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Sample records for alpha-proteobacterium caulobacter crescentus

  1. Genome analysis of DNA repair genes in the alpha proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus

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    Menck Carlos FM

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integrity of DNA molecules is fundamental for maintaining life. The DNA repair proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to tolerate them. DNA repair genes are best known from the gamma-proteobacterium Escherichia coli, which is the most understood bacterial model. However, genome sequencing raises questions regarding uniformity and ubiquity of these DNA repair genes and pathways, reinforcing the need for identifying genes and proteins, which may respond to DNA damage in other bacteria. Results In this study, we employed a bioinformatic approach, to analyse and describe the open reading frames potentially related to DNA repair from the genome of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This was performed by comparison with known DNA repair related genes found in public databases. As expected, although C. crescentus and E. coli bacteria belong to separate phylogenetic groups, many of their DNA repair genes are very similar. However, some important DNA repair genes are absent in the C. crescentus genome and other interesting functionally related gene duplications are present, which do not occur in E. coli. These include DNA ligases, exonuclease III (xthA, endonuclease III (nth, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (ada gene, photolyase-like genes, and uracil-DNA-glycosylases. On the other hand, the genes imuA and imuB, which are involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis, have recently been described in C. crescentus, but are absent in E. coli. Particularly interesting are the potential atypical phylogeny of one of the photolyase genes in alpha-proteobacteria, indicating an origin by horizontal transfer, and the duplication of the Ada orthologs, which have diverse structural configurations, including one that is still unique for C. crescentus. Conclusion The absence and the presence of certain genes are discussed and predictions are made considering the particular

  2. Core-oscillator model of Caulobacter crescentus

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    Vandecan, Yves; Biondi, Emanuele; Blossey, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a powerful model organism for studies of bacterial cell cycle regulation. Although the major regulators and their connections in Caulobacter have been identified, it still is a challenge to properly understand the dynamics of its circuitry which accounts for both cell cycle progression and arrest. We show that the key decision module in Caulobacter is built from a limit cycle oscillator which controls the DNA replication program. The effect of an induced cell cycle arrest is demonstrated to be a key feature to classify the underlying dynamics.

  3. Caulobacter crescentus as a Whole-Cell Uranium Biosensor▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hillson, Nathan J; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    We engineered a strain of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to fluoresce in the presence of micromolar levels of uranium at ambient temperatures when it is exposed to a hand-held UV lamp. Previous microarray experiments revealed that several Caulobacter genes are significantly upregulated in response to uranium but not in response to other heavy metals. We designated one of these genes urcA (for uranium response in caulobacter). We constructed a reporter that utilizes the urcA promoter to ...

  4. Periodic synthesis of phospholipids during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, E A; Bender, R A

    1987-01-01

    Net phospholipid synthesis is discontinuous during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle with synthesis restricted to two discrete periods. The first period of net phospholipid synthesis begins in the swarmer cell shortly after cell division and ends at about the time when DNA replication initiates. The second period of phospholipid synthesis begins at a time when DNA replication is about two-thirds complete and ends at about the same time that DNA replication terminates. Thus, considerable D...

  5. The coding and noncoding architecture of the Caulobacter crescentus genome.

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    Jared M Schrader

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Caulobacter crescentus undergoes an asymmetric cell division controlled by a genetic circuit that cycles in space and time. We provide a universal strategy for defining the coding potential of bacterial genomes by applying ribosome profiling, RNA-seq, global 5'-RACE, and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS data to the 4-megabase C. crescentus genome. We mapped transcript units at single base-pair resolution using RNA-seq together with global 5'-RACE. Additionally, using ribosome profiling and LC-MS, we mapped translation start sites and coding regions with near complete coverage. We found most start codons lacked corresponding Shine-Dalgarno sites although ribosomes were observed to pause at internal Shine-Dalgarno sites within the coding DNA sequence (CDS. These data suggest a more prevalent use of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence for ribosome pausing rather than translation initiation in C. crescentus. Overall 19% of the transcribed and translated genomic elements were newly identified or significantly improved by this approach, providing a valuable genomic resource to elucidate the complete C. crescentus genetic circuitry that controls asymmetric cell division.

  6. Diverse Functions for Six Glycosyltransferases in Caulobacter crescentus Cell Wall Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Yakhnina, Anastasiya A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2013-01-01

    The essential process of peptidoglycan synthesis requires two enzymatic activities, transpeptidation and transglycosylation. While the PBP2 and PBP3 transpeptidases perform highly specialized functions that are widely conserved, the specific roles of different glycosyltransferases are poorly understood. For example, Caulobacter crescentus encodes six glycosyltransferase paralogs of largely unknown function. Using genetic analyses, we found that Caulobacter glycosyltransferases are primarily r...

  7. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis of heavy metal stresses inCaulobacter crescentus

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    Hu, Ping; Brodie, Eoin L.; Suzuki, Yohey; McAdams, Harley H.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2005-09-21

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and related stalkbacterial species are known for their distinctive ability to live in lownutrient environments, a characteristic of most heavy metal contaminatedsites. Caulobacter crescentus is a model organism for studying cell cycleregulation with well developed genetics. We have identified the pathwaysresponding to heavy metal toxicity in C. crescentus to provide insightsfor possible application of Caulobacter to environmental restoration. Weexposed C. crescentus cells to four heavy metals (chromium, cadmium,selenium and uranium) and analyzed genome wide transcriptional activitiespost exposure using a Affymetrix GeneChip microarray. C. crescentusshowed surprisingly high tolerance to uranium, a possible mechanism forwhich may be formation of extracellular calcium-uranium-phosphateprecipitates. The principal response to these metals was protectionagainst oxidative stress (up-regulation of manganese-dependent superoxidedismutase, sodA). Glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin, glutaredoxinsand DNA repair enzymes responded most strongly to cadmium and chromate.The cadmium and chromium stress response also focused on reducing theintracellular metal concentration, with multiple efflux pumps employed toremove cadmium while a sulfate transporter was down-regulated to reducenon-specific uptake of chromium. Membrane proteins were also up-regulatedin response to most of the metals tested. A two-component signaltransduction system involved in the uranium response was identified.Several differentially regulated transcripts from regions previously notknown to encode proteins were identified, demonstrating the advantage ofevaluating the transcriptome using whole genome microarrays.

  8. Biomineralization of Uranium by PhoY Phosphatase Activity Aids Cell Survival in Caulobacter crescentus

    OpenAIRE

    Yung, Mimi C.; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the ...

  9. Surface-layer protein from Caulobacter crescentus: expression, purification and X-ray crystallographic analysis.

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    Jones, Michael D; Chan, Anson C K; Nomellini, John F; Murphy, Michael E P; Smit, John

    2016-09-01

    Protein surface layers are self-assembling, paracrystalline lattices on the surface of many prokaryotes. Surface-layer proteins have not benefited from widespread structural analysis owing to their resistance to crystallization. Here, the successful expression of a truncated version of RsaA, the surface-layer protein from Caulobacter crescentus, from a Caulobacter protein-expression system is reported. The purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the truncated RsaA, the largest surface-layer protein studied to date and the first from a Gram-negative bacterium, are also reported. PMID:27599857

  10. Advantages and mechanisms of polarity and cell shape determination in Caulobacter crescentus

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    Lawler, Melanie L.; Brun, Yves V.

    2007-01-01

    The tremendous diversity of bacterial cell shapes and the targeting of proteins and macromolecular complexes to specific subcellular sites strongly suggest that cellular organization provides important advantages for bacteria in their environment. Key advances have been made in the understanding of the mechanism and function of polarity and cell shape by studying the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, whose cell cycle progression involves the ordered synthesis of different polar struct...

  11. Proteome of Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle publicty accessible on SWICZ server

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohradský, Jiří; Janda, Ivan; Grunenfelder, B.; Berndt, P.; Roder, D.; Langen, H.; Weiser, Jaroslav; Jenal, U.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2003), s. 1874-7882. ISSN 1615-9853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/03/0293; GA AV ČR IAA5020211 Grant ostatní: GA Swiss National Science Foundation fellowship(XX) 31-59050.99 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : bioinformatics * caulobacter * crescentus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.766, year: 2003

  12. Reduction of Cr(VI) and survival in Cr-contaminated sites by Caulobacter crescentus

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    Hu, P.; Chakraborty, R.; Brodie, E. L.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Caulobacter spp. is known to be able to live in low-nutrient environments, a characteristic of most heavy metal-contaminated sites. Recent studies have shown that Caulobacter crescentus can grow in chemically defined medium containing up to 1 mM uranium. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis and electron microscopic imaging of heavy metal stresses in Caulobacter crescentus also provided insight and evidence that the bacterium used an array of defensive mechanisms to deal with heavy metal stresses. In addition to up-regulated enzymes protecting against oxidative stress, DNA repair and down-regulated potential chromium transport, one of the major gene groups respond to chromium stress is "electron transport process and cytochrome oxidases", including cytochrome c oxidases, raising the possibility that the cells can employ the cytochromes to reduce chromium. Analysis of the microbial community at the chromium contaminated DOE site at Hanford, WA revealed the presence of Caulobacter spp. As an oligotroph, Caulobacter can play a significant role in chromium reduction in the environment where the nutrients are limited. This result was confirmed by both 16S rDNA based microarray (Phylochip) as well as by MDA-based clone library data. Based on these results we further investigated the capability of this organism to reduce Cr(VI) using the well known model strain Caulobacter crescentus CB15N. Preliminary cell suspension experiments were set up with glucose as the electron donor and Cr(VI) as the electron acceptor in phosphate based M2 salts buffer. After 22 hours almost 27% of Cr(VI) was reduced in the incubations containing active cells relative to the controls containing heat killed cells. Also, in another set of controls with no electron acceptor added, cells showed no increase in cell density during that time demonstrating that the reduction of Cr(VI) by cells of Caulobacter was due to biological activity. Future experiments will investigate the components

  13. A moving DNA replication factory in Caulobacter crescentus

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    Jensen, Rasmus B.; Wang, Sherry C.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2001-01-01

    The in vivo intracellular location of components of the Caulobacter replication apparatus was visualized during the cell cycle. Replisome assembly occurs at the chromosomal origin located at the stalked cell pole, coincident with the initiation of DNA replication. The replisome gradually moves to midcell as DNA replication proceeds and disassembles upon completion of DNA replication. Although the newly replicated origin regions of the chromosome are rapidly moved to opposite cell poles by an ...

  14. The core and O-polysaccharide structure of the Caulobacter crescentus lipopolysaccharide.

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    Jones, Michael D; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Nomellini, John F; Smit, John

    2015-01-30

    Here we describe the analysis of the structure of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Caulobacter crescentus strain JS1025, a derivative of C. crescentus CB15 NA1000 with an engineered amber mutation in rsaA, leading to the loss of the protein S-layer and gene CCNA_00471 encoding a putative GDP-L-fucose synthase. LPS was isolated using an aqueous membrane disruption method. Polysaccharide and core oligosaccharide were produced by mild acid hydrolysis and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical methods. Spectra revealed the presence of two polysaccharides, one of them, a rhamnan, could be removed using periodate oxidation. Another polymer, built from 4-amino-4-deoxy-D-rhamnose (perosamine), mannose, and 3-O-methyl-glucose, should be the O-chain of the LPS according to genetic data. The attribution of the rhamnan as a part of LPS or a separate polymer was not possible. PMID:25498010

  15. A stochastic spatiotemporal model of a response-regulator network in the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle

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    Li, Fei; Subramanian, Kartik; Chen, Minghan; Tyson, John J.; Cao, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetric cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus is controlled by an elaborate molecular mechanism governing the production, activation and spatial localization of a host of interacting proteins. In previous work, we proposed a deterministic mathematical model for the spatiotemporal dynamics of six major regulatory proteins. In this paper, we study a stochastic version of the model, which takes into account molecular fluctuations of these regulatory proteins in space and time during early stages of the cell cycle of wild-type Caulobacter cells. We test the stochastic model with regard to experimental observations of increased variability of cycle time in cells depleted of the divJ gene product. The deterministic model predicts that overexpression of the divK gene blocks cell cycle progression in the stalked stage; however, stochastic simulations suggest that a small fraction of the mutants cells do complete the cell cycle normally.

  16. Biomineralization of uranium by PhoY phosphatase activity aids cell survival in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Yung, Mimi C; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-08-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria. PMID:24878600

  17. Biomineralization of Uranium by PhoY Phosphatase Activity Aids Cell Survival in Caulobacter crescentus

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    Yung, M C [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiao, Y [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-22

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria.

  18. The flagellar motor of Caulobacter crescentus generates more torque when a cell swims backwards

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    Lele, Pushkar P.; Roland, Thibault; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Chen, Yihao; Berg, Howard C.

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus swims by rotating a single right-handed helical filament. These cells have two swimming modes: a pusher mode, in which clockwise (CW) rotation of the filament thrusts the cell body forwards, and a puller mode, in which counterclockwise (CCW) rotation pulls it backwards. The situation is reversed in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that rotates several left-handed filaments CCW to drive the cell body forwards. The flagellar motor in E. coli generates more torque in the CCW direction than the CW direction in swimming cells. However, C. crescentus and other bacteria with single filaments swim forwards and backwards at similar speeds, prompting the assumption that motor torques in the two modes are the same. Here, we present evidence that motors in C. crescentus develop higher torques in the puller mode than in the pusher mode, and suggest that the anisotropy in torque generation is similar in the two species, despite the differences in filament handedness and motor bias.

  19. Phosphate starvation triggers production and secretion of an extracellular lipoprotein in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Sophie Le Blastier

    Full Text Available Life in oligotrophic environments necessitates quick adaptive responses to a sudden lack of nutrients. Secretion of specific degradative enzymes into the extracellular medium is a means to mobilize the required nutrient from nearby sources. The aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus must often face changes in its environment such as phosphate limitation. Evidence reported in this paper indicates that under phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces a membrane surface-anchored lipoprotein named ElpS subsequently released into the extracellular medium. A complete set of 12 genes encoding a type II secretion system (T2SS is located adjacent to the elpS locus in the C. crescentus genome. Deletion of this T2SS impairs release of ElpS in the environment, which surprisingly remains present at the cell surface, indicating that the T2SS is not involved in the translocation of ElpS to the outer membrane but rather in its release. Accordingly, treatment with protease inhibitors prevents release of ElpS in the extracellular medium suggesting that ElpS secretion relies on a T2SS-secreted protease. Finally, secretion of ElpS is associated with an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity in culture supernatants, suggesting a role of the secreted protein in inorganic phosphate mobilization. In conclusion, we have shown that upon phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces an outer membrane bound lipoprotein, ElpS, which is further cleaved and released in the extracellular medium in a T2SS-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ElpS is associated with an alkaline phosphatase activity, thereby allowing the bacterium to gather inorganic phosphates from a poor environment.

  20. Two Outer Membrane Proteins Are Required for Maximal Type I Secretion of the Caulobacter crescentus S-Layer Protein

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    Toporowski, Michael C.; Nomellini, John F.; Awram, Peter; Smit, John

    2004-01-01

    Transport of RsaA, the crystalline S-layer subunit protein of Caulobacter crescentus, is mediated by a type I secretion mechanism. Two proteins have been identified that play the role of the outer membrane protein (OMP) component in the RsaA secretion machinery. The genes rsaFa and rsaFb were identified by similarity to the Escherichia coli hemolysin secretion OMP TolC by using the C. crescentus genome sequence. The rsaFa gene is located several kilobases downstream of the other transporter g...

  1. Regulation of the activity of the dual-function DnaA protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Carmen Fernandez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available DnaA is a conserved essential bacterial protein that acts as the initiator of chromosomal replication as well as a master transcriptional regulator in Caulobacter crescentus. Thus, the intracellular levels of active DnaA need to be tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Our previous work suggested that DnaA may be regulated at the level of its activity by the replisome-associated protein HdaA. Here, we describe the construction of a mutant DnaA protein [DnaA(R357A]. The R357 residue in the AAA+ domain of the C. crescentus DnaA protein is equivalent to the R334 residue of the E. coli DnaA protein, which is required for the Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA (RIDA. We found that the expression of the DnaA(R357A mutant protein in C. crescentus, but not the expression of the wild-type DnaA protein at similar levels, causes a severe phenotype of over-initiation of chromosomal replication and that it blocks cell division. Thus, the mutant DnaA(R357A protein is hyper-active to promote the initiation of DNA replication, compared to the wild-type DnaA protein. DnaA(R357A could not replace DnaA in vivo, indicating that the switch in DnaA activity once chromosomal replication has started may be an essential process in C. crescentus. We propose that the inactivation of DnaA is the main mechanism ensuring that chromosomal replication starts only once per cell cycle. We further observed that the R357A substitution in DnaA does not promote the activity of DnaA as a direct transcriptional activator of four important genes, encoding HdaA, the GcrA master cell cycle regulator, the FtsZ cell division protein and the MipZ spatial regulator of cell division. Thus, the AAA+ domain of DnaA may play a role in temporally regulating the bifunctionality of DnaA by reallocating DnaA molecules from initiating DNA replication to transcribing genes within the unique DnaA regulon of C. crescentus.

  2. The curved shape of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus enhances colonization of surfaces in flow

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    Persat, Alexandre; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria thrive in all types of fluid environments; flow is thus a ubiquitous aspect of their lives. Bacteria have evolved a variety of cellular components contributing to their growth in specific environments. However, cellular features that help them survive and develop in flow have been rarely characterized. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus may have evolved its curved shape to enhance the colonization of surfaces in flow. C. crescentus curvature is preserved in the wild but straight mutants have no known growth disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Leveraging microfluidics and single-cell imaging, we demonstrate that curvature enhances surface colonization in flow, promoting the formation of larger microcolonies. Cells attach to a surface from a single pole, so that flow affects their orientation. In flow, viscous forces generate a torque on the curved cell body, which reorients the cell in the direction of the flow. The curved cell appears to arc above the surface, optimally orienting its unattached pole towards the surface. This reduces the distance between the surface and the pole, thereby enhancing attachment of its progeny. Additionally, we show that curved shape enhances colony spreading across the direction of the flow, generating more robust biofilm compared to straight mutants.

  3. Two RND proteins involved in heavy metal efflux in Caulobacter crescentus belong to separate clusters within proteobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Valencia, Estela Y; Vânia S. Braz; Guzzo, Cristiane; Marques, Marilis V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heavy metal Resistance-Nodulation-Division (HME-RND) efflux systems help Gram-negative bacteria to keep the intracellular homeostasis under high metal concentrations. These proteins constitute the cytoplasmic membrane channel of the tripartite RND transport systems. Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 possess two HME-RND proteins, and the aim of this work was to determine their involvement in the response to cadmium, zinc, cobalt and nickel, and to analyze the phylogenetic distribution a...

  4. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Joshua W Modell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage.

  5. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Modell, Joshua W; Kambara, Tracy K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage. PMID:25350732

  6. Growth control switch by a DNA-damage-inducible toxin-antitoxin system in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Martins, Daniel; Redder, Peter; Frandi, Antonio; Mignolet, Johann; Chapalay, Julien Bortoli; Chambon, Marc; Turcatti, Gerardo; Viollier, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems (TASs) are thought to respond to various stresses, often inducing growth-arrested (persistent) sub-populations of cells whose housekeeping functions are inhibited. Many such TASs induce this effect through the translation-dependent RNA cleavage (RNase) activity of their toxins, which are held in check by their cognate antitoxins in the absence of stress. However, it is not always clear whether specific mRNA targets of orthologous RNase toxins are responsible for their phenotypic effect, which has made it difficult to accurately place the multitude of TASs within cellular and adaptive regulatory networks. Here, we show that the TAS HigBA of Caulobacter crescentus can promote and inhibit bacterial growth dependent on the dosage of HigB, a toxin regulated by the DNA damage (SOS) repressor LexA in addition to its antitoxin HigA, and the target selectivity of HigB's mRNA cleavage activity. HigB reduced the expression of an efflux pump that is toxic to a polarity control mutant, cripples the growth of cells lacking LexA, and targets the cell cycle circuitry. Thus, TASs can have outcome switching activity in bacterial adaptive (stress) and systemic (cell cycle) networks. PMID:27572440

  7. Structural insights into ChpT, an essential dimeric histidine phosphotransferase regulating the cell cycle in Caulobacter crescentus

    OpenAIRE

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Clantin, Bernard; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Verger, Alexis; Biondi, Emanuele G; Villeret, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Two-component and phosphorelay signal-transduction proteins are crucial for bacterial cell-cycle regulation in Caulobacter crescentus. ChpT is an essential histidine phosphotransferase that controls the activity of the master cell-cycle regulator CtrA by phosphorylation. Here, the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of ChpT is reported. ChpT is a homodimer and adopts the domain architecture of the intracellular part of class I histidine kinases. Each subunit consists of two distinct domains: a...

