WorldWideScience

Sample records for alpha-nucleus interaction potential

  1. Alpha-nucleus elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.; Alamanos, N.; Berthier, B.; Bruge, G.; Faraggi, H.; Lugol, J.C.; Mittig, W.; Papineau, L.; Yavin, A.I.; Buenerd, M.; Bauhoff, W.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic scattering of 288, 340, 480 and 699 MeV Alpha-particles was measured on 208 Pb, 116 Sn and 58 Ni. The data were analysed in terms of a phenomenological optical model. The optical potentials obtained were found to vary consistently with the target nucleus and the incident energy. The radial zone where the potentials are well determined was studied in detail. The data for 208 Pb were also analysed with a folding model. The energy dependence of the strong-absorption radius and of the reaction cross section shows that the nuclear surface becomes slightly transparent for incident energies above 150 MeV per nucleon. (orig.)

  2. Diatomic interaction potential theory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Goodisman, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Diatomic Interaction Potential Theory, Volume 2: Applications discusses the variety of applicable theoretical material and approaches in the calculations for diatomic systems in their ground states. The volume covers the descriptions and illustrations of modern calculations. Chapter I discusses the calculation of the interaction potential for large and small values of the internuclear distance R (separated and united atom limits). Chapter II covers the methods used for intermediate values of R, which in principle means any values of R. The Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction schemes des

  3. Calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Sebastian; Tresp, Christoph; Menke, Henri; Urvoy, Alban; Firstenberg, Ofer; Büchler, Hans Peter; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    The strong interaction between individual Rydberg atoms provides a powerful tool exploited in an ever-growing range of applications in quantum information science, quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry. One hallmark of the Rydberg interaction is that both its strength and angular dependence can be fine-tuned with great flexibility by choosing appropriate Rydberg states and applying external electric and magnetic fields. More and more experiments are probing this interaction at short atomic distances or with such high precision that perturbative calculations as well as restrictions to the leading dipole-dipole interaction term are no longer sufficient. In this tutorial, we review all relevant aspects of the full calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials. We discuss the derivation of the interaction Hamiltonian from the electrostatic multipole expansion, numerical and analytical methods for calculating the required electric multipole moments and the inclusion of electromagnetic fields with arbitrary direction. We focus specifically on symmetry arguments and selection rules, which greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix, enabling the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian up to higher multipole orders on a desktop computer. Finally, we present example calculations showing the relevance of the full interaction calculation to current experiments. Our software for calculating Rydberg potentials including all features discussed in this tutorial is available as open source.

  4. Calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Sebastian; Büchler, Hans Peter; Tresp, Christoph; Urvoy, Alban; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Menke, Henri; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    The strong interaction between individual Rydberg atoms provides a powerful tool exploited in an ever-growing range of applications in quantum information science, quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry. One hallmark of the Rydberg interaction is that both its strength and angular dependence can be fine-tuned with great flexibility by choosing appropriate Rydberg states and applying external electric and magnetic fields. More and more experiments are probing this interaction at short atomic distances or with such high precision that perturbative calculations as well as restrictions to the leading dipole–dipole interaction term are no longer sufficient. In this tutorial, we review all relevant aspects of the full calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials. We discuss the derivation of the interaction Hamiltonian from the electrostatic multipole expansion, numerical and analytical methods for calculating the required electric multipole moments and the inclusion of electromagnetic fields with arbitrary direction. We focus specifically on symmetry arguments and selection rules, which greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix, enabling the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian up to higher multipole orders on a desktop computer. Finally, we present example calculations showing the relevance of the full interaction calculation to current experiments. Our software for calculating Rydberg potentials including all features discussed in this tutorial is available as open source. (tutorial)

  5. Calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Sebastian; Tresp, Christoph; Menke, Henri

    2017-01-01

    The strong interaction between individual Rydberg atoms provides a powerful tool exploited in an ever-growing range of applications in quantum information science, quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry. One hallmark of the Rydberg interaction is that both its strength and angular dependence...... can be fine-tuned with great flexibility by choosing appropriate Rydberg states and applying external electric and magnetic fields. More and more experiments are probing this interaction at short atomic distances or with such high precision that perturbative calculations as well as restrictions...

  6. Monopole-antimonopole interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Ayush; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2017-11-01

    We numerically study the interactions of twisted monopole-antimonopole pairs in the 't Hooft-Polyakov model for a range of values of the scalar to vector mass ratio. We also recover the sphaleron solution at maximum twist discovered by Taubes [Commun. Math. Phys. 86, 257 (1982), 10.1007/BF01206014] and map out its energy and size as functions of parameters.

  7. Interaction potential for two different atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmichev, V.E.; Peresypkin, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    Using the rigorous approach to the nonrelativistic four Coulomb particle problem the interaction potentials between an ordinary hydrogen and muonic-hydrogen atoms at large: R>a e +a μ (1), and intermediate: a e >R>>a μ (2) distances, where a e and a μ are the Bohr radii, are calculated in the adiabatic approximation. The van der Waals potential constants in the region (1) and an explicit potential form in the region (2) taking into account both the polarization effects and the electron screening corrections are determined. 10 refs

  8. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Benevides Moreira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. METHOD Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. RESULTS The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole, increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. CONCLUSION A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences.

  9. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Maiara Benevides; Mesquita, Maria Gefé da Rosa; Stipp, Marluci Andrade Conceição; Paes, Graciele Oroski

    2017-07-20

    To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole), increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences. Analisar as potenciais interações medicamentosas intravenosas e seu grau de severidade associadas à administração desses medicamentos a partir das prescrições do Centro de Terapia Intensiva. Estudo quantitativo, tipologia retrospectiva exploratória, com análise estatística descritiva das prescrições medicamentosas do Centro de Terapia Intensiva de um Hospital Universitário, no período de março-junho/2014. A amostra foi composta de 319 prescrições e subamostras de 50 prescrições. Constatou-se que a média de medicamentos por paciente foi de 9,3 registros, e evidenciou-se maior probabilidade para ocorrência de interação medicamentosa inerente à polifarmácia. O estudo identificou interações medicamentosas graves, como a administração concomitante de Tramadol com medicamentos inibidores seletivos da recaptação da serotonina, (exemplo: Metoclopramida e Fluconazol

  10. PRESENTATION POTENTIAL USING IN PEDAGOGICAL INTERACTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Ershova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The given article is aimed at considering multimedia presentation potential and its influence on strengthening classroom teacher-student interaction. In the article the importance of using this kind of activity in the study process is pointed in connection with educational state policy on the one hand. On the other hand, gained students’ skills as a final result of work with presentations met employers’ demand for both parent and world labour-markets and bring competitive benefit to the candidates. Scientific novelty and results. Multimedia presentation is considered as a specific complex of classroom activities. The students are oriented on the self analysis and presentation assessment. It is shown that well-organized process of peer students’ assessment allows to simultaneously helping in solving the didactic and methodical problems. To this purpose the system of assessment criteria should be developed. It has to be clear for students for making assessment feasible and time-saving. The example of a possible variant of criteria system is described; quality of the presentations prepared by students can be defined based on such system criteria. The author also analyzed software products of the three main platforms (Windows, Linux, MacOs which have different tools and allow to follow users’ needs for creating presentations. In the article there is a comparative table of the two most popular software development: the program Microsoft PowerPoint and the web-service Prezi for realizing the relevance of their use in the study process. Practical significance of the present article concludes in author’s suggestions of some recommendations for presentation potential use as a tool of improving pedagogical interaction process with contemporary students. 

  11. Fomivirsen: clinical pharmacology and potential drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Richard S; Henry, Scott P; Grillone, Lisa R

    2002-01-01

    Fomivirsen sodium is a 21-base phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to the messenger RNA of the major immediate-early region proteins of human cytomegalovirus, and is a potent and selective antiviral agent for cytomegalovirus retinitis. Following intravitreal administration, fomivirsen is slowly cleared from vitreous with a half-life of approximately 55 hours in humans. Preclinical studies show that fomivirsen distributes to retina and is slowly metabolised by exonuclease digestion. Clearance from retina was shown to be similarly slow following loading from the vitreous. The estimated half-life for clearance of fomivirsen from retina was 78 hours in monkeys following a 115-microg dose. Because of the low doses coupled with slow disposition from the eye, measurable concentrations of drug are not detected in the systemic circulation following intravitreal administration. Systemically administered phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides are highly bound to albumin and alpha2-macroglobulin in blood plasma. Because fomivirsen does not compete for oxidative metabolic processes involved in clearance of many xenobiotics, the most likely mechanism for drug interactions may be altered protein binding of a coadministered drug. The extremely low systemic exposure to this oligodeoxynucleotide following intravitreal administration largely negates its potential ability to interact with systemically administered drugs. Even if fomivirsen were able to access the blood, protein binding assays indicate that drugs that are site I and site II binders of albumin (warfarin, ibuprofen, salicylic acid) are not displaced in the presence of phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides of various sequences at concentrations orders of magnitude higher than that seen for fomivirsen. Administration of fomivirsen with numerous systemically administered antiretrovirals (for example zidovudine and zalcitabine) as well as systemically administered anticytomegalovirus agents such as foscarnet

  12. Potential interaction between valproic acid and doripenem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Thaddaus R; Onisk, Mallory L; Chapman, Bret A

    2011-02-01

    A potential interaction between valproate (VPA) and doripenem leading to decreased valproic acid concentrations in two patients is described. In the first patient case, a 54-year-old female presented to the emergency department following a seizure episode after stopping her medications a few days prior. She was given a 1500 mg (23 mg/kg) intravenous (IV) bolus dose of valproate and restarted on her home regimen of divalproex sodium 750 mg daily which quickly resulted in valproic acid blood concentrations within the reference range. The patient was later started on doripenem 500 mg IV every 8 hours and subsequent valproic acid concentrations decreased by 62%. The second patient was a 54-year-old female transferred from an outlying facility following a motor vehicle accident. The patient was receiving valproate 1250 mg IV every 8 hours for seizure prophylaxis following a traumatic brain injury. She developed pneumonia and was started on doripenem 500mg IV every 8 hours. Valproic acid concentrations decreased by 69% within two days. This case report describes two patients receiving concomitant valproate and doripenem resulting in a 62% and 69% reduction in valproic acid concentration.

  13. Ion mobilities and ion-atom interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatland, I.R.

    1982-01-01

    The techniques for measuring the mobilities of ions in gases, relating interaction potentials to mobilities, and determining potentials from experimental mobilities are reviewed. Applications are presented for positive alkali ions and negative halogen ions in inert gases. (Auth.)

  14. Wake potentials of the ILC Interaction Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The vacuum chamber of the ILC Interaction Region (IR) is optimized for best detector performance. It has special shaping to minimize additional backgrounds due to the metal part of the chamber. Also, for the same reason this thin vacuum chamber does not have water cooling. Therefore, small amounts of power, which may be deposited in the chamber, can be enough to raise the chamber to a high temperature. One of the sources of 'heating' power is the electromagnetic field of the beam. This field diffracts by non-regularities of the beam pipe and excites free-propagating fields, which are then absorbed by the pipe wall. In addition we have a heating power of the image currents due to finite conductivity of the metallic wall. We will discuss these effects as updating the previous results. The conclusions of this report are: (1) The amount of the beam energy loss in IR is almost equal to the energy loss in one ILC (TESLA) accelerating cryo-module; (2) Addition energy spread at IR is very small; (3) Spectrum of the wake fields is limited 300 GHz; (4) Average power of the wake fields excited in IR is 30 W for nominal ILC parameters; and (5) Pulse power in this case is 6 kilowatts.

  15. Potentials of interaction between medium energy particles and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhnoj, Yu.A.; Molev, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of interaction between mean-energy particles and atomic nuclei is determined as a solution of an integral equation relating it to the scattering matrix. Potentials involving the central and spin-orbital or isospin parts are reconstructed on the basis of the scattering matrix of the diffraction model. Approximated expressions for central and spin-orbital potentials in the case of weak refraction are obtained. The effect of nuclear parameters on the shape of central potential of interaction between 156 MeV protons and the 208 Pb nuclei is considered. The calculated and phenomenological central and spin-orbital potentials of interaction between 185 MeV protons and the 90 Zr, 208 Pb nuclei are in good agreement only in the surface region of nuclei. The central and isospin potentials of interaction between the 3 He nuclei with 217 MeV energy and the 9 Be nuclei are studied

  16. Potential drug-drug interaction in Mexican patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-Zurita, María Conchita; Juárez-Rojop, Isela E; Genis, Alma; Tovilla-Zárate, Carlos Alfonso; González-Castro, Thelma Beatriz; Lilia López-Narváez, María; de la O de la O, María Elena; Nicolini, Humberto

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to observe potential drug-drug interactions in the medication of Mexican schizophrenic patients. We performed a retrospective and cross-sectional study that was carried out in a psychiatric clinic. Only the prescriptions of patients with schizophrenia whose diagnoses were based on the DSM-IV instrument were included in this study. The Drug Interactions Checker software ( http://www.drugs.com/drug_interactions.html ) was used in this study to analyse potential drug-drug interactions. In total, 86 of 126 patients were at risk of potential drug-drug interactions. Haloperidol and biperiden was the most common drug pair of 232 pairs evaluated. In our study, 13.8% of drug-drug interaction showed a major level of severity, whereas in 83.2%, the interaction was moderate. Finally, central nervous system (CNS) depression and anticholinergic effect were the main possible effects of drug-drug interaction. Our results revealed a high number of patients with schizophrenia receiving two or more drugs. The potential drug-drug interactions observed in the Mexican population are consistent with the concomitant use of antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, and antidepressants prescribed in schizophrenia that could cause central nervous system (CNS) depression and anticholinergic effect. Drug-drug interaction must be considered when the patient with schizophrenia is medicated.

  17. Effective potential of light quark interactions at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipskikh, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    The model of an open bosonic string with free ends is applied to construct the effective interaction potential for two light quarks at finite temperatures. This potential is shown to be a second-order potential with respect to the interquark distance

  18. Potential drug-drug interactions on in-patient medication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are an important cause of adverse drug reactions. The pharmacoepidemiology of such interactions in hospitals in Uganda is not known. Objectives: To determine the prevalence, clinical importance and factors associated with potential DDIs at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital ...

  19. Risk factors for potential drug interactions in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Gonzalez Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz; Petersen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify patient- and practice-related factors associated with potential drug interactions. Methods: A register analysis study in general practices in the county of Funen, Denmark. Prescription data were retrieved from a population-based prescription database (Odense University...... Pharmacoepidemiologic Database, OPED) covering prescriptions to all inhabitants in the county of Funen, Denmark. All individuals exposed to concurrent use of two or more drugs (polypharmacy) were identified. Combinations of drugs with potential interactions were registered and classified as major, moderate, or minor......, depending on the severity of outcome and the quality of documentation. A two-level random coefficient logistic regression model was used to investigate factors related to potential drug interactions. Results: One-third of the population was exposed to polypharmacy, and 6% were exposed to potential drug...

  20. Effective polarization interaction potentials of the partially ionized dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T S [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, K N [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Omarbakiyeva, Yu A [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Roepke, G [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-04-28

    The effective polarization interaction potential between charged and neutral particles is considered for a partially ionized plasma. This pseudopotential is deduced taking into account quantum-mechanical effects at short distances as well as screening effects at large distances. Furthermore, a cutoff radius is obtained using a modified effective-range theory. Explicit results for parameters describing the interaction of the atom with charged particles are given.

  1. Analytical local electron-electron interaction model potentials for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Reiher, Markus; Hinze, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Analytical local potentials for modeling the electron-electron interaction in an atom reduce significantly the computational effort in electronic structure calculations. The development of such potentials has a long history, but some promising ideas have not yet been taken into account for further improvements. We determine a local electron-electron interaction potential akin to those suggested by Green et al. [Phys. Rev. 184, 1 (1969)], which are widely used in atom-ion scattering calculations, electron-capture processes, and electronic structure calculations. Generalized Yukawa-type model potentials are introduced. This leads, however, to shell-dependent local potentials, because the origin behavior of such potentials is different for different shells as has been explicated analytically [J. Neugebauer, M. Reiher, and J. Hinze, Phys. Rev. A 65, 032518 (2002)]. It is found that the parameters that characterize these local potentials can be interpolated and extrapolated reliably for different nuclear charges and different numbers of electrons. The analytical behavior of the corresponding localized Hartree-Fock potentials at the origin and at long distances is utilized in order to reduce the number of fit parameters. It turns out that the shell-dependent form of Green's potential, which we also derive, yields results of comparable accuracy using only one shell-dependent parameter

  2. Herbal medication: potential for adverse interactions with analgesic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, W

    2002-12-01

    The use of herbal supplements in the US has increased dramatically in recent years. These products are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with the same scrutiny as conventional drugs. Patients who use herbal supplements often do so in conjunction with conventional drugs. This article is a review of potential adverse interactions between some of the commonly used herbal supplements and analgesic drugs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly aspirin, have the potential to interact with herbal supplements that are known to possess antiplatelet activity (ginkgo, garlic, ginger, bilberry, dong quai, feverfew, ginseng, turmeric, meadowsweet and willow), with those containing coumarin (chamomile, motherworth, horse chestnut, fenugreek and red clover) and with tamarind, enhancing the risk of bleeding. Acetaminophen may also interact with ginkgo and possibly with at least some of the above herbs to increase the risk of bleeding. Further, the incidences of hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity may be augmented by acetaminophen when concomitantly used with the potentially hepatotoxic herbs Echinacea and kava, and with herbs containing salicylate (willow, meadowsweet), respectively. The concomitant use of opioid analgesics with the sedative herbal supplements, valerian, kava and chamomile, may lead to increased central nervous system (CNS) depression. The analgesic effect of opioids may also be inhibited by ginseng. It is suggested that health-care professionals should be more aware of the potential adverse interactions between herbal supplements and analgesic drugs, and take appropriate precautionary measures to avoid their possible occurrences. However, as most of the interaction information available is based on individual case reports, animal studies and in vitro data, further research is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions.

  3. Diabatic interaction potential for nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerenberg, W.; Lukasiak, A.

    1984-01-01

    Within a refined method for the construction of diabatic states allowing for the treatment of the full spin-orbit coupling, characteristic features of the diabatic potential for nucleus-nucleus collisions are investigated. Approximately 90% of the strong repulsion results from diabatic particle-hole excitations, while only 10% is due to compression. The diabatic interaction potential describes a physical situation intermediate between adiabatic and sudden approximations. (orig.)

  4. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  5. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Sarita, E-mail: saritaiitr2003@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Rani, Pooja [D.A.V. College, Sec-10, Chandigarh-160010 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO{sub 2} (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO{sub 2} has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=−21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  6. Interacting Bose gas confined in a Kronig-Penney potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, O. A.; Solís, M. A.

    We analyze the effect of the 1D periodic Kronig-Penney potential, composed of barriers of width b and separated a distance a, over an interacting Bose gas. At T = 0 , the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved analytically in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions for repulsive or attractive interaction between bosons. By applying the boundary conditions for periodic solutions as well as the normalization of the wave function, we arrive to a set of nonlinear equations from which we obtain the density profile and the chemical potential of the condensate as a function of the particle momentum. The profiles for attractive and repulsive interactions are compared with that of the non-interacting case. For attractive interaction we are able to observe a pronounced spatial localization in the middle of every two barriers. We reproduce the well known results when the Kronig-Penney potential becomes a Dirac Comb. We acknowledge partial support from Grants PAPIIT IN111613 and CONACyT 221030.

  7. Electrostatic potential profile and nonlinear current in an interacting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. We consider an interacting one-dimensional molecular wire attached to two metal electrodes on either side of it. The electrostatic potential profile across the wire-electrode interface has been deduced solving the Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently. Since the Poisson distribution crucially depends ...

  8. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torquato, Salvatore [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  9. Comparison of biomolecules on the basis of Molecular Interaction Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Interaction Potentials (MIP are frequently used for the comparison of series of compounds displaying related biological behaviors. These potentials are interaction energies between the considered compounds and relevant probes. The interaction energies are computed in the nodes of grids defined around the compounds. There is a need of detailed and objective comparative analyses of MIP distributions in the framework of structure-activity studies. On the other hand, MIP-based studies do not have to be restricted to series of small ligands, since such studies present also interesting possibilities for the analysis and comparison of biological macromolecules. Such analyses can benefit from the application of new methods and computational approaches. The new software MIPSim (Molecular Interaction Potentials Similarity analysis has recently been introduced with the purpose of analyzing and comparing MIP distributions of series of biomolecules. This program is transparently integrated with other programs, like GAMESS or GRID, which can be used for the computation of the potentials to be analyzed or compared. MIPSim incorporates several definitions of similarity coefficients, and is capable of combining several similarity measures into a single one. On the other hand, MIPSim can perform automatic explorations of the maximum similarity alignments between pairs of molecules.

  10. On the nuclear interaction potential in the heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Kh.L.; Shitikova, K.V.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction potential of heavy ions 4 He, 6 Li, 12 C and 16 O is constructed in the folding model. The density of nuclear matter distribution for these nuclei is calculated in the framework of the hyperspherical function method. For the calculation of the folding potential the Skyrme two-body nucleon-nucleon forces were employed. The influence of several effects on the results of calculation is studied. Density dependence of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, dependence of the folding potential on the number of particles, the potential symmetry in the interaction of identical and different particles and the possibility of observing the monopole-resonance in the ion inelastic scattering are investigated. The investigations showed that the higher is the nuclear excitation energy the wider and shallower is the form of a potential. Non-diagonal matrix elements are not negligible. Nevertheless, in order to estimate the degree of the monopole giant resonance manifestation in the heavy ion collisions, it is necessary to carry out the direct calculation of inelastic collision cross-section for two heavy particles including the calculation over this channel into the scheme

  11. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Mei [Department of Physics, Institute of Quantitative Biology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Kang, Hongsuk; Luan, Binquan [Computational Biological Center, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Yang, Zaixing [Institute of Quantitative Biology and Medicine, SRMP and RAD-X, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhou, Ruhong, E-mail: ruhong@us.ibm.com [Department of Physics, Institute of Quantitative Biology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Computational Biological Center, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  12. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Luan, Binquan; Yang, Zaixing; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  13. No strings attached potential vs. interaction energy in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, T.

    1996-01-01

    In infrared-stable fixed-point field theories, the interaction energy of a test particle is proportional to the non-relativistic (heavy source) coordinate-space potential derived from the field strength produced by that source. This is no longer true in ultraviolet-stable fixed-point field theories (UVSFPFT) as they may not have a finite infrared fixed point. This leads to the possibility that UVSFPFTs may have quite conventional field strength distributions despite the unusual spatial dependence expected for the interaction energy

  14. Interaction potentials and their effect on crystal nucleation and symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.S.; Rahman, A.

    1979-01-01

    Molecular dynamics technique has been used to study the effect of the interaction potential on crystal nucleation and the symmetry of the nucleated phase. Four systems, namely rubidium, Lennard-Jones, rubidium-truncated, and Lennard-Jones-truncated, have been studied each at reduced density 0.95. Two types of calculations were performed. Firstly, starting from a liquid state, each system was quenched rapidly to a reduced temperature of approx.0.1. The nucleation process for these systems was monitored by studying the time dependence of temperature and the pair correlation function, and the resulting crystalline structure analyzed using among other properties the Voronoi polyhedra. Only in the case of rubidium was a b.c.c. structure nucleated. In the other three cases we obtained a f.c.c. ordering. Secondly, we have studied the effect of changing the interaction potential in a system which has already achieved an ordered state under the action of some other potential. After establishing a b.c.c. structure in a rubidium system, the change in the symmetry of the system was studied when the pair potential was modified to one of the other three forms. The results from both types of calculations are consistent: the rubidium potential leads to a b.c.c. structure while the other three potentials give an f.c.c. structure. Metastable disordered structures were not obtained in any of the calculations. However, the time elapse between the moment when the system is quick-quenched and the moment when nucleation occurs appears to depend upon the potential of interaction

  15. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p sistema nervoso central e cardiovascular, mas também podem interferir em testes utilizados para a detecção da resistência do HIV aos medicamentos antirretrovirais. investigar las posibles interacciones fármaco-fármaco (PDDI en inglés) en pacientes con infección por VIH que reciben terapia antirretroviral. un estudio transversal se llevó a cabo en 161 adultos con infección por VIH. Se recogieron datos clínicos, socio demográficos, y de tratamiento antirretroviral. Para analizar las posibles interacciones entre medicamentos, se utilizó el software Micromedex(r). El análisis estadístico se realizó mediante regresión logística binaria, considerando estadísticamente significativo un valor de p de ≤0.05. de todos los participantes, el 52,2% fueron expuestos a posibles interacciones entre fármacos. En total, aparecieron 218 interacciones entre fármacos potenciales, de las que el 79,8% se produjo entre los fármacos utilizados para el tratamiento antirretroviral. Se observó una asociación entre el uso de cinco o más medicamentos y posibles

  16. Interaction Potential between Parabolic Rotator and an Outside Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At micro/nanoscale, the interaction potential between parabolic rotator and a particle located outside the rotator is studied on the basis of the negative exponential pair potential 1/Rn between particles. Similar to two-dimensional curved surfaces, we confirm that the potential of the three-dimensional parabolic rotator and outside particle can also be expressed as a unified form of curvatures; that is, it can be written as the function of curvatures. Furthermore, we verify that the driving forces acting on the particle may be induced by the highly curved micro/nano-parabolic rotator. Curvatures and the gradient of curvatures are the essential elements forming the driving forces. Through the idealized numerical experiments, the accuracy of the curvature-based potential is preliminarily proved.

  17. Interaction potentials and thermodynamic properties of two component semiclassical plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Ismagambetova, T. N. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan); Gabdullin, M. T. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, NNLOT, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, the effective interaction potential in two component semiclassical plasma, taking into account the long-range screening and the quantum-mechanical diffraction effects at short distances, is obtained on the basis of dielectric response function method. The structural properties of the semiclassical plasma are considered. The thermodynamic characteristics (the internal energy and the equation of state) are calculated using two methods: the method of effective potentials and the method of micropotentials with screening effect taken into account by the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the HNC approximation.

  18. Cosmological solutions in string theory with dilaton self interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mora, C

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present homogeneous and isotropic cosmological solutions for the low energy limit of string theory with a self interacting potential for the scalar field. For a potential that is a linear combination of two exponential, a family of exact solutions are found for the different spatial curvatures. Among this family a non singular accelerating solution for positive curvature is singled out and the violation of the energy conditions for that solution is studied, and also its astrophysical consequences. The string coupling for this solution is finite. (Author)

  19. Inelastic multiple scattering of interacting bosons in weak random potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Within the present thesis we develop a diagrammatic scattering theory for interacting bosons in a three-dimensional, weakly disordered potential. Based on a microscopic N-body scattering theory, we identify the relevant diagrams including elastic and inelastic collision processes that are sufficient to describe quantum transport in the regime of weak disorder. By taking advantage of the statistical properties of the weak disorder potential, we demonstrate how the N-body dynamics can be reduced to a nonlinear integral equation of Boltzmann type for the single-particle diffusive flux. A presently available alternative description - based on the Gross-Pitaevskii equation - only includes elastic collisions. In contrast, we show that far from equilibrium the presence of inelastic collisions - even for weak interaction strength - must be accounted for and can induce the full thermalization of the single-particle current. In addition, we also determine the coherent corrections to the incoherent transport, leading to the effect of coherent backscattering. For the first time, we are able to analyze the influence of inelastic collisions on the coherent backscattering signal, which lead to an enhancement of the backscattered cone in a narrow spectral window, even for increasing non-linearity. With a short recollection of the presently available experimental techniques we furthermore show how an immediate implementation of our suggested setup with confined Bose-Einstein condensates can be accomplished. Thereby, the emergence of collective and/or thermodynamic behavior from fundamental, microscopic constituents can also be assessed experimentally. In a second part of this thesis, we present first results for light scattering off strongly interacting Rydberg atoms trapped in a one-dimensional, chain-like configuration. In order to monitor the time-dependence of this interacting many-body system, we devise a weak measurement scenario for which we derive a master equation for the

  20. Interactions of C+(2PJ) with rare gas atoms: incipient chemical interactions, potentials and transport coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, William D.; Thorington, Rebecca L.; Viehland, Larry A.; Breckenridge, W. H.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2018-03-01

    Accurate interatomic potentials were calculated for the interaction of a singly charged carbon cation, C+, with a single rare gas atom, RG (RG = Ne-Xe). The RCCSD(T) method and basis sets of quadruple-ζ and quintuple-ζ quality were employed; each interaction energy was counterpoise corrected and extrapolated to the basis set limit. The lowest C+(2P) electronic term of the carbon cation was considered, and the interatomic potentials calculated for the diatomic terms that arise from these: 2Π and 2Σ+. Additionally, the interatomic potentials for the respective spin-orbit levels were calculated, and the effect on the spectroscopic parameters was examined. In doing this, anomalously large spin-orbit splittings for RG = Ar-Xe were found, and this was investigated using multi-reference configuration interaction calculations. The latter indicated a small amount of RG → C+ electron transfer and this was used to rationalize the observations. This is taken as evidence of an incipient chemical interaction, which was also examined via contour plots, Birge-Sponer plots and various population analyses across the C+-RG series (RG = He-Xe), with the latter showing unexpected results. Trends in several spectroscopic parameters were examined as a function of the increasing atomic number of the RG atom. Finally, each set of RCCSD(T) potentials was employed, including spin-orbit coupling to calculate the transport coefficients for C+ in RG, and the results were compared with the limited available data. This article is part of the theme issue `Modern theoretical chemistry'.

  1. Interactions of C+(2 PJ ) with rare gas atoms: incipient chemical interactions, potentials and transport coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, William D; Thorington, Rebecca L; Viehland, Larry A; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2018-03-13

    Accurate interatomic potentials were calculated for the interaction of a singly charged carbon cation, C + , with a single rare gas atom, RG (RG = Ne-Xe). The RCCSD(T) method and basis sets of quadruple-ζ and quintuple-ζ quality were employed; each interaction energy was counterpoise corrected and extrapolated to the basis set limit. The lowest C + ( 2 P ) electronic term of the carbon cation was considered, and the interatomic potentials calculated for the diatomic terms that arise from these: 2 Π and 2 Σ + Additionally, the interatomic potentials for the respective spin-orbit levels were calculated, and the effect on the spectroscopic parameters was examined. In doing this, anomalously large spin-orbit splittings for RG = Ar-Xe were found, and this was investigated using multi-reference configuration interaction calculations. The latter indicated a small amount of RG → C + electron transfer and this was used to rationalize the observations. This is taken as evidence of an incipient chemical interaction, which was also examined via contour plots, Birge-Sponer plots and various population analyses across the C + -RG series (RG = He-Xe), with the latter showing unexpected results. Trends in several spectroscopic parameters were examined as a function of the increasing atomic number of the RG atom. Finally, each set of RCCSD(T) potentials was employed, including spin-orbit coupling to calculate the transport coefficients for C + in RG, and the results were compared with the limited available data.This article is part of the theme issue 'Modern theoretical chemistry'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  2. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, W M M S; Seneviratne, Gamini; Kulasooriya, S A

    2006-12-01

    Plants benefit extensively by harbouring endophytic microbes. They promote plant growth and confer enhanced resistance to various pathogens. However, the way the interactions among endophytes influence the plant productivity has not been explained. Present study experimentally showed that endophytes isolated from rice (Oryza sativa) used as the test plant produced two types of interactions; biofilms (bacteria attached to mycelia) and mixed cultures with no such attachments. Acidity, as measured by pH in cultures with biofilms was higher than that of fungi alone, bacteria alone or the mixed cultures. Production of indoleacetic acid like substances (IAAS) of biofilms was higher than that of mixed cultures, fungi or bacteria. Bacteria and fungi produced higher quantities of IAAS than mixed cultures. In mixed cultures, the potential of IAAS production of resident microbes was reduced considerably. There was a negative relationship between IAAS and pH of the biofilms, indicating that IAAS was the main contributor to the acidity. However, such a relationship was not observed in mixed cultures. Microbial acid production is important for suppressing plant pathogens. Thus the biofilm formation in endophytic environment seems to be very important for healthy and improved plant growth. However, it is unlikely that an interaction among endophytes takes place naturally in the endophytic environment, due to physical barriers of plant tissues. Further, critical cell density dependant quorum sensing that leads to biofilm formation may not occur in the endophytic environment as there is a limited space. As such in vitro production and application of beneficial biofilmed inocula of endophytes are important for improved plant production in any agro-ecosystem. The conventional practice of plant inoculation with monocultures or mixed cultures of effective microbes may not give the highest microbial effect, which may only be achieved by biofilm formation.

  3. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer Patient ... Jewish Health wants you to be aware these drug-food interactions when taking anticoagulant medicine. Ask your health care ...

  4. Commercially available interactive video games in burn rehabilitation: therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Ingrid S; Bagley, Anita; Kawada, Jason; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2012-06-01

    Commercially available interactive video games (IVG) like the Nintendo Wii™ (NW) and PlayStation™II Eye Toy (PE) are increasingly used in the rehabilitation of patients with burn. Such games have gained popularity in burn rehabilitation because they encourage range of motion (ROM) while distracting from pain. However, IVGs were not originally designed for rehabilitation purposes but rather for entertainment and may lack specificity for achieving rehabilitative goals. Objectively evaluating the specific demands of IVGs in relation to common burn therapy goals will determine their true therapeutic benefit and guide their use in burn rehabilitation. Upper extremity (UE) motion of 24 normal children was measured using 3D motion analysis during play with the two types of IVGs most commonly described for use after burn: NW and PE. Data was analyzed using t-tests and One-way Analysis of Variance. Active range of motion for shoulder flexion and abduction during play with both PE and NW was within functional range, thus supporting the idea that IVGs offer activities with therapeutic potential to improve ROM. PE resulted in higher demands and longer duration of UE motion than NW, and therefore may be the preferred tool when UE ROM or muscular endurance are the goals of rehabilitation. When choosing a suitable IVG for application in rehabilitation, the user's impairment together with the therapeutic attributes of the IVG should be considered to optimize outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Myocardial fibroblast-matrix interactions and potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Edie C; Bradshaw, Amy D; Zile, Michael R; Spinale, Francis G

    2014-05-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic structure, adapting to physiological and pathological stresses placed on the myocardium. Deposition and organization of the matrix fall under the purview of cardiac fibroblasts. While often overlooked compared to myocytes, fibroblasts play a critical role in maintaining ECM homeostasis under normal conditions and in response to pathological stimuli assume an activated, myofibroblast phenotype associated with excessive collagen accumulation contributing to impaired cardiac function. Complete appreciation of fibroblast function is hampered by the lack of fibroblast-specific reagents and the heterogeneity of fibroblast precursors. This is further complicated by our ability to dissect the role of myofibroblasts versus fibroblasts in myocardial in remodeling. This review highlights critical points in the regulation of collagen deposition by fibroblasts, the current panel of molecular tools used to identify fibroblasts and the role of fibroblast-matrix interactions in fibroblast function and differentiation into the myofibroblast phenotype. The clinical potential of exploiting differences between fibroblasts and myofibroblasts and using them to target specific fibroblast populations is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Myocyte-Fibroblast Signalling in Myocardium." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Improved Interaction Potentials for Charged Residues in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2008-01-01

    -consistent, experimental set of hydration free energies for acetate (Asp), propionate (Glu), 4-methylimidazolium (Hip), n-butylammonium (Lys), and n-propylguanidinium (Arg), all resembling charged residue side chains, including -carbons. It is shown that OPLS-AA free energies depend critically on the type of water model......, TIP4P or TIP3P; i.e., each water model requires specific water-charged molecule interaction potentials. New models (models 1 and 3) are thus described for both water models. Uncertainties in relative free energies of charged residues are ~2 kcal/mol with the new parameters, due to variations in system...... setup (MAEs of ca. 1 kcal/mol) and noise from simulations (ca. 1 kcal/mol). The latter error of ~1 kcal/mol contrasts MAEs from standard OPLS-AA of up to 13 kcal/mol for the entire series of charged residues or up to 5 kcal/mol for the cationic series Lys, Arg, and Hip. The new parameters can be used...

  7. Induced gravity with Higgs potential. Elementary interactions and quantum processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezares Roder, Nils Manuel

    2010-07-01

    This work is intended to first serve as introduction in fundamental subjects of physics in order to be then able to review the mechanism of symmetry breakdown and its essential character in physics. It introduces the concept of scalar-tensor theories of gravity based on Bergmann-Wagoner models with a Higgs potential. The main physical context aimed is the problem of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the one hand, there is gravitation. Within this context, we have Dark Matter as an especially relevant concept. This work entails the following main contributions: - General features of Einstein's theory are introduced together with generalities of the different elementary interactions of physics from which the concepts of dark sectors and Higgs Mechanism are derived. - The concept of symmetry breaking and especially the Higgs Mechanism of mass generation are discussed in their relevance for the most different subjects of physics, especially in relation to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics with elementary Higgs fields. - Scalar-Tensor Theories are introduced in order to build in them the process of Higgs Mechanism. This is then fulfilled with a theory of induced gravity with a Higgs potential which seems renormalizable according to deWitt's power counting criterion, and with mass-generating Higgs fields which only couple gravitationally as well as with Higgs fields which act analogously to cosmon fields. - Further, the energy density of the gravitational field is derived for the specific model of induced gravity from an analogy to electrodynamics. It is shown that a nonvanishing value of pressure related to the scalar field is necessary in order to reproduce standard linear solar-relativistic dynamics. Within astrophysical considerations for flat rotation curves of galaxies, a possible dark-matter behavior is concluded within spherical symmetry. The scalar field and the dark-matter profile of total energy density are derived. An analogous

  8. Induced gravity with Higgs potential. Elementary interactions and quantum processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezares Roder, Nils Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This work is intended to first serve as introduction in fundamental subjects of physics in order to be then able to review the mechanism of symmetry breakdown and its essential character in physics. It introduces the concept of scalar-tensor theories of gravity based on Bergmann-Wagoner models with a Higgs potential. The main physical context aimed is the problem of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the one hand, there is gravitation. Within this context, we have Dark Matter as an especially relevant concept. This work entails the following main contributions: - General features of Einstein's theory are introduced together with generalities of the different elementary interactions of physics from which the concepts of dark sectors and Higgs Mechanism are derived. - The concept of symmetry breaking and especially the Higgs Mechanism of mass generation are discussed in their relevance for the most different subjects of physics, especially in relation to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics with elementary Higgs fields. - Scalar-Tensor Theories are introduced in order to build in them the process of Higgs Mechanism. This is then fulfilled with a theory of induced gravity with a Higgs potential which seems renormalizable according to deWitt's power counting criterion, and with mass-generating Higgs fields which only couple gravitationally as well as with Higgs fields which act analogously to cosmon fields. - Further, the energy density of the gravitational field is derived for the specific model of induced gravity from an analogy to electrodynamics. It is shown that a nonvanishing value of pressure related to the scalar field is necessary in order to reproduce standard linear solar-relativistic dynamics. Within astrophysical considerations for flat rotation curves of galaxies, a possible dark-matter behavior is concluded within spherical symmetry. The scalar field and the dark-matter profile of total energy density are derived. An analogous relation between

  9. Intrinsic interactive reinforcement learning - Using error-related potentials for real world human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Kyoung; Kirchner, Elsa Andrea; Stefes, Arne; Kirchner, Frank

    2017-12-14

    Reinforcement learning (RL) enables robots to learn its optimal behavioral strategy in dynamic environments based on feedback. Explicit human feedback during robot RL is advantageous, since an explicit reward function can be easily adapted. However, it is very demanding and tiresome for a human to continuously and explicitly generate feedback. Therefore, the development of implicit approaches is of high relevance. In this paper, we used an error-related potential (ErrP), an event-related activity in the human electroencephalogram (EEG), as an intrinsically generated implicit feedback (rewards) for RL. Initially we validated our approach with seven subjects in a simulated robot learning scenario. ErrPs were detected online in single trial with a balanced accuracy (bACC) of 91%, which was sufficient to learn to recognize gestures and the correct mapping between human gestures and robot actions in parallel. Finally, we validated our approach in a real robot scenario, in which seven subjects freely chose gestures and the real robot correctly learned the mapping between gestures and actions (ErrP detection (90% bACC)). In this paper, we demonstrated that intrinsically generated EEG-based human feedback in RL can successfully be used to implicitly improve gesture-based robot control during human-robot interaction. We call our approach intrinsic interactive RL.

  10. On the interaction potential in low energy ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chini, T.K.; Ghose, D.

    1989-01-01

    The shadow cones for 998 eV Li + → Ag and 2 keV Na + → Cu are calculated by classical scattering theory using Thomas-Fermi-Moliere potential, universal potential of Ziegler et al. and the Born-Mayer potential. It is found that the Born-Mayer potential with the parameters calculated by Andersen and Sigmund also predicts well the shape of the shadow cones. (orig.)

  11. Gear-based species selectivity and potential interactions between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we used multivariate and ecological approaches to evaluate gear competition and interactions between artisanal and aquarium fishers using a case study of the Shimoni area, southcoast of Kenya. Aquarium fisher catches were monitored from September 2010 to March 2013; while artisanal fisher catches were ...

  12. Studies on pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of vinpocetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Vinpocetine, a semi-synthetic derivative of vincamine, is a popular dietary supplement used for the treatment of several central nervous system related disorders. Despite its wide use, no pharmacokinetic drug interaction studies are reported in literature. Due to increasing use of dietar...

  13. Separable potential model for K- N interactions at low energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cieplý, Aleš; Smejkal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2010), s. 191-208 ISSN 1434-6001 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1441 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : CHIRAL PERTURBATION- THEORY * KAON-NUCLEON INTERACTIONS * SCATTERING LENGTHS Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 2.592, year: 2010

  14. Localization of interacting Fermi gases in quasiperiodic potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Pilati, Sebastiano; Varma, Vipin Kerala

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the zero-temperature metal-insulator transition in a one-dimensional two-component Fermi gas in the presence of a quasi-periodic potential resulting from the superposition of two optical lattices of equal intensity but incommensurate periods. A mobility edge separating (low energy) Anderson localized and (high energy) extended single-particle states appears in this continuous-space model beyond a critical intensity of the quasi-periodic potential. In order to discern the metall...

  15. MicroRNAs and potential target interactions in psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibert, John Robert; Løvendorf, Marianne B.; Litman, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    degradation. MicroRNAs are important in the pathogenesis of human diseases such as immunological disorders, as they regulate a broad range of biological processes. OBJECTIVE: We investigated miRNA-mRNA interactions in involved (PP) and non-involved (PN) psoriatic skin compared with healthy skin (NN). METHODS......BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease often seen in patients with a genetic susceptibility. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are endogenous, short RNA molecules that can bind to parts of mRNA target genes, thus inhibiting their translation and causing accelerated turnover or transcript......: Biopsies were obtained from PP, PN and NN, the miRNA and mRNA expression was analyzed by microarray techniques and a subset of miRNAs and mRNAs were validated by q-RT-PCR. Novel target interactions in psoriasis were found using PubMed, miRBase and RNAhybrid. In addition, TIMP3 protein expression...

  16. In vitro interactions between Armillaria species and potential biocontrol fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keča Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between Armillaria species and seven other fungi were tested in vitro. Tree antagonistic (Trichoderma viride, Trichotecium roseum and Penicillium sp. and four decaying (Hypholoma fasciculare¸ Hypholoma capnoides, Phlebiopsis gigantea, and Pleurotus ostreatus fungi were chosen for this study. The best results were noted for Trichoderma viride, because fungus was able to kill both mycelia and rhizomorphs of Armillaria species, while Hypholoma spp. inhibited both growth of Armillaria colonies and rhizomorph production.

  17. In vitro interactions between Armillaria species and potential biocontrol fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Keča Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Interaction between Armillaria species and seven other fungi were tested in vitro. Tree antagonistic (Trichoderma viride, Trichotecium roseum and Penicillium sp.) and four decaying (Hypholoma fasciculare¸ Hypholoma capnoides, Phlebiopsis gigantea, and Pleurotus ostreatus) fungi were chosen for this study. The best results were noted for Trichoderma viride, because fungus was able to kill both mycelia and rhizomorphs of Armillaria species, while Hypholoma spp. inhibited both growth of Armillar...

  18. The fusion of heavy ions in an interaction potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper contains the problems connected with fusion processes in heavy ions collision. Results of experimental fusion data for reactions: 9 Be + 12 C, 6 Li + 28 Si, 9 Be + 28 Si, 12 C + 28 Si, 12 C + 16 O and 16 O + 16 O are presented. Comparison of measured fusion cross sections with predictions of the fusion potential model have been made. The validity of this model for both light systems, like 9 Be + 12 C and heavy systems, like 35 Cl + 62 Ni, have been discussed. In conclusion, it should be stated that fusion cross sections could be correctly predicted by the potential model with a potential describing the elastic scattering data. (author)

  19. Nucleon-nucleon interaction with quark exchanges and prediction to colour van der Waals potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.

    1985-11-01

    The nucleon-nucleon interaction is considered by including the colour nucleon clusters. The nucleon-nucleon system is treated as a six-quark system. The obtained local potentials reduce the short-range repulsion. The resulted nucleon-nucleon potential by using a quark-quark potential well agrees with the central-force potentials. The phase shifts calculated by using these local potentials are in good agreement with those obtained from other methods. Introducing the quark-quark potential in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, leads to a colour van der Waals potential very strong compared with that predicted by experiments. (author)

  20. A constructive model potential method for atomic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottcher, C.; Dalgarno, A.

    1974-01-01

    A model potential method is presented that can be applied to many electron single centre and two centre systems. The development leads to a Hamiltonian with terms arising from core polarization that depend parametrically upon the positions of the valence electrons. Some of the terms have been introduced empirically in previous studies. Their significance is clarified by an analysis of a similar model in classical electrostatics. The explicit forms of the expectation values of operators at large separations of two atoms given by the model potential method are shown to be equivalent to the exact forms when the assumption is made that the energy level differences of one atom are negligible compared to those of the other.

  1. Separable-potential model for the pion--nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, W.T.

    1976-01-01

    A separable potential which fits the low and intermediate π-N scattering is proposed which is more convenient for application than those separable models which use Regge parameterizations of the very high energy phase shifts. The form factors for this model are equal to zero for momenta q greater than 1 GeV/c, and are expected to provide more reasonable off-shell behavior than the form factors obtained from those models based on the Regge extrapolation

  2. Pharmacological potential of biogenic amine-polyamine interactions beyond neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Jiménez, F; Ruiz-Pérez, M V; Urdiales, J L; Medina, M A

    2013-09-01

    Histamine, serotonin and dopamine are biogenic amines involved in intercellular communication with multiple effects on human pathophysiology. They are products of two highly homologous enzymes, histidine decarboxylase and l-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, and transmit their signals through different receptors and signal transduction mechanisms. Polyamines derived from ornithine (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are mainly involved in intracellular effects related to cell proliferation and death mechanisms. This review summarizes structural and functional evidence for interactions between components of all these amine metabolic and signalling networks (decarboxylases, transporters, oxidases, receptors etc.) at cellular and tissue levels, distinct from nervous and neuroendocrine systems, where the crosstalk among these amine-related components can also have important pathophysiological consequences. The discussion highlights aspects that could help to predict and discuss the effects of intervention strategies. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. On critical stability of three quantum charges interacting through delta potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    We consider three one dimensional quantum, charged and spinless particles interacting through delta potentials. We derive sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of at least one bound state.......We consider three one dimensional quantum, charged and spinless particles interacting through delta potentials. We derive sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of at least one bound state....

  4. On critical stability of three quantum charges interacting through delta potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    We consider three one-dimensional quantum, charged and spinless particles interacting through delta potentials. We derive sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of at least one bound state.......We consider three one-dimensional quantum, charged and spinless particles interacting through delta potentials. We derive sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of at least one bound state....

  5. Technological Dangers and the Potential of Human-Robot Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The ethical debate on social robotics has become one of the cutting edge topics of our time. When it comes to both academic and non-academic debates, the methodological framework is, with few exceptions, typically and tacitly grounded in an us-versus-them perspective. It is as though we were...... technological dangers and opportunities. Finally, aiming for the very limits of the theory, I discuss the contours of a praxis facilitating being-with-robots beyond conceptualization. Basically, this mode of being, pertaining to non-technological HRI, bypasses Heidegger’s warnings, and potentially facilitates...

  6. Host-Symbiont Interactions for Potentially Managing Heteropteran Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Souza Prado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects in the suborder Heteroptera, the so-called true bugs, include over 40,000 species worldwide. This insect group includes many important agricultural pests and disease vectors, which often have bacterial symbionts associated with them. Some symbionts have coevolved with their hosts to the extent that host fitness is compromised with the removal or alteration of their symbiont. The first bug/microbial interactions were discovered over 50 years ago. Only recently, mainly due to advances in molecular techniques, has the nature of these associations become clearer. Some researchers have pursued the genetic modification (paratransgenesis of symbionts for disease control or pest management. With the increasing interest and understanding of the bug/symbiont associations and their ecological and physiological features, it will only be a matter of time before pest/vector control programs utilize this information and technique. This paper will focus on recent discoveries of the major symbiotic systems in Heteroptera, highlighting how the understanding of the evolutionary and biological aspects of these relationships may lead to the development of alternative techniques for efficient heteropteran pest control and suppression of diseases vectored by Heteroptera.

  7. Pharmacological potential of biogenic amine–polyamine interactions beyond neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Jiménez, F; Ruiz-Pérez, M V; Urdiales, J L; Medina, M A

    2013-01-01

    Histamine, serotonin and dopamine are biogenic amines involved in intercellular communication with multiple effects on human pathophysiology. They are products of two highly homologous enzymes, histidine decarboxylase and l-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, and transmit their signals through different receptors and signal transduction mechanisms. Polyamines derived from ornithine (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are mainly involved in intracellular effects related to cell proliferation and death mechanisms. This review summarizes structural and functional evidence for interactions between components of all these amine metabolic and signalling networks (decarboxylases, transporters, oxidases, receptors etc.) at cellular and tissue levels, distinct from nervous and neuroendocrine systems, where the crosstalk among these amine-related components can also have important pathophysiological consequences. The discussion highlights aspects that could help to predict and discuss the effects of intervention strategies. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23347064

  8. The potential of Hypoxis hemerocallidea for herb-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasinu, Pius S; Gutmann, Heike; Schiller, Hilmar; Bouic, Patrick J; Rosenkranz, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Aqueous decoction of Hypoxis hemerocallidea Fisch. & C.A. Mey. (Hypoxidaceae) (Hypoxis) is widely consumed in Southern Africa by people living with HIV/AIDS, some of whom are on ARV and other medications. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of the crude aqueous extracts of Hypoxis to inhibit major forms of CYP450 and transport proteins. Corms of Hypoxis were water-extracted and incubated (in graded concentrations: 1-100 µg/mL) with human liver microsomes (20 min) to monitor the effects on phenacetin O-deethylation, coumarin 7-hydroxylation, bupropion hydroxylation, paclitaxel 6α-hydroxylation, diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation, S-mephenytoin 4'-hydroxylation, bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation, chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation, midazolam 1'-hydroxylation and testosterone 6β-hydroxylation as markers for the metabolic activities of CYP1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1 and 3A4/5, respectively. The generation of metabolites were monitored and quantified with the aid of LC-MS/MS. The potential of the extracts to inhibit human ATP-binding cassette transporter activity was assessed using recombinant MDCKII and LLC-PK1 cells over-expressing human breast cancer resistant protein and human P-glycoprotein , respectively (with Ko143 and cyclosporin A as positive controls). Similar assessment was performed with human organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP1B1 and OATP1B3) using recombinant HEK293 cells over-expressing OATP1B1 and OATP1B3, respectively (with rifamycin and 10 µM atorvastatin as positive controls). Extracts of Hypoxis inhibited the production of the metabolites of the substrates of the following enzymes (as compared to controls) with the indicated IC50 values (µg/mL): CYP1A2 (120.6), CYP2A6 (210.8), CYP2B6 (98.5), CYP2C8 (195.2), CYP2C9 (156) and CYP3A4/5 (185.4). The inhibition of the uptake activity of OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 were also observed with IC50 values of 93.4 and 244.8 μg/mL, respectively. Extract concentrations higher than the

  9. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bogetti-Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug interactions (contraindicated/severe (n=64 and those with non-severe drug-drug interactions (moderate/minor/absent (n=117. Additional socio-demographic, clinical and caregiver data were included. Potential drug-drug interactions were identified using Micromedex Drug Reax 2.0® database. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were enrolled, including 57 men (31.5% and 124 women (68.5% with a mean age of 80.11±8.28 years. One hundred and seven (59.1% patients in our population had potential drug-drug interactions, of which 64 (59.81% were severe/contraindicated. The main severe potential drug-drug interactions were caused by the combinations citalopram/anti-platelet (11.6%, clopidogrel/omeprazole (6.1%, and clopidogrel/aspirin (5.5%. Depression, the use of a higher number of medications, dementia severity and caregiver burden were the most significant factors associated with severe potential drug-drug interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Older people with dementia experience many severe potential drug-drug interactions. Anti-depressants, antiplatelets, anti-psychotics and omeprazole were the drugs most commonly involved in these interactions. Despite their frequent use, anti-dementia drugs were not involved in severe potential drug-drug interactions. The number and type of medications taken, dementia severity and depression in patients in addition to caregiver burden should be considered to avoid possible drug interactions in this population.

  10. Calculation of parameters of the interaction potential between excited alkali atoms and mercury atoms: The Cs*, Pr*-Hg interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, A.V.

    1994-01-01

    Based on the method of effective potential involving the new polarization interaction potential calculated from polarization diagrams of the perturbation theory in the Thomas-Fermi approximation, the main parameters of the interatomic potentials (equilibrium distances, potential well depth) are evaluated for a system consisting of an alkali atom in the ground and excited states and of a mercury atom. The results of calculations of quasi-molecular terms for the A-Hg system, where A = Na, Cs, Fr, are reported, some of which are obtained for the first time. A comparison is made with available experimental and theoretical data. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. On the theory of interaction potentials in ionic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, Roberto [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Soto-Bubert, Andres [Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejercito 441, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: roberto.acevedo@umayor.cl

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research work is to report a more comprehensive and detailed study of both, the intermolecular and intramolecular potencial functions with reference to the various families of the elpasolite type crystals. The cohesive energy has been thought as a sum of three terms; the long range (Coulombic), the Born and the van der Waals contributions to the total energy. The Born-Mayer-Buckingham potential{sup 1} has been employed in all of these current studies and a number of convergence tests are analyzed from a formal viewpoint. Our work has been focused to the following systems: Cs{sub 2}NaLnF{sub 6}, Cs{sub 2}NaLnCl{sub 6}, Cs{sub 2}NaLnBr{sub 6}, Rb{sub 2}NaLnF{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}KLnF{sub 6} in the Fm3m space group. A substantial amount of theoretical models have been analyzed and several computing simulations have been undertaken to estimate the reticular energies and the corresponding heat of formation for these crystals. To achieve this goal, a Born-Haber thermodynamic cycle has been introduced in our model. It is shown that the calculated energy values are reasonable and follow the expected trend along the lanthanide series in the periodic chart. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the current and proposed generalized model. The most likely sources for improvement are discussed in detail. New convergence tests as well as some master equations have been introduced to study the various diagonal contributions to the total energy.

  12. Systemic anticancer therapy (SACT) for lung cancer and its potential for interactions with other medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Systemic anticancer therapy, comprising chemotherapy agents alongside targeted therapies and immunotherapy, is clinically indicated for late-stage lung cancer. It is delivered in regimens often containing multiple anticancer agents as well as supportive care medicines to reduce side effects, raising potential for polypharmacy and therefore the possibility of drug-drug interactions with medicines taken for comorbidities. A pharmacy-led process commonly performed to assist safe prescribing in secondary care is medicines reconciliation; its benefit in minimising interactions involving systemic anticancer therapy medicines has not been assessed previously. The objectives were to characterise the potential drug-drug interactions between systemic anticancer therapy medicines for lung cancer and other medicines and to evaluate the rate of medicines reconciliation being performed and the extent of documentation of potential interactions (clinical audit). This retrospective case series study involved recording the medicines being taken by lung cancer patients undergoing systemic anticancer therapy elicited in consultations at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, United Kingdom. Potential interactions were identified and characterised in terms of severity using the British National Formulary and other sources. Patient consultation records were also searched for documentation of medicines reconciliation and acknowledgement of potential drug-drug interactions. Twenty-three patients were included in this study. Eighty-eight potential drug-drug interactions were identified across 21 patients, 39% (34/88) of which involved the supportive care medicine dexamethasone. 3.0% of consultations included a documented medicines reconciliation, and 15.9% of potential interactions were documented in the notes, with no correlation between the two. Potentially serious interactions were significantly more likely to be documented ( p medicines exist; particular attention should be paid to

  13. Potential of the neutron lloyd's mirror interferometer for the search for new interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokotilovski, Yu. N., E-mail: pokot@nf.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    We discuss the potential of the neutron Lloyd's mirror interferometer in a search for new interactions at small scales. We consider three hypothetical interactions that may be tested using the interferometer. The chameleon scalar field proposed to solve the enigma of accelerating expansion of the Universe produces interaction between particles and matter. The axion-like spin-dependent coupling between a neutron and nuclei or/and electrons may result in a P- and T-noninvariant interaction with matter. Hypothetical non-Newtonian gravitational interactions mediates an additional short-range potential between neutrons and bulk matter. These interactions between the neutron and the mirror of a Lloyd-type neutron interferometer cause a phase shift of neutron waves. We estimate the sensitivity and systematic effects of possible experiments.

