remediation of a polluted waterway increases near-surface coarse and culturable microbial aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, M Elias; O'Mullan, Gregory D

    2014-04-15

    Aeration remediation is currently used in polluted urban waterways to increase oxygen levels in the water column. Recent studies have provided increasing evidence that the bursting of bubbles at water surfaces introduced by aeration, or other surface disturbances, can transfer viable bacteria to the air. In heavily sewage-polluted waterways these water-originated bacterial aerosols may pose as a health risk to recreators in small boats or residents inhabiting the shoreline. Nonetheless, few studies have explored aerosols above active aeration remediation projects in waterways or investigated how bacterial aerosols change with vertical distance from aeration activities. This study, conducted at the Newtown Creek superfund site in Brooklyn, NY, USA, measured coarse aerosol particles and culturable bacteria in near-surface air above waters undergoing aeration remediation. Regardless of aeration operation culturable bacterial fallout was greater near-surface (0.6m above water) than previously-reported measurements made at 2.5m. Molecular analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences from isolated bacteria demonstrates that water and air shared a large number of bacterial genera and that the genera present in the near-surface aerosols (0.6m) contained water-associated Vibrio and Caulobacter, which were not present at 2.5m, despite the smaller sequence library size from the near-surface. Also, the near-surface microbial assemblage had significantly greater association with sequences detected previously in aquatic environments compared to the 2.5m library. We found compelling evidence that aeration activity contributed to this vertical gradient in bacterial aerosol concentrations and identity. Similar to results from 2.5m, concentrations of near-surface respirable coarse aerosols (aeration was occurring. Culturable bacterial aerosol fallout was also greater near-surface when the aerator was on compared to simultaneous measurements made at 2.5m. Furthermore, when the aerator was

  2. Continental subsurface waters support unique but diverse C-acquisition strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. M.; Magnabosco, C.; Brown, C. T.; Grim, S. L.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Wilkie, K. M.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Simkus, D.; Slater, G. F.; Hendrickson, S.; Pullin, M. J.; Kieft, T. L.; Li, L.; Snyder, L.; Kuloyo, O.; Linage, B.; Borgonie, G.; Vermeulen, J.; Maleke, M.; Tlalajoe, N.; Moloantoa, K.; van Heerden, E.; Vermeulen, F.; Pienaar, M.; Munro, A.; Joubert, L.; Ackerman, J.; van Jaarsveld, C.; Onstott, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial subsurface environments generally support two orders of magnitude fewer microorganisms than submarine environments where energy and C sources are more abundant. However, our research on the geochemistry and stable isotopes has suggested that the microbial communities residing in the continental subsurface waters, aged more than thousands of years, do not live by a monotypic metabolic network across sites. We evaluated the taxonomic and functional diversity of microbial communities from three localities in South Africa and their relationship to the environmental parameters associated with each fracture water. The borehole at Tau Tona Au mine (TT107; 3,100 mbls), Masimong Au mine (MM5; 1,900 mbls) and Zondereinde Pt mine (NO14; 2,100 mbls) contain saline fracture water of paleometeroic origin but the anaerobic ecosystems were driven by distinctive C-assimilation strategies. Archaea and Bacteria are present in all samples with the latter being dominant (>75%). The similarity between the Δ14C and δ13C-PLFA with those of the DIC indicates that the majority of cellular C in the TT107 sample was derived from the DIC (0.6 mM), even though dissolved CH4 (8.8 mM) is more available. The DIC may have supported a wide variety of chemoautotrophs including the predominant firmicutes, e.g. Thermincola sp. and Ca. Desulforudis audaxviator. Interestingly, a considerable percentage of sequences related to oligotrophic α-proteobacteria Caulobacter sp. was detected, which warrants further investigation as the aerobic heterotrophic microorganism has a unique dimorphic life cycle. For the MM5 sample, the δ13C and δ2H of the CH4 indicate it was produced via CO2 reduction from DIC, which is consistent with the relatively high abundance of hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanothermobacter sp. that scavenged the abiogenic H2 and utilized the DIC (0.43 mM) leading to its enriched δ13C signature. In contrast to the TT107 sample, the much-depleted δ13C-CH4 indicates that the