  8. The Caulobacter crescentus Paracrystalline S-Layer Protein Is Secreted by an ABC Transporter (Type I) Secretion Apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Awram, Peter; Smit, John

    1998-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is a gram-negative bacterium that produces a two-dimensional crystalline array on its surface composed of a single 98-kDa protein, RsaA. Secretion of RsaA to the cell surface relies on an uncleaved C-terminal secretion signal. In this report, we identify two genes encoding components of the RsaA secretion apparatus. These components are part of a type I secretion system involving an ABC transporter protein. These genes, lying immediately 3′ of rsaA, were found by screen...

  9. Functional Characterization of UDP-Glucose:Undecaprenyl-Phosphate Glucose-1-Phosphate Transferases of Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Kinnari B.; Toh, Evelyn; Fernandez, Ximena B.; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; Hardy, Gail G.; Brun, Yves V.; Bernards, Mark A.; Valvano, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 WcaJ and the Caulobacter crescentus HfsE, PssY, and PssZ enzymes are predicted to initiate the synthesis of colanic acid (CA) capsule and holdfast polysaccharide, respectively. These proteins belong to a prokaryotic family of membrane enzymes that catalyze the formation of a phosphoanhydride bond joining a hexose-1-phosphate with undecaprenyl phosphate (Und-P). In this study, in vivo complementation assays of an E. coli K-12 wcaJ mutant demonstrated that WcaJ and PssY ca...

  10. The cloning, expression, purification, characterization and modeled structure of Caulobacter crescentus β-Xylosidase I.

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    Graciano, Luciana; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Seixas, Flavio Augusto Vicente; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Sampaio, Silvio César; Silva, José Luis da Conceição; Osaku, Clarice Aoki; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2012-09-01

    The xynB1 gene (CCNA 01040) of Caulobacter crescentus that encodes a bifunctional enzyme containing the conserved β-Xylosidase and α-L-Arabinofuranosidase (β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara) domains was amplified by PCR and cloned into the vector pJet1.2Blunt. The xynB1 gene was subcloned into the vector pPROEX-hta that produces a histidine-fused translation product. The overexpression of recombinant β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara was induced with IPTG in BL21 (DE3) and the resulting intracellular protein was purified with pre-packaged nickel-Sepharose columns. The recombinant β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara exhibited a specific β-Xylosidase I activity of 1.25 U mg(-1) to oNPX and a specific α-L-Arabinofuranosidase activity of 0.47 U mg(-1) to pNPA. The predominant activity of the recombinant enzyme was its β-Xylosidase I activity, and the enzymatic characterization was focused on it. The β-Xylosidase I activity was high over the pH range 3-10, with maximal activity at pH 6. The enzyme activity was optimal at 45 °C, and a high degree of stability was verified over 240 min at this temperature. Moreover, β-Xylosidase activity was inhibited in the presence of the metals Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), and the enzyme exhibited K(M) and V(Max) values of 2.89 ± 0.13 mM and 1.4 ± 0.04 μM min(-1) to oNPX, respectively. The modeled structure of β-xylosidase I showed that its active site is highly conserved compared with other structures of the GH43 family. The increase in the number of contact residues responsible for maintaining the dimeric structure indicates that this dimer is more stable than the tetramer form. PMID:22806729

  11. Tn-seq of Caulobacter crescentus under uranium stress reveals genes essential for detoxification and stress tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubiquitous aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is highly resistant to uranium (U) and facilitates U biomineralization and thus holds promise as an agent of U bioremediation. In order to gain an understanding of how C. crescentus tolerates U, we employed transposon (Tn) mutagenesis paired with deep sequencing (Tn-seq) in a global screen for genomic elements required for U resistance. Of the 3,879 annotated genes in the C. crescentus genome, 37 were found to be specifically associated with fitness under U stress, 15 of which were subsequently tested through mutational analysis. Systematic deletion analysis revealed that mutants lacking outer membrane transporters (rsaFa and rsaFb), a stress-responsive transcription factor (cztR), or a ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase (spoT) exhibited a significantly lower survival rate under U stress. RsaFa and RsaFb, which are homologues of TolC in Escherichia coli, have previously been shown to mediate S-layer export. Transcriptional analysis revealed upregulation of rsaFa and rsaFb by 4- and 10-fold, respectively, in the presence of U. We additionally show that rsaFa mutants accumulated higher levels of U than the wild type, with no significant increase in oxidative stress levels. These results suggest a function for RsaFa and RsaFb in U efflux and/or maintenance of membrane integrity during U stress. In addition, we present data implicating CztR and SpoT in resistance to U stress. Together, our findings reveal novel gene targets that are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of U resistance in C. crescentus

  12. S-Layer-Mediated Display of the Immunoglobulin G-Binding Domain of Streptococcal Protein G on the Surface of Caulobacter crescentus: Development of an Immunoactive Reagent▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nomellini, John F.; Duncan, Gillian; Dorocicz, Irene R.; Smit, John

    2007-01-01

    The immunoglobulin G (IgG)-binding streptococcal protein G is often used for immunoprecipitation or immunoadsorption-based assays, as it exhibits binding to a broader spectrum of host species IgG and IgG subclasses than the alternative, Staphylococcus aureus protein A. Caulobacter crescentus produces a hexagonally arranged paracrystalline protein surface layer (S-layer) composed of a single secreted protein, RsaA, that is notably tolerant of heterologous peptide insertions while maintaining t...

  13. Development of an HIV-1 Microbicide Based on Caulobacter crescentus: Blocking Infection by High-Density Display of Virus Entry Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Christina; Nomellini, John F; Ailon, Evan; Shanina, Iryna; Sangsari, Sassan; Cavacini, Lisa A; Smit, John; Horwitz, Marc S

    2013-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic remains an enormous global health concern. Despite effective prevention options, 2.6 million new infections occur annually, with women in developing countries accounting for more than half of these infections. New prevention strategies that can be used by women are urgently needed. Topical microbicides specific for HIV-1 represent a promising prevention strategy. Conceptually, using harmless bacteria to display peptides or proteins capable of blocking entry provides an inexpensive approach to microbicide development. To avoid the potential pitfalls of engineering commensal bacteria, our strategy is to genetically display infection inhibitors on a non-native bacterium and rely on topical application of stabilized bacteria before potential virus exposure. Due to the high density cell-surface display capabilities and the inherent low toxicity of the bacterium, the S-layer mediated protein display capabilities of the non-pathogenic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has been exploited for this approach. We have demonstrated that C. crescentus displaying MIP1α or CD4 interfered with the virus entry pathway and provided significant protection from HIV-1 pseudovirus representing clade B in a standard single cycle infection assay. Here we have expanded our C. crescentus based microbicide approach with additional and diverse classes of natural and synthetic inhibitors of the HIV-1 entry pathway. All display constructs provided variable but significant protection from HIV-1 infection; some with protection as high as 70%. Further, we describe protection from infection with additional viral clades. These findings indicate the significant potential for engineering C. crescentus to be an effective and readily adaptable HIV-1 microbicide platform. PMID:23840383

  14. Development of an HIV-1 Microbicide Based on Caulobacter crescentus: Blocking Infection by High-Density Display of Virus Entry Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Farr

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS pandemic remains an enormous global health concern. Despite effective prevention options, 2.6 million new infections occur annually, with women in developing countries accounting for more than half of these infections. New prevention strategies that can be used by women are urgently needed. Topical microbicides specific for HIV-1 represent a promising prevention strategy. Conceptually, using harmless bacteria to display peptides or proteins capable of blocking entry provides an inexpensive approach to microbicide development. To avoid the potential pitfalls of engineering commensal bacteria, our strategy is to genetically display infection inhibitors on a non-native bacterium and rely on topical application of stabilized bacteria before potential virus exposure. Due to the high density cell-surface display capabilities and the inherent low toxicity of the bacterium, the S-layer mediated protein display capabilities of the non-pathogenic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has been exploited for this approach. We have demonstrated that C. crescentus displaying MIP1α or CD4 interfered with the virus entry pathway and provided significant protection from HIV-1 pseudovirus representing clade B in a standard single cycle infection assay. Here we have expanded our C. crescentus based microbicide approach with additional and diverse classes of natural and synthetic inhibitors of the HIV-1 entry pathway. All display constructs provided variable but significant protection from HIV-1 infection; some with protection as high as 70%. Further, we describe protection from infection with additional viral clades. These findings indicate the significant potential for engineering C. crescentus to be an effective and readily adaptable HIV-1 microbicide platform.

  15. Identification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of esterase A from Caulobacter crescentus CB15, a family VIII lipolytic enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esterase A from C. crescentus CB15 was crystallized in space group C2221 and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.62 Å. The structures and functions of family VIII lipolytic enzymes, which have moderate sequence identity to class C β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins, are largely unknown. Here, the X-ray crystallographic study of a family VIII esterase from Caulobacter crescentus CB15 (CcEstA) is described. Sequence analysis revealed that CcEstA has a conserved serine residue within the S-X-X-K motif which acts as a catalytic nucleophile. Recombinant protein containing an N-terminal His tag was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Functional studies showed that CcEstA acts on α- and β-naphthyl acetate as substrates. In addition, it can catalyze the hydrolysis of ketoprofen ethyl ester, a highly useful product in industrial applications. CcEstA was crystallized using a solution consisting of 1.0 M potassium/sodium tartrate, 0.1 M imidazole pH 8.0, 0.2 M NaCl, and X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.62 Å with an Rmerge of 9.4%. The crystals of CcEstA belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 172.23, b = 176.68, c = 47.93 Å. Structure determination is in progress

  16. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  17. Activation and polar sequestration of PopA, a c-di-GMP effector protein involved in Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozaki, Shogo; Schalch-Moser, Annina; Zumthor, Ludwig; Manfredi, Pablo; Ebbensgaard, Anna Elisabeth; Schirmer, Tilman; Jenal, Urs

    2014-01-01

    When Caulobacter crescentus enters S-phase the replication initiation inhibitor CtrA dynamically positions to the old cell pole to be degraded by the polar ClpXP protease. Polar delivery of CtrA requires PopA and the diguanylate cyclase PleD that positions to the same pole. Here we present evidence...... that PopA originated through gene duplication from its paralogue response regulator PleD and subsequent co-option as c-di-GMP effector protein. While the C-terminal catalytic domain (GGDEF) of PleD is activated by phosphorylation of the N-terminal receiver domain, functional adaptation has reversed...... PopA to the cell pole in response to c-di-GMP binding. In agreement with the divergent activation and targeting mechanisms, distinct markers sequester PleD and PopA to the old cell pole upon S-phase entry. Together these data indicate that PopA adopted a novel role as topology specificity factor to...

  18. Cloning and expression of the xynA1 gene encoding a xylanase of the GH10 group in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciano, Luciana; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Vieira, Fabíola Giovanna Nesello; Bosetto, Adilson; Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2015-04-01

    Caulobacter crescentus (NA1000 strain) are aquatic bacteria that can live in environments of low nutritional quality and present numerous genes that encode enzymes involved in plant cell wall deconstruction, including five genes for β-xylosidases (xynB1-xynB5) and three genes for xylanases (xynA1-xynA3). The overall activity of xylanases in the presence of different agro-industrial residues was evaluated, and it was found that the residues from the processing of corn were the most efficient in inducing bacterial xylanases. The xynA1 gene (CCNA_02894) encoding a predicted xylanase of group 10 of glyco-hydrolases (GH10) that was efficiently overexpressed in Escherichia coli LMG194 using 0.02 % arabinose, after cloning into the vector pJet1.2blunt and subcloning into the expression vector pBAD/gIII, provided a fusion protein that contained carboxy-terminal His-tags, named XynA1. The characterization of pure XynA1 showed an enzymatic activity of 18.26 U mL(-1) and a specific activity of 2.22 U mg-(1) in the presence of xylan from beechwood as a substrate. XynA1 activity was inhibited by EDTA and metal ions such as Cu(2+) and Mg(2+). By contrast, β-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol (DTT), and Ca(2+) induced recombinant enzyme activity. Kinetic data for XynA1 revealed K M and V max values of 3.77 mg mL-(1) and 10.20 μM min-(1), respectively. Finally, the enzyme presented an optimum pH of 6 and an optimum temperature of 50 °C. In addition, 80 % of the activity of XynA1 was maintained at 50 °C for 4 h of incubation, suggesting a thermal stability for the biotechnological processes. This work is the first study concerning the cloning, overexpression, and enzymatic characterization of C. crescentus xylanase. PMID:25791579

  19. Analysis of the xynB5 gene encoding a multifunctional GH3-BglX β-glucosidase-β-xylosidase-α-arabinosidase member in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justo, Priscila Innocenti; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Maller, Alexandre; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; da Conceição-Silva, José Luis; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2015-10-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus (NA1000) xynB5 gene (CCNA_03149) encodes a predicted β-glucosidase-β-xylosidase enzyme that was amplified by polymerase chain reaction; the product was cloned into the blunt ends of the pJet1.2 plasmid. Analysis of the protein sequence indicated the presence of conserved glycosyl hydrolase 3 (GH3), β-glucosidase-related glycosidase (BglX) and fibronectin type III-like domains. After verifying its identity by DNA sequencing, the xynB5 gene was linked to an amino-terminal His-tag using the pTrcHisA vector. A recombinant protein (95 kDa) was successfully overexpressed from the xynB5 gene in E. coli Top 10 and purified using pre-packed nickel-Sepharose columns. The purified protein (BglX-V-Ara) demonstrated multifunctional activities in the presence of different substrates for β-glucosidase (pNPG: p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucoside) β-xylosidase (pNPX: p-nitrophenyl-β-D-xyloside) and α-arabinosidase (pNPA: p-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinosidase). BglX-V-Ara presented an optimal pH of 6 for all substrates and optimal temperature of 50 °C for β-glucosidase and α-L-arabinosidase and 60 °C for β-xylosidase. BglX-V-Ara predominantly presented β-glucosidase activity, with the highest affinity for its substrate and catalytic efficiency (Km 0.24 ± 0.0005 mM, Vmax 0.041 ± 0.002 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.27 mM(-1) s(-1)), followed by β-xylosidase (Km 0.64 ± 0.032 mM, Vmax 0.055 ± 0.002 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.14 mM(-1)s(-1)) and finally α-L-arabinosidase (Km 1.45 ± 0.05 mM, Vmax 0.091 ± 0.0004 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.1 mM(-1) s(-1)). To date, this is the first report to demonstrate the characterization of a GH3-BglX family member in C. crescentus that may have applications in biotechnological processes (i.e., the simultaneous saccharification process) because the multifunctional enzyme could play an important role in bacterial hemicellulose degradation. PMID:26264062

  20. Predator/prey interaction between Pfiesteria piscicida and Rhodomonas mediated by a marine alpha proteobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, M R

    2004-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida coexists with bacteria in aquatic environments and as such, may interact with them at the physiological level. This study was designed to investigate the influence of bacteria, present in a clonal culture of Pfiesteria piscicida, on the predator/prey relationship of this dinoflagellate with the alga Rhodomonas. A series of replenishment experiments with bacteria isolated from P. piscicida clonal culture and the bacteria-free P. piscicida derived from the same culture were carried out. In the presence of bacteria, the number of P. piscicida increased significantly when incubated with alga Rhodomonas. This enhanced growth was almost entirely due to the increased consumption rate of Rhodomonas by P. piscicida since in bacteria-free (axenic) cultures Rhodomonas were consumed at significantly reduced rates relative to cultures with bacteria. Subsequent replenishment experiments with individual bacterial isolates showed that a single isolate was responsible for the increased predation rate of P. piscicida. The presence or absence of this specific bacterium determined the outcome of the interaction between P. piscicida and Rhodomonas. Partial sequence analysis of the 16S rDNA of this isolate indicated that it was a novel marine alpha proteobacterium with sequence similarities to a Roseobacter sp. and a bacterium recently isolated from a toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium sp. PMID:15259269

  1. Methylation involved in chemotaxis is regulated during Caulobacter differentiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, P; Gomes, S L; Sweeney, K; Ely, B; L. Shapiro

    1983-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus carries a flagellum and is motile only during a limited time in its cell cycle. We have asked if the biochemical machinery that mediates chemotaxis exists coincident with the cell's structural ability to respond to a chemotactic signal. We first demonstrated that one function of the chemotaxis machinery, the ability to methylate the carboxyl side chains of a specific set of membrane proteins (methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, MCPs), is present in C. crescentus. This...

  2. A self-associating protein critical for chromosome attachment, division, and polar organization in caulobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Briegel, Ariane; Jensen, Grant J; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2008-01-01

    Cell polarization is an integral part of many unrelated bacterial processes. How intrinsic cell polarization is achieved is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that Caulobacter crescentus uses a multimeric pole-organizing factor (PopZ) that serves as a hub to concurrently achieve several...... suggests that localization of PopZ largely relies on PopZ multimerization in chromosome-free regions, consistent with a self-organizing mechanism.......Cell polarization is an integral part of many unrelated bacterial processes. How intrinsic cell polarization is achieved is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that Caulobacter crescentus uses a multimeric pole-organizing factor (PopZ) that serves as a hub to concurrently achieve several...

  3. Isolation and characterization of Caulobacter mutants impaired in adaptation to stationary phase

    OpenAIRE

    Italiani Valéria C. S.; Marques Marilis V

    2003-01-01

    The entry into stationary phase causes a change in the pattern of gene expression of bacteria, when the cells must express a whole set of genes involved mainly with resistance to starvation and to environmental stresses. As an attempt to identify genes important for the survival of Caulobacter crescentus in stationary phase, we have screened a library of 5,000 clones generated by random transposon mutagenesis for mutants that showed reduced viability after prolonged growth. Four clones were s...

  4. Isolation and characterization of Caulobacter mutants impaired in adaptation to stationary phase Isolamento e caracterização de mutantes de Caulobacter deficientes na adaptação à fase estacionária

    OpenAIRE

    Italiani, Valéria C. S.; Marques, Marilis V.

    2003-01-01

    The entry into stationary phase causes a change in the pattern of gene expression of bacteria, when the cells must express a whole set of genes involved mainly with resistance to starvation and to environmental stresses. As an attempt to identify genes important for the survival of Caulobacter crescentus in stationary phase, we have screened a library of 5,000 clones generated by random transposon mutagenesis for mutants that showed reduced viability after prolonged growth. Four clones were s...

  5. Depletion of the xynB2 gene upregulates β-xylosidase expression in C. crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Mingori, Moara Rodrigues; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Seixas, Flávio Augusto Vicente; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is able to express several enzymes involved in the utilization of lignocellulosic biomasses. Five genes, xynB1-5, that encode β-xylosidases are present in the genome of this bacterium. In this study, the xynB2 gene, which encodes β-xylosidase II (CCNA_02442), was cloned under the control of the PxylX promoter to generate the O-xynB2 strain, which overexpresses the enzyme in the presence of xylose. In addition, a null mutant strain, Δ-xynB2, was created by two homologous recombination events where the chromosomal xynB2 gene was replaced by a copy that was disrupted by the spectinomycin-resistant cassette. We demonstrated that C. crescentus cells lacking β-xylosidase II upregulates the xynB genes inducing β-xylosidase activity. Transcriptional analysis revealed that xynB1 (RT-PCR analysis) and xynB2 (lacZ transcription fusion) gene expression was induced in the Δ-xynB2 cells, and high β-xylosidase activity was observed in the presence of different agro-industrial residues in the null mutant strain, a characteristic that can be explored and applied in biotechnological processes. In contrast, overexpression of the xynB2 gene caused downregulation of the expression and activity of the β-xylosidase. For example, the β-xylosidase activity that was obtained in the presence of sugarcane bagasse was 7-fold and 16-fold higher than the activity measured in the C. crescentus parental and O-xynB2 cells, respectively. Our results suggest that β-xylosidase II may have a role in controlling the expression of the xynB1 and xynB2 genes in C. crescentus. PMID:24142353

  6. Report of the First Human Case of Caulobacter sp. Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Justesen, Ulrik S; Holt, Hanne M.; Thiesson, Helle C; Blom, Jens; Nielsen, Xiaohui C.; Dargis, Rimtas; Kemp, Michael; Christensen, Jens J.

    2007-01-01

    A Caulobacter sp. isolate was recovered from the dialysis fluid of a patient undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Bacterial identification included electron microscopy and 16S rDNA sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of human Caulobacter infection. Special growth requirements suggest that Caulobacter spp. may be overlooked in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

  7. Caulobacter chromosome in vivo configuration matches model predictions for a supercoiled polymer in a cell-like confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Sun-Hae; Toro, Esteban; Mortensen, Kim; de la Rosa, Mario A. Díaz; Doniach, Sebastian; Shapiro, Lucy; Spakowitz, Andrew J.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2013-01-01

    the contour length, and cell-to-cell distribution of the interloci distance r is a universal function of r/n0.22 with broad cell-to-cell variability. For DNA segments greater than about 300 kb, the mean interloci distances scale as n, in agreement with previous observations. The 0.22 value of the......We measured the distance between fluorescent-labeled DNA loci of various interloci contour lengths in Caulobacter crescentus swarmer cells to determine the in vivo configuration of the chromosome. For DNA segments less than about 300 kb, the mean interloci distances, 〈r〉, scale as n0.22, where n is...... scaling exponent for short DNA segments is consistent with theoretical predictions for a branched DNA polymer structure. Predictions from Brownian dynamics simulations of the packing of supercoiled DNA polymers in an elongated cell-like confinement are also consistent with a branched DNA structure, and...