  14. The potential of the system of interpersonal interaction in the formation of adolescent autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Dorontsova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a significant and actual issue of developing autonomy of the individual. Special attention is paid to adolescent age having high potential for developing autonomy in view of certain changes in the psychological and social sphere of the adolescents. The value of interpersonal interaction in the course of developing adolescent autonomy is shown. The approaches to the concept of interaction are analyzed, four main directions of explaining the essence of interaction are allocated: symbolical interactionism (J. Mid, social exchange (J. Homans, G. Blumer, sociodramatic touch (E. Goffman transaction analysis (E. Berne. Types of interaction, efficiency of interaction development are considered. The analysis of interpersonal interaction issues shows its communication with the categories of «relation», «communication» and «joint activity» (B.G. Ananyev, G.M. Andreyeva, S.V. Dukhnovsky, Ya.L. Kolominsky V.N. Kunitsyna, V.N. Myasishchev, B.D. Parygin, etc.. The concept of interpersonal interaction system of the autonomy causing development of adolescence in the paradigm of psychologist-teacher interaction, and also child-parent interaction is described. The advantage of psychological assistance and pedagogical support within the system of interpersonal interaction for further development of adolescent autonomy is proved. The value of cooperation as one of the types of interpersonal interaction in the course of adolescent autonomy development is shown. Mechanisms of interpersonal interaction, nature of contact in interpersonal interaction, components of a social situation are described.

  15. Prevalence and patient awareness of selected potential drug interactions with self-medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermitte, J; Reber, D; Beutler, M; Bruppacher, R; Hersberger, K E

    2007-04-01

    In community pharmacies potential drug interactions between prescription only medicines (POM) and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs purchased for self-medication arise mainly in two situations: (i) if an OTC drug is purchased by a passer-by customer whose prescribed drug therapy is not known; or (ii) if a POM or an OTC drug is requested by a regular customer whose prescribed drug therapy is usually recorded. With this study we aimed to assess the prevalence of potential drug interactions with selected POM and OTC drugs in passer-by and regular customers as well as their awareness of these potential drug interactions. Data were collected in 14 community pharmacies in the region of Basel, Switzerland by observation of customer contacts and interviews with passer-by customers purchasing selected OTC drugs, and telephone-interviews with regular customers treated with selected POMs identified in community pharmacies' databases. The selected POMs and OTC drugs are drugs which could lead to clinically relevant drug interactions of varying severity but manageable through different interventions such as adjustment of dose and its timing and/or monitoring of the therapy, and avoidance of the combination by choosing an alternative treatment. Of 1183 passer-by customers observed, 164 (14 x 4%) purchased at least one of the selected OTC drugs. One hundred and two (62 x 2%) of those subjects were interviewed. Forty-three (42 x 2%) mentioned taking prescribed drugs, and three of them were exposed to potential drug interactions of moderate severity. Out of 592 regular customers selected from the community pharmacy database, 434 (73 x 3%) could be interviewed. Sixty-nine (15 x 9%) of them were exposed to a potential drug interaction between purchased OTC drug for self-medication and their POM. Furthermore, 116 (26 x 7%) regular customers were exposed to potential drug interactions within their prescribed drugs and in 28 (6 x 5%) multiple (>or=2) potential drug interactions were found

  16. Stability of stationary states of non-local equations with singular interaction potentials

    KAUST Repository

    Fellner, Klemens

    2011-04-01

    We study the large-time behaviour of a non-local evolution equation for the density of particles or individuals subject to an external and an interaction potential. In particular, we consider interaction potentials which are singular in the sense that their first derivative is discontinuous at the origin.For locally attractive singular interaction potentials we prove under a linear stability condition local non-linear stability of stationary states consisting of a finite sum of Dirac masses. For singular repulsive interaction potentials we show the stability of stationary states of uniformly bounded solutions under a convexity condition.Finally, we present numerical simulations to illustrate our results. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Dynamic interaction potential and the scattering cross sections of the semiclassical plasma particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Shalenov, E. O.; Gabdullina, G. L. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71al Farabi Street, Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-04-15

    The dynamic model of the charged particles interaction in non-ideal semiclassical plasma is presented. This model takes into account the quantum mechanical diffraction effect and the dynamic screening effect. On the basis of the dynamic interaction potential, the electron scattering cross sections are investigated. Comparison with the results obtained on the basis of other models and conclusions were made.

  18. Nuclear interaction potential in a folded-Yukawa model with diffuse densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randrup, J.

    1975-09-01

    The folded-Yukawa model for the nuclear interaction potential is generalized to diffuse density distributions which are generated by folding a Yukawa function into sharp generating distributions. The effect of a finite density diffuseness or of a finite interaction range is studied. The Proximity Formula corresponding to the generalized model is derived and numerical comparison is made with the exact results. (8 figures)

  19. Interaction between ions in hot dense plasma via screened Cornell potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Gabdullin, M. T. [Institute for Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi Str., 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-04-15

    Hot dense plasma with non-ideal ions and weakly coupled electrons is studied analytically in the framework of the random phase approximation. It is shown that at some plasma parameters ions interact by a screened Cornell potential. The reduction in the transport coefficients due to the localization of the electron around the ion is predicted. This prediction is confirmed by the molecular dynamics simulation of the one-component ion plasma interacting via the obtained screened Cornell type potential.

  20. Expanding Interaction Potentials within Virtual Environments: Investigating the Usability of Speech and Manual Input Modes for Decoupled Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Stedmon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed technologies and ubiquitous computing now support users who may be detached or decoupled from traditional interactions. In order to investigate the potential usability of speech and manual input devices, an evaluation of speech input across different user groups and a usability assessment of independent-user and collaborative-user interactions was conducted. Whilst the primary focus was on a formative usability evaluation, the user group evaluation provided a formal basis to underpin the academic rigor of the exercise. The results illustrate that using a speech interface is important in understanding user acceptance of such technologies. From the usability assessment it was possible to translate interactions and make them compatible with innovative input devices. This approach to interaction is still at an early stage of development, and the potential or validity of this interfacing concept is still under evaluation; however, as a concept demonstrator, the results of these initial evaluations demonstrate the potential usability issues of both input devices as well as highlighting their suitability for advanced virtual applications.

  1. Prevalence of Potential and Clinically Relevant Statin-Drug Interactions in Frail and Robust Older Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Michele; Hilmer, Sarah; Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Reeve, Emily; Gnjidic, Danijela

    2015-10-01

    A significant proportion of older people are prescribed statins and are also exposed to polypharmacy, placing them at increased risk of statin-drug interactions. To describe the prevalence rates of potential and clinically relevant statin-drug interactions in older inpatients according to frailty status. A cross-sectional study of patients aged ≥65 years who were prescribed a statin and were admitted to a teaching hospital between 30 July and 10 October 2014 in Sydney, Australia, was conducted. Data on socio-demographics, comorbidities and medications were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Potential statin-drug interactions were defined if listed in the Australian Medicines Handbook and three international drug information sources: the British National Formulary, Drug Interaction Facts and Drug-Reax(®). Clinically relevant statin-drug interactions were defined as interactions with the highest severity rating in at least two of the three international drug information sources. Frailty was assessed using the Reported Edmonton Frail Scale. A total of 180 participants were recruited (median age 78 years, interquartile range 14), 35.0% frail and 65.0% robust. Potential statin-drug interactions were identified in 10% of participants, 12.7% of frail participants and 8.5% of robust participants. Clinically relevant statin-drug interactions were identified in 7.8% of participants, 9.5% of frail participants and 6.8% of robust participants. Depending on the drug information source used, the prevalence rates of potential and clinically relevant statin-drug interactions ranged between 14.4 and 35.6% and between 14.4 and 20.6%, respectively. In our study of frail and robust older inpatients taking statins, the overall prevalence of potential statin-drug interactions was low and varied significantly according to the drug information source used.

  2. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itse...... of such interaction for advanced drug delivery are presented.......Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself....... Therefore, protein-nanomaterial interaction is a great challenge for nanomaterial systems and should be inhibited. However, this interaction can also be used to functionalize nanomaterials by forming a selected protein corona. Unlike other decoration using exogenous molecules, nanomaterials functionalized...

  3. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, R. van; Brundel, D.H.; Neef, C.; Gelder, T. van; Mathijssen, R.H.; Burger, D.M.; Jansman, F.G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background:Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment.Methods:A search

  4. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.F. van Leeuwen (Roelof); D.H.S. Brundel (D. H S); C. Neef (Cees); T. van Gelder (Teun); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); D.M. Burger (David); F.G.A. Jansman (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment.

  5. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Brundel, D. H. S.; Neef, C.; van Gelder, T.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; Burger, D. M.; Jansman, F. G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment. Methods: A

  6. Interaction potential and repulsive force between atoms whose internuclear separations are small

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, Jacques

    1971-01-01

    The Thomas-Fermi equation is solved for the homonuclear diatomic molecule. The electronic density and electrostatic potential at each point are used to calculate energies and interaction potentials for very small internuclear separation distances. The repulsive force between atoms is derived by means of the virial theorem. (author) [fr

  7. Deuteron nuclear interaction potential with heavy nuclei in single folding model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Babak

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Deuteron interaction potential with heavy nuclei at sub-barrier energies has been constructed in the frame-work of single folding model using the complex dynamic polarization potential. It is shown that the account of finite deuteron size leads to significant increasing of nuclear potential in outer region of interaction. Cross sec-tions of deuteron elastic scattering on 208Pb at energy 7, 7.3 and 8 MeV were calculated and compared with ex-periment data. Calculations were performed without any variations of parameters.

  8. A reactive empirical bond order (REBO) potential for hydrocarbon-oxygen interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Boris; Lee, Ki-Ho; Sinnott, Susan B

    2004-01-01

    The expansion of the second-generation reactive empirical bond order (REBO) potential for hydrocarbons, as parametrized by Brenner and co-workers, to include oxygen is presented. This involves the explicit inclusion of C-O, H-O, and O-O interactions to the existing C-C, C-H, and H-H interactions in the REBO potential. The details of the expansion, including all parameters, are given. The new, expanded potential is then applied to the study of the structure and chemical stability of several molecules and polymer chains, and to modelling chemical reactions among a series of molecules, within classical molecular dynamics simulations

  9. Consensus validation of the POSAMINO (POtentially Serious Alcohol-Medication INteractions in Older adults) criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Holton, Alice E

    2017-11-08

    Older adults are particularly vulnerable to adverse effects from concurrent alcohol and medication use. However, there is limited evidence regarding the prevalence of these adverse outcomes among older adults, and there is a lack of consensus regarding what constitutes an alcohol-interactive medicine. The objective of this study was to develop an explicit list of potentially serious alcohol-medication interactions for use in older adults.

  10. On the conductivity of a one-dimensional system of interacting fermions in a random potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, W.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional system of interacting fermions in an external potential is studied. The problem was for this purpose transformed to two classical models of statistical mechanics in two dimensions in which occasionally results were found in complementary ranges of the interaction constants of the fermion system. The conductivity appeared as a simple correlation function in both classical models. It was shown that the interaction in a one-dimensional polluted fermion system can cause an isolator-metal transition. (orig./HSI) [de

  11. [Potential antimicrobial drug interactions in clinical practice: consequences of polypharmacy and multidrug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Múgica, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Polypharmacy is a growing problem nowadays, which can increase the risk of potential drug interactions, and result in a loss of effectiveness. This is particularly relevant to the anti-infective therapy, especially when infection is produced by resistant bacteria, because therapeutic options are limited and interactions can cause treatment failure. All antimicrobial prescriptions were retrospectively reviewed during a week in the Pharmacy Department, in order to detect potential drug-interactions and analysing their clinical significance. A total of 314 antimicrobial prescriptions from 151 patients were checked. There was at least one potential interaction detected in 40% of patients, being more frequent and severe in those infected with multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Drugs most commonly involved were quinolones, azoles, linezolid and vancomycin. Potential drug interactions with antimicrobial agents are a frequent problem that can result in a loss of effectiveness. This is why they should be detected and avoided when possible, in order to optimize antimicrobial therapy, especially in case of multidrug resistant infections.

  12. Evaluation of the Stillinger-Weber classical interaction potential for tetragonal semiconductors in nonideal atomic configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, B.W.

    1986-01-01

    A classical potential incorporating two- and three-body interaction terms has recently been introduced by Stillinger and Weber (SW) for simulation of the liquefaction transition of silicon. The equilibrium mechanical properties of this potential are determined and found to agree well with experimental values. The potential also seems to be adequate for problems involving computation of defect energies, such as the stability of strained-layer superlattice interfaces. However, inadequate treatment of configurations with low coordination number makes modeling of the epitaxial growth of (111) silicon impossible. Simple modifications of the SW potential form do allow for (111) epitaxial growth, but the earliest stages of growth then become unphysical

  13. Potential Energy Curves and Collisions Integrals of Air Components. 2; Interactions Involving Ionized Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Collision integrals are fundamental quantities required to determine the transport properties of the environment surrounding aerospace vehicles in the upper atmosphere. These collision integrals can be determined as a function of temperature from the potential energy curves describing the atomic and molecular collisions. Ab initio calculations provide a practical method of computing the required interaction potentials. In this work we will discuss recent advances in scattering calculations with an emphasis on the accuracy that is obtainable. Results for interactions of the atoms and ionized atoms of nitrogen and oxygen will be reviewed and their application to the determination of transport properties, such as diffusion and viscosity coefficients, will be examined.

  14. Temperature-dependent optical potential and mean free path based on Skyrme interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Lingxiao; Zhuo Yizhong; Noerenberg, W.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1986-03-01

    Optical potentials and mean free paths of nucleons at finite temperatures are studied by utilizing effective Skyrme interactions which yield 'good' optical potentials at zero temperature. The results for nuclear matter (symmetric and asymmetric) are applied within the local density approximation of finite nuclei at various temperatures. Because of the limitation due to zero-range forces used and the assumptions of temperature independent nuclear densities and effective Skyrme interactions made, the calculations are expected to be limited to nucleon energies between 10 and 50 MeV above the Fermi energy and to nuclear temperatures of less than 8 MeV. (orig.)

  15. Repulsive baryonic interactions and lattice QCD observables at imaginary chemical potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Vovchenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The first principle lattice QCD methods allow to calculate the thermodynamic observables at finite temperature and imaginary chemical potential. These can be compared to the predictions of various phenomenological models. We argue that Fourier coefficients with respect to imaginary baryochemical potential are sensitive to modeling of baryonic interactions. As a first application of this sensitivity, we consider the hadron resonance gas (HRG model with repulsive baryonic interactions, which are modeled by means of the excluded volume correction. The Fourier coefficients of the imaginary part of the net-baryon density at imaginary baryochemical potential – corresponding to the fugacity or virial expansion at real chemical potential – are calculated within this model, and compared with the Nt=12 lattice data. The lattice QCD behavior of the first four Fourier coefficients up to T≃185 MeV is described fairly well by an interacting HRG with a single baryon–baryon eigenvolume interaction parameter b≃1 fm3, while the available lattice data on the difference χ2B−χ4B of baryon number susceptibilities is reproduced up to T≃175 MeV. Keywords: Hadron resonance gas, Excluded volume, Imaginary chemical potential

  16. Potential drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in dermatological inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lukas; Kränke, Birger; Aberer, Werner

    2016-11-01

    To present information on the frequency of drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions, and to provide assistance on how to minimize these major problems in the pharmacological treatment of dermatological inpatients. The medications given to 1,099 dermatological inpatients were retrospectively analyzed for drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions using web-based drug interaction software (Diagnosia ® Check). We report an overall frequency of relevant drug-drug interactions of 51.7 %, with an average of 3.2 interactions per affected inpatient. Drug combinations that should have been avoided were found in 5.7 % of the study population. Total drug count was the most important risk factor. Drug groups involved in the majority of interactions were analgesics, cardiovascular and antithrombotic agents, as well as antidepressants. The risk of developing adverse drug reactions was rated as "high" in 53.1 % of inpatients. The top five adverse reactions in this patient group were bleeding, constipation, anticholinergic effects, sedation, and orthostatic effects. Potential drug-drug interactions as well as adverse drug reactions are alarmingly common in dermatological inpatients. Every other patient is at risk of experiencing such interactions or adverse reactions, and every twentieth patient receives a drug combination that should not be administered. Increased alertness is a must in order to identify patients at risk. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effective Potential Energies and Transport Cross Sections for Interactions of Hydrogen and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Arnold, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The interaction energies for N2-He and N2-H2 are calculated by accurate ab initio methods. The virial coefficient and differential scattering cross section for N2-H2 are calculated; the theoretical results are compared with experimental data. The transport collision integrals for N2-H2 and N2-N2 interactions are calculated and tabulated; the results yield transport coefficients that compare well with measured data. Transport coefficients are found to be determined accurately from the interaction energies for a specific configuration of the molecule formed from the interaction partners. Comparisons with results of measurement and accurate calculations demonstrate that the transport properties of complex molecular interactions can be determined rapidly and fairly accurately from the interaction energies of simpler system using combination rules for the short-range parameters of effective interaction energies and the coefficients for the long-range forces. The coefficients for a two-parameter temperature expansion of diffusion and viscosity are tabulated for a realistic universal potential energy that is based primarily on the results of very accurate calculations of the He-He interaction energy.

  18. Variance heterogeneity analysis for detection of potentially interacting genetic loci: method and its limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Duijn Cornelia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presence of interaction between a genotype and certain factor in determination of a trait's value, it is expected that the trait's variance is increased in the group of subjects having this genotype. Thus, test of heterogeneity of variances can be used as a test to screen for potentially interacting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In this work, we evaluated statistical properties of variance heterogeneity analysis in respect to the detection of potentially interacting SNPs in a case when an interaction variable is unknown. Results Through simulations, we investigated type I error for Bartlett's test, Bartlett's test with prior rank transformation of a trait to normality, and Levene's test for different genetic models. Additionally, we derived an analytical expression for power estimation. We showed that Bartlett's test has acceptable type I error in the case of trait following a normal distribution, whereas Levene's test kept nominal Type I error under all scenarios investigated. For the power of variance homogeneity test, we showed (as opposed to the power of direct test which uses information about known interacting factor that, given the same interaction effect, the power can vary widely depending on the non-estimable direct effect of the unobserved interacting variable. Thus, for a given interaction effect, only very wide limits of power of the variance homogeneity test can be estimated. Also we applied Levene's approach to test genome-wide homogeneity of variances of the C-reactive protein in the Rotterdam Study population (n = 5959. In this analysis, we replicate previous results of Pare and colleagues (2010 for the SNP rs12753193 (n = 21, 799. Conclusions Screening for differences in variances among genotypes of a SNP is a promising approach as a number of biologically interesting models may lead to the heterogeneity of variances. However, it should be kept in mind that the absence of variance heterogeneity for

  19. Potential drug-drug interactions with direct oral anticoagulants in elderly hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Heather L; Polasek, Thomas M

    2017-10-01

    To determine the prevalence and nature of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in elderly hospitalized patients. This was a retrospective observational study. Inclusion criteria were: aged over 65 years; taking apixaban, rivaroxaban or dabigatran; and admitted to the Repatriation General Hospital between April 2014 and July 2015. A list of clinically relevant 'perpetrator' drugs was compiled from product information, the Australian Medicines Handbook, the Australian National Prescribing Service resources, and local health network guidelines. The prevalence and nature of potential DDIs with DOACs was determined by comparing inpatient drug charts with the list of perpetrator drugs. There were 122 patients in the study with a mean age of 82 years. Most patients had nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and were taking DOACs to prevent thrombotic stroke (83%). Overall, 45 patients (37%) had a total of 54 potential DDIs. Thirty-five patients had potential pharmacodynamic DDIs with antidepressants, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antiplatelets (35/122, 29%). Nineteen patients had potential pharmacokinetic DDIs (19/122, 16%). Of these, 68% (13/19) were taking drugs that increase DOAC plasma concentrations (amiodarone, erythromycin, diltiazem or verapamil) and 32% (6/19) were taking drugs that decrease DOAC plasma concentrations (carbamazepine, primidone or phenytoin). There were no cases of patients taking contraindicated interacting drugs. Potential DDIs with DOACs in elderly hospital inpatients are relatively common, particularly interactions that may increase the risk of bleeding. The risk-benefit ratio of DOACs in elderly patients on polypharmacy should always be carefully considered.

  20. Potential effect of cationic liposomes on interactions with oral bacterial cells and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Marika; Morisaki, Hirobumi; Negishi, Yoichi; Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Miyazaki, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2016-01-01

    Although oral infectious diseases have been attributed to bacteria, drug treatments remain ineffective because bacteria and their products exist as biofilms. Cationic liposomes have been suggested to electrostatically interact with the negative charge on the bacterial surface, thereby improving the effects of conventional drug therapies. However, the electrostatic interaction between oral bacteria and cationic liposomes has not yet been examined in detail. The aim of the present study was to examine the behavior of cationic liposomes and Streptococcus mutans in planktonic cells and biofilms. Liposomes with or without cationic lipid were prepared using a reverse-phase evaporation method. The zeta potentials of conventional liposomes (without cationic lipid) and cationic liposomes were -13 and 8 mV, respectively, and both had a mean particle size of approximately 180 nm. We first assessed the interaction between liposomes and planktonic bacterial cells with a flow cytometer. We then used a surface plasmon resonance method to examine the binding of liposomes to biofilms. We confirmed the binding behavior of liposomes with biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The interactions between cationic liposomes and S. mutans cells and biofilms were stronger than those of conventional liposomes. Microscopic observations revealed that many cationic liposomes interacted with the bacterial mass and penetrated the deep layers of biofilms. In this study, we demonstrated that cationic liposomes had higher affinity not only to oral bacterial cells, but also biofilms than conventional liposomes. This electrostatic interaction may be useful as a potential drug delivery system to biofilms.

  1. Comparison of Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira biflexa genomes: analysis of potential leptospiral-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Prachi; Ramakrishnan, Gayatri; Dhandapani, Gunasekaran; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Madanan, Madathiparambil G

    2017-05-02

    Leptospirosis, a potentially life-threatening disease, remains the most widespread zoonosis caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira. The pathogenic spirochaete, Leptospira interrogans, is characterized by its ability to permeate human host tissues rapidly and colonize multiple organs in the host. In spite of the efforts taken to comprehend the pathophysiology of the pathogen and the heterogeneity posed by L. interrogans, the current knowledge on the mechanism of pathogenesis is modest. In an attempt to contribute towards the same, we demonstrate the use of an established structure-based protocol coupled with information on subcellular localization of proteins and their tissue-specificity, in recognizing a set of 49 biologically feasible interactions potentially mediated by proteins of L. interrogans in humans. We have also presented means to adjudge the physicochemical viability of the predicted host-pathogen interactions, for selected cases, in terms of interaction energies and geometric shape complementarity of the interacting proteins. Comparative analyses of proteins of L. interrogans and the saprophytic spirochaete, Leptospira biflexa, and their predicted involvement in interactions with human hosts, aided in underpinning the functional relevance of leptospiral-host protein-protein interactions specific to L. interrogans as well as those specific to L. biflexa. Our study presents characteristics of the pathogenic L. interrogans that are predicted to facilitate its ability to persist in human hosts.

  2. Potential Drug-Drug Interactions in Psychiatric Ward of a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify the prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in a psychiatric ward, their levels and association with risk factors. Methods: This study was conducted in the psychiatric ward of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Medical records of 415 patients were retrospectively reviewed for ...

  3. A method for computing the inter-residue interaction potentials for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2007-06-16

    Jun 16, 2007 ... [Luthra A, Jha A N, Ananthasuresh G K and Vishveswara S 2007 A method for computing the inter-residue interaction potentials for reduced amino acid alphabet; J. ... Therefore, a systematic approach to this problem is warranted so ... chemical and biological or quantitative measures are used. Dayhoff et al ...

  4. Repulsive baryonic interactions and lattice QCD observables at imaginary chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovchenko, Volodymyr; Pásztor, Attila; Fodor, Zoltán; Katz, Sandor D.; Stoecker, Horst

    2017-12-01

    The first principle lattice QCD methods allow to calculate the thermodynamic observables at finite temperature and imaginary chemical potential. These can be compared to the predictions of various phenomenological models. We argue that Fourier coefficients with respect to imaginary baryochemical potential are sensitive to modeling of baryonic interactions. As a first application of this sensitivity, we consider the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model with repulsive baryonic interactions, which are modeled by means of the excluded volume correction. The Fourier coefficients of the imaginary part of the net-baryon density at imaginary baryochemical potential - corresponding to the fugacity or virial expansion at real chemical potential - are calculated within this model, and compared with the Nt = 12 lattice data. The lattice QCD behavior of the first four Fourier coefficients up to T ≃ 185 MeV is described fairly well by an interacting HRG with a single baryon-baryon eigenvolume interaction parameter b ≃ 1 fm3, while the available lattice data on the difference χ2B - χ4B of baryon number susceptibilities is reproduced up to T ≃ 175 MeV.

  5. Quasi-emf under contact interaction of bodies during cutting as electron potential energy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that cutting quasi-emf measured under the contact interaction of a number of pure metals (molybdenum, titanium, niobium, iron, copper, beryllium, lead, nickel and cobalt), graphite and silicon correlates closely with Fermi levels calculated for them, i.e. it reflects the potential electron energy. Correlation is observed at different cutting rate (temperature) and consequently at different electron kinetic energy

  6. Stochastic quantum inflation for a canonical scalar field with linear self-interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panotopoulos, Grigoris [CENTRA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2017-10-15

    We apply Starobinsky's formalism of stochastic inflation to the case of a massless minimally coupled scalar field with linear self-interaction potential. We solve the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation exactly, and we obtain analytical expressions for the stochastic expectation values. (orig.)

  7. Single-ion and pair-interaction potentials near simple metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.N.; Barrera, R.G.; Cleveland, C.L.; Landman, U.

    1983-01-01

    Presented is a model for semi-infinite simple metals which does not require crystalline order or a single species, and thus is applicable to problems of defect energetics near the surface and random-alloy surfaces as well as ideal metal surfaces. The formulation is based on the use of ionic pseudopotentials and linear-response theory. An expression for the total energy is obtained which depends explicitly on ionic species and position. This expression is decomposed into a density-dependent term and single-ion and ionic pair-interaction potential terms. The single-ion potentials oscillate about a constant bulk value, with the magnitude of the oscillation decreasing rapidly away from the surface. The interaction between pairs of ions near the surface is shown to be a noncentral force interaction which differs significantly from the central-force bulk pair potential. The effect of quantum interference in the response of the semi-infinite electron gas to the ions is seen in both the single-ion and the pair-interaction potentials. Results are presented for the simple metals sodium, potassium, and rubidium

  8. Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Determination of the Interaction Potential in Liquid CD4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarini, E.; Barocchi, F.; Sampoli, M.; Venturi, G.; Bafile, U.

    2007-01-01

    Anisotropic interactions of liquid CD 4 are studied in detail by comparison of inelastic neutron Brillouin scattering data with molecular dynamics simulations using up to four different models of the methane site-site potential. We demonstrate that the experimental dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) acts as a highly discriminating quantity for possible interaction schemes. In particular, the Q evolution of the spectra enables a selective probing of the short- and medium-range features of the anisotropic potentials. We show that the preferential configuration of methane dimers at liquid densities can thus be discerned by analyzing the orientation-dependent model potential curves, in light of the experimental and simulation results

  9. Interaction potentials lithium and potassium ions with argon, krypton and xenon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palyukh, B.M.; Rykalyuk, R.E.; Chigin', V.I.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of obtained experimental dependences of integral cross sections of elastic scattering of Li + and K + alkali metal ions with atoms of Ar, Kr and Xe inert gases on collision energy as well as quantum oscillations of glory detected for the first time for ion-atomic collisions determined were potentials of these particle interaction in a wide range of internucleus distances including repulsion potential minimum and remote-action polarization attraction. A method for obtaining five free parameters of the potential suggested in the form of piecewise continuous function permitting to form potential minimum by means of three values: put depth epsilon, equilibrium distance Rsub(m) and curvature Ksub(epsilon) independent of change of potential at remote and small distances [ru

  10. Monomerization of cytosolic mature smac attenuates interaction with IAPs and potentiation of caspase activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Burke

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The four residues at the amino-terminus of mature Smac/DIABLO are an IAP binding motif (IBM. Upon exit from mitochondria, mature Smac interacts with inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs, abrogating caspase inhibition. We used the ubiquitin fusion model to express mature Smac in the cytosol. Transiently expressed mature Smac56-239 (called Smac56 and Smac60-239 (called Smac60, which lacks the IBM, interacted with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP. However, stable expression produced wild type Smac56 that failed to homodimerize, interact with XIAP, and potentiate caspase activation. Cytosolic Smac60 retained these functions. Cytosolic Smac56 apparently becomes posttranslationally modified at the dimer interface region, which obliterated the epitope for a monoclonal antibody. Cytosolic Smacδ, which has the IBM but lacks amino acids 62-105, homodimerized and weakly interacted with XIAP, but failed to potentiate apoptosis. These findings suggest that the IBM of Smac is a recognition point for a posttranslational modification(s that blocks homodimerization and IAP interaction, and that amino acids 62-105 are required for the proapoptotic function of Smac.

  11. Potential Drug-Drug Interactions Among Critically Ill Pediatric Patients in a Tertiary Pulmonary Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzad, Maryam; Arenas-Lopez, Sara; Baniasadi, Shadi

    2018-02-01

    Patients in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) are at increased risk of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) because of the complexity of pharmacotherapy. The current study aimed to assess the rate, pattern, risk factors, and management of pDDIs in the PICU of an academic pulmonary hospital. A prospective observational study was conducted for 6 months. Pharmacotherapy data of PICU-admitted patients were evaluated by a clinical pharmacologist. Interacting drugs, reliability, mechanism, potential outcome, and clinical management of pDDIs were identified using the Lexi-Interact database. Logistic regression was applied to analyze the risk factors that could be associated with the interactions. One hundred and twenty-three medication profiles were evaluated during the study period. Diseases of the respiratory system were the main diagnoses among intensive care unit (ICU)-admitted patients (56.1%). A total of 38.6% of the patients exposed to at least 1 major and/or contraindicated interaction during ICU admission. Most pDDIs occurred through metabolic (35.4%) and additive (34.8%) mechanisms. The existence of pDDIs was significantly associated with the number of prescribed medications. Exposure to pDDIs is frequent in critically ill pediatric patients and related to the number of medications. Daily and close cooperation between clinicians and clinical pharmacologists is recommended to prevent harmful outcomes of DDIs. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  12. Potential drug–drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualetti G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Pasqualetti, Sara Tognini, Valeria Calsolaro, Antonio Polini, Fabio Monzani Geriatrics Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug–drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug–drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug–drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with

  13. Frequency of potential interactions between drugs in medical prescriptions in a city in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genici Weyh Bleich

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Drug interactions form part of current clinical practice and they affect between 3 and 5% of polypharmacy patients. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions for adult and elderly patients. TYPE OF STUDY AND SETTING: Cross-sectional pharmacoepidemiological survey in the Parque Verde housing project, municipality of Cascavel, Paraná, Brazil, between December 2006 and February 2007. METHODS: Stratified cluster sampling, proportional to the total number of homes in the housing project, was used. The sample consisted of 95 homes and 96 male or female patients aged 19 or over, with medical prescriptions for at least two pharmaceutical drugs. Interactions were identified using DrugDigest, Medscape and Micromedex softwares. RESULTS: Most of the patients were female (69.8%, married (59.4% and in the age group of 60 years or over (56.3%, with an income less than or equal to three minimum monthly salaries (81.3% and less than eight years of schooling (69.8%; 90.6% of the patients were living with another person. The total number of pharmaceutical drugs was 406 (average of 4.2 medications per patient. The drugs most prescribed were antihypertensives (47.5%. The frequency of drug interactions was 66.6%. Among the 154 potential drug interactions, 4.6% were classified as major, 65.6% as moderate and 20.1% as minor. CONCLUSION: The high frequency of drug prescriptions with a potential for differentiated interactions indicates a situation that has so far been little explored, albeit a reality in household surveys.

  14. Association of COMT and COMT-DRD2 interaction with creative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun eZhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that genes involved in dopamine (DA transmission may contribute to creativity. Among these genes, the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT and the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2 are the most promising candidates. Our previous study has revealed evidence for the involvement of DRD2 in creative potential. The present study extended our previous study by systematically exploring the association of COMT with creative potential as well as the interaction between COMT and DRD2. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs covering COMT were genotyped in 543 healthy Chinese college students whose creative potentials were assessed by divergent thinking tests. Single SNP analysis showed that rs174697 was nominally associated with verbal originality, two SNPs (rs737865 and rs5993883 were nominally associated with figural fluency, and two SNPs (rs737865 and rs4680 were nominally associated with figural originality. Haplotype analysis showed that, the TCT and CCT haplotype (rs737865-rs174675-rs5993882 were nominally associated with figural originality, and the TATGCAG and CGCGGGA haplotype (rs4646312-rs6269-rs4633-rs6267-rs4818-rs4680-rs769224 were nominally associated with figural originality and verbal flexibility, respectively. However, none of these nominal findings survived correction for multiple testing. Gene-gene interaction analysis identified one significant four-way interaction of rs174675 (COMT, rs174697 (COMT, rs1076560 (DRD2 and rs4436578 (DRD2 on verbal fluency, one significant four-way interaction of rs174675 (COMT, rs4818 (COMT, rs1076560 (DRD2 and rs4648317 (DRD2 on verbal flexibility, and one significant three-way interaction of rs5993883 (COMT, rs4648319 (DRD2 and rs4648317 (DRD2 on figural flexibility. In conclusion, the present study provides nominal evidence for the involvement of COMT in creative potential and suggests that DA related genes may act in coordination to contribute to creativity.

  15. Co-creative dance practices - how participants’ mutual exploration of interactional potentials cultivates embodied narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne

    Based on an evaluation of a national dance project in Denmark, this paper explores how the sensing and moving body is essentially shaped in the mutual affaires of interaction. The national project, running from 2014-2017, was led by The Dancehalls, funded by 2.7 mill. Euro, and involved more than...... 32 municipalities (www.tafatomdansen.dk). Analyses of the co-creative dance practices specifically highlight how processes of transmission unfold between participants’ exploration of interactional potentials within the group and participants’ subjective dance experiences. The discussion centres...

  16. Co-creative dance practices - how participants’ mutual exploration of interactional potentials cultivates embodied narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne

    Based on an evaluation of a national dance project in Denmark, this paper explores how the sensing and moving body is essentially shaped in the mutual affaires of interaction. The national project, running from 2014-2017, was led by The Dancehalls, funded by 2.7 mill. Euro, and involved more than...... 32 municipalities (www.tafatomdansen.dk). Analyses of the co-creative dance practices specifically highlight how processes of transmission unfold between participants’ exploration of interactional potentials within the group and participants’ subjective dance experiences. The discussion centres...... on clarifying how embodied narratives are modified and changed on the premise of reciprocity unfolding in social contexts....

  17. Medicinal plant reported with adverse reactions in Cuba: potential interactions with conventional drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Martínez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Herbal drugs are a mixture of active compounds and the chemical complexity of each formulation increase with the possibility of interactions between them and conventional drugs. Many mechanisms are implicated in the interactions; scientific community has dedicated the attentions to enzymes as P-gp and CYP450. Aims: To investigate in the literature the principal plants with suspicions of adverse reactions in Cuba and their potential interactions with conventional drugs. Methods: PubMed was the database used as source of information until February 2014. Key words: Herb-Drug, Drug-Plant, Herbal–Drug, Interactions with scientific names of plants was used. Information was structured and analysed with EndNote X4. Analysis and integration of the information: Allium sativum L. (garlic was the plant with the high number of studies related with CYP450 and P-gp. Plants with great demand as Morinda citrifolia L. (noni, Psidium guajava L. (guayaba, Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger and Eucalyptus spp. (eucalyptus have a very small number of studies. The professionals of the health should keep in mind the possibility of interactions between herbal products and conventional drugs to increase the effectiveness of phytotherapy. Conclusions: It is necessary enhance reports and investigations and to put to disposition of the system of health information on the interactions of plants and to stimulate the investigation that offers information for the rational use of our medicinal plants.

  18. Coupled dynamics of interacting spin-1 bosons in a double-well potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, D. W. S.; Foerster, A.; Gusmão, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of dynamical processes involving two or three particles in a double-well potential. Motivated by experimental realizations of such a system with optically trapped cold atoms, we focus on spin-1 bosons with special attention on the effects of a spin-dependent interaction in addition to the usual Hubbard-like repulsive one. For a sufficiently weak tunneling amplitude in comparison to the dominant Hubbard coupling, particle motion is strongly correlated, occurring only under fine-tuned relationships between well-depth asymmetry and interactions. We highlight processes involving tunneling of coupled particle pairs and triads, emphasizing the role of the spin-dependent interaction in resonance conditions.

  19. Understanding consumer motivations for interacting in online food communities – potential for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lina; Sørensen, Bjarne Taulo; Tudoran, Ana Alina

    This study contributes to the understanding of online user communities as a potential source of innovation. That would require an interest from users in interacting in such communities. In order to establish interaction, users must provide as well as consume information. However, depending...... on the innovation task, one may be more important than the other. It is therefore important to understand, how companies can increase user willingness to engage in these different interaction forms. This study investigates the influence of various motivation factors and user interests on intention to provide...... or consume information in online food communities. A survey was conducted among 1009 respondents followed by analysis based on Structural Equation Modelling. Results revealed the effect of motivation factors to be stronger than basic consumer interests indicating that companies can influence the intended...

  20. A new method for detecting interactions between the senses in event-related potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondan, Matthias; Röder, B.

    2006-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) can be used in multisensory research to determine the point in time when different senses start to interact, for example, the auditory and the visual system. For this purpose, the ERP to bimodal stimuli (AV) is often compared to the sum of the ERPs to auditory (A......) and visual (V) stimuli: AV - (A + V). If the result is non-zero, this is interpreted as an indicator for multisensory interactions. Using this method, several studies have demonstrated auditory-visual interactions as early as 50 ms after stimulus onset. The subtraction requires that A, V, and AV do...... not contain common activity: This activity would be subtracted twice from one ERP and would, therefore, contaminate the result. In the present study, ERPs to unimodal, bimodal, and trimodal auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli (T) were recorded. We demonstrate that (T + TAV) - (TA + TV) is equivalent to AV...

  1. Mach-Zehnder interferometry with interacting Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrada, T.

    2014-01-01

    Mach-Zehnder interferometry with interacting Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential Particle-wave duality has enabled the construction of interferometers for massive particles such as electrons, neutrons, atoms or molecules. Implementing atom interferometry has required the development of analogues to the optical beam-splitters, phase shifters or recombiners to enable the coherent, i.e. phase-preserving manipulation of quantum superpositions. While initially demonstrating the wave nature of particles, atom interferometers have evolved into some of the most advanced devices for precision measurement, both for technological applications and tests of the fundamental laws of nature. Bose- Einstein condensates (BEC) of ultracold atoms are particular matter waves: they exhibit a collective many-body wave function and macroscopic coherence properties. As such, they have often been considered as an analogue to optical laser elds and it is natural to wonder whether BECs can provide to atom interferometry a similar boost as the laser brought to optical interferometry. One fundamental dierence between atomic BECs and lasers elds is the presence of atomic interactions, yielding an intrinsic non-linearity. On one hand, interactions can lead to eects destroying the phase coherence and limiting the interrogation time of trapped BEC interferometers. On the other hand, they can be used to generate nonclassical (e.g. squeezed) states to improve the sensitivity of interferometric measurements beyond the standard quantum limit (SQL). In this thesis, we present the realization of a full Mach-Zehnder interferometric sequence with trapped, interacting BECs con ned on an atom chip. Our interferometer relies on the coherent manipulation of a BEC in a magnetic double-well potential. For this purpose, we developed a novel type of matter-wave recombiner, an element which so far was missing in BEC atom optics. We have been able to exploit interactions to generate a squeezed

  2. Collision kernels in the eikonal approximation for Lennard-Jones interaction potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, S.

    1985-03-01

    The velocity changing collisions are conveniently described by collisional kernels. These kernels depend on an interaction potential and there is a necessity for evaluating them for realistic interatomic potentials. Using the collision kernels, we are able to investigate the redistribution of atomic population's caused by the laser light and velocity changing collisions. In this paper we present the method of evaluating the collision kernels in the eikonal approximation. We discuss the influence of the potential parameters Rsub(o)sup(i), epsilonsub(o)sup(i) on kernel width for a given atomic state. It turns out that unlike the collision kernel for the hard sphere model of scattering the Lennard-Jones kernel is not so sensitive to changes of Rsub(o)sup(i) as the previous one. Contrary to the general tendency of approximating collisional kernels by the Gaussian curve, kernels for the Lennard-Jones potential do not exhibit such a behaviour. (author)

  3. Effective Potential Energies and Transport Cross Sections for Atom-Molecule Interactions of Nitrogen and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The potential energy surfaces for H2-N and N2-N interactions are calculated by accurate ab initio methods and applied to determine transport data. The results confirm that an effective potential energy for accurately determining transport properties can be calculated using a single orientation. A simple method is developed to determine the dispersion coefficients of effective potential energies Effective potential energies required for O2-O collisions are determ=ined. The H2-N, N2-N, O2-H, and O2-O collision integrals are calculated and tabulated for a large range of temperatures. The theoretical values of the N2-N and O2-O diffusion coefficients compare well with measured data available at room temperature.

  4. Potential effect on the interaction of highly charged ion with graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haibo; Sun, Mengli; Liu, Fengfei; Yang, Di; Zhang, Duofei; Yuan, Wei; Du, Xin; Chen, Hao; Wang, Lanxi; Wang, Tieshan

    2017-09-01

    Graphene is two dimensional materials which is composited by carbon atoms in honeycomb like lattice. Because of its wonderful characteristics, graphene was studied extensively. In this study, the interaction of highly charged ions (HCI) with the graphene was studied via Raman spectroscopy. The difference of Raman spectra of graphene impacted by HCIs with different charge states was presented. The intensity ratio of D peak to G peak varied with the square root of fluence was displayed. A model that was fitted with experimental results was proposed. According to the model, the potential effect that the size of damaged region grew with potential energy of HCI was proposed for the interaction of HCI with graphene.

  5. Essential multimeric enzymes in kinetoplastid parasites: A host of potentially druggable protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmuth, Leah M; Johnson, Meredith G; Gavenonis, Jason

    2017-06-01

    Parasitic diseases caused by kinetoplastid parasites of the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania are an urgent public health crisis in the developing world. These closely related species possess a number of multimeric enzymes in highly conserved pathways involved in vital functions, such as redox homeostasis and nucleotide synthesis. Computational alanine scanning of these protein-protein interfaces has revealed a host of potentially ligandable sites on several established and emerging anti-parasitic drug targets. Analysis of interfaces with multiple clustered hotspots has suggested several potentially inhibitable protein-protein interactions that may have been overlooked by previous large-scale analyses focusing solely on secondary structure. These protein-protein interactions provide a promising lead for the development of new peptide and macrocycle inhibitors of these enzymes.

  6. Life history determines genetic structure and evolutionary potential of host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Luke G; Thrall, Peter H; Burdon, Jeremy J; Linde, Celeste C

    2008-12-01

    Measures of population genetic structure and diversity of disease-causing organisms are commonly used to draw inferences regarding their evolutionary history and potential to generate new variation in traits that determine interactions with their hosts. Parasite species exhibit a range of population structures and life-history strategies, including different transmission modes, life-cycle complexity, off-host survival mechanisms and dispersal ability. These are important determinants of the frequency and predictability of interactions with host species. Yet the complex causal relationships between spatial structure, life history and the evolutionary dynamics of parasite populations are not well understood. We demonstrate that a clear picture of the evolutionary potential of parasitic organisms and their demographic and evolutionary histories can only come from understanding the role of life history and spatial structure in influencing population dynamics and epidemiological patterns.

  7. Multiple scattering of low energy ions in matter: Influence of energy loss and interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekhtiche, A. [Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), BP 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Faculté des Sciences et de la Technologie, Université Yahia Farès de Médéa (Algeria); Khalal-Kouache, K., E-mail: kkouache@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), BP 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of inelastic energy loss and interaction potential on transmitted ions at low energy is studied. For this purpose, angular distributions of slow He{sup +} ions transmitted through thin Ag films are calculated using the theory of multiple scattering. Thin films (20–50 Å at 2 keV and 50–200 Å at 10 keV) are considered so that the total path length of transmitted ions can be approximated by the value of the target thickness in this calculation. The corresponding values of the relative energy loss ΔE/E are comprised between 0.04 and 0.17. We show that even if low values of the thickness are considered, the total energy loss of ions in the target should be included in the calculation. These calculated angular distributions are also influenced by the potential used to describe the interaction between the incident ion and the target atom.

  8. Effect of taurine and potential interactions with caffeine on cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Shimada, Kayoko; Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Azuma, Junichi; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2014-05-01

    The major impetus behind the rise in energy drink popularity among adults is their ability to heighten mental alertness, improve physical performance and supply energy. However, accompanying the exponential growth in energy drink usage have been recent case reports and analyses from the National Poison Data System, raising questions regarding the safety of energy drinks. Most of the safety concerns have centered on the effect of energy drinks on cardiovascular and central nervous system function. Although the effects of caffeine excess have been widely studied, little information is available on potential interactions between the other active ingredients of energy drinks and caffeine. One of the active ingredients often mentioned as a candidate for interactions with caffeine is the beta-amino acid, taurine. Although taurine is considered a conditionally essential nutrient for humans and is thought to play a key role in several human diseases, clinical studies evaluating the effects of taurine are limited. However, based on this review regarding possible interactions between caffeine and taurine, we conclude that taurine should neutralize several untoward effects of caffeine excess. In agreement with this conclusion, the European Union's Scientific Committee on Food published a report in March 2003 summarizing its investigation into potential interactions of the ingredients in energy drinks. At the cardiovascular level, they concluded that "if there are any interactions between caffeine and taurine, taurine might reduce the cardiovascular effects of caffeine." Although these interactions remain to be further examined in humans, the physiological functions of taurine appear to be inconsistent with the adverse cardiovascular symptoms associated with excessive consumption of caffeine-taurine containing beverages.

  9. Multi-time Schrödinger equations cannot contain interaction potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrat, Sören, E-mail: petrat@math.lmu.de [Mathematisches Institut, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Theresienstr. 39, 80333 München (Germany); Tumulka, Roderich, E-mail: tumulka@math.rutgers.edu [Department of Mathematics, Rutgers University, 110 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Multi-time wave functions are wave functions that have a time variable for every particle, such as ϕ(t{sub 1},x{sub 1},...,t{sub N},x{sub N}). They arise as a relativistic analog of the wave functions of quantum mechanics but can be applied also in quantum field theory. The evolution of a wave function with N time variables is governed by N Schrödinger equations, one for each time variable. These Schrödinger equations can be inconsistent with each other, i.e., they can fail to possess a joint solution for every initial condition; in fact, the N Hamiltonians need to satisfy a certain commutator condition in order to be consistent. While this condition is automatically satisfied for non-interacting particles, it is a challenge to set up consistent multi-time equations with interaction. We prove for a wide class of multi-time Schrödinger equations that the presence of interaction potentials (given by multiplication operators) leads to inconsistency. We conclude that interaction has to be implemented instead by creation and annihilation of particles, which, in fact, can be done consistently [S. Petrat and R. Tumulka, “Multi-time wave functions for quantum field theory,” Ann. Physics (to be published)]. We also prove the following result: When a cut-off length δ > 0 is introduced (in the sense that the multi-time wave function is defined only on a certain set of spacelike configurations, thereby breaking Lorentz invariance), then the multi-time Schrödinger equations with interaction potentials of range δ are consistent; however, in the desired limit δ → 0 of removing the cut-off, the resulting multi-time equations are interaction-free, which supports the conclusion expressed in the title.

  10. Fokker-action principle for a system of particles interacting through a linear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivacoba, A.

    1984-01-01

    A Fokker-action principle for a system of scalar particles interacting through their time-symmetric relativistic generalization of linear potential is obtained. From this action, motion equations and conservation laws for the total energy and angular momentum of the system, in which field contributions are included, are derived. These equations are exactly applied to the problem suggested by Schild of two particles moving in circular concentric orbits

  11. Formation of chain structures in systems of charged grains interacting via isotropic pair potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaulina, O. S.; Lisina, I. I.; Koss, K. G., E-mail: Xeniya.Koss@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Conditions for the formation of chain structures of charged grains confined in the gravitational field by external electric fields are studied analytically and numerically. The relationships between the parameters of the pair interaction potential, the number of grains, and the electric field gradient in the trap are found. A criterion for the violation of stable equilibrium in a quasi-one-dimensional chain of grains and the formation of a new configuration in the system is proposed.

  12. Remarks on the proximity scaling applied to heavy ion interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, M.; Barranco, M.; Vinas, X.; Ngo, C.; Tomasi, E.; Ngo, H.

    1983-01-01

    Two heavy ion interaction potentials have been computed using the same nuclear force. One has been obtained from symmetric semi-infinite nuclear matter slabs and the other one from finite nuclei. After a proximity scaling, two rather different universal functions are obtained. We argue that this is due to the different surface thickness of semi-infinite nuclear matter and finite nuclei. Consequently, it is the universal function obtained from the nucleus-nucleus systematics that should be used in the applications

  13. An evaluation of diverse methods of obtaining effective Schroedinger interaction potentials for elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, K.; Allen, L.J.; Steward, C.; Hodgson, P.E.; Sofianos, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Direct solution of the Schroedinger equation and inversion methods of analysis of elastic scattering data are considered to evaluate the information that they can provide about the physical interaction between colliding nuclear particles. It was found that both optical model and inversion methods based upon inverse scattering theories are subject to ambiguities. Therefore, it is essential that elastic scattering data analyses are consistent with microscopic calculations of the potential. 25 refs

  14. Life history determines genetic structure and evolutionary potential of host–parasite interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, Luke G.; Thrall, Peter H.; Burdon, Jeremy J.; Linde, Celeste C.

    2008-01-01

    Measures of population genetic structure and diversity of disease-causing organisms are commonly used to draw inferences regarding their evolutionary history and potential to generate new variation in traits that determine interactions with their hosts. Parasite species exhibit a range of population structures and life-history strategies, including different transmission modes, life-cycle complexity, off-host survival mechanisms and dispersal ability. These are important determinants of the f...

  15. Potential herb-drug interactions found in a community pharmacy patients

    OpenAIRE

    C. Batista; C. Pinho; M. Castel-Branco; M. Caramona; I. Figueiredo

    2015-01-01

    Phytotherapy has always played a leading role in therapeutics. However, a strong knowledge of the risk-benefit relationship of herbal products by patients and health professionals is necessary. The goals of this study were to characterize the consumption pattern of medicinal plants in patients in a community pharmacy, identify potential herb-drug interactions, and establish a list of recommendations for health professionals and/or patients in order to prevent/minimize negative outcomes arisin...

  16. Interface bonding in silicon oxide nanocontacts: interaction potentials and force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierez-Kien, M.; Craciun, A. D.; Pinon, A. V.; Le Roux, S.; Gallani, J. L.; Rastei, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    The interface bonding between two silicon-oxide nanoscale surfaces has been studied as a function of atomic nature and size of contacting asperities. The binding forces obtained using various interaction potentials are compared with experimental force curves measured in vacuum with an atomic force microscope. In the limit of small nanocontacts (typically measured with sensitive probes the bonding is found to be influenced by thermal-induced fluctuations. Using interface interactions described by Morse, embedded atom model, or Lennard-Jones potential within reaction rate theory, we investigate three bonding types of covalent and van der Waals nature. The comparison of numerical and experimental results reveals that a Lennard-Jones-like potential originating from van der Waals interactions captures the binding characteristics of dry silicon oxide nanocontacts, and likely of other nanoscale materials adsorbed on silicon oxide surfaces. The analyses reveal the importance of the dispersive surface energy and of the effective contact area which is altered by stretching speeds. The mean unbinding force is found to decrease as the contact spends time in the attractive regime. This contact weakening is featured by a negative aging coefficient which broadens and shifts the thermal-induced force distribution at low stretching speeds.

  17. Virus–Bacteria Interactions: Implications and Potential for the Applied and Agricultural Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Moore

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic virus–bacteria interactions have recently become an emerging topic of study due to multiple significant examples related to human pathogens of clinical interest. However, such omnipresent and likely important interactions for viruses and bacteria relevant to the applied and agricultural sciences have not been reviewed or compiled. The fundamental basis of this review is that these interactions have importance and deserve more investigation, as numerous potential consequences and applications arising from their discovery are relevant to the applied sciences. The purpose of this review is to highlight and summarize eukaryotic virus–bacteria findings in the food/water, horticultural, and animal sciences. In many cases in the agricultural sciences, mechanistic understandings of the effects of virus–bacteria interactions remain unstudied, and many studies solely focus on co-infections of bacterial and viral pathogens. Given recent findings relative to human viral pathogens, further research related to virus–bacteria interactions would likely result in numerous discoveries and beneficial applications.

  18. Cyclin D3 interacts with human activating transcription factor 5 and potentiates its transcription activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenjin; Sun Maoyun; Jiang Jianhai; Shen Xiaoyun; Sun Qing; Liu Weicheng; Shen Hailian; Gu Jianxin

    2004-01-01

    The Cyclin D3 protein is a member of the D-type cyclins. Besides serving as cell cycle regulators, D-type cyclins have been reported to be able to interact with several transcription factors and modulate their transcriptional activations. Here we report that human activating transcription factor 5 (hATF5) is a new interacting partner of Cyclin D3. The interaction was confirmed by in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro binding analysis. Neither interaction between Cyclin D1 and hATF5 nor interaction between Cyclin D2 and hATF5 was observed. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that Cyclin D3 could colocalize with hATF5 in the nuclear region. Cyclin D3 could potentiate hATF5 transcriptional activity independently of its Cdk4 partner. But Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D2 had no effect on hATF5 transcriptional activity. These data provide a new clue to understand the new role of Cyclin D3 as a transcriptional regulator

  19. Predicting potential drug-drug interactions by integrating chemical, biological, phenotypic and network data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yanlin; Liu, Feng; Luo, Fei; Tian, Gang; Li, Xiaohong

    2017-01-05

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the major concerns in drug discovery. Accurate prediction of potential DDIs can help to reduce unexpected interactions in the entire lifecycle of drugs, and are important for the drug safety surveillance. Since many DDIs are not detected or observed in clinical trials, this work is aimed to predict unobserved or undetected DDIs. In this paper, we collect a variety of drug data that may influence drug-drug interactions, i.e., drug substructure data, drug target data, drug enzyme data, drug transporter data, drug pathway data, drug indication data, drug side effect data, drug off side effect data and known drug-drug interactions. We adopt three representative methods: the neighbor recommender method, the random walk method and the matrix perturbation method to build prediction models based on different data. Thus, we evaluate the usefulness of different information sources for the DDI prediction. Further, we present flexible frames of integrating different models with suitable ensemble rules, including weighted average ensemble rule and classifier ensemble rule, and develop ensemble models to achieve better performances. The experiments demonstrate that different data sources provide diverse information, and the DDI network based on known DDIs is one of most important information for DDI prediction. The ensemble methods can produce better performances than individual methods, and outperform existing state-of-the-art methods. The datasets and source codes are available at https://github.com/zw9977129/drug-drug-interaction/ .

  20. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Anders S., E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang, E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Elstner, Marcus [Theoretische Chemische Biologie, Universität Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  1. Proper construction of ab initio global potential surfaces with accurate long-range interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2000-01-01

    An efficient procedure based on the reproducing kernel Hilbert space interpolation method is presented for constructing intermolecular potential energy surfaces (PES) using not only calculated ab initio data but also a priori information on long-range interactions. Explicitly, use of the reciprocal power reproducing kernel on the semiinfinite interval [0,∞) yields a set of exact linear relations between dispersion (multipolar) coefficients and PES data points at finite internuclear separations. Consequently, given a combined set of ab initio data and the values of dispersion (multipolar) coefficients, the potential interpolation problem subject to long-range interaction constraints can be solved to render globally smooth, asymptotically accurate ab initio potential energy surfaces. Very good results have been obtained for the one-dimensional He-He potential curve and the two-dimensional Ne-CO PES. The construction of the Ne-CO PES was facilitated by invoking a new reproducing kernel for the angular coordinate based on the optimally stable and shape-preserving Bernstein basis functions. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  2. Optical potentials derived from microscopic separable interactions including binding and recoil effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siciliano, E.R.; Walker, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    We first consider a projectile scattering from a nucleon bound in a fixed potential. A separable Galilean invariant projectile-nucleon interaction is adopted. Without using the fixed scatterer approximation or using closure on the intermediate target nucleon states we obtain various forms for the projectile-bound nucleon t matrix. Effects due to intermediate target excitation and nucleon recoil are discussed. By making the further approximations of closure and fixed scatterers we make connection with the work of previous authors. By generalizing to projectile interaction with several bound nucleons and examining the appropriate multiple scattering series we identify the optical potential for projectile elastic scattering from the many-body system. Different optical potentials are obtained for different projectile-bound nucleon t matrices, and we study the differences predicted by these dissimilar optical potentials for elastic scattering. In a model problem, we study pion-nucleus elastic scattering and compare the predictions obtained by adopting procedures used by (1) Landau, Phatak, and Tabakin and (2) Piepho-Walker to the predictions obtained in a less restrictive, but computationally difficult treatment

  3. Empirical intermolecular potential from depolarized interaction-induced light scattering spectra for tetrafluoromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Mohamed Sayed Abdel

    2002-07-01

    Depolarized interaction-induced light scattering spectra of tetrafluoromethane in the frequency range 2-150 cm-1 at 294.5 K and 0.91 mol/l with the interaction pressure virial coefficient and viscosity have been used for deriving the empirical multiparameter Morse-Morse-Morse-Spline-van der Waals (M3SV), Lennard-Jones, Kihara, and exp-6 intermolecular potentials. The line shape at relatively low frequencies is determined largely by the effect of bound and free transitions. At intermediate frequencies it is sensitive to both the attractive part of the potential and the short-range part of the polarizability anisotropy. The high frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision-induced rotational Raman effect and estimates for the dipole-quadrupole and dipole-octopole polarizabilities A and E, respectively, are obtained. Absolute zeroth and second moments have been measured and compared with theoretical calculations using these models of the intermolecular potentials. The results show that M3SV is the most accurate potential yet reported for this system.