  8. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2005-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

  9. Isolation and characterization of Caulobacter mutants impaired in adaptation to stationary phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italiani Valéria C. S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The entry into stationary phase causes a change in the pattern of gene expression of bacteria, when the cells must express a whole set of genes involved mainly with resistance to starvation and to environmental stresses. As an attempt to identify genes important for the survival of Caulobacter crescentus in stationary phase, we have screened a library of 5,000 clones generated by random transposon mutagenesis for mutants that showed reduced viability after prolonged growth. Four clones were selected, which displayed either lower viability or a longer time of recovery from stationary phase. The genes disrupted were identified, and the gene products were found to be mainly involved with amino acid metabolism (glutamate N-acetyltransferase, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase and L-aspartate oxidase or with recombination (exonuclease RecJ. Each mutant was tested for resistance to stresses, such as oxidative, saline, acidic, heat and UV exposure, showing different responses. Although the mutations obtained were not in genes involved specifically in stationary phase, our results suggest that amino acids metabolism may play an important role in keeping viability during this growth phase.

  10. Report of the first human case of Caulobacter sp. infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik S; Holt, Hanne M; Thiesson, Helle;

    2007-01-01

    A Caulobacter sp. isolate was recovered from the dialysis fluid of a patient undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Bacterial identification included electron microscopy and 16S rDNA sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of human Caulobacter infection. Special growth requirements suggest...

  11. Función de la proteína CdnL en las bacterias Myxococcus xanthus y Caulobacter crescentus

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego García, Aranzazu

    2015-01-01

    La proteína CarD es un regulador transcripcional de acción global en la bacteria Myxococcus xanthus, que se requiere para la actividad de varios factores σ-ECF (extracytoplasmatic function). CarD presenta una arquitectura de dominios única, con un dominio C-terminal de unión al DNA similar a las proteínas eucarióticas HMGA (high-mobility group A), y un dominio N-terminal, típicamente bacteriano, que define a la familia de proteínas PF02559. Dicha familia incluye el dominio de interacción con ...

  12. Genome Sequence of Selenium-Solubilizing Bacterium Caulobacter vibrioides T5M6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yihua; Qin, Yanan; Kot, Witold;

    2016-01-01

    Caulobacter vibrioides T5M6 is a Gram-negative strain that strongly solubilizes selenium (Se) mineral into Se(IV) and was isolated from a selenium mining area in Enshi, southwest China. This strain produces the phytohormone IAA and promotes plant growth. Here we present the genome of this strain ...

  13. Dissection of recognition determinants of Escherichia coli sigma32 suggests a composite -10 region with an 'extended -10' motif and a core -10 element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Byoung-Mo; Rhodius, Virgil A; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Gross, Carol A

    2009-05-01

    Sigma32 controls expression of heat shock genes in Escherichia coli and is widely distributed in proteobacteria. The distinguishing feature of sigma32 promoters is a long -10 region (CCCCATNT) whose tetra-C motif is important for promoter activity. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis of sigma32 and in vivo and in vitro assays, we identified promoter recognition determinants of this motif. The most downstream C (-13) is part of the -10 motif; our work confirms and extends recognition determinants of -13C. Most importantly, our work suggests that the two upstream Cs (-16, -15) constitute an 'extended -10' recognition motif that is recognized by K130, a residue universally conserved in beta- and gamma-proteobacteria. This residue is located in the alpha-helix of sigmaDomain 3 that mediates recognition of the extended -10 promoter motif in other sigmas. K130 is not conserved in alpha- and delta-/epsilon-proteobacteria and we found that sigma32 from the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus does not need the extended -10 motif for high promoter activity. This result supports the idea that K130 mediates extended -10 recognition. Sigma32 is the first Group 3 sigma shown to use the 'extended -10' recognition motif. PMID:19400791

  14. A prevalent alpha-proteobacterium Paracoccus sp. in a population of the Cayenne ticks (Amblyomma cajennense from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Machado-Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is the most common tick-borne disease in South America, the presence of Rickettsia sp. in Amblyomma ticks is a possible indication of its endemicity in certain geographic regions. In the present work, bacterial DNA sequences related to Rickettsia amblyommii genes in A. dubitatum ticks, collected in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso, were discovered. Simultaneously, Paracoccus sp. was detected in aproximately 77% of A. cajennense specimens collected in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This is the first report of Paracoccus sp. infection in a specific tick population, and raises the possibility of these bacteria being maintained and/or transmitted by ticks. Whether Paracoccus sp. represents another group of pathogenic Rhodobacteraceae or simply plays a role in A. cajennense physiology, is unknown. The data also demonstrate that the rickettsial 16S rRNA specific primers used forRickettsia spp. screening can also detect Paracoccus alpha-proteobacteria infection in biological samples. Hence, a PCRRFLP strategy is presented to distinguish between these two groups of bacteria.

  15. Localisation and Functional Analysis of a Manganese Oxidase Protein From the Marine Alpha-Proteobacterium Aurantimonas manganoxydans (sp. SI85-9A1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C. R.; Davis, R.; Tebo, B.

    2007-12-01

    The marine α-proteobacterium SI85-9A1 was isolated in 1985 from the oxic-anoxic transition zone in Sannich Inlet, Vancouver Island, Canada. This organism was originally isolated due to its ability to oxidise manganese from Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxides. It later proved to have a functional Type I RuBisCO suggesting it can potentially grow autotrophically with Mn(II) acting as the electron donor. Until now the mechanism of Mn(II) oxidation has remained enigmatic although clues from the genome and preliminary experiments suggested SI85-9A1 possessed a manganese oxidase similar to the Mox oxidase produced by Pedomicrobium sp. ACM 3067. Whole cell fractionation techniques were used to localise this protein to the outer membrane where it is loosely bound and can be washed off. Manganese oxidation activity in non-pure crude extracts was analysed using an LBB colorimetric assay and monitoring Mn(III)-pyrophosphate complex formation at 258 nm in a Mn(III) capture assay. Both these assays not only confirmed function but suggested that this protein is extremely active with a manganese oxidation rate approaching 8.9 μM min-1 mg-1. Partial FPLC purification confirmed that this protein was approximately 50 KD in size and may be part of a larger holoenzyme.

  16. Anatomy of a bacterial cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Amick, Jean D; Brun, Yves V.

    2001-01-01

    Two recent reports describe mRNA and protein expression patterns in the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The combined use of DNA microarray and proteomic analyses provides a powerful new perspective for unraveling the global regulatory networks of this complex bacterium.

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10422-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 148_3252( CP000148 |pid:none) Geobacter metallireducens GS-15... 494 e-138 CP000447_2705( CP000447 |pid:none) Shewanell...000613_385( CP000613 |pid:none) Rhodospirillum centenum SW, comp... 469 e-131 (Q5RBD5) RecName: Full...ig-U10422-1Q.Seq.d (1267 letters) Database: CSM 6905 sequences; 5,674,871 total letters Score E Sequences producing significant al...ig An07c010... 432 e-119 AE005673_2155( AE005673 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus CB15, c...o... 431 e-119 CP001340_2252( CP001340 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus NA1000,

  18. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.;

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that coll...... cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology......The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that...

  19. Electronic and protein structural dynamics of a photosensory LOV histidine kinase †

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre, Maxime T.A.; Purcell, Erin B.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Robert, Bruno; Kennis, John T. M.; Crosson, Sean

    2010-01-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus encodes a two-component signalling protein, LovK, that contains an N-terminal photosensory LOV domain coupled to a C-terminal histidine kinase. LovK binds a flavin cofactor, undergoes a reversible photocycle, and displays regulated ATPase and autophosphorylation activity in response to visible light. Femtosecond to nanosecond visible absorption spectroscopy demonstrates congruence between full-length LovK and isolated LOV domains in the mechanism and kinet...

  20. Single-Molecule and Superresolution Imaging in Live Bacteria Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Biteen, Julie S; Moerner, W. E.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule imaging enables biophysical measurements devoid of ensemble averaging, gives enhanced spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit, and permits superresolution reconstructions. Here, single-molecule and superresolution imaging are applied to the study of proteins in live Caulobacter crescentus cells to illustrate the power of these methods in bacterial imaging. Based on these techniques, the diffusion coefficient and dynamics of the histidine protein kinase PleC, the locali...

  1. Allosteric Regulation of Histidine Kinases by Their Cognate Response Regulator Determines Cell Fate

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Ralf; Jaeger, Tina; Abel, Sören; Wiederkehr, Irene; Folcher, Marc; Biondi, Emanuele G.; Laub, Michael T.; Jenal, Urs

    2008-01-01

    The two-component phosphorylation network is of critical importance for bacterial growth and physiology. Here, we address plasticity and interconnection of distinct signal transduction pathways within this network. In Caulobacter crescentus antagonistic activities of the PleC phosphatase and DivJ kinase localized at opposite cell poles control the phosphorylation state and subcellular localization of the cell fate determinator protein DivK. We show that DivK functions as an allosteric regulat...

  2. Pseudoroseovarius zhejiangensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel alpha-proteobacterium isolated from the chemical wastewater, and reclassification of Roseovarius crassostreae as Pseudoroseovarius crassostreae comb. nov., Roseovarius sediminilitoris as Pseudoroseovarius sediminilitoris comb. nov. and Roseovarius halocynthiae as Pseudoroseovarius halocynthiae comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cong; Pan, Jie; Zhang, Xin-Qi; Su, Yue; Wu, Min

    2015-08-01

    A Gram-stain negative, aerobic, non-motile and ovoid- to rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated JB3(T), was isolated from a wastewater sample collected from the biochemical reaction basin of Haiyan fine chemical factory in Zhejiang, China. Strain JB3(T) was found to grow optimally at pH 7.0-8.0, at 28 °C and in the presence of 1.0-2.0 % (w/v) NaCl. Chemotaxonomic analysis showed that strain JB3(T) contains ubiquinone-10 (>99 %) as the predominant respiratory quinone and C18:1 ω7c (70.9 %) as the most abundant fatty acid. The polar lipids of strain JB3(T) were identified as phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, an aminophospholipid, an unidentified aminolipid, four unidentified phospholipids and three unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content of strain JB3(T) was determined to be 68.1 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between the isolate and Roseovarius crassostreae DSM 16950(T), Roseovarius sediminilitoris KCTC 23959(T) and Roseovarius halocynthiae MA1-10(T) were found to be 97.1, 96.8 and 96.2 %, respectively. Morevoer, the similarity between strain JB3(T) and the type strain of the genus Roseovarius (Roseovarius tolerans DSM 11457(T)) was found to be 93.8 %. The phylogenetic trees reconstructed with all three treeing methods showed that strain JB3(T) constituted a different taxon, which was separate from other taxa with validly published names, and formed a cluster with R. crassostreae DSM 16950(T), R. sediminilitoris KCTC 23959(T) and R. halocynthiae MA1-10(T). These three species were not placed within the phylogenetic cluster formed by R. tolerans DSM 11457(T). Differential phenotypic properties, together with the phylogenetic distinctiveness, demonstrated that strain JB3(T) is clearly distinct from species of the genus Roseovarius. On the basis of these features, we propose strain JB3(T) represents a novel species of a novel genus with the name Pseudoroseovarius zhejiangensis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is JB3(T) (=MCCC 1K00457(T) = KCTC 42443(T)). We also propose that R. crassostreae, R. sediminilitoris and R. halocynthiae should be transferred to this new genus as Pseudoroseovarius crassostreae comb. nov., Pseudoroseovarius sediminilitoris comb. nov. and Pseudoroseovarius halocynthiae comb. nov., respectively. PMID:26066711

  3. Transcription rate and transcript length drive formation of chromosomal interaction domain boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tung Bk; Laub, Michael T

    2016-07-15

    Chromosomes in all organisms are highly organized and divided into multiple chromosomal interaction domains, or topological domains. Regions of active, high transcription help establish and maintain domain boundaries, but precisely how this occurs remains unclear. Here, using fluorescence microscopy and chromosome conformation capture in conjunction with deep sequencing (Hi-C), we show that in Caulobacter crescentus, both transcription rate and transcript length, independent of concurrent translation, drive the formation of domain boundaries. We find that long, highly expressed genes do not form topological boundaries simply through the inhibition of supercoil diffusion. Instead, our results support a model in which long, active regions of transcription drive local decompaction of the chromosome, with these more open regions of the chromosome forming spatial gaps in vivo that diminish contacts between DNA in neighboring domains. These insights into the molecular forces responsible for domain formation in Caulobacter likely generalize to other bacteria and possibly eukaryotes. PMID:27288403

  4. Branched signal wiring of an essential bacterial cell-cycle phosphotransfer protein

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, Jimmy A.; Xu, Qingping; Childers, W. Seth; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Kern, Justin W.; Eckart, Michael; Deacon, Ashley M.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    Vital to bacterial survival is the faithful propagation of cellular signals, and in Caulobacter crescentus ChpT is an essential mediator within the cell cycle circuit. ChpT functions as a histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (HPt) that shuttles a phosphoryl group from the receiver domain of CckA, the upstream hybrid histidine kinase (HK), to one of two downstream response regulators (RRs)—CtrA or CpdR—that controls cell cycle progression. To understand how ChpT interacts with multiple...

  5. A role for the weak DnaA binding sites in bacterial replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    DnaA initiates the chromosomal DNA replication in nearly all bacteria, and replication origins are characterized by binding sites for the DnaA protein (DnaA-boxes) along with an ‘AT-rich’ region. However, great variation in number, spatial organization and specificity of DnaA-boxes is observed...... between species. In the study by Taylor et al. (2011), new and unexpectedly weak DnaA-boxes were identified within the Caulobacter crescentus origin of replication (Cori). The position of weak and stronger DnaA-boxes follows a pattern seen in Escherichia coli oriC. This raises the possibility that...

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10309-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pickettii 12J chromos... 68 4e-12 CU207211_2890( CU207211 |pid:none) Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans ch... 67 ...Y344466 |pid:none) Tigriopus californicus isolate Abg... 99 3e-33 CP001340_503( CP001340 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus...iquinol-cytochrome c reductase iron-sul... 103 1e-20 CP000449_185( CP000449 |pid:none) Maricaulis maris MCS1...vvsqnqpavvvkwrgkplfirhrsaeeisesqavqlstlpdpq adnrsfkstrmdyfswclhsfrlypnfrww*lqwlvlsmswfsl**rwsy*kgscpneln rst...ontig-U10309-1Q.Seq.d Length = 1136 Score = 1536 bits (775), Expect = 0.0 Identities = 775/775 (100%) Strand = Plus / Plus

  7. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Marilyn G. Wiebe; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-01-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, prod...

  8. Complete genome of Phenylobacterium zucineum – a novel facultative intracellular bacterium isolated from human erythroleukemia cell line K562

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Jie

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenylobacterium zucineum is a recently identified facultative intracellular species isolated from the human leukemia cell line K562. Unlike the known intracellular pathogens, P. zucineum maintains a stable association with its host cell without affecting the growth and morphology of the latter. Results Here, we report the whole genome sequence of the type strain HLK1T. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (3,996,255 bp and a circular plasmid (382,976 bp. It encodes 3,861 putative proteins, 42 tRNAs, and a 16S-23S-5S rRNA operon. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that it is phylogenetically closest to Caulobacter crescentus, a model species for cell cycle research. Notably, P. zucineum has a gene that is strikingly similar, both structurally and functionally, to the cell cycle master regulator CtrA of C. crescentus, and most of the genes directly regulated by CtrA in the latter have orthologs in the former. Conclusion This work presents the first complete bacterial genome in the genus Phenylobacterium. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that the CtrA regulon is well conserved between C. crescentus and P. zucineum.

  9. High-resolution mapping of the spatial organization of a bacterial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tung B K; Imakaev, Maxim V; Mirny, Leonid A; Laub, Michael T

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomes must be highly compacted and organized within cells, but how this is achieved in vivo remains poorly understood. We report the use of chromosome conformation capture coupled with deep sequencing (Hi-C) to map the structure of bacterial chromosomes. Analysis of Hi-C data and polymer modeling indicates that the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome consists of multiple, largely independent spatial domains that are probably composed of supercoiled plectonemes arrayed into a bottle brush-like fiber. These domains are stable throughout the cell cycle and are reestablished concomitantly with DNA replication. We provide evidence that domain boundaries are established by highly expressed genes and the formation of plectoneme-free regions, whereas the histone-like protein HU and SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) promote short-range compaction and the colinearity of chromosomal arms, respectively. Collectively, our results reveal general principles for the organization and structure of chromosomes in vivo. PMID:24158908

  10. Proteotoxic stress induces a cell-cycle arrest by stimulating Lon to degrade the replication initiator DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Liu, Jing; Chien, Peter; Laub, Michael T

    2013-08-01

    The decision to initiate DNA replication is a critical step in the cell cycle of all organisms. Cells often delay replication in the face of stressful conditions, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate in Caulobacter crescentus that proteotoxic stress induces a cell-cycle arrest by triggering the degradation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator. A depletion of available Hsp70 chaperone, DnaK, either through genetic manipulation or heat shock, induces synthesis of the Lon protease, which can directly degrade DnaA. Unexpectedly, we find that unfolded proteins, which accumulate following a loss of DnaK, also allosterically activate Lon to degrade DnaA, thereby ensuring a cell-cycle arrest. Our work reveals a mechanism for regulating DNA replication under adverse growth conditions. Additionally, our data indicate that unfolded proteins can actively and directly alter substrate recognition by cellular proteases. PMID:23911325

  11. AcEST: DK958696 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes...us ka... 64 5e-10 sp|Q9KA70|RASP_BACHD Zinc metalloprotease rasP OS=Bacillus halod... 6...FV +DPE+ Sbjct: 62 LLPLGGFVRMAGEDPET 78 >sp|Q9KA70|RASP_BACHD Zinc metalloprotease rasP OS=Bacillus halo... 62 GGYVRMAGEDPE 73 >sp|Q9A710|MMPA_CAUCR Metalloprotease mmpA OS=Caulobacter crescentus GN=mmpA PE=1 SV=1 Length...662 Definition Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST39A01NGRL0002_K24. 5' end sequence. Accession DK958696 Tissue type prothall

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15635-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 252 |pid:none) Lawsonia intracellularis PHE/MN1... 107 2e-21 AE016830_1135( AE016830 |pid:none) Enterococcus faecal...s; 8,075,542 total letters Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value Contig-U15635-1 (Cont...M270312_10( AM270312 |pid:none) Aspergillus niger contig An14c004... 283 3e-74 AE016830_2264( AE016830 |pid:none) Enterococcus faecal...5673 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus CB15, co... 203 4e-50 CP000009_871( CP0000...7_1293( CP000937 |pid:none) Francisella philomiragia subsp.... 192 1e-46 CP000323_1140( CP000323 |pid:none) Psychrobacter cryohal

  13. Cell cycle control in Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Justine

    2016-04-01

    Alphaproteobacteria include many medically and environmentally important organisms. Despite the diversity of their niches and lifestyles, from free-living to host-associated, they usually rely on very similar mechanisms to control their cell cycles. Studies on Caulobacter crescentus still lay the foundation for understanding the molecular details of pathways regulating DNA replication and cell division and coordinating these two processes with other events of the cell cycle. This review highlights recent discoveries on the regulation and the mode of action of conserved global regulators and small molecules like c-di-GMP and (p)ppGpp, which play key roles in cell cycle control. It also describes several newly identified mechanisms that modulate cell cycle progression in response to stresses or environmental conditions. PMID:26871482

  14. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  15. Noise in Exponential Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles; Henry, Jon; Burov, Stas; Lin, Yihan; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron; Scherer, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    The interplay between growth and division of cells is has been studied in the context of exponential growth of bacterial cells (in suitable conditions) for decades. However, bulk culture studies obscure phenomena that manifest in single cells over many generations. We introduce a unique technology combining microfluidics, single-cell imaging, and quantitative analysis. This enables us to track the growth of single Caulobacter crescentus stalked cells over hundreds of generations. The statistics that we extract indicate a size thresholding mechanism for cell division and a non-trivial scaling collapse of division time distributions at different temperatures. In this talk I shall discuss these observations and a stochastic model of growth and division that captures all our observations with no free parameters.

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15518-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pid:none) Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans ch... 70 3e-10 CP001392_2585( CP001392 |pid:none) Diaphorobacter sp. ...52 AE005673_923( AE005673 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus CB15, com... 151 3e-49 CP000449_864( CP000449 |pid:none) Maricau...tig-U15518-1Q.Seq.d (2022 letters) Database: CSM 8402 sequences; 8,075,542 total letters Score E Sequences producing significa...re = 3515 bits (1773), Expect = 0.0 Identities = 1831/1845 (99%) Strand = Plus / Plus Query: 112 gagttagactca...arch space: 15905079540 effective search space used: 15905079540 T: 0 A: 40 X1: 6 (11.9 bits) X2: 15

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05994-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ; ... 229 1e-58 CU207211_3071( CU207211 |pid:none) Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans ch... 229 1e-58 FN392321_754...1( BT076534 |pid:none) Caligus rogercresseyi clone crog-e... 338 2e-91 (A6RW56) RecName: Full=ATP-dependent rRNA helicase...54202_287( CR954202 |pid:none) Ostreococcus tauri strain OTTH05... 327 4e-88 (Q2H1Q8) RecName: Full=ATP-dependent rRNA helicase...4e-59 AE005673_832( AE005673 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus CB15, com... 231 4e-59 CP000937_1787( CP000937 |pid:none) Francise...l=ATP-dependent RNA helicase drs1; ... 226 1e-57 AP006627_3931( AP006627 |pid:none) Bacillus claus

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12311-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ns Agy99, c... 45 0.007 AY177427_2( AY177427 |pid:none) Oligella urethralis insertion sequ... 45 0.007 EU118... crescentus CB15, co... 49 4e-04 AM270345_13( AM270345 |pid:none) Aspergillus niger contig...927_2142( CP000927 |pid:none) Caulobacter sp. K31, complete g... 55 5e-06 CP000903_3117( CP000903 |pid:none) Bacillus wei... 46 0.002 CP000034_345( CP000034 |pid:none) Shigella dysenteriae Sd197, comp... 4...( CP000267 |pid:none) Rhodoferax ferrireducens T118, ... 45 0.004 CP001117_5( CP001117 |pid:none) Deinococcus desert

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13958-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hii ATCC ... 41 0.086 AB017194_1( AB017194 |pid:none) Plectonema boryanum ORF270, prolin... 41 0.086 BA00004...( AW759085 ) sl34e01.y1 Gm-c1027 Glycine max cDNA clone GENOME... 52 3e-11 4 ( FC674402 ) CAXW9990.rev CAXW Lottia gigantea from fem...pionase, bet... 362 2e-98 AY829756_1( AY829756 |pid:none) Lonomia obliqua hypothe...) Brevibacillus agri strain NCHU1002... 148 5e-34 BA000030_1957( BA000030 |pid:none) Streptomyces avermi...onas syringae pv. tomato... 72 6e-11 AE005673_211( AE005673 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus CB15, com

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14072-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |pid:none) Sulfurovum sp. NBC37-1 genomic ... 50 4e-05 AJ006687_1( AJ006687 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescentus major che...05 CP001227_190( CP001227 |pid:none) Rickettsia peacockii str. Rustic... 50 4e-05 AE004091_414( AE004091 |pi...rd Canis familiaris ... 44 4.9 1 ( EF085015 ) Picea sitchensis clone WS0283_H23 unkno... 44 4.9 1 ( ES853576 ) WS02759.CR_C20 SS-IL-A-FL-14 Picea sitchensis cDN... 44 4....BR_H23 SS-IB-A-FL-13 Picea sitchensis cDNA... 44 4.9 1 ( DR472723 ) WS00956.B21_P18 IS-B-N-A-10 Picea

  1. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Marilyn G; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-11-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, producing D-gluconate and D-sorbitol when a mixture of D-glucose and D-fructose was used as substrate. However, the activity in Cc aaor expressing strain was >100-fold lower compared to strains expressing Zm gfor. Interestingly, C. crescentus AAOR was clearly more efficient than the Zm GFOR in converting in vitro a single sugar substrate D-xylose (10 mM) to xylitol without an added cofactor, whereas this type of activity was very low with Zm GFOR. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of D-xylose, the S. cerevisiae strain expressing Cc aaor produced nearly equal concentrations of D-xylonate and xylitol (12.5 g D-xylonate l(-1) and 11.5 g D-xylitol l(-1) from 26 g D-xylose l(-1)), whereas the control strain and strain expressing Zm gfor produced only D-xylitol (5 g l(-1)). Deletion of the gene encoding the major aldose reductase, Gre3p, did not affect xylitol production in the strain expressing Cc aaor, but decreased xylitol production in the strain expressing Zm gfor. In addition, expression of Cc aaor together with the D-xylonolactone lactonase encoding the gene xylC from C. crescentus slightly increased the final concentration and initial volumetric production rate of both D-xylonate and D-xylitol. These results suggest that C. crescentus AAOR is a novel type of oxidoreductase able to convert the single aldose substrate D-xylose to both its oxidized and reduced product. PMID:26264136

  2. Scanning electron microscopy and in vitro cultivation of endophytic bacteria from potato tubers related to Zebra Chip disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebra chip disease (ZCD) drastically reduces the quality and market value of potatoes in North America. The disease is associated with a phloem-limited alpha-proteobacterium, “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum”. No effective measure is currently available to control ZCD. It is known that endoph...

  3. Mathematical modeling of bacterial track-altering motors: Track cleaving through burnt-bridge ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtylla, Blerta; Keener, James P.

    2015-04-01

    The generation of directed movement of cellular components frequently requires the rectification of Brownian motion. Molecular motor enzymes that use ATP to walk on filamentous tracks are typically involved in cell transport, however, a track-altering motor can arise when an enzyme interacts with and alters its track. In Caulobacter crescentus and other bacteria, an active DNA partitioning (Par) apparatus is employed to segregate replicated chromosome regions to specific locations in dividing cells. The Par apparatus is composed of two proteins: ParA, an ATPase that can form polymeric structures on the nucleoid, and ParB, a protein that can bind and destabilize ParA structures. It has been proposed that the ParB-mediated alteration of ParA structures could be responsible for generating the directed movement of DNA during bacterial division. How precisely these actions are coordinated and translated into directed movement is not clear. In this paper we consider the C. crescentus segregation apparatus as an example of a track altering motor that operates using a so-called burnt-bridge mechanism. We develop and analyze mathematical models that examine how diffusion and ATP-hydrolysis-mediated monomer removal (or cleaving) can be combined to generate directed movement. Using a mean first passage approach, we analytically calculate the effective ParA track-cleaving velocities, effective diffusion coefficient, and other higher moments for the movement a ParB protein cluster that breaks monomers away at random locations on a single ParA track. Our model results indicate that cleaving velocities and effective diffusion constants are sensitive to ParB-induced ATP hydrolysis rates. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with stochastic simulation results.

  4. Rapid pairing and resegregation of distant homologous loci enables double-strand break repair in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) can lead to the loss of genetic information and cell death. Although DSB repair via homologous recombination has been well characterized, the spatial organization of this process inside cells remains poorly understood, and the mechanisms used for chromosome resegregation after repair are unclear. In this paper, we introduced site-specific DSBs in Caulobacter crescentus and then used time-lapse microscopy to visualize the ensuing chromosome dynamics. Damaged loci rapidly mobilized after a DSB, pairing with their homologous partner to enable repair, before being resegregated to their original cellular locations, independent of DNA replication. Origin-proximal regions were resegregated by the ParABS system with the ParA structure needed for resegregation assembling dynamically in response to the DSB-induced movement of an origin-associated ParB away from one cell pole. Origin-distal regions were resegregated in a ParABS-independent manner and instead likely rely on a physical, spring-like force to segregate repaired loci. Collectively, our results provide a mechanistic basis for the resegregation of chromosomes after a DSB. PMID:26240183

  5. Nutritional Control of DNA Replication Initiation through the Proteolysis and Regulated Translation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, David J; Heinen, Christian; Schramm, Frederic D; Thüring, Marietta; Aakre, Christopher D; Murray, Sean M; Laub, Michael T; Jonas, Kristina

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria can arrest their own growth and proliferation upon nutrient depletion and under various stressful conditions to ensure their survival. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppressing growth and arresting the cell cycle under such conditions remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify post-transcriptional mechanisms that help enforce a cell-cycle arrest in Caulobacter crescentus following nutrient limitation and during entry into stationary phase by limiting the accumulation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator protein. DnaA is rapidly degraded by the Lon protease following nutrient limitation. However, the rate of DnaA degradation is not significantly altered by changes in nutrient availability. Instead, we demonstrate that decreased nutrient availability downregulates dnaA translation by a mechanism involving the 5' untranslated leader region of the dnaA transcript; Lon-dependent proteolysis of DnaA then outpaces synthesis, leading to the elimination of DnaA and the arrest of DNA replication. Our results demonstrate how regulated translation and constitutive degradation provide cells a means of precisely and rapidly modulating the concentration of key regulatory proteins in response to environmental inputs. PMID:26134530

  6. The bacterial cell cycle regulator GcrA is a σ70 cofactor that drives gene expression from a subset of methylated promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakonsen, Diane L; Yuan, Andy H; Laub, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Cell cycle progression in most organisms requires tightly regulated programs of gene expression. The transcription factors involved typically stimulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences in promoters and recruiting RNA polymerase. Here, we found that the essential cell cycle regulator GcrA in Caulobacter crescentus activates the transcription of target genes in a fundamentally different manner. GcrA forms a stable complex with RNA polymerase and localizes to almost all active σ(70)-dependent promoters in vivo but activates transcription primarily at promoters harboring certain DNA methylation sites. Whereas most transcription factors that contact σ(70) interact with domain 4, GcrA interfaces with domain 2, the region that binds the -10 element during strand separation. Using kinetic analyses and a reconstituted in vitro transcription assay, we demonstrated that GcrA can stabilize RNA polymerase binding and directly stimulate open complex formation to activate transcription. Guided by these studies, we identified a regulon of ∼ 200 genes, providing new insight into the essential functions of GcrA. Collectively, our work reveals a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation, and we discuss the potential benefits of activating transcription by promoting RNA polymerase isomerization rather than recruitment exclusively. PMID:26545812

  7. Nutritional Control of DNA Replication Initiation through the Proteolysis and Regulated Translation of DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can arrest their own growth and proliferation upon nutrient depletion and under various stressful conditions to ensure their survival. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppressing growth and arresting the cell cycle under such conditions remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify post-transcriptional mechanisms that help enforce a cell-cycle arrest in Caulobacter crescentus following nutrient limitation and during entry into stationary phase by limiting the accumulation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator protein. DnaA is rapidly degraded by the Lon protease following nutrient limitation. However, the rate of DnaA degradation is not significantly altered by changes in nutrient availability. Instead, we demonstrate that decreased nutrient availability downregulates dnaA translation by a mechanism involving the 5' untranslated leader region of the dnaA transcript; Lon-dependent proteolysis of DnaA then outpaces synthesis, leading to the elimination of DnaA and the arrest of DNA replication. Our results demonstrate how regulated translation and constitutive degradation provide cells a means of precisely and rapidly modulating the concentration of key regulatory proteins in response to environmental inputs.

  8. A bacterial toxin inhibits DNA replication elongation through a direct interaction with the β sliding clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher D; Phung, Tuyen N; Huang, David; Laub, Michael T

    2013-12-12

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are ubiquitous on bacterial chromosomes, yet the mechanisms regulating their activity and the molecular targets of toxins remain incompletely defined. Here, we identify SocAB, an atypical TA system in Caulobacter crescentus. Unlike canonical TA systems, the toxin SocB is unstable and constitutively degraded by the protease ClpXP; this degradation requires the antitoxin, SocA, as a proteolytic adaptor. We find that the toxin, SocB, blocks replication elongation through an interaction with the sliding clamp, driving replication fork collapse. Mutations that suppress SocB toxicity map to either the hydrophobic cleft on the clamp that binds DNA polymerase III or a clamp-binding motif in SocB. Our findings suggest that SocB disrupts replication by outcompeting other clamp-binding proteins. Collectively, our results expand the diversity of mechanisms employed by TA systems to regulate toxin activity and inhibit bacterial growth, and they suggest that inhibiting clamp function may be a generalizable antibacterial strategy. PMID:24239291

  9. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Thomas H.; Seth Childers, W.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Eckart, Michael R.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  10. The bacterial tubulin FtsZ requires its intrinsically disordered linker to direct robust cell wall construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Kousik; Miguel, Amanda; Desmarais, Samantha M; Meier, Elizabeth L; Casey Huang, Kerwyn; Goley, Erin D

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial GTPase FtsZ forms a cytokinetic ring at midcell, recruits the division machinery and orchestrates membrane and peptidoglycan cell wall invagination. However, the mechanism for FtsZ regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism is unknown. The FtsZ GTPase domain is separated from its membrane-anchoring C-terminal conserved (CTC) peptide by a disordered C-terminal linker (CTL). Here we investigate CTL function in Caulobacter crescentus. Strikingly, production of FtsZ lacking the CTL (ΔCTL) is lethal: cells become filamentous, form envelope bulges and lyse, resembling treatment with β-lactam antibiotics. This phenotype is produced by FtsZ polymers bearing the CTC and a CTL shorter than 14 residues. Peptidoglycan synthesis still occurs downstream of ΔCTL; however, cells expressing ΔCTL exhibit reduced peptidoglycan crosslinking and longer glycan strands than wild type. Importantly, midcell proteins are still recruited to sites of ΔCTL assembly. We propose that FtsZ regulates peptidoglycan metabolism through a CTL-dependent mechanism that extends beyond simple protein recruitment. PMID:26099469

  11. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  12. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  13. Structure of a putative trans-editing enzyme for prolyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 1.7 Å resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional structure of the APE2540 protein from A. pernix K1 has been determined by the multiple anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å resolution. The structure includes two monomers in the asymmetric unit and shares structural similarity with the YbaK protein or cysteinyl-tRNAPro deacylase from H. influenzae. The crystal structure of APE2540, the putative trans-editing enzyme ProX from Aeropyrum pernix K1, was determined in a high-throughput manner. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.4, b = 58.9, c = 53.6 Å, β = 106.8°. The structure was solved by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å and refined to an R factor of 16.8% (Rfree = 20.5%). The crystal structure includes two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer consists of eight β-strands and seven α-helices. A structure-homology search revealed similarity between the trans-editing enzyme YbaK (or cysteinyl-tRNAPro deacylase) from Haemophilus influenzae (HI1434; 22% sequence identity) and putative ProX proteins from Caulobacter crescentus (16%) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (21%)

  14. A novel roseobacter phage possesses features of podoviruses, siphoviruses, prophages and gene transfer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yuanchao; Huang, Sijun; Voget, Sonja; Simon, Meinhard; Chen, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria in the Roseobacter lineage have been studied extensively due to their significant biogeochemical roles in the marine ecosystem. However, our knowledge on bacteriophage which infects the Roseobacter clade is still very limited. Here, we report a new bacteriophage, phage DSS3Φ8, which infects marine roseobacter Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. DSS3Φ8 is a lytic siphovirus. Genomic analysis showed that DSS3Φ8 is most closely related to a group of siphoviruses, CbK-like phages, which infect freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. DSS3Φ8 contains a smaller capsid and has a reduced genome size (146 kb) compared to the CbK-like phages (205–279 kb). DSS3Φ8 contains the DNA polymerase gene which is closely related to T7-like podoviruses. DSS3Φ8 also contains the integrase and repressor genes, indicating its potential to involve in lysogenic cycle. In addition, four GTA (gene transfer agent) genes were identified in the DSS3Φ8 genome. Genomic analysis suggests that DSS3Φ8 is a highly mosaic phage that inherits the genetic features from siphoviruses, podoviruses, prophages and GTAs. This is the first report of CbK-like phages infecting marine bacteria. We believe phage isolation is still a powerful tool that can lead to discovery of new phages and help interpret the overwhelming unknown sequences in the viral metagenomics.

  15. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Thomas H; Seth Childers, W; Blair, Jimmy A; Eckart, Michael R; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  16. Filament depolymerization can pull a chromosome during bacterial mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banigan, Edward; Gelbart, Michael; Gitai, Zemer; Liu, Andrea; Wingreen, Ned

    2011-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole and binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, thus pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that is disassembling it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple and physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is ``self-diffusiophoretic'': by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the concentration of ParA is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is controlled by the product of an effective relaxation time for the chromosome and the rate of ParA disassembly. Our results provide a physical explanation of the mechanism of depolymerization-driven translocation and suggest physical explanations for recent experimental observations.

  17. Structure of the Bacterial Cytoskeleton Protein Bactofilin by NMR Chemical Shifts and Sequence Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Maher M; Wang, Yong; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2016-06-01

    Bactofilins constitute a recently discovered class of bacterial proteins that form cytoskeletal filaments. They share a highly conserved domain (DUF583) of which the structure remains unknown, in part due to the large size and noncrystalline nature of the filaments. Here, we describe the atomic structure of a bactofilin domain from Caulobacter crescentus. To determine the structure, we developed an approach that combines a biophysical model for proteins with recently obtained solid-state NMR spectroscopy data and amino acid contacts predicted from a detailed analysis of the evolutionary history of bactofilins. Our structure reveals a triangular β-helical (solenoid) conformation with conserved residues forming the tightly packed core and polar residues lining the surface. The repetitive structure explains the presence of internal repeats as well as strongly conserved positions, and is reminiscent of other fibrillar proteins. Our work provides a structural basis for future studies of bactofilin biology and for designing molecules that target them, as well as a starting point for determining the organization of the entire bactofilin filament. Finally, our approach presents new avenues for determining structures that are difficult to obtain by traditional means. PMID:27276252

  18. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles S; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-11-11

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple (≈ 1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a simple physical principle governing these complex biological processes: a single temperature-dependent scale of cellular time governs the stochastic dynamics of growth and division in balanced growth conditions. PMID:25349411

  19. AcEST: DK953058 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available orin OS=Homo sapiens GN=DCN PE=1 SV=1 31 4.6 sp|Q97CK6|COMB_THEVO Probable 2-phosphosulfolactate phosphatase... 318 >sp|Q97CK6|COMB_THEVO Probable 2-phosphosulfolactate phosphatase OS=Thermoplasma volcanium GN=comB PE=3...rized protein OS=Strep... 39 0.20 tr|B4D4G1|B4D4G1_9BACT Beta-lactamase OS=Chthoniobacte...rase OS=Streptomyces pristinaespirali... 37 1.3 tr|A7CQJ3|A7CQJ3_9BACT Beta-lactamase OS=Opitutaceae bacte...in OS=Crypt... 35 2.9 tr|Q9ABH2|Q9ABH2_CAUCR Esterase A OS=Caulobacter crescentus GN=C... 35 3.7 tr|B2ULQ7|B2ULQ7_AKKM8 Beta-lact

  20. A novel roseobacter phage possesses features of podoviruses, siphoviruses, prophages and gene transfer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yuanchao; Huang, Sijun; Voget, Sonja; Simon, Meinhard; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria in the Roseobacter lineage have been studied extensively due to their significant biogeochemical roles in the marine ecosystem. However, our knowledge on bacteriophage which infects the Roseobacter clade is still very limited. Here, we report a new bacteriophage, phage DSS3Φ8, which infects marine roseobacter Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. DSS3Φ8 is a lytic siphovirus. Genomic analysis showed that DSS3Φ8 is most closely related to a group of siphoviruses, CbK-like phages, which infect freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. DSS3Φ8 contains a smaller capsid and has a reduced genome size (146 kb) compared to the CbK-like phages (205-279 kb). DSS3Φ8 contains the DNA polymerase gene which is closely related to T7-like podoviruses. DSS3Φ8 also contains the integrase and repressor genes, indicating its potential to involve in lysogenic cycle. In addition, four GTA (gene transfer agent) genes were identified in the DSS3Φ8 genome. Genomic analysis suggests that DSS3Φ8 is a highly mosaic phage that inherits the genetic features from siphoviruses, podoviruses, prophages and GTAs. This is the first report of CbK-like phages infecting marine bacteria. We believe phage isolation is still a powerful tool that can lead to discovery of new phages and help interpret the overwhelming unknown sequences in the viral metagenomics. PMID:27460944

  1. Dibenzofuran degradation by Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 under environmental stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Coronado E.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomonas wittichii is a gram-negative Alpha-proteobacterium, capable of degrading xenobiotic compounds such as dibenzofuran (DBF), dibenzo-p-dioxin, carbazole, 2-hydroxybiphenyl or nitro diphenyl ether herbicides. The metabolism of strain RW1 has been the subject of previous studies and a number of genes involved in DBF degradation have been characterized. It is known that RW1 posseses a unique initial DBF dioxygenase (encoded by the dxnAl gene) that catalyzes the first step in the degrad...

  2. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Skerker

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein-protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK-CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this

  3. Filament depolymerization can explain chromosome pulling during bacterial mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Banigan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole, binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that disassembles it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple, physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is "self-diffusiophoretic": by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is most robust when ParB binds side-on to ParA filaments. In this case, robust translocation occurs over a wide parameter range and is controlled by a single dimensionless quantity: the product of the rate of ParA disassembly and a characteristic relaxation time of the chromosome. This time scale measures the time it takes for the chromosome to recover its average shape after it is has been pulled. Our results suggest explanations for observed phenomena such as segregation failure, filament-length-dependent translocation velocity, and chromosomal compaction.