  4. Possible Experiment for the Demonstration of Neutron Waves Interaction with Spatially Oscillating Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloi Mădălina Mihaela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of problems in neutron optics is well described by a theory based on application of the effective potential model. It was assumed that the concept of the effective potential in neutron optics have a limited region of validity and ceases to be correct in the case of the giant acceleration of a matter. To test this hypothesis a new Ultra Cold neutron experiment for the observation neutron interaction with potential structure oscillating in space was proposed. The report is focused on the model calculations of the topography of sample surface that oscillate in space. These calculations are necessary to find an optimal parameters and geometry of the planned experiment.

  5. Potential herb-drug interactions found in a community pharmacy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Batista

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytotherapy has always played a leading role in therapeutics. However, a strong knowledge of the risk-benefit relationship of herbal products by patients and health professionals is necessary. The goals of this study were to characterize the consumption pattern of medicinal plants in patients in a community pharmacy, identify potential herb-drug interactions, and establish a list of recommendations for health professionals and/or patients in order to prevent/minimize negative outcomes arising from these interactions. In a sample of 25 patients, 24 cases of potential herb-drug interactions were detected. Most of the cases corresponded to the simultaneous use of a conventional medication with Ginkgo. The recommendation list involved monitoring the effectiveness and safety of conventional therapy associated with the use of medicinal plants, with particular focus on clinical and laboratory monitoring of the occurrence of bleeding, blood pressure, glycaemia and liver function. The results indicate that there is still a lack of knowledge about the possible risks of herbal products, which may adversely affect patient’s health. The pharmacist is in prime position to raise awareness in the population, avoiding harmful situations for the patient's health.

  6. Subsystem-DFT potential-energy curves for weakly interacting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüns, Danny; Klahr, Kevin; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Visscher, Lucas; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2015-06-14

    Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (DFT) within the local-density approximation (LDA) or the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) is known to fail for the correct description of London dispersion interactions. Often, not even bound potential-energy surfaces are obtained for van der Waals complexes, unless special correction schemes are employed. In contrast to that, there has been some evidence for the fact that subsystem-based density functional theory produces interaction energies for weakly bound systems which are superior to Kohn-Sham DFT results without dispersion corrections. This is usually attributed to an error cancellation between the approximate exchange-correlation and non-additive kinetic-energy functionals employed in subsystem DFT. Here, we investigate the accuracy of subsystem DFT for weakly interacting systems in detail, paying special attention to the shape of the potential-energy surfaces (PESs). Our test sets include the extensive S22x5 and S66x8 data sets. Our results indicate that subsystem DFT PESs strongly vary depending on the functional. LDA results are usually quite good, but behave differently from their KS counterparts. GGA results from the popular Perdew-Wang (PW91) set of functionals produce PESs that are often, but not in general overbinding. Results from Becke-Perdew (BP86) GGAs, by contrast, show the typical problems known from the corresponding KS results. We provide some preliminary results for empirical corrections for both PW91 and BP86 in subsystem DFT.

  7. Interfacial energetics of two-dimensional colloidal clusters generated with a tunable anharmonic interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilou, Elaa; Du, Di; Kuei, Steve; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2018-02-01

    Interfacial characteristics are critical to various properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials such as band alignment at a heterojunction and nucleation kinetics in a 2D crystal. Despite the desire to harness these enhanced interfacial properties for engineering new materials, unexpected phase transitions and defects, unique to the 2D morphology, have left a number of open questions. In particular, the effects of configurational anisotropy, which are difficult to isolate experimentally, and their influence on interfacial properties are not well understood. In this work, we begin to probe this structure-thermodynamic relationship, using a rotating magnetic field to generate an anharmonic interaction potential in a 2D system of paramagnetic particles. At low magnetic field strengths, weakly interacting colloidal particles form non-close-packed, fluidlike droplets, whereas, at higher field strengths, crystallites with hexagonal ordering are observed. We examine spatial and interfacial properties of these 2D colloidal clusters by measuring the local bond orientation order parameter and interfacial stiffness as a function of the interaction strength. To our knowledge, this is the first study to measure the tunable interfacial stiffness of a 2D colloidal cluster by controlling particle interactions using external fields.

  8. Erythromycin potentiates PR interval prolonging effect of verapamil in the rat: A pharmacodynamic drug interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakhel, Yaman; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2006-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers and macrolide antibiotics account for many drug interactions. Anecdotal reports suggest interactions between the two resulting in severe side effects. We studied the interaction between verapamil and erythromycin in the rat to see whether it occurs at the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamic level. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received doses of 1 mg/kg verapamil or 100 mg/kg erythromycin alone or in combination (n = 6/group). Serial blood samples (0-6 h) were taken for determination of the drug concentrations using HPLC. Electrocardiograms were recorded (0-6 h) through subcutaneously inserted lead II. Binding of the drugs to plasma proteins was studied using spiked plasma. Verapamil prolonged PR but not QT interval. Erythromycin prolonged QT but not PR interval. The combination resulted in a significant increase in PR interval prolongation and AV node blocks but did not further prolong QT interval. Pharmacokinetics and protein binding of neither drug were altered by the other. Our rat data confirm the anecdotal human case reports that combination of erythromycin and verapamil can result in potentiation of the cardiovascular response. The interaction appears to be at the pharmacodynamic rather than pharmacokinetic level hence may be extrapolated to other calcium channel antagonists

  9. Language learning, recasts, and interaction involving AAC: background and potential for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michael T; Soto, Gloria; Nelson, Keith

    2017-03-01

    For children with typical development, language is learned through everyday discursive interaction. Adults mediate child participation in such interactions through the deployment of a range of co-constructive strategies, including repeating, questioning, prompting, expanding, and reformulating the child's utterances. Adult reformulations of child utterances, also known as recasts, have also been shown to relate to the acquisition of linguistic structures in children with language and learning disabilities and children and adults learning a foreign language. In this paper we discuss the theoretical basis and empirical evidence for the use of different types of recasts as a major language learning catalyst, and what may account for their facilitative effects. We consider the occurrence of different types of recasts in AAC-mediated interactions and their potential for language facilitation, within the typical operational and linguistic constraints of such interactions. We also consider the benefit of explicit and corrective forms of recasts for language facilitation in conversations with children who rely on AAC. We conclude by outlining future research directions.

  10. The hyperon-nucleon interaction potential in the bound-state soliton model: the Λ N case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.L.; Herscovitz, V.E.; Scoccola, N.N.

    1999-05-01

    We develop the formalism the study the hyperon-nucleon interaction potential within the bound state approach to the SU (3) Skyrme model. The general framework is illustrated by applying it to the diagonal Λ N potential. The central, spin-spin and tensor components of this interaction are obtained and compared with those derived using alternative schemes. (author)

  11. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection

  12. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry applied to IL-23 interaction characteristics: potential impact for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Roxana E; Krystek, Stanley R; Huang, Richard Y-C; Wei, Hui; Tao, Li; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E; Doyle, Michael L; Tymiak, Adrienne A; Engen, John R; Chen, Guodong

    2015-04-01

    IL-23 is an important therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Adnectins are targeted protein therapeutics that are derived from domain III of human fibronectin and have a similar protein scaffold to antibodies. Adnectin 2 was found to bind to IL-23 and compete with the IL-23/IL-23R interaction, posing a potential protein therapeutic. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and computational methods were applied to probe the binding interactions between IL-23 and Adnectin 2 and to determine the correlation between the two orthogonal methods. This review summarizes the current structural knowledge about IL-23 and focuses on the applicability of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to investigate the higher order structure of proteins, which plays an important role in the discovery of new and improved biotherapeutics.

  13. Analytical Determination of the Confinement Potential and Coupling Constant of Spin--Orbit Interactions of Electrons in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Dineykhan, M; Zhaugasheva, S A; Al Farabi Kazakh State National University. Almaty

    2005-01-01

    Multilayer nanocrystalline structure is represented by the electrostatic field inducted by total image charge, and the confinement potential for electrons is determined. Assuming that at a given distance the confinement potential is equal to the Coulomb repulsion and an interaction between electrons becomes spin-orbit, the constant of the spin-orbit interaction of electrons in nanostructures is determined. The dependence of the constant of the spin-orbit interaction on environment parameters and the distance between electrons is studied.

  14. Prevalence study on potential drug-drug interaction in cancer patients in Piacenza hospital's Onco-Haematology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchia, Stefano; Orlandi, Elena; Confalonieri, Corrado; Damonti, Enrico; Riva, Alessandra; Sartori, Alessia; Cavanna, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Background Cancer patients can be a human model of potential drug interactions. Usually they receive a large number of different medications, including antineoplastic agents, drugs for comorbid illness and medication for supportive care, however information about these interactions are fragmented and poor. Objective We assessed a prospective study to evaluate the prevalence of drug interaction among patients hospitalized in the Onco-Haematology department, Hospital of Piacenza. Methods Data on drugs administered for cancer, comorbidities, or supportive care were collected from different computerized prescription software in use in the department; we compared them with a database to focus on the co-administration of drugs. A literature review was performed to identify major potential drug interaction and to classify them by level of severity and by strengths of scientific evidence. Results In this study 284 cancer patients were enrolled; patients had taken an average of seven drugs on each day of therapy plus chemotherapeutic agents, we identified 67 potential drug interactions. At least 53 patients had one potential drug interaction. Of all potential drug interactions 63 were classified as moderate severity and only four as major. In 55 cases chemotherapeutic agents were involved in possible interactions with supportive care drugs, meanwhile in 12 cases the potential drug interactions were between supportive care drugs. Conclusions In our centre, thanks to a computerized prescription software, integrated with caution alarm in case of possible interaction, we had a lower rate of potential drug interactions than the one from literature. It is possible to improve the software integrating the alarm with the potential drug interactions between chemotherapy agents and supportive care drugs.

  15. Minimizing the injury potential of deploying airbag interactions with car occupants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Harold J; Prasad, Priya; Dalmotas, Dainius

    2013-11-01

    Minimizing the injury potential of the interactions between deploying airbags and car occupants is the major issue with the design of airbag systems. This concern was identified in 1964 by Carl Clark when he presented the results of human volunteer and dummy testing of the "Airstop" system that was being developed for aircraft. The following is a chronological summary of the actions taken by the car manufacturers, airbag suppliers, SAE and ISO task groups, research institutes and universities, and consumer and government groups to address this issue.

  16. Examination of Industrial Symbiosis Potential Interactions in an Industrial Area Of NE Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gaidajis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the potential contribution of Industrial Symbiosis in fostering environmental and economical benefits in the area of Nea Karvali, Kavala, Greece. Industrial Symbiosis describes the mutualistic interaction of different industries for beneficial reuse of waste flows or energy cascading that results in a more resource-efficient production system and fewer adverse environmental impacts. Results from the case study presented in this paper, show that the implementation of symbiotic relationships in the industrial area under study, would lead to significant environmental benefits (GHG reduction, reduction on natural sources consumption and would give a boost to the local economical sector by developing new business opportunities.

  17. Distribution of cardiac sodium channels in clusters potentiates ephaptic interactions in the intercalated disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hichri, Echrak; Abriel, Hugues; Kucera, Jan P

    2018-02-15

    It has been proposed that ephaptic conduction, relying on interactions between the sodium (Na + ) current and the extracellular potential in intercalated discs, might contribute to cardiac conduction when gap junctional coupling is reduced, but this mechanism is still controversial. In intercalated discs, Na + channels form clusters near gap junction plaques, but the functional significance of these clusters has never been evaluated. In HEK cells expressing cardiac Na + channels, we show that restricting the extracellular space modulates the Na + current, as predicted by corresponding simulations accounting for ephaptic effects. In a high-resolution model of the intercalated disc, clusters of Na + channels that face each other across the intercellular cleft facilitate ephaptic impulse transmission when gap junctional coupling is reduced. Thus, our simulations reveal a functional role for the clustering of Na + channels in intercalated discs, and suggest that rearrangement of these clusters in disease may influence cardiac conduction. It has been proposed that ephaptic interactions in intercalated discs, mediated by extracellular potentials, contribute to cardiac impulse propagation when gap junctional coupling is reduced. However, experiments demonstrating ephaptic effects on the cardiac Na + current (I Na ) are scarce. Furthermore, Na + channels form clusters around gap junction plaques, but the electrophysiological significance of these clusters has never been investigated. In patch clamp experiments with HEK cells stably expressing human Na v 1.5 channels, we examined how restricting the extracellular space modulates I Na elicited by an activation protocol. In parallel, we developed a high-resolution computer model of the intercalated disc to investigate how the distribution of Na + channels influences ephaptic interactions. Approaching the HEK cells to a non-conducting obstacle always increased peak I Na at step potentials near the threshold of I Na activation

  18. Interaction of landscape varibles on the potential geographical distribution of parrots in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plasencia–Vázquez, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The loss, degradation, and fragmentation of forested areas are endangering parrot populations. In this study, we determined the influence of fragmentation in relation to vegetation cover, land use, and spatial configuration of fragments on the potential geographical distribution patterns of parrots in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. We used the potential geographical distribution for eight parrot species, considering the recently published maps obtained with the maximum entropy algorithm, and we incorporated the probability distribution for each species. We calculated 71 metrics/variables that evaluate forest fragmentation, spatial configuration of fragments, the ratio occupied by vegetation, and the land use in 100 plots of approximately 29 km², randomly distributed within the presence and absence areas predicted for each species. We also considered the relationship between environmental variables and the distribution probability of species. We used a partial least squares regression to explore patterns between the variables used and the potential distribution models. None of the environmental variables analyzed alone determined the presence/absence or the probability distribution of parrots in the Peninsula. We found that for the eight species, either due to the presence/absence or the probability distribution, the most important explanatory variables were the interaction among three variables, particularly the interactions among the total forest area, the total edge, and the tropical semi–evergreen medium– height forest. Habitat fragmentation influenced the potential geographical distribution of these species in terms of the characteristics of other environmental factors that are expressed together with the geographical division, such as the different vegetation cover ratio and land uses in deforested areas.

  19. A C-code for the double folding interaction potential of two spherical nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a C-code designed to obtain the nucleus-nucleus potential by using the double folding model (DFM) and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier. The program calculates the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei. The most important output parameters are the Coulomb barrier energy and the radius. Since many researchers use a Woods-Saxon profile for the nuclear term of the potential we provide an option in our code for fitting the DFM potential by such a profile. Program summaryProgram title: DFMSPH Catalogue identifier: AEFH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5929 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 115 740 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: PC Operating system: Windows XP (with the GCC-compiler version 2) RAM: Below 10 Mbyte Classification: 17.9 Nature of problem: The code calculates in a semimicroscopic way the bare interaction potential between two colliding spherical nuclei as a function of the center of mass distance. The height and the position of the Coulomb barrier are found. The calculated potential is approximated by a conventional Woods-Saxon profile near the barrier. Dependence of the barrier parameters upon the characteristics of the effective NN forces (like, e.g. the range of the exchange part of the nuclear term) can be investigated. Solution method: The nucleus-nucleus potential is calculated using the double folding model with the Coulomb and the effective M3Y NN interactions. For the direct parts of the Coulomb and the nuclear terms, the Fourier transform method is used. In order to calculate the exchange parts the density matrix expansion method

  20. DFMSPH14: A C-code for the double folding interaction potential of two spherical nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    This is a new version of the DFMSPH code designed to obtain the nucleus-nucleus potential by using the double folding model (DFM) and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier. The new version uses the charge, proton, and neutron density distributions provided by the user. Also we added an option for fitting the DFM potential by the Gross-Kalinowski profile. The main functionalities of the original code (e.g. the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei, the Coulomb barrier characteristics, etc.) have not been modified. Catalog identifier: AEFH_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFH_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland. Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7211 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 114404 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: PC and Mac Operation system: Windows XP and higher, MacOS, Unix/Linux Memory required to execute with typical data: below 10 Mbyte Classification: 17.9 Catalog identifier of previous version: AEFH_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comp. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 168 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of physical problem: The code calculates in a semimicroscopic way the bare interaction potential between two colliding spherical nuclei as a function of the center of mass distance. The height and the position of the Coulomb barrier are found. The calculated potential is approximated by an analytical profile (Woods-Saxon or Gross-Kalinowski) near the barrier. Dependence of the barrier parameters upon the characteristics of the effective NN forces (like, e.g. the range of the exchange part of the nuclear term) can be investigated. Method of solution: The nucleus-nucleus potential is calculated using the double

  1. [Prevalence of Avoidable Potential Interactions Between Antidepressants and Other Drugs in Colombian Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Alba, Jorge E; Morales-Plaza, Cristhian David

    2013-06-01

    To determine the possible drugs interactions with antidepressive agents in data bases of patients in the Health Insurance System of Colombia. From data bases of about 4 million users in Colombia, a systematic review of drugs dispensation statistics was made to identify drug interactions between antidepressive agents, cholinergic antagonists and tramadol in 2010. We identified 114,465 monthly users of antidepressive agents. Of these, 5776 (5.0%) received two, and 178 (0.2%) received three antidepressive agents simultaneously. The most frequent combination was fluoxetine+trazodone (n=3235; 56.9% of cases). About 1127 (1.0%) patients were prescribed a cholinergic antagonist simultaneously; 2523 (2.1%) users were dispensed tramadol at the same time, while raising the risk of serotonin syndrome. Drug interactions represent a potential risk that is often underestimated by physicians. Pharmacovigilance is a useful tool to optimize resources and prevent negative outcomes associated with medication. It is recommended that systematic search is made to enhance surveillance programs for the rational use of medicines in this country. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Cubic–quintic long-range interactions with double well potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsilifis, Panagiotis A; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G; Rothos, Vassilis M

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we examine the combined effects of cubic and quintic terms of the long-range type in the dynamics of a double well potential. Employing a two-mode approximation, we systematically develop two cubic–quintic ordinary differential equations and assess the contributions of the long-range interactions in each of the relevant prefactors, gauging how to simplify the ensuing dynamical system. Finally, we obtain a reduced canonical description for the conjugate variables of relative population imbalance and relative phase between the two wells and proceed to a dynamical systems analysis of the resulting pair of ordinary differential equations. While in the case of cubic and quintic interactions of the same kind (e.g. both attractive or both repulsive), only a symmetry-breaking bifurcation can be identified, a remarkable effect that emerges e.g. in the setting of repulsive cubic but attractive quintic interactions is a ‘symmetry-restoring’ bifurcation. Namely, in addition to the supercritical pitchfork that leads to a spontaneous symmetry breaking of the antisymmetric state, there is a subcritical pitchfork that eventually reunites the asymmetric daughter branch with the antisymmetric parent one. The relevant bifurcations, the stability of the branches and their dynamical implications are examined both in the reduced (ODE) and in the full (PDE) setting. The model is argued to be of physical relevance, especially so in the context of optical thermal media. (paper)

  3. Modeling state entropy of the EEG and auditory evoked potentials: hypnotic and analgesic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Ana; Amorim, Pedro; Nunes, Catarina S

    2007-01-01

    Because of the complexity of raw electroencephalogram (EEG), for the anesthesiologist it is very difficult to evaluate the patient's hypnosis state. Because of this, several depth of anesthesia monitors have been developed, and are in current use at the operating room (OR). These monitors convert the information supplied by the EEG or derived signals into a simple, easy to understand index. Nowadays, general anesthesia is controlled only by the clinician, which decides what is the best drug combination for the patient, regarding all information given by monitors and sensors in the OR. In this work, we collected data from two study groups with auditory evoked potentials (AEP) monitoring, and Entropy (SE) monitoring. A model was fitted to the signals and the Hill equation parameters adjusted, in both study groups. The objective was to predict hypnosis indices, regarding only the drugs administered to a patient, and capture the initial individual patient characteristics that might influence the drugs interaction in the human body. Hypnotic and analgesic drugs interact in different ways throughout the anaesthesia stages. The models obtained captured the different dynamic interaction of drugs, during the induction and maintenance phases, demonstrating that the model must have incorporated all this information in order to perform satisfactorily. Other information like haemodynamic variables might be included in the search for the optimum model.

  4. Brain potentials after clicking a mouse: a new psychophysiological approach to human-computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittono, Hiroshi; Hamada, Aya; Hori, Tadao

    As a first step in developing a new psychophysiological technique to assess mental workload in human-computer interaction (HCI), we recorded event-related brain potentials for visual stimuli triggered by voluntary mouse clicks. Twelve university students clicked a mouse button at their own pace. Each click triggered 1 of 3 alphabetic letters assigned to frequent standard, rare target, and rare nontarget stimuli. Counting target stimuli was required. Both rare stimuli elicited a P3 (P300) wave, the amplitude of which was larger when the stimuli were triggered by mouse clicks than when the same stimuli were presented automatically without mouse clicks. Postmotor potentials associated with clicking were small in amplitude (<2 microV) and did not temporally overlap with the P3. The findings suggest that the P3 can be recorded for a computer's response to the user's intentional action and may be used as a measure of perceptual-central processing resources allocated to the HCI task. Actual or potential applications of this research include the evaluation of the user's attentional state during HCI byrecording brain potentials in the "mouse click" or action-perception paradigm.

  5. Chemical compounds from anthropogenic environment and immune evasion mechanisms: potential interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Julia; Corsini, Emanuela; Williams, Marc A.; Decker, William; Manjili, Masoud H.; Otsuki, Takemi; Singh, Neetu; Al-Mulla, Faha; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Colacci, Anna Maria; Vaccari, Monica; Mondello, Chiara; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Raju, Jayadev; Hamid, Roslida A.; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano; Roy, Rabindra; Woodrick, Jordan; Salem, Hosni K.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Brown, Dustin G.; Lowe, Leroy; Lyerly, H.Kim

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies suggest an important role of host immunity as a barrier to tumor formation and progression. Complex mechanisms and multiple pathways are involved in evading innate and adaptive immune responses, with a broad spectrum of chemicals displaying the potential to adversely influence immunosurveillance. The evaluation of the cumulative effects of low-dose exposures from the occupational and natural environment, especially if multiple chemicals target the same gene(s) or pathway(s), is a challenge. We reviewed common environmental chemicals and discussed their potential effects on immunosurveillance. Our overarching objective was to review related signaling pathways influencing immune surveillance such as the pathways involving PI3K/Akt, chemokines, TGF-β, FAK, IGF-1, HIF-1α, IL-6, IL-1α, CTLA-4 and PD-1/PDL-1 could individually or collectively impact immunosurveillance. A number of chemicals that are common in the anthropogenic environment such as fungicides (maneb, fluoxastrobin and pyroclostrobin), herbicides (atrazine), insecticides (pyridaben and azamethiphos), the components of personal care products (triclosan and bisphenol A) and diethylhexylphthalate with pathways critical to tumor immunosurveillance. At this time, these chemicals are not recognized as human carcinogens; however, it is known that they these chemicalscan simultaneously persist in the environment and appear to have some potential interfere with the host immune response, therefore potentially contributing to promotion interacting with of immune evasion mechanisms, and promoting subsequent tumor growth and progression. PMID:26002081

  6. Limitations of in vitro assessments of the drug interaction potential of botanical supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, John S; Zhu, Hao-Jie

    2012-09-01

    Although there are inherent and recognized limitations of in vitro screening methodologies to assess conventional drug-drug interactions (DDIs) per industry guidelines and those adopted by independent laboratories, further limitations are being appreciated which are unique to the evaluation of botanical products and potential DDIs in which they may participate. Among the larger issues faced are the uncertainty in assigning hepatic concentrations of multiple constituents and their potential metabolites, accounting for oral bioavailability, distribution, first-pass metabolism and active metabolites. Furthermore, the wide variability in the chemical composition of commercially available botanical supplement formulations continues to be a major concern, and manufacturing standards or enforcement thereof is essentially nonexistent in most countries. Differing formulations, unspecified product excipients, administration and absorption of the therapeutic ingredient(s) of a standardized dosage form, the very presence and/or concentration of one or more phytoconstituents within a supplement are typically unknown and nontarget entities. A further issue is the absence of authentic analytical standards, and the inability to accurately screen the entities as mixtures to even approximate typical scenarios, which may occur following the ingestion of dietary supplements, adds additional layers of complexity to experimental design and difficulty in interpreting experimental results. Multiple challenges exist in experimental methodologies employed in performing in vitro research with conventional pharmaceuticals and those unique to botanical extracts. These obstacles prevent the investigators from effectively utilizing high-throughput models to accomplish more than essentially "flag" suspected sources of drug interactions which must be further evaluated in vivo, at present, in order to confirm clinical significance. This review is intended to discuss the problems and challenges in

  7. Analysis of potential drug-drug interactions in medical intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uijtendaal, Esther V; van Harssel, Lieke L M; Hugenholtz, Gerard W K; Kuck, Emile M; Zwart-van Rijkom, Jeannette E F; Cremer, Olaf L; Egberts, Toine C G

    2014-03-01

    To describe the frequency and type of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in a general intensive care unit (ICU) and to make recommendations to improve the management of these pDDIs. Retrospective observational study. General ICU of a tertiary care hospital. All patients admitted for more than 24 hours between May 2009 and December 2010 who were prescribed at least one medication. Based on the G-Standaard, the Dutch national drug database, pDDIs were identified and classified into categories of potential clinical outcome and management advice. In total, 35,784 medication episodes were identified, resulting in 2887 pDDIs (8.1%). These 2887 pDDIs occurred in 1659 patients for a mean frequency of 1.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-1.9) pDDIs per patient. Overall, 54% of the patients experienced at least one pDDI with pDDIs present during 27% of all ICU admission days. All pDDIs could be reconstructed using 81 of the 358 (23%) relevant unique pDDI pairs described in the G-Standaard. The most frequently occurring potential clinical consequence was an increased risk of side effects or toxicity (91% of the pDDIs) such as electrolyte disturbances and masking of hypoglycemia. The most important advised management strategy was monitoring (81%), consisting of monitoring of laboratory values (52%), clinical monitoring of toxicity or effectiveness (48%), or monitoring of physical parameters such as electrocardiogram and blood pressure (11%). Potential drug-drug interactions occur in 54% of all ICU patients, which is two times more than the rate seen in patients on general wards. A limited set of 20 pDDI pairs is responsible for more than 90% of all pDDIs. Therefore, it is worthwhile to develop guidelines for the management of these specific pDDIs. As the vast majority of the interactions can be managed by monitoring, advanced clinical decision support systems linking laboratory data to prescription data may be an effective risk management strategy. © 2014 American

  8. Direct and indirect effects of a potential aquatic contaminant on grazer-algae interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-White, Michelle A; Lamberti, Gary A

    2009-02-01

    Contaminants have direct, harmful effects across multiple ecological scales, including the individual, the community, and the ecosystem levels. Less, however, is known about how indirect effects of contaminants on consumer physiology or behavior might alter community interactions or ecosystem processes. We examined whether a potential aquatic contaminant, an ionic liquid, can indirectly alter benthic algal biomass and primary production through direct effects on herbivorous snails. Ionic liquids are nonvolatile organic salts being considered as an environmentally friendly potential replacement for volatile organic compounds in industry. In two greenhouse experiments, we factorially crossed four concentrations of 1-N-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (bmimBr; experiment 1: 0 or 10 mg/L; experiment 2: 0, 1, or 100 mg/L) with the presence or absence of the snail Physa acuta in aquatic mesocosms. Experimental results were weighted by their respective control (no bmimBr or P. acuta) and combined for statistical analysis. When both bmimBr and snails were present, chlorophyll a abundance and algal biovolume were higher than would be expected if both factors acted additively. In addition, snail growth rates, relative to those of controls, declined by 41 to 101% at 10 and 100 mg/L of bmimBr. Taken together, these two results suggest that snails were less efficient grazers in the presence of bmimBr, resulting in release of algae from the grazer control. Snails stimulated periphyton primary production in the absence, but not in the presence, of bmimBr, suggesting that bmimBr also can indirectly alter ecosystem function. These findings suggest that sublethal contaminant levels can negatively impact communities and ecosystem processes via complex interactions, and they provide baseline information regarding the potential effects of an emergent industrial chemical on aquatic systems.

  9. A C-code for the double folding interaction potential for reactions involving deformed target nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a C-code designed to obtain the interaction potential between a spherical projectile nucleus and an axial-symmetrical deformed target nucleus and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier, by using the double folding model (DFM). The program calculates the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei as well as of the angle between the axis of symmetry of the target nucleus and the beam direction. The most important output parameters are the Coulomb barrier energy and the radius. Since many researchers use a Woods-Saxon profile for the nuclear term of the potential we provide an option in our code for fitting the DFM potential by such a profile near the barrier. Program summaryProgram title: DFMDEF Catalogue identifier: AENI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2245 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 215442 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C. Computer: PC, Mac. Operating system: Windows XP (with the GCC-compiler version 2), MacOS, Linux. RAM: 100 MB with average parameters set Classification: 17.9. Nature of problem: The code calculates in a semimicroscopic way the bare interaction potential between a spherical projectile nucleus and a deformed but axially symmetric target nucleus as a function of the center of mass distance as well as of the angle between the axis of symmetry of the target nucleus and the beam direction. The height and the position of the Coulomb barrier are found. The calculated potential is approximated by a conventional Woods-Saxon profile near the barrier. Dependence of the barrier parameters upon the characteristics of the effective NN forces (like, e

  10. Modeling Molecular Interactions in Water: From Pairwise to Many-Body Potential Energy Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Almost 50 years have passed from the first computer simulations of water, and a large number of molecular models have been proposed since then to elucidate the unique behavior of water across different phases. In this article, we review the recent progress in the development of analytical potential energy functions that aim at correctly representing many-body effects. Starting from the many-body expansion of the interaction energy, specific focus is on different classes of potential energy functions built upon a hierarchy of approximations and on their ability to accurately reproduce reference data obtained from state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations and experimental measurements. We show that most recent potential energy functions, which include explicit short-range representations of two-body and three-body effects along with a physically correct description of many-body effects at all distances, predict the properties of water from the gas to the condensed phase with unprecedented accuracy, thus opening the door to the long-sought “universal model” capable of describing the behavior of water under different conditions and in different environments. PMID:27186804

  11. Clinically Relevant Pharmacological Strategies That Reverse MDMA-Induced Brain Hyperthermia Potentiated by Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    MDMA-induced hyperthermia is highly variable, unpredictable, and greatly potentiated by the social and environmental conditions of recreational drug use. Current strategies to treat pathological MDMA-induced hyperthermia in humans are palliative and marginally effective, and there are no specific pharmacological treatments to counteract this potentially life-threatening condition. Here, we tested the efficacy of mixed adrenoceptor blockers carvedilol and labetalol, and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, in reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia. We injected rats with a moderate non-toxic dose of MDMA (9 mg/kg) during social interaction, and we administered potential treatment drugs after the development of robust hyperthermia (>2.5 °C), thus mimicking the clinical situation of acute MDMA intoxication. Brain temperature was our primary focus, but we also simultaneously recorded temperatures from the deep temporal muscle and skin, allowing us to determine the basic physiological mechanisms of the treatment drug action. Carvedilol was modestly effective in attenuating MDMA-induced hyperthermia by moderately inhibiting skin vasoconstriction, and labetalol was ineffective. In contrast, clozapine induced a marked and immediate reversal of MDMA-induced hyperthermia via inhibition of brain metabolic activation and blockade of skin vasoconstriction. Our findings suggest that clozapine, and related centrally acting drugs, might be highly effective for reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia in emergency clinical situations, with possible life-saving results.

  12. Deuteron spin-flip reactions and supermultiplet potential model of interaction of the lightest clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, V M; Struzhko, B G

    2002-01-01

    Heterogeneous data on the double and triple differential cross sections of d + p -> np + p and d + t(h) -> np + t(h) or d + t -> nn + h nuclear reactions are reduced by Migdal-Watson approximation to the unified shape of the differential cross section angular dependence having in mind just singlet nucleon-nucleon pair formation. The results are compared with the supermultiplet potential model of the lightest nuclei interaction. The d + t(h) collision is characterized by the fact that the power of V sup [ sup 4 sup 1 sup ] (r) potential is 50% higher than that of the V sup [ sup 3 sup 2 sup ] (r) one ([f] = [41] and [f] = [32] are the orbital Young patterns. This is why the theory is able to describe quantitatively both the above experiment and the elastic scattering one. However, for d + p collision the difference of potential powers for the [f] = [3] and [f] = [21] patterns equals 20% only and the agreement of theory with experiment on deuteron spin-flip is merely qualitative

  13. Calculations of the thermal conductivities of ionic materials by simulation with polarizable interaction potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtori, Norikazu; Salanne, Mathieu; Madden, Paul A

    2009-03-14

    Expressions for the energy current of a system of charged, polarizable ions in periodic boundary conditions are developed in order to allow the thermal conductivity in such a system to be calculated by computer simulation using the Green-Kubo method. Dipole polarizable potentials for LiCl, NaCl, and KCl are obtained on a first-principles basis by "force matching" to the results of ab initio calculations on suitable condensed-phase ionic configurations. Simulation results for the thermal conductivity, and also other transport coefficients, for the melts are compared with experimental data and with results obtained with other interaction potentials. The agreement with experiment is almost quantitative, especially for NaCl and KCl, indicating that these methodologies, perhaps with more sophisticated forms for the potential, can be used to predict thermal conductivities for melts for which experimental determination is very difficult. It is demonstrated that the polarization effects have an important effect on the energy current and are crucial to a predictive scheme for the thermal conductivity.

  14. Are distance-dependent statistical potentials considering three interacting bodies superior to two-body statistical potentials for protein structure prediction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghomi, Hamed Tabatabaei; Thompson, Jared J; Lill, Markus A

    2014-10-01

    Distance-based statistical potentials have long been used to model condensed matter systems, e.g. as scoring functions in differentiating native-like protein structures from decoys. These scoring functions are based on the assumption that the total free energy of the protein can be calculated as the sum of pairwise free energy contributions derived from a statistical analysis of pair-distribution functions. However, this fundamental assumption has been challenged theoretically. In fact the free energy of a system with N particles is only exactly related to the N-body distribution function. Based on this argument coarse-grained multi-body statistical potentials have been developed to capture higher-order interactions. Having a coarse representation of the protein and using geometric contacts instead of pairwise interaction distances renders these models insufficient in modeling details of multi-body effects. In this study, we investigated if extending distance-dependent pairwise atomistic statistical potentials to corresponding interaction functions that are conditional on a third interacting body, defined as quasi-three-body statistical potentials, could model details of three-body interactions. We also tested if this approach could improve the predictive capabilities of statistical scoring functions for protein structure prediction. We analyzed the statistical dependency between two simultaneous pairwise interactions and showed that there is surprisingly little if any dependency of a third interacting site on pairwise atomistic statistical potentials. Also the protein structure prediction performance of these quasi-three-body potentials is comparable with their corresponding two-body counterparts. The scoring functions developed in this study showed better or comparable performances compared to some widely used scoring functions for protein structure prediction.

  15. Single-particle potential of the Λ hyperon in nuclear matter with chiral effective field theory NLO interactions including effects of Y N N three-baryon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M.

    2018-03-01

    Adopting hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-nucleon-nucleon interactions parametrized in chiral effective field theory, single-particle potentials of the Λ and Σ hyperons are evaluated in symmetric nuclear matter and in pure neutron matter within the framework of lowest-order Bruckner theory. The chiral NLO interaction bears strong Λ N -Σ N coupling. Although the Λ potential is repulsive if the coupling is switched off, the Λ N -Σ N correlation brings about the attraction consistent with empirical data. The Σ potential is repulsive, which is also consistent with empirical information. The interesting result is that the Λ potential becomes shallower beyond normal density. This provides the possibility of solving the hyperon puzzle without introducing ad hoc assumptions. The effects of the Λ N N -Λ N N and Λ N N -Σ N N three-baryon forces are considered. These three-baryon forces are first reduced to normal-ordered effective two-baryon interactions in nuclear matter and then incorporated in the G -matrix equation. The repulsion from the Λ N N -Λ N N interaction is of the order of 5 MeV at normal density and becomes larger with increasing density. The effects of the Λ N N -Σ N N coupling compensate the repulsion at normal density. The net effect of the three-baryon interactions on the Λ single-particle potential is repulsive at higher densities.

  16. Interaction of C2H with molecular hydrogen: Ab initio potential energy surface and scattering calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    The potential energy surface (PES) describing the interaction of the ethynyl (C2H) radical in its ground X˜ 2Σ+ electronic state with molecular hydrogen has been computed through restricted coupled cluster calculations including single, double, and (perturbative) triple excitations [RCCSD(T)], with the assumption of fixed molecular geometries. The computed points were fit to an analytical form suitable for time-independent quantum scattering calculations of rotationally inelastic cross sections and rate constants. A representative set of energy dependent state-to-state cross sections is presented and discussed. The PES and cross sections for collisions of H2(j = 0) are compared with a previous study [F. Najar et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 614, 251 (2014)] of collisions of C2H with H2 treated as a spherical collision partner. Good agreement is found between the two sets of calculations when the H2 molecule in the present calculation is spherically averaged.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation study of superhydrated perdeuterated natrolite using a new interaction potential model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demontis, Pierfranco; Gulín-Gonzalez, Jorge; Suffritti, Giuseppe B

    2006-04-13

    To test a new interaction potential, molecular dynamics simulations of zeolite natrolite were performed for the structures under ambient conditions hydrated by perdeuterated water and at high pressure (1.87 GPa) in the superhydrated phase, which were recently studied by neutron diffraction. The experimental structures were reproduced with reasonable accuracy, and the hydrogen bond features are discussed. As in ordinary natrolite, a flip motion of water molecules around the HOH bisector is found, which, together with translational oscillations, gives rise to transient hydrogen bonds between water molecules, which do not appear from experimental equilibrium coordinates. The dynamics of water molecules can explain some problems encountered in refining the experimental structure. Vibrational spectra of natrolite containing perdeuterated water, which are not yet measured, were simulated, and their qualitative trend is discussed.

  18. Non-relativistic treatment of diatomic molecules interacting with a generalized Kratzer potential in hyperspherical coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durmus, Aysen

    2011-01-01

    We investigate solutions of a non-relativistic wave equation in hyperspherical coordinates for a diatomic molecule system interacting with a generalized Kratzer potential. Rovibrational eigenvalues and corresponding wavefunctions of non-relativistic diatomic molecules have been determined within the framework of the asymptotic iteration method. Certain fundamental conditions for the applications of the asymptotic iteration method, such as a suitable asymptotic form for the wave-function and the termination condition for the iteration process, are discussed. N-dimensional bound state eigenfunction solutions used in studying the dynamical variables of diatomic molecules are obtained in terms of a confluent hypergeometric function and a generalized Laguerre polynomial. This systematic approach is tested by calculating the rovibrational energy spectra of hydrogen and sodium chloride molecules.

  19. Born-Oppenheimer potential energy for interaction of antihydrogen with molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasburger, Krzysztof

    2005-01-01

    Inelastic collisions with hydrogen molecules are claimed to be an important channel of antihydrogen Hbar losses (Armour and Zeman 1999 Int. J. Quantum Chem. 74 645). In the present work, interaction energies for the H 2 -Hbar system in the ground state have been calculated within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The leptonic problem was solved variationally with the basis of explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The geometry of H 2 was fixed at equilibrium geometry and the Hbar atom approached the molecule from two directions-along or perpendicularly to the bond axis. Purely attractive potential energy curve has been obtained for the first nuclear configuration, while a local maximum (lower than the energy at infinite separation) has been found for the second one

  20. Born Oppenheimer potential energy for interaction of antihydrogen with molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Krzysztof

    2005-09-01

    Inelastic collisions with hydrogen molecules are claimed to be an important channel of antihydrogen (\\overlineH) losses (Armour and Zeman 1999 Int. J. Quantum Chem. 74 645). In the present work, interaction energies for the H_{2}\\--\\overlineH system in the ground state have been calculated within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The leptonic problem was solved variationally with the basis of explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The geometry of H2 was fixed at equilibrium geometry and the \\overlineH atom approached the molecule from two directions—along or perpendicularly to the bond axis. Purely attractive potential energy curve has been obtained for the first nuclear configuration, while a local maximum (lower than the energy at infinite separation) has been found for the second one.

  1. An evaluation of the potential drug interaction between warfarin and levothyroxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M D; Delate, T; Clark, M; Clark, N; Horn, J R; Witt, D M

    2014-08-01

    Drug interaction references report that initiation of levothyroxine potentiates the effects of warfarin, and recommend more frequent International Normalized Ratio (INR) monitoring, but the mechanism is not well understood. To assess the impact of levothyroxine initiation on INR response. A retrospective, self-controlled study was performed on patients aged ≥ 18 years receiving chronic warfarin therapy who were started on levothyroxine between 1 January 2006 and 30 June 2013, and who were followed for 90 days prior to and after levothyroxine initiation. The included patients had at least one elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone laboratory value in the pre-period, continuous warfarin therapy for 100 days prior to levothyroxine initiation, no purchases of medications known to interact with warfarin, no procedures requiring warfarin interruption, and no bleeding or thromboembolic event during the study period. The primary outcome was a comparison of the warfarin dose/INR ratio recorded before the initiation of levothyroxine with the ratio recorded during the post-period after two consecutive INRs with no warfarin dose change. One hundred and two patients were included in the primary outcome. The mean warfarin dose/INR ratios in the pre-period and post-period were equivalent (P = 0.825). Although the mean warfarin dose was numerically lower in the post-period than in the pre-period, this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.068). No difference in the mean warfarin dose/INR ratio before and after initiation of levothyroxine was detected. The results suggest that there is not a clinically significant interaction between warfarin and levothyroxine, and so additional monitoring may not be necessary. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  2. Plant-Microbial Interactions Define Potential Mechanisms of Organic Matter Priming in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhalnina, K.; Cho, H. J.; Hao, Z.; Mansoori, N.; Karaoz, U.; Jenkins, S.; White, R. A., III; Lipton, M. S.; Deng, K.; Zhou, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Northen, T.; Firestone, M. K.; Brodie, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, metabolic processes of plants and microorganisms are closely coupled, and together with soil minerals, their interactions regulate the turnover of soil organic C (SOC). Plants provide readily assimilable metabolites for microorganisms through exudation, and it has been hypothesized that increasing concentrations of exudate C may either stimulate or suppress rates of SOC mineralization (rhizosphere priming). Both positive and negative rhizosphere priming has been widely observed, however the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. To begin to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying rhizosphere priming, we isolated a broad range of soil bacteria from a Mediterranean grassland dominated by annual grass. Thirty-nine heterotrophic bacteria were selected for genome sequencing and both rRNA gene analysis and metagenome coverage suggest that these isolates represent naturally abundant strain variants. We analyzed their genomes for potential metabolic traits related to life in the rhizosphere and the decomposition of polymeric SOC. While the two dominant groups, Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, were enriched in polymer degrading enzymes, Alphaproteobacterial isolates contained greater gene copies of transporters related to amino acid, organic acid and auxin uptake or export, suggesting an enhanced metabolic potential for life in the root zone. To verify this metabolic potential, we determined the enzymatic activities of these isolates and revealed preferences of strains to degrade certain polymers (xylan, cellulose or lignin). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy is being used to determine which polymeric components of plant roots are targeted by specific strains and how exudates may impact their degradation. To verify the potential of isolates to assimilate root exudates and export key metabolites we are using LC-MS/MS based exometabolomic profiling. The traits hypothesized and verified here (transporters, enzymes, exudate uptake

  3. Chemical compounds from anthropogenic environment and immune evasion mechanisms: potential interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Julia; Corsini, Emanuela; Williams, Marc A; Decker, William; Manjili, Masoud H; Otsuki, Takemi; Singh, Neetu; Al-Mulla, Faha; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Colacci, Anna Maria; Vaccari, Monica; Mondello, Chiara; Scovassi, A Ivana; Raju, Jayadev; Hamid, Roslida A; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano; Roy, Rabindra; Woodrick, Jordan; Salem, Hosni K; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Brown, Dustin G; Bisson, William H; Lowe, Leroy; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-06-01

    An increasing number of studies suggest an important role of host immunity as a barrier to tumor formation and progression. Complex mechanisms and multiple pathways are involved in evading innate and adaptive immune responses, with a broad spectrum of chemicals displaying the potential to adversely influence immunosurveillance. The evaluation of the cumulative effects of low-dose exposures from the occupational and natural environment, especially if multiple chemicals target the same gene(s) or pathway(s), is a challenge. We reviewed common environmental chemicals and discussed their potential effects on immunosurveillance. Our overarching objective was to review related signaling pathways influencing immune surveillance such as the pathways involving PI3K/Akt, chemokines, TGF-β, FAK, IGF-1, HIF-1α, IL-6, IL-1α, CTLA-4 and PD-1/PDL-1 could individually or collectively impact immunosurveillance. A number of chemicals that are common in the anthropogenic environment such as fungicides (maneb, fluoxastrobin and pyroclostrobin), herbicides (atrazine), insecticides (pyridaben and azamethiphos), the components of personal care products (triclosan and bisphenol A) and diethylhexylphthalate with pathways critical to tumor immunosurveillance. At this time, these chemicals are not recognized as human carcinogens; however, it is known that they these chemicalscan simultaneously persist in the environment and appear to have some potential interfere with the host immune response, therefore potentially contributing to promotion interacting with of immune evasion mechanisms, and promoting subsequent tumor growth and progression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Invariance and variability in interaction error-related potentials and their consequences for classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Alqumsan, Mohammad; Kapeller, Christoph; Hintermüller, Christoph; Guger, Christoph; Peer, Angelika

    2017-12-01

    Objective. This paper discusses the invariance and variability in interaction error-related potentials (ErrPs), where a special focus is laid upon the factors of (1) the human mental processing required to assess interface actions (2) time (3) subjects. Approach. Three different experiments were designed as to vary primarily with respect to the mental processes that are necessary to assess whether an interface error has occurred or not. The three experiments were carried out with 11 subjects in a repeated-measures experimental design. To study the effect of time, a subset of the recruited subjects additionally performed the same experiments on different days. Main results. The ErrP variability across the different experiments for the same subjects was found largely attributable to the different mental processing required to assess interface actions. Nonetheless, we found that interaction ErrPs are empirically invariant over time (for the same subject and same interface) and to a lesser extent across subjects (for the same interface). Significance. The obtained results may be used to explain across-study variability of ErrPs, as well as to define guidelines for approaches to the ErrP classifier transferability problem.

  5. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl-Emiliane Tien Chow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10m and oxygen-starved basin (200m waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n=5010 had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI’s non-redundant ‘nr’ database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  6. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Dan J.; Mattus, Catherine H.; Dole, Leslie Robert

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a 'primer' on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a 'bench-scale' laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the 'primer,' a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

  7. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  8. Drug utilization, prescription errors and potential drug-drug interactions: an experience in rural Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathish, Devarajan; Bahini, Sivaswamy; Sivakumar, Thanikai; Thiranagama, Thilani; Abarajithan, Tharmarajah; Wijerathne, Buddhika; Jayasumana, Channa; Siribaddana, Sisira

    2016-06-25

    Prescription writing is a process which transfers the therapeutic message from the prescriber to the patient through the pharmacist. Prescribing errors, drug duplication and potential drug-drug interactions (pDDI) in prescriptions lead to medication error. Assessment of the above was made in prescriptions dispensed at State Pharmaceutical Corporation (SPC), Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. A cross sectional study was conducted. Drugs were classified according to the WHO anatomical, therapeutic chemical classification system. A three point Likert scale, a checklist and Medscape online drug interaction checker were used to assess legibility, completeness and pDDIs respectively. Thousand prescriptions were collected. Majority were hand written (99.8 %) and from the private sector (73 %). The most frequently prescribed substance and subgroup were atorvastatin (4 %, n = 3668) and proton pump inhibitors (7 %, n = 3668) respectively. Out of the substances prescribed from the government and private sectors, 59 and 50 % respectively were available in the national list of essential medicines, Sri Lanka. Patients address (5 %), Sri Lanka Medical Council (SLMC) registration number (35 %), route (7 %), generic name (16 %), treatment symbol (48 %), diagnosis (41 %) and refill information (6 %) were seen in less than half of the prescriptions. Most were legible with effort (65 %) and illegibility was seen in 9 %. There was significant difference in omission and/or errors of generic name (P = 0.000), dose (P = 0.000), SLMC registration number (P = 0.000), and in evidence of pDDI (P = 0.009) with regards to the sector of prescribing. The commonest subgroup involved in duplication was non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (43 %; 56/130). There were 1376 potential drug interactions (466/887 prescriptions). Most common pair causing pDDI was aspirin with losartan (4 %, n = 1376). Atorvastatin was the most frequently prescribed substance

  9. DNA-interactive properties of crotamine, a cell-penetrating polypeptide and a potential drug carrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Crotamine, a 42-residue polypeptide derived from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, has been shown to be a cell-penetrating protein that targets chromosomes, carries plasmid DNA into cells, and shows specificity for actively proliferating cells. Given this potential role as a nucleic acid-delivery vector, we have studied in detail the binding of crotamine to single- and double-stranded DNAs of different lengths and base compositions over a range of ionic conditions. Agarose gel electrophoresis and ultraviolet spectrophotometry analysis indicate that complexes of crotamine with long-chain DNAs readily aggregate and precipitate at low ionic strength. This aggregation, which may be important for cellular uptake of DNA, becomes less likely with shorter chain length. 25-mer oligonucleotides do not show any evidence of such aggregation, permitting the determination of affinities and size via fluorescence quenching experiments. The polypeptide binds non-cooperatively to DNA, covering about 5 nucleotide residues when it binds to single (ss or (ds double stranded molecules. The affinities of the protein for ss- vs. ds-DNA are comparable, and inversely proportional to salt levels. Analysis of the dependence of affinity on [NaCl] indicates that there are a maximum of ∼3 ionic interactions between the protein and DNA, with some of the binding affinity attributable to non-ionic interactions. Inspection of the three-dimensional structure of the protein suggests that residues 31 to 35, Arg-Trp-Arg-Trp-Lys, could serve as a potential DNA-binding site. A hexapeptide containing this sequence displayed a lower DNA binding affinity and salt dependence as compared to the full-length protein, likely indicative of a more suitable 3D structure and the presence of accessory binding sites in the native crotamine. Taken together, the data presented here describing crotamine-DNA interactions may lend support to the design of more

  10. Potential drug–drug interactions in HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshikoya KA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kazeem A Oshikoya,1 Ibrahim A Oreagba,2 Saheed Lawal,2 Olufunsho Awodele,2 Olayinka O Ogunleye,1 Idowu O Senbanjo,3 Sunday O Olayemi,2 Veronica C Ezeaka,4,5 Edamisan O Temiye,4,5 Titilope A Adeyemo,4,6 Oluranti Opanuga,4,7 Olufunmilayo A Lesi,4,8 Sulaimon A Akanmu4,6 1Department of Pharmacology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 3Department of Paediatrics, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 4APIN Clinic, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria; 5Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 6Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 7Department of Pharmacy, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba Lagos, Nigeria; 8Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria Background: Multi-therapy is common in HIV-infected children, and the risk for clinically significant drug interactions (CSDIs is high. We investigated the prevalence of CSDIs between antiretroviral (ARV and co-prescribed drugs for children attending a large HIV clinic in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods: The case files of pediatric patients receiving treatment at the HIV clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH, Idi-Araba, between January 2005 and December 2010 were reviewed. The ARV and co-prescribed drug pairs were evaluated for potential interactions using the Liverpool HIV Pharmacology Group website. The potential interactions were rated as A (no known interaction, B (minor/no action needed, C (moderate/monitor therapy, D (major/therapy modification, and X (contraindicated/avoid combination. Results: Of the 310 cases reviewed, 208 (67.1% patients were at risk of CSDIs. Artemisinin-based combination therapy was prescribed for over one

  11. P3-5: Temporal Interactions between Binocular Inputs in Visual Evoked-Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunkyue Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between neural activity driven by inputs through the two eyes were examined using visual evoked-potentials (VEP in normal human subjects. VEP recordings were obtained at the occipital electrodes using binocularly asynchronous pattern-reversal checkerboard stimuli: The patter-reversal times for the two eyes differed by 0, ±50, ±150, or ±350 ms, with the positive stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA meaning that the right-eye reversal occurred first. For comparison, monocular VEPs were also obtained using trial conditions where the checkerboard pattern-reversals were shown to only one eye, while a blank field to the other. The VEPs of the various trial conditions were analyzed using both temporal and frequency analysis methods. Three observations were made: First, the N75 amplitude was significantly reduced in the ±50 ms SOA conditions. Second, on ±150 ms and ± ms SOA conditions, a negative potential was observed over the period when the stimuli were binocularly incongruent. Third, the alpha-band power was reduced and the beta-band power increased on asynchronous conditions, compared to the synchronous patter-reversal. These findings show that activities of binocular neurons in the visual cortices get modulated by binocular incongruity in the asynchronous pattern-reversal stimuli. Our stimuli may prove valuable in elucidating neural mechanisms of integration of binocular visual inputs, especially when combined with brain source-localization techniques and compared between normal subjects and patients with dysfunction in binocular vision.

  12. Discussion on pharmacogenetic interaction in G6PD deficiency and methods to identify potential hemolytic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganelli, Genesia; Fico, Annalisa; Martini, Giuseppe; Filosa, Stefania

    2010-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common form of red blood cell enzymopathy. The disorder has reached polymorphic frequencies in different parts of the world due to the relative protection conferred against malaria. G6PD is a housekeeping X-linked gene encoding the first enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, an NADPH-producing dehydrogenase. Because erythrocytes do not generate NADPH in any other way than pentose phosphate pathway, they are more susceptible than any other cells to oxidative damages. G6PD deficiency is a prime example of a hemolytic anemia due to an interaction between an intracorpuscular cause and an extracorpuscular cause, because in the majority of cases an exogenous agent triggers hemolysis. Hemolysis, in fact, can be caused by exposure to oxidant agents. Although studies performed on epidemiology, genetics and molecular biology have broaden the information on G6pd deficiency, there are still no reliable and validated methods to test drug hemolytic potential in G6PD deficient patients. The review gives an overview of current knowledge on G6pd deficiency and on the methods that have been developed so far in order to identify drugs causing acute hemolytic anemia in G6pd deficiency. Moreover, we discuss the new potential preclinical strategies to assess, in vitro and in vivo, drug hemolytic risks.

  13. The Prevalence of Potential Drug Interactions Among Critically Ill Elderly Patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rafiei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the research was to determine prevalence of potential drug interactions among elderly patients in the Shahid Bahonar ICU in Kerman. Methods & Materials: In this cross sectional study, data about all elderly patients who were admitted in the intensive care unit from 1/4/2009 to 1/4/2010 were retrieved from medical records and evaluated with regard to the number and type of drug interactions, the number of drugs administered, age, sex, length of stay in the ICU, and the number of doctors prescribing medications of medications administered. The extent and number of drug interactions were investigated based on the reference textbook Drug Interaction Facts and in order to analyze the data collected, using SPSS 18 and according to study goals, a descriptive test, Pierson's correlation test, an independent T-test and a one-way ANOVA were used. Results: In total, 77 types of drugs and 394 drugs were prescribed with a mean of 5.6(SD=1.5 drugs per patient. A total of 108 potential drug interactions were found related to drugs prescribed during the first twenty-four hours. In terms of the type of drug interactions, delayed, moderate and possible types comprised the highest proportion of drug interactions. The four major interactions were between cimetidine and methadone, furosemide and amikacine, phenytoin and dopamine, and heparin and aspirin. The results of Pierson's correlation test were inicative of a positive correlation between the number of potential drug interactions and that of the drugs prescribed (r=0.563, P<0.05. Results of a one-way ANOVA showed that the mean number of potential drug interaction were significantly higher in those who died than in other patients (P<0.05. Conclusion: Elderly patients who are admitted to the intensive care unit are at a high risk of developing drug interactions and better care must be taken by medical team members.

  14. Intermolecular Interactions and Cooperative Effects from Electronic Structure Calculations: An Effective Means for Developing Interaction Potentials for Condensed Phase Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2004-05-01

    The modeling of the macroscopic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems via atomistic simulations such as molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) techniques is based on the accurate description of the relevant solvent-solute and solvent-solvent intermolecular interactions. The total energy (U) of an n-body molecular system can be formally written as [1,2,3

  15. The prevalence of major potential drug-drug interactions at a University health centre pharmacy in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy-Dixon T

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify major potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs on prescriptions filled at the University Health Centre Pharmacy, Mona Campus, Jamaica. Methods: This investigation utilised a cross-sectional analysis on all prescriptions with more than one drug that were filled at the Health Centre Pharmacy between November 2012 and February 2013. Potential DDIs were identified using the online Drug Interactions Checker database of Drugs.com. Results: During the period of the study, a total of 2814 prescriptions were analysed for potential DDIs. The prevalence of potential DDIs found during the study period was 49.82%. Major potential DDIs accounted for 4.7 % of the total number of interactions detected, while moderate potential DDIs and minor potential DDIs were 80.8 % and 14.5 % respectively. The three most frequently occurring major potential DDIs were amlodipine and simvastatin (n=46, amiloride and losartan (n=27 and amiloride and lisinopril (n=16. Conclusion: This study has highlighted the need for educational initiatives to ensure that physicians and pharmacists collaborate in an effort to minimise the risks to the patients. These interactions are avoidable for the most part, as the use of online tools can facilitate the selection of therapeutic alternatives or guide decisions for closer patient monitoring and thus reduce the risks of adverse events.

  16. Semi-Relativistic Two-Body States of Spinless Particles with a Scalar-Type Interaction Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thylwe, K. E.

    2018-02-01

    A semi-relativistic quantum approximation for mutual scalar interaction potentials is outlined and discussed. Equations are consistent with two-body Dirac equations for bound states of zero total angular momentum. Two-body effects near the non-relativistic limit for a linear scalar potential is studied in some detail.

  17. Calculation of the real part of the interaction potential between two heavy ions in the sudden approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, H.; Ngo, C.