  4. Elucidation of a novel lipid A α-(1,1)-GalA transferase gene (rgtF) from Mesorhizobium loti: Heterologous expression of rgtF causes Rhizobium etli to synthesize lipid A with α-(1,1)-GalA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dusty B; Muszynski, Artur; Carlson, Russell W

    2013-05-01

    An unusual α-(1,1)-galacturonic acid (GalA) lipid A modification has been reported in the lipopolysaccharide of a number of interesting Gram-negative bacteria, including the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azospirillum lipoferum, Mesorhizobium huakuii and M. loti, the stalk-forming bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. However, the α-(1,1)-GalA transferase (GalAT) gene, which we have named RgtF, was not identified. Species of the Rhizobium genera produce lipid A with α-(1,4')-GalA but not α-(1,1)-GalA. The Rhizobium GalAT, RgtD, is the lipid A α-(1-4')-GalAT which utilizes the lipid donor dodecaprenyl-phosphate GalA (Dod-P-GalA) for GalA transfer. An additional Rhizobium GalAT, RgtE, is required for the biosynthesis of Dod-P-GalA. We predicted candidate rgtF genes in bacterial species known to produce lipid A with α-(1,1)-GalA. In order to determine the predicted rgtF gene function, we cloned the M. loti rgtF gene into an expression plasmid and introduced that plasmid into Rhizobium etli strains that do not contain the rgtF gene nor produce lipid A α-(1,1)-GalA. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis combined with NMR studies revealed that the lipid As from these rgtF-complemented strains were modified with an additional α-(1,1)-GalA attached to the proximal glucosamine. PMID:23283001

  5. Enhancement of flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Sha, Sha; Pelcovits, Robert; Tang, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of the swimming speed of many species of flagellated bacteria in polymer solutions have shown that with the addition of high molecular weight polymers, the speed initially increases as a function of the kinematic viscosity. It peaks at around 1.5-2 cP with typically 10-30% higher values than in cell media without added polymers (~ 1 cP). Past the peak, the average speed gradually decreases as the solution becomes more viscous. Swimming motility persists until solution viscosity reaches 5-10 cP. Models have been proposed to account for this behavior, and the magnitude of the peak becomes a crucial test of theoretical predictions. The status of the field is complicated in light of a recent report (Martinez et al., PNAS, 2014), stressing that low-molecular weight impurities account for the peaked speed-viscosity curves in some cases. We measured the swimming speed of a uni-flagellated bacterium, caulobacter crescentus, in solutions of a number of polymers of several different sizes. Our findings confirm the peaked speed-viscosity curve, only as the molecular weight of the flexible polymers used surpassed ~ 50,000 da. The threshold molecular weight required to augment swimming speed varies somewhat with the polymer species, but it generally corresponds to radius of gyration over tens of nanometers. This general feature is consistent with the model of Powers et al. (Physics of Fluid, 2009), predicting that nonlinear viscoelasticity of the fluid enhances swimming motility. Work Supported by the NSF Fluid Physics Program (Award number CBET 1438033).

  6. ParABS system in chromosome partitioning in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A Iniesta

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is an essential cellular function in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. The ParABS system is a fundamental player for a mitosis-like process in chromosome partitioning in many bacterial species. This work shows that the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus also uses the ParABS system for chromosome segregation. Its large prokaryotic genome of 9.1 Mb contains 22 parS sequences near the origin of replication, and it is shown here that M. xanthus ParB binds preferentially to a consensus parS sequence in vitro. ParB and ParA are essential for cell viability in M. xanthus as in Caulobacter crescentus, but unlike in many other bacteria. Absence of ParB results in anucleate cells, chromosome segregation defects and loss of viability. Analysis of ParA subcellular localization shows that it clusters at the poles in all cells, and in some, in the DNA-free cell division plane between two chromosomal DNA masses. This ParA localization pattern depends on ParB but not on FtsZ. ParB inhibits the nonspecific interaction of ParA with DNA, and ParA colocalizes with chromosomal DNA only when ParB is depleted. The subcellular localization of ParB suggests a single ParB-parS complex localized at the edge of the nucleoid, next to a polar ParA cluster, with a second ParB-parS complex migrating after the replication of parS takes place to the opposite nucleoid edge, next to the other polar ParA cluster.

  7. Functional Identification of Incorrectly Annotated Prolidases from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.; Patskovsky, Y; Xu, C; Meyer, A; Sauder, J; Burley, S; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    The substrate profiles for two proteins from Caulobacter crescentus CB15 (Cc2672 and Cc3125) and one protein (Sgx9359b) derived from a DNA sequence (gi|44368820) isolated from the Sargasso Sea were determined using combinatorial libraries of dipeptides and N-acyl derivatives of amino acids. These proteins are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and are currently misannotated in NCBI as catalyzing the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Pro dipeptides. Cc2672 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides and the N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of lysine and arginine. This enzyme will also hydrolyze longer peptides that terminate in either lysine or arginine. The N-methyl phosphonate derivative of l-lysine was a potent competitive inhibitor of Cc2672 with a Ki value of 120 nM. Cc3125 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides but will not hydrolyze tripeptides or the N-formyl and N-acetyl derivatives of lysine or arginine. The substrate profile for Sgx9359b is similar to that of Cc2672 except that compounds with a C-terminal lysine are not recognized as substrates. The X-ray structure of Sgx9359b was determined to a resolution of 2.3 Angstroms. The protein folds as a (e/a)8-barrel and self-associates to form a homooctamer. The active site is composed of a binuclear metal center similar to that found in phosphotriesterase and dihydroorotase. In one crystal form, arginine was bound adventitiously to the eight active sites within the octamer. The orientation of the arginine in the active site identified the structural determinants for recognition of the a-carboxylate and the positively charged side chains of arginine-containing substrates. This information was used to identify 18 other bacterial sequences that possess identical or similar substrate profiles.

  8. Accommodation of GDP-Linked Sugars in the Active Site of GDP-Perosamine Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Paul D.; Carney, Amanda E.; Holden, Hazel M. (UW)

    2009-01-12

    Perosamine (4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-mannose), or its N-acetylated form, is one of several dideoxy sugars found in the O-antigens of such infamous Gram-negative bacteria as Vibrio cholerae O1 and Escherichia coli O157:H7. It is added to the bacterial O-antigen via a nucleotide-linked version, namely GDP-perosamine. Three enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of GDP-perosamine starting from mannose 1-phosphate. The focus of this investigation is GDP-perosamine synthase from Caulobacter crescentus, which catalyzes the final step in GDP-perosamine synthesis, the conversion of GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose to GDP-perosamine. The enzyme is PLP-dependent and belongs to the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily. It contains the typically conserved active site lysine residue, which forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor. Two crystal structures were determined for this investigation: a site-directed mutant protein (K186A) complexed with GDP-perosamine and the wild-type enzyme complexed with an unnatural ligand, GDP-3-deoxyperosamine. These structures, determined to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, revealed the manner in which products, and presumably substrates, are accommodated within the active site pocket of GDP-perosamine synthase. Additional kinetic analyses using both the natural and unnatural substrates revealed that the K{sub m} for the unnatural substrate was unperturbed relative to that of the natural substrate, but the k{sub cat} was lowered by a factor of approximately 200. Taken together, these studies shed light on why GDP-perosamine synthase functions as an aminotransferase whereas another very similar PLP-dependent enzyme, GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose 3-dehydratase or ColD, catalyzes a dehydration reaction using the same substrate.

  9. Catalytic Mechanism of Perosamine N-Acetyltransferase Revealed by High-Resolution X-ray Crystallographic Studies and Kinetic Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoden, James B.; Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Cook, Paul D.; Menden, Patrick; Cleland, W.W.; Holden, Hazel M. (UW); (Mount Union); (UW-MED)

    2012-09-17

    N-Acetylperosamine is an unusual dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of some Gram-negative bacteria, including the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. The last step in its biosynthesis is catalyzed by PerB, an N-acetyltransferase belonging to the left-handed {beta}-helix superfamily of proteins. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of PerB from Caulobacter crescentus. For this study, three structures were determined to 1.0 {angstrom} resolution or better: the enzyme in complex with CoA and GDP-perosamine, the protein with bound CoA and GDP-N-acetylperosamine, and the enzyme containing a tetrahedral transition state mimic bound in the active site. Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme folds into two distinct regions. The N-terminal domain is globular and dominated by a six-stranded mainly parallel {beta}-sheet. It provides most of the interactions between the protein and GDP-perosamine. The C-terminal domain consists of a left-handed {beta}-helix, which has nearly seven turns. This region provides the scaffold for CoA binding. On the basis of these high-resolution structures, site-directed mutant proteins were constructed to test the roles of His 141 and Asp 142 in the catalytic mechanism. Kinetic data and pH-rate profiles are indicative of His 141 serving as a general base. In addition, the backbone amide group of Gly 159 provides an oxyanion hole for stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state. The pH-rate profiles are also consistent with the GDP-linked amino sugar substrate entering the active site in its unprotonated form. Finally, for this investigation, we show that PerB can accept GDP-3-deoxyperosamine as an alternative substrate, thus representing the production of a novel trideoxysugar.

  10. An Analysis of the Solution Structure and Signaling Mechanism of LovK, a Sensor Histidine Kinase Integrating Light and Redox Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin-binding LOV domains are broadly conserved in plants, fungi, archaea, and bacteria. These ∼100-residue photosensory modules are generally encoded within larger, multidomain proteins that control a range of blue light-dependent physiologies. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus encodes a soluble LOV-histidine kinase, LovK, that regulates the adhesive properties of the cell. Full-length LovK is dimeric as are a series of systematically truncated LovK constructs containing only the N-terminal LOV sensory domain. Nonconserved sequence flanking the LOV domain functions to tune the signaling lifetime of the protein. Size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) demonstrate that the LOV sensor domain does not undergo a large conformational change in response to photon absorption. However, limited proteolysis identifies a sequence flanking the C-terminus of the LOV domain as a site of light-induced change in protein conformation and dynamics. On the basis of SAXS envelope reconstruction and bioinformatic prediction, we propose this dynamic region of structure is an extended C-terminal coiled coil that links the LOV domain to the histidine kinase domain. To test the hypothesis that LOV domain signaling is affected by cellular redox state in addition to light, we measured the reduction potential of the LovK FMN cofactor. The measured potential of -258 mV is congruent with the redox potential of Gram-negative cytoplasm during logarithmic growth (-260 to -280 mV). Thus, a fraction of LovK in the cytosol may be in the reduced state under typical growth conditions. Chemical reduction of the FMN cofactor of LovK attenuates the light-dependent ATPase activity of the protein in vitro, demonstrating that LovK can function as a conditional photosensor that is regulated by the oxidative state of the cellular environment.

  11. Comparative 3-D Modeling of tmRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wower Iwona

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trans-translation releases stalled ribosomes from truncated mRNAs and tags defective proteins for proteolytic degradation using transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA. This small stable RNA represents a hybrid of tRNA- and mRNA-like domains connected by a variable number of pseudoknots. Comparative sequence analysis of tmRNAs found in bacteria, plastids, and mitochondria provides considerable insights into their secondary structures. Progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of template switching, which constitutes an essential step in trans-translation, is hampered by our limited knowledge about the three-dimensional folding of tmRNA. Results To facilitate experimental testing of the molecular intricacies of trans-translation, which often require appropriately modified tmRNA derivatives, we developed a procedure for building three-dimensional models of tmRNA. Using comparative sequence analysis, phylogenetically-supported 2-D structures were obtained to serve as input for the program ERNA-3D. Motifs containing loops and turns were extracted from the known structures of other RNAs and used to improve the tmRNA models. Biologically feasible 3-D models for the entire tmRNA molecule could be obtained. The models were characterized by a functionally significant close proximity between the tRNA-like domain and the resume codon. Potential conformational changes which might lead to a more open structure of tmRNA upon binding to the ribosome are discussed. The method, described in detail for the tmRNAs of Escherichia coli, Bacillus anthracis, and Caulobacter crescentus, is applicable to every tmRNA. Conclusion Improved molecular models of biological significance were obtained. These models will guide in the design of experiments and provide a better understanding of trans-translation. The comparative procedure described here for tmRNA is easily adopted for the modeling the members of other RNA families.

  12. Study of Class I and Class III Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Synthases with Substrates Containing a Modified Side Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kaimin; Cao, Ruikai; Hua, Duy H; Li, Ping

    2016-04-11

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are carbon and energy storage polymers produced by a variety of microbial organisms under nutrient-limited conditions. They have been considered as an environmentally friendly alternative to oil-based plastics due to their renewability, versatility, and biodegradability. PHA synthase (PhaC) plays a central role in PHA biosynthesis, in which its activity and substrate specificity are major factors in determining the productivity and properties of the produced polymers. However, the effects of modifying the substrate side chain are not well understood because of the difficulty to accessing the desired analogues. In this report, a series of 3-(R)-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A (HACoA) analogues were synthesized and tested with class I synthases from Chromobacterium sp. USM2 (PhaCCs and A479S-PhaCCs) and Caulobacter crescentus (PhaCCc) as well as class III synthase from Allochromatium vinosum (PhaECAv). It was found that, while different PHA synthases displayed distinct preference with regard to the length of the alkyl side chains, they could withstand moderate side chain modifications such as terminal unsaturated bonds and the azide group. Specifically, the specific activity of PhaCCs toward propynyl analogue (HHxyCoA) was only 5-fold less than that toward the classical substrate HBCoA. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of PhaECAv toward azide analogue (HABCoA) was determined to be 2.86 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which was 6.2% of the value of HBCoA (4.62 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)) measured in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). These side chain modifications may be employed to introduce new material functions to PHAs as well as to study PHA biogenesis via click-chemistry, in which the latter remains unknown and is important for metabolic engineering to produce PHAs economically. PMID:26974339

  13. Disease: H01148 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01148 Caulobacter infection The genus Caulobacter includes gram-negative bacteria characterized ... minoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and sulfadiazine . PMID:17267638 Justesen US, Holt HM, Thiesson HC, ...

  14. Functional Annotation of Two New Carboxypeptidases from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.; Xu, C; Kumaran, D; Brown, A; Sauder, M; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    Two proteins from the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The first protein, Cc0300, was from Caulobacter crescentus CB-15 (Cc0300), while the second one (Sgx9355e) was derived from an environmental DNA sequence originally isolated from the Sargasso Sea (gi|44371129). The catalytic functions and the substrate profiles for the two enzymes were determined with the aid of combinatorial dipeptide libraries. Both enzymes were shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Xaa dipeptides in which the amino acid at the N-terminus was relatively unimportant. These enzymes were specific for hydrophobic amino acids at the C-terminus. With Cc0300, substrates terminating in isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, valine, methionine, and tryptophan were hydrolyzed. The same specificity was observed with Sgx9355e, but this protein was also able to hydrolyze peptides terminating in threonine. Both enzymes were able to hydrolyze N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of the hydrophobic amino acids and tripeptides. The best substrates identified for Cc0300 were l-Ala-l-Leu with kcat and kcat/Km values of 37 s-1 and 1.1 x 105 M-1 s-1, respectively, and N-formyl-l-Tyr with kcat and kcat/Km values of 33 s-1 and 3.9 x 105 M-1 s-1, respectively. The best substrate identified for Sgx9355e was l-Ala-l-Phe with kcat and kcat/Km values of 0.41 s-1 and 5.8 x 103 M-1 s-1. The three-dimensional structure of Sgx9355e was determined to a resolution of 2.33 Angstroms with l-methionine bound in the active site. The a-carboxylate of the methionine is ion-paired to His-237 and also hydrogen bonded to the backbone amide groups of Val-201 and Leu-202. The a-amino group of the bound methionine interacts with Asp-328. The structural determinants for substrate recognition were identified and compared with other enzymes in this superfamily that hydrolyze dipeptides with different specificities.

  15. [Transgenic bioinsecticides inimical to parasites, but imical to environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucińska, Jolanta; Lonc, Elzbieta; Rydzanicz, Katarzyna

    2003-01-01

    Culex and Anopheles, and Bti--mostly to Culex, Aedes and some Simmulidae. Gram-negative bacteria (Asticcacaulis excentricus, Caulobacter crescentus and Ancylobacter aquaticus) turned out also to be effective delta-endotoxin producers. They grow on simple media and do not contain proteases which could degrade Cry proteins. In some cases, 100% mosquito larvae mortality was observed as a result of an exposure to transgenic microorganisms containing Bti genes. However, transgenic techniques are still not very popular in the world, despite their efficacy in biological control of insects. The transgenic organism construction is expensive and time-consuming. Genetic engineering is still raising a lot of anxieties and doubts concerning inappropriate use of modified organisms. On the other hand, this technology could solve many problems associated with vectors of important diseases, which are still unapproachable to contemporary medicine. PMID:16889013

  16. The biology of habitat dominance; can microbes behave as weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, Jonathan A; Bell, Andrew N W; Bhaganna, Prashanth; Mswaka, Allen Y; Timson, David J; Hallsworth, John E

    2013-09-01

    , such as Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Pseudoxylaria spp., exhibit characteristics of both weed and non-weed species. We propose that the concept of nonweeds represents a 'dustbin' group that includes species such as Synodropsis spp., Polypaecilum pisce, Metschnikowia orientalis, Salmonella spp., and Caulobacter crescentus. We show that microbial weeds are conceptually distinct from plant weeds, microbial copiotrophs, r-strategists, and other ecophysiological groups of microorganism. Microbial weed species are unlikely to emerge from stationary-phase or other types of closed communities; it is open habitats that select for weed phenotypes. Specific characteristics that are common to diverse types of open habitat are identified, and implications of weed biology and open-habitat ecology are discussed in the context of further studies needed in the fields of environmental and applied microbiology. PMID:23336673

  17. Phylogenomics and signature proteins for the alpha Proteobacteria and its main groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok Amy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha proteobacteria are one of the largest and most extensively studied groups within bacteria. However, for these bacteria as a whole and for all of its major subgroups (viz. Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales and Caulobacterales, very few or no distinctive molecular or biochemical characteristics are known. Results We have carried out comprehensive phylogenomic analyses by means of Blastp and PSI-Blast searches on the open reading frames in the genomes of several α-proteobacteria (viz. Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Brucella suis, Caulobacter crescentus, Gluconobacter oxydans, Mesorhizobium loti, Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, Silicibacter sp. TM1040, Rhodospirillum rubrum and Wolbachia (Drosophila endosymbiont. These studies have identified several proteins that are distinctive characteristics of all α-proteobacteria, as well as numerous proteins that are unique repertoires of all of its main orders (viz. Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales and Caulobacterales and many families (viz. Rickettsiaceae, Anaplasmataceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Bradyrhiozobiaceae, Brucellaceae and Bartonellaceae. Many other proteins that are present at different phylogenetic depths in α-proteobacteria provide important information regarding their evolution. The evolutionary relationships among α-proteobacteria as deduced from these studies are in excellent agreement with their branching pattern in the phylogenetic trees and character compatibility cliques based on concatenated sequences for many conserved proteins. These studies provide evidence that the major groups within α-proteobacteria have diverged in the following order: (Rickettsiales(Rhodospirillales (Sphingomonadales (Rhodobacterales (Caulobacterales-Parvularculales (Rhizobiales. We also describe two conserved inserts in DNA

  18. Exploring mitochondrial evolution and metabolism organization principles by comparative analysis of metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiao; Wang, Zhuo; Hao, Pei; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yi-Xue

    2010-06-01

    The endosymbiotic theory proposed that mitochondrial genomes are derived from an alpha-proteobacterium-like endosymbiont, which was concluded from sequence analysis. We rebuilt the metabolic networks of mitochondria and 22 relative species, and studied the evolution of mitochondrial metabolism at the level of enzyme content and network topology. Our phylogenetic results based on network alignment and motif identification supported the endosymbiotic theory from the point of view of systems biology for the first time. It was found that the mitochondrial metabolic network were much more compact than the relative species, probably related to the higher efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation of the specialized organelle, and the network is highly clustered around the TCA cycle. Moreover, the mitochondrial metabolic network exhibited high functional specificity to the modules. This work provided insight to the understanding of mitochondria evolution, and the organization principle of mitochondrial metabolic network at the network level. PMID:20298776

  19. Mitochondrial genome evolution and the origin of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, B F; Gray, M W; Burger, G

    1999-01-01

    Recent results from ancestral (minimally derived) protists testify to the tremendous diversity of the mitochondrial genome in various eukaryotic lineages, but also reinforce the view that mitochondria, descendants of an endosymbiotic alpha-Proteobacterium, arose only once in evolution. The serial endosymbiosis theory, currently the most popular hypothesis to explain the origin of mitochondria, postulates the capture of an alpha-proteobacterial endosymbiont by a nucleus-containing eukaryotic host resembling extant amitochondriate protists. New sequence data have challenged this scenario, instead raising the possibility that the origin of the mitochondrion was coincident with, and contributed substantially to, the origin of the nuclear genome of the eukaryotic cell. Defining more precisely the alpha-proteobacterial ancestry of the mitochondrial genome, and the contribution of the endosymbiotic event to the nuclear genome, will be essential for a full understanding of the origin and evolution of the eukaryotic cell as a whole. PMID:10690412

  20. Frequency of infection with A and B supergroup Wolbachia in insects and pests associated with mulberry and silkworm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B M Prakash; H P Puttaraju

    2007-06-01

    Wolbachia is a ubiquitous, Gram-negative, vertically transmitted, alpha-proteobacterium that causes an array of reproductive abnormalities including cytoplasmic incompatibility, feminization of genetic males, parthenogenesis in a number of insect species, among others. Wolbachia is now being exploited as an agent for pest and vector control. Previous surveys indicated that it is commonly seen in 16–76% of arthropods. In this paper, using polymerase chain reaction assay based on specific amplification of the ftsZ-A and -B supergroup Wolbachia gene fragments, we found that 30% of insects and pests screened were positive for Wolbachia. Among them 66.7% harbour double Wolbachia infection, while 33.3% harbour single Wolbachia infection. These results indicate widespread infection with both double and single Wolbachia, and provide a wealth of information to exploit this endobacterium for the management of pests and vectors.