    1980-04-01

    We have calculated the interaction potential between two heavy ions using the energy density formalism and Fermi distributions for the nuclear densities. The experimental fusion barriers are rather well reproduced. The conditions for the observation of fusion between two heavy ions is discussed. As far as the nuclear part of the interaction potential is concerned, the proximity scaling is investigated in details. It is found that the proximity theorem is satisfied to a good extent. However, as far as the neutron excess is concerned, a disagreement with the proximity potential is observed

  18. Begomoviral Movement Protein Effects in Human and Plant Cells: Towards New Potential Interaction Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Krapp

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Geminiviral single-stranded circular DNA genomes replicate in nuclei so that the progeny DNA has to cross both the nuclear envelope and the plasmodesmata for systemic spread within plant tissues. For intra- and intercellular transport, two proteins are required: a nuclear shuttle protein (NSP and a movement protein (MP. New characteristics of ectopically produced Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV MP (MPAbMV, either authentically expressed or fused to a yellow fluorescent protein or epitope tags, respectively, were determined by localization studies in mammalian cell lines in comparison to plant cells. Wild-type MPAbMV and the distinct MPAbMV: reporter protein fusions appeared as curled threads throughout mammalian cells. Co-staining with cytoskeleton markers for actin, intermediate filaments, or microtubules identified these threads as re-organized microtubules. These were, however, not stabilized by the viral MP, as demonstrated by nocodazole treatment. The MP of a related bipartite New World begomovirus, Cleome leaf crumple virus (ClLCrV, resulted in the same intensified microtubule bundling, whereas that of a nanovirus did not. The C-terminal section of MPAbMV, i.e., the protein’s oligomerization domain, was dispensable for the effect. However, MP expression in plant cells did not affect the microtubules network. Since plant epidermal cells are quiescent whilst mammalian cells are proliferating, the replication-associated protein RepAbMV protein was then co-expressed with MPAbMV to induce cell progression into S-phase, thereby inducing distinct microtubule bundling without MP recruitment to the newly formed threads. Co-immunoprecipitation of MPAbMV in the presence of RepAbMV, followed by mass spectrometry identified potential novel MPAbMV-host interaction partners: the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 4 (Pin4 and stomatal cytokinesis defective 2 (SCD2 proteins. Possible roles of these putative interaction partners in the

  19. Potential impact of climate-related changes is buffered by differential responses to recruitment and interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Menge, Bruce A.

    2011-08-01

    Detection of ecosystem responsiveness to climatic perturbations can provide insight into climate change consequences. Recent analyses linking phytoplankton abundance and mussel recruitment to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) revealed a paradox. Despite large increases in mussel recruitment beginning in 2000, adult mussel responses were idiosyncratic by site and intertidal zone, with no response at one long-term site, and increases in the low zone (1.5% per year) and decreases in the mid zone (1.3% per year) at the other. What are the mechanisms underlying these differential changes? Species interactions such as facilitation by barnacles and predation are potential determinants of successful mussel colonization. To evaluate these effects, we analyzed patterns of barnacle recruitment, determined if predation rate covaried with the increase in mussel recruitment, and tested facilitation interactions in a field experiment. Neither magnitude nor season of barnacle recruitment changed meaningfully with site or zone from the 1990s to the 2000s. In contrast to the relationship between NPGO and local-scale mussel recruitment, relationships between local-scale patterns of barnacle recruitment and climate indices were weak. Despite differences in rates of prey recruitment and abundance of sea stars in 1990–1991, 1999–2000, and 2007–2008, predation rates were nearly identical in experiments before, during, and after 1999–2000. The facilitation experiment showed that mussels M. trossulus only became abundant when barnacle recruitment was allowed, when abundance of barnacles reached high abundance of ∼50% cover, and when mussel recruitment was sufficiently high. Thus, in the low zone minimal changes in mussel abundance despite sharply increased recruitment rates are consistent with the hypothesis that change in adult mussel cover was buffered by the relative insensitivity of barnacle recruitment to climatic fluctuations, and a resultant lack of change in

  20. Interspecies interactions and potential Influenza A virus risk in small swine farms in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCune Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent avian influenza epidemic in Asia and the H1N1 pandemic demonstrated that influenza A viruses pose a threat to global public health. The animal origins of the viruses confirmed the potential for interspecies transmission. Swine are hypothesized to be prime "mixing vessels" due to the dual receptivity of their trachea to human and avian strains. Additionally, avian and human influenza viruses have previously been isolated in swine. Therefore, understanding interspecies contact on smallholder swine farms and its potential role in the transmission of pathogens such as influenza virus is very important. Methods This qualitative study aimed to determine swine-associated interspecies contacts in two coastal areas of Peru. Direct observations were conducted at both small-scale confined and low-investment swine farms (n = 36 and in open areas where swine freely range during the day (n = 4. Interviews were also conducted with key stakeholders in swine farming. Results In both locations, the intermingling of swine and domestic birds was common. An unexpected contact with avian species was that swine were fed poultry mortality in 6/20 of the farms in Chancay. Human-swine contacts were common, with a higher frequency on the confined farms. Mixed farming of swine with chickens or ducks was observed in 36% of all farms. Human-avian interactions were less frequent overall. Use of adequate biosecurity and hygiene practices by farmers was suboptimal at both locations. Conclusions Close human-animal interaction, frequent interspecies contacts and suboptimal biosecurity and hygiene practices pose significant risks of interspecies influenza virus transmission. Farmers in small-scale swine production systems constitute a high-risk population and need to be recognized as key in preventing interspecies pathogen transfer. A two-pronged prevention approach, which offers educational activities for swine farmers about sound hygiene and

  1. Crystalline structures of particles interacting through the harmonic-repulsive pair potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    The behavior of identical particles interacting through the harmonic-repulsive pair potential has been studied in 3D using molecular dynamics simulations at a number of different densities. We found that at many densities, as the temperature of the systems decreases, the particles crystallize into complex structures whose formation has not been anticipated in previous studies on the harmonic-repulsive pair potential. In particular, at certain densities, crystallization into the structure I a 3 ¯ d (space group #230) with 16 particles in the unit cell occupying Wyckoff special positions (16b) was observed. This crystal structure has not been observed previously in experiments or in computer simulations of single component atomic or soft matter systems. At another density, we observed a liquid which is rather stable against crystallization. Yet, we observed crystallization of this liquid into the monoclinic C2/c (space group #15) structure with 32 particles in the unit cell occupying four different non-special Wyckoff (8f) sites. In this structure particles located at different Wyckoff sites have different energies. From the perspective of the local atomic environment, the organization of particles in this structure resembles the structure of some columnar quasicrystals. At a different value of the density, we did not observe crystallization at all despite rather long molecular dynamics runs. At two other densities, we observed the formation of the β S n distorted diamond structures instead of the expected diamond structure. Possibly, we also observed the formation of the R 3 ¯ c hexagonal lattice with 24 particles per unit cell occupying non-equivalent positions.

  2. The Interaction of Fatigue and Potentiation Following an Acute Bout of Unilateral Squats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha K. Andrews, Jesse M. Horodyski, Daniel A. MacLeod, Joseph Whitten, David G. Behm

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A prior conditioning resistance exercise can augment subsequent performance of the affected muscles due to the effects of post-activation potentiation (PAP. The non-local muscle fatigue literature has illustrated the global neural effects of unilateral fatigue. However, no studies have examined the possibility of acute non-local performance enhancements. The objective of the study was to provide a conditioning stimulus in an attempt to potentiate the subsequent jump performance of the affected limb and determine if there were performance changes in the contralateral limb. Using a randomized allocation, 14 subjects (6 females, 8 males completed three conditions on separate days: 1 unilateral, dominant leg, Bulgarian split squat protocol with testing of the exercised leg, 2 unilateral, dominant leg, Bulgarian split squat protocol with testing of the contralateral, non-exercised leg and 3 control session with testing of the non-dominant leg. Pre- and post-testing consisted of countermovement (CMJ and drop jumps (DJ. The exercised leg exhibited CMJ height increases of 3.5% (p = 0.008; d = 0.28, 4.0% (p = 0.011; d = 0.33 and 3.2% (p = 0.013; d = 0.26 at 1, 5, and 10 min post-intervention respectively. The contralateral CMJ height had 2.0% (p = 0.034; d = 0.18, 1.2% (p = 0.2; d = 0.12, and 2.1% (p = 0.05; d = 0.17 deficits at 1, 5, and 10 min post-intervention respectively. Similar relative results were found for CMJ power. There were no significant interactions for DJ measures or control CMJ measures. The findings suggest that PAP effects were likely predominant for the exercised leg whereas the conditioning exercise provided trivial magnitude although statistically significant neural impairments for the contralateral limb.

  3. The potential interaction between oral anticoagulants and acetaminophen in everyday practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Geven, LM; Kuitert, NA; Risselada, A; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The drug-drug interaction between oral anticoagulants (especially warfarin) and acetaminophen has been described, but evidence is conflicting and evidence for a similar interaction between acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon and acetaminophen is limited. Therefore, a study was performed to

  4. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van Dijk (David); G. Ertaylan (Gokhan); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); P.M.A. Sloot (Peter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally

  5. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, D.; Ertaylan, G.; Boucher, C.A.B.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally and

  6. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  7. Charge transfer interaction using quasiatomic minimal-basis orbitals in the effective fragment potential method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Peng; Gordon, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The charge transfer (CT) interaction, the most time-consuming term in the general effective fragment potential method, is made much more computationally efficient. This is accomplished by the projection of the quasiatomic minimal-basis-set orbitals (QUAMBOs) as the atomic basis onto the self-consistent field virtual molecular orbital (MO) space to select a subspace of the full virtual space called the valence virtual space. The diagonalization of the Fock matrix in terms of QUAMBOs recovers the canonical occupied orbitals and, more importantly, gives rise to the valence virtual orbitals (VVOs). The CT energies obtained using VVOs are generally as accurate as those obtained with the full virtual space canonical MOs because the QUAMBOs span the valence part of the virtual space, which can generally be regarded as “chemically important.” The number of QUAMBOs is the same as the number of minimal-basis MOs of a molecule. Therefore, the number of VVOs is significantly smaller than the number of canonical virtual MOs, especially for large atomic basis sets. This leads to a dramatic decrease in the computational cost

  8. Spatial Interaction Modeling to Identify Potentially Exposed Populations during RDD or IND Terrorism Incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regens, J.L.; Gunter, J.T.; Gupta, S.

    2009-01-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive no.5 (HSPD-5) Management of Domestic Incidents and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Incidents underscore the need to delineate radiological emergency guidance applicable to remedial action and recovery following an RDD or IND incident. Rapid delineation of the population potentially exposed to ionizing radiation from fallout during terrorist incidents involving RDDs or low-yield nuclear devices (≤ 20 KT) is necessary for effective medical response and incident management as part of the recovery process. This paper illustrates the application of spatial interaction models to allocate population data for a representative U.S. urban area (≅1.3M people; 1,612.27 km 2 area) at a geographical scale relevant for accurately estimating risk given dose concentrations. Estimated total dose equivalents (TEDE) are calculated for isopleths moving away from the detonation point for typical release scenarios. Population is estimated within the TEDE zones using Euclidean distances between zip code polygon centroids generated in ArcGIS version 9.1 with distance decay determined by regression analysis to apportion origin-destination pairs to a population count and density matrix on a spatial basis for daytime and night-time release scenarios. (authors)

  9. Potential interaction between transport and stream networks over the lowland rivers in Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Suvendu; Sahu, Abhay Sankar

    2017-07-15

    Extension of transport networks supports good accessibility and associated with the development of a region. However, transport lines have fragmented the regional landscape and disturbed the natural interplay between rivers and their floodplains. Spatial analysis using multiple buffers provides information about the potential interaction between road and stream networks and their impact on channel morphology of a small watershed in the Lower Gangetic Plain. Present study is tried to understand the lateral and longitudinal disconnection in headwater stream by rural roads with the integration of geoinformatics and field survey. Significant (p stream crossing in the last five decades (1970s-2010s) contribute to making longitudinal and lateral disconnection in the fluvial system of Kunur River Basin. Channel geometry from ten road-stream crossings shows significant (p = 0.01) differences between upstream and downstream of crossing structure and created problems like downstream scouring, increased drop height at outlet, formation of stable bars, severe bank erosion, and make barriers for river biota. The hydro-geomorphic processes are also adversely affected due to lateral disconnection and input of fine to coarse sediments from the river side growth of unpaved road (1922%). Limited streamside development, delineation of stream corridor, regular monitoring and engineering efficiency for the construction of road and road-stream crossing might be effective in managing river geomorphology and riverine landscape. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  11. Interaction of the 106-126 prion peptide with lipid membranes and potential implication for neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupiereux, Ingrid; Zorzi, Willy; Lins, Laurence; Brasseur, Robert; Colson, Pierre; Heinen, Ernst; Elmoualij, Benaissa

    2005-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation in the brain of an abnormally misfolded, protease-resistant, and β-sheet rich pathogenic isoform (PrP sc ) of the cellular prion protein (PrP c ). In the present work, we were interested to study the mode of prion protein interaction with the membrane using the 106-126 peptide and small unilamellar lipid vesicles as model. As previously demonstrated, we showed by MTS assay that PrP 106-126 induces alterations in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We demonstrated for the first time by lipid-mixing assay and by the liposome vesicle leakage test that PrP 106-126, a non-tilted peptide, induces liposome fusion thus a potential cell membrane destabilization, as supported by membrane integrity assay (LDH). By circular dichroism (CD) analysis we showed that the fusogenic property of PrP 106-126 in the presence of liposome is associated with a predominantly β-sheet structure. These data suggest that the fusogenic property associated with a predominant β-sheet structure exhibited by the prion peptides contributes to the neurotoxicity of these peptides by destabilizing cellular membranes. The latter might be attached at the membrane surface in a parallel orientation as shown by molecular modeling

  12. Wigner quantum systems. Two particles interacting via a harmonic potential-1: two-dimensional space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamupingene, A.H.; Tsaneva, S.P.

    1985-08-01

    A non-canonical quantum system, consisting of two non-relativistic particles, interacting via a harmonic potential, is considered. The centre-of-mass position and momentum operators obey the canonical commutation relations, whereas the internal variables are assumed to be the odd generators of the Lie superalgebra sl(1,2). This assumption implies a set of constraints in the phase space, which are explicitly written in the paper. All finite dimensional irreducible representations of sl(1,2) are considered. Particular attention is paid to the physical representations, i.e. the representations, corresponding to Hermitian position and momentum operators. The properties of the physical observables are investigated. In particular, the operators of the internal Hamiltonian, the relative distance, the internal momentum and the orbital momentum commute with each other. The spectrum of these operators is finite. The distance between the constituents is preserved in time. It can take no more than three different values. For any non-negative integer or half-integer l there exists a representation, where the orbital momentum is l (in unit 2 slash-h). The position of any one of the particles cannot be localized, since the operators of the coordinates do not commute with each other. The constituents are smeared with a certain probability within a finite surface, which moves with a constant velocity together with the centre of mass. (author)

  13. Interaction among hERG channel blockers is a potential mechanism of death in caffeine overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jifeng; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Kai; Chen, Qingmao; Chen, Yingying; Shen, Yueliang; Xiao, Liping; Jiang, Liqin; Chen, Yuan

    2017-04-05

    Caffeine overdose death is due to cardiac arrest, but its mechanism has not been explored in detail. In this study, our data showed that caffeine significantly prolonged the heart rate-corrected QT interval (QTc) of rabbits in vivo (PCaffeine was also found to be a hERG channel blocker with an IC 50 of 5.04mM (n=5). Although these two findings likely link caffeine overdose death with hERG channel blockade, the amount of caffeine consumption needed to reach the IC 50 is very high. Further study demonstrated that addition another hERG blocker could lower the consumption of caffeine significantly, no matter whether two hERG blockers share the same binding sites. Our data does not rule out other possibility, however, it suggests that there is a potential causal relationship between caffeine overdose death with hERG channel and the interaction among these hERG blockers. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Effective potentials for charge-helium and charge-singly-ionized helium interactions in a dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T.S.; Amirov, S.M.; Moldabekov, Zh.A. [Institute for Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-06-15

    The effective electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials arising as a result of partial screening of the helium nucleus field by bound electrons, taking into account both screening by free charged particles and quantum diffraction effect in dense plasmas were derived. The impact of quantum effects on screening was analyzed. It was shown that plasma polarization around the atom leads to the additional repulsion (attraction) between the electron (proton) and the helium atom. The method of constructing the full electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials as the sum of the derived potentials with the polarization potential and exchange potential is discussed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CORREIA, RION BRATTIG; LI, LANG; ROCHA, LUIS M.

    2015-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this “Bibliome”, the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products—including cannabis—which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015. We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that

  16. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  17. Event Related Potential Study of Language Interaction in Bilingual Aphasia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, Elvira; Wittevrongel, Benjamin; De Keyser, Kim; De Letter, Miet; Hulle, Marc M Van

    2018-01-01

    Half of the global population can be considered bilingual. Nevertheless when faced with patients with aphasia, clinicians and therapists usually ignore the patient's second language (L2) albeit its interference in first language (L1) processing has been shown. The excellent temporal resolution by which each individual linguistic component can be gaged during word-processing, promoted the event-related potential (ERP) technique for studying language processing in healthy bilinguals and monolingual aphasia patients. However, this technique has not yet been applied in the context of bilingual aphasia. In the current study, we report on L2 interference in L1 processing using the ERP technique in bilingual aphasia. We tested four bilingual- and one trilingual patients with aphasia, as well as several young and older (age-matched with patients) healthy subjects as controls. We recorded ERPs when subjects were engaged in a semantic association judgment task on 122 related and 122 unrelated Dutch word-pairs (prime and target words). In 61 related and 61 unrelated word-pairs, an inter-lingual homograph was used as prime. In these word-pairs, when the target was unrelated to the prime in Dutch (L1), it was associated to the English (L2) meaning of the homograph. Results showed a significant effect of homograph use as a prime on early and/or late ERPs in response to word-pairs related in Dutch or English. Each patient presented a unique pattern of L2 interference in L1 processing as reflected by his/her ERP image. These interferences depended on the patient's pre- and post-morbid L2 proficiency. When the proficiency was high, the L2 interference in L1 processing was higher. Furthermore, the mechanism of interference in patients that were pre-morbidly highly proficient in L2 additionally depended on the frequency of pre-morbid L2 exposure. In summary, we showed that the mechanism behind L2 interference in L1 processing in bilingual patients with aphasia depends on a complex

  18. Intrinsic interactive reinforcement learning – Using error-related potentials for real world human-robot interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Su Kyoung; Kirchner, Elsa Andrea; Stefes, Arne; Kirchner, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Reinforcement learning (RL) enables robots to learn its optimal behavioral strategy in dynamic environments based on feedback. Explicit human feedback during robot RL is advantageous, since an explicit reward function can be easily adapted. However, it is very demanding and tiresome for a human to continuously and explicitly generate feedback. Therefore, the development of implicit approaches is of high relevance. In this paper, we used an error-related potential (ErrP), an event-related acti...

  19. Studies of P-matrix formalism on the basis of the potential description of two-particle interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenko, V.A.; Petrov, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    A study is made of mathematical and physical aspects of the P-matrix approach within the framework of the potential description of two particle interaction when the dynamics is based on the nonrelativistic Schroedinger equation. A dispersion formula for the P-matrix is derived correctly, different ways of its expansion by means of which it is possible to develop different methods of an approximate description of the quantities characterizing the two-particle interaction are suggested. 15 refs. (author)

  20. Impact of wall potential on the fluid-wall interaction in a cylindrical capillary and a generalized Kelvin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubov, T.S.; Mainwaring, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work a generalized Kelvin equation for a fluid confined in thick-walled cylindrical capillary is developed. This has been accomplished by including the potential energy function for interaction between a solid wall of a capillary and a confined fluid into the Kelvin equation. Using the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, an explicit form of the potential energy functions as expressed by hypergeometrical functions have been derived-firstly, for the interaction between a solid wall and a test atom placed at an arbitrary point in a long open-end capillary, and thereafter for the body-body interaction between the solid wall and a confined Lennard-Jones fluid. Further, this generalized Kelvin equation has been applied to detailed description hysteresis phenomena in such capillaries. All numerical calculations have been carried out for the model argon-graphite system at 90 K

  1. Influence of Three-square-well Interaction Potential on Isotope Effect Coefficient of High-TC Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Dokkaemklang, S.; Kumvongsa, C.; Maneeratanakul, S.

    2005-10-01

    In this research, the exact formula of the isotope effect coefficient of s wave and d-wave superconductor in weak-coupling limit are derived by using a three square- well interaction potential that pairing interaction consists of 3 parts : an attractive electron-phonon interaction, an attractive non-electron-phonon interaction , and a repulsive Coulomb interaction . op ac , w w and c w is the characteristic energy cutoff of the Debye phonon , non-phonon ,and Coulomb respectively and 2 / 1 ac M- a w , and c op , w w do not depend on isotope mass(M). We find that, in all case of consideration, the isotope coefficient converges to 0.5 at lower value of Coulomb coupling constant and larger values of phonon and non-phonon coupling constant

  2. Potential interaction between zinc ions and a cyclodextrin-based diclofenac formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Imad I; El-Sabawi, Dina; Abdel Jalil, Mariam

    2016-03-01

    Complexes of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with hydroxypropyl betacyclodextrin (HPβCD) were prepared by co-evaporation in a 1:1 ratio and characterized in light of previously reported data. Phase solubility diagrams were obtained for DF-Na with HPβCD in the presence and absence of zinc ions. Dissolution profiles were obtained for DF-Na and its HPβCD complex at acidic (pH 1.2) as well as in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8), in the presence and absence of zinc. HPβCD, as expected, was shown to improve the dissolution of DF-Na in acidic medium but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). The presence of zinc ions decreased the in vitro dissolution of DF-HPβCD complex in acidic medium (pH 1.2) but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). It was confirmed that the precipitate that was formed by zinc ions in the presence of HPβCD and DF-Na contained no cyclodextrin and most likely it was a mixture of the complexes: DF 2 -Zn and DF-Zn with some molecules of water. In vivo experiments on rats have shown that HPβCD has no statistically significant effect on absorption or bioavailability of DF-Na in spite of the observed improvement of its in vitro dissolution by HPβCD. Moreover, zinc ions were shown to decrease the absorption rate of DF-Na in rats model but did neither significantly alter the absorption nor bioavailability of DF-HPβCD complex. The zinc induced precipitates of DF were shown to have significantly different crystalline properties when HPβCD was present. Therefore, the pharmaceutical details of a DF-Na preparation should be considered when designing the formulation and predicting possible interaction between DF-Na (or other potential NSAIDs) and zinc metal.

  3. Prevalence of potential drug interactions in Thai patients receiving simvastatin: The causality assessment of musculoskeletal adverse events induced by statin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriangkhawut, Methira; Tansakul, Patthana; Uchaipichat, Verawan

    2017-09-01

    Drug-drug interactions are one of the major risk factors associated with statin-induced myopathy. Although simvastatin is widely used in Thailand, studies investigating the prevalence of potential simvastatin-drug interactions (SDIs) and its clinical relevance in Thai population are still limited. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of potential SDIs (phase 1 study) and musculoskeletal adverse effects (AEs) associated with those interactions (phase 2 study). A phase 1 study was retrospectively conducted with outpatients at a 60-bed hospital who received simvastatin between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013. In phase 2, study was cross-sectionally conducted in outpatients whose prescriptions contain potential SDIs. Musculoskeletal AEs were evaluated by using symptom checklist questionnaires and measuring plasma creatinine kinase (CK). The causal relationship between the AEs and the potential SDIs was assessed using a Drug Interaction Probability Scale. Out of 3447 simvastatin users, potential SDIs were found in 314 patients (9.1%). The prevalence of prescriptions containing potential SDIs was in the range of 4.7-6.0%. Two-thirds of the potential SDIs were rated to be highly significant while more than 70% were in contraindication list. The most common precipitant drugs were gemfibrozil (382 prescriptions), colchicine (171 prescriptions) and amlodipine (152 prescriptions). Of 49 patients recruited into phase 2 study, we found that 31 patients (63.3%) had myopathy. Myalgia was the most frequently identified AEs ( n  = 18, 58.1%), followed by asymptomatic rising CK ( n  = 8, 25.8%), and myositis ( n  = 5, 16.1%). Musculoskeletal AEs associated with SDIs were found in 16 patients (51.6%). Of these, we found 50.0%, 31.3% and 18.8% had asymptomatic rising CK, myalgia, and myositis, respectively. Precipitant drugs associated with myopathy were amlodipine (2 possible cases), colchicine (3 possible cases), gemfibrozil (8 possible and 1 probable cases), nevirapine (1

  4. Interactions among Future Study Abroad Students: Exploring Potential Intercultural Learning Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, C.; Beaven, A.; Pugliese, R.

    2015-01-01

    The study presented in this article aims to explore if and how intercultural learning may take place in students' class interaction. It is grounded in the assumption that interculturality is not a clear-cut feature inherent to interactions occurring when individuals with presumed different linguistic and cultural/national backgrounds talk to each…

  5. Hetero-interaction between Gouy-Stern double layers : charge and potential regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyklema, J.; Duval, J.F.L.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of Advances is devoted to the memory of Hans-Joachim Schulze who, before his untimely death, made substantial contributions in the domains of flotation, wetting and particle interaction, often under adverse working conditions. Many of his publications involve hetero-interaction between

  6. Simple potential model for interaction of dark particles with massive bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takibayev, Nurgali

    2018-01-01

    A simple model for interaction of dark particles with matter based on resonance behavior in a three-body system is proposed. The model describes resonant amplification of effective interaction between two massive bodies at large distances between them. The phenomenon is explained by catalytic action of dark particles rescattering at a system of two heavy bodies which are understood here as the big stellar objects. Resonant amplification of the effective interaction between the two heavy bodies imitates the increase in their mass while their true gravitational mass remains unchanged. Such increased interaction leads to more pronounced gravitational lensing of bypassing light. It is shown that effective interaction between the heavy bodies is changed at larger distances and can transform into repulsive action.

  7. Potential job facilitation benefits of "water cooler" conversations: the importance of social interactions in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Iris Y; Kwantes, Catherine T

    2015-01-01

    This study looked at the extent to which personality and cultural factors predicted participants' perceptions of the importance private interactions played in the workplace. The 134 participants read a vignette (where a new employee socially interacted at low or high levels with co-workers) and completed the Big Five Inventory, Social Axioms Survey, and questions concerning expected workplace experiences. Results indicated employees who engaged in high levels of private interaction with co-workers were expected to be better liked, to receive better performance evaluations, were more likely to receive co-worker assistance, and were thought to be more likely chosen for future projects. However, the personality and social axiom variables studied did not significantly interact with social interaction to influence expectations of workplace outcomes.

  8. Coronal mass ejection and stream interaction region characteristics and their potential geomagnetic effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, G.M.; Russell, C.T.; Luhmann, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the largest geomagnetic storms are caused by extraordinary increases in the solar wind velocity and/or southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) produced by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated interplanetary shocks. However, much more frequent small to moderate increases in solar wind velocity and compressions in the IMF can be caused by either coronal mass ejections or fast/slow stream interactions. This study examines the relative statistics of the magnitudes of disturbances associated with the passage of both interplanetary coronal mass ejections and stream interaction regions, using an exceptionally continuous interplanetary database from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter at 0.7 AU throughout most of solar cycle 21. It is found that both stream interaction and CMEs produce magnetic fields significantly larger than the nominal IMF. Increases in field magnitude that are up to 2 and 3 times higher than the ambient field are observed for stream interaction regions and CMEs, respectively. Both stream interactions and CMEs produce large positive and negative Β z components at 0.7 AU, but only CMEs produce Β z magnitudes greater than 35 nT. CMEs are often associated with sustained periods of positive or negative Β z whereas stream interaction regions are more often associated with fluctuating Β z . CMEs tend to produce larger solar wind electric fields than stream interactions. Yet stream interactions tend to produce larger dynamic pressures than CMEs. Dst predictions based on solar wind duskward electric field and dynamic pressure indicate that CMEs produce the largest geomagnetic disturbances while the low-speed portion of stream interaction regions are least geomagnetically effective. Both stream interaction regions and CMEs contribute to low and moderate levels of activity with relative importance determined by their solar-cycle-dependent occurrence rates

  9. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boucher Charles AB

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally and dynamically, we have constructed an HIV-1 human protein interaction network. This network was analyzed for important proteins and processes that are specific for the HIV life-cycle. In order to expose viral strategies, network motif analysis was carried out showing reoccurring patterns in virus-host dynamics. Results Our analyses show that human proteins interacting with HIV form a densely connected and central sub-network within the total human protein interaction network. The evaluation of this sub-network for connectivity and centrality resulted in a set of proteins essential for the HIV life-cycle. Remarkably, we were able to associate proteins involved in RNA polymerase II transcription with hubs and proteasome formation with bottlenecks. Inferred network motifs show significant over-representation of positive and negative feedback patterns between virus and host. Strikingly, such patterns have never been reported in combined virus-host systems. Conclusions HIV infection results in a reprioritization of cellular processes reflected by an increase in the relative importance of transcriptional machinery and proteasome formation. We conclude that during the evolution of HIV, some patterns of interaction have been selected for resulting in a system where virus proteins preferably interact with central human proteins for direct control and with proteasomal proteins for indirect control over the cellular processes. Finally, the patterns described by network motifs illustrate how virus and host interact with one another.

  10. A parallel interaction potential approach coupled with the immersed boundary method for fully resolved simulations of deformable interfaces and membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arza, Vamsi Spandan; Meschini, Valentina; Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Lohse, Detlef; Querzoli, Giorgio; de Tullio, Marco D.; Verzicco, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we show and discuss how the deformation dynamics of closed liquid–liquid interfaces (for example drops and bubbles) can be replicated with use of a phenomenological interaction potential model. This new approach to simulate liquid–liquid interfaces is based on the fundamental principle

  11. The influence of prejudice and stereotypes on anticipated affect : feelings about a potentially negative interaction with another ethnic group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Ernestine; Finchilescu, Gillian; Brix, Louise; Wijnants, Nienke; Koomen, Willem

    2008-01-01

    In this research we investigated whether feelings about an imagined potentially negative interaction with a member of another ethnic group was affected more by valence than content of stereotypes, and whether the differential influence of perception and meta-perception was similar for dominant and

  12. Prevalence of potential drug–drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  13. In-vitro evaluation of the P-glycoprotein interactions of a series of potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, André Huss; Rønsted, Nina; Jäger, Anna Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Drug compounds interacting with the blood-brain barrier efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) might have limited access to brain tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether nine potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids of the crinine, lycorine and galanthamine types...

  14. Sources, potentials and fields in Lorenz and Coulomb gauge: Cancellation of instantaneous interactions for moving point charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wundt, B.J.; Jentschura, U.D.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the coupling of the electromagnetic sources (charge and current densities) to the scalar and vector potentials in classical electrodynamics, using Green function techniques. As is well known, the scalar potential shows an action-at-a-distance behavior in Coulomb gauge. The conundrum generated by the instantaneous interaction has intrigued physicists for a long time. Starting from the differential equations that couple the sources to the potentials, we here show in a concise derivation, using the retarded Green function, how the instantaneous interaction cancels in the calculation of the electric field. The time derivative of a specific additional term in the vector potential, present only in Coulomb gauge, yields a supplementary contribution to the electric field which cancels the gradient of the instantaneous Coulomb gauge scalar potential, as required by gauge invariance. This completely eliminates the contribution of the instantaneous interaction from the electric field. It turns out that a careful formulation of the retarded Green function, inspired by field theory, is required in order to correctly treat boundary terms in partial integrations. Finally, compact integral representations are derived for the Liénard–Wiechert potentials (scalar and vector) in Coulomb gauge which manifestly contain two compensating action-at-a-distance terms. - Highlights: ► We investigate action-at-a-distance effects in electrodynamics in detail. ► We calculate the instantaneous interactions for scalar and vector potentials. ► The cancellation mechanism involves the retarded Green function. ► The mechanism is confirmed on the example of moving point charges. ► The Green function has to be treated with care for nontrivial boundary terms.

  15. Tritrophic Interactions Mediated by Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatiles: Mechanisms, Ecological Relevance, and Application Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlings, Ted C J; Erb, Matthias

    2018-01-07

    Tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and their natural enemies are an integral part of all terrestrial ecosystems. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) play a key role in these interactions, as they can attract predators and parasitoids to herbivore-attacked plants. Thirty years after this discovery, the ecological importance of the phenomena is widely recognized. However, the primary function of HIPVs is still subject to much debate, as is the possibility of using these plant-produced cues in crop protection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of HIPVs in tritrophic interactions from an ecological as well as a mechanistic perspective. This overview focuses on the main gaps in our knowledge of tritrophic interactions, and we argue that filling these gaps will greatly facilitate efforts to exploit HIPVs for pest control.

  16. Variation in plant-mediated interactions between rhizobacteria and caterpillars: potential role of soil composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pangesti, N.P.D.; Pineda Gomez, A.M.; Dicke, M.; Loon, van J.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Selected strains of non-pathogenic rhizobacteria can trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants against aboveground insect herbivores. However, the underlying mechanisms of plant-mediated interactions between rhizobacteria and herbivorous insects are still poorly understood. Using

  17. Hyaluronan-CD44 Interactions Decrease the Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    cancer cells in vivo. This study focuses on understanding the mechanisms by which CD44 inhibits breast cancer cell invasion. We have found that the differential interaction between CD44 and soluble or embedded Hyaluronan leads to differential phosphorylation of ERK and Pak. These differentially activated signaling pathways molecularly govern a phenotypic switch between invasiveness or proliferation. Additionally, this interactions also leads to decreased transcription of the metalloprotease MMP9 when on collagen IV gels but not collagen I gels. Together, these mechanisms

  18. Plant Virus–Insect Vector Interactions: Current and Potential Future Research Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Mann, Krin S.; Johnson, Karyn N.

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition and transmission by an insect vector is central to the infection cycle of the majority of plant pathogenic viruses. Plant viruses can interact with their insect host in a variety of ways including both non-persistent and circulative transmission; in some cases, the latter involves virus replication in cells of the insect host. Replicating viruses can also elicit both innate and specific defense responses in the insect host. A consistent feature is that the interaction of the virus with its insect host/vector requires specific molecular interactions between virus and host, commonly via proteins. Understanding the interactions between plant viruses and their insect host can underpin approaches to protect plants from infection by interfering with virus uptake and transmission. Here, we provide a perspective focused on identifying novel approaches and research directions to facilitate control of plant viruses by better understanding and targeting virus–insect molecular interactions. We also draw parallels with molecular interactions in insect vectors of animal viruses, and consider technical advances for their control that may be more broadly applicable to plant virus vectors. PMID:27834855

  19. Relation between the change of density of states and the shape of the potential in two-body interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo

    2017-04-01

    We derive a general relation in two-body scattering theory that more directly relates the change of density of states (DDOS) due to interaction to the shape of the potential. The relation allows us to infer certain global properties of the DDOS from the global properties of the potential. In particular, we show that DDOS is negative at all energies and for all partial waves, for potentials that are more repulsive than +1 /r2 everywhere. This behavior represents a different class of global properties of DDOS from that described by the Levinson's theorem.

  20. Transitioning from microbiome composition to microbial community interactions: the potential of the metaorganism Hydra as an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Deines

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Animals are home to complex microbial communities, which are shaped through interactions within the community, interactions with the host, and through environmental factors. The advent of high-throughput sequencing methods has led to novel insights in changing patterns of community composition and structure. However, deciphering the different types of interactions among community members, with their hosts and their interplay with their environment is still a challenge of major proportion. The emerging fields of synthetic microbial ecology and community systems biology have the potential to decrypt these complex relationships. Studying host-associated microbiota across multiple spatial and temporal scales will bridge the gap between individual microorganism studies and large-scale whole community surveys. Here, we discuss the unique potential of Hydra as an emerging experimental model in microbiome research. Through in vivo, in vitro, and in silico approaches the interaction structure of host-associated microbial communities and the effects of the host on the microbiota and its interactions can be disentangled. Research in the model system Hydra can unify disciplines from molecular genetics to ecology, opening up the opportunity to discover fundamental rules that govern microbiome community stability.

  1. Quantitative analysis of molecular interaction potentials of ionic liquid anions using multi-functionalized stationary phases in HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chul-Woong; Stolte, Stefan; Ranke, Johannes; Preiss, Ulrich; Krossing, Ingo; Thöming, Jorg

    2014-08-04

    The molecular interaction potentials, including S (dipolarity/polarizability), A (hydrogen bonding acidity), and B (hydrogen bonding basicity), of anions are experimentally determined using multi-functionalized stationary phases in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) systems. We employ three different multi-functionalized stationary phase columns (Obelisc R, Obelisc N, and Acclaim Trinity-P1) combined with two ingredients, namely, acetonitrile (ACN) and methanol (MeOH). These conditions can cause neutral, cationic, and anionic compounds to be retained. By using the retention characteristics of calibration compounds, including cations, anions, and neutral compounds, system parameters including the ionic interaction terms (zc Zc , za Za ) are evaluated using multiple linear regression, resulting in a standard deviation (SD) of 0.090-0.158 log units. Based on the system parameters and retention characteristics of the anions of interest, their molecular interaction potentials are characterized on the same scale for neutral and cationic molecules. Furthermore, to verify the determined molecular interaction potentials, we predict anion hydrophobicity. The results show that the determined S, A, and B, together with the computable descriptors E (excess molar refraction) and V (McGowan volume), can predict anion hydrophobicity with R(2) =0.982 and SD=0.167 (dimensionless). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Potential drug-drug interactions in a Brazilian teaching hospital: age-related differences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Oliveira Melo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes to measure frequency and to characterize the profile of potential drug interactions (pDDI in a general medicine ward of a teaching hospital. Data about identification and clinical status of patients were extracted from medical records between March to August 2006. The occurrence of pDDI was analyzed using the database monographs Micromedex® DrugReax® System. From 5,336 prescriptions with two or more drugs, 3,097 (58.0% contained pDDI. The frequency of major and well document pDDI was 26.5%. Among 647 patients, 432 (66.8% were exposed to at least one pDDI and 283 (43.7% to major pDDI. The multivariate analysis identified that factors related to higher rates of major pDDI were the same age (p< 0.0001, length of stay (p< 0.0001, prevalence of hypertension [OR=3.42 (p< 0.0001] and diabetes mellitus [OR=2.1 (p< 0.0001], cardiovascular diseases (p< 0.0001 and the number of prescribed drugs (Spearman’s correlation=0.640622, p< 0.0001. Between major pDDI, the main risk was hemorrhage (50.3%, the most frequent major pDDI involved combination of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Among moderate pDDI, 3,866 (90.8% involved medicines for the treatment of chronic non-communicable diseases, mainly hypertension. In HU-USP, the profile of pDDI was similar among adults and elderly (the most frequent pDDI and major pDDI were same, the difference was only the frequency in either group. The efforts of the clinical pharmacists should be directed to elderly patients with cardiovascular compromise, mainly in use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Furthermore, hospital managers should increase the integration between levels of health care to promote safety patient after discharge.Keywords: Drug interactions. Aged. Internal Medicine. Hospitals, University. RESUMOInterações medicamentosas potenciais em um hospital escolar brasileiro: diferenças relacionadas à idade?O estudo tem por objetivo descrever o perfil de intera

  3. Older age and steroid use are associated with increasing polypharmacy and potential medication interactions among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parian, Alyssa; Ha, Christina Y

    2015-06-01

    Comorbidity and polypharmacy, more prevalent among older persons, may impact the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aims of this study were to assess the frequency of polypharmacy and medication interactions within a cohort of older patients with IBD and describe IBD treatment patterns. Cohort study of 190 patients with IBD 65 years or older followed at a tertiary IBD referral center from 2006 to 2012. Data collected included demographics, IBD-specific characteristics including disease activity, and comorbidity. Medication histories were extracted from medical records, and data were used to classify polypharmacy, frequency, and severity of potential medication interactions and inappropriate medication use. Older patients with IBD were prescribed an average of 9 routine medications. Severe polypharmacy (≥10 routine medications) was present in 43.2% of studied patients and associated with increasing age, greater comorbidity, and steroid use. Overall, 73.7% of patients had at least 1 potential medication interaction, including 40% of patients with potential IBD medication-associated interactions. Chronic steroids were prescribed to 40% of the older patients including 24% who were in remission or with mild disease activity. Only 39.5% of patients were on immunomodulators and 21.1% on biologics. Approximately, 35% of patients were given at least 1 Beers inappropriate medication and almost 10% were receiving chronic narcotics. Older patients with IBD are at increased risk for severe polypharmacy and potential major medication interactions especially with increasing comorbidity and chronic steroid use. Steroid-maintenance therapies are prevalent among the older patients with IBD with lower utilization of steroid-sparing regimens.

  4. Monomerization of cytosolic mature smac attenuates interaction with IAPs and potentiation of caspase activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen P Burke; Jeffrey B Smith

    2010-01-01

    The four residues at the amino-terminus of mature Smac/DIABLO are an IAP binding motif (IBM). Upon exit from mitochondria, mature Smac interacts with inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs), abrogating caspase inhibition. We used the ubiquitin fusion model to express mature Smac in the cytosol. Transiently expressed mature Smac56-239 (called Smac56) and Smac60-239 (called Smac60), which lacks the IBM, interacted with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). However, stable expression pr...

  5. Pregnancy, prescription medicines and the potential risk of herb-drug interactions: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLay, James S; Izzati, Naila; Pallivalapila, Abdul R; Shetty, Ashalatha; Pande, Binita; Rore, Craig; Al Hail, Moza; Stewart, Derek

    2017-12-19

    Pregnant women are routinely prescribed medicines while self-medicating with herbal natural products to treat predominantly pregnancy related conditions. The aim of this study was to assess the potential for herb-drug interactions (HDIs) in pregnant women and to explore possible herb-drug interactions and their potential clinical significance. A cross-sectional survey of women during early pregnancy or immediately postpartum in North-East Scotland. Outcome measures included; Prescription medicines use excluding vitamins and potential HDIs assessed using Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. The survey was completed by 889 respondents (73% response rate). 45.3% (403) reported the use of at least one prescription medicine, excluding vitamins. Of those taking prescription medicines, 44.9% (181) also reported concurrent use of at least one HNP (Range 1-12). A total of 91 different prescription medicines were reported by respondents using HNPs. Of those taking prescription medicines, 44.9% (181) also reported concurrent use of at least one HNP (Range 1-12). Thirty-four herb-drug interactions were identified in 23 (12.7%) women with the potential to increase the risk of postpartum haemorrhage, alter maternal haemodynamics, and enhance maternal/fetal CNS depression. Almost all were rated as moderate (93.9%), one as a potentially major (ginger and nifedipine) and only one minor (ondansetron and chamomile). Almost half of pregnant women in this study were prescribed medicines excluding vitamins and minerals and almost half of these used HNPs. Potential moderate to severe HDIs were identified in an eighth of the study cohort. Healthcare professionals should be aware that the concurrent use of HNPs and prescription medicines during pregnancy is common and carries potential risks.

  6. Modelling particles moving in a potential field with pairwise interactions and an application

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Brillinger; Haiganoush Preisler; M. J. Wisdom

    2011-01-01

    Motions of particles in fields characterized by real-valued potential functions, are considered. Three particular expressions for potential functions are studied. One, U, depends on the ith particle’s location, ri(t) at times t

  7. A parallel interaction potential approach coupled with the immersed boundary method for fully resolved simulations of deformable interfaces and membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandan, Vamsi; Meschini, Valentina; Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Lohse, Detlef; Querzoli, Giorgio; de Tullio, Marco D.; Verzicco, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we show and discuss how the deformation dynamics of closed liquid-liquid interfaces (for example drops and bubbles) can be replicated with use of a phenomenological interaction potential model. This new approach to simulate liquid-liquid interfaces is based on the fundamental principle of minimum potential energy where the total potential energy depends on the extent of deformation of a spring network distributed on the surface of the immersed drop or bubble. Simulating liquid-liquid interfaces using this model require computing ad-hoc elastic constants which is done through a reverse-engineered approach. The results from our simulations agree very well with previous studies on the deformation of drops in standard flow configurations such as a deforming drop in a shear flow or cross flow. The interaction potential model is highly versatile, computationally efficient and can be easily incorporated into generic single phase fluid solvers to also simulate complex fluid-structure interaction problems. This is shown by simulating flow in the left ventricle of the heart with mechanical and natural mitral valves where the imposed flow, motion of ventricle and valves dynamically govern the behaviour of each other. Results from these simulations are compared with ad-hoc in-house experimental measurements. Finally, we present a simple and easy to implement parallelisation scheme, as high performance computing is unavoidable when studying large scale problems involving several thousands of simultaneously deforming bodies in highly turbulent flows.

  8. Potential drug-drug interactions in the neurology ward of a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hospital, Peshawar granted approval (no. NWHP/Eth-H-087/15) for the conduct of this study. In-patients' records were reviewed and screened retrospectively for pDDIs using computerized drug interaction and information system, the Micromedex Drug-Reax System. (Thomson Reuters Healthcare Inc, Greenwood. Village ...

  9. Variance heterogeneity analysis for detection of potentially interacting genetic loci: Method and its limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); A. Dehghan (Abbas); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Presence of interaction between a genotype and certain factor in determination of a trait's value, it is expected that the trait's variance is increased in the group of subjects having this genotype. Thus, test of heterogeneity of variances can be used as a test to screen for

  10. SoundScapes: non-formal learning potentials from interactive VEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony; Petersson, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Non-formal learning is evident from an inhabited information space that is created from non-invasive multi-dimensional sensor technologies that source human gesture. Libraries of intuitive interfaces empower natural interaction where the gesture is mapped to the multisensory content. Large screen...

  11. Clinical relevancy and determinants of potential drug–drug interactions in chronic kidney disease patients: results from a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ahsan Saleem,1,2 Imran Masood,1 Tahir Mehmood Khan3 1Department of Pharmacy, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur, Pakistan; 2Pharmacy Services Department, Integrated Medical Center, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan; 3School of Pharmacy, Monash University, Sunway Campus, Selangor, Malaysia Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD alters the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses of various renally excreted drugs and increases the risk of drug-related problems, such as drug–drug interactions.Objectives: To assess the pattern, determinants, and clinical relevancy of potential drug–drug interactions (pDDIs in CKD patients.Materials and methods: This study retrospectively reviewed medical charts of all CKD patients admitted in the nephrology unit of a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan from January 2013 to December 2014. The Micromedex Drug-Reax® system was used to screen patient profiles for pDDIs, and IBM SPSS version 20 was used to carry out statistical analysis.Results: We evaluated 209 medical charts and found pDDIs in nearly 78.5% CKD patients. Overall, 541 pDDIs were observed, of which, nearly 60.8% patients had moderate, 41.1% had minor, 27.8% had major, and 13.4% had contraindicated interactions. Among those interactions, 49.4% had good evidence, 44.0% had fair, 6.3% had excellent evidence, and 35.5% interactions had delayed onset of action. The potential adverse outcomes of pDDIs included postural hypotension, QT prolongation, ceftriaxone–calcium precipitation, cardiac arrhythmias, and reduction in therapeutic effectiveness. The occurrence of pDDIs was found strongly associated with the age of <60 years, number of prescribed medicines ≥5, hypertension, and the lengthy hospitalization of patients.Conclusion: The occurrence of pDDIs was high in CKD patients. It was observed that CKD patients with an older age, higher number of prescribed medicines, lengthy hospitalization, and hypertension were at

  12. Particle resonance in the Dirac equation in the presence of a delta interaction and a perturbative hyperbolic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalba, Victor M.; Gonzalez-Diaz, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    We show that the energy spectrum of the one-dimensional Dirac equation, in the presence of an attractive vectorial delta potential, exhibits a resonant behavior when one includes an asymptotically spatially vanishing weak electric field associated with a hyperbolic tangent potential. We solve the Dirac equation in terms of Gauss hyper-geometric functions and show explicitly how the resonant behavior depends on the strength of the electric field evaluated at the support of the point interaction. We derive an approximate expression for the value of the resonances and compare the results calculated for the hyperbolic potential with those obtained for a linear perturbative potential. Finally, we characterize the resonances with the help of the phase shift and the Wigner delay time. (orig.)

  13. Potential Energy Curves and Transport Properties for the Interaction of He with Other Ground-state Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Harry; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The interactions of a He atom with a heavier atom are examined for 26 different elements, which are consecutive members selected from three rows (Li - Ne, Na - Ar, and K,Ca, Ga - Kr) and column 12 (Zn,Cd) of the periodic table. Interaction energies are determined wing high-quality ab initio calculations for the states of the molecule that would be formed from each pair of atoms in their ground states. Potential energies are tabulated for a broad range of Interatomic separation distances. The results show, for example, that the energy of an alkali interaction at small separations is nearly the same as that of a rare-gas interaction with the same electron configuration for the dosed shells. Furthermore, the repulsive-range parameter for this region is very short compared to its length for the repulsion dominated by the alkali-valence electron at large separations (beyond about 3-4 a(sub 0)). The potential energies in the region of the van der Waals minimum agree well with the most accurate results available. The ab initio energies are applied to calculate scattering cross sections and obtain the collision integrals that are needed to determine transport properties to second order. The theoretical values of Li-He total scattering cross sections and the rare-gas atom-He transport properties agree well (to within about 1%) with the corresponding measured data. Effective potential energies are constructed from the ab initio energies; the results have been shown to reproduce known transport data and can be readily applied to predict unknown transport properties for like-atom interactions.

  14. Optimization of long range potential interaction parameters in ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianyang; Derrick, Joseph; Nahin, Minal; Chen, Xi; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos

    2018-02-01

    The problem of optimizing Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential parameters to perform collision cross section (CCS) calculations in ion mobility spectrometry has been undertaken. The experimental CCS of 16 small organic molecules containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and fluoride in N2 was compared to numerical calculations using Density Functional Theory (DFT). CCS calculations were performed using the momentum transfer algorithm IMoS and a 4-6-12 potential without incorporating the ion-quadrupole potential. A ceteris paribus optimization method was used to optimize the intercept σ and potential well-depth ɛ for the given atoms. This method yields important information that otherwise would remain concealed. Results show that the optimized L-J parameters are not necessarily unique with intercept and well-depth following an exponential relation at an existing line of minimums. Similarly, the method shows that some molecules containing atoms of interest may be ill-conditioned candidates to perform optimizations of the L-J parameters. The final calculated CCSs for the chosen parameters differ 1% on average from their experimental counterparts. This result conveys the notion that DFT calculations can indeed be used as potential candidates for CCS calculations and that effects, such as the ion-quadrupole potential or diffuse scattering, can be embedded into the L-J parameters without loss of accuracy but with a large increase in computational efficiency.

  15. Plastic potential: how the phenotypes and adaptations of pathogens are influenced by microbial interactions within plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Kayleigh R; Carbone, Ignazio; Jones, Corbin D; Mitchell, Charles E

    2017-08-01

    Predicting the effects of plant-associated microbes on emergence, spread, and evolution of plant pathogens demands an understanding of how pathogens respond to these microbes at two levels of biological organization: that of an individual pathogen and that of a pathogen population across multiple individual plants. We first examine the plastic responses of individual plant pathogens to microbes within a shared host, as seen through changes in pathogen growth and multiplication. We then explore the limited understanding of how within-plant microbial interactions affect pathogen populations and discuss the need to incorporate population-level observations with population genomic techniques. Finally, we suggest that integrating across levels will further our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary impacts of within-plant microbial interactions on pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The potential of plant viruses to promote genotypic diversity via genotype x environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Mölken, Tamara; Stuefer, Josef F.

    2011-01-01

    † Background and Aims Genotype by environment (G × E) interactions are important for the long-term persistence of plant species in heterogeneous environments. It has often been suggested that disease is a key factor for the maintenance of genotypic diversity in plant populations. However, empirical...... and the G × E interactions were examined with respect to genotypespecific plant responses to WClMV infection. Thus, the environment is defined as the presence or absence of the virus. † Key Results WClMV had a negative effect on plant performance as shown by a decrease in biomass and number of ramets...... evidence for this contention is scarce. Here virus infection is proposed as a possible candidate for maintaining genotypic diversity in their host plants. † Methods The effects of White clover mosaic virus (WClMV) on the performance and development of different Trifolium repens genotypes were analysed...

  17. [Multi-sensory interaction in tinnitus: visual evoked potentials and somatosensory stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráiz, C; Hernández-Calvín, F J; Plaza, G; Toledano, A; De los Santos, G

    2003-05-01

    Anomalous cross-modal interactions along the audiovestibular, visual and soma-tosensorial pathways could be the responsible for aberrant signals, clinically expressed as phantom perceptions. This results in tinnitus that can be modified by gaze movements or somatosensorial stimulation through skin, orofacial (jaw) and cervical movements. This phenomenon has also been described in some patients with acute unilateral deafferentation of the auditory peripheral system as a result of surgery to remove a tumour in the posterior fossal. Neuroimaging preliminary studies (PET, f-MRI) describe multisensorial interactions and cortical reorganisation processes in chronic tinnitus. Treatment approaches are still unknown although counselling regarding the benignity of the process and the high percentage of habituation to the symptom is the most effective framework. We present our experience in four cases.

  18. Kinetics of two-dimensional electron plasma, interacting with fluctuating potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiko, I.I.; Sirenko, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, from the first principles, after the fashion of Klimontovich, the authors derive quantum kinetic equation for electron gas, inhomogeneous in z-direction and homogeneous in XY-plane. Special attention is given to the systems with quasi-two-dimensional electron gas (2 DEG), which are widely explored now. Both interaction between the particles of 2 DEG (in general, of several sorts), and interaction with an external system (phonons, impurities, after change carries etc.) are considered. General theory is used to obtain energy and momentum balance equations and relaxation frequencies for 2 DEG in the basis of plane waves. The case of crossed electric and magnetic fields is also treated. As an illustration the problems of 2 DEG scattering on semibounded three-dimensional electron gas and on two-dimensional hole gas are considered; transverse conductivity of nondegenerate 2 DEG, scattered by impurities in ultraquantum magnetic field, is calculated

  19. The potential drug-drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors and warfarin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Hansen, Morten Rix

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been suggested to increase the effect of warfarin, and clinical guidelines recommend careful monitoring of international normalized ratio (INR) when initiating PPI among warfarin users. However, this drug-drug interaction is sparsely investigated...... before and after PPI initiation. Sensitivity analyses revealed no differences among individual PPIs. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of a clinically meaningful drug-drug interaction between PPIs and warfarin in a Northern European patient population of unselected patients from an everyday outpatient...... and outpatient clinics and their use of prescription drugs. Data were analyzed in 2015. We assessed INR, warfarin dose, and dose/INR ratio before and after initiating PPI treatment using the paired student's t-test. RESULTS: We identified 305 warfarin users initiating treatment with PPIs. The median age was 71...

  20. Finite-size, chemical-potential and magnetic effects on the phase transition in a four-fermion interacting model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, E.B.S. [Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Para, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Maraba (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Linhares, C.A. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, A.P.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, J.M.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Fisica, Salvador (Brazil); Santana, A.E. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    We study effects coming from finite size, chemical potential and from a magnetic background on a massive version of a four-fermion interacting model. This is performed in four dimensions as an application of recent developments for dealing with field theories defined on toroidal spaces. We study effects of the magnetic field and chemical potential on the size-dependent phase structure of the model, in particular, how the applied magnetic field affects the size-dependent critical temperature. A connection with some aspects of the hadronic phase transition is established. (orig.)

  1. Heterospecific social interactions of the invasive guppy (Poecilia reticulata): a potential trait to enhance invasion success

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho-Cervantes, Morelia

    2015-01-01

    Electronic version excludes material for which permission has not been granted by the rights holder From all the species that arrive to a novel environment, very few manage to form a viable population. The guppy, a very successful invader, is a highly social species that performs some of its vital tasks (e.g., foraging, avoiding predators) in groups. This thesis aimed to quantify heterospecific association benefits that enhance invasion success. Interactions between invaders and natives co...

  2. Coarse-Grained Potential for Interaction with a Spherical Colloidal Particle and Planar Wall

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Předota, Milan; Nezbeda, Ivo; Pařez, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 5 (2010), s. 527-545 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0094; GA AV ČR IAA400720802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : spherical colloidal particles * surface interaction * molecular simulations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.853, year: 2010

  3. Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like anomalies of a core-softened model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that water-like anomalies can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric potential with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened potential. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened potential on the existence and location of various water-like anomalies in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the potentials. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic anomalies. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened potentials have concluded that the structural anomaly region encloses the diffusion anomaly region, which in turn, encloses the density anomaly region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion anomaly region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural anomaly region. Also, density anomaly region is not completely enclosed by diffusion anomaly region in this case

  4. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  5. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists such as ......The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...... also key figures in the philosophical discussions of nature and science - from philosophical tendencies like logical empiricism via critical rationalism to various neo-Kantian trends....

  6. Diet-Gene Interactions and PUFA Metabolism: A Potential Contributor to Health Disparities and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd H. Chilton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The “modern western” diet (MWD has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6 18 carbon (C18, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6, with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS cluster that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA, CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  7. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  8. Diet-gene interactions and PUFA metabolism: a potential contributor to health disparities and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Floyd H; Murphy, Robert C; Wilson, Bryan A; Sergeant, Susan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Seeds, Michael C; Mathias, Rasika A

    2014-05-21

    The "modern western" diet (MWD) has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6) 18 carbon (C18), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS) cluster) that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA), CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  9. Diet-Gene Interactions and PUFA Metabolism: A Potential Contributor to Health Disparities and Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Floyd H.; Murphy, Robert C.; Wilson, Bryan A.; Sergeant, Susan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Seeds, Michael C.; Mathias, Rasika A.