  1. Gene : CBRC-ACAR-01-0857 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0857 Novel UN C UNKNOWN GLGB_CHLCV 0.21 31% ref|ZP_01422754.1| Integrase, catalytic ... region ... [Caulobacter sp. K31] gb|EAU09851.1| Integrase, ca ... talytic region ... [Caulobacter sp. K31] 1.0 39% MSGWIDRVGALLVSFIPMLF ...

  2. Synthetic strategies for controlling inter- and intramolecular interactions: Applications in single-molecule fluorescence imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and palladium catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Nicholas R.

    proximity of the Cy3 and Cy5 fluorophores, behaves as an optical photoswitch in the presence of a thiol reagent. This unique property was employed to achieve sub-diffraction-limited imaging of the stalks of Caulobacter crescentus cells with 30-nm resolution using STORM (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy). Lastly, the synthesis of the first selenium analogue of firefly luciferin is described, and this analogue is shown to be a competent substrate for firefly luciferase (fLuc). Remarkably, it exhibits red-shifted bioluminescence emission relative to the native sulfur analogue. The in vivo performance of the selenium and sulfur analogues in imaging are compared by tail-vein injection into nude mice bearing subcutaneous tumor xenografts of a human breast cancer cell line that was stably transduced to express fLuc. Part II of this thesis begins by addressing design considerations in the development of palladium catalysts that effect oxidative transformations under mild conditions (i.e., 1 atm air, room temperature) using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant. A newly synthesized cationic palladium complex, [(2,9-dimethylphenanthroline)Pd(OAc)]2[OTf]2, is shown to catalyze aerobic alcohol oxidation under such conditions with an unprecedented initial turnover frequency, but the presence of partially reduced oxygen species results in competitive ligand oxidation with concomitant decrease in catalyst activity. To remedy this, oxidatively resistant ligands, which are essential for the development of next-generation, high-turnover-frequency palladium catalysts that utilize oxygen as a terminal oxidant, have been prepared and effectively employed. In addition, the first general palladium-catalyzed route to the carbonylation of diols is reported. In this system, carbon monoxide (1 atm) serves the carbonyl source, (2,9-dimethylphenanthroline)Pd(OAc) 2 acts as the catalyst, and N-chlorosuccinimide and iodosobenzene are the oxidants for 1,2- and 1,3-diols, respectively. This

  3. 系列混合碳源条件下颗粒化EBPR系统茵群结构变化规律研究%A study of microbial diversity of granule-based enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems cultivated with ratiometric propionate and acetate as mixed carbon sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋涛; 孙培德; 金均

    2012-01-01

    A series of mixed carbon sources with different ratios of propionate and acetate was applied in granule-based enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) sludge in SBR reactor. Microbial diversity change during the granular process and functional bacteria competition under different carbon sources were studied. Significant microbial diversity change in EBPR system was exhibited during granulation. Uncultured bacteria previously dominated in the system disappeared rapidly, while uncultured rhodocyclaceae bacterium and portions of candidatus competibacter phosphatis, denitrifying bacterium, acinetobacter and uncultured alpha proteobacterium were gradually washed out. Uncultured chlorobi bacterium and uncultured alpha proteobacterium were the primary phosphorus removal bacteria in developed granular EBPR system. The change of bacteria population ofcandidatus competibacterphosphatis and uncultured chlorobi bacterium was evidenced as a result of microbial diversity under different ratios of mixed carbon sources. The population of candidatus competibacter phosphatis increased monotonically with acetate concentration, decreaseing the system phosphorus removal efficiency. Meanwhile, the population of uncultured chlorobi bacterium had a positive correlation with propionate concentration, which maintained good phosphorus removal efficiency of the EBPR system.%在SBR反应器中接种富含聚磷菌的活性污泥,采用一系列不同丙酸/乙酸比例混合的碳源进行EBPR系统污泥的颗粒化培养,并考察了颗粒化进程中的系统菌群结构变化,以及不同混合碳源条件对系统功能菌种竞争的影响.结果表明,污泥颗粒化过程对EBPR系统菌群结构产生了较大的筛选作用.原本在系统中占优势的一类Uncultured bacterium被迅速淘汰;Uncultured Rhodocyclaceae bacterium、部分Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis、部分Denitrifying bacterium、Acinetobacter及部分Uncultured alpha proteobacterium分别逐渐被淘

  4. Bacterial study of Vostok drilling fluid: the tool to make ice core finding confident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhina, I. A.; Petit, J. R.; Lukin, V. V.; Bulat, S. A.

    2003-04-01

    Decontamination of Vostok ice core is a critical issue in molecular biology studies. Core surface contains a film of hardly removable 'dirty' drilling fluid representing a mixture of polyhydrocarbons (PHC) including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and freon. To make ice microbial finding more confident the original Vostok drilling fluid sampled from different depths (110m - 3600m) was analyzed for bacterial content by ribosomal DNA sequencing. Total, 33 clones of 16S ribosomal DNA were recovered from four samples of drilling fluid at 110, 2750, 3400, and 3600m leading to identification of 8 bacterial species. No overlapping was observed even for neighboring samples (3400m and 3600m). At present four major bacteria with the titer more than 103-104 cells per ml (as estimated from PCR results) are identified. Among them we found: unknown representative of Desulfobacteraceae which are able to oxidize sulphates and degrade benzenes (110m); PAH-degrading alpha-proteobacterium Sphingomonas natatoria (3400m); alpha-proteobacterium representing closely-related group of Sphingomonas sp. (e.g., S. aurantiaca) which are able to degrade PAH as well, and human pathogen closely related to Haloanella gallinarum of CFB group (3600m). Four additional species were revealed as single clones and showed relatedness to human pathogens and saprophytes as well as soil bacteria. These bacteria may represent drilling fluid contaminants introduced during its sampling or DNA extraction procedure. Of four major bacteria revealed, one species, Sphingomonas natatoria, has been met by us in the Vostok core from 3607 m depth (AF532054) whereas another Sphingomonas sp. which we refer to as S. aurantiaca was found in Antarctic microbial endolithic community (AF548567), hydrocarbon-containing soil near Scott Base in Antarctica (AF184221) and even isolated from 3593m Vostok accretion ice (AF324199) and Taylor Dome core (AF395031). The source for major human pathogen-related bacteria is rather uncertain

  5. The Genome of the Obligately Intracellular Bacterium Ehrlichia canis Reveals Themes of Complex Membrane Structure and Immune Evasion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Doyle, C Kuyler [Center for Biodenfense and Emerging Infectious Diseases; Lykidis, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Francino, M P [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S [ORNL; Shin, M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Malfatti, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Yu, X J [Center for Biodenfense and Emerging Infectious Diseases; Walker, D H [Center for Biodenfense and Emerging Infectious Diseases; McBride, J W [Center for Biodenfense and Emerging Infectious Diseases; Kyripides, N C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2006-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis, a small obligately intracellular, tick-transmitted, gram-negative, {alpha}-proteobacterium, is the primary etiologic agent of globally distributed canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Complete genome sequencing revealed that the E. canis genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 1,315,030 bp predicted to encode 925 proteins, 40 stable RNA species, 17 putative pseudogenes, and a substantial proportion of noncoding sequence (27%). Interesting genome features include a large set of proteins with transmembrane helices and/or signal sequences and a unique serine-threonine bias associated with the potential for O glycosylation that was prominent in proteins associated with pathogen-host interactions. Furthermore, two paralogous protein families associated with immune evasion were identified, one of which contains poly(G-C) tracts, suggesting that they may play a role in phase variation and facilitation of persistent infections. Genes associated with pathogen-host interactions were identified, including a small group encoding proteins (n = 12) with tandem repeats and another group encoding proteins with eukaryote-like ankyrin domains (n = 7).

  6. A new alpha-proteobacterial clade of Bdellovibrio-like predators: implications for the mitochondrial endosymbiotic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidov, Yaacov; Huchon, Dorothee; Koval, Susan F; Jurkevitch, Edouard

    2006-12-01

    Bdellovibrio-and-like organisms (BALOs) are peculiar, ubiquitous, small-sized, highly motile Gram-negative bacteria that are obligatory predators of other bacteria. Typically, these predators invade the periplasm of their prey where they grow and replicate. To date, BALOs constitute two highly diverse families affiliated with the delta-proteobacteria class. In this study, Micavibrio spp., a BALO lineage of epibiotic predators, were isolated from soil. These bacteria attach to digest and grow at the expense of other prokaryotes, much like other BALOs. Multiple phylogenetic analyses based on six genes revealed that they formed a deep branch within the alpha-proteobacteria, not affiliated with any of the alpha-proteobacterial orders. The presence of BALOs deep among the alpha-proteobacteria suggests that their peculiar mode of parasitism maybe an ancestral character in this proteobacterial class. The origin of the mitochondrion from an alpha-proteobacterium endosymbiont is strongly supported by molecular phylogenies. Accumulating data suggest that the endosymbiont's host was also a prokaryote. As prokaryotes are unable to phagocytose, the means by which the endosymbiont gained access into its host remains mysterious. We here propose a scenario based on the BALO feeding-mode to hypothesize a mechanism at play at the origin of the mitochondrial endosymbiosis. PMID:17107559

  7. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-21

    Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  8. Genomic Sequencing and Biological Characteristics of a Novel Escherichia Coli Bacteriophage 9g, a Putative Representative of a New Siphoviridae Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene E. Kulikov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage 9g was isolated from horse feces using Escherichia coli C600 as a host strain. Phage 9g has a slightly elongated capsid 62 × 76 nm in diameter and a non-contractile tail about 185 nm long. The complete genome sequence of this bacteriophage consists of 56,703 bp encoding 70 predicted open reading frames. The closest relative of phage 9g is phage PhiJL001 infecting marine alpha-proteobacterium associated with Ircinia strobilina sponge, sharing with phage 9g 51% of amino acid identity in the main capsid protein sequence. The DNA of 9g is resistant to most restriction endonucleases tested, indicating the presence of hypermodified bases. The gene cluster encoding a biosynthesis pathway similar to biosynthesis of the unusual nucleoside queuosine was detected in the phage 9g genome. The genomic map organization is somewhat similar to the typical temperate phage gene layout but no integrase gene was detected. Phage 9g efficiently forms stable associations with its host that continues to produce the phage over multiple passages, but the phage can be easily eliminated via viricide treatment indicating that no true lysogens are formed. Since the sequence, genomic organization and biological properties of bacteriophage 9g are clearly distinct from other known Enterobacteriaceae phages, we propose to consider it as the representative of a novel genus of the Siphoviridae family.

  9. Structural and functional characterization of the oxidoreductase alpha-DsbA1 from Wolbachia pipientis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Mareike; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, Iñaki; Jarrott, Russell; Shouldice, Stephen R; Wouters, Merridee A; Frei, Patrick; Glockshuber, Rudi; O'Neill, Scott L; Heras, Begoña; Martin, Jennifer L

    2009-07-01

    The alpha-proteobacterium Wolbachia pipientis is a highly successful intracellular endosymbiont of invertebrates that manipulates its host's reproductive biology to facilitate its own maternal transmission. The fastidious nature of Wolbachia and the lack of genetic transformation have hampered analysis of the molecular basis of these manipulations. Structure determination of key Wolbachia proteins will enable the development of inhibitors for chemical genetics studies. Wolbachia encodes a homologue (alpha-DsbA1) of the Escherichia coli dithiol oxidase enzyme EcDsbA, essential for the oxidative folding of many exported proteins. We found that the active-site cysteine pair of Wolbachia alpha-DsbA1 has the most reducing redox potential of any characterized DsbA. In addition, Wolbachia alpha-DsbA1 possesses a second disulfide that is highly conserved in alpha-proteobacterial DsbAs but not in other DsbAs. The alpha-DsbA1 structure lacks the characteristic hydrophobic features of EcDsbA, and the protein neither complements EcDsbA deletion mutants in E. coli nor interacts with EcDsbB, the redox partner of EcDsbA. The surface characteristics and redox profile of alpha-DsbA1 indicate that it probably plays a specialized oxidative folding role with a narrow substrate specificity. This first report of a Wolbachia protein structure provides the basis for future chemical genetics studies. PMID:19265485

  10. In vitro replication of mitochondrial plasmid mp1 from the higher plant Chenopodium album (L.): a remnant of bacterial rolling circle and conjugative plasmids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backert, S; Kunnimalaiyaan, M; Börner, T; Nielsen, B L

    1998-12-11

    According to the endosymbiotic theory, mitochondrial genomes evolved from the chromosome of an alpha-proteobacterium-like ancestor and developed during evolution an extraordinary variation in size, structure and replication. We studied in vitro DNA replication of the mitochondrial circular plasmid mp1 (1309 bp) from the higher plant Chenopodium album (L.) as a model system that replicates in a manner reminiscent of bacterial rolling circle plasmids. Several mp1 subclones were tested for their ability to support DNA replication using a newly developed in vitro system. Neutral/neutral two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the in vitro products revealed typical simple Y patterns of intermediates consistent with a rolling circle type of replication. Replication activity was very high for a BamHI-restricted total plasmid DNA clone, a 464 bp BamHI/KpnI fragment and a 363 bp BamHI/SmaI fragment. Further subcloning of a 148 bp BamHI/EcoRI fragment resulted in the strongest in vitro DNA replication activity, while a 1161 bp-template outside of this region resulted in a substantial loss of activity. Electron microscopic studies of in vitro DNA replication products from the highly active clones also revealed sigma-shaped molecules. These results support our in vivo data for the presence of a predominant replication origin between positions 628 and 776 on the plasmid map. This sequence shares homology with double-stranded rolling circle origin (dso) or transfer origin (oriT) nicking motifs from bacterial plasmids. mp1 is the first described rolling circle plasmid in eukaryotes. PMID:9837722

  11. Population Structures of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W; Liang, M; Guan, L; Xu, M; Wen, X; Deng, X; Chen, J

    2014-02-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly detrimental citrus disease associated with 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', a nonculturable alpha-proteobacterium. Characterization of the bacterial populations is important for development of disease management strategies. In this study, the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' populations in eight provinces in southern China where HLB is endemic were analyzed based on tandem repeat number (TRN) variations in a previously characterized genomic locus CLIBASIA_01645. Of the 224 HLB samples collected, 175 (78.3%) samples yielded single polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons (the single amplicon group, SAG) and 49 (21.7%) samples produced multiple PCR amplicons (the multiple amplicon group, MAG). Variations in SAG are summarized by Nei's diversity index (H) and ratio of TRN ≤ 10/TRN > 10 genotypes (R10). Variations in the MAG are described by the percentage of occurrence (PMAG). At an orchard-level comparison, the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' population from a Guangdong orchard (n = 24) showed H = 0.50, R10 = 23, and PMAG = 0, significantly different from that of the non-Guangdong orchards in Yunnan (n = 23), H = 0.83, R10 = 2.3, and PMAG = 11.5, and in Hainan (n = 35), H = 0.88, R10 = 1.5, and PMAG = 16.7. In a region-level consideration, the Guangdong 'Ca. L. asiaticus' population (n = 78) was H = 0.77, R10 = 25, and PMAG = 1.3, whereas the non-Guangdong population (n = 84) was H = 0.91, R10 = 1.6, and PMAG = 26.9. Overall, significant differences were observed between the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' population from Guangdong Province and those from the other provinces. A strong aggregation of TRN = 6, 7, and 8 genotypes is characteristic to the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' population in Guangdong. Referenced to genome annotation, we propose that rearrangement of tandem repeats at locus CLIBASIA_01645 could be associated with bacterial environmental adaptation. PMID:24093922

  12. The complete genome sequence of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', the bacterium associated with potato zebra chip disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lin

    Full Text Available Zebra Chip (ZC is an emerging plant disease that causes aboveground decline of potato shoots and generally results in unusable tubers. This disease has led to multi-million dollar losses for growers in the central and western United States over the past decade and impacts the livelihood of potato farmers in Mexico and New Zealand. ZC is associated with 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', a fastidious alpha-proteobacterium that is transmitted by a phloem-feeding psyllid vector, Bactericera cockerelli Sulc. Research on this disease has been hampered by a lack of robust culture methods and paucity of genome sequence information for 'Ca. L. solanacearum'. Here we present the sequence of the 1.26 Mbp metagenome of 'Ca. L. solanacearum', based on DNA isolated from potato psyllids. The coding inventory of the 'Ca. L. solanacearum' genome was analyzed and compared to related Rhizobiaceae to better understand 'Ca. L. solanacearum' physiology and identify potential targets to develop improved treatment strategies. This analysis revealed a number of unique transporters and pathways, all potentially contributing to ZC pathogenesis. Some of these factors may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Taxonomically, 'Ca. L. solanacearum' is related to 'Ca. L. asiaticus', a suspected causative agent of citrus huanglongbing, yet many genome rearrangements and several gene gains/losses are evident when comparing these two Liberibacter. species. Relative to 'Ca. L. asiaticus', 'Ca. L. solanacearum' probably has reduced capacity for nucleic acid modification, increased amino acid and vitamin biosynthesis functionalities, and gained a high-affinity iron transport system characteristic of several pathogenic microbes.

  13. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-15

    Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)] over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the “fines” fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  14. Screening a wide host-range, waste-water metagenomic library in tryptophan auxotrophs of Rhizobium leguminosarum and of Escherichia coli reveals different classes of cloned trp genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youguo; Wexler, Margaret; Richardson, David J; Bond, Philip L; Johnston, Andrew W B

    2005-12-01

    A metagenomic cosmid library was constructed, in which the insert DNA was derived from bacteria in a waste-water treatment plant and the vector was the wide host-range cosmid pLAFR3. The library was screened for clones that could correct defined tryptophan auxotrophs of the alpha-proteobacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum and of Escherichia coli. A total of 26 different cosmids that corrected at least one trp mutant in one or both of these species were obtained. Several cosmids corrected the auxotrophy of one or more R. leguminosarum trp mutants, but not the corresponding mutants in E. coli. Conversely, one cosmid corrected trpA, B, C, D and E mutants of E. coli but none of the trp mutants of R. leguminosarum. Two of the Trp+ cosmids were examined in more detail. One contained a trp operon that resembled that of the pathogen Chlamydophila caviae, containing the unusual kynU gene, which specifies kynureninase. The other, whose trp genes functioned in R. leguminosarum but not in E. coli, contained trpDCFBA in an operon that is likely co-transcribed with five other genes, most of which had no known link with tryptophan synthesis. The sequences of these TRP proteins, and the products of nine other genes encoded by this cosmid, failed to affiliate them with any known bacterial lineage. For one metagenomic cosmid, lac reporter fusions confirmed that its cloned trp genes were transcribed in R. leguminosarum, but not in E. coli. Thus, rhizobia, with their many sigma-factors, may be well-suited hosts for metagenomic libraries, cloned in wide host-range vectors. PMID:16309391

  15. Molecular characterization of a mosaic locus in the genome of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xuefeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huanglongbing (HLB is a highly destructive disease of citrus production worldwide. 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', an unculturable alpha proteobacterium, is a putative pathogen of HLB. Information about the biology and strain diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is currently limited, inhibiting the scope of HLB research and control. Results A genomic region (CLIBASIA_05640 to CLIBASIA_05650 of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' showing hyper-sequence variation or locus mosaicism was identified and investigated using 262 bacterial strains (188 from China and 74 from Florida. Based on the characteristic electrophoretic profiles of PCR amplicons generated by a specific primer set, eight electrophoretic types (E-types were identified, six E-types (A, B, C, D, E, and F in China and four E-types (A, C, G, and H in Florida. The 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains from China consisted predominately of E-type A (71.3% and E-type B (19.7%. In contrast, the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains from Florida was predominated by E-type G (82.4%. Diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in China was also evidenced. Strains from the high altitude Yunnan Province consisted of five E-types with E-type B being the majority (62.8%, whereas strains from the low altitude coastal Guangdong Province consisted of only two E-types with E-type A as the majority (97.0%. Sequence analyses revealed that variation of DNA amplicons was due to insertion/deletion events at CLIBASIA_05650 and the downstream intergenic region. Conclusions This study demonstrated the genomic mosaicism of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' resulted from active DNA insertion/deletion activities. Analyses of strain variation depicted the significant inter- and intra-continent diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus'.

  16. Twenty-One Genome Sequences from Pseudomonas Species and 19 Genome Sequences from Diverse Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere and Endosphere of Populus deltoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Martin, Stanton [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    To aid in the investigation of the Populus deltoides microbiome we generated draft genome sequences for twenty one Pseudomonas and twenty one other diverse bacteria isolated from Populus deltoides roots. Genome sequences for isolates similar to Acidovorax, Bradyrhizobium, Brevibacillus, Burkholderia, Caulobacter, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Novosphingobium, Pantoea, Phyllobacterium, Polaromonas, Rhizobium, Sphingobium and Variovorax were generated.

  17. AcEST: DK943627 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tor SUI1 homolog OS=... 39 0.008 sp|Q9QZW9|MNX1_MOUSE Motor neuron and pancreas homeobox protein ... 31 1.7 ...n protein ftsZ OS=Caulobacter c... 30 2.9 sp|P50219|MNX1_HUMAN Motor neuron and p

  18. System-level design of bacterial cell cycle control

    OpenAIRE

    McAdams, Harley H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the cell cycle control logic in Caulobacter has progressed to the point where we now have an integrated view of the operation of an entire bacterial cell cycle system functioning as a state machine. Oscillating levels of a few temporally-controlled master regulator proteins in a cyclical circuit drive cell cycle progression. To a striking degree, the cell cycle regulation is a whole cell phenomenon. Phospho-signaling proteins and proteases dynamically deployed to specific loc...

  19. Identification of a bacteria-like ferrochelatase in Strongyloides venezuelensis, an animal parasitic nematode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Nagayasu

    Full Text Available Heme is an essential molecule for vast majority of organisms serving as a prosthetic group for various hemoproteins. Although most organisms synthesize heme from 5-aminolevulinic acid through a conserved heme biosynthetic pathway composed of seven consecutive enzymatic reactions, nematodes are known to be natural heme auxotrophs. The completely sequenced Caenorhabditis elegans genome, for example, lacks all seven genes for heme biosynthesis. However, genome/transcriptome sequencing of Strongyloides venezuelensis, an important model nematode species for studying human strongyloidiasis, indicated the presence of a gene for ferrochelatase (FeCH, which catalyzes the terminal step of heme biosynthesis, whereas the other six heme biosynthesis genes are apparently missing. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that nematode FeCH genes, including that of S. venezuelensis (SvFeCH have a fundamentally different evolutionally origin from the FeCH genes of non-nematode metazoa. Although all non-nematode metazoan FeCH genes appear to be inherited vertically from an ancestral opisthokont, nematode FeCH may have been acquired from an alpha-proteobacterium, horizontally. The identified SvFeCH sequence was found to function as FeCH as expected based on both in vitro chelatase assays using recombinant SvFeCH and in vivo complementation experiments using an FeCH-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Messenger RNA expression levels during the S. venezuelensis lifecycle were examined by real-time RT-PCR. SvFeCH mRNA was expressed at all the stages examined with a marked reduction at the infective third-stage larvae. Our study demonstrates the presence of a bacteria-like FeCH gene in the S. venezuelensis genome. It appeared that S. venezuelensis and some other animal parasitic nematodes reacquired the once-lost FeCH gene. Although the underlying evolutionary pressures that necessitated this reacquisition remain to be investigated, it is interesting that the presence of Fe

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09445-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fisffsfpskislqlgdr***nyfikiffk kkkikkkhgksi*k******y*niksifk*knk*ir*fcisiri...rvqynhdtiliihyis--- ---FFVFLFFCSFFFLFFXYKIKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK Frame C: dfshphfifflkfyffyfnflfffsflfffsfhffhflrkylcn*eidnnkiil*kff... CAWZ13685.fwd CAWZ Helobdella robusta Primary Lat... 40 0.006 2 ( AM449950 ) Vitis vinifera contig VV78X030...d:none) Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifo... 65 2e-09 CP000927_3597( CP000927 |pid:none) Caulobacter sp. K31...09 CP000491_527( CP000491 |pid:none) Paracoccus denitrificans PD1222 ... 64 4e-09 CP000439_968( CP000439 |pi

  1. AcEST: BP917236 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e: Altschul, Stephen F., Thomas L. Madden, Alejandro A. Schaffer, Jinghui Zhang, Zheng Zhang, Webb Miller..., and David J. Lipman (1997), Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein databas...Y2965_CAUCR UPF0339 protein CC_2965 OS=Caulobacter cre... 29 8.2 sp|Q04AM0|FTHS_LACDB Forma...te--tetrahydrofolate ligase OS=Lactoba... 29 8.2 sp|Q1GA94|FTHS_LACDA Formate--tetrahydrofolate ligas...29 TEGYASKASAKNAIESIKKNGPEAEIDDQTD 59 >sp|Q04AM0|FTHS_LACDB Formate--tetrahydrofolate ligase OS=Lactobacillu

  2. Low Earth orbit journey and ground simulations studies point out metabolic changes in the ESA life support organism Rhodospirillum rubrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroleo, Felice; Leys, Natalie; Benotmane, Rafi; Vanhavere, Filip; Janssen, Ann; Hendrickx, Larissa; Wattiez, Ruddy; Mergeay, Max

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a project of closed regenerative life support system for future space flights developed by the European Space Agency. It consists of interconnected processes (i.e. bioreactors, higher plant compartments, filtration units,..) targeting the total recycling of organic waste into oxygen, water and food. Within the MELiSSA loop, the purple non-sulfur alpha-proteobacterium R. rubrum ATCC25903 is used to convert fatty acids released from the upstream raw waste digesting reactor to CO2 and biomass, and to complete the mineralization of aminoacids into NH4+ that will be forwarded to the nitrifying compartment. Among the numerous challenges of the project, the functional stability of the bioreactors in long term and under space flight conditions is of paramount importance for the efficiency of the life support system and consequently the crew safety. Therefore, the physiological and metabolic changes induced by space flight were investigated for R. rubrum. The bacterium grown on solid medium during 2 different 10-day space flights to the ISS (MES- SAGE2, BASE-A experiments) were compared to cells grown on Earth 1 g gravity or modeled microgravity and normal Earth radiation or simulated space flight radiation conditions in order to relate each single stress to its respective cellular response. For simulating the radiation environment, pure gamma and neutron sources were combined, while simulation of changes in gravity where performed using the Random Positioning Machine technology. Transcriptome analysis using R. rubrum total genome DNA-chip showed up-regulation of genes involved in oxidative stress response after a 10-day mission inside the ISS, without loss of viability. As an example, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, thioredoxin reductase and bacterioferritin genes are least 2 fold induced although the radiation dose experienced by the bacterium (4 mSv) is very low compared to its radiotolerance (D10 = 100 Sv

  3. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Laub

    2008-12-29

    Our team of investigators from MIT (Michael Laub) and Stanford (Harley McAdams and Lucy Shapiro) conducted a multi-faceted, systematic experimental analysis of the 106 Caulobacter two-component signal transduction system proteins (62 histidine kinases and 44 response regulators) to understand how they coordinate cell cycle progression, metabolism, and response to environmental changes. These two-component signaling proteins were characterized at the genetic, biochemical, and genomic levels. The results generated by our laboratories have provided numerous insights into how Caulobacter cells sense and respond to a myriad of signals. As nearly all bacteria use two-component signaling for cell regulation, the results from this project help to deepen our general understanding of bacterial signal transduction. The tools and approaches developed can be applied to other bacteria. In particular, work from the Laub laboratory now enables the systematic, rational rewiring of two-component signaling proteins, a major advance that stands to impact synthetic biology and the development of biosensors and other designer molecular circuits. Results are summarized from our work. Each section lists publications and publicly-available resources which result from the work described.

  4. AcEST: DK959581 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes...7 tr|B4B111|B4B111_9CHRO Membrane-associated zinc metalloprotease ... 91 7e-17 tr|Q10ZE4|Q10ZE4_TRIEI YUP8H12.25 ((Arabidopsis thal...ase mmpA OS=Caulobacter crescen... 57 1e-07 sp|Q9KA70|RASP_BACHD Zinc metalloprotease rasP OS=Bacillus halo...bjct: 64 YCG 66 >sp|Q5L0J5|RASP_GEOKA Zinc metalloprotease rasP OS=Geobacillus kaustophilus GN=rasP PE=3 SV=1 Length...680 Definition Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST39A01NGRL0005_B11. 5' end sequence. Accession DK959581 Tissue type prothall

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11264-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7 2e-06 CP001053_1582( CP001053 |pid:none) Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN ... 57 2e-06 AE005673_1559( AE005673 |pid:none) Caulobacter...681_1571( AM398681 |pid:none) Flavobacterium psychrophilum JI... 94 2e-17 AY458631_5( AY458631 |pid:none) Uncultured marine bacteri...1_647( CP000781 |pid:none) Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2, ... 75 1e-11 CP000360_4038( CP000360 |pid:none) Acidobacteria bacteri... CP000497 |pid:none) Pichia stipitis CBS 6054 chromosom... 67 4e-11 AP009386_1248( AP009386 |pid:none) Burkholderia mult...... 63 3e-08 DQ077738_2( DQ077738 |pid:none) Uncultured bacterium clone pLR1 pu... 63 3e-08 BX

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15680-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s) Database: CSM 8402 sequences; 8,075,542 total letters Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value Cont...AM270075_67( AM270075 |pid:none) Aspergillus niger contig An04c014... 209 e-104 T29637( T29637 ) hypothetical protein F49E8.3 - Caen...3e-79 BC059334_1( BC059334 |pid:none) Xenopus laevis hypothetical protei... 174 7e-79 CP000927_3( CP000927 |pid:none) Caulobacter...Sulfolobus islandicus Y.G.57.14... 132 6e-62 CP000414_448( CP000414 |pid:none) Leuconostoc mesenteroides sub... BT010001 |pid:none) Drosophila melanogaster RE31064 fu... 80 4e-15 T29564( T29564 )hypothetical protein T12E12.6 - Caen

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13457-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s; 5,674,871 total letters Score E Sequences producing significant alignment...nicola strain ... 150 4e-44 D83379_1( D83379 |pid:none) Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus mRNA for re... 159 4e-44 ( P07278 ) RecName: Full...57 2e-09 CP000613_484( CP000613 |pid:none) Rhodospirillum centenum SW, comp... 66...2( CP001193 |pid:none) Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trif... 50 2e-04 AE005673_1405( AE005673 |pid:none) Caulobacter crescent...=cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II reg... 150 7e-38 AY387673_1( AY387673 |pid:none) Aplysia californica

  8. Biodiversity characterization of cellulolytic bacteria present on native Chaco soil by comparison of ribosomal RNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, Paola; Sede, Silvana M; Campos, Eleonora; Rorig, Marcela; Principi, Dario; Tosto, Daniela; Hopp, H Esteban; Grasso, Daniel; Cataldi, Angel

    2012-04-01

    Sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was used to study bacterial diversity of a pristine forest soil and of two cultures of the same soil enriched with cellulolytic bacteria. Our analysis revealed high bacterial diversity in the native soil sample, evidencing at least 10 phyla, in which Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria accounted for more than 76% of all sequences. In both enriched samples, members of Proteobacteria were the most frequently represented. The majority of bacterial genera in both enriched samples were identified as Brevundimonas and Caulobacter, but members of Devosia, Sphingomonas, Variovorax, Acidovorax, Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter and Delftia were also found. In addition, it was possible to identify cellulolytic taxa such as Acidothermus, Micromonospora, Streptomyces, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas, which indicates that this ecosystem could be an attractive source for study of novel enzymes for cellulose degradation. PMID:22202170

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15214-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e) Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae... 107 4e-22 CP000927_3202( CP000927 |pid:none) Cau...lobacter sp. K31, complete g... 107 4e-22 CP000569_1501( CP000569 |pid:none) Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae...000687_1497( CP000687 |pid:none) Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae... 107 6e-22 (Q9...P001098_708( CP001098 |pid:none) Halothermothrix orenii H 168, co... 104 4e-21 (Q8RQM6) RecName: Full=Diaminopim... 83 9e-15 AE017283_1241( AE017283 |pid:none) Propionibacterium acnes KPA1712... 83 9e-15 (Q9X5M1) RecName: Full=Diaminopim

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16394-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e) Ralstonia pickettii 12D chromoso... 61 2e-07 CP001087_4453( CP001087 |pid:non... 2e-07 CP001069_1086( CP001069 |pid:none) Ralstonia pickettii 12J chromos... 61 2...28158_890( CU928158 |pid:none) Escherichia fergusonii ATCC 3546... 55 1e-05 AJ011832_1( AJ011832 |pid:none) Yersini...e) Caulobacter sp. K31, complete g... 55 1e-05 CP000720_2725( CP000720 |pid:none) Yersinia pseudotuberculosi...s IP ... 55 1e-05 AM260480_2064( AM260480 |pid:none) Ralstonia eutropha H16 chromoso... 55 1e-05 AE017

  11. AcEST: DK952721 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 21|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: TST38A01NGRL0014_N22, 5' (441 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fas...Definition tr|B0SUQ9|B0SUQ9_CAUSK Acriflavin resistance protein OS=Caulobacter sp. (strain K31) Align length..._hit_id Q6NH62 Definition sp|Q6NH62|ACNR_CORDI HTH-type transcriptional repr...NR_CORDI HTH-type transcriptional repressor acnR OS=... 34 0.30 sp|Q71F56|MD13L_HUMAN Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcri... OS=Echinococcus granulosus GN=T... 29 9.8 sp|Q92835|SHIP1_HUMAN Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate 5... 29 10.0 >sp

  12. Phylosenetic identification and microbial diversity in snow of the summit (8201 m) of Cho Oyu Mountain,Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG XiaoMei; WANG Jian; CHEN Fang; YU Jun; HUA Sang; ASAN Ciren; LUOSANG JiangBai; WANG Wei; YU Liang; ZHENG XiaoGuang

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial diversity and abundance in snow of the summit (8201 m) of Cho Oyu mountain, Tibet,were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing followed by scanning electronic microscopy analysis. Most of bacteria were found to be of spherical or oval shape (>95%). Bacterial 16S rDNA sequences were classified into 5 genera (Caulobacter, Ralstonia, Cupriavidus, Pelomonas and Pseudornonas).Gammaproteobacteria were the most abundant (91.25%) among the library that consists of 594 clones. The sequences found in this study are highly similar to those previously retrieved from other cold en-vironments, such as ice core, sea ice, permafrost and snow. The results showed that the cold and barren environments strongly influence the survival of bacteria. The high similarity among sequences retrieved from snow sample and other places, such as ocean, soil and water, suggested that the bacte-ria in snow, soil and water environments have the same origin.

  13. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized 1 from citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rDNA microarray and 16S rDNA clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria from 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs while 20 orders from phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs compared to asymptomatic midribs. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants, but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis was further verified by sequencing 16S rDNA clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of Las in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate Las as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. Citrus is the most important commercial fruit crop in Florida. In recent years, citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also called citrus greening, has severely affected Florida's citrus production and hence has drawn an enormous amount of attention. HLB is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus (6,13), characterized by blotchy mottling with green islands on leaves, as well as stunting, fruit decline, and small, lopsided fruits with poor coloration. The disease tends to be associated with a phloem-limited fastidious {alpha}-proteobacterium given a provisional Candidatus status (Candidatus Liberobacter spp. later changed to Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) in nomenclature (18,25,34). Previous studies indicate that HLB infection causes disorder in the phloem and severely impairs the translocation of assimilates in

  14. Microbial nitrogen cycling in Arctic snowpacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arctic snowpacks are often considered as chemical reactors for a variety of chemicals deposited through wet and dry events, but are overlooked as potential sites for microbial metabolism of reactive nitrogen species. The fate of deposited species is critical since warming leads to the transfer of contaminants to snowmelt-fed ecosystems. Here, we examined the role of microorganisms and the potential pathways involved in nitrogen cycling in the snow. Next generation sequencing data were used to follow functional gene abundances and a 16S rRNA (ribosomal ribonucleic acid) gene microarray was used to follow shifts in microbial community structure during a two-month spring-time field study at a high Arctic site, Svalbard, Norway (79° N). We showed that despite the low temperatures and limited water supply, microbial communities inhabiting the snow cover demonstrated dynamic shifts in their functional potential to follow several different pathways of the nitrogen cycle. In addition, microbial specific phylogenetic probes tracked different nitrogen species over time. For example, probes for Roseomonas tracked nitrate concentrations closely and probes for Caulobacter tracked ammonium concentrations after a delay of one week. Nitrogen cycling was also shown to be a dominant process at the base of the snowpack. (letter)

  15. [Qualitative and quantitative determination of bacterial populations in an aquatic environment. 7. Development of bacterial growth on raw materials exposed to potable water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dott, W; Schoenen, D

    1985-05-01

    Refined steel plates coated with different materials that contained available organic compounds led to a microbial growth on the surface. Even plastics and bitumen which were used in the sphere of drinking water showed after an exposure time of three months up to 192 ml slime per square meter. The number of viable bacteria within the Aufwuchs was in the range of 10(7) cfu/ml. The production of slime increased with time. The relation of carbohydrate and protein content significantly changed from 2 at the beginning to 30 after 12 months of incubation the bitumen coating test plates. This indicates an increase synthesis of carbohydrate containing extracellular polymeric substances during the late phase of growth. The bacteria isolated from the Aufwuchs mainly belonged to the genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Acinetobacter, Caulobacter, sheated bacteria and other gramnegative physiologically nonreactiv roads. During exposure of the plates the relation changed within the bacterial communities of the main groups. Comparing the bacteria communities of inlet and outflow water it became evident that the later one was influenced by bacteria of the Aufwuchs. PMID:4024773

  16. Crude oil treatment leads to shift of bacterial communities in soils from the deep active layer and upper permafrost along the China-Russia Crude Oil Pipeline route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizhong Yang

    Full Text Available The buried China-Russia Crude Oil Pipeline (CRCOP across the permafrost-associated cold ecosystem in northeastern China carries a risk of contamination to the deep active layers and upper permafrost in case of accidental rupture of the embedded pipeline or migration of oil spills. As many soil microbes are capable of degrading petroleum, knowledge about the intrinsic degraders and the microbial dynamics in the deep subsurface could extend our understanding of the application of in-situ bioremediation. In this study, an experiment was conducted to investigate the bacterial communities in response to simulated contamination to deep soil samples by using 454 pyrosequencing amplicons. The result showed that bacterial diversity was reduced after 8-weeks contamination. A shift in bacterial community composition was apparent in crude oil-amended soils with Proteobacteria (esp. α-subdivision being the dominant phylum, together with Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The contamination led to enrichment of indigenous bacterial taxa like Novosphingobium, Sphingobium, Caulobacter, Phenylobacterium, Alicylobacillus and Arthrobacter, which are generally capable of degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The community shift highlighted the resilience of PAH degraders and their potential for in-situ degradation of crude oil under favorable conditions in the deep soils.