    2014-01-01

    The “modern western” diet (MWD) has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6) 18 carbon (C18), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS) cluster) that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA), CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations. PMID:24853887

  10. Adaptable interaction between aquaporin-1 and band 3 reveals a potential role of water channel in blood CO2transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Kate; Lee, Ting-Ying; Periasamy, Ammasi; Kao, Fu-Jen; Li, Li-Tzu; Lin, Chuang-Yu; Lin, Hui-Ju; Lin, Marie

    2017-10-01

    Human CO 2 respiration requires rapid conversion between CO 2 and HCO 3 - Carbonic anhydrase II facilitates this reversible reaction inside red blood cells, and band 3 [anion exchanger 1 (AE1)] provides a passage for HCO 3 - flux across the cell membrane. These 2 proteins are core components of the CO 2 transport metabolon. Intracellular H 2 O is necessary for CO 2 /HCO 3 - conversion. However, abundantly expressed aquaporin 1 (AQP1) in erythrocytes is thought not to be part of band 3 complexes or the CO 2 transport metabolon. To solve this conundrum, we used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measured by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM-FRET) and identified interaction between aquaporin-1 and band 3 at a distance of 8 nm, within the range of dipole-dipole interaction. Notably, their interaction was adaptable to membrane tonicity changes. This suggests that the function of AQP1 in tonicity response could be coupled or correlated to its function in band 3-mediated CO 2 /HCO 3 - exchange. By demonstrating AQP1 as a mobile component of the CO 2 transport metabolon, our results uncover a potential role of water channel in blood CO 2 transport and respiration.-Hsu, K., Lee, T.-Y., Periasamy, A., Kao, F.-J., Li, L.-T., Lin, C.-Y., Lin, H.-J., Lin, M. Adaptable interaction between aquaporin-1 and band 3 reveals a potential role of water channel in blood CO 2 transport. © FASEB.

  11. Third version of a program for calculating the static interaction potential between an electron and a diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raseev, G.

    1980-01-01

    This program calculates the one-centre expansion of a two-centre wave function of a diatomic molecule and also the multipole expansion of its static interaction with a point charge. It is an extension to some classes of open-shell targets of the previous versions and it provides both the wave function and the potential in a form suitable for use in an electron-molecule scattering program. (orig./HSI)

  12. Large-scale identification of potential drug targets based on the topological features of human protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Zhong, Wen-Qian; Liu, Zhi-Qing; Huang, Meng-Hua; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2015-04-29

    Identifying potential drug target proteins is a crucial step in the process of drug discovery and plays a key role in the study of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Based on the fact that the majority of proteins exert their functions through interacting with each other, we propose a method to recognize target proteins by using the human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. In the network, vertexes and edges are weighted by using the confidence scores of interactions and descriptors of protein primary structure, respectively. The novel network topological features are defined and employed to characterize protein using existing databases. A widely used minimum redundancy maximum relevance and random forests algorithm are utilized to select the optimal feature subset and construct model for the identification of potential drug target proteins at the proteome scale. The accuracies of training set and test set are 89.55% and 85.23%. Using the constructed model, 2127 potential drug target proteins have been recognized and 156 drug target proteins have been validated in the database of drug target. In addition, some new drug target proteins can be considered as targets for treating diseases of mucopolysaccharidosis, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and pseudo-von Willebrand, etc. It is anticipated that the proposed method may became a powerful high-throughput virtual screening tool of drug target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Repaglinide-gemfibrozil drug interaction: inhibition of repaglinide glucuronidation as a potential additional contributing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Chen, Weiqi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Ling; Hong, Yang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Wenying; Zhang, Yueping; Tang, Yuwei; Zhang, Hongjian; Humphreys, William Griffith; Rodrigues, A David

    2010-12-01

    To further explore the mechanism underlying the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil, alone or in combination with itraconazole. Repaglinide metabolism was assessed in vitro (human liver subcellular fractions, fresh human hepatocytes, and recombinant enzymes) and the resulting incubates were analyzed, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and radioactivity counting, to identify and quantify the different metabolites therein. Chemical inhibitors, in addition to a trapping agent, were also employed to elucidate the importance of each metabolic pathway. Finally, a panel of human liver microsomes (genotyped for UGT1A1*28 allele status) was used to determine the importance of UGT1A1 in the direct glucuronidation of repaglinide. The results of the present study demonstrate that repaglinide can undergo direct glucuronidation, a pathway that can possibly contribute to the interaction with gemfibrozil. For example, [³H]-repaglinide formed glucuronide and oxidative metabolites (M2 and M4) when incubated with primary human hepatocytes. Gemfibrozil effectively inhibited (∼78%) both glucuronide and M4 formation, but had a minor effect on M2 formation. Concomitantly, the overall turnover of repaglinide was also inhibited (∼80%), and was completely abolished when gemfibrozil was co-incubated with itraconazole. These observations are in qualitative agreement with the in vivo findings. UGT1A1 plays a significant role in the glucuronidation of repaglinide. In addition, gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit repaglinide glucuronidation and the inhibition by gemfibrozil glucuronide is time-dependent. Inhibition of UGT enzymes, especially UGT1A1, by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide is an additional mechanism to consider when rationalizing the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Assessment of the Drug-Drug Interaction Potential Between Theacrine and Caffeine in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui; Ma, Dejian; Crone, Laura Brooks; Butawan, Matthew; Meibohm, Bernd; Bloomer, Richard J; Yates, Charles R

    2017-09-01

    Objective: Theacrine, a methylurate class purine alkaloid, triggers diverse pharmacologic responses, including psychostimulatory activity by modulation of adenosinergic and dopaminergic pathways. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, theacrine increased energy, concentration, and mood, while reducing fatigue. Because caffeine, a methylxanthine purine alkaloid, is frequently coadministered with theacrine, we sought to determine if a pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic interaction existed between theacrine and caffeine. Methods: Eight healthy adults received theacrine, as TeaCrine ® (25 or 125 mg), caffeine (150 mg), or a combination of theacrine (125 mg) and caffeine (150 mg) in a randomized, double-blind crossover study. Blood samples were collected over a 24-hour period and analyzed by Liquid chromatrography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for theacrine, caffeine, and paraxanthine. Pharmacodynamic response markers, heart rate and blood pressure, were recorded. Results: Theacrine pharmacokinetics was similar following administration of theacrine alone. Caffeine coadministration increased maximum plasma concentration and area under the curve of theacrine without altering theacrine half-life. Theacrine had no impact on caffeine or paraxanthine pharmacokinetics. There was no difference between treatment groups with regard to heart rate or systolic/diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions: Coadministration of theacrine and caffeine results in a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction, viz ., increased theacrine exposure. Enhanced oral bioavailability is the most likely mechanism by which caffeine alters theacrine exposure. However, further studies examining the contribution of presystemic elimination mechanisms, for example, efflux transport and/or gut metabolism, to theacrine bioavailability are needed to confirm the exact mechanism(s). Hemodynamic parameters were unaltered despite the pharmacokinetic interaction, suggesting

  15. Relaxation of strongly coupled Coulomb systems after rapid changes of the interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Gericke, D O; Semkat, D; Bonitz, M; Kremp, D

    2003-01-01

    The relaxation of charged particle systems after sudden changes of the pair interaction strength is investigated. As examples, we show the results for plasmas after ionization and after a rapid change of screening. Comparisons are made between molecular dynamics simulation and a kinetic description based on the Kadanoff-Baym equations. We found the latter very sensitive to the way the scattering cross section is treated. We also predict the new equilibrium state requiring only conservation of energy. In this case, the correlation energy is computed using the hypernetted chain approximation.

  16. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...

  17. Detection of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions for Outpatients across Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA has adopted smart cards (or NHI-IC cards as health cards to carry patients’ medication histories across hospitals in Taiwan. The aims of this study are to enhance a computerized physician order entry system to support drug-drug interaction (DDI checking based on a patient’s medication history stored in his/her NHI-IC card. For performance evaluation, we developed a transaction tracking log to keep track of every operation on NHI-IC cards. Based on analysis of the transaction tracking log from 1 August to 31 October 2007, physicians read patients’ NHI-IC cards in 71.01% (8,246 of patient visits; 33.02% (2,723 of the card reads showed at least one medicine currently being taken by the patient, 82.94% of which were prescribed during the last visit. Among 10,036 issued prescriptions, seven prescriptions (0.09% contained at least one drug item that might interact with the currently-taken medicines stored in NHI-IC cards and triggered pop-up alerts. This study showed that the capacity of an NHI-IC card is adequate to support DDI checking across hospitals. Thus, the enhanced computerized physician order entry (CPOE system can support better DDI checking when physicians are making prescriptions and provide safer medication care, particularly for patients who receive medication care from different hospitals.

  18. Detection of potential drug-drug interactions for outpatients across hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Min-Hui; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lo, Yu-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2014-01-27

    The National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) has adopted smart cards (or NHI-IC cards) as health cards to carry patients' medication histories across hospitals in Taiwan. The aims of this study are to enhance a computerized physician order entry system to support drug-drug interaction (DDI) checking based on a patient's medication history stored in his/her NHI-IC card. For performance evaluation, we developed a transaction tracking log to keep track of every operation on NHI-IC cards. Based on analysis of the transaction tracking log from 1 August to 31 October 2007, physicians read patients' NHI-IC cards in 71.01% (8,246) of patient visits; 33.02% (2,723) of the card reads showed at least one medicine currently being taken by the patient, 82.94% of which were prescribed during the last visit. Among 10,036 issued prescriptions, seven prescriptions (0.09%) contained at least one drug item that might interact with the currently-taken medicines stored in NHI-IC cards and triggered pop-up alerts. This study showed that the capacity of an NHI-IC card is adequate to support DDI checking across hospitals. Thus, the enhanced computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system can support better DDI checking when physicians are making prescriptions and provide safer medication care, particularly for patients who receive medication care from different hospitals.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of fluid cyclopropane with MP2/CBS-fitted intermolecular interaction potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yen-Ching; Wang, Yi-Siang; Chao, Sheng D

    2017-08-14

    Modeling fluid cycloalkanes with molecular dynamics simulations has proven to be a very challenging task partly because of lacking a reliable force field based on quantum chemistry calculations. In this paper, we construct an ab initio force field for fluid cyclopropane using the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. We consider 15 conformers of the cyclopropane dimer for the orientation sampling. Single-point energies at important geometries are calibrated by the coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitation method. Dunning's correlation consistent basis sets (up to aug-cc-pVTZ) are used in extrapolating the interaction energies at the complete basis set limit. The force field parameters in a 9-site Lennard-Jones model are regressed by the calculated interaction energies without using empirical data. With this ab initio force field, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of fluid cyclopropane and calculate both the structural and dynamical properties. We compare the simulation results with those using an empirical force field and obtain a quantitative agreement for the detailed atom-wise radial distribution functions. The experimentally observed gross radial distribution function (extracted from the neutron scattering measurements) is well reproduced in our simulation. Moreover, the calculated self-diffusion coefficients and shear viscosities are in good agreement with the experimental data over a wide range of thermodynamic conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ab initio force field which is capable of competing with empirical force fields for simulating fluid cyclopropane.

  20. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies of tedizolid to assess the potential for peripheral or central monoamine oxidase interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, S; Bartizal, K; Minassian, S L; Fang, E; Prokocimer, P

    2013-07-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a novel oxazolidinone prodrug whose active moiety, tedizolid, has improved potency against Gram-positive pathogens and pharmacokinetics, allowing once-daily administration. Given linezolid warnings for drug-drug and drug-food interactions mediated by monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition, including sporadic serotonergic toxicity, these studies evaluated tedizolid for potential MAO interactions. In vitro, tedizolid and linezolid were reversible inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B; the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for tedizolid was 8.7 μM for MAO-A and 5.7 μM for MAO-B and 46.0 and 2.1 μM, respectively, with linezolid. Tedizolid phosphate was negative in the mouse head twitch model of serotonergic activity. Two randomized placebo-controlled crossover clinical studies assessed the potential of 200 mg/day tedizolid phosphate (at steady state) to enhance pressor responses to coadministered oral tyramine or pseudoephedrine. Sensitivity to tyramine was determined by comparing the concentration of tyramine required to elicit a ≥ 30-mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure (TYR30) when administered with placebo versus tedizolid phosphate. The geometric mean tyramine sensitivity ratio (placebo TYR30/tedizolid phosphate TYR30) was 1.33; a ratio of ≥ 2 is considered clinically relevant. In the pseudoephedrine study, mean maximum systolic blood pressure was not significantly different when pseudoephedrine was coadministered with tedizolid phosphate versus placebo. In summary, tedizolid is a weak, reversible inhibitor of MAO-A and MAO-B in vitro. Provocative testing in humans and animal models failed to uncover significant signals that would suggest potential for hypertensive or serotonergic adverse consequences at the therapeutic dose of tedizolid phosphate. Clinical studies are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01539473 (tyramine interaction study conducted at Covance Clinical Research Center, Evansville, IN) and NCT01577459

  1. A three-dimensional viscous/potential flow interaction analysis method for multi-element wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, F. A.; Woodward, F. A.; Maskew, B.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis method and computer program were developed for the calculation of the viscosity dependent aerodynamic characteristics of multi-element, finite wings in incompressible flow. A fully-three dimensional potential flow program is used to determine the inviscid pressure distribution about the configuration. The potential flow program uses surface source and vortex singularities to represent the inviscid flow. The method is capable of analysing configurations having at most one slat, a main element, and two slotted flaps. Configurations are limited to full span slats or flaps. The configuration wake is allowed to relax as a force free wake, although roll up is not allowed at this time. Once the inviscid pressure distribution is calculated, a series of boundary layer computations are made along streamwise strips.

  2. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  3. Education in interactive media: a survey on the potentials of computers for visual literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Güleryüz, Hakan

    1996-01-01

    Ankara : Bilkent University, Department of Graphic Design and Institute of Fine Arts, 1996. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1996. Includes bibliographical references leaves 89-94. This study aims at investigating the potentials of multimedia and computers in design. For this purpose, a general survey on the historical development of computers for their use in education and possibilities related to the use of technology in education is conducted. Based on this survey, the dep...

  4. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs: Review and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V; Mullangi, Ramesh; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-10-01

    Sucralfate, a complex of aluminium hydroxide with sulfated sucrose, forms a strong gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosal barrier with excellent anti-ulcer property. Because sucralfate does not undergo any significant oral absorption, sucralfate resides in the GIT for a considerable length of time. The unabsorbed sucralfate may alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral drugs by impeding its absorption and reducing the oral bioavailability. Because of the increased use of sucralfate, it was important to provide a reappraisal of the published clinical drug-drug interaction studies of sucralfate with scores of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along with study design, objectives and key remarks. While the loss of oral bioavailability was significant for the fluoroquinolone class, it generally varied for other classes of drugs, suggesting that impact of the co-administration of sucralfate is manageable in clinical situations. Given the technology advancement in formulation development, it may be in order feasible to develop appropriate formulation strategies to either avoid or minimize the absorption-related issues when co-administered with sucralfate. It is recommended that consideration of both in vitro and preclinical studies may be in order to gauge the level of interaction of a drug with sucralfate. Such data may aid in the development of appropriate strategies to navigate the co-administration of sucralfate with other drugs in this age of polypharmacy.

  5. Cumulative organic anion transporter-mediated drug-drug interaction potential of multiple components in salvia miltiorrhiza (danshen) preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Venitz, Jürgen; Sweet, Douglas H

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate organic anion transporter-mediated drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential for individual active components of Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza) vs. combinations using in vitro and in silico approaches. Inhibition profiles for single Danshen components and combinations were generated in stably-expressing human (h)OAT1 and hOAT3 cells. Plasma concentration-time profiles for compounds were estimated from in vivo human data using an i.v. two-compartment model (with first-order elimination). The cumulative DDI index was proposed as an indicator of DDI potential for combination products. This index was used to evaluate the DDI potential for Danshen injectables from 16 different manufacturers and 14 different lots from a single manufacturer. The cumulative DDI index predicted in vivo inhibition potentials, 82% (hOAT1) and 74% (hOAT3), comparable with those observed in vitro, 72 ± 7% (hOAT1) and 81 ± 10% (hOAT3), for Danshen component combinations. Using simulated unbound Cmax values, a wide range in cumulative DDI index between manufacturers, and between lots, was predicted. Many products exhibited a cumulative DDI index > 1 (50% inhibition). Danshen injectables will likely exhibit strong potential to inhibit hOAT1 and hOAT3 function in vivo. The proposed cumulative DDI index might improve prediction of DDI potential of herbal medicines or pharmaceutical preparations containing multiple components.

  6. Analysis of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions and Its Clinical Manifestation of Pediatric Prescription on 2 Pharmacies in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa I. Barliana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI in prescription have high incidence around the world, including Indonesia. However, scientific evidence regarding DDI in Indonesia is not available. Therefore, in this study we have conducted survey in 2 pharmacies in Bandung against pediatric prescription given by pediatrician. These prescriptions then analyzed the potential for DDI contained in the prescription and clinical manifestation. The analysis showed that in pharmacy A, there are 33 prescriptions (from a total of 155 prescriptions that have potential DDI, or approximately 21.19% (2 prescriptions have the potential DDI major categories, 23 prescriptions categorized as moderate, and 8 prescriptions as minor. In Pharmacy B, there are 6 prescriptions (from a total of 40 prescriptions or 15% of potential DDI (4 prescriptions categorized as moderate and 2 prescriptions as minor. This result showed that potential DDI happened less than 50% in pediatric prescription from both pharmacies. However, this should get attention because DDI should not happen in a prescription considering its clinical manifestations caused by DDI. Moreover, current pharmaceutical care refers to patient oriented than product oriented. In addition, further study for the pediatric prescription on DDI incidence in large scale need to be investigated.

  7. Interacting Effects of Leaf Water Potential and Biomass on Vegetation Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, M.; Wood, J. D.; Novick, K. A.; Pockman, W.; Konings, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    Remotely-sensed microwave observations of vegetation optical depth (VOD) have been widely used to examine vegetation responses to climate. Such studies have alternately found that VOD is sensitive to both biomass and canopy water content. However, the relative impacts of changes in phenology or water stress on VOD have not been disentangled. In particular, understanding whether leaf water potential (LWP) affects VOD may permit the assimilation of satellite observations into new large-scale plant hydraulic models. Despite extensive validation of the relationship between satellite-derived VOD estimates and vegetation density, relatively few studies have explicitly sought to validate the sensitivity of VOD to canopy water status, and none have studied the effect of variations in LWP on VOD. In this work, we test the sensitivity of VOD to variations in LWP, and present a conceptual framework which relates VOD to a combination of leaf water potential and total biomass including leaves, whose dynamics can be measured through leaf area index, and woody biomass. We used in-situ measurements of LWP data to validate the conceptual model in mixed deciduous forests in Indiana and Missouri, as well as a pinion-juniper woodland in New Mexico. Observed X-band VOD from the AMSR-E and AMSR2 satellites showed dynamics similar to those reconstructed VOD signals based on the new conceptual model which employs in-situ LWP data (R2=0.60-0.80). Because LWP data are not available at global scales, we further estimated ecosystem LWP based on remotely sensed surface soil moisture to better understand the sensitivity of VOD across ecosystems. At the global scale, incorporating a combination of biomass and water potential in the reconstructed VOD signal increased correlations with VOD about 15% compared to biomass alone and about 30% compared to water potential alone. In wetter regions with denser and taller canopy heights, VOD has a higher correlation with leaf area index than with water

  8. Ab initio Potential-Energy Surfaces and Electron-Spin-Exchange Cross Sections for H-O2 Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene

    1996-01-01

    Accurate quartet- and doublet-state potential-energy surfaces for the interaction of a hydrogen atom and an oxygen molecule in their ground states have been determined from an ab initio calculation using large-basis sets and the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method. These potential surfaces have been used to calculate the H-O2 electron-spin-exchange cross section; the square root of the cross section (in a(sub 0)), not taking into account inelastic effects, can be obtained approximately from the expressions 2.390E(sup -1/6) and 5.266-0.708 log10(E) at low and high collision energies E (in E(sub h)), respectively. These functional forms, as well as the oscillatory structure of the cross section found at high energies, are expected from the nature of the interaction energy. The mean cross section (the cross section averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution) agrees reasonably well with the results of measurements.

  9. Roaming of dogs in remote Indigenous communities in northern Australia and potential interaction between community and wild dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombara, C; Dürr, S; Gongora, J; Ward, M P

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the roaming of Indigenous community dogs and potential interaction with wild dogs and dingoes. Cross-sectional survey and longitudinal follow-up study. Six remote Indigenous communities in Cape York Peninsula and Arnhem Land in northern Australia were selected. Hair samples were collected from community dogs and microsatellite DNA analyses were used to determine hybrid (>10% dingo DNA) status. Dogs were fitted with GPS collars and home range (ha) was estimated during monitoring periods of up to 3 days. In Cape York Peninsula, 6% of the 35 dogs sampled were dingo hybrids, whereas in Arnhem Land 41% of the 29 dogs sampled were hybrids. The median extended home range was estimated to be 4.54 ha (interquartile range, 3.40 - 7.71). Seven community dogs were identified with an estimated home range > 20 ha and home ranges included the bushland surrounding communities. No significant difference in home ranges was detected between hybrid and non-hybrid dogs. Study results provide some evidence (dingo hybridisation, bushland forays) of the potential interaction between domestic and wild dogs in northern Australia. The nature of this interaction needs further investigation to determine its role in disease transmission; for example, in the case of a rabies incursion in this region. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  10. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com .

  11. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com.

  12. A protocol for a randomized clinical trial of interactive video dance: potential for effects on cognitive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovancevic Jelena

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical exercise has the potential to affect cognitive function, but most evidence to date focuses on cognitive effects of fitness training. Cognitive exercise also may influence cognitive function, but many cognitive training paradigms have failed to provide carry-over to daily cognitive function. Video games provide a broader, more contextual approach to cognitive training that may induce cognitive gains and have carry over to daily function. Most video games do not involve physical exercise, but some novel forms of interactive video games combine physical activity and cognitive challenge. Methods/Design This paper describes a randomized clinical trial in 168 postmenopausal sedentary overweight women that compares an interactive video dance game with brisk walking and delayed entry controls. The primary endpoint is adherence to activity at six months. Additional endpoints include aspects of physical and mental health. We focus this report primarily on the rationale and plans for assessment of multiple cognitive functions. Discussion This randomized clinical trial may provide new information about the cognitive effects of interactive videodance. It is also the first trial to examine physical and cognitive effects in older women. Interactive video games may offer novel strategies to promote physical activity and health across the life span. The study is IRB approved and the number is: PRO08080012 ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01443455

  13. A protocol for a randomized clinical trial of interactive video dance: potential for effects on cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovancevic, Jelena; Rosano, Caterina; Perera, Subashan; Erickson, Kirk I; Studenski, Stephanie

    2012-06-06

    Physical exercise has the potential to affect cognitive function, but most evidence to date focuses on cognitive effects of fitness training. Cognitive exercise also may influence cognitive function, but many cognitive training paradigms have failed to provide carry-over to daily cognitive function. Video games provide a broader, more contextual approach to cognitive training that may induce cognitive gains and have carry over to daily function. Most video games do not involve physical exercise, but some novel forms of interactive video games combine physical activity and cognitive challenge. This paper describes a randomized clinical trial in 168 postmenopausal sedentary overweight women that compares an interactive video dance game with brisk walking and delayed entry controls. The primary endpoint is adherence to activity at six months. Additional endpoints include aspects of physical and mental health. We focus this report primarily on the rationale and plans for assessment of multiple cognitive functions. This randomized clinical trial may provide new information about the cognitive effects of interactive videodance. It is also the first trial to examine physical and cognitive effects in older women. Interactive video games may offer novel strategies to promote physical activity and health across the life span.The study is IRB approved and the number is: PRO08080012ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01443455.

  14. The effect of potential supramolecular-bond promoters on the DNA-interacting abilities of copper-terpyridine compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Jordi; Brissos, Rosa F; Salinas-Uber, Jorge; Caballero, Ana B; Caubet, Amparo; Roubeau, Olivier; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Gamez, Patrick

    2015-09-28

    Three copper(ii) coordination compounds have been prepared from three different 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-based ligands, which have been selected to investigate the potential role of supramolecular interactions on the DNA-interacting and cytotoxicity properties of the corresponding metal complexes. Hence, the ligands 4'-((naphthalen-2-yl)methoxy)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine () and 4'-((1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)methoxy)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine () have been synthesized from commercially-available 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (), and their copper(ii) complexes have been obtained by reaction with copper(ii) nitrate. The DNA-interacting abilities of the corresponding compounds [Cu()(H2O)(NO3)2] (), [Cu()(NO3)(H2O)](NO3)(MeOH) () and [Cu()(NO3)(H2O)](NO3) () have been investigated using different techniques, and cytotoxicity assays with several cancer cell lines have revealed interesting features, viz. the more efficient complex is , which although it does not act as a DNA cleaver, displays the most effective DNA-interacting and cytotoxic properties, compared to and .

  15. Effective medium potentials for molecule-surface interactions: H2 on Cu and Ni surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1989-01-01

    outside metal surfaces and the applicability is illustrated for H2 adsorbing on various Cu and Ni surfaces. Although very approximate, the calculated potentials seem to include a number of features observed experimentally: Ni is more active in dissociating H2 than Cu, and open surfaces are more active...... than close-packed ones. Moreover, the method is simple enough that one can contemplate studying variations in dissociation pathways over the surface unit cell. For the Cu surfaces these variations are substantial accounting for at least part of the variation of the sticking coefficient with the kinetic...

  16. Interaction potential of the H-He system and the hyperfine frequency shift of H in He buffer gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, K.T.; Yang, X.D.

    1990-01-01

    The van der Waals potential of the H-He interaction and the hyperfine frequency shift of H in He are predicted using the Tang-Toennies model. This model damps the long-range ab initio dispersion terms individually using a universal damping function and adds to this a simple Born-Mayer repulsive term. The Born-Mayer parameters are derived from self-consistent-field calculations. The resulting potential is found to be in good agreement with two molecular-beam experiments and its well parameters, in excellent agreement with the complete configuration-interaction calculation. In order to compare with experiment, the hyperfine frequency shift is thermally averaged over the potential both quantum mechanically and classically. The thermally averaged results are in excellent agreement with experiment in the high-temperature range but there are some discrepancies with the measurements at 0.5 and at 1.15 K. These discrepancies may be due to the fact that the long-range coefficient K 10 used is too small. The quantum and classical results are practically identical for temperature above 40 K. The classical statistics fails completely only for temperature below 5 K. Also in the quantum calculation, the isotope effect between 3 He and 4 He is found to show up only for temperature below 10 K. The theoretical isotope effect is in qualitative agreement with experiment

  17. Potenciais interações medicamentosas em pacientes com artrite reumatoide Potential drug interactions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Bagatini

    2011-02-01

    risk of potential undesirable interactions between medications used for managing RA and those used for non-chronic diseases. METHODS: A cohort study was carried out with 103 RA patients registered at the Strategy of Access to Medications from the Brazilian Health Ministry, at the School of Pharmacy of the city of Florianópolis, state of Santa Catarina. Patients were monthly followed up by use of form completion. Drug interactions were identified by use of the Drugdex System - Thomson Micromedex® - Interactions database. RESULTS: Polypharmacy was found in 95.1% of the patients, and 19 potential undesirable interactions were observed between the drugs used by 74 patients (mean of 3.0 ± 1.2 interactions/patient. All potential interactions were related to methotrexate. Omeprazole was the major representative, accounting for 29.3% of the interactions, followed by diclofenac sodium (17.6%, and metamizole sodium (13.2%. CONCLUSION: Considering that this study confirms that polypharmacy is a common therapeutic practice in RA patients, it is worth emphasizing the need for greater surveillance regarding the adverse effects or effectiveness reduction of certain drugs due to drug interaction

  18. Adaptation of hybrid human-computer interaction systems using EEG error-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Biasiucci, Andrea; Forster, Killian; Roggen, Daniel; Troster, Gerhard; Millan, Jose Del R

    2010-01-01

    Performance improvement in both humans and artificial systems strongly relies in the ability of recognizing erroneous behavior or decisions. This paper, that builds upon previous studies on EEG error-related signals, presents a hybrid approach for human computer interaction that uses human gestures to send commands to a computer and exploits brain activity to provide implicit feedback about the recognition of such commands. Using a simple computer game as a case study, we show that EEG activity evoked by erroneous gesture recognition can be classified in single trials above random levels. Automatic artifact rejection techniques are used, taking into account that subjects are allowed to move during the experiment. Moreover, we present a simple adaptation mechanism that uses the EEG signal to label newly acquired samples and can be used to re-calibrate the gesture recognition system in a supervised manner. Offline analysis show that, although the achieved EEG decoding accuracy is far from being perfect, these signals convey sufficient information to significantly improve the overall system performance.

  19. Lunar ground penetrating radar: Minimizing potential data artifacts caused by signal interaction with a rover body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulos, Michael; Redman, David; Pollard, Wayne H.; Haltigin, Timothy W.; Dietrich, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is the leading geophysical candidate technology for future lunar missions aimed at mapping shallow stratigraphy (lunar materials, as well as its small size and lightweight components, make it a very attractive option from both a scientific and engineering perspective. However, the interaction between a GPR signal and the rover body is poorly understood and must be investigated prior to a space mission. In doing so, engineering and survey design strategies should be developed to enhance GPR performance in the context of the scientific question being asked. This paper explores the effects of a rover (simulated with a vertical metal plate) on GPR results for a range of heights above the surface and antenna configurations at two sites: (i) a standard GPR testing site with targets of known position, size, and material properties, and; (ii) a frozen lake for surface reflectivity experiments. Our results demonstrate that the GPR antenna configuration is a key variable dictating instrument design, with the XX polarization considered optimal for minimizing data artifact generation. These findings could thus be used to help guide design requirements for an eventual flight instrument.

  20. Ecosystem Interactions Underlie the Spread of Avian Influenza A Viruses with Pandemic Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Bahl

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite evidence for avian influenza A virus (AIV transmission between wild and domestic ecosystems, the roles of bird migration and poultry trade in the spread of viruses remain enigmatic. In this study, we integrate ecosystem interactions into a phylogeographic model to assess the contribution of wild and domestic hosts to AIV distribution and persistence. Analysis of globally sampled AIV datasets shows frequent two-way transmission between wild and domestic ecosystems. In general, viral flow from domestic to wild bird populations was restricted to within a geographic region. In contrast, spillover from wild to domestic populations occurred both within and between regions. Wild birds mediated long-distance dispersal at intercontinental scales whereas viral spread among poultry populations was a major driver of regional spread. Viral spread between poultry flocks frequently originated from persistent lineages circulating in regions of intensive poultry production. Our analysis of long-term surveillance data demonstrates that meaningful insights can be inferred from integrating ecosystem into phylogeographic reconstructions that may be consequential for pandemic preparedness and livestock protection.

  1. Ecosystem Interactions Underlie the Spread of Avian Influenza A Viruses with Pandemic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Justin; Pham, Truc T.; Hill, Nichola J.; Hussein, Islam T. M.; Ma, Eric J.; Easterday, Bernard C.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Wentworth, David E.; Kayali, Ghazi; Krauss, Scott; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.; Swartz, Michael D.; Smith, Gavin J. D.; Runstadler, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence for avian influenza A virus (AIV) transmission between wild and domestic ecosystems, the roles of bird migration and poultry trade in the spread of viruses remain enigmatic. In this study, we integrate ecosystem interactions into a phylogeographic model to assess the contribution of wild and domestic hosts to AIV distribution and persistence. Analysis of globally sampled AIV datasets shows frequent two-way transmission between wild and domestic ecosystems. In general, viral flow from domestic to wild bird populations was restricted to within a geographic region. In contrast, spillover from wild to domestic populations occurred both within and between regions. Wild birds mediated long-distance dispersal at intercontinental scales whereas viral spread among poultry populations was a major driver of regional spread. Viral spread between poultry flocks frequently originated from persistent lineages circulating in regions of intensive poultry production. Our analysis of long-term surveillance data demonstrates that meaningful insights can be inferred from integrating ecosystem into phylogeographic reconstructions that may be consequential for pandemic preparedness and livestock protection. PMID:27166585

  2. Early interactions between leukocytes and three different potentially bioactive titanium surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Anna; Malmberg, Per; Kjellin, Per; Currie, Fredrik; Arvidsson, Martin; Franke Stenport, Victoria

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the early interactions between leukocytes and three different surface modifications, suggested as bioactive. Blasted titanium discs were modified by alkali and heat treatment, sodium fluoride treatment, or hydroxyapatite coating. A number of these discs were also immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for a week, a treatment which yielded high levels of calcium and phosphate on each surface type. The specimens were exposed for human venous blood for 32 minutes and the respiratory burst response was measured in terms of reactive oxygen species with a luminometer, and coverage of viable cells with a fluorescence microscope after staining steps. The topography, morphology, and chemistry of the surfaces were evaluated with optical interferometry and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). A high respiratory burst response was found for HA coated titanium in comparison with the other surface groups (p burst response (p < 0.0005) and removed statistically significant differences between the surface groups. Thus, the results in the present study indicate that different titanium surface modifications influence the early inflammatory response differently, and that calcium phosphate compounds increase the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Potential interactions between heterotrophic archaea and bacteria for degrading particulate organic carbon in marine water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Zhang, C.; Tian, J.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial degradation of organic matter is an essential process in marine carbon cycle, which constitutes an integral component of the marine ecosystem and influences climate change. It is still poorly known, however, how microorganisms interact in utilizing organic matter in the ocean. We have performed metagenomic and qPCR analyses of archaea and bacteria in both particle-attached (>3 mm) and free-living (0.2-3 mm) fractions from surface down to 8727 m in the Mariana Trench. The metagenomic results showed large numbers of genes related to the degradation of valine, leucine, isoleucine and lysine, which were similar between free-living and particle-attached fractions from surface to 6000 m depth intervals. However, the relative abundance of these genes decreased in particle-attached fractions and increased in the free-living fractions below 6000 m depth. This is consistent with the ecophysiology of marine group II (MGII) Euryarchaeota, which are suggested to be able to degrade proteins and lipids. Overall, significant correlation (R2 = 0.95) was observed between the abundance of particle-attached MGII and that of particle-attached heterotrophic bacteria in the Mariana Trench water column; whereas, the correlation was significantly reduced (R2 = 0.34) between free-living MGII and free-living bacteria. We hypothesize that particle-attached MGII and heterotrophic bacteria were mutually beneficial in degrading organic matter, which becomes less important between these organisms in the free-living population.

  4. Correlative micro-diffraction and differential phase contrast study of mean inner potential and subtle beam-specimen interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Mingjian, E-mail: mingjian.wu@fau.de; Spiecker, Erdmann, E-mail: erdmann.spiecker@fau.de

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Correlative micro-diffraction and DPC-STEM as effective and intuitive method for probing nano-scale electric fields/electrostatic potentials. • Mean inner potential accurately measured by electron refraction from cleaved crystal wedge. • Suggested a pseudo-contactless mode for probing electrostatic potential differences by considering subtle displacements of Fresnel fringes. - Abstract: We present a correlative micro-diffraction and differential phase contrast (DPC) study within scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) on the determination of mean inner potential (MIP) and explain the origin of subtle beam-specimen interactions at the edge of wedge-shaped crystals using both experiment and simulation. Our measurement of MIP of Si and GaAs resulted in 12.48 ± 0.22 V and 14.15 ± 0.22 V, respectively, from directly evaluating beam refraction in micro-diffraction mode. DPC-STEM measurements gave very similar values. Fresnel fringes within the diffraction disk resulting from interaction of the highly coherent electron beam with the aperture are observed and a numerical simulation scheme is implemented to reproduce the effect of the specimen on the fringe pattern. Perfect agreement between experiment and simulation has been achieved in terms of subtle displacements of the fringes upon approaching the sample edge with the electron probe. The existence of the fringes has minor effect on the DPC-STEM signal, which is well below the noise level of our setup at practically reasonable acquisition times. We suggest the possibility to perform pseudo-contactless probing of weak potential differences in beam sensitive samples by evaluating the subtle displacements of Fresnel fringes quantitatively.

  5. In vitro metabolism and drug-drug interaction potential of UTL-5g, a novel chemo- and radioprotective agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianmei; Shaw, Jiajiu; Dubaisi, Sarah; Valeriote, Frederick; Li, Jing

    2014-12-01

    N-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-1,2-oxazole-3-carboxamide (UTL-5g), a potential chemo- and radioprotective agent, acts as a prodrug requiring bioactivation to the active metabolite 5-methylisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid (ISOX). UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and 2,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) has been identified in porcine and rabbit liver esterases. The purpose of this study was to provide insights on the metabolism and drug interaction potential of UTL-5g in humans. The kinetics of UTL-5g hydrolysis was determined in human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant human carboxylesterases (hCE1b and hCE2). The potential of UTL-5g and its metabolites for competitive inhibition and time-dependent inhibition of microsomal cytochrome P450 (P450) was examined in HLM. UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and DCA in HLM were NADPH-independent, with a maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) of 11.1 nmol/min per mg and substrate affinity (Km) of 41.6 µM. Both hCE1b and hCE2 effectively catalyzed UTL-5g hydrolysis, but hCE2 exhibited ∼30-fold higher catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) than hCE1b. UTL-5g and DCA competitively inhibited microsomal CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19 (IC50 values 5g. Factors influencing carboxylesterase activities may have a significant impact on the pharmacological and therapeutic effects of UTL-5g. UTL-5g has the potential to inhibit P450-mediated metabolism through competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition. Caution is particularly needed for potential drug interactions involving competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2 in the future clinical development of UTL-5g. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. Syntrophic interactions improve power production in formic acid fed MFCs operated with set anode potentials or fixed resistances

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Dan

    2011-10-24

    Formic acid is a highly energetic electron donor but it has previously resulted in low power densities in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different set anode potentials (-0.30, -0.15, and +0.15V; vs. a standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) were used to evaluate syntrophic interactions in bacterial communities for formic acid degradation relative to a non-controlled, high resistance system (1,000Ω external resistance). No current was generated at -0.30V, suggesting a lack of direct formic acid oxidation (standard reduction potential: -0.40V). More positive potentials that allowed for acetic acid utilization all produced current, with the best performance at -0.15V. The anode community in the -0.15V reactor, based on 16S rDNA clone libraries, was 58% Geobacter sulfurreducens and 17% Acetobacterium, with lower proportions of these genera found in the other two MFCs. Acetic acid was detected in all MFCs suggesting that current generation by G. sulfurreducens was dependent on acetic acid production by Acetobacterium. When all MFCs were subsequently operated at an external resistance for maximum power production (100Ω for MFCs originally set at -0.15 and +0.15V; 150Ω for the control), they produced similar power densities and exhibited the same midpoint potential of -0.15V in first derivative cyclic voltammetry scans. All of the mixed communities converged to similar proportions of the two predominant genera (ca. 52% G. sulfurreducens and 22% Acetobacterium). These results show that syntrophic interactions can be enhanced through setting certain anode potentials, and that long-term performance produces stable and convergent communities. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Potential of future seismogenesis in Hebei Province (NE China) due to stress interactions between strong earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakostas, Vassilios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Jin, Xueshen; Liu, Zhihui; Paradisopoulou, Parthena; He, Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Northeast China, a densely populated area, is affected by intense seismic activity, which includes large events that caused extensive disaster and tremendous loss of life. For contributing to the continuous efforts for seismic hazard assessment, the earthquake potential from the active faults near the cities of Zhangjiakou and Langfang in Hebei Province is examined. We estimate the effect of the coseismic stress changes of strong (M ⩾ 5.0) earthquakes on the major regional active faults, and mapped Coulomb stress change onto these target faults. More importantly our calculations reveal that positive stress changes caused by the largest events of the 1976 Tangshan sequence make the Xiadian and part of Daxing fault, thus considered the most likely sites of the next strong earthquake in the study area. The accumulated static stress changes that reached a value of up to 0.4 bar onto these faults, were subsequently incorporated in earthquake probability estimates for the next 30 years.

  8. Interacting Effects of Leaf Water Potential and Biomass on Vegetation Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Mostafa; Wood, Jeffrey D.; Novick, Kimberly A.; Pangle, Robert; Pockman, William T.; McDowell, Nate G.; Konings, Alexandra G.

    2017-11-01

    Remotely sensed microwave observations of vegetation optical depth (VOD) have been widely used for examining vegetation responses to climate. Nevertheless, the relative impacts of phenological changes in leaf biomass and water stress on VOD have not been explicitly disentangled. In particular, determining whether leaf water potential (ψL) affects VOD may allow these data sets as a constraint for plant hydraulic models. Here we test the sensitivity of VOD to variations in ψL and present a conceptual framework that relates VOD to ψL and total biomass including leaves, whose dynamics are measured through leaf area index, and woody components. We used measurements of ψL from three sites across the US—a mixed deciduous forests in Indiana and Missouri and a piñon-juniper woodland in New Mexico—to validate the conceptual model. The temporal dynamics of X-band VOD were similar to those of the VOD signal estimated from the new conceptual model with observed ψL (R2 = 0.6-0.8). At the global scale, accounting for a combination of biomass and estimated ψL (based on satellite surface soil moisture data) increased correlations with VOD by 15% and 30% compared to biomass and water potential, respectively. In wetter regions with denser and taller canopy heights, VOD has a higher correlation with leaf area index than with water stress and vice versa in drier regions. Our results demonstrate that variations in both phenology and ψL must be considered to accurately interpret the dynamics of VOD observations for ecological applications.

  9. Cholinergic interactions between donepezil and prucalopride in human colon: potential to treat severe intestinal dysmotility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, J; Kung, V W S; Boundouki, G; Aziz, Q; De Maeyer, J H; Knowles, C H; Sanger, G J

    2013-11-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors such as neostigmine are used for acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, but cardio-bronchial side-effects limit use. To minimize side-effects, lower doses could be combined with a 5-HT4 receptor agonist, which also facilitates intestinal cholinergic activity. However, safety concerns, especially in the elderly, require drugs with good selectivity of action. These include the AChE inhibitor donepezil (used for Alzheimer's disease, with reduced cardio-bronchial liability) and prucalopride, the first selective, clinically available 5-HT4 receptor agonist. This study examined their individual and potential synergistic activities in human colon. Neuronally mediated muscle contractions and relaxations of human colon were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and defined phenotypically as cholinergic, nitrergic or tachykinergic using pharmacological tools; the effects of drugs were determined as changes in 'area under the curve'. Prucalopride increased cholinergically mediated contractions (EC50 855 nM; 33% maximum increase), consistent with its ability to stimulate intestinal motility; donepezil (477%) and neostigmine (2326%) had greater efficacy. Concentrations of donepezil (30-100 nM) found in venous plasma after therapeutic doses had minimal ability to enhance cholinergic activity. However, donepezil (30 nM) together with prucalopride (3, 10 μM) markedly increased EFS-evoked contractions compared with prucalopride alone (P = 0.04). For example, the increases observed with donepezil and prucalopride 10 μM together or alone were, respectively, 105 ± 35%, 4 ± 6% and 35 ± 21% (n = 3-7, each concentration). Potential synergy between prucalopride and donepezil activity calls for exploration of this combination as a safer, more effective treatment of colonic pseudo-obstruction. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Surface Electrical Potentials of Root Cell Plasma Membranes: Implications for Ion Interactions, Rhizotoxicity, and Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Min Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many crop plants are exposed to heavy metals and other metals that may intoxicate the crop plants themselves or consumers of the plants. The rhizotoxicity of heavy metals is influenced strongly by the root cell plasma membrane (PM surface’s electrical potential (ψ0. The usually negative ψ0 is created by negatively charged constituents of the PM. Cations in the rooting medium are attracted to the PM surface and anions are repelled. Addition of ameliorating cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+ to the rooting medium reduces the effectiveness of cationic toxicants (e.g., Cu2+ and Pb2+ and increases the effectiveness of anionic toxicants (e.g., SeO42− and H2AsO4−. Root growth responses to ions are better correlated with ion activities at PM surfaces ({IZ}0 than with activities in the bulk-phase medium ({IZ}b (IZ denotes an ion with charge Z. Therefore, electrostatic effects play a role in heavy metal toxicity that may exceed the role of site-specific competition between toxicants and ameliorants. Furthermore, ψ0 controls the transport of ions across the PM by influencing both {IZ}0 and the electrical potential difference across the PM from the outer surface to the inner surface (Em,surf. Em,surf is a component of the driving force for ion fluxes across the PM and controls ion-channel voltage gating. Incorporation of {IZ}0 and Em,surf into quantitative models for root metal toxicity and uptake improves risk assessments of toxic metals in the environment. These risk assessments will improve further with future research on the application of electrostatic theory to heavy metal phytotoxicity in natural soils and aquatic environments.

  11. Light response and potential interacting proteins of a grape flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Run-Ze; Pan, Qiu-Hong; Duan, Chang-Qing; Wang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H), a member of cytochrome P450 protein family, introduces B-ring hydroxyl group in the 3' position of the flavonoid. In this study, the cDNA sequence of a F3'H gene (VviF3'H), which contains an open reading frame of 1530 bp encoding a polypeptide of 509 amino acids, was cloned and characterized from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Sauvignon. VviF3'H showed high homology to known F3'H genes, especially F3'Hs from the V. vinifera reference genome (Pinot Noir) and lotus. Expression profiling analysis using real-time PCR revealed that VviF3'H was ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues including berries, leaves, flowers, roots, stems and tendrils, suggesting its important physiological role in plant growth and development. Moreover, the transcript level of VviF3'H gene in grape berries was relatively higher at early developmental stages and gradually decreased during véraison, and then increased in the mature phase. In addition, the promoter of VviF3'H was isolated by using TAIL-PCR. Yeast one-hybrid screening of the Cabernet Sauvignon cDNA library and subsequent in vivo/vitro validations revealed the interaction between VviF3'H promoter and several transcription factors, including members of HD-Zip, NAC, MYB and EIN families. A transcriptional regulation mechanism of VviF3'H expression is proposed for the first time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Seaweed-coral interactions: variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential effects on coral resilience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta M Bonaldo

    Full Text Available Tropical reefs are in global decline with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. Negative associations between macroalgae and corals are well documented, but the mechanisms involved, the dynamics of the interactions, and variance in effects of different macroalgal-coral pairings are poorly investigated. We assessed the frequency, magnitude, and dynamics of macroalgal-coral competition involving allelopathic and non-allelopathic macroalgae on three, spatially grouped pairs of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs and non-MPAs in Fiji. In non-MPAs, biomass of herbivorous fishes was 70-80% lower, macroalgal cover 4-9 fold higher, macroalgal-coral contacts 5-15 fold more frequent and 23-67 fold more extensive (measured as % of colony margin contacted by macroalgae, and coral cover 51-68% lower than in MPAs. Coral contacts with allelopathic macroalgae occurred less frequently than expected by chance across all sites, while contact with non-allelopathic macroalgae tended to occur more frequently than expected. Transplants of allelopathic macroalgae (Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Galaxaura filamentosa against coral edges inflicted damage to Acropora aspera and Pocillopora damicornis more rapidly and extensively than to Porites cylindrica and Porites lobata, which appeared more resistant to these macroalgae. Montipora digitata experienced intermediate damage. Extent of damage from macroalgal contact was independent of coral colony size for each of the 10 macroalgal-coral pairings we established. When natural contacts with Galaxaura filamentosa were removed in the field, recovery was rapid for Porites lobata, but Pocillopora damicornis did not recover and damage continued to expand. As macroalgae increase on overfished tropical reefs, allelopathy could produce feedbacks that suppress coral resilience, prevent coral recovery, and promote the stability of algal beds in habitats previously available to corals.

  13. National Geothermal Data System: Interactive Assessment of Geothermal Energy Potential in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Lee [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Richard, Stephen [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Clark, Ryan; Patten, Kim; Love, Diane; Coleman, Celia; Chen, Genhan; Matti, Jordan; Pape, Estelle; Musil, Leah

    2012-01-30

    Geothermal-relevant geosciences data from all 50 states (www.stategeothermaldata.org), federal agencies, national labs, and academic centers are being digitized and linked in a distributed online network via the U.S. Department of Energy-funded National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) to foster geothermal energy exploration and development through use of interactive online ‘mashups,’data integration, and applications. Emphasis is first to make as much information as possible accessible online, with a long range goal to make data interoperable through standardized services and interchange formats. An initial set of thirty geoscience data content models is in use or under development to define a standardized interchange format: aqueous chemistry, borehole temperature data, direct use feature, drill stem test, earthquake hypocenter, fault feature, geologic contact feature, geologic unit feature, thermal/hot spring description, metadata, quaternary fault, volcanic vent description, well header feature, borehole lithology log, crustal stress, gravity, heat flow/temperature gradient, permeability, and feature descriptions data like developed geothermal systems, geologic unit geothermal properties, permeability, production data, rock alteration description, rock chemistry, and thermal conductivity. Map services are also being developed for isopach maps, aquifer temperature maps, and several states are working on geothermal resource overview maps. Content models are developed preferentially from existing community use in order to encourage widespread adoption and promulgate minimum metadata quality standards. Geoscience data and maps from other NGDS participating institutions, or “nodes” (USGS, Southern Methodist University, Boise State University Geothermal Data Coalition) are being supplemented with extensive land management and land use resources from the Western Regional Partnership (15 federal agencies and 5 Western states) to provide access to a comprehensive

  14. Relativistic symmetries in the Rosen—Morse potential and tensor interaction using the Nikiforov—Uvarov method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikhdair Sameer M; Hamzavi Majid

    2013-01-01

    Approximate analytical bound-state solutions of the Dirac particle in the fields of attractive and repulsive Rosen—Morse (RM) potentials including the Coulomb-like tensor (CLT) potential are obtained for arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number κ. The Pekeris approximation is used to deal with the spin-orbit coupling terms κ (κ± 1)r −2 . In the presence of exact spin and pseudospin (p-spin) symmetries, the energy eigenvalues and the corresponding normalized two-component wave functions are found by using the parametric generalization of the Nikiforov—Uvarov (NU) method. The numerical results show that the CLT interaction removes degeneracies between the spin and p-spin state doublets. (general)

  15. Interactions between mood and the structure of semantic memory: event-related potentials evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ana P.; del Re, Elisabetta; Nestor, Paul G; McCarley, Robert W.; Gonçalves, Óscar F.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that affect acts as modulator of cognitive processes and in particular that induced mood has an effect on the way semantic memory is used on-line. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine affective modulation of semantic information processing under three different moods: neutral, positive and negative. Fifteen subjects read 324 pairs of sentences, after mood induction procedure with 30 pictures of neutral, 30 pictures of positive and 30 pictures of neutral valence: 108 sentences were read in each mood induction condition. Sentences ended with three word types: expected words, within-category violations, and between-category violations. N400 amplitude was measured to the three word types under each mood induction condition. Under neutral mood, a congruency (more negative N400 amplitude for unexpected relative to expected endings) and a category effect (more negative N400 amplitude for between- than to within-category violations) were observed. Also, results showed differences in N400 amplitude for both within- and between-category violations as a function of mood: while positive mood tended to facilitate the integration of unexpected but related items, negative mood made their integration as difficult as unexpected and unrelated items. These findings suggest the differential impact of mood on access to long-term semantic memory during sentence comprehension. PMID:22434931

  16. Kaempferol glycosides from Lobularia maritima and their potential role in plant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Antonio; Ricci, Andreina; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Golino, Annunziata; Izzo, Angelina; Pascarella, Maria Teresa; Piccolella, Simona; Esposito, Assunta

    2009-02-01

    Six kaempferol glycosides, four of them characterized for the first time, were isolated from the leaf extract of Lobularia maritima. The structural elucidation was performed by a combined approach using Electrospray-Ionization Triple-Quadrupole Mass-Spectrometric (ESI/TQ/MS) techniques, and 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments (1H, 13C, DEPT, DQ-COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, NOESY, HSQC, HMBC, and HSQC-TOCSY). The isolated kaempferol derivatives have different disaccharide substituents at C(3) and four of them have a rhamnose unit at C(7). To evaluate their potential allelopathic role within the herbaceous plant community, the compounds, as well as the aglycone obtained from enzymatic hydrolysis, have been tested in vitro on three coexisting plant species, Dactylis hispanica, Petrorhagia velutina, and Phleum subulatum. The results obtained allow us to hypothesize that the type of the sugar modulates the biological response. The bioassay data, analyzed by a multivariate approach, and grouping the compounds on the basis of the number of sugar units and the nature of carbohydrates present in the disaccharide moiety, indicate a structure-activity relationship.

  17. Endothelial Alterations in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis: Potential Effect of Monocyte Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Atehortúa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE are prone to develop atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases five times more often than the general population; this increase in frequency could be partially explained by an increase in the macrovasculature endothelial damage. In these autoimmune diseases, a microvascular endothelial injury has also been reported in different organs and tissues, especially in sites where ultrafiltration processes occur. Different components that are characteristic to the immunopathology of RA and SLE could be involved in the endothelial cell activation, permeability increase, functional alteration, and vascular injury. Circulating immune complexes (IC detected in SLE and RA have been proposed to participate in the endothelial injury. In the vascular environment, IC can generate different responses that could be mediated by monocytes, because these cells have patrolling and monitoring functions on the endothelium. However, with certain stimuli such as TLR ligands, the monocytes are retained in the lumen, releasing proinflammatory mediators that participate in the endothelial damage. This paper aims to review some aspects about the endothelial activation and dysfunction in the context of SLE and RA, as well as the potential role that monocytes apparently play in this process.

  18. Interaction of Ulocladium atrum, a Potential Biological Control Agent, with Botrytis cinerea and Grapevine Plantlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ronseaux

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of biological control agent, Ulocladium atrum (isolates U13 and U16 in protecting Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay against gray mold disease caused by Botrytis cinerea, and simulation of the foliar defense responses was investigated. A degraded mycelium structure during cultural assay on potato dextrose agar revealed that U. atrum isolates U13 and U16 were both antagonistic to B. cinerea, mainly when isolates were inoculated two days before Botrytis. Under in vitro conditions, foliar application of U. atrum protected grapevine leaves against gray mold disease. An increase in chitinase activity was induced by the presence of U. atrum isolates indicating that the biological control agents triggered plant defense mechanisms. Moreover, U13 has the potential to colonize the grapevine plantlets and to improve their growth. The ability of U. atrum isolates to exhibit an antagonistic effect against B. cinerea in addition to their aptitude to induce plant resistance and to promote grapevine growth may explain a part of their biological activity. Hence, this study suggests that U. atrum provides a suitable biocontrol agent against gray mold in grapevines.

  19. Systems integration of biodefense omics data for analysis of pathogen-host interactions and identification of potential targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B McGarvey

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The NIAID (National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases Biodefense Proteomics program aims to identify targets for potential vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics for agents of concern in bioterrorism, including bacterial, parasitic, and viral pathogens. The program includes seven Proteomics Research Centers, generating diverse types of pathogen-host data, including mass spectrometry, microarray transcriptional profiles, protein interactions, protein structures and biological reagents. The Biodefense Resource Center (www.proteomicsresource.org has developed a bioinformatics framework, employing a protein-centric approach to integrate and support mining and analysis of the large and heterogeneous data. Underlying this approach is a data warehouse with comprehensive protein + gene identifier and name mappings and annotations extracted from over 100 molecular databases. Value-added annotations are provided for key proteins from experimental findings using controlled vocabulary. The availability of pathogen and host omics data in an integrated framework allows global analysis of the data and comparisons across different experiments and organisms, as illustrated in several case studies presented here. (1 The identification of a hypothetical protein with differential gene and protein expressions in two host systems (mouse macrophage and human HeLa cells infected by different bacterial (Bacillus anthracis and Salmonella typhimurium and viral (orthopox pathogens suggesting that this protein can be prioritized for additional analysis and functional characterization. (2 The analysis of a vaccinia-human protein interaction network supplemented with protein accumulation levels led to the identification of human Keratin, type II cytoskeletal 4 protein as a potential therapeutic target. (3 Comparison of complete genomes from pathogenic variants coupled with experimental information on complete proteomes allowed the identification and

  20. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials: exploring the interactions with Caco-2 cells for potential oral drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyuco, Jurja C; Liu, Yuanjie; Tan, Bee-Jen; Chiu, Gigi NC

    2011-01-01

    Although carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been increasingly studied for their biomedical applications, there is limited research on these novel materials for oral drug delivery. As such, this study aimed to explore the potential of CNMs in oral drug delivery, and the objectives were to evaluate CNM cytotoxicity and their abilities to modulate paracellular transport and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux pump. Three types of functionalized CNMs were studied, including polyhydroxy small-gap fullerenes (OH-fullerenes), carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f SWCNT-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f SWCNT-PEG), using the well-established Caco-2 cell monolayer to represent the intestinal epithelium. All three CNMs had minimum cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cells, as demonstrated through lactose dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Of the three CNMs, f SWCNT-COOH significantly reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced transport of Lucifer Yellow across the Caco-2 monolayer. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that f SWCNT-COOH treated cells had the highest perturbation in the distribution of ZO-1, a protein marker of tight junction, suggesting that f SWCNT-COOH could enhance paracellular permeability via disruption of tight junctions. This modulating effect of f SWCNT-COOH can be reversed over time. Furthermore, cellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate, rhodamine-123, was significantly increased in cells treated with f SWCNT-COOH, suggestive of P-gp inhibition. Of note, f SWCNT-PEG could increase rhodamine-123 accumulation without modifying the tight junction. Collectively, these results suggest that the functionalized CNMs could be useful as modulators for oral drug delivery, and the differential effects on the intestinal epithelium imparted by different types of CNMs would create unique opportunities for drug-specific oral

  1. Alphacoronaviruses in New World Bats: Prevalence, Persistence, Phylogeny, and Potential for Interaction with Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Christina; Cryan, Paul M.; O'Shea, Thomas J.; Oko, Lauren M.; Ndaluka, Christina; Calisher, Charles H.; Berglund, Andrew D.; Klavetter, Mead L.; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Dominguez, Samuel R.; Montgomery, Joel Mark

    2011-01-01

    Bats are reservoirs for many different coronaviruses (CoVs) as well as many other important zoonotic viruses. We sampled feces and/or anal swabs of 1,044 insectivorous bats of 2 families and 17 species from 21 different locations within Colorado from 2007 to 2009. We detected alphacoronavirus RNA in bats of 4 species: big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), 10% prevalence; long-legged bats (Myotis volans), 8% prevalence; little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), 3% prevalence; and western long-eared bats (Myotis evotis), 2% prevalence. Overall, juvenile bats were twice as likely to be positive for CoV RNA as adult bats. At two of the rural sampling sites, CoV RNAs were detected in big brown and long-legged bats during the three sequential summers of this study. CoV RNA was detected in big brown bats in all five of the urban maternity roosts sampled throughout each of the periods tested. Individually tagged big brown bats that were positive for CoV RNA and later sampled again all became CoV RNA negative. Nucleotide sequences in the RdRp gene fell into 3 main clusters, all distinct from those of Old World bats. Similar nucleotide sequences were found in amplicons from gene 1b and the spike gene in both a big-brown and a long-legged bat, indicating that a CoV may be capable of infecting bats of different genera. These data suggest that ongoing evolution of CoVs in bats creates the possibility of a continued threat for emergence into hosts of other species. Alphacoronavirus RNA was detected at a high prevalence in big brown bats in roosts in close proximity to human habitations (10%) and known to have direct contact with people (19%), suggesting that significant potential opportunities exist for cross-species transmission of these viruses. Further CoV surveillance studies in bats throughout the Americas are warranted.