  17. Comparison of reversible-jump Markov-chain-Monte-Carlo learning approach with other methods for missing enzyme identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Bo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Zhu, Jinmin; Hung, Y S; Wong, Stephen T C

    2008-04-01

    Computational identification of missing enzymes plays a significant role in accurate and complete reconstruction of metabolic network for both newly sequenced and well-studied organisms. For a metabolic reaction, given a set of candidate enzymes identified according to certain biological evidences, a powerful mathematical model is required to predict the actual enzyme(s) catalyzing the reactions. In this study, several plausible predictive methods are considered for the classification problem in missing enzyme identification, and comparisons are performed with an aim to identify a method with better performance than the Bayesian model used in previous work. In particular, a regression model consisting of a linear term and a nonlinear term is proposed to apply to the problem, in which the reversible jump Markov-chain-Monte-Carlo (MCMC) learning technique (developed in [Andrieu C, Freitas Nando de, Doucet A. Robust full Bayesian learning for radial basis networks 2001;13:2359-407.]) is adopted to estimate the model order and the parameters. We evaluated the models using known reactions in Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Vibrio cholerae and Caulobacter cresentus bacteria, as well as one eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. Although support vector regression also exhibits comparable performance in this application, it was demonstrated that the proposed model achieves favorable prediction performance, particularly sensitivity, compared with the Bayesian method. PMID:17950040

  18. Isolation and characterization of culturable seed-associated bacterial endophytes from gnotobiotically grown Marama bean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimwamurombe, Percy Maruwa; Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Marama bean (Tylosema esculentum) is an indigenous non-nodulating legume to the arid agro-ecological parts of Southern Africa. It is a staple food for the Khoisan and Bantu people from these areas. It is intriguing how it is able to synthesize the high-protein content in the seeds since its natural habitat is nitrogen deficient. The aim of the study was to determine the presence of seed transmittable bacterial endophytes that may have growth promoting effects, which may be particularly important for the harsh conditions. Marama bean seeds were surface sterilized and gnotobiotically grown to 2 weeks old seedlings. From surface-sterilized shoots and roots, 123 distinct bacterial isolates were cultured using three media, and identified by BOX-PCR fingerprinting and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes. Phylogenetic analyses of 73 putative endophytes assigned them to bacterial species from 14 genera including Proteobacteria (Rhizobium, Massilia, Kosakonia, Pseudorhodoferax, Caulobacter, Pantoea, Sphingomonas, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium), Firmicutes (Bacillus), Actinobacteria (Curtobacterium, Microbacterium) and Bacteroidetes (Mucilaginibacter, Chitinophaga). Screening for plant growth-promoting activities revealed that the isolates showed production of IAA, ACC deaminase, siderophores, endoglucanase, protease, AHLs and capacities to solubilize phosphate and fix nitrogen. This is the first report that marama bean seeds may harbor endophytes that can be cultivated from seedlings; in this community of bacteria, physiological characteristics that are potentially plant growth promoting are widespread. PMID:27118727

  19. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Peptide F1 against Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jianyin; Chen, Feilong; Duan, Shan; Gao, Xiangyang; Liu, Guo; Chen, Yunjiao; Dixon, William; Xiao, Hang; Cao, Yong

    2015-08-19

    Antimicrobial peptides have received increasing attention in the agricultural and food industries due to their potential to control pathogens. However, to facilitate the development of novel peptide-based antimicrobial agents, details regarding the molecular mechanisms of these peptides need to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial mechanism of peptide F1, a bacteriocin found in Tibetan kefir, against Escherichia coli at protein levels using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. In response to treatment with peptide F1, 31 of the 280 identified proteins in E. coli showed alterations in their expression, including 10 down-regulated proteins and 21 up-regulated proteins. These 31 proteins all possess different molecular functions and are involved in different molecular pathways, as is evident in referencing the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Specifically, pathways that were significantly altered in E. coli in response to peptide F1 treatment include the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and the cell cycle-caulobacter pathways, which was also associated with inhibition of the cell growth, induction of morphological changes, and cell death. The results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides. PMID:26208148

  20. Characterization of bacterial communities associated with Brassica napus L. growing on a Zn-contaminated soil and their effects on root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbán, Blanca; Croes, Sarah; Weyens, Nele; Lobo, M Carmen; Pérez-Sanz, Araceli; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) and plants can enhance biomass production and metal tolerance of the host plants. This work aimed at isolating and characterizing the cultivable bacterial community associated with Brassica napus growing on a Zn-contaminated site, for selecting cultivable PGPB that might enhance biomass production and metal tolerance of energy crops. The effects of some of these bacterial strains on root growth of B. napus exposed to increasing Zn and Cd concentrations were assessed. A total of 426 morphologically different bacterial strains were isolated from the soil, the rhizosphere, and the roots and stems of B. napus. The diversity of the isolated bacterial populations was similar in rhizosphere and roots, but lower in soil and stem compartments. Burkoholderia, Alcaligenes, Agrococcus, Polaromonas, Stenotrophomonas, Serratia, Microbacterium, and Caulobacter were found as root endophytes exclusively. The inoculation of seeds with Pseudomonas sp. strains 228 and 256, and Serratia sp. strain 246 facilitated the root development of B. napus at 1,000 µM Zn. Arthrobacter sp. strain 222, Serratia sp. strain 246, and Pseudomonas sp. 228 and 262 increased the root length at 300 µM Cd. PMID:27159736

  1. Indigenous bacteria may interfere with the biocontrol of plant diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Nobutaka; Akutsu, Katsumi

    2009-06-01

    Prodigiosin is a reddish antibiotic pigment that plays an important role in the biocontrol of plant diseases by the bacterium Serratia marcescens. However, its activity is unstable under agricultural conditions; further, it can be degraded by various environmental factors. To examine the effect of epiphytic microbes on the stability of prodigiosin used for biological control processes, we collected a total of 1,280 bacterial isolates from the phylloplane of cyclamen and tomato plants. Approximately 72% of the bacterial strains isolated from the cyclamen plants and 66% of those isolated from the tomato plants grew on minimal agar medium containing 100 μg ml-1 prodigiosin. Certain isolates obtained from both plant species exhibited prodigiosin-degrading activity. We compared the 16S rRNA gene sequences derived from the isolates with sequences in a database. The comparison revealed that the sequences determined for the prodigiosin-degrading isolates were homologous to those of the genera Pseudomonas, Caulobacter, Rhizobium, Sphingomonas, Janthinobacterium, Novosphingobium, and Rathayibacter. These results indicate that indigenous epiphytic microorganisms may interfere with the interaction between plant pathogens and biocontrol agents by degrading the antibiotics produced by the agents.

  2. Identification and characterization of metabolic properties of bacterial populations recovered from arsenic contaminated ground water of North East India (Assam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soma; Sar, Pinaki

    2013-12-01

    Diversity of culturable bacterial populations within the Arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater of North Eastern state (Assam) of India is studied. From nine As contaminated samples 89 bacterial strains are isolated. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis reveals predominance of Brevundimonas (35%) and Acidovorax (23%) along with Acinetobacter (10%), Pseudomonas (9%) and relatively less abundant (<5%) Undibacterium, Herbaspirillum, Rhodococcus, Staphylococcus, Bosea, Bacillus, Ralstonia, Caulobacter and Rhizobiales members. High As(III) resistance (MTC 10-50 mM) is observed for the isolates obtained from As(III) enrichment, particularly for 3 isolates of genus Brevundimonas (MTC 50 mM). In contrast, high resistance to As(V) (MTC as high as 550 mM) is present as a ubiquitous property, irrespective of isolates' enrichment condition. Bacterial genera affiliated to other groups showed relatively lower degree of As resistance [MTCs of 15-20 mM As(III) and 250-350 mM As(V)]. As(V) reductase activity is detected in strains with high As(V) as well as As(III) resistance. A strong correlation could be established among isolates capable of reductase activity and siderophore production as well as As(III) tolerance. A large number of isolates (nearly 50%) is capable of anaerobic respiration using alternate inorganic electron acceptors [As(V), Se(VI), Fe(III), [NO(3)(2), SO(4)(2), S(2)O(3)(2). Ability to utilize different carbon sources ranging from C2-C6 compounds along with some complex sugars is also observed. Particularly, a number of strains is found to possess ability to grow chemolithotrophically using As(III) as the electron donor. The study reports for the first time the identity and metabolic abilities of bacteria in As contaminated ground water of North East India, useful to elucidate the microbial role in influencing mobilization of As in the region. PMID:24210546

  3. Efficacy of Various Chemical Disinfectants on Biofilms Formed in Spacecraft Potable Water System Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Willy; Garcia, Veronica; Castro, Victoria; Ott, Mark; Duane

    2009-01-01

    As the provision of potable water is critical for successful habitation of the International Space Station (ISS), life support systems were installed in December 2008 to recycle both humidity from the atmosphere and urine to conserve available water in the vehicle. Pre-consumption testing from the dispensing needle at the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) indicated that bacterial concentrations exceeded the current ISS specifications of 50 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Subsequent investigations revealed that a corrugated stainless steel flex hose upstream of the dispensing needle in the PWD was filled with non-sterile water and left at room temperature for over one month before launch. To simulate biofilm formation that was suspected in the flight system, sterile flex hoses were seeded with a consortium of bacterial isolates previously recovered from other ISS water systems, which included Ralstonia pickettii, Burkholderia multivorans, Caulobacter vibrioides., and Cupriavidus pauculus. After 5 days of incubation, these hoses were challenged with various chemical disinfectants including hydrogen peroxide, colloidal silver, and buffered pH solutions to determine the ability of the disinfectants to decrease and maintain bacterial concentrations below ISS specifications. Disinfection efficacy over time was measured by collecting daily heterotrophic plate counts following exposure to the disinfectants. A single flush with either 6% hydrogen peroxide solution or a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide and 400 ppb colloidal silver effectively reduced the bacterial concentrations to less than 1 CFU/ml for a period of up to 2 months. Testing results indicated that hydrogen peroxide and mixtures of hydrogen peroxide and colloidal silver have tremendous potential as alternative disinfectants for ISS water systems.

  4. Bacterial Colonization of Cod (Gadus morhua L.) and Halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) Eggs in Marine Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Geir Høvik; Olafsen, Jan A.

    1989-01-01

    Aquaculture has brought about increased interest in mass production of marine fish larvae. Problems such as poor egg quality and mass mortality of fish larvae have been prevalent. The intensive incubation techniques that often result in bacterial overgrowth on fish eggs could affect the commensal relationship between the indigenous microflora and opportunistic pathogens and subsequently hamper egg development, hatching, larval health, and ongrowth. Little information about the adherent microflora on fish eggs is available, and the present study was undertaken to describe the microbial ecology during egg development and hatching of two fish species of potential commercial importance in marine aquaculture. Attachment and development of the bacterial flora on cod (Gadus morhua L.) eggs from fertilization until hatching was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The adherent microflora on cod (G. morhua L.) and halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) eggs during incubation was characterized and grouped by cluster analysis. Marked bacterial growth could be demonstrated 2 h after fertilization, and at hatching eggs were heavily overgrown. Members of the genera Pseudomonas, Alteromonas, Aeromonas, and Flavobacterium were found to dominate on the surface of both cod and halibut eggs. The filamentous bacterium Leucothrix mucor was found on eggs from both species. While growth of L. mucor on halibut eggs was sparse, cod eggs with a hairy appearance due to overgrowth by this bacterium close to hatching were frequently observed. Vibrio fischeri could be detected on cod eggs only, and pathogenic vibrios were not detected. Members of the genera Moraxella and Alcaligenes were found only on halibut eggs. Caulobacter and Seliberia spp. were observed attached to eggs dissected from cod ovaries under sterile conditions, indicating the presence of these bacteria in ovaries before spawning. Adherent strains did not demonstrate antibiotic resistance above a normal level. Attempts to

  5. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Katrina L; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  6. Anterior foregut microbiota of the glassy-winged sharpshooter explored using deep 16S rRNA gene sequencing from individual insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E Rogers

    Full Text Available The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS is an invasive insect species that transmits Xylella fastidiosa, the bacterium causing Pierce's disease of grapevine and other leaf scorch diseases. X. fastidiosa has been shown to colonize the anterior foregut (cibarium and precibarium of sharpshooters, where it may interact with other naturally-occurring bacterial species. To evaluate such interactions, a comprehensive list of bacterial species associated with the sharpshooter cibarium and precibarium is needed. Here, a survey of microbiota associated with the GWSS anterior foregut was conducted. Ninety-six individual GWSS, 24 from each of 4 locations (Bakersfield, CA; Ojai, CA; Quincy, FL; and a laboratory colony, were characterized for bacteria in dissected sharpshooter cibaria and precibaria by amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene using Illumina MiSeq technology. An average of approximately 150,000 sequence reads were obtained per insect. The most common genus detected was Wolbachia; sequencing of the Wolbachia ftsZ gene placed this strain in supergroup B, one of two Wolbachia supergroups most commonly associated with arthropods. X. fastidiosa was detected in all 96 individuals examined. By multilocus sequence typing, both X. fastidiosa subspecies fastidiosa and subspecies sandyi were present in GWSS from California and the colony; only subspecies fastidiosa was detected in GWSS from Florida. In addition to Wolbachia and X. fastidiosa, 23 other bacterial genera were detected at or above an average incidence of 0.1%; these included plant-associated microbes (Methylobacterium, Sphingomonas, Agrobacterium, and Ralstonia and soil- or water-associated microbes (Anoxybacillus, Novosphingobium, Caulobacter, and Luteimonas. Sequences belonging to species of the family Enterobacteriaceae also were detected but it was not possible to assign these to individual genera. Many of these species likely interact with X. fastidiosa in the

  7. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina L Callender

    Full Text Available Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI, and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas, metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude and mineralization (five-fold. Genomic techniques proved useful in

  8. Anterior foregut microbiota of the glassy-winged sharpshooter explored using deep 16S rRNA gene sequencing from individual insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Elizabeth E; Backus, Elaine A

    2014-01-01

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) is an invasive insect species that transmits Xylella fastidiosa, the bacterium causing Pierce's disease of grapevine and other leaf scorch diseases. X. fastidiosa has been shown to colonize the anterior foregut (cibarium and precibarium) of sharpshooters, where it may interact with other naturally-occurring bacterial species. To evaluate such interactions, a comprehensive list of bacterial species associated with the sharpshooter cibarium and precibarium is needed. Here, a survey of microbiota associated with the GWSS anterior foregut was conducted. Ninety-six individual GWSS, 24 from each of 4 locations (Bakersfield, CA; Ojai, CA; Quincy, FL; and a laboratory colony), were characterized for bacteria in dissected sharpshooter cibaria and precibaria by amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene using Illumina MiSeq technology. An average of approximately 150,000 sequence reads were obtained per insect. The most common genus detected was Wolbachia; sequencing of the Wolbachia ftsZ gene placed this strain in supergroup B, one of two Wolbachia supergroups most commonly associated with arthropods. X. fastidiosa was detected in all 96 individuals examined. By multilocus sequence typing, both X. fastidiosa subspecies fastidiosa and subspecies sandyi were present in GWSS from California and the colony; only subspecies fastidiosa was detected in GWSS from Florida. In addition to Wolbachia and X. fastidiosa, 23 other bacterial genera were detected at or above an average incidence of 0.1%; these included plant-associated microbes (Methylobacterium, Sphingomonas, Agrobacterium, and Ralstonia) and soil- or water-associated microbes (Anoxybacillus, Novosphingobium, Caulobacter, and Luteimonas). Sequences belonging to species of the family Enterobacteriaceae also were detected but it was not possible to assign these to individual genera. Many of these species likely interact with X. fastidiosa in the cibarium and

  9. Autochthonous bioaugmentation with environmental samples rich in hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria for bench-scale bioremediation of oily seawater and desert soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nedaa; Dashti, Narjes; Salamah, Samar; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Sorkhoh, Naser; Radwan, Samir

    2016-05-01

    Oil-contaminated seawater and desert soil batches were bioaugmented with suspensions of pea (Pisum sativum) rhizosphere and soil with long history of oil pollution. Oil consumption was measured by gas-liquid chromatography. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria in the bioremediation batches were counted using a mineral medium with oil vapor as a sole carbon source and characterized by their 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-gene sequences. Most of the oil was consumed during the first 2-4 months, and the oil-removal rate decreased or ceased thereafter due to nutrient and oxygen depletion. Supplying the batches with NaNO3 (nitrogen fertilization) at a late phase of bioremediation resulted in reenhanced oil consumption and bacterial growth. In the seawater batches bioaugmented with rhizospheric suspension, the autochthonous rhizospheric bacterial species Microbacterium oxidans and Rhodococcus spp. were established and contributed to oil-removal. The rhizosphere-bioaugmented soil batches selectively favored Arthrobacter nitroguajacolicus, Caulobacter segnis, and Ensifer adherens. In seawater batches bioaugmented with long-contaminated soil, the predominant oil-removing bacterium was the marine species Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. In soil batches on the other hand, the autochthonous inhabitants of the long-contaminated soil, Pseudomonas and Massilia species were established and contributed to oil removal. It was concluded that the use of rhizospheric bacteria for inoculating seawater and desert soil and of bacteria in long-contaminated soil for inoculating desert soil follows the concept of "autochthonous bioaugmentation." Inoculating seawater with bacteria in long-contaminated soil, on the other hand, merits the designation "allochthonous bioaugmentation." PMID:26801925

  10. Transcriptome changes and cAMP oscillations in an archaeal cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soppa Jörg

    2007-06-01

    allowed to identify a strategy of transcript level regulation that is different from all previously characterized species. The transcript levels of only 3% of all genes are regulated, a fraction that is considerably lower than has been reported for four eukaryotic species (6% – 28% and for the bacterium C. crescentus (19%. It was shown that cAMP is present in significant concentrations in an archaeon, and the phylogenetic profile of the adenylate cyclase indicates that this signaling molecule is widely distributed in archaea. The occurrence of cell cycle-dependent oscillations of the cAMP concentration in an archaeon and in several eukaryotic species indicates that cAMP level changes might be a phylogenetically old signal for cell cycle progression.

  11. Functional Identification and Structure Determination of Two Novel Prolidases from cog1228 in the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Dao Feng; Patskovsky, Yury; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Sisco, Abby A.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M. (Einstein); (TAM); (Lilly)

    2010-12-07

    Two uncharacterized enzymes from the amidohydrolase superfamily belonging to cog1228 were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The two proteins, Sgx9260c (gi|44242006) and Sgx9260b (gi|44479596), were derived from environmental DNA samples originating from the Sargasso Sea. The catalytic function and substrate profiles for Sgx9260c and Sgx9260b were determined using a comprehensive library of dipeptides and N-acyl derivative of L-amino acids. Sgx9260c catalyzes the hydrolysis of Gly-L-Pro, L-Ala-L-Pro, and N-acyl derivatives of L-Pro. The best substrate identified to date is N-acetyl-L-Pro with a value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} of 3 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Sgx9260b catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-hydrophobic L-Pro dipeptides and N-acyl derivatives of L-Pro. The best substrate identified to date is N-propionyl-L-Pro with a value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} of 1 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Three-dimensional structures of both proteins were determined by X-ray diffraction methods (PDB codes 3MKV and 3FEQ). These proteins fold as distorted ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrels with two divalent cations in the active site. The structure of Sgx9260c was also determined as a complex with the N-methylphosphonate derivative of L-Pro (PDB code 3N2C). In this structure the phosphonate moiety bridges the binuclear metal center, and one oxygen atom interacts with His-140. The {alpha}-carboxylate of the inhibitor interacts with Tyr-231. The proline side chain occupies a small substrate binding cavity formed by residues contributed from the loop that follows {beta}-strand 7 within the ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrel. A total of 38 other proteins from cog1228 are predicted to have the same substrate profile based on conservation of the substrate binding residues. The structure of an evolutionarily related protein, Cc2672 from Caulobacter crecentus, was determined as a complex with the N-methylphosphonate derivative of L-arginine (PDB code 3MTW).

  12. Continental subsurface waters support unique but diverse C-acquisition strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. M.; Magnabosco, C.; Brown, C. T.; Grim, S. L.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Wilkie, K. M.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Simkus, D.; Slater, G. F.; Hendrickson, S.; Pullin, M. J.; Kieft, T. L.; Li, L.; Snyder, L.; Kuloyo, O.; Linage, B.; Borgonie, G.; Vermeulen, J.; Maleke, M.; Tlalajoe, N.; Moloantoa, K.; van Heerden, E.; Vermeulen, F.; Pienaar, M.; Munro, A.; Joubert, L.; Ackerman, J.; van Jaarsveld, C.; Onstott, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial subsurface environments generally support two orders of magnitude fewer microorganisms than submarine environments where energy and C sources are more abundant. However, our research on the geochemistry and stable isotopes has suggested that the microbial communities residing in the continental subsurface waters, aged more than thousands of years, do not live by a monotypic metabolic network across sites. We evaluated the taxonomic and functional diversity of microbial communities from three localities in South Africa and their relationship to the environmental parameters associated with each fracture water. The borehole at Tau Tona Au mine (TT107; 3,100 mbls), Masimong Au mine (MM5; 1,900 mbls) and Zondereinde Pt mine (NO14; 2,100 mbls) contain saline fracture water of paleometeroic origin but the anaerobic ecosystems were driven by distinctive C-assimilation strategies. Archaea and Bacteria are present in all samples with the latter being dominant (>75%). The similarity between the Δ14C and δ13C-PLFA with those of the DIC indicates that the majority of cellular C in the TT107 sample was derived from the DIC (0.6 mM), even though dissolved CH4 (8.8 mM) is more available. The DIC may have supported a wide variety of chemoautotrophs including the predominant firmicutes, e.g. Thermincola sp. and Ca. Desulforudis audaxviator. Interestingly, a considerable percentage of sequences related to oligotrophic α-proteobacteria Caulobacter sp. was detected, which warrants further investigation as the aerobic heterotrophic microorganism has a unique dimorphic life cycle. For the MM5 sample, the δ13C and δ2H of the CH4 indicate it was produced via CO2 reduction from DIC, which is consistent with the relatively high abundance of hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanothermobacter sp. that scavenged the abiogenic H2 and utilized the DIC (0.43 mM) leading to its enriched δ13C signature. In contrast to the TT107 sample, the much-depleted δ13C-CH4 indicates that the