  2. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials: exploring the interactions with Caco-2 cells for potential oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyuco, Jurja C; Liu, Yuanjie; Tan, Bee-Jen; Chiu, Gigi N C

    2011-01-01

    Although carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been increasingly studied for their biomedical applications, there is limited research on these novel materials for oral drug delivery. As such, this study aimed to explore the potential of CNMs in oral drug delivery, and the objectives were to evaluate CNM cytotoxicity and their abilities to modulate paracellular transport and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux pump. Three types of functionalized CNMs were studied, including polyhydroxy small-gap fullerenes (OH-fullerenes), carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f SWCNT-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f SWCNT-PEG), using the well-established Caco-2 cell monolayer to represent the intestinal epithelium. All three CNMs had minimum cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cells, as demonstrated through lactose dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Of the three CNMs, f SWCNT-COOH significantly reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced transport of Lucifer Yellow across the Caco-2 monolayer. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that f SWCNT-COOH treated cells had the highest perturbation in the distribution of ZO-1, a protein marker of tight junction, suggesting that f SWCNT-COOH could enhance paracellular permeability via disruption of tight junctions. This modulating effect of f SWCNT-COOH can be reversed over time. Furthermore, cellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate, rhodamine-123, was significantly increased in cells treated with f SWCNT-COOH, suggestive of P-gp inhibition. Of note, f SWCNT-PEG could increase rhodamine-123 accumulation without modifying the tight junction. Collectively, these results suggest that the functionalized CNMs could be useful as modulators for oral drug delivery, and the differential effects on the intestinal epithelium imparted by different types of CNMs would create unique opportunities for drug-specific oral

  3. Glucocorticoids in Fish Eggs: Variation, Interactions with the Environment, and the Potential to Shape Offspring Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopinka, N M; Capelle, P M; Semeniuk, C A D; Love, O P

    Wild and captive vertebrates face multiple stressors that all have the potential to induce chronic maternal stress (i.e., sustained, elevated plasma glucocorticoids), resulting in embryo exposure to elevated maternally derived glucocorticoids. In oviparous taxa such as fish, maternally derived glucocorticoids in eggs are known for their capacity to shape offspring phenotype. Using a variety of methodologies, scientists have quantified maternally derived levels of egg cortisol, the primary glucocorticoid in fishes, and examined the cascading effects of egg cortisol on progeny phenotype. Here we summarize and interpret the current state of knowledge on egg cortisol in fishes and the relationships linking maternal stress/state to egg cortisol and offspring phenotype/fitness. Considerable variation in levels of egg cortisol exists across species and among females within a species; this variation is hypothesized to be due to interspecific differences in reproductive life history and intraspecific differences in female condition. Outcomes of experimental studies manipulating egg cortisol vary both inter- and intraspecifically. Moreover, while exogenous elevation of egg cortisol (as a proxy for maternal stress) induces phenotypic changes commonly considered to be maladaptive (e.g., smaller offspring size), emerging work in other taxa suggests that there can be positive effects on fitness when the offspring's environment is taken into account. Investigations into (i) mechanisms by which egg cortisol elicits phenotypic change in offspring (e.g., epigenetics), (ii) maternal and offspring buffering capacity of cortisol, and (iii) factors driving natural variation in egg cortisol and how this variation affects offspring phenotype and fitness are all germane to discussions on egg glucocorticoids as signals of maternal stress.

  4. Alphacoronaviruses in New World bats: prevalence, persistence, phylogeny, and potential for interaction with humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Osborne

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Bats are reservoirs for many different coronaviruses (CoVs as well as many other important zoonotic viruses. We sampled feces and/or anal swabs of 1,044 insectivorous bats of 2 families and 17 species from 21 different locations within Colorado from 2007 to 2009. We detected alphacoronavirus RNA in bats of 4 species: big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus, 10% prevalence; long-legged bats (Myotis volans, 8% prevalence; little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus, 3% prevalence; and western long-eared bats (Myotis evotis, 2% prevalence. Overall, juvenile bats were twice as likely to be positive for CoV RNA as adult bats. At two of the rural sampling sites, CoV RNAs were detected in big brown and long-legged bats during the three sequential summers of this study. CoV RNA was detected in big brown bats in all five of the urban maternity roosts sampled throughout each of the periods tested. Individually tagged big brown bats that were positive for CoV RNA and later sampled again all became CoV RNA negative. Nucleotide sequences in the RdRp gene fell into 3 main clusters, all distinct from those of Old World bats. Similar nucleotide sequences were found in amplicons from gene 1b and the spike gene in both a big-brown and a long-legged bat, indicating that a CoV may be capable of infecting bats of different genera. These data suggest that ongoing evolution of CoVs in bats creates the possibility of a continued threat for emergence into hosts of other species. Alphacoronavirus RNA was detected at a high prevalence in big brown bats in roosts in close proximity to human habitations (10% and known to have direct contact with people (19%, suggesting that significant potential opportunities exist for cross-species transmission of these viruses. Further CoV surveillance studies in bats throughout the Americas are warranted.

  5. Biological aspects of the potential interaction between androgen suppression and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zietman, Anthony L.

    1996-01-01

    It is a basic axiom of radiotherapy that the radiation dose required for tumor eradication increases with increasing tumor volume. These Patterns of Care Studies and prospective studies using rebiopsy have shown that this holds true for prostate cancer as well. Despite our best endeavors with conventional dose, there remains a substantial element of local failure following radiotherapy, and this is T-stage related. Unlikely many other solid tumors, a convenient method of volume reduction exists for prostate carcinoma. Approximately 90% demonstrate shrinkage following androgen suppression, an effect that is more pronounced at the primary site than metastatic sites. Transrectal ultrasound studies have shown a median of 40% prostatic tumor volume reduction after 3-4 months of androgen suppression. With more protracted androgen suppression the shrinkage progresses and a small minority of patients may actually have a complete response determined pathologically. Animal models demonstrate clearly that the TCD 50 of androgen dependent tumors may be decreased by prior androgen depression. This effect is most pronounced if radiation is deferred until the time of maximal tumor regression. The advantage is lost if the tumor is allowed to regrow in an androgen independent fashion to its original volume. It is not clear whether this benefit of neoadjuvant androgen suppression results solely from volume shrinkage. The potential for synergy exists as both radiation and androgen suppression have an element of apoptosis as a common pathway of cell death. Although apoptosis is certainly the major cause of cell death from androgen suppression its' contribution to radiation cell kill in prostatic adenocarcinomas is yet to be evaluated. If the two effects are additive and not synergistic, then sequence should be unimportant. Animal models, however, demonstrate that the TCD 50 of androgen dependent tumors is not significantly reduced by adjuvant androgen suppression. Human data is still

  6. Adverse effects of female obesity and interaction with race on reproductive potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    Across the reproductive spectrum, obesity is associated with greater risks for adverse health outcomes, including higher rates of infertility, subfertility, early pregnancy loss, fetal deaths and stillbirths, congenital anomalies, and pregnancy complications. The excess reproductive morbidity associated with obesity may increase with longer duration, making the current trends among children and young adults particularly critical in terms of their future reproductive potential. Obese women have a lower chance of pregnancy following in vitro fertilization (IVF), require higher dosages of gonadotropins, and have reduced rates of implantation, clinical intrauterine gestation, and live birth rates and increased rates of pregnancy loss, as well as greater risks for prematurity and preeclampsia even when stratified by plurality. Racial and ethnic differences by overweight and obesity in IVF outcomes have been reported. Compared with normal-weight women, failure to achieve a clinical intrauterine gestation is significantly more likely among obese women overall, normal-weight and obese Asian women, normal-weight Hispanic women, and overweight and obese Black women. Among women who do conceive, compared with normal-weight women, failure to achieve a live birth is significantly more likely among overweight and obese women overall, and among overweight and obese Asian women, overweight and obese Hispanic women, and normal-weight and obese Black women. Although weight loss should theoretically be the first line of therapy for obese women, other lifestyle factors, such as regular physical exercise, elimination of tobacco use and alcohol consumption, and stress management, may be of more immediate benefit in achieving conception. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential of water-washing of rape straw on thermal properties and interactions during co-combustion with bituminous coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiulin; Han, Lujia; Huang, Guangqun

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the thermal properties and interactions during co-combustion of rape straw (RS) before and after water-washing with bituminous coal. A series of experiments was conducted to investigate the properties and interactions during co-combustion of RS with bituminous coal (at 10, 20, 40 and 60% RS). The feasibility and potential of water-washing as an RS pre-treatment was also explored. Reactivity and the amount of heat released followed a quadratic trend, while changes to the degree of interactions between the fuels conformed to a cosine curve. Water-washing increased the ignition and burn-out temperatures and slightly decreased reactivity. Demineralization negatively affected the previously synergistic co-firing relationship, nevertheless, the amount of heat released increased by 10.28% and the average activation energy (146kJ/mol) was lower than that of the unwashed blend (186kJ/mol). Overall, water-washing of RS could prove a useful pre-treatment before co-combustion with bituminous coal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of a model Fermi liquid interacting via a hard-core repulsive potential and an attractive tail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Tai Kai; Singwi, K.S.

    1986-02-01

    In this paper we present an extensive microscopic study of the collective and single-particle properties of a model Fermi liquid whose particles interact via a repulsive hard-core potential and an attractive tail. The model system is intended to simulate liquid 3 He. The study is based on an approximate scheme of Singwi, Tosi, Land and Sjoelander (STLS) which was devised to treat correlations in Coulomb Fermi liquids. The primary aim of this study is to learn whether the model system is capable of reproducing some of the salient features observed in normal liquid 3 He, and about the role of the repulsive and attractive parts of the potential. We have calculated the Landau parameters F 0 /sup s/ and F 0 /sup a/ and their variation with pressure, the wave number and pressure dependence of the spin-symmetric and spin-anti-symmetric polarization potentials, pressure dependence of the dispersion of the zero sound, the static structure factors and the quasiparticle mass. Although we make no quantitative claims when comparing our calculations with experiments in real liquid 3 He, we do conclude that our model system within the framework of the STLS scheme can account qualitatively for the latter. Besides, since the theory is microscopic in nature and is parameter free, it has enabled us to understand better the role of the repulsive and the attractive parts of the bare potential in determining the properties of liquid 3 He. 27 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Inhibitory effects of spirulina platensis on carcinogen-activating cytochrome P450 isozymes and potential for drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savranoglu, Seda; Tumer, Tugba Boyunegmez

    2013-01-01

    Spirulina platensis (SP) has been considered as potential food source of 21st century due to its remarkable nutrient profile and therapeutic benefits. However, the cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated drug/chemical interaction potential of SP has not yet been pursued. We investigated the effects of SP on the expressions and enzymatic activities of main CYP isozymes. After the rats were orally administered with SP daily for 5 consecutive weeks, there were significant downregulations in hepatic expression levels and inhibition in enzymatic activities of CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 compared to controls. In addition, a significant decrease was observed in CYP2C6-associated enzyme activity with no remarkable changes in messenger RNA (mRNA)/protein levels. The SP application resulted in significant increases in mRNA/protein levels of both CYP2B1 and CYP3A1 without a significant change in enzyme activities. These findings partly explain the chemopreventive properties of SP toward various organ toxicities, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis; however, its coadministration with some CYP substrates may lead to undesirable drug interactions.

  10. Evidence for a pharmacokinetic interaction between eslicarbazepine and rosuvastatin: Potential effects on xenobiotic transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidal, Barry E; Mintzer, Scott; Schwab, Matthias; Schutz, Ralph; Kharidia, Jahnavi; Blum, David; Grinnell, Todd; Sunkaraneni, Soujanya

    2017-09-01

    Patients with partial-onset seizures and comorbid cardiovascular disease may concomitantly receive eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), an antiepileptic drug, and rosuvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. This study evaluated the effect of multiple-dose ESL on the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of a single dose of rosuvastatin in healthy subjects. This was a Phase I, single-center, fixed-sequence, open-label study. Healthy subjects received two treatments, in sequence. Treatment A: a single 40mg oral dose of rosuvastatin on Day 1, followed by a washout period (Days 1-4); treatment B: titration of ESL (400-800mg once daily) on Days 5-18, followed by ESL 1200mg once daily on Days 19-35, with a single dose of rosuvastatin (40mg) on Day 32. Subjects then entered a 2-week follow-up period. Plasma concentrations of rosuvastatin were quantified for PK analyses. Safety and tolerability were assessed throughout the study. Thirty-three healthy subjects were enrolled and 30 completed the study. Mean rosuvastatin (standard deviation) t 1/2 was similar when rosuvastatin was used concomitantly with ESL and when it was used alone (26.5 [16.3]h, and 22.4 [9.5]h, respectively). The geometric least squares mean ratios (90% confidence intervals) of rosuvastatin exposure levels between rosuvastatin used concomitantly with ESL and rosuvastatin used alone were as follows: C max , 64.0% (55.9-73.3%); AUC (0-∞) , 63.0% (57.1-69.4%); and AUC (0-last) , 60.9% (55.2-67.1%). Concomitant use of ESL and rosuvastatin was generally well tolerated. Rosuvastatin exposure was 36-39% lower with steady-state administration of ESL, potentially due to reduced oral bioavailability of rosuvastatin. Consequently, when rosuvastatin is used with ESL, a rosuvastatin dose adjustment may be necessary if a clinically significant change in lipids is noted. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Assessment of the Drug Interaction Potential of Unconjugated and GalNAc3-Conjugated 2'-MOE-ASOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Colby S; Yu, Rosie Z; Warren, Mark S; Liu, Michael; Jahic, Mirza; Nichols, Brandon; Post, Noah; Lin, Song; Norris, Daniel A; Hurh, Eunju; Huang, Jane; Watanabe, Tanya; Henry, Scott P; Wang, Yanfeng

    2017-12-15

    Antisense oligonucleotides are metabolized by nucleases and drug interactions with small drug molecules at either the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme or transporter levels have not been observed to date. Herein, a comprehensive in vitro assessment of the drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential was carried out with four 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-modified antisense oligonucleotides (2'-MOE-ASOs), including a single triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc 3 )-conjugated ASO. Several investigations to describe the DDI potential of a 2'-MOE-ASO conjugated to a high-affinity ligand for hepatocyte-specific asialoglycoprotein receptors are explored. The inhibition on CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and CYP3A4 and induction on CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 were investigated in cryopreserved hepatocytes using up to 100 μM of each ASO. No significant inhibition (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC 50 ] > 100 μM) or induction was observed based on either enzymatic phenotype or mRNA levels. In addition, transporter interaction studies were conducted with nine major transporters per recommendations from regulatory guidances and included three hepatic uptake transporters, organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1), organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1), and OATP1B3; three renal uptake transporters, organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1), OAT3, and OCT2; and three efflux transporters, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and bile salt export pump (BSEP). None of the four ASOs (10 μM) were substrates of any of the nine transporters, with uptake drug molecules via any major CYP enzyme or drug transporters at clinically relevant exposures. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Maximum flow approach to prioritize potential drug targets of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv from protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melak, Tilahun; Gakkhar, Sunita

    2015-12-01

    In spite of the implementations of several strategies, tuberculosis (TB) is overwhelmingly a serious global public health problem causing millions of infections and deaths every year. This is mainly due to the emergence of drug-resistance varieties of TB. The current treatment strategies for the drug-resistance TB are of longer duration, more expensive and have side effects. This highlights the importance of identification and prioritization of targets for new drugs. This study has been carried out to prioritize potential drug targets of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv based on their flow to resistance genes. The weighted proteome interaction network of the pathogen was constructed using a dataset from STRING database. Only a subset of the dataset with interactions that have a combined score value ≥770 was considered. Maximum flow approach has been used to prioritize potential drug targets. The potential drug targets were obtained through comparative genome and network centrality analysis. The curated set of resistance genes was retrieved from literatures. Detail literature review and additional assessment of the method were also carried out for validation. A list of 537 proteins which are essential to the pathogen and non-homologous with human was obtained from the comparative genome analysis. Through network centrality measures, 131 of them were found within the close neighborhood of the centre of gravity of the proteome network. These proteins were further prioritized based on their maximum flow value to resistance genes and they are proposed as reliable drug targets of the pathogen. Proteins which interact with the host were also identified in order to understand the infection mechanism. Potential drug targets of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv were successfully prioritized based on their flow to resistance genes of existing drugs which is believed to increase the druggability of the targets since inhibition of a protein that has a maximum flow to

  13. An R package "VariABEL" for genome-wide searching of potentially interacting loci by testing genotypic variance heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struchalin Maksim V

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hundreds of new loci have been discovered by genome-wide association studies of human traits. These studies mostly focused on associations between single locus and a trait. Interactions between genes and between genes and environmental factors are of interest as they can improve our understanding of the genetic background underlying complex traits. Genome-wide testing of complex genetic models is a computationally demanding task. Moreover, testing of such models leads to multiple comparison problems that reduce the probability of new findings. Assuming that the genetic model underlying a complex trait can include hundreds of genes and environmental factors, testing of these models in genome-wide association studies represent substantial difficulties. We and Pare with colleagues (2010 developed a method allowing to overcome such difficulties. The method is based on the fact that loci which are involved in interactions can show genotypic variance heterogeneity of a trait. Genome-wide testing of such heterogeneity can be a fast scanning approach which can point to the interacting genetic variants. Results In this work we present a new method, SVLM, allowing for variance heterogeneity analysis of imputed genetic variation. Type I error and power of this test are investigated and contracted with these of the Levene's test. We also present an R package, VariABEL, implementing existing and newly developed tests. Conclusions Variance heterogeneity analysis is a promising method for detection of potentially interacting loci. New method and software package developed in this work will facilitate such analysis in genome-wide context.

  14. Interactive and individual effects of sensory potentiation and region-specific changes in excitability after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, N; Parker, D

    2011-12-29

    While promoting regeneration across lesion sites is a main focus of research into spinal injury, changes also occur in the sublesion spinal cord and its sensory inputs. However, how these varied effects relate to recovery remains largely unknown. Here, we have examined changes in sensory inputs and region-specific changes in spinal cord excitability after spinal cord lesions in the lamprey, a model system for studying regeneration and functional recovery, and related the changes to the degree of locomotor recovery.Proprioceptive responses below lesion sites were potentiated and their rate of adaptation reduced 8-10 weeks after lesioning (i.e. when animals usually showed significant locomotor recovery). These effects were associated with changes in cellular properties that were consistent with an increase in proprioceptor excitability. However, the changes in proprioceptive inputs did not correlate with the degree of locomotor recovery. There were region-specific changes in spinal cord excitability below lesion sites. In isolation, these excitability changes also did not correlate with the degree of locomotor recovery, but in this case, there were significant interactions between the magnitude of stimulation-evoked responses across the lesion site (used to assess the extent of regeneration) and sublesion changes in excitability. These interactions differed in animals that recovered well or poorly, suggesting that the nature of this interaction influenced recovery. These results add to the evidence for diverse changes in the spinal cord after injury, and suggest that regenerated inputs and their interactions with sublesion networks influence the degree of functional recovery. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Real and imaginary part of the potential between two nuclei and the realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trefz, M.

    1985-01-01

    Starting from a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction (Reid soft-core) in the model of two infinitely extended confusing nuclear matter complex energy densities are calculated by means of a G matrix. By means of a generalized local-density approximation the results are transferred to finite nuclei. In the framework of the frozen-density approximation in the energy-density formalism a complex potential between two nuclei is calculated. The potential calculated so contains not the contribution of 1-particle-1-hole states to the optical potential. The contribution of these states is therefore calculated in the Feshbach formalism, respectively these states are explicitely regarded in coupled-channel calculations. The model is applied to light (for instance 12 C+ 12 C), medium heavy (for instance 48 Ca+ 48 Ca), and heavy (for instance 40 Ar+ 208 Pb) systems. Potentials for incident energies of 5-84 MeV per projectile nucleon are calculated. By means of these potentials differential cross sections and reaction cross sections are determined and compared with the experimental data. The energy dependence of the reaction cross section is discussed. It is shown that at higher energies (40 MeV/N) the differential cross sections can be quantitatively reproduced. For the reaction cross section in the whole energy range good agreement with the experiment is obtained. Contrarily to current theoretical models it is proved that at low energies the excitation of collective states yields a large contribution to the reaction cross section and therefore must not be neglected. (orig.) [de

  16. The effects of ocean circulation on ocean-ice interaction and potential feedbacks in an idealized shelf cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, S. P.; Thompson, A. F.; Schodlok, M.

    2016-02-01

    The West Antarctic ice sheet is melting at unprecedented rates, which will impact global sea level rise. The ocean may be playing the dominant role in this ice melt through the upwelling of warm and salty Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) in regions such as Pine Island Glacier (PIG). There is evidence that the Antarctic Slope Front at the continental shelf constrains shoreward transport of CDW by mesoscale eddies. However, little is known about the ocean-ice interaction and potential feedbacks that take place once this water is advected into ice shelf cavities. In this talk we use MITgcm to simulate an idealized setup of the PIG ice shelf cavity, similar to the setup in De Rydt et al. 2014, to understand the effects of ocean circulation and potential feedbacks of ice-shelf melt on the ocean circulation. To do this we run the model in two different configurations with and without a wind-driven current at the northern edge of the ice shelf and annually updating the geometry of the ice shelf based on the parameterized ice-shelf melt. Eddy heat and potential vorticity fluxes are diagnosed and presented for each of the simulations and compared with control simulations where the ice-shelf cavity is not modified. Results show high ice shelf melt during the first year with maximum values in excess of 60 meters near the grounding line, but settle to tens of meters during the following years.

  17. α-α interaction reexamined in the context of the Sao Paulo potential: possible applications in astrophysics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasques, L.R.; Chamon, L.C.; Botero, D.F.M.; Carlson, B.V.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: We have analyzed a large set of α-α elastic scattering data for bombarding energies ranging from 0.6 to 29.5 MeV. The complete lack of open reaction channels at these somehow low energies results in a vanishing imaginary part for the optical interaction. This characteristic makes the α-α reaction particularly interesting as the corresponding elastic scattering cross sections and phase shifts become very sensitive to the real part of the interaction. The data were analyzed within the context of the velocity-dependent Sao Paulo potential, which is a successful theoretical model for the description of heavy-ion reactions from sub-barrier to intermediate energies. We have shown that, even in this low energy region, the velocity dependence of the Sao Paulo potential model is a necessary ingredient for describing the data. Despite the reasonable description obtained with the Sao Paulo potential, the analyses indicate the necessity of an additional weak dependence of the interaction on the angular momentum. These important characteristics open the possibility for studying reactions with astrophysical interested. In particular, predictions of the astrophysical S-factor for the 12 C(α,γ) reaction will be presented. The understanding of the reaction rate for the α-capture process by a 12 C nucleus is a crucial ingredient for predicting the stellar helium burning and the subsequent fate of stars as this reaction determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen towards the end of the Red Giants phase. It is well known that low mass stars evolve to White Dwarfs and this ratio determines the final abundance composition in White Dwarf matter and sets the trigger conditions for type Ia supernova explosions. The carbon-oxygen ratio also dictates the subsequent sequence of burning processes during the final stages of stellar evolution for massive stars. Thus, it has a key role in the determination of the abundance composition in outer shells of the star prior to core

  18. Potential drug-drug interactions among elderly patients on anti-hypertensive medications in two tertiary healthcare facilities in Ekiti State, South-West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Olusesan Fadare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Drug-drug interactions remain a major cause of adverse drug reactions with great consequences such as increased morbidity and increased healthcare cost. In elderly patients with systemic hypertension, there is a tendency for them to be prescribed multiple medications and this may expose them to some drug-drug interactions (DDIs especially in the context of physiological changes of ageing. The objective of this study was to evaluate potential drug-drug interaction among some Nigerian elderly hypertension. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving elderly hypertensive patients attending the general outpatient clinic of two tertiary healthcare facilities located in Ekiti State, South-West Nigeria. The information collected from the patients′ medical records included their ages, gender, diagnosis and list of prescribed anti-hypertensive medications. Potential drug-drug interactions were checked for using the Multi-Drug Interaction Checker (Medscape Reference and Epocrates Drug Interaction Checker (San Mateo CA, USA. Results: A total of 350 elderly patients attended the clinics during the study period of which 208 (59.4% hypertensive patients were identified and their records used for analysis. The fixed-dose combination drug Moduretic® (Amiloride /Hydrochlorothiazide-25.7% was the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive followed by Lisinopril (16.6%, Amlodipine (13.2% and Nifedipine (12.6%. The anti-platelet Acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA was prescribed for 100 (48.1% patients and represented 19.8% of all prescribed medications. A total of 231 potential DDIs were found among the patients giving a mean of 1.3 interactions per patient. The most common identified drug pairs with potential interactions were ACE inhibitors - Amiloride, followed by ACE inhibitors - Hydrochlorothiazide, ACE inhibitors - ASA and ARB - Amiloride. Conclusion: Potential drug-drug interactions, though common in this study comprised mainly of minor and moderate

  19. Exact and Effective Pair-Wise Potential for Protein-Ligand Interactions Obtained from a Semiempirical Energy Partition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Melo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the partition method introduced by Carvalho and Melo was used to study the complex between Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor (CMTI-I and glycerol at the AM1 level. An effective potential, combining non-bonding and polarization plus charge transfer (PLCT terms, was introduced to evaluate the magnitude of the interaction between each amino acid and the ligand. In this case study, the nonbonding–PLCT noncompensation characterizes the stabilization energy of the association process in study. The main residues (Gly29, Cys3 and Arg5 with net attractive effects and Arg1 (with a net repulsive effect, responsible by the stability of protein-ligand complex, are associated with large nonbonding energies non-compensated by PLCT effects. The results obtained enable us to conclude that the present decomposition scheme can be used for understanding the cohesive phenomena in proteins.

  20. Dayside and nightside contributions to the cross polar cap potential: placing an upper limit on a viscous-like interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations of changes in size of the ionospheric polar cap allow the dayside and nightside reconnection rates to be quantified. From these it is straightforward to estimate the rate of antisunward transport of magnetic flux across the polar regions, quantified by the cross polar cap potential ΦPC. When correlated with upstream measurements of the north-south component of the IMF, ΦPC is found to increase for more negative Bz, as expected. However, we also find that ΦPC does not, on average, decrease to zero, even for strongly northward IMF. In the past this has been interpreted as evidence for a viscous interaction between the magnetosheath flow and the outer boundaries of the magnetosphere. In contrast, we show that this is the consequence of flows excited by tail reconnection, which is inherently uncorrelated with IMF Bz.

  1. Dayside and nightside contributions to the cross polar cap potential: placing an upper limit on a viscous-like interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations of changes in size of the ionospheric polar cap allow the dayside and nightside reconnection rates to be quantified. From these it is straightforward to estimate the rate of antisunward transport of magnetic flux across the polar regions, quantified by the cross polar cap potential ΦPC. When correlated with upstream measurements of the north-south component of the IMF, ΦPC is found to increase for more negative Bz, as expected. However, we also find that ΦPC does not, on average, decrease to zero, even for strongly northward IMF. In the past this has been interpreted as evidence for a viscous interaction between the magnetosheath flow and the outer boundaries of the magnetosphere. In contrast, we show that this is the consequence of flows excited by tail reconnection, which is inherently uncorrelated with IMF Bz.

  2. Brewing and volatiles analysis of three tea beers indicate a potential interaction between tea components and lager yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Lei; Peng, Li-Juan; Ho, Chi-Tang; Yan, Shou-He; Meurens, Marc; Zhang, Zheng-Zhu; Li, Da-Xiang; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Bao, Guan-Hu; Gao, Xue-Ling; Ling, Tie-Jun

    2016-04-15

    Green tea, oolong tea and black tea were separately introduced to brew three kinds of tea beers. A model was designed to investigate the tea beer flavour character. Comparison of the volatiles between the sample of tea beer plus water mixture (TBW) and the sample of combination of tea infusion and normal beer (CTB) was accomplished by triangular sensory test and HS-SPME GC-MS analysis. The PCA of GC-MS data not only showed a significant difference between volatile features of each TBW and CTB group, but also suggested some key compounds to distinguish TBW from CTB. The results of GC-MS showed that the relative concentrations of many typical tea volatiles were significantly changed after the brewing process. More interestingly, the behaviour of yeast fermentation was influenced by tea components. A potential interaction between tea components and lager yeast could be suggested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mean force potential of interaction between Na+ and Cl- ions in planar nanopores in contact with water under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevkunov, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    The mean force potential (MFP) of interaction between counterions Na+ and Cl- in a planar nanopore with structureless hydrophobic walls is calculated via computer simulation under the condition that the nanopore is in contact with water at an external pressure that exceeds the saturation pressure but remains insufficient to fill the nanopore with water. For a nanopore with a liquid phase, the MFP dependence on the interionic distance indicates the dissociation of an ion pair into two hydrated ions in a nanopore that is not completely filled with water. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules drawn into the interionic space decisively influence the dissociation. The attraction between counterions, averaged over thermal fluctuations, depends largely on the pore width and grows as the shielding of the ions' electric field by water molecules in a narrow pore diminishes. The contributions from energy and entropy to the free energy of hydration are analyzed.

  4. Interaction Potential of the Multitargeted Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Dovitinib with Drug Transporters and Drug Metabolising Enzymes Assessed in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Weiss

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dovitinib (TKI-258 is under development for the treatment of diverse cancer entities. No published information on its pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential is available. Thus, we assessed its interaction with important drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters and its efficacy in multidrug resistant cells in vitro. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1 inhibition was evaluated by calcein assay, inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2 by pheophorbide A efflux, and inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs by 8-fluorescein-cAMP uptake. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4, 2C19, and 2D6 was assessed by using commercial kits. Induction of transporters and enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Possible aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR activating properties were assessed by a reporter gene assay. Substrate characteristics were evaluated by growth inhibition assays in cells over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Dovitinib weakly inhibited CYP2C19, CYP3A4, P-gp and OATPs. The strongest inhibition was observed for BCRP (IC50 = 10.3 ± 4.5 μM. Among the genes investigated, dovitinib only induced mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, ABCC3 (coding for multidrug resistance-associated protein 3, and ABCG2 and suppressed mRNA expression of some transporters and drug metabolising enzymes. AhR reporter gene assay demonstrated that dovitinib is an activator of this nuclear receptor. Dovitinib retained its efficacy in cell lines over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Our analysis indicates that dovitinib will most likely retain its efficacy in tumours over-expressing P-gp or BCRP and gives first evidence that dovitinib might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions.

  5. Potential for alcohol and drug interactions in older adults: evidence from the Irish longitudinal study on ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Older adults are susceptible to adverse effects from the concomitant use of prescription medications and alcohol. This study estimates the prevalence of exposure to alcohol interactive (AI) medications and concomitant alcohol use by therapeutic class in a large, nationally representative sample of older adults. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of a population based sample of older Irish adults aged ≥60 years using data from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) (N = 3,815). AI medications were identified using Stockley’s Drug Interactions, the British National Formulary and the Irish Medicines Formulary. An in-home inventory of medications was used to characterise AI drug exposure by therapeutic class. Self-reported alcohol use was classified as non-drinker, light/moderate and heavy drinking. Comorbidities known to be exacerbated by alcohol were also recorded (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, peptic ulcer disease, liver disease, depression, gout or breast cancer), as well as sociodemographic and health factors. Results Seventy-two per cent of participants were exposed to AI medications, with greatest exposure to cardiovascular and CNS agents. Overall, 60% of participants exposed to AI medications reported concomitant alcohol use, compared with 69.5% of non-AI exposed people (p alcohol consumption (both light/moderate and heavier) and AI medications. Current smokers and people with increasing co-morbidities were also at greatest risk for heavy drinking in combination with AI medications. Conclusions The concurrent use of alcohol with AI medications, or with conditions known to be exacerbated by alcohol, is common among older Irish adults. Prescribers should be aware of potential interactions, and screen patients for alcohol use and provide warnings to minimize patient risk. PMID:24766969

  6. GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

    2011-05-17

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  7. Interaction between bradykinin potentiating nonapeptide (BPP9a) and {beta}-cyclodextrin: A structural and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lula, Ivana; De Sousa, Frederico B. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Denadai, Angelo M.L. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, CEFET-MG, Campus VII, 35.183-006, Timoteo, MG (Brazil); Ferreira de Lima, Guilherme; Duarte, Helio Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mares Guia, Thiago R. dos [Departamento de Bioquimica e Imunologia, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Faljoni-Alario, Adelaide [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santoro, Marcelo M. [Departamento de Bioquimica e Imunologia, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Camargo, Antonio C.M. de [Center for Applied Toxinology CAT-CEPID, Laboratorio Especial de Toxicologia Aplicada, Instituto Butantan, 05503-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Robson A.S. dos [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofisica, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); and others

    2012-02-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the physical and chemical characterizations of the supramolecular complex formed between {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}CD) and bradykinin potentiating nonapeptide (BPP9a), an endogenous toxin found in Bothrops jararaca. Circular dichroism results indicate a conformational change in the BPP9a secondary structure upon its complexation with {beta}CD. Nuclear magnetic resonance results, mainly from NOESY experiments, and theoretical calculations showed a favorable interaction between the tryptophan residue of BPP9a and the {beta}CD cavity. Thermodynamic inclusion parameters were investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry, demonstrating that {beta}CD/BPP9a complex formation is an exothermic process that results in a reduction in entropy. Additionally, in vitro degradation study of BPP9a against trypsin (37 Degree-Sign C, pH 7.2) showed higher stability of peptide in presence of {beta}CD. This {beta}CD/BPP9a complex, which presents new chemical properties arising from the peptide inclusion process, may be useful as an antihypertensive drug in oral pharmaceutical formulations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd and NMR showed evidences for the existence of more than one structure in solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexation with {beta}CD reduces the conformational rigidity of the peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}CD cavity recognize Trp and/or Pro segments of BPP9a. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interactions involving disaggregation of BPP9a assemblies and binding with {beta}CD.

  8. Determination of LFER descriptors of 30 cations of ionic liquids--progress in understanding their molecular interaction potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chul-Woong; Jungnickel, Christian; Stolte, Stefan; Preiss, Ulrich; Arning, Jürgen; Ranke, Johannes; Krossing, Ingo; Thöming, Jorg

    2012-02-01

    In order to understand molecular interaction potentials of 30 cations of ionic liquids (ILs), the well-known linear free energy relationship concept (LFER) was applied. The LFER descriptors for the excess molar refractivity and the molar volume were calculated in silico and for hydrogen-bonding acidity and basicity, and the polarizability/dipolarity of IL cations were experimentally determined through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements. For the study, three different columns (RP-select B, Cyan, and Diol) and buffered mobile phases, based on two organic solvents acetonitrile (ACN) and methanol (MeOH), were selectively combined to the HPLC separation systems RP-select B-ACN, RP-select B-MeOH, Cyan-MeOH, Diol-ACN, and Diol-MeOH. By measuring the retention factors of 45 neutral calibration compounds and calculating LFER descriptors of three cations in the HPLC systems, the system parameters, including an ionic z coefficient, were determined. Conversely, the LFER descriptors of 30 ionic liquid cations were determined, based on the parameters of five systems and their retention factors in the HPLC systems. The results showed that the type of head group, alkyl chain length and further substituents of the cation have a significant influence on the dipolarity/polarizability and the hydrogen-bonding acidity, and functionalized groups (hydroxyl, ether, and dimethylamino) lead to hydrogen-bonding basicity of the cation. The characterization of cationic LFER descriptors opens up the chance for a more quantitative understanding of molecular interaction potentials and physicochemical properties of ILs. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. MRP2 mediated drug-drug interaction: indomethacin increases sulfasalazine absorption in the small intestine, potentially decreasing its colonic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-02-15

    We have recently shown that efflux transport, mediated by multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), is responsible for sulfasalazine low-permeability in the small intestine, thereby enabling its colonic targeting and therapeutic action. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential pharmacokinetic interaction between indomethacin and sulfasalazine, in the mechanism of efflux transporter competition. The concentration-dependent effects of indomethacin on sulfasalazine intestinal epithelial transport were investigated across Caco-2 cell monolayers, in both apical to basolateral (AP-BL) and BL-AP directions. The interaction was then investigated in the in situ single-pass rat jejunal perfusion model. Sulfasalazine displayed 30-fold higher BL-AP than AP-BL Caco-2 permeability, indicative of net mucosal secretion. Indomethacin significantly increased AP-BL and decreased BL-AP sulfasalazine Caco-2 transport, in a concentration-dependent manner, with IC(50) values of 75 and 196 microM respectively. In the rat model, higher sulfasalazine concentrations resulted in higher intestinal permeability, consistent with saturation of efflux transporter. Without indomethacin, sulfasalazine demonstrated low rat jejunal permeability (vs. metoprolol). Indomethacin significantly increased sulfasalazine P(eff), effectively shifting it from BCS (biopharmaceutics classification system) Class IV to II. In conclusion, the data indicate that concomitant intake of indomethacin and sulfasalazine may lead to increased absorption of sulfasalazine in the small intestine, thereby reducing its colonic concentration and potentially altering its therapeutic effect. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of interacting tunneling transport: variational grand potential, density functional formulation and nature of steady-state forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyldgaard, P

    2012-01-01

    The standard formulation of tunneling transport rests on an open-boundary modeling. There, conserving approximations to nonequilibrium Green function or quantum statistical mechanics provide consistent but computational costly approaches; alternatively, the use of density-dependent ballistic-transport calculations (e.g., Lang 1995 Phys. Rev. B 52 5335), here denoted ‘DBT’, provides computationally efficient (approximate) atomistic characterizations of the electron behavior but has until now lacked a formal justification. This paper presents an exact, variational nonequilibrium thermodynamic theory for fully interacting tunneling and provides a rigorous foundation for frozen-nuclei DBT calculations as a lowest-order approximation to an exact nonequilibrium thermodynamic density functional evaluation. The theory starts from the complete electron nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics and I identify the operator for the nonequilibrium Gibbs free energy which, generally, must be treated as an implicit solution of the fully interacting many-body dynamics. I demonstrate a minimal property of a functional for the nonequilibrium thermodynamic grand potential which thus uniquely identifies the solution as the exact nonequilibrium density matrix. I also show that the uniqueness-of-density proof from a closely related Lippmann-Schwinger collision density functional theory (Hyldgaard 2008 Phys. Rev. B 78 165109) makes it possible to express the variational nonequilibrium thermodynamic description as a single-particle formulation based on universal electron-density functionals; the full nonequilibrium single-particle formulation improves the DBT method, for example, by a more refined account of Gibbs free energy effects. I illustrate a formal evaluation of the zero-temperature thermodynamic grand potential value which I find is closely related to the variation in the scattering phase shifts and hence to Friedel density oscillations. This paper also discusses the

  11. Potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions to patients over 45 years of age in primary care, southern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Juarez Vieira Teixeira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few cross-sectional studies involving adults and elderly patients with major DDIs have been conducted in the primary care setting. The study aimed to investigate the prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs in patients treated in primary care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study involving patients aged 45 years or older was conducted at 25 Basic Health Units in the city of Maringá (southern Brazil from May to December 2010. The data were collected from prescriptions at the pharmacy of the health unit at the time of the delivery of medication to the patient. After delivery, the researcher checked the electronic medical records of the patient. A total of 827 patients were investigated (mean age: 64.1; mean number of medications: 4.4. DDIs were identified in the Micromedex® database. The prevalence of potential DDIs and major DDIs was 63.0% and 12.1%, respectively. In both the univariate and multivariate analyses, the number of drugs prescribed was significantly associated with potential DDIs, with an increasing risk from three to five drugs (OR = 4.74; 95% CI: 2.90-7.73 to six or more drugs (OR = 23.03; 95% CI: 10.42-50.91. Forty drugs accounted for 122 pairs of major DDIs, the most frequent of which involved simvastatin (23.8%, captopril/enalapril (16.4% and fluoxetine (16.4%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first large-scale study on primary care carried out in Latin America. Based on the findings, the estimated prevalence of potential DDIs was high, whereas clinically significant DDIs occurred in a smaller proportion. Exposing patients to a greater number of prescription drugs, especially three or more, proved to be a significant predictor of DDIs. Prescribers should be more aware of potential DDIs. Future studies should assess potential DDIs in primary care over a longer period of time.

  12. Potential disease interaction reinforced: double-virus-infected escaped farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., recaptured in a nearby river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhun, A S; Karlsbakk, E; Isachsen, C H; Omdal, L M; Eide Sørvik, A G; Skaala, Ø; Barlaup, B T; Glover, K A

    2015-02-01

    The role of escaped farmed salmon in spreading infectious agents from aquaculture to wild salmonid populations is largely unknown. This is a case study of potential disease interaction between escaped farmed and wild fish populations. In summer 2012, significant numbers of farmed Atlantic salmon were captured in the Hardangerfjord and in a local river. Genetic analyses of 59 of the escaped salmon and samples collected from six local salmon farms pointed out the most likely source farm, but two other farms had an overlapping genetic profile. The escapees were also analysed for three viruses that are prevalent in fish farming in Norway. Almost all the escaped salmon were infected with salmon alphavirus (SAV) and piscine reovirus (PRV). To use the infection profile to assist genetic methods in identifying the likely farm of origin, samples from the farms were also tested for these viruses. However, in the current case, all the three farms had an infection profile that was similar to that of the escapees. We have shown that double-virus-infected escaped salmon ascend a river close to the likely source farms, reinforcing the potential for spread of viruses to wild salmonids. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Fish Diseases published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the hydrogen-peroxide−noble-gas interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncaratti, L. F., E-mail: lz@fis.unb.br; Leal, L. A.; Silva, G. M. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Pirani, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210 Salvador (Brazil); Gargano, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Quantum Theory Project, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    We consider the analytical representation of the potential energy surfaces of relevance for the intermolecular dynamics of weakly bound complexes of chiral molecules. In this paper we study the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}−Ng (Ng=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) systems providing the radial and the angular dependence of the potential energy surface on the relative position of the Ng atom. We accomplish this by introducing an analytical representation which is able to fit the ab initio energies of these complexes in a wide range of geometries. Our analysis sheds light on the role that the enantiomeric forms and the symmetry of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule play on the resulting barriers and equilibrium geometries. The proposed theoretical framework is useful to study the dynamics of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule, or other systems involving O–O and S–S bonds, interacting by non-covalent forces with atoms or molecules and to understand how the relative orientation of the O–H bonds changes along collisional events that may lead to a hydrogen bond formation or even to selectivity in chemical reactions.

  14. Influence of the chemical potential on the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and gapped graphene or a graphene-coated substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    We present a formalism based on first principles of quantum electrodynamics at nonzero temperature which permits us to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a graphene sheet with arbitrary mass gap and chemical potential, including graphene-coated substrates. The free energy and force of the Casimir-Polder interaction are expressed via the polarization tensor of graphene in (2 +1 ) -dimensional space-time in the framework of the Dirac model. The obtained expressions are used to investigate the influence of the chemical potential of graphene on the Casimir-Polder interaction. Computations are performed for an atom of metastable helium interacting with either a freestanding graphene sheet or a graphene-coated substrate made of amorphous silica. It is shown that the impacts of the nonzero chemical potential and the mass gap on the Casimir-Polder interaction are in opposite directions, by increasing and decreasing the magnitudes of the free energy and force, respectively. It turns out, however, that the temperature-dependent part of the Casimir-Polder interaction is decreased by a nonzero chemical potential, whereas the mass gap increases it compared to the case of undoped, gapless graphene. The physical explanation for these effects is provided. Numerical computations of the Casimir-Polder interaction are performed at various temperatures and atom-graphene separations.

  15. nfluence of the nuclear part of the nuclei interaction potential to the mass yields of fragments from fission of highly-excited nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Denisov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence for various parameterizations of the nuclear part of the interaction potential to the mass yields of fission fragments of highly excited nuclei for the reaction α+197Au → fission was studied. It is shown that using of various nuclear potentials leads to small changes in the yields of fission fragments of the nuclei.

  16. Grapefruit juice and its constituents augment colchicine intestinal absorption: potential hazardous interaction and the role of p-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the potential interaction between grapefruit juice (GFJ) and the oral microtubule polymerization inhibitor colchicine, a P-gp and CYP3A4 substrate. Colchicine intestinal epithelial transport was investigated across Caco-2 cell monolayers in both AP-BL and BL-AP directions, in the absence/presence of known P-gp inhibitors (verapamil and quinidine). The concentration-dependent effects of GFJ and its major constituents (6'-7'-dihydroxybergamottin, naringin and naringenin) on colchicine Caco-2 mucosal secretion were examined. The effect of GFJ on colchicine intestinal-permeability was then investigated in-situ in the rat perfusion model, in both jejunum and ileum. Colchicine exhibited 20-fold higher BL-AP than AP-BL Caco-2 permeability, indicative of net mucosal secretion, which was reduced by verapamil/quinidine. Colchicine AP-BL permeability was increased and BL-AP was decreased by GFJ in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) values of 0.75% and 0.46% respectively), suggesting inhibition of efflux transport, rather than metabolizing enzyme. Similar effects obtained following pre-experiment incubation with GFJ, even though the juice was not present throughout the transepithelial study. 6'-7'-Dihydroxybergamottin, naringin and naringenin displayed concentration-dependent inhibition on colchicine BL-AP secretion (IC(50) values of 90, 592 and 11.6 microM respectively). Ten percent GFJ doubled colchicine rat in-situ ileal permeability, and increased 1.5-fold jejunal permeability. The data suggest that GFJ may augment colchicine oral bioavailability. Due to colchicine narrow therapeutic-index and severely toxic side-effects, awareness of this interaction is prudent.

  17. Wild and domestic pig interactions at the wildlife-livestock interface of Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda, and the potential association with African Swine Fever outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther eKukielka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bushpigs (Potamochoerus larvatus and warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus, which are widely distributed in Eastern Africa, are likely to cohabitate in the same environment with domestic pigs, facilitating the transmission of shared pathogens. However, potential interactions between bushpig, warthog and domestic pig and the resulting potential circulation of infectious diseases have rarely been investigated in Africa to date. In order to understand the dynamics of such interactions and the potential influence of human behavior and husbandry practices on them, individual interviews (n=233 and participatory rural appraisals (n=11 were carried out among Ugandan pig farmers at the edge of Murchison Falls National Park, northern Uganda. In addition, as an example of possible implications of wild and domestic pig interactions, nonlinear multivariate analysis (multiple correspondence analyses was used to investigate the potential association between the aforementioned factors (interactions and human behavior and practices and farmer reported ASF outbreaks. No direct interactions between wild pigs and domestic pig were reported in our study area. However, indirect interactions were described by 83 (35.6 % of the participants and were identified to be more common at water sources during the dry season. Equally, eight (3.4% farmers declared exposing their domestic pig to raw hunting leftovers of wild pigs. The exploratory analysis performed suggested possible associations between the farmer reported ASF outbreaks and indirect interactions, free-range housing systems, dry season, and having a warthog burrow less than 3km from the household. Our study was useful to gather local knowledge and to identify knowledge gaps about potential interactions between wild and domestic pig in this area. This information could be useful to facilitate the design of future observational studies to better understand the potential transmission of pathogens between wild and

  18. Supplementary Material for: Potential impact of climate-related changes is buffered by differential responses to recruitment and interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Menge, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of ecosystem responsiveness to climatic perturbations can provide insight into climate change consequences. Recent analyses linking phytoplankton abundance and mussel recruitment to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) revealed a paradox. Despite large increases in mussel recruitment beginning in 2000, adult mussel responses were idiosyncratic by site and intertidal zone, with no response at one long-term site, and increases in the low zone (1.5% per year) and decreases in the mid zone (1.3% per year) at the other. What are the mechanisms underlying these differential changes? Species interactions such as facilitation by barnacles and predation are potential determinants of successful mussel colonization. To evaluate these effects, we analyzed patterns of barnacle recruitment, determined if predation rate covaried with the increase in mussel recruitment, and tested facilitation interactions in a field experiment. Neither magnitude nor season of barnacle recruitment changed meaningfully with site or zone from the 1990s to the 2000s. In contrast to the relationship between NPGO and local-scale mussel recruitment, relationships between local-scale patterns of barnacle recruitment and climate indices were weak. Despite differences in rates of prey recruitment and abundance of sea stars in 1990–1991, 1999–2000, and 2007–2008, predation rates were nearly identical in experiments before, during, and after 1999–2000. The facilitation experiment showed that mussels M. trossulus only became abundant when barnacle recruitment was allowed, when abundance of barnacles reached high abundance of ∼50% cover, and when mussel recruitment was sufficiently high. Thus, in the low zone minimal changes in mussel abundance despite sharply increased recruitment rates are consistent with the hypothesis that change in adult mussel cover was buffered by the relative insensitivity of barnacle recruitment to climatic fluctuations, and a resultant lack of

  19. In Vitro and Clinical Evaluations of the Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of a Metabotropic Glutamate 2/3 Receptor Agonist Prodrug with Intestinal Peptide Transporter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Y Anne; Long, Amanda J; Annes, William F; Witcher, Jennifer W; Knadler, Mary Pat; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun A; Mitchell, Malcolm I; Leese, Phillip; Hillgren, Kathleen M

    2017-02-01

    Despite peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) being responsible for the bioavailability for a variety of drugs, there has been little study of its potential involvement in drug-drug interactions. Pomaglumetad methionil, a metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor agonist prodrug, utilizes PEPT1 to enhance absorption and bioavailability. In vitro studies were conducted to guide the decision to conduct a clinical drug interaction study and to inform the clinical study design. In vitro investigations determined the prodrug (LY2140023 monohydrate) is a substrate of PEPT1 with K m value of approximately 30 µM, whereas the active moiety (LY404039) is not a PEPT1 substrate. In addition, among the eight known PEPT1 substrates evaluated in vitro, valacyclovir was the most potent inhibitor (IC 50 = 0.46 mM) of PEPT1-mediated uptake of the prodrug. Therefore, a clinical drug interaction study was conducted to evaluate the potential interaction between the prodrug and valacyclovir in healthy subjects. No effect of coadministration was observed on the pharmacokinetics of the prodrug, valacyclovir, or either of their active moieties. Although in vitro studies showed potential for the prodrug and valacyclovir interaction via PEPT1, an in vivo study showed no interaction between these two drugs. PEPT1 does not appear to easily saturate because of its high capacity and expression in the intestine. Thus, a clinical interaction at PEPT1 is unlikely even with a compound with high affinity for the transporter. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  20. Measures of nonclassicality for a two-level atom interacting with power-law potential field under decoherence effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, S.; Berrada, K.; Alkhateeb, Sadah A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a useful quantum system to perform different tasks of quantum information and computational technologies. We explore the required optimal conditions for this system that are feasible with real experimental realization. We present an active way to control the variation of some measures of nonclassicality considering the time-dependent coupling and photon transition effects under a model that closely describes a realistic experimental scenario. We investigate qualitatively the quantum measures for a two-level atom system interacting with a quantum field initially defined in a coherent state in the framework of power-law potentials (PLPCSs). We study the nonlocal correlation in the whole system state using the negativity as a measure of entanglement in terms of the exponent parameter, number of photon transition, and phase damping effect. The influences of the different physical parameters on the statistical properties and purity of the field are also demonstrated during the time evolution. The results indicate that the preservation and enhancement of entanglement greatly benefit from the combination of the choice of the physical parameters. Finally, we explore an interesting relationship between the different quantum measures of non-classicality during the time evolution in the absence and presence of time-dependent coupling effect.

  1. Seed yield components and their potential interaction in grasses - to what extend does seed weigth influence yield?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelt, B; Gislum, R

    2010-01-01

     In a first-year seed crop of red fescue (Festuca rubra L.) the degree of lodging was controlled by the use of Moddus (Trinexapac-ethyl). Seed weight was found to increase by the decreasing degree of lodging prior to harvest. The higher seed weights were accompanied by higher yields even though t...... with yield loss during the harvest and post-harvest processes....... In a first-year seed crop of red fescue (Festuca rubra L.) the degree of lodging was controlled by the use of Moddus (Trinexapac-ethyl). Seed weight was found to increase by the decreasing degree of lodging prior to harvest. The higher seed weights were accompanied by higher yields even though...... the number of reproductive tillers and floret site utilization (FSU) were unaffected by the treatments. Seed yield is affected by several yield components and reflects the interaction between the seed yield potential (e.g. number of reproductive tillers, number of spikelets and florets/spikelet per...

  2. Event-related brain potentials suggest a late interaction of meter and syntax in the P600.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Kotz, Sonja A

    2009-09-01

    Many studies refer to the relevance of metric cues in speech segmentation during language acquisition and adult language processing. However, the on-line use (i.e., time-locking the unfolding of a sentence to EEG) of metric stress patterns that are manifested by the succession of stressed and unstressed syllables during auditory syntactic processing has not been investigated. This is surprising as both processes rely on abstract rules that allow the building up of expectancies of which element will occur next and at which point in time. Participants listened to metrically regular sentences that could either be correct, syntactically incorrect, metrically incorrect, or doubly incorrect. They either judged syntactic correctness or metric homogeneity in two different sessions. We provide first event-related potential evidence that the metric structure of a given language is processed in two stages as evidenced in a biphasic pattern of an early frontal negativity and a late posterior positivity. This pattern is comparable to the biphasic pattern reported in syntactic processing. However, metric cues are processed earlier than syntactic cues during the first stage (LAN), whereas both processes seem to interact at a later integrational stage (P600). The present results substantiate the important impact of metric cues during auditory syntactic language processing.

  3. Drug-Drug Interactions Potential of Icariin and Its Intestinal Metabolites via Inhibition of Intestinal UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Feng Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Icariin is known as an indicative constituent of the Epimedium genus, which has been commonly used in Chinese herbal medicine to enhance treat impotence and improve sexual function, as well as for several other indications for over 2000 years. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of icariin and its intestinal metabolites on the activities of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT activities. Using a panel of recombinant human UGT isoforms, we found that icariin exhibited potent inhibition against UGT1A3. It is interesting that the intestinal metabolites of icariin exhibited a different inhibition profile compared with icariin. Different from icariin, icariside II was a potent inhibitor of UGT1A4, UGT1A7, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7, and icaritin was a potent inhibitor of UGT1A7 and UGT1A9. The potential for drug interactions in vivo was also quantitatively predicted and compared. The quantitative prediction of risks indicated that in vivo inhibition against intestinal UGT1A3, UGT1A4, and UGT1A7 would likely occur after oral administration of icariin products.

  4. Interaction of cement model systems with superplasticizers investigated by atomic force microscopy, zeta potential, and adsorption measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Lucia; Kaufmann, Josef; Winnefeld, Frank; Plank, Johann

    2010-07-01

    Polyelectrolyte-based dispersants are commonly used in a wide range of industrial applications to provide specific workability to colloidal suspensions. Their working mechanism is based on adsorption onto the surfaces of the suspended particles. The adsorbed polymer layer can exercise an electrostatic and/or a steric effect which is responsible for achieving dispersion. This study is focused on the dispersion forces induced by polycarboxylate ether-based superplasticizers (PCEs) commonly used in concrete. They are investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) applying standard silicon nitride tips exposed to solutions with different ionic compositions in a wet cell. Adsorption isotherms and zeta potential analysis were performed to characterize polymer displacement in the AFM system on nonreactive model substrates (quartz, mica, calcite, and magnesium oxide) in order to avoid the complexity of cement hydration products. The results show that PCE is strongly adsorbed by positively charged materials. This fact reveals that, being silicon nitride naturally positively charged, in most cases the superplasticizer adsorbs preferably on the silicon nitride tip than on the AFM substrate. However, the force-distance curves displayed repulsive interactions between tip and substrates even when polymer was poorly adsorbed on both. These observations allow us to conclude that the dispersion due to PCE strongly depends on the particle charge. It differs between colloids adsorbing and not adsorbing PCE, and leads to different forces acting between the particles. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The interaction between electromagnetic fields at megahertz, gigahertz and terahertz frequencies with cells, tissues and organisms: risks and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Sergii; Begley, Ryan; Harvey, Alan R; Hool, Livia; Wallace, Vincent P

    2017-12-01

    Since regular radio broadcasts started in the 1920s, the exposure to human-made electromagnetic fields has steadily increased. These days we are not only exposed to radio waves but also other frequencies from a variety of sources, mainly from communication and security devices. Considering that nearly all biological systems interact with electromagnetic fields, understanding the affects is essential for safety and technological progress. This paper systematically reviews the role and effects of static and pulsed radio frequencies (10 0 -10 9 Hz), millimetre waves (MMWs) or gigahertz (10 9 -10 11 Hz), and terahertz (10 11 -10 13 Hz) on various biomolecules, cells and tissues. Electromagnetic fields have been shown to affect the activity in cell membranes (sodium versus potassium ion conductivities) and non-selective channels, transmembrane potentials and even the cell cycle. Particular attention is given to millimetre and terahertz radiation due to their increasing utilization and, hence, increasing human exposure. MMWs are known to alter active transport across cell membranes, and it has been reported that terahertz radiation may interfere with DNA and cause genomic instabilities. These and other phenomena are discussed along with the discrepancies and controversies from published studies. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Chemical potential for the interacting classical gas and the ideal quantum gas obeying a generalized exclusion principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, F J; Olivares-Quiroz, L

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we address the concept of the chemical potential μ in classical and quantum gases towards the calculation of the equation of state μ = μ(n, T) where n is the particle density and T the absolute temperature using the methods of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two cases seldom discussed in elementary textbooks are presented with detailed calculations. The first one refers to the explicit calculation of μ for the interacting classical gas exemplified by van der Waals gas. For this purpose, we used the method described by van Kampen (1961 Physica 27 783). The second one refers to the calculation of μ for ideal quantum gases that obey a generalized Pauli's exclusion principle that leads to statistics that go beyond the Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac cases. The audience targeted in this work corresponds mainly to advanced undergraduates and graduate students in the physical-chemical sciences but it is not restricted to them. In regard of this, we have put a special emphasis on showing some additional details of calculations that usually do not appear explicitly in textbooks. (paper)

  7. The interaction between electromagnetic fields at megahertz, gigahertz and terahertz frequencies with cells, tissues and organisms: risks and potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Ryan; Harvey, Alan R.; Hool, Livia; Wallace, Vincent P.

    2017-01-01

    Since regular radio broadcasts started in the 1920s, the exposure to human-made electromagnetic fields has steadily increased. These days we are not only exposed to radio waves but also other frequencies from a variety of sources, mainly from communication and security devices. Considering that nearly all biological systems interact with electromagnetic fields, understanding the affects is essential for safety and technological progress. This paper systematically reviews the role and effects of static and pulsed radio frequencies (100–109 Hz), millimetre waves (MMWs) or gigahertz (109–1011 Hz), and terahertz (1011–1013 Hz) on various biomolecules, cells and tissues. Electromagnetic fields have been shown to affect the activity in cell membranes (sodium versus potassium ion conductivities) and non-selective channels, transmembrane potentials and even the cell cycle. Particular attention is given to millimetre and terahertz radiation due to their increasing utilization and, hence, increasing human exposure. MMWs are known to alter active transport across cell membranes, and it has been reported that terahertz radiation may interfere with DNA and cause genomic instabilities. These and other phenomena are discussed along with the discrepancies and controversies from published studies. PMID:29212756

  8. Beyond Competitive Inhibition: Regulation of ABC Transporters by Kinases and Protein-Protein Interactions as Potential Mechanisms of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Rebecca R; Potukuchi, Praveen K; Schuetz, Erin G; Schuetz, John D

    2018-03-07

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane efflux transporters mediating the extrusion of an array of substrates ranging from amino acids and lipids to xenobiotics, and many therapeutic compounds, including anticancer drugs. The ABC transporters are also recognized as important contributors to pharmacokinetics, especially in drug-drug interactions and adverse drug effects. Drugs and xenobiotics, as well as pathological conditions, can influence the transcription of ABC transporters, or modify their activity or intracellular localization. Kinases can affect the aforementioned processes for ABC transporters as do protein interactions. In this review, we focus on the ABC transporters ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC4 and ABCG2 and illustrate how kinases and protein-protein interactions affect these transporters. The clinical relevance of these factors is currently unknown, however these examples suggest that our understanding of drug-drug interactions will benefit from further knowledge of how kinases and protein-protein interactions affect ABC transporters. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Dark and antidark soliton interactions in the nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation with the self-induced parity-time-symmetric potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Xu, Tao

    2015-03-01

    Via the Nth Darboux transformation, a chain of nonsingular localized-wave solutions is derived for a nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation with the self-induced parity-time (PT) -symmetric potential. It is found that the Nth iterated solution in general exhibits a variety of elastic interactions among 2N solitons on a continuous-wave background and each interacting soliton could be the dark or antidark type. The interactions with an arbitrary odd number of solitons can also be obtained under different degenerate conditions. With N=1 and 2, the two-soliton and four-soliton interactions and their various degenerate cases are discussed in the asymptotic analysis. Numerical simulations are performed to support the analytical results, and the stability analysis indicates that the PT-symmetry breaking can also destroy the stability of the soliton interactions.

  10. Interferon-gamma potentiates NMDA receptor signaling in spinal dorsal horn neurons via microglia-neuron interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonekatsu, Mayumi; Taniguchi, Wataru; Yamanaka, Manabu; Nishio, Naoko; Tsutsui, Shunji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Munehito; Nakatsuka, Terumasa

    2016-01-01

    Glia-neuron interactions play an important role in the development of neuropathic pain. Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokne →cytokine Interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is upregulated in the dorsal horn after peripheral nerve injury, and intrathecal IFNγ administration induces mechanical allodynia in rats. A growing body of evidence suggests that IFNγ might be involved in the mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but its effects on the spinal dorsal horn are unclear. We performed blind whole-cell patch-clamp recording to investigate the effect of IFNγ on postsynaptic glutamate-induced currents in the substantia gelatinosa neurons of spinal cord slices from adult male rats. IFNγ perfusion significantly enhanced the amplitude of NMDA-induced inward currents in substantia gelatinosa neurons, but did not affect AMPA-induced currents. The facilitation of NMDA-induced current by IFNγ was inhibited by bath application of an IFNγ receptor-selective antagonist. Adding the Janus activated kinase inhibitor tofacitinib to the pipette solution did not affect the IFNγ-induced facilitation of NMDA-induced currents. However, the facilitatory effect of IFNγ on NMDA-induced currents was inhibited by perfusion of the microglial inhibitor minocycline. These results suggest that IFNγ binds the microglial IFNγ receptor and enhances NMDA receptor activity in substantia gelatinosa neurons. Next, to identify the effector of signal transmission from microglia to dorsal horn neurons, we added an inhibitor of G proteins, GDP-β-S, to the pipette solution. In a GDP-β-S-containing pipette solution, IFNγ-induced potentiation of the NMDA current was significantly suppressed after 30 min. In addition, IFNγ-induced potentiation of NMDA currents was blocked by application of a selective antagonist of CCR2, and its ligand CCL2 increased NMDA-induced currents. Our findings suggest that IFNγ enhance the amplitude of NMDA-induced inward currents in substantia gelatinosa neurons via microglial

  11. Interferon-gamma potentiates NMDA receptor signaling in spinal dorsal horn neurons via microglia–neuron interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonekatsu, Mayumi; Yamanaka, Manabu; Nishio, Naoko; Tsutsui, Shunji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Munehito; Nakatsuka, Terumasa

    2016-01-01

    Background Glia–neuron interactions play an important role in the development of neuropathic pain. Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokne →cytokine Interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is upregulated in the dorsal horn after peripheral nerve injury, and intrathecal IFNγ administration induces mechanical allodynia in rats. A growing body of evidence suggests that IFNγ might be involved in the mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but its effects on the spinal dorsal horn are unclear. We performed blind whole-cell patch-clamp recording to investigate the effect of IFNγ on postsynaptic glutamate-induced currents in the substantia gelatinosa neurons of spinal cord slices from adult male rats. Results IFNγ perfusion significantly enhanced the amplitude of NMDA-induced inward currents in substantia gelatinosa neurons, but did not affect AMPA-induced currents. The facilitation of NMDA-induced current by IFNγ was inhibited by bath application of an IFNγ receptor-selective antagonist. Adding the Janus activated kinase inhibitor tofacitinib to the pipette solution did not affect the IFNγ-induced facilitation of NMDA-induced currents. However, the facilitatory effect of IFNγ on NMDA-induced currents was inhibited by perfusion of the microglial inhibitor minocycline. These results suggest that IFNγ binds the microglial IFNγ receptor and enhances NMDA receptor activity in substantia gelatinosa neurons. Next, to identify the effector of signal transmission from microglia to dorsal horn neurons, we added an inhibitor of G proteins, GDP-β-S, to the pipette solution. In a GDP-β-S–containing pipette solution, IFNγ-induced potentiation of the NMDA current was significantly suppressed after 30 min. In addition, IFNγ-induced potentiation of NMDA currents was blocked by application of a selective antagonist of CCR2, and its ligand CCL2 increased NMDA-induced currents. Conclusion Our findings suggest that IFNγ enhance the amplitude of NMDA-induced inward currents in substantia

  12. Exact equivalence between one-dimensional Bose gases interacting via hard-sphere and zero-range potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valiente, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    We prove the equivalence between the hard-sphere Bose gas and a system with momentum-dependent zero-range interactions in one spatial dimension, which we call extended hard-sphere Bose gas. The two-body interaction in the latter model has the advantage of being a regular pseudopotential. The most...... attractive interactions, in perturbation theory from the novel extended hard-sphere Bose gas....

  13. New potential antitumoral fluorescent tetracyclic thieno[3,2-b]pyridine derivatives: interaction with DNA and nanosized liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calhelha Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fluorescence properties of two new potential antitumoral tetracyclic thieno[3,2-b]pyridine derivatives were studied in solution and in liposomes of DPPC (dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, egg lecithin (phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk; Egg-PC and DODAB (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide. Compound 1, pyrido[2',3':3,2]thieno[4,5-d]pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-6-one, exhibits reasonably high fluorescence quantum yields in all solvents studied (0.20 ≤ ΦF ≤ 0.30, while for compound 2, 3-[(p-methoxyphenylethynyl]pyrido[2',3':3,2]thieno[4,5-d]pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-6-one, the values are much lower (0.01 ≤ ΦF ≤ 0.05. The interaction of these compounds with salmon sperm DNA was studied using spectroscopic methods, allowing the determination of intrinsic binding constants, K i = (8.7 ± 0.9 × 103 M-1 for compound 1 and K i = (5.9 ± 0.6 × 103 M-1 for 2, and binding site sizes of n = 11 ± 3 and n = 7 ± 2 base pairs, respectively. Compound 2 is the most intercalative compound in salmon sperm DNA (35%, while for compound 1 only 11% of the molecules are intercalated. Studies of incorporation of both compounds in liposomes of DPPC, Egg-PC and DODAB revealed that compound 2 is mainly located in the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer, while compound 1 prefers a hydrated and fluid environment.

  14. The glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycle: importance of late postnatal development and potential reciprocal interactions between biosynthesis and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eHertz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard for studies of glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycling and its connections to brain biosynthesis from glucose of glutamate and GABA and their subsequent metabolism are the elegant in vivo studies by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR, showing the large fluxes in the cycle. However, simpler experiments in intact brain tissue (e.g. immunohistochemistry, brain slices, cultured brain cells and mitochondria have also made important contributions to the understanding of details, mechanisms and functional consequences of glutamate/GABA biosynthesis and degradation. The purpose of this review is to attempt to integrate evidence from different sources regarding i the enzyme(s responsible for the initial conversion of -ketoglutarate to glutamate; ii the possibility that especially glutamate oxidation is essentially confined to astrocytes; and iii the ontogenetically very late onset and maturation of glutamine-glutamate(GABA cycle function. Pathway models based on the functional importance of aspartate for glutamate synthesis suggest the possibility of interacting pathways for biosynthesis and degradation of glutamate and GABA and the use of transamination as the default mechanism for initiation of glutamate oxidation. The late development and maturation are related to the late cortical gliogenesis and convert brain cortical function from being purely neuronal to becoming neuronal-astrocytic. This conversion is associated with huge increases in energy demand and production, and the character of potentially incurred gains of function are discussed. These may include alterations in learning mechanisms, in mice indicated by lack of pairing of odor learning with aversive stimuli in newborn animals but the development of such an association 10-12 days later. The possibility is suggested that analogous maturational changes may contribute to differences in the way learning is accomplished in the newborn human brain and during later development.

  15. Interactions of the α-subunits of heterotrimeric G-proteins with GPCRs, effectors and RGS proteins: a critical review and analysis of interacting surfaces, conformational shifts, structural diversity and electrostatic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltoumas, Fotis A; Theodoropoulou, Margarita C; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2013-06-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest families of membrane receptors in eukaryotes. Heterotrimeric G-proteins, composed of α, β and γ subunits, are important molecular switches in the mediation of GPCR signaling. Receptor stimulation after the binding of a suitable ligand leads to G-protein heterotrimer activation and dissociation into the Gα subunit and Gβγ heterodimer. These subunits then interact with a large number of effectors, leading to several cell responses. We studied the interactions between Gα subunits and their binding partners, using information from structural, mutagenesis and Bioinformatics studies, and conducted a series of comparisons of sequence, structure, electrostatic properties and intermolecular energies among different Gα families and subfamilies. We identified a number of Gα surfaces that may, in several occasions, participate in interactions with receptors as well as effectors. The study of Gα interacting surfaces in terms of sequence, structure and electrostatic potential reveals features that may account for the Gα subunit's behavior towards its interacting partners. The electrostatic properties of the Gα subunits, which in some cases differ greatly not only between families but also between subfamilies, as well as the G-protein interacting surfaces of effectors and regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) suggest that electrostatic complementarity may be an important factor in G-protein interactions. Energy calculations also support this notion. This information may be useful in future studies of G-protein interactions with GPCRs and effectors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions among ambulatory cancer patients: a prevalence study using an advanced screening method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R.W.F.; Swart, E.L.; Boom, F.A.; Schuitenmaker, M.S.; Hugtenburg, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The pharmacotherapeutic treatment of patients with cancer is generally associated with multiple side-effects. Drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions between anti-cancer drugs or interactions with medication to treat comorbidity can reinforce or intensify side-effects.The aim of

  17. Potential of 13C and 15N Labeling for Studying Protein-Protein Interactions Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haris, Parvez I.; Robillard, George T.; Dijk, Alard A. van; Chapman, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we examine the interaction between two bacterial proteins, namely HPr and IIAmtl of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system, using FTIR spectroscopy. In an interaction involving a 1:1 molar ratio of these two proteins, when they are unlabeled, the

  18. Assessing the learning potential of an interactive digital game versus an interactive-style didactic lecture: the continued importance of didactic teaching in medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtier, Jesse; Webb, Emily M; Phelps, Andrew S; Naeger, David M

    2016-12-01

    Games with educational intent offer a possible advantage of being more interactive and increasing learner satisfaction. We conducted a two-armed experiment to evaluate student satisfaction and content mastery for an introductory pediatric radiology topic, taught by either an interactive digital game or with a traditional didactic lecture. Medical students participating in a fourth-year radiology elective were invited to participate. Student cohorts were alternatively given a faculty-supervised 1h session playing a simple interactive digital Tic-tac-toe quiz module on pediatric gastrointestinal radiology or a 1h didactic introductory lecture on the same topic. Survey questions assessed the learners' perceived ability to recall the material as well as their satisfaction with the educational experience. Results of an end-of-rotation exam were reviewed to evaluate a quantitative measure of learning between groups. Survey responses were analyzed with a chi-squared test. Exam results for both groups were analyzed with a paired Student's t-test. Students in the lecture group had higher test scores compared to students in the game group (4.0/5 versus 3.6/5, P = 0.045). Students in the lecture group reported greater understanding and recall of the material than students in the game group (P game group (P = 0.04 and P game group in ability to maintain interest (P = 0.187). In comparison to pre-survey results, there was a statistically significant decrease in interest for further digital interactive materials reported by students in the game group (P = 0.146). Our experience supported the use of a traditional lecture over a digital game module. While these results might be affected by the specific lecture and digital content in any given comparison, a digital module is not always the superior option.

  19. A method for creating interactive content for the iPod, and its potential use as a learning tool: technical advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Edward J; Devitt, Peter G

    2007-09-22

    Podcasting is currently a popular means of delivery of information with a large number of podcasts specifically tailored for educational purposes. It can be argued that the passive nature of this teaching methodology limits the educational benefit that can be derived from podcasts. This paper describes the development and construction of interactive material for the iPod, and a survey of student attitudes towards this type of learning material. The development of interactive material for an iPod is described in detail. This material was developed and demonstrated to 50 medical students. These students completed a paper-based survey on the potential uses of this technology, before and after a 20 minute presentation in class of an interactive case-study on an iPod. A technical description of how to develop interactive content for the iPod was created. The results of the student survey indicate a favourable shift in student attitudes after viewing the interactive case. Despite only 15% of the students owning an iPod, 57% of the students were positive about having access to interactive iPod content and 59% believed they would use it whilst travelling. The percentage of students who felt podcasting was a useful means of learning increased from 9% to 41%. The development of interactive content for the iPod is feasible. There are indications that students view interactive iPod cases as having value as an additional learning resource.

  20. Characterization of the Oriskany and Berea Sandstones: Evaluating Biogeochemical Reactions of Potential Sandstone–Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verba, Circe [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Harris, Aubrey [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2016-07-07

    The Marcellus shale, located in the mid-Atlantic Appalachian Basin, has been identified as a source for natural gas and targeted for hydraulic fracturing recovery methods. Hydraulic fracturing is a technique used by the oil and gas industry to access petroleum reserves in geologic formations that cannot be accessed with conventional drilling techniques (Capo et al., 2014). This unconventional technique fractures rock formations that have low permeability by pumping pressurized hydraulic fracturing fluids into the subsurface. Although the major components of hydraulic fracturing fluid are water and sand, chemicals, such as recalcitrant biocides and polyacrylamide, are also used (Frac Focus, 2015). There is domestic concern that the chemicals could reach groundwater or surface water during transport, storage, or the fracturing process (Chapman et al., 2012). In the event of a surface spill, understanding the natural attenuation of the chemicals in hydraulic fracturing fluid, as well as the physical and chemical properties of the aquifers surrounding the spill site, will help mitigate potential dangers to drinking water. However, reports on the degradation pathways of these chemicals are limited in existing literature. The Appalachian Basin Marcellus shale and its surrounding sandstones host diverse mineralogical suites. During the hydraulic fracturing process, the hydraulic fracturing fluids come into contact with variable mineral compositions. The reactions between the fracturing fluid chemicals and the minerals are very diverse. This report: 1) describes common minerals (e.g. quartz, clay, pyrite, and carbonates) present in the Marcellus shale, as well as the Oriskany and Berea sandstones, which are located stratigraphically below and above the Marcellus shale; 2) summarizes the existing literature of the degradation pathways for common hydraulic fracturing fluid chemicals [polyacrylamide, ethylene glycol, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), glutaraldehyde

  1. A Multiple Interaction Analysis Reveals ADRB3 as a Potential Candidate for Gallbladder Cancer Predisposition via a Complex Interaction with Other Candidate Gene Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Rai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gallbladder cancer is the most common and a highly aggressive biliary tract malignancy with a dismal outcome. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, comprising the combined effect of multiple genetic variations of mild consequence along with numerous dietary and environmental risk factors. Previously, we demonstrated the association of several candidate gene variations with GBC risk. In this study, we aimed to identify the combination of gene variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility of GBC. Here, we performed Multifactor-Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis (CRT to investigate the gene–gene interactions and the combined effect of 14 SNPs in nine genes (DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634; FAS (rs2234767; FASL (rs763110; DCC (rs2229080, rs4078288, rs7504990, rs714; PSCA (rs2294008, rs2978974; ADRA2A (rs1801253; ADRB1 (rs1800544; ADRB3 (rs4994; CYP17 (rs2486758 involved in various signaling pathways. Genotyping was accomplished by PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assays. SPSS software version 16.0 and MDR software version 2.0 were used for all the statistical analysis. Single locus investigation demonstrated significant association of DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634, DCC (rs714, rs2229080, rs4078288 and ADRB3 (rs4994 polymorphisms with GBC risk. MDR analysis revealed ADRB3 (rs4994 to be crucial candidate in GBC susceptibility that may act either alone (p < 0.0001, CVC = 10/10 or in combination with DCC (rs714 and rs2229080, p < 0.0001, CVC = 9/10. Our CRT results are in agreement with the above findings. Further, in-silico results of studied SNPs advocated their role in splicing, transcriptional and/or protein coding regulation. Overall, our result suggested complex interactions amongst the studied SNPs and ADRB3 rs4994 as candidate influencing GBC susceptibility.

  2. Non-autonomous matter-wave solitons in hybrid atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with tunable interactions and harmonic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deng-Shan; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Lizhen

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate matter-wave solitons in hybrid atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with tunable interactions and external potentials. Three types of time-modulated harmonic potentials are considered and, for each of them, two groups of exact non-autonomous matter-wave soliton solutions of the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equation are presented. Novel nonlinear structures of these non-autonomous matter-wave solitons are analyzed by displaying their density distributions. It is shown that the time-modulated nonlinearities and external potentials can support exact non-autonomous atomic-molecular matter-wave solitons.

  3. Effect of choice of pair interaction potential on the results of simulation of edge dislocation in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyshev, S.A.; Baranov, M.A.; Gorlov, N.V.; Starostenkov, M.D.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    Remote action empirical potential, obtained from the set of experimental data for α-iron, is suggested for the following parameters: elastic modulus, sublimation energy, lattice parameter, Short-life part of the potential coincides with statistical potential calculated for doubly ionized iron. Parameters of edge dislocation, found on the basis of the potential, agree with the known from literature calculations. It is shown that inclination of dislocation energy diagram is the most sensitive criterium of applicability of pair potentials for simulation of linear defects

  4. Dielectric-dependent screened Hartree-Fock exchange potential and Slater-formula with Coulomb-hole interaction for energy band structure calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Tomomi; Nakajima, Takahito

    2014-09-21

    We previously reported a screened Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange potential for energy band structure calculations [T. Shimazaki and Y. Asai, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 164702 (2009); T. Shimazaki and Y. Asai, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 224105 (2010)]. In this paper, we discuss the Coulomb-hole (COH) interaction and screened Slater-formula and determine the energy band diagrams of several semiconductors, such as diamond, silicon, AlAs, AlP, GaAs, GaP, and InP, based on the screened HF exchange potential and Slater-formula with COH interaction, to demonstrate the adequacy of those theoretical concepts. The screened HF exchange potential and Slater-formula are derived from a simplified dielectric function and, therefore, include the dielectric constant in their expressions. We also present a self-consistent calculation technique to automatically determine the dielectric constant, which is incorporated into each self-consistent field step.

  5. Physiological effects of climate warming on flowering plants and insect pollinators and potential consequences for their interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. SCAVEN, Nicole E. RAFFERTY

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing concern about the influence of climate change on flowering plants, pollinators, and the mutualistic interactions between them has led to a recent surge in research. Much of this research has addressed the consequences of warming for phenological and distributional shifts. In contrast, relatively little is known about the physiological responses of plants and insect pollinators to climate warming and, in particular, how these responses might affect plant-pollinator interactions. Here, we summarize the direct physiological effects of temperature on flowering plants and pollinating insects to highlight ways in which plant and pollinator responses could affect floral resources for pollinators, and pollination success for plants, respectively. We also consider the overall effects of these responses on plant-pollinator interaction networks. Plant responses to warming, which include altered flower, nectar, and pollen production, could modify floral resource availability and reproductive output of pollinating insects. Similarly, pollinator responses, such as altered foraging activity, body size, and life span, could affect patterns of pollen flow and pollination success of flowering plants. As a result, network structure could be altered as interactions are gained and lost, weakened and strengthened, even without the gain or loss of species or temporal overlap. Future research that addresses not only how plant and pollinator physiology are affected by warming but also how responses scale up to affect interactions and networks should allow us to better understand and predict the effects of climate change on this important ecosystem service [Current Zoolo­gy 59 (3: 418–426, 2013].

  6. Identification of New Potential Interaction Partners for Human Cytoplasmic Copper Chaperone Atox1: Roles in Gene Regulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Öhrvik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The human copper (Cu chaperone Atox1 delivers Cu to P1B type ATPases in the Golgi network, for incorporation into essential Cu-dependent enzymes. Atox1 homologs are found in most organisms; it is a 68-residue ferredoxin-fold protein that binds Cu in a conserved surface-exposed Cys-X-X-Cys (CXXC motif. In addition to its well-documented cytoplasmic chaperone function, in 2008 Atox1 was suggested to have functionality in the nucleus. To identify new interactions partners of Atox1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with a large human placenta library of cDNA fragments using Atox1 as bait. Among 98 million fragments investigated, 25 proteins were found to be confident interaction partners. Nine of these were uncharacterized proteins, and the remaining 16 proteins were analyzed by bioinformatics with respect to cell localization, tissue distribution, function, sequence motifs, three-dimensional structures and interaction networks. Several of the hits were eukaryotic-specific proteins interacting with DNA or RNA implying that Atox1 may act as a modulator of gene regulation. Notably, because many of the identified proteins contain CXXC motifs, similarly to the Cu transport reactions, interactions between these and Atox1 may be mediated by Cu.

  7. Spin and pseudospin symmetric Dirac particles in the field of Tietz—Hua potential including Coulomb tensor interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikhdair, Sameer M.; Hamzavi, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Approximate analytical solutions of the Dirac equation for Tietz—Hua (TH) potential including Coulomb-like tensor (CLT) potential with arbitrary spin—orbit quantum number κ are obtained within the Pekeris approximation scheme to deal with the spin—orbit coupling terms κ(κ ± 1)r −2 . Under the exact spin and pseudospin symmetric limitation, bound state energy eigenvalues and associated unnormalized two-component wave functions of the Dirac particle in the field of both attractive and repulsive TH potential with tensor potential are found using the parametric Nikiforov—Uvarov (NU) method. The cases of the Morse oscillator with tensor potential, the generalized Morse oscillator with tensor potential, and the non-relativistic limits have been investigated. (general)

  8. Potential drug interaction with opioid agonist in the setting of chronic low-dose opioid antagonist use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, James B; Nair, Vidya; Diaz, Christopher J; Penoyar, Jonathan B; Goode, Penelope A

    2017-08-01

    Low dose naltrexone (LDN) has been evaluated in several small studies for the treatment of inflammatory conditions. It is thought to work through modulation of inflammatory mediators and upregulation of endogenous opioid receptors. This may hypersensitize patients to exogenous opioids. Drug-drug interaction screening tools built into electronic health records and other services identify the interaction as risk of opioid withdrawal rather than hypersensitivity. We present a case of a drug-drug interaction in a patient who was receiving LDN treatment of multiple sclerosis. The patient received a single dose of oxycodone 5mg that resulted in obtundation unresponsive to painful stimuli necessitating the administration of naloxone boluses and infusion along with admission to the intensive care unit for 1 night. The patient responded well to naloxone therapy. He was discharged in satisfactory condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular interaction of gp120 and B40 aptamer: A potential new HIV-1 entry inhibitor drug

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baron, MK

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available 40 aptamer interfered with interaction of gp120 with CCR5 and soluble human CD4 receptors (Figure 1). CD4 and CCR5 are physiological receptors expressed on target host cells that are exploited by the virus for entry and infection. Point mutations... immunodefi ciency virus type 1 blocks gp120-CCR5 interaction. J Virol 79:13806-10. Finzi, D., J. Blankson, J. D. Siliciano, J. B. Margolick, K. Chadwick, T. Pierson, K. Smith, J. Lisziewicz, F. Lori, C. Flexner, T. C. Quinn, R. E. Chaisson, E. Rosenberg, B...

  10. Genetic sequence-based prediction of long-range chromatin interactions suggests a potential role of short tandem repeat sequences in genome organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikumbh, Sarvesh; Pfeifer, Nico

    2017-04-18

    Knowing the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the chromatin is important for obtaining a complete picture of the regulatory landscape. Changes in the 3D structure have been implicated in diseases. While there exist approaches that attempt to predict the long-range chromatin interactions, they focus only on interactions between specific genomic regions - the promoters and enhancers, neglecting other possibilities, for instance, the so-called structural interactions involving intervening chromatin. We present a method that can be trained on 5C data using the genetic sequence of the candidate loci to predict potential genome-wide interaction partners of a particular locus of interest. We have built locus-specific support vector machine (SVM)-based predictors using the oligomer distance histograms (ODH) representation. The method shows good performance with a mean test AUC (area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve) of 0.7 or higher for various regions across cell lines GM12878, K562 and HeLa-S3. In cases where any locus did not have sufficient candidate interaction partners for model training, we employed multitask learning to share knowledge between models of different loci. In this scenario, across the three cell lines, the method attained an average performance increase of 0.09 in the AUC. Performance evaluation of the models trained on 5C data regarding prediction on an independent high-resolution Hi-C dataset (which is a rather hard problem) shows 0.56 AUC, on average. Additionally, we have developed new, intuitive visualization methods that enable interpretation of sequence signals that contributed towards prediction of locus-specific interaction partners. The analysis of these sequence signals suggests a potential general role of short tandem repeat sequences in genome organization. We demonstrated how our approach can 1) provide insights into sequence features of locus-specific interaction partners, and 2) also identify their cell

  11. Effect of School Pretend Play on Preschoolers' Social Competence in Peer Interactions: Gender as a Potential Moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Wing-kai; Cheng, Rebecca Wing-yi

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the moderating effect of gender on the causal relationships between different school play activities (pretend and non-pretend play) and social competence in peer interactions among a sample of Hong Kong children. Participants were 60 Hong Kong preschoolers (mean age = 5.44, 36.67% female). Children with matched home pretend…

  12. Unveiling magnetic interactions of ruthenium trichloride via constraining direction of orbital moments: Potential routes to realize a quantum spin liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Y. S.; Xiang, H. J.; Gong, X. G.

    2017-08-01

    Recent experiments reveal that the honeycomb ruthenium trichloride α -RuC l3 is a prime candidate of the Kitaev quantum spin liquid (QSL). However, there is no theoretical model which can properly describe its experimental dynamical response due to the lack of a full understanding of its magnetic interactions. Here, we propose a general scheme to calculate the magnetic interactions in systems (e.g., α -RuC l3 ) with nonnegligible orbital moments by constraining the directions of orbital moments. With this scheme, we put forward a minimal J1-K1-Γ1-J3-K3 model for α -RuC l3 and find that: (I) The third nearest neighbor (NN) antiferromagnetic Heisenberg interaction J3 stabilizes the zigzag antiferromagnetic order; (II) The NN symmetric off-diagonal exchange Γ1 plays a pivotal role in determining the preferred direction of magnetic moments and generating the spin wave gap. An exact diagonalization study on this model shows that the Kitaev QSL can be realized by suppressing the NN symmetric off-diagonal exchange Γ1 and the third NN Heisenberg interaction J3. Thus, we not only propose a powerful general scheme for investigating the intriguing magnetism of Jeff=1 /2 magnets, but also point out future directions for realizing the Kitaev QSL in the honeycomb ruthenium trichloride α -RuC l3 .

  13. Potential drug–drug interactions in pediatric wards of Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henok Getachew

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The study showed that most of the interactions had moderate severity followed by minor severity. Age and polypharmacy were found to show statistically significant association with the occurrence of PDDIs. Due to sensitive nature of pediatrics population, close monitoring is recommended for the detection and management of PDDIs to prevent its negative consequences.

  14. College Chemistry Students' Understanding of Potential Energy in the Context of Atomic-Molecular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nicole M.; Cooper, Melanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the energy changes that occur as atoms and molecules interact forms the foundation for understanding the macroscopic energy changes that accompany chemical processes. In order to identify ways to scaffold students' understanding of the connections between atomic-molecular and macroscopic energy perspectives, we conducted a…

  15. The Interaction of Src Kinase with beta 3 Integrin Tails : A Potential Therapeutic Target in Thrombosis and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huveneers, Stephan; Danen, Erik H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of Src family kinases is an important event downstream of integrin adhesion signaling in many cell types. A particularly intriguing connection between an integrin and a Src family kinase was first discovered in platelets, where the selective direct interaction of alpha IIb beta 3

  16. Potential for alcohol and drug interactions in older adults: evidence from the Irish longitudinal study on ageing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cousins, Gráinne

    2014-08-01

    Older adults are susceptible to adverse effects from the concomitant use of prescription medications and alcohol. This study estimates the prevalence of exposure to alcohol interactive (AI) medications and concomitant alcohol use by therapeutic class in a large, nationally representative sample of older adults.

  17. Assessing rear-end crash potential in urban locations based on vehicle-by-vehicle interactions, geometric characteristics and operational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, Loukas; Stylianou, Katerina; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed A

    2018-03-01

    Rear-end crashes are one of the most frequently occurring crash types, especially in urban networks. An understanding of the contributing factors and their significant association with rear-end crashes is of practical importance and will help in the development of effective countermeasures. The objective of this study is to assess rear-end crash potential at a microscopic level in an urban environment, by investigating vehicle-by-vehicle interactions. To do so, several traffic parameters at the individual vehicle level have been taken into consideration, for capturing car-following characteristics and vehicle interactions, and to investigate their effect on potential rear-end crashes. In this study rear-end crash potential was estimated based on stopping distance between two consecutive vehicles, and four rear-end crash potential cases were developed. The results indicated that 66.4% of the observations were estimated as rear-end crash potentials. It was also shown that rear-end crash potential was presented when traffic flow and speed standard deviation were higher. Also, locational characteristics such as lane of travel and location in the network were found to affect drivers' car following decisions and additionally, it was shown that speeds were lower and headways higher when Heavy Goods Vehicles lead. Finally, a model-based behavioral analysis based on Multinomial Logit regression was conducted to systematically identify the statistically significant variables in explaining rear-end risk potential. The modeling results highlighted the significance of the explanatory variables associated with rear-end crash potential, however it was shown that their effect varied among different model configurations. The outcome of the results can be of significant value for several purposes, such as real-time monitoring of risk potential, allocating enforcement units in urban networks and designing targeted proactive safety policies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Oral treatment with essential oil of Hyptis spicigera Lam. (Lamiaceae) reduces acute pain and inflammation in mice: Potential interactions with transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Róli Rodrigues; Coelho, Igor Dos Santos; Junqueira, Stella Célio; Pigatto, Glauce Regina; Salvador, Marcos José; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; de Faria, Felipe Meira

    2017-03-22

    The genus Hyptis comprehends almost 400 species widespread in tropical and temperate regions of America. The use of Hyptis spicigera Lam. (Lamiaceae) is reported in traditional medicine due to its gastroprotective, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. The rationale of this study was to investigate the potential use of the essential oil of H. spicigera (EOHs) as analgesic. The antinociceptive effect of EOHs was verified analyzing acute nocifensive behavior of mice induced by chemical noxious stimuli [i.e., formalin and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels agonists]. We also verified the effects of EOHs on locomotor activity and motor performance in mice. Finally, we investigate the involvement of central afferent C-fibers with EOHs analgesic effect. EOHs presented antinociceptive effect at 300 and 1000mg/kg on formalin-induced pain behavior model, presenting 50% and 72% of inhibition during the first phase (ED 50 =292mg/kg), and 85% and 100% during de second phase (ED 50 =205mg/kg), respectively. Temperature of the hind paw was reduced by EOHs treatment in a dose-dependent manner; oedema was diminished only by EOHs 1000mg/kg. EOHs does not impaired locomotor activity or motor performance. For mice injected with capsaicin, a TRPV1 activator, EOHs (1000mg/kg, ED 50 =660mg/kg) showed decreased (63%) nociceptive behavior. When injected with cinnamaldehyde (TRPA1 activator), mice treated with EOHs showed 23%, 43% and 66% inhibition on nociceptive behavior (100, 300 and 1000mg/kg, respectively; ED 50 402mg/kg). When mice were injected with menthol (TRPM8 activator), EOHs showed 29%, 59% and 98% inhibition of nociceptive behavior (100, 300 and 1000mg/kg, respectively; with ED 50 =198mg/kg. Finally, when desensitized mice were injected with menthol, EOHs (300mg/kg) does not show antinociceptive effect. This study demonstrated the efficacy of EOHs on experimental models of nociception. We have found the involvement of TRP channels V1, A1 and M8 with EOHs

  19. Ab initio calculation of the interaction potentials of helium, neon, and methane as well as theoretical studies on their thermophysical properties and those of water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmann, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of the pure gases helium, neon, methane and water vapor were calculated for low densities over wide temperature ranges. Statistical thermodynamics was used for the determination of the pressure virial coefficients. The kinetic theory of gases was utilized for the calculation of the transport and relaxation properties. So far kinetic theory was limited to linear molecules and has now been extended to molecules of arbitrary geometry to enable calculations on methane and water vapor. The interaction potentials, which are needed for all computations, were determined for helium, neon and methane from the supermolecular approach using quantum chemical ab initio methods. For water the interaction potentials were taken from the literature. The calculated values of the thermophysical properties for the four gases show very good agreement with the best experimental data. At very low and very high temperatures the theoretical values are more accurate than experimental data. (orig.)

  20. Caffeine and D2O medium interact in affecting the expression of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier work has been extended to compare the killing of long-phase V79 Chinese hamster cells by ionizing radiation when they are treated immediately after irradiation with medium containing either caffeine or 90% D 2 O. The object was to determine if the enhanced killing due to post-treatment with caffeine, or D 2 O, resulted from action on the same sector of potentially lethal damage as appeared to be the case for hypertonic shock and D 2 O medium. The treatments by themselves were not toxic to unirradiated cells. We found that the enhanced expression of potentially lethal damage by post-treatment with caffeine or D 2 O medium is similar. For example, the kinetic of the repair of the potentially lethal damage expressible by either post-treatment was similar, and an additive enhancement of potentially lethal damage occurred when the two treatments were administered sequentially. These findings suggest that caffeine and D 2 O medium affect the same sector of potentially lethal damage. When the two treatments were combined, however, they competed with each other. Thus, although caffeine and D 2 O medium act on the same sector of potentially lethal damage they do so differently, suggesting that more than one pathway of the expression of radiation damage can result in the same phenotypic effect. (author)

  1. Autism and Intellectual Disability-Associated KIRREL3 Interacts with Neuronal Proteins MAP1B and MYO16 with Potential Roles in Neurodevelopment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying F Liu

    Full Text Available Cell-adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily play critical roles in brain development, as well as in maintaining synaptic plasticity, the dysfunction of which is known to cause cognitive impairment. Recently dysfunction of KIRREL3, a synaptic molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily, has been implicated in several neurodevelopmental conditions including intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, and in the neurocognitive delay associated with Jacobsen syndrome. However, the molecular mechanisms of its physiological actions remain largely unknown. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that the KIRREL3 extracellular domain interacts with brain expressed proteins MAP1B and MYO16 and its intracellular domain can potentially interact with ATP1B1, UFC1, and SHMT2. The interactions were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and colocalization analyses of proteins expressed in human embryonic kidney cells, mouse neuronal cells, and rat primary neuronal cells. Furthermore, we show KIRREL3 colocalization with the marker for the Golgi apparatus and synaptic vesicles. Previously, we have shown that KIRREL3 interacts with the X-linked intellectual disability associated synaptic scaffolding protein CASK through its cytoplasmic domain. In addition, we found a genomic deletion encompassing MAP1B in one patient with intellectual disability, microcephaly and seizures and deletions encompassing MYO16 in two unrelated patients with intellectual disability, autism and microcephaly. MAP1B has been previously implicated in synaptogenesis and is involved in the development of the actin-based membrane skeleton. MYO16 is expressed in hippocampal neurons and also indirectly affects actin cytoskeleton through its interaction with WAVE1 complex. We speculate KIRREL3 interacting proteins are potential candidates for intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Moreover, our findings provide further insight into understanding the molecular

  2. Cosmological solutions in string theory with dilaton self interaction potential; Soluciones cosmologicas en teoria de cuerdas con potencial de autointeraccion dilatonico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, C. [Departamento de Matematicas, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Biotecnologia, IPN, Av. Acueducto s/n Barrio La Laguna Ticoman, 07340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: cmora@acei.upibi.ipn.mx; Pimentel, L.O. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-lztapalapa, A.P. 44-534, 09340Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: lopr@xanum.uam.mx

    2003-07-01

    In this work we present homogeneous and isotropic cosmological solutions for the low energy limit of string theory with a self interacting potential for the scalar field. For a potential that is a linear combination of two exponential, a family of exact solutions are found for the different spatial curvatures. Among this family a non singular accelerating solution for positive curvature is singled out and the violation of the energy conditions for that solution is studied, and also its astrophysical consequences. The string coupling for this solution is finite. (Author)

  3. Potential Benefits of Incorporating Peer-to-Peer Interactions Into Digital Interventions for Psychotic Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagianti, Bruno; Quraishi, Sophia H; Schlosser, Danielle A

    2017-12-15

    Peer-to-peer interactions and support groups mitigate experiences of social isolation and loneliness often reported by individuals with psychotic disorders. Online peer-to-peer communication can promote broader use of this form of social support. Peer-to-peer interactions occur naturally on social media platforms, but they can negatively affect mental health. Recent digital interventions for persons with psychotic disorders have harnessed the principles of social media to incorporate peer-to-peer communication. This review examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of recent digital interventions in order to identify strategies to maximize benefits of online peer-to-peer communication for persons with psychotic disorders. An electronic database search of PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Health Technology Assessment Database was conducted in February 2017 and yielded a total of 1,015 results. Eight publications that reported data from six independent trials and five interventions were reviewed. The technology supporting peer-to-peer communication varied greatly across studies, from online forums to embedded social networking. When peer-to-peer interactions were moderated by facilitators, retention, engagement, acceptability, and efficacy were higher than for interventions with no facilitators. Individuals with psychotic disorders were actively engaged with moderated peer-to-peer communication and showed improvements in perceived social support. Studies involving service users in intervention design showed higher rates of acceptability. Individuals with psychotic disorders value and benefit from digital interventions that include moderated peer-to-peer interactions. Incorporating peer-to-peer communication into digital interventions for this population may increase compliance with other evidence-based therapies by producing more acceptable and engaging online environments.

  4. On the analysis of protein-protein interactions via knowledge-based potentials for the prediction of protein-protein docking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Aloy, Patrick; Oliva, Baldo

    2011-01-01

    Development of effective methods to screen binary interactions obtained by rigid-body protein-protein docking is key for structure prediction of complexes and for elucidating physicochemical principles of protein-protein binding. We have derived empirical knowledge-based potential functions for s...... and with independence of the partner. This information is encoded at the residue level and could be easily incorporated in the initial grid scoring for Fast Fourier Transform rigid-body docking methods.......Development of effective methods to screen binary interactions obtained by rigid-body protein-protein docking is key for structure prediction of complexes and for elucidating physicochemical principles of protein-protein binding. We have derived empirical knowledge-based potential functions...... for selecting rigid-body docking poses. These potentials include the energetic component that provides the residues with a particular secondary structure and surface accessibility. These scoring functions have been tested on a state-of-art benchmark dataset and on a decoy dataset of permanent interactions. Our...

  5. Augmented potential, energy densities, and virial relations in the weak- and strong-interaction limits of DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, Stefan; Levy, Mel; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2017-12-01

    The augmented potential introduced by Levy and Zahariev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 113002 (2014)] is shifted with respect to the standard exchange-correlation potential of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory by a density-dependent constant that makes the total energy become equal to the sum of the occupied orbital energies. In this work, we analyze several features of this approach, focusing on the limit of infinite coupling strength and studying the shift and the corresponding energy density at different correlation regimes. We present and discuss coordinate scaling properties of the augmented potential, study its connection to the response potential, and use the shift to analyze the classical jellium and uniform gas models. We also study other definitions of the energy densities in relation to the functional construction by local interpolations along the adiabatic connection. Our findings indicate that the energy density that is defined in terms of the electrostatic potential of the exchange-correlation hole is particularly well suited for this purpose.

  6. Augmented potential, energy densities, and virial relations in the weak- and strong-interaction limits of DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, Stefan; Levy, Mel; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2017-12-07

    The augmented potential introduced by Levy and Zahariev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 113002 (2014)] is shifted with respect to the standard exchange-correlation potential of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory by a density-dependent constant that makes the total energy become equal to the sum of the occupied orbital energies. In this work, we analyze several features of this approach, focusing on the limit of infinite coupling strength and studying the shift and the corresponding energy density at different correlation regimes. We present and discuss coordinate scaling properties of the augmented potential, study its connection to the response potential, and use the shift to analyze the classical jellium and uniform gas models. We also study other definitions of the energy densities in relation to the functional construction by local interpolations along the adiabatic connection. Our findings indicate that the energy density that is defined in terms of the electrostatic potential of the exchange-correlation hole is particularly well suited for this purpose.

  7. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Avian Interactions at Four Proposed Wind Energy Facilities on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-08-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) is investigating whether to install wind turbines to provide a supplemental source of electricity at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) near Lompoc, California. As part of that investigation, VAFB sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide a preliminary characterization of the potential risk to wildlife resources (mainly birds and bats) from wind turbine installations. With wind power development expanding throughout North America and Europe, concerns have surfaced over the number of bird fatalities associated with wind turbines. Guidelines developed for the wind industry by the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC) recommend assessing potential impacts to birds, bats, and other potentially sensitive resources before construction. The primary purpose of an assessment is to identify potential conflicts with sensitive resources, to assist developers with identifying their permitting needs, and to develop strategies to avoid impacts or to mitigate their effects. This report provides a preliminary (Phase I) biological assessment of potential impacts to birds and bats that might result from construction and operation of the proposed wind energy facilities on VAFB.

  8. Aqueous solvation of As(OH)3: A Monte Carlo study with flexible polarizable classical interaction potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cobos, J.; Vargas, M. Cristina; Ramírez-Solís, A.; Ortega-Blake, I.

    2010-09-01

    A theoretical study of the hydration of arsenious acid is presented. This study included ab initio calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. The model potentials used for the simulations were ab initio derived and they include polarizability, nonadditivity, and molecular relaxation. It is shown that with these refined potentials it is possible to reproduce the available experimental evidence and therefore permit the study of clusters, as well as of the hydration process in solution. From the study of stepwise hydration and the Monte Carlo simulation of the condensed phase it is concluded that As(OH)3 presents a hydration scheme similar to an amphipathic molecule. This phenomenon is explained as due to the existence of both a positive electrostatic potential and a localized lone pair in the vicinity of As. These results are used to rationalize the known passage of As(OH)3 through aqua-glyceroporines.

  9. Potential interactions among disease, pesticides, water quality and adjacent land cover in amphibian habitats in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglin, William A.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Anderson, Chauncey; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Chestnut, Tara E.; Muths, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate interactions among disease, pesticides, water quality, and adjacent land cover, we collected samples of water, sediment, and frog tissue from 21 sites in 7 States in the United States (US) representing a variety of amphibian habitats. All samples were analyzed for > 90 pesticides and pesticide degradates, and water and frogs were screened for the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) using molecular methods. Pesticides and pesticide degradates were detected frequently in frog breeding habitats (water and sediment) as well as in frog tissue. Fungicides occurred more frequently in water, sediment, and tissue than was expected based upon their limited use relative to herbicides or insecticides. Pesticide occurrence in water or sediment was not a strong predictor of occurrence in tissue, but pesticide concentrations in tissue were correlated positively to agricultural and urban land, and negatively to forested land in 2-km buffers around the sites. Bd was detected in water at 45% of sites, and on 34% of swabbed frogs. Bd detections in water were not associated with differences in land use around sites, but sites with detections had colder water. Frogs that tested positive for Bd were associated with sites that had higher total fungicide concentrations in water and sediment, but lower insecticide concentrations in sediments relative to frogs that were Bd negative. Bd concentrations on frog swabs were positively correlated to dissolved organic carbon, and total nitrogen and phosphorus, and negatively correlated to pH and water temperature.Data were collected from a range of locations and amphibian habitats and represent some of the first field-collected information aimed at understanding the interactions between pesticides, land use, and amphibian disease. These interactions are of particular interest to conservation efforts as many amphibians live in altered habitats and may depend on wetlands embedded in these landscapes to

  10. Widespread confusion in the modeling of Europa's magnetospheric interaction: what the potential modeler should consider before getting started

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding Europa's interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere is a critical part of the ocean sounding objective of the upcoming Clipper mission and interpretation of these observations will require modeling efforts that build upon studies done over the last four decades. Unfortunately, these studies are often confusing and contradictory. There is, as yet, no community consensus on the assumptions and parameters that go into such models. There is enough uncertainty in this problem that I cannot tell anyone, with certainty, what they should and should not do, but in this presentation I will outline what modelers should at least consider before starting. The most important consideration that is often missing in the literature is plasma flow diversion. Many papers assume that Europa's interaction is lunar-like; a completely absorbing barrier. Data and plasma models show that there is likely significant diversion, and such diversion could prevent the bulk of magnetospheric plasa particles from reaching the surface. On the other hand, some models likely overestimate the amount of diversion: we do know that a significant amount of plasma must reach the surface in order to produce the atmosphere via sputtering and radiolysis, but most plasma models usually treat the atmosphere as a fixed boundary condition. A second consideration is energy range of particles responsible for radiolysis and sputtering. The particles bombarding the surface range from thermal plasma (eV-keV) to non-thermal (keV-MeV), but to many modelers, it seems, these are indistinguishable despite drastic differences in how these populations interact with the moon. To illustrate this confusion, the attached figure shows the O2 source rate (O2 is likely the dominant atmospheric component) from published Europa atmosphere/plasma models. There is little agreement on either the source rate or the particle population responsible for its production. Finally, I will discuss how experiences with other planetary

  11. Using structural knowledge in the protein data bank to inform the search for potential host-microbe protein interactions in sequence space: application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Gaurang; Mande, Shekhar C

    2017-04-04

    A comprehensive map of the human-M. tuberculosis (MTB) protein interactome would help fill the gaps in our understanding of the disease, and computational prediction can aid and complement experimental studies towards this end. Several sequence-based in silico approaches tap the existing data on experimentally validated protein-protein interactions (PPIs); these PPIs serve as templates from which novel interactions between pathogen and host are inferred. Such comparative approaches typically make use of local sequence alignment, which, in the absence of structural details about the interfaces mediating the template interactions, could lead to incorrect inferences, particularly when multi-domain proteins are involved. We propose leveraging the domain-domain interaction (DDI) information in PDB complexes to score and prioritize candidate PPIs between host and pathogen proteomes based on targeted sequence-level comparisons. Our method picks out a small set of human-MTB protein pairs as candidates for physical interactions, and the use of functional meta-data suggests that some of them could contribute to the in vivo molecular cross-talk between pathogen and host that regulates the course of the infection. Further, we present numerical data for Pfam domain families that highlights interaction specificity on the domain level. Not every instance of a pair of domains, for which interaction evidence has been found in a few instances (i.e. structures), is likely to functionally interact. Our sorting approach scores candidates according to how "distant" they are in sequence space from known examples of DDIs (templates). Thus, it provides a natural way to deal with the heterogeneity in domain-level interactions. Our method represents a more informed application of local alignment to the sequence-based search for potential human-microbial interactions that uses available PPI data as a prior. Our approach is somewhat limited in its sensitivity by the restricted size and

  12. Mannose-specific interactions of Lactobacillus plantarum in the intestine : bacterial genes, molecular host responses and potential probiotic effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pretzer, G.

    2008-01-01

    One potential mechanism by which probiotic microorganisms may exert beneficial health effects to the host is the inhibition of intestinal infections by competitive exclusion of pathogenic bacteria. This concept may also be applicable for mannose-specific adhesion to the epithelial surface, which has

  13. Chemical Potential for the Interacting Classical Gas and the Ideal Quantum Gas Obeying a Generalized Exclusion Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, F. J.; Olivares-Quiroz, L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we address the concept of the chemical potential [mu] in classical and quantum gases towards the calculation of the equation of state [mu] = [mu](n, T) where n is the particle density and "T" the absolute temperature using the methods of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two cases seldom discussed in elementary textbooks are…

  14. Web Based Interactive Software in International Business: The Case of the Global Market Potential System Online (GMPSO[C])

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janavaras, Basil J.; Gomes, Emanuel; Young, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to confirm whether students using the Global Market Potential System Online (GMPSO) web based software, (http://globalmarketpotential.com), for their class project enhanced their knowledge and understanding of international business. The challenge most business instructors and practitioners face is to determine how to bring the…

  15. In Vitro Intestinal Absorption and Metabolism of Magnoflorine and its Potential Interaction in Coptidis Rhizoma Decoction in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Baojuan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Su, Jin; Miao, Qing; Miao, Peipei; Chen, Ning; Wang, Zijian; Zhang, Yujie; Ma, Shuangcheng

    2017-04-01

    In our previous studies, it was found that there existed pharmacokinetic interactions between magnoflorine and the rest of the ingredients in Coptidis Rhizoma. In this study, the pharmacokinetic interaction mechanism of magnoflorine with the rest of the components in Coptidis Rhizoma was researched based on the intestinal absorption and metabolism characteristics. The absorption characteristics of magnoflorine in each rat intestinal segments were evaluated by non-everted intestinal sac model. To identify the metabolites of magnoflorine, the acceptor solutions of each intestinal segment at 120 min were analyzed by HPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap MS. The accumulative absorption (Q), the absorption rate (J) and the apparent permeability coefficient (P app ) of magnoflorine were increased in duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon of the Coptidis Rhizoma group as compared to the magnoflorine group, but there was no statistical difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Four phase I metabolites of magnoflorine were identified in intestinal acceptor solutions of pure compound, while eight metabolites were detected in that of Coptidis Rhizoma decoction including six phase I metabolites and two phase II metabolic products. It was shown that the rest of the ingredients in Coptidis Rhizoma accelerated the absorption of magnoflorine weakly and promoted the metabolism of magnoflorine in the gut. The effects of other processes in the pharmacokinetics should be further evaluated.

  16. Review of potential interactions between stocked rainbow trout and listed Snake River sockeye salmon in Pettit Lake Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuscher, D.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if hatchery rainbow trout compete with or prey on juvenile Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka in Pettit Lake, Idaho. In 1995, a total of 8,570 age-0 sockeye and 4,000 hatchery rainbow trout were released in Pettit Lake. After releasing the fish, gillnets were set in the pelagic and littoral zones to collected diet and spatial distribution data. Interactions were assessed monthly from June 1995 through March 1996. Competition for food was discounted based on extremely low diet overlap results observed throughout the sample period. Conversely, predation interactions were more significant. A total of 119 rainbow trout stomachs were analyzed, two contained O. nerka. The predation was limited to one sample period, but when extrapolated to the whole rainbow trout populations results in significant losses. Total consumption of O. nerka by rainbow trout ranged from an estimated 10 to 23% of initial stocking numbers. Predation results contradict earlier findings that stocked rainbow trout do not prey on wild kokanee or sockeye in the Sawtooth Lakes. The contradiction may be explained by a combination of poorly adapted hatchery sockeye and a littoral release site that forced spatial overlap that was not occurring in the wild populations. Releasing sockeye in the pelagic zone may have reduced or eliminated predation losses to rainbow trout

  17. Review of potential interactions between stocked rainbow trout and listed Snake River sockeye salmon in Pettit Lake Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuscher, D.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if hatchery rainbow trout compete with or prey on juvenile Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka in Pettit Lake, Idaho. In 1995, a total of 8,570 age-0 sockeye and 4,000 hatchery rainbow trout were released in Pettit Lake. After releasing the fish, gillnets were set in the pelagic and littoral zones to collected diet and spatial distribution data. Interactions were assessed monthly from June 1995 through March 1996. Competition for food was discounted based on extremely low diet overlap results observed throughout the sample period. Conversely, predation interactions were more significant. A total of 119 rainbow trout stomachs were analyzed, two contained O. nerka. The predation was limited to one sample period, but when extrapolated to the whole rainbow trout populations results in significant losses. Total consumption of O. nerka by rainbow trout ranged from an estimated 10 to 23% of initial stocking numbers. Predation results contradict earlier findings that stocked rainbow trout do not prey on wild kokanee or sockeye in the Sawtooth Lakes. The contradiction may be explained by a combination of poorly adapted hatchery sockeye and a littoral release site that forced spatial overlap that was not occurring in the wild populations. Releasing sockeye in the pelagic zone may have reduced or eliminated predation losses to rainbow trout.

  18. Potentially severe drug-drug interactions among older people and associations in assisted living facilities in Finland: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramura-Grönblad, Mariko; Raivio, Minna; Savikko, Niina; Muurinen, Seija; Soini, Helena; Suominen, Merja; Pitkälä, Kaisu

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to assess potentially severe class D drug-drug interactions (DDDIs) in residents 65 years or older in assisted living facilities with the use of a Swedish and Finnish drug-drug interaction database (SFINX). A cross-sectional study of residents in assisted living facilities in Helsinki, Finland. A total of 1327 residents were assessed in this study. Drugs were classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system and DDDIs were coded according to the SFINX. Prevalence of DDDIs, associated factors and 3-year mortality among residents. Of the participants (mean age was 82.7 years, 78.3% were females), 5.9% (N = 78) are at risk for DDDIs, with a total of 86 interactions. Participants with DDDIs had been prescribed a higher number of drugs (10.8 (SD 3.8) vs. 7.9 (SD 3.7), p assisted living, 5.9% were exposed to DDDIs associated with the use of a higher number of drugs. Physicians should be trained to find safer alternatives to drugs associated with DDDIs. KEY POINTS   Potentially severe, class D drug-drug interactions (DDDIs) have been defined in the SFINX database as clinically relevant drug interactions that should be avoided.  • Of the residents in assisted living, 5.9% were exposed to DDDIs that were associated with the use of a higher number of drugs.  • The most frequent DDDIs were related to the concomitant use of potassium with amiloride or spironolactone. Carbamazepine and methotrexate were also linked to DDDIs.  • No difference in mortality was observed between residents exposed to DDDIs and residents not exposed to DDDIs.

  19. Bacteriophage interactions with Vibrio anguillarum and the potential for phage therapy in marine aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbo, Nanna Iben

    vibriosis which affects a lot of different fish species. As in the rest of the world, an increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria is also observed in the aquaculture industry making chemotherapeutics futile. Bacteriophage therapy offers a great potential in treatment and control of Vibrio anguillarum.......g. vaccines. The lytic broad-host-range phage KVP40 was applied to cod and turbot larvae to control different V. anguillarum strains. We observed that phage KVP40 was able to reduce and/or delay the mortality. Further, phage KVP40 was also able to reduced the mortality imposed by the natural bacterial...... background present in the larvae, emphasizing its potential as a therapeutic agent. In phage therapy the resistance mechanisms after phage exposure and the impact on the host are not fully understood. A molecular and mechanistic understanding of resistance mechanisms and virulence properties of the host...

  20. Clusters of proteins in bio-membranes: insights into the roles of interaction potential shapes and of protein diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Meilhac, Nicolas; Destainville, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that proteins embedded in lipidic bio-membranes can spontaneously self-organize into stable small clusters, or membrane nano-domains, due to the competition between short-range attractive and longer-range repulsive forces between proteins, specific to these systems. In this paper, we carry on our investigation, by Monte Carlo simulations, of different aspects of cluster phases of proteins in bio-membranes. First, we compare different long-range potentials (includ...

  1. Five ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for hydrated NaCl and NaF. I. Two-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yimin, E-mail: yimin.wang@emory.edu; Bowman, Joel M., E-mail: jmbowma@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry, Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Kamarchik, Eugene, E-mail: eugene.kamarchik@gmail.com [Quantum Pomegranate, LLC, 2604 Kings Lake Court NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30345 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    We report full-dimensional, ab initio-based potentials and dipole moment surfaces for NaCl, NaF, Na{sup +}H{sub 2}O, F{sup −}H{sub 2}O, and Cl{sup −}H{sub 2}O. The NaCl and NaF potentials are diabatic ones that dissociate to ions. These are obtained using spline fits to CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z energies. In addition, non-linear least square fits using the Born-Mayer-Huggins potential are presented, providing accurate parameters based strictly on the current ab initio energies. The long-range behavior of the NaCl and NaF potentials is shown to go, as expected, accurately to the point-charge Coulomb interaction. The three ion-H{sub 2}O potentials are permutationally invariant fits to roughly 20 000 coupled cluster CCSD(T) energies (awCVTZ basis for Na{sup +} and aVTZ basis for Cl{sup −} and F{sup −}), over a large range of distances and H{sub 2}O intramolecular configurations. These potentials are switched accurately in the long range to the analytical ion-dipole interactions, to improve computational efficiency. Dipole moment surfaces are fits to MP2 data; for the ion-ion cases, these are well described in the intermediate- and long-range by the simple point-charge expression. The performance of these new fits is examined by direct comparison to additional ab initio energies and dipole moments along various cuts. Equilibrium structures, harmonic frequencies, and electronic dissociation energies are also reported and compared to direct ab initio results. These indicate the high fidelity of the new PESs.

  2. A viscous/potential flow interaction analysis method for multi-element infinite swept wings, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, F. A.; Woodward, F. A.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis method and computer program have been developed for the calculation of the viscosity dependent aerodynamic characteristics of multi-element infinite swept wings in incompressible flow. The wing configuration consisting at the most of a slat, a main element and double slotted flap is represented in the method by a large number of panels. The inviscid pressure distribution about a given configuration in the normal chord direction is determined using a two dimensional potential flow program employing a vortex lattice technique. The boundary layer development over each individual element of the high lift configuration is determined using either integral or finite difference boundary layer techniques. A source distribution is then determined as a function of the calculated boundary layer displacement thickness and pressure distributions. This source distribution is included in the second calculation of the potential flow about the configuration. Once the solution has converged (usually after 2-5 iterations between the potential flow and boundary layer calculations) lift, drag, and pitching moments can be determined as functions of Reynolds number.

  3. Estimating spatial accessibility to facilities on the regional scale: an extended commuting-based interaction potential model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charreire Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing interest in the study of the relationships between individual health-related behaviours (e.g. food intake and physical activity and measurements of spatial accessibility to the associated facilities (e.g. food outlets and sport facilities. The aim of this study is to propose measurements of spatial accessibility to facilities on the regional scale, using aggregated data. We first used a potential accessibility model that partly makes it possible to overcome the limitations of the most frequently used indices such as the count of opportunities within a given neighbourhood. We then propose an extended model in order to take into account both home and work-based accessibility for a commuting population. Results Potential accessibility estimation provides a very different picture of the accessibility levels experienced by the population than the more classical "number of opportunities per census tract" index. The extended model for commuters increases the overall accessibility levels but this increase differs according to the urbanisation level. Strongest increases are observed in some rural municipalities with initial low accessibility levels. Distance to major urban poles seems to play an essential role. Conclusions Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that should integrate some aspects of travel behaviour. Our work supports the evidence that the choice of appropriate accessibility indices including both residential and non-residential environmental features is necessary. Such models have potential implications for providing relevant information to policy-makers in the field of public health.

  4. Interaction of Interceed oxidized regenerated cellulose with macrophages: a potential mechanism by which Interceed may prevent adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S; Santanam, N; Reddy, P P; Rock, J A; Murphy, A A; Parthasarathy, S

    1997-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether Interceed oxidized regenerated cellulose (Johnson & Johnson Medical, Arlington, Tex.), because of its polyanionic nature, may compete for the macrophage scavenger receptor. RAW macrophages were incubated with Interceed oxidized regenerated cellulose and known scavenger receptor ligands. The production of interleukin-1beta by mouse peritoneal macrophages was measured in the presence of Interceed cellulose. When macrophages were incubated with Interceed cellulose, increasing concentrations inhibited the uptake of fluorescent acetyl low-density lipoprotein. In the presence of Interceed cellulose there was a decrease in the production of interleukin-1beta by mouse macrophages. These results suggest that the interaction of Interceed oxidized regenerated cellulose with macrophages with scavenger receptors may result in a decreased secretion of matrix components, inflammatory mediators, and cellular growth factors. Thus Interceed cellulose may function as a biologic barrier in preventing adhesions.

  5. The Biological Properties and Potential Interacting Proteins of d-Alanyl-d-alanine Ligase A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: d-alanine-d-alanine ligase (DdlA, an effective target for drug development to combat against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, which threatens human health globally, supplies a substrate of d-alanyl-d-alanine for peptidoglycan crosslinking by catalyzing the dimerization of two d-alanines. To obtain a better understanding of DdlA profiles and develop a colorimetric assay for high-throughput inhibitor screening, we focused on explicating and characterizing Tb-DdlA. (2 Methods and Results: Rv2981c (ddlA was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified Tb-DdlA was identified using (anti-polyhistidine antibody followed by DdlA activity confirmation by measuring the released orthophosphate via colorimetric assay and the yielded d-alanyl-d-alanine through high performance thin layer chromatography (HP-TLC. The kinetic assays on Tb-DdlA indicated that Tb-DdlA exhibited a higher affinity to ATP (KmATP: 50.327 ± 4.652 μmol/L than alanine (KmAla: 1.011 ± 0.094 mmol/L. A colorimetric assay for Tb-DdlA activity was developed for high-throughput screening of DdlA inhibitors in this study. In addition, we presented an analysis on Tb-DdlA interaction partners by pull-down assay and MS/MS. Eight putative interaction partners of Tb-DdlA were identified. (3 Conclusions: Our dataset provided a valuable resource for exploring Tb-DdlA biology, and developed an easy colorimetric assay for screening of Tb-DdlA inhibitors.

  6. Prediction of dynamic Rankine Cycle waste heat recovery performance and fuel saving potential in passenger car applications considering interactions with vehicles’ energy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, Tilmann Abbe; Tegethoff, Wilhelm; Eilts, Peter; Koehler, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Method for evaluating fuel saving potential of vehicle waste heat recovery systems. • Analysis of interactions between waste heat recovery system and vehicle. • Evaluation of fuel saving potential in dynamic motorway driving scenario. • Parameter study for increasing fuel saving potential of integrated system. - Abstract: Waste heat recovery (WHR) by means of a Rankine Cycle is a promising approach for achieving reductions in fuel consumption and, as a result, exhaust emissions of passenger car engines. To find the best compromise between complexity and fuel saving potential, methods for predicting the WHR performance for different system configurations and stationary as well as dynamic driving scenarios are needed. Since WHR systems are usually not included in today’s car concepts, they are mostly designed as add-on systems. As a result their integration may lead to negative interactions due to increased vehicle weight, engine backpressure and cooling demand. These effects have to be considered when evaluating the fuel saving potential. A new approach for predicting WHR performance and fuel saving potential was developed and is presented in this paper. It is based on simple dynamic models of a system for recovering exhaust gas waste heat and its interfaces with the vehicle: the exhaust system for heat input, the on-board electric system for power delivery and the engine cooling system for heat rejection. The models are validated with test bench measurements of the cycle components. A study of fuel saving potential in an exemplary dynamic motorway driving scenario shows the effect of vehicle integration: while the WHR system could improve fuel economy by 3.4%, restrictions in power output due to the architecture of the on-board electric system, package considerations, increased weight, cooling demand and exhaust gas backpressure lead to a reduction of fuel saving potential by 60% to 1.3%. A parameter study reveals that, in addition to weight

  7. Dynamics of atoms in strong laser fields I: A quasi analytical model in momentum space based on a Sturmian expansion of the interacting nonlocal Coulomb potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ongonwou, F., E-mail: fred.ongonwou@gmail.com [Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université des Sciences et Techniques de Masuku, B.P. 943 Franceville (Gabon); Tetchou Nganso, H.M., E-mail: htetchou@yahoo.com [Atoms and Molecules Laboratory, Centre for Atomic Molecular Physics and Quantum Optics (CEPAMOQ), Faculty of Science, University of Douala, P.O. Box 8580, Douala (Cameroon); Ekogo, T.B., E-mail: tekogo@yahoo.fr [Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université des Sciences et Techniques de Masuku, B.P. 943 Franceville (Gabon); Kwato Njock, M.G., E-mail: mkwato@yahoo.com [Atoms and Molecules Laboratory, Centre for Atomic Molecular Physics and Quantum Optics (CEPAMOQ), Faculty of Science, University of Douala, P.O. Box 8580, Douala (Cameroon)

    2016-12-15

    In this study we present a model that we have formulated in the momentum space to describe atoms interacting with intense laser fields. As a further step, it follows our recent theoretical approach in which the kernel of the reciprocal-space time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) is replaced by a finite sum of separable potentials, each of them supporting one bound state of atomic hydrogen (Tetchou Nganso et al. 2013). The key point of the model is that the nonlocal interacting Coulomb potential is expanded in a Coulomb Sturmian basis set derived itself from a Sturmian representation of Bessel functions of the first kind in the position space. As a result, this decomposition allows a simple spectral treatment of the TDSE in the momentum space. In order to illustrate the credibility of the model, we have considered the test case of atomic hydrogen driven by a linearly polarized laser pulse, and have evaluated analytically matrix elements of the atomic Hamiltonian and dipole coupling interaction. For various regimes of the laser parameters used in computations our results are in very good agreement with data obtained from other time-dependent calculations.

  8. Dynamics of atoms in strong laser fields I: A quasi analytical model in momentum space based on a Sturmian expansion of the interacting nonlocal Coulomb potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongonwou, F.; Tetchou Nganso, H. M.; Ekogo, T. B.; Kwato Njock, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    In this study we present a model that we have formulated in the momentum space to describe atoms interacting with intense laser fields. As a further step, it follows our recent theoretical approach in which the kernel of the reciprocal-space time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) is replaced by a finite sum of separable potentials, each of them supporting one bound state of atomic hydrogen (Tetchou Nganso et al. 2013). The key point of the model is that the nonlocal interacting Coulomb potential is expanded in a Coulomb Sturmian basis set derived itself from a Sturmian representation of Bessel functions of the first kind in the position space. As a result, this decomposition allows a simple spectral treatment of the TDSE in the momentum space. In order to illustrate the credibility of the model, we have considered the test case of atomic hydrogen driven by a linearly polarized laser pulse, and have evaluated analytically matrix elements of the atomic Hamiltonian and dipole coupling interaction. For various regimes of the laser parameters used in computations our results are in very good agreement with data obtained from other time-dependent calculations.

  9. Bimolecular interaction of argpyrimidine (a Maillard reaction product) in in vitro non-enzymatic protein glycation model and its potential role as an antiglycating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, Abhishek; Dhara, Kaliprasanna; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2017-09-01

    Non- enzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, is one of the most important and investigated reactions in biochemistry. Maillard reaction products (MRPs) like protein-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are often referred to cause pathophysiological complications in human systems. On contrary, several MRPs are exogenously used as antioxidant, antimicrobial and flavouring agents. In the preset study, we have shown that argpyrimidine, a well-established AGE, interacts with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glucose individually in standard BSA-glucose model system and successfully inhibits glycation of the protein. Bimolecular interaction of argpyrimidine with glucose or BSA has been studied independently. Chromatographic purification, different spectroscopic studies and molecular modeling have been used to evaluate the nature and pattern of interactions. Binding of argpyrimidine with BSA prevents incorporation of glucose inside the native protein. Argpyrimidine can also directly entrap glucose. Both these interactions may be associated with the antiglycation potential of argpyrimidine, indicating a beneficial function of an AGE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. It's a dark, dark world: background evolution of interacting φCDM models beyond simple exponential potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Suprit; Singh, Parminder, E-mail: ssingh2@physics.du.ac.in, E-mail: psingh@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, University Road, University Enclave, New Delhi 110 007 (India)

    2016-05-01

    We study the background cosmological dynamics with a three component source content: a radiation fluid, a barotropic fluid to mimic the matter sector and a single scalar field which can act as dark energy giving rise to the late-time accelerated phase. Using the well-known dimensionless variables, we cast the dynamical equations into an autonomous system of ordinary differential equations (ASODE), which are studied by computing the fixed points and the conditions for their stability. The matter fluid and the scalar field are taken to be uncoupled at first and later, we consider a coupling between the two of the form Q = √(2/3)κβρ{sub m} φ̇ where ρ{sub m} is the barotropic fluid density. The key point of our analysis is that for the closure of ASODE, we only demand that the jerk, Γ = V V ''/ V '{sup 2} is a function of acceleration, z = −M{sub p}V'/V, that is, Γ = 1+ f ( z ). In this way, we are able to accommodate a large class of potentials that goes beyond the simple exponential potentials. The analysis is completely generic and independent of the form of the potential for the scalar field. As an illustration and confirmation of the analysis, we consider f ( z ) of the forms μ/ z {sup 2}, μ/ z , (μ− z )/ z {sup 2} and (μ− z ) to numerically compute the evolution of cosmological parameters with and without coupling. Implications of the approach and the results are discussed.

  11. Molecular Interaction and Computational Analytical Studies of Pinocembrin for its Antiangiogenic Potential Targeting VEGFR-2: A Persuader of Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Sharma, Mala; Shakeel, Eram; Jamal, Qazi M Sajid; Kamal, Mohammad A; Sayeed, Usman; Khan, Mohammad K A; Siddiqui, Mohammad H; Arif, Jamal M; Akhtar, Salman

    2018-04-16

    Designing a novel antagonist against VEGFR-2 is being applied currently to inhibit cancer growth and metastasis. Because of the unexpected side effects incurred by the contemporary anticancer medications, the focus has been laid towards identifying natural compounds that might carry the potential to inhibit tumor progression. VEGR-2 remains an important target for anticancer drug development as it is the master regulator of vascular growth. The study focuses on virtual screening of compounds from plants of Asteraceae family that bears antiangiogenic potential and thus, inhibiting VEGFR-2 using a computational approach. Structures of phytochemicals were prepared using ChemDraw Ultra 10 software and converted into its 3D PDB structure and minimized using Discovery Studio client 2.5. The target protein, VEGFR-2 was retrieved from RCSB PDB. Lipinski's rule and ADMET toxicity profiling were carried out on the phytochemicals of the Asteraceae family and the filtered compounds were further promoted for molecular docking and MD simulation analysis. The study extends towards the SOM analysis of Pinocembrin to predict the possible toxic and non-toxic in vivo metabolites via in silico tools (Xenosite Web and PASS online server) Results: The docking results revealed promising inhibitory potential of Pinocembrin against VEGFR-2 with binding energy of -8.50 kcal/mole as compared to its known inhibitors Sorafenib and YLT192 having binding energy of -6.49 kcal/mole and -8.02 kcal/mol respectively. Further, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for 10ns were conducted for optimization, flexibility prediction, and determination of folded VEGFR-2 stability. The Hsp90-Pinocembrin complex was found to be quite stable with RMSD value of 0.2nm. Pinocembrin was found to be metabolically stable undergoing phase I metabolism with non-toxic metabolites compared to the standard drug Sorafenib and YLT192. Obtained results propose Pinocembrin as a multi-targeted novel lead compound that bears

  12. Electrostatic interaction between Interball-2 and the ambient plasma. 1. Determination of the spacecraft potential from current calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bouhram

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The Interball-2 spacecraft travels at altitudes extending up to 20 000 km, and becomes positively charged due to the low-plasma densities encountered and the photoemission on its sunlit surface. Therefore, a knowledge of the spacecraft potential Fs is required for correcting accurately thermal ion measurements on Interball-2. The determination of Fs  is based on the balance of currents between escaping photoelectrons and incoming plasma electrons. A three-dimensional model of the potential structure surrounding Interball-2, including a realistic geometry and neglecting the space-charge densities, is used to find, through particle simulations, current-voltage relations of impacting plasma electrons Ie (Fs and escaping photoelectrons Iph (Fs . The inferred relations are compared to analytic relationships in order to quantify the effects of the spacecraft geometry, the ambient magnetic field B0 and the electron temperature Te . We found that the complex geometry has a weak effect on the inferred currents, while the presence of B0 tends to decrease their values. Providing that the photoemission saturation current density Jph0 is known, a relation between Fs and the plasma density Ne can be derived by using the current balance. Since Jph0 is critical to this process, simultaneous measurements of Ne from Z-mode observations in the plasmapause, and data on the potential difference Fs  - Fp  between the spacecraft and an electric probe (p are used in order to reverse the process. A value Jph0 ~ = 32 µAm-2 is estimated, close to laboratory tests, but less than typical measurements in space. Using this value, Ne and Fs  can be derived systematically from electric field measurements without any additional calculation. These values are needed for correcting the distributions of low-energy ions measured by the Hyperboloid experiment on Interball-2. The effects of the potential structure on ion trajectories reaching Hyperboloid are discussed

  13. Multiphonon resonant Raman scattering in the semimagnetic semiconductor Cd sub 1 sub - sub x Mn sub x Te: Froehlich and deformation potential exciton-phonon interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Riera, R; Marin, J L; Bergues, J M; Campoy, G

    2003-01-01

    A theory describing multiphonon resonant Raman scattering (MPRRS) processes in wide-gap diluted magnetic semiconductors is presented, with Cd sub 1 sub - sub x Mn sub x Te as an example. The incident radiation frequency omega sub l is taken above the fundamental absorption region. The photoexcited electron and hole make real transitions through the LO phonon, when one considers Froehlich (F) and deformation potential (DP) interactions. The strong exchange interaction, typical of these materials, leads to a large spin splitting of the exciton states in the magnetic field. Neglecting Landau quantization, this Zeeman splitting gives rise to the formation of eight bands (two conduction and six valence ones) and ten different exciton states according to the polarization of the incident light. Explicit expressions for the MPRRS intensity of second and third order, the indirect creation and annihilation probabilities, the exciton lifetime, and the probabilities of transition between different exciton states and diff...

  14. Interaction between ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with human serum albumin as binary and ternary systems by multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaki, Hanie; Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Reza Saberi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the competition of ropinirole hydrochloride (RP) and aspirin (ASA) in binding to human serum albumin (HSA) in physiological buffer (pH=7.4) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta-potential measurements. Fluorescence analysis was used to define the binding and quenching properties of drug-HSA complexes in binary and ternary systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that in the presence of RP, the binding constant of HSA–ASA was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to result in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The effect of drugs on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD). The RLS method determined the critical aggregation concentration of drugs on HSA in binary and ternary systems that confirmed the zeta potential results. Structural modeling showed that the affinity of each of the drugs to HSA in binary and ternary systems confirms the spectroscopic results. - Highlights: ► We studied the interaction of ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with HSA. ► Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. ► We determined the critical induced aggregation concentration of both drugs on HSA. ► The binding mechanism of drugs as separate and simultaneous to HSA has been compared. ► The binding site of both drugs as simultaneous effects on HSA has been determined.

  15. Wastewater treatment plant effluent as a source of microplastics: review of the fate, chemical interactions and potential risks to aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziajahromi, Shima; Neale, Peta A; Leusch, Frederic D L

    2016-11-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent has been identified as a potential source of microplastics in the aquatic environment. Microplastics have recently been detected in wastewater effluent in Western Europe, Russia and the USA. As there are only a handful of studies on microplastics in wastewater, it is difficult to accurately determine the contribution of wastewater effluent as a source of microplastics. However, even the small amounts of microplastics detected in wastewater effluent may be a remarkable source given the large volumes of wastewater treatment effluent discharged to the aquatic environment annually. Further, there is strong evidence that microplastics can interact with wastewater-associated contaminants, which has the potential to transport chemicals to aquatic organisms after exposure to contaminated microplastics. In this review we apply lessons learned from the literature on microplastics in the aquatic environment and knowledge on current wastewater treatment technologies, with the aim of identifying the research gaps in terms of (i) the fate of microplastics in WWTPs, (ii) the potential interaction of wastewater-based microplastics with trace organic contaminants and metals, and (iii) the risk for aquatic organisms.

  16. Interaction between ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with human serum albumin as binary and ternary systems by multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahaki, Hanie, E-mail: hanieh.mahaki@gmail.com [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina; Chamani, Jamshidkhan [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reza Saberi, Mohammad [Medical Chemistry Department, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to describe the competition of ropinirole hydrochloride (RP) and aspirin (ASA) in binding to human serum albumin (HSA) in physiological buffer (pH=7.4) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta-potential measurements. Fluorescence analysis was used to define the binding and quenching properties of drug-HSA complexes in binary and ternary systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that in the presence of RP, the binding constant of HSA-ASA was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to result in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The effect of drugs on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD). The RLS method determined the critical aggregation concentration of drugs on HSA in binary and ternary systems that confirmed the zeta potential results. Structural modeling showed that the affinity of each of the drugs to HSA in binary and ternary systems confirms the spectroscopic results. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the interaction of ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined the critical induced aggregation concentration of both drugs on HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding mechanism of drugs as separate and simultaneous to HSA has been compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding site of both drugs as simultaneous effects on HSA has been determined.

  17. Specific Interaction between eEF1A and HIV RT Is Critical for HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and a Potential Anti-HIV Target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Li

    2015-12-01

    transcription and replication, and the RT-eEF1A interaction is a potential drug target.

  18. From Acupuncture to Interaction between δ-Opioid Receptors and Na+ Channels: A Potential Pathway to Inhibit Epileptic Hyperexcitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongman Chao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting about 1% of population. Although the precise mechanism of its pathophysiological changes in the brain is unknown, epilepsy has been recognized as a disorder of brain excitability characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures that result from the abnormal, excessive, and synchronous activity of clusters of nerve cells in the brain. Currently available therapies, including medical, surgical, and other strategies, such as ketogenic diet and vagus nerve stimulation, are symptomatic with their own limitations and complications. Seeking new strategies to cure this serious disorder still poses a big challenge to the field of medicine. Our recent studies suggest that acupuncture may exert its antiepileptic effects by normalizing the disrupted neuronal and network excitability through several mechanisms, including lowering the overexcited neuronal activity, enhancing the inhibitory system, and attenuating the excitatory system in the brain via regulation of the interaction between δ-opioid receptors (DOR and Na+ channels. This paper reviews the progress in this field and summarizes new knowledge based on our work and those of others.

  19. From Acupuncture to Interaction between δ-Opioid Receptors and Na (+) Channels: A Potential Pathway to Inhibit Epileptic Hyperexcitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Dongman; Shen, Xueyong; Xia, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting about 1% of population. Although the precise mechanism of its pathophysiological changes in the brain is unknown, epilepsy has been recognized as a disorder of brain excitability characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures that result from the abnormal, excessive, and synchronous activity of clusters of nerve cells in the brain. Currently available therapies, including medical, surgical, and other strategies, such as ketogenic diet and vagus nerve stimulation, are symptomatic with their own limitations and complications. Seeking new strategies to cure this serious disorder still poses a big challenge to the field of medicine. Our recent studies suggest that acupuncture may exert its antiepileptic effects by normalizing the disrupted neuronal and network excitability through several mechanisms, including lowering the overexcited neuronal activity, enhancing the inhibitory system, and attenuating the excitatory system in the brain via regulation of the interaction between δ -opioid receptors (DOR) and Na(+) channels. This paper reviews the progress in this field and summarizes new knowledge based on our work and those of others.

  20. From Acupuncture to Interaction between δ-Opioid Receptors and Na+ Channels: A Potential Pathway to Inhibit Epileptic Hyperexcitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Dongman; Shen, Xueyong; Xia, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting about 1% of population. Although the precise mechanism of its pathophysiological changes in the brain is unknown, epilepsy has been recognized as a disorder of brain excitability characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures that result from the abnormal, excessive, and synchronous activity of clusters of nerve cells in the brain. Currently available therapies, including medical, surgical, and other strategies, such as ketogenic diet and vagus nerve stimulation, are symptomatic with their own limitations and complications. Seeking new strategies to cure this serious disorder still poses a big challenge to the field of medicine. Our recent studies suggest that acupuncture may exert its antiepileptic effects by normalizing the disrupted neuronal and network excitability through several mechanisms, including lowering the overexcited neuronal activity, enhancing the inhibitory system, and attenuating the excitatory system in the brain via regulation of the interaction between δ-opioid receptors (DOR) and Na+ channels. This paper reviews the progress in this field and summarizes new knowledge based on our work and those of others. PMID:23662118

  1. The interactions between gut microbiota and entomopathogenic fungi: a potential approach for biological control of Blattella germanica (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Sun, Xiao X; Zhang, Xian C; Zhang, Shuo; Lu, Jie; Xia, Yong M; Huang, Yan H; Wang, Xue J

    2018-02-01

    Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana mainly infect insects through the cuticle; gut infection occasionally occurs. Micro-organisms existing in the gut may play a crucial role in the evolution and ecology of host defenses against fungal pathogens. To evaluate whether the gut bacteria participate in antifungal activity, and to determine their role in host protection, the interactions between gut bacteria and M. anisopliae and the diversity of gut microbiota in cockroaches were studied. An oral feeding test showed that the mortality of conventional cockroaches was significantly lower than that of germ-free cockroaches; both gut homogenates and aqueous fecal extracts showed antifungal activity, but the samples from germ-free cockroaches did not. Twenty-two bacterial strains with antifungal activity and siderophore-producing ability were isolated from the gut and feces of cockroaches. Using high-throughput sequencing techniques, a total of 23 different phyla and 212 genera were detected. The composition of the microbiota of the hindgut was vastly different from those of the foregut and midgut; higher diversity and abundance of Bacteroides and Pseudomonas were found in the hindgut. The gut microbiota of German cockroaches may play a critical role in protecting cockroaches from fungal invasion and colonization. Removing certain bacteria from the B. germanica microbiota may facilitate microbial control using fungal pathogens. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. ARG1 (altered response to gravity) encodes a DnaJ-like protein that potentially interacts with the cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedbrook, J. C.; Chen, R.; Masson, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    Gravitropism allows plant organs to direct their growth at a specific angle from the gravity vector, promoting upward growth for shoots and downward growth for roots. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying gravitropic signal transduction. We found that mutations in the ARG1 locus of Arabidopsis thaliana alter root and hypocotyl gravitropism without affecting phototropism, root growth responses to phytohormones or inhibitors of auxin transport, or starch accumulation. The positional cloning of ARG1 revealed a DnaJ-like protein containing a coiled-coil region homologous to coiled coils found in cytoskeleton-interacting proteins. These data suggest that ARG1 participates in a gravity-signaling process involving the cytoskeleton. A combination of Northern blot studies and analysis of ARG1-GUS fusion-reporter expression in transgenic plants demonstrated that ARG1 is expressed in all organs. Ubiquitous ARG1 expression in Arabidopsis and the identification of an ortholog in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that ARG1 is involved in other essential processes.

  3. The interaction of HAb18G/CD147 with integrin α6β1 and its implications for the invasion potential of human hepatoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Juan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HAb18G/CD147 plays pivotal roles in invasion by hepatoma cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Our previous study demonstrated that overexpression of HAb18G/CD147 promotes invasion by interacting with integrin α3β1. However, it has never been investigated whether α3β1 is solely responsible for this process or if other integrin family members also interact with HAb18G/CD147 in human hepatoma cells. Methods Human SMMC-7721 and FHCC98 cells were cultured and transfected with siRNA fragments against HAb18G/CD147. The expression levels of HAb18G/CD147 and integrin α6β1 were determined by immunofluorescent double-staining and confocal imaging analysis. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses were performed to examine the native conformations of HAb18G/CD147 and integrin α6β1. Invasion potential was evaluated with an invasion assay and gelatin zymography. Results We found that integrin α6β1 co-localizes and interacts with HAb18G/CD147 in human hepatoma cells. The enhancing effects of HAb18G/CD147 on invasion capacity and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs were partially blocked by integrin α6β1 antibodies (P 2+ mobilization, significantly reduced cell invasion potential and secretion of MMPs in human hepatoma cells (P Conclusion These results suggest that α6β1 interacts with HAb18G/CD147 to mediate tumor invasion and metastatic processes through the PI3K pathway.

  4. Phage-Host Interactions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the Potential for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb

    temperatures below 15°C and typically with fry mortality rates of 50-60%. Several attempts of vaccine development against RTFS have been made, but according to my knowledge no commercial vaccine is yet available. Bacterial chemotherapy is still the most effective and used treatment of RTFS today. However......, the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance has led to increased attention to the use of phages for controlling F. psychrophilum infections in aquaculture. In a synopsis and four scientific papers, this PhD project studies the potential and optimizes the use of phage therapy for treatment and prevention...... cells could be maintained at a low level throughout the rest of the experiment. Surprisingly, no difference was observed between infection with single phages or phage cocktails. At the end of incubation phage-sensitive strains dominated in the cultures with low initial phage concentrations and phage-resistant...

  5. Interacting Effects of Leaf Water Potential and Biomass on Vegetation Optical Depth: Effects of LWP and Biomass on VOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momen, Mostafa [Department of Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford CA USA; Wood, Jeffrey D. [School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Novick, Kimberly A. [School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University-Bloomington, Bloomington IN USA; Pangle, Robert [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM USA; Pockman, William T. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM USA; McDowell, Nate G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Konings, Alexandra G. [Department of Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford CA USA

    2017-11-01

    Remotely sensed microwave observations of vegetation optical depth (VOD) have been widely used for examining vegetation responses to climate. Nevertheless, the relative impacts of phenological changes in leaf biomass and water stress on VOD have not been explicitly disentangled. In particular, determining whether leaf water potential (ψL) affects VOD may allow these data sets as a constraint for plant hydraulic models. Here we test the sensitivity of VOD to variations in ψL and present a conceptual framework that relates VOD to ψL and total biomass including leaves, whose dynamics are measured through leaf area index, and woody components. We used measurements of ψL from three sites across the US—a mixed deciduous forests in Indiana and Missouri and a piñon-juniper woodland in New Mexico—to validate the conceptual model. The temporal dynamics of X-band VOD were similar to those of the VOD signal estimated from the new conceptual model with observed ψL (R2 = 0.6–0.8). At the global scale, accounting for a combination of biomass and estimated ψL (based on satellite surface soil moisture data) increased correlations with VOD by ~ 15% and 30% compared to biomass and water potential, respectively. In wetter regions with denser and taller canopy heights, VOD has a higher correlation with leaf area index than with water stress and vice versa in drier regions. Our results demonstrate that variations in both phenology and ψL must be considered to accurately interpret the dynamics of VOD observations for ecological applications.

  6. Modeling of human prokineticin receptors: interactions with novel small-molecule binders and potential off-target drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Levit

    Full Text Available The Prokineticin receptor (PKR 1 and 2 subtypes are novel members of family A GPCRs, which exhibit an unusually high degree of sequence similarity. Prokineticins (PKs, their cognate ligands, are small secreted proteins of ∼80 amino acids; however, non-peptidic low-molecular weight antagonists have also been identified. PKs and their receptors play important roles under various physiological conditions such as maintaining circadian rhythm and pain perception, as well as regulating angiogenesis and modulating immunity. Identifying binding sites for known antagonists and for additional potential binders will facilitate studying and regulating these novel receptors. Blocking PKRs may serve as a therapeutic tool for various diseases, including acute pain, inflammation and cancer.Ligand-based pharmacophore models were derived from known antagonists, and virtual screening performed on the DrugBank dataset identified potential human PKR (hPKR ligands with novel scaffolds. Interestingly, these included several HIV protease inhibitors for which endothelial cell dysfunction is a documented side effect. Our results suggest that the side effects might be due to inhibition of the PKR signaling pathway. Docking of known binders to a 3D homology model of hPKR1 is in agreement with the well-established canonical TM-bundle binding site of family A GPCRs. Furthermore, the docking results highlight residues that may form specific contacts with the ligands. These contacts provide structural explanation for the importance of several chemical features that were obtained from the structure-activity analysis of known binders. With the exception of a single loop residue that might be perused in the future for obtaining subtype-specific regulation, the results suggest an identical TM-bundle binding site for hPKR1 and hPKR2. In addition, analysis of the intracellular regions highlights variable regions that may provide subtype specificity.

  7. Interaction potentials of Cd-Ne from temperature dependent of intercombination Cd line 326.1 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roston, G.D. E-mail: gamal_daniel@yahoo.com

    2004-08-01

    The absorption profile and the temperature dependence of the Cd line at 326.1 nm perturbed by Ne at a density of about 1.13x10{sup 19} atoms cm{sup -3} have been carefully studied over a spectral range extending from 600 cm{sup -1} in the blue wing to 700 cm{sup -1} in the red wing using a high-resolution double-beam spectrometer. Interatomic potentials for Cd-Ne in the ground electronic state {sup 1}0{sup +} as well as the exited ({sup 3}0{sup +} and {sup 3}1) states have been deduced from the spectrum. The van der Waals coefficient differences between the ground {sup 1}0{sup +} state and the two exited states {sup 3}0{sup +} and {sup 3}1 ({delta}C{sub 6}{sup 0} and {delta}C{sub 6}{sup 1}) are obtained from the near red wing profile using Kuhn's law. The values of {delta}C{sub 6}{sup 0} and {delta}C{sub 6}{sup 1} are found to be equal to 23.5{+-}2 and 39.3{+-}3 eVA{sup 6}, respectively. The interatomic potentials parameters (well depths {epsilon} (cm{sup -1}) and their positions R{sub m} (A) for the ground {sup 1}0{sup +} and the exited ({sup 3}0{sup +} and {sup 3}1) states are found to be (41.4{+-}3, 4.1{+-}0.2), (82.5{+-}4, 3.7{+-}0.2) and (18.03{+-}2, 4.25{+-}0.3), respectively. The obtained well depths with their allowable errors are in good agreement with the values obtained before for the Cd-Ne system from the molecular beams experiments.

  8. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to be utilized when analyzing existing designs, as well as developing designs exploring new ways of designing kinesthetic interactions....

  9. Novel secreted isoform of adhesion molecule ICAM-4: Potential regulator of membrane-associated ICAM-4 interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gloria; Spring, Frances A.; Parons, Stephen F.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Peters, Luanne L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2003-02-18

    ICAM-4, a newly characterized adhesion molecule, is expressed early in human erythropoiesis and functions as a ligand for binding a4b1 and aV integrin-expressing cells. Within the bone marrow, erythroblasts surround central macrophages forming erythroblastic islands. Evidence suggests that these islands are highly specialized subcompartments where cell adhesion events, in concert with cytokines, play critical roles in regulating erythropoiesis and apoptosis. Since erythroblasts express a4b1 and ICAM-4 and macrophages exhibit aV, ICAM-4 is an attractive candidate for mediating cellular interactions within erythroblastic islands. To determine whether ICAM-4 binding properties are conserved across species, we first cloned and sequenced the murine homologue. The translated amino acid sequence showed 68 percent overall identity with human ICAM-4. Using recombinant murine ICAM-4 extracellular domains, we discovered that hematopoietic a4b1-expressing HEL cells and non-hematopoietic aV-expressing FLY cells adhered to mouse ICAM-4. Cell adhesion studies showed that FLY and HEL cells bound to mouse and human proteins with similar avidity. These data strongly suggest conservation of integrin-binding properties across species. Importantly, we characterized a novel second splice cDNA that would be predicted to encode an ICAM-4 isoform, lacking the membrane-spanning domain. Erythroblasts express both isoforms of ICAM-4. COS-7 cells transfected with GFP constructs of prototypic or novel ICAM-4 cDNA showed different cellular localization patterns. Moreover, analysis of tissue culture medium revealed that the novel ICAM-4 cDNA encodes a secreted protein. We postulate that secretion of this newly described isoform, ICAM-4S, may modulate binding of membrane-associated ICAM-4 and could thus play a critical regulatory role in erythroblast molecular attachments.

  10. Modelling human protein interaction networks as metric spaces has potential in disease research and drug target discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhal, Emad; Mwambene, Eric C; Gamieldien, Junaid

    2014-06-14

    We have recently shown by formally modelling human protein interaction networks (PINs) as metric spaces and classified proteins into zones based on their distance from the topological centre that hub proteins are primarily centrally located. We also showed that zones closest to the network centre are enriched for critically important proteins and are also functionally very specialised for specific 'house keeping' functions. We proposed that proteins closest to the network centre may present good therapeutic targets. Here, we present multiple pieces of novel functional evidence that provides strong support for this hypothesis. We found that the human PINs has a highly connected signalling core, with the majority of proteins involved in signalling located in the two zones closest to the topological centre. The majority of essential, disease related, tumour suppressor, oncogenic and approved drug target proteins were found to be centrally located. Similarly, the majority of proteins consistently expressed in 13 types of cancer are also predominantly located in zones closest to the centre. Proteins from zones 1 and 2 were also found to comprise the majority of proteins in key KEGG pathways such as MAPK-signalling, the cell cycle, apoptosis and also pathways in cancer, with very similar patterns seen in pathways that lead to cancers such as melanoma and glioma, and non-neoplastic diseases such as measles, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. Based on the diversity of evidence uncovered, we propose that when considered holistically, proteins located centrally in the human PINs that also have similar functions to existing drug targets are good candidate targets for novel therapeutics. Similarly, since disease pathways are dominated by centrally located proteins, candidates shortlisted in genome scale disease studies can be further prioritized and contextualised based on whether they occupy central positions in the human PINs.

  11. Two grams of sarcosine in schizophrenia – is it too much? A potential role of glutamate- serotonin interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strzelecki D

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dominik Strzelecki, Justyna Szyburska, Jolanta Rabe-JabłońskaDepartment of Affective and Psychotic Disorders, Central Clinical Hospital, Medical University of Lódz, Lódz, PolandAbstract: Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Dysfunction of the glutamatergic system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Therefore, glutamatergic agents such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor co-agonists (ie, glycine, D-cycloserine and glycine transporter type 1 inhibitors (eg, sarcosine are studied for their efficacy in ameliorating negative and cognitive symptomatology in patients with schizophrenia. We report the case of a 23-year-old schizophrenic patient treated with quetiapine and citalopram, who was offered concomitant sarcosine treatment. After obtaining an informed consent, we started administration of 2 g of sarcosine per day to treat persistent negative and cognitive symptoms. The patient's activity and mood improved within 2 weeks, but in the following 2 weeks the patient reported increased drive, activity, libido, unpleasant inner tension, and irritability. We ruled out hypomania and decided to decrease the daily dose of sarcosine to 1 g, which resulted in reduction of drive and irritability. Activity and mood improved compared with his state before adding sarcosine. We suggest a sarcosine dose between 1 g and 2 g per day with an initial dose of 2 g, but if side effects occur, the dose should be decreased to 1 g per day. We would like to emphasize the clinically important glutamate-serotonin interaction during concomitant use of sarcosine, citalopram, and quetiapine in our patient, which may lead to serious discomfort.Keywords: schizophrenia, glutamatergic system, serotoninergic system, sarcosine, NMDA receptor, dose finding

  12. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of tivantinib (ARQ 197) using cocktail probes in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masaya; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P; Strickler, John H; Puzanov, Igor; Gajee, Roohi; Wang, Yibin; Zahir, Hamim

    2018-01-01

    This phase 1, open-label, crossover study sought to evaluate drug-drug interactions between tivantinib and cytochrome P450 (CYP) substrates and tivantinib and P-glycoprotein. The effect of tivantinib doses on the pharmacokinetics of the probe drugs for CYP1A2 (caffeine), CYP2C9 (S-warfarin), CYP2C19 (omeprazole), and CYP3A4 (midazolam), and for P-glycoprotein (digoxin) was investigated in 28 patients with advanced cancer using a cocktail probe approach. Patients received single doses of probe drugs alone and, after 5 days of treatment, with tivantinib 360 mg twice daily. The ratios of geometric least squares mean (90% confidence interval) for the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to the last quantifiable concentration in the presence/absence of tivantinib were 0.97 (0.89-1.05) for caffeine, 0.88 (0.76-1.02) for S-warfarin, 0.89 (0.60-1.31) for omeprazole, 0.83 (0.67-1.02) for midazolam, and 0.69 (0.51-0.94) for digoxin. Similar effects were observed for maximum plasma concentrations; the ratio for digoxin in the presence/absence of tivantinib was 0.75 (0.60-0.95). The data suggest that tivantinib 360 mg twice daily has either a minimal or no effect on the pharmacokinetics of probe drugs for CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 substrates, and decreases the systemic exposure of P-glycoprotein substrates when administered with tivantinib. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Differential effects of climate and species interactions on range limits at a hybrid zone: potential direct and indirect impacts of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Michael A; Rice, Amber M

    2015-11-01

    The relative contributions of climate versus interspecific interactions in shaping species distributions have important implications for closely related species at contact zones. When hybridization occurs within a contact zone, these factors regulate hybrid zone location and movement. While a hybrid zone's position may depend on both climate and interactions between the hybridizing species, little is known about how these factors interact to affect hybrid zone dynamics. Here, we utilize SDM (species distribution modeling) both to characterize the factors affecting the current location of a moving North American avian hybrid zone and to predict potential direct and indirect effects of climate change on future distributions. We focus on two passerine species that hybridize where their ranges meet, the Black-capped (Poecile atricapillus) and Carolina (P. carolinensis) chickadee. Our contemporary climate models predict the occurrence of climatically suitable habitat extending beyond the hybrid zone for P. atricapillus only, suggesting that interspecific interactions primarily regulate this range boundary in P. atricapillus, while climatic factors regulate P. carolinensis. Year 2050 climate models predict a drastic northward shift in suitable habitat for P. carolinensis. Because of the greater importance of interspecific interactions for regulating the southern range limit of P. atricapillus, these climate-mediated shifts in the distribution of P. carolinensis may indirectly lead to a range retraction in P. atricapillus. Together, our results highlight the ways climate change can both directly and indirectly affect species distributions and hybrid zone location. In addition, our study lends support to the longstanding hypothesis that abiotic factors regulate species' poleward range limits, while biotic factors shape equatorial range limits.

  14. The interactions of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a potential site for toxic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Chester E; Fukuto, Jon M; Taguchi, Keiko; Froines, John; Cho, Arthur K

    2005-06-30

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to 1,3-diphosphoglycerate, one of the precursors for glycolytic ATP biosynthesis. The enzyme contains an active site cysteine thiolate, which is critical for its catalytic function. As part of a continuing study of the interactions of quinones with biological systems, we have examined the susceptibility of GAPDH to inactivation by 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ). In a previous study of quinone toxicity, this quinone, whose actions have been exclusively attributed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caused a reduction in the glycolytic activity of GAPDH under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, indicating indirect and possible direct actions on this enzyme. In this study, the effects of 9,10-PQ on GAPDH were examined in detail under aerobic and anaerobic conditions so that the role of oxygen could be distinguished from the direct effects of the quinone. The results indicate that, in the presence of the reducing agent DTT, GAPDH inhibition by 9,10-PQ under aerobic conditions was mostly indirect and comparable to the direct actions of exogenously-added H2O2 on this enzyme. GAPDH was also inhibited by 9,10-PQ anaerobically, but in a somewhat more complex manner. This quinone, which is not considered an electrophile, inhibited GAPDH in a time-dependent manner, consistent with irreversible modification and comparable to the electrophilic actions of 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ). Analysis of the anaerobic inactivation kinetics for the two quinones revealed comparable inactivation rate constants (k(inac)), but a much lower inhibitor binding constant (K(i)) for 1,4-BQ. Protection and thiol titration studies suggest that these quinones bind to the NAD+ binding site and modify the catalytic thiol from this site. Thus, 9,10-PQ inhibits GAPDH by two distinct mechanisms: through ROS generation that results in the oxidization of GAPDH thiols, and by an

  15. Role of peripheral sigma-1 receptors in ischaemic pain: Potential interactions with ASIC and P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, S G; Roh, D H; Yoon, S Y; Choi, S R; Choi, H S; Moon, J Y; Kang, S Y; Kim, H W; Han, H J; Beitz, A J; Oh, S B; Lee, J H

    2016-04-01

    The role of peripheral sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) in normal nociception and in pathologically induced pain conditions has not been thoroughly investigated. Since there is mounting evidence that Sig-1Rs modulate ischaemia-induced pathological conditions, we investigated the role of Sig-1Rs in ischaemia-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and addressed their possible interaction with acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and P2X receptors at the ischaemic site. We used a rodent model of hindlimb thrombus-induced ischaemic pain (TIIP) to investigate their role. Western blot was performed to observe changes in Sig-1R expression in peripheral nervous tissues. MA was measured after intraplantar (i.pl.) injections of antagonists for the Sig-1, ASIC and P2X receptors in TIIP rats or agonists of each receptor in naïve rats. Sig-1R expression significantly increased in skin, sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglia at 3 days post-TIIP surgery. I.pl. injections of the Sig-1R antagonist, BD-1047 on post-operative days 0-3 significantly attenuated the development of MA during the induction phase, but had no effect on MA when given during the maintenance phase (days 3-6 post-surgery). BD-1047 synergistically increased amiloride (an ASICs blocker)- and TNP-ATP (a P2X antagonist)-induced analgesic effects in TIIP rats. In naïve rats, i.pl. injection of Sig-1R agonist PRE-084 alone did not produce MA; but it did induce MA when co-administered with either an acidic pH solution or a sub-effective dose of αβmeATP. Peripheral Sig-1Rs contribute to the induction of ischaemia-induced MA via facilitation of ASICs and P2X receptors. Thus, peripheral Sig-1Rs represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ischaemic pain. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  16. Study of the universal function of nuclear proximity potential between α and nuclei from density-dependent nucleon-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, G.L.; Zheng, H.B.; Qu, W.W.

    2013-01-01

    The universal function of proximity potential between α and nuclei is systematically studied from the double-folding model with the density-dependent nucleon-nucleon interaction (CDM3Y6) by analyzing different target nuclei with Z=48-92. The analytical formula of universal function is obtained at s 0 >-1 by fitting all of the calculated values. Using this formula we calculate the half-lives of α decay for heavy nuclei in comparison with the values of the experimental data. It is shown that the half-lives of the α decay calculated from the presently obtained universal function in proximity potential can keep within a factor of 3 with the experimental data. (orig.)

  17. Better band gaps for wide-gap semiconductors from a locally corrected exchange-correlation potential that nearly eliminates self-interaction errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Harbola, Manoj K.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2017-10-01

    This work constitutes a comprehensive and improved account of electronic-structure and mechanical properties of silicon-nitride (Si3 N4 ) polymorphs via van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB) exchange-corrected local density approximation (LDA) that enforces the exact exchange potential asymptotic behavior. The calculated lattice constant, bulk modulus, and electronic band structure of Si3 N4 polymorphs are in good agreement with experimental results. We also show that, for a single electron in a hydrogen atom, spherical well, or harmonic oscillator, the LB-corrected LDA reduces the (self-interaction) error to exact total energy to  ∼10%, a factor of three to four lower than standard LDA, due to a dramatically improved representation of the exchange-potential.

  18. Optical potential coupled to discrete variable representation for calculations of quasibound states: Application to the CO(B 1Sigma + -Dscript1 Sigma + ) predissociating interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerville, M.; Robbe, J. M.

    1994-11-01

    The optical potential method initially proposed by Jolicard and Austin in the context of the stabilization method is reviewed here and used with the accurate and the efficient discrete variable representation method to obtain the energies and the widths (respectively, the real and the imaginary part of the resonance energies) of rovibrational predissociated states of diatomic molecules. In this method the resonances for an n coupled states problem are obtained by a direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix in the diabatic representation. This Hamiltonian matrix is directly evaluated in the discrete variable representation using the Fourier grid Hamiltonian method proposed by Marston and Balint-Kurti. In this approach, two optical potentials are tested and used here to impose the asymptotic behaviors of the boundary conditions which are compatible with the resonance states. The method is exemplified for the B 1Σ+-D'1 Σ+ Rydberg-valence predissociating interaction in the CO molecule.

  19. ARTE: French-German Experiments in Crossing the Borders. 'One Media – Three Screens' Convergence and Interactivity at its Full Potential?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wiehl

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution aims at discussing policies of convergence as well as at questioning whether the current strategies really exploit the options of digital media to its full potential – especially with regard to transmedia-storytelling, interactivity, participation and networking. By the paradigm of the 'European Culture Channel' ARTE, we draw a sketch of the portfolio of existing and emerging new formats and user practices. In the second part, we examine one specific genre from this context: the web-or trans-media-documentary. Taking Prison Valley as a case study, we consider transformations on both the macro and the micro level. Eventually, we question whether ARTE fulfils its promise to be the first "100% bi-medial channel" (ARTE mission statement, or whether it promotes an 'extended side-by-sideness' of devices and practices – some first steps towards the synergetic potential of media convergence.

  20. A new (multi-reference configuration interaction) potential energy surface for H2CO and preliminary studies of roaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Houston, Paul L.; Bowman, Joel M.

    2017-03-01

    We report a new global potential energy surface (PES) for H2CO, based on precise fitting of roughly 67 000 MRCI/cc-pVTZ energies. This PES describes the global minimum, the cis- and trans-HCOH isomers, and barriers relevant to isomerization, formation of the molecular (H2+CO) and radical (H+HCO) products, and the loose so-called roaming transition-state saddle point. The key features of the PES are reviewed and compared with a previous PES, denoted by PES04, based on five local fits that are `stitched' together by switching functions (Zhang et al. 2004 J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 8980-8986 (doi:10.1021/jp048339l)). Preliminary quasi-classical trajectory calculations are performed at the total energy of 36 233 cm-1 (103 kcal mol-1), relative to the H2CO global minimum, using the new PES, with a particular focus on roaming dynamics. When compared with the results from PES04, the new PES findings show similar rotational distributions, somewhat more roaming and substantially higher H2 vibrational excitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'.

  1. Prioritization for interferon-free regimens and potential drug interactions of current direct-acting anti-hepatitis C agents in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodoridi, Μargarita; Dalekos, George N; Goulis, John; Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Triantos, Christos; Zachou, Kalliopi; Koukoufiki, Argyro; Κourikou, Αnastasia; Ζisimopoulos, Κonstantinos; Τsoulas, Christos; Papatheodoridis, George V

    2017-01-01

    We determined the proportions of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in association with possible prioritized indications for interferon-free regimens and the use of co-medications with potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Five hundred consecutive mono-infected CHC patients seen in 2015 at 5 Greek centers were included. Priorities for interferon-free regimens were based on liver disease severity, contraindication(s) for interferon and prior interferon-treatment failure. All co-medications were classified into those with no DDIs/no clear data for DDIs, potential DDIs, and contraindication due to DDI for each agent, according to the HEP Drug Interaction Checker. Of the 500 patients, 1% had undergone liver transplantation, whereas 6.6% had decompensated cirrhosis, 21.8% F4, 17.1% F3, 10.4% F2, and 34.8% F0-1 fibrosis. Contraindications for interferon were present in 38.5% of non-transplant patients with compensated liver disease. The probability of contraindications/potential DDIs was greater for boceprevir/telaprevir and ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir±dasabuvir, compared to all other agents (Pfree regimens from cirrhosis to F3 and perhaps F2 fibrosis will increase the proportion of patients with DAA access by only 10-15% and 10%, respectively. A potential for DDIs is frequently present with protease inhibitors, but also exists with other DAAs. The probability of DDIs is higher in patients with priority for DAAs, including those who have advanced liver disease and are usually of older age.

  2. Immunoliposomes directed toward VCAM-1 interact specifically with activated endothelial cells--a potential tool for specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinea, Manuela; Manduteanu, Ileana; Dragomir, Elena; Capraru, Monica; Simionescu, Maya

    2005-11-01

    Immunoliposomes can be potentially used as carriers for drug delivery to specific cells. The aim of this paper was to exploit the overexpression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) on activated human endothelial cells (HEC) for targeting of anti-VCAM-1 coupled liposomes with the intent for further use as drug carriers. TNF-alpha-activated HEC were exposed to liposomes, either plain or coupled with antibodies to VCAM-1 (L-VCAM-1) or to irrelevant IgG (L-IgG); nonactivated HEC subjected to the same conditions were used as control. For binding studies, the cells were incubated with fluorescently labeled liposomes at 4 degrees C, and after 2 h, fluorescence intensity was assessed by flow cytometry; specificity of binding was determined by performing the experiments in the presence of excess anti-VCAM-1. Cellular internalization of liposomes was studied employing radioactively or fluorescently labelled liposomes; to detect the mechanisms of uptake, experiments were performed in the presence of agents that interfere in the endocytotic pathway. Transmigration of liposomes was monitored in a two-chamber culture model. The effect of L-VCAM-1 binding to HEC on intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and distribution of actin was determined by fluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy. (1) L-VCAM-1 binds selectively and specifically to TNF-alpha activated HEC. (2) Approximately 50% of L-VCAM-1 is taken up by receptor-mediated endocytosis via clathrin-coated vesicles. (3) Binding of L-VCAM-1 to HEC surface induces a rise in [Ca(2+)](i) and reorganization of actin filaments. (4) A small percentage of liposomes migrates across HEC. The data indicate that VCAM-1 may be an appropriate target for specific drug delivery to activated HEC using immunoliposomes.

  3. Childhood trauma affects processing of social interactions in borderline personality disorder: An event-related potential study investigating empathy for pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasbeck, Vera; Enzi, Björn; Brüne, Martin

    2017-06-15

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have difficulties in empathising with others and show disturbances in social interactions. Using a 'Social Interaction Empathy Task', we found that BPD patients judged neutral and psychologically painful conditions as more painful than healthy subjects. Here, we present the neural correlates underlying these differences in empathy for pain. Female BPD patients and healthy controls completed the 'Social Interaction Empathy Task' during EEG recording. Event-related potentials (ERP) were analysed for an early anterior component and a late latency positivity. Empathic abilities were assessed using the Interpersonal Reactivity Index and early aversive experiences were measured by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). ERPs in the patient group matched the behaviour results and correlated with the level of personal distress and CTQ. In addition, ERPs of patients were predicted by childhood maltreatment and stress. Taken together, our findings indicate that the observed behavioural differences between patients with BPD and controls might be due to modulatory effects of empathic abilities on the evaluation of pain-related social stimuli, which are supposed to be based on childhood maltreatment.

  4. Interactive Methods for Teaching Action Potentials, an Example of Teaching Innovation from Neuroscience Postdoctoral Fellows in the Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen-Rhinehart, E; Eisen, A; Eaton, D; McCormack, K

    2009-01-01

    Acquiring a faculty position in academia is extremely competitive and now typically requires more than just solid research skills and knowledge of one's field. Recruiting institutions currently desire new faculty that can teach effectively, but few postdoctoral positions provide any training in teaching methods. Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) is a successful postdoctoral training program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) providing training in both research and teaching methodology. The FIRST program provides fellows with outstanding interdisciplinary biomedical research training in fields such as neuroscience. The postdoctoral research experience is integrated with a teaching program which includes a How to Teach course, instruction in classroom technology and course development and mentored teaching. During their mentored teaching experiences, fellows are encouraged to explore innovative teaching methodologies and to perform science teaching research to improve classroom learning. FIRST fellows teaching neuroscience to undergraduates have observed that many of these students have difficulty with the topic of neuroscience. Therefore, we investigated the effects of interactive teaching methods for this topic. We tested two interactive teaching methodologies to determine if they would improve learning and retention of this information when compared with standard lectures. The interactive methods for teaching action potentials increased understanding and retention. Therefore, FIRST provides excellent teaching training, partly by enhancing the ability of fellows to integrate innovative teaching methods into their instruction. This training in turn provides fellows that matriculate from this program more of the characteristics that hiring institutions desire in their new faculty.

  5. Interactive Methods for Teaching Action Potentials, an Example of Teaching Innovation from Neuroscience Postdoctoral Fellows in the Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen-Rhinehart, E.; Eisen, A.; Eaton, D.; McCormack, K.

    2009-01-01

    Acquiring a faculty position in academia is extremely competitive and now typically requires more than just solid research skills and knowledge of one’s field. Recruiting institutions currently desire new faculty that can teach effectively, but few postdoctoral positions provide any training in teaching methods. Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) is a successful postdoctoral training program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) providing training in both research and teaching methodology. The FIRST program provides fellows with outstanding interdisciplinary biomedical research training in fields such as neuroscience. The postdoctoral research experience is integrated with a teaching program which includes a How to Teach course, instruction in classroom technology and course development and mentored teaching. During their mentored teaching experiences, fellows are encouraged to explore innovative teaching methodologies and to perform science teaching research to improve classroom learning. FIRST fellows teaching neuroscience to undergraduates have observed that many of these students have difficulty with the topic of neuroscience. Therefore, we investigated the effects of interactive teaching methods for this topic. We tested two interactive teaching methodologies to determine if they would improve learning and retention of this information when compared with standard lectures. The interactive methods for teaching action potentials increased understanding and retention. Therefore, FIRST provides excellent teaching training, partly by enhancing the ability of fellows to integrate innovative teaching methods into their instruction. This training in turn provides fellows that matriculate from this program more of the characteristics that hiring institutions desire in their new faculty. PMID:23493377

  6. Artemether-Lumefantrine Combination Therapy for Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria: The Potential for Complex Interactions with Antiretroviral Drugs in HIV-Infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Byakika-Kibwika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of malaria in HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART poses significant challenges. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL is one of the artemisisnin-based combination therapies recommended for treatment of malaria. The drug combination is highly efficacious against sensitive and multidrug resistant falciparum malaria. Both artemether and lumefantrine are metabolized by hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450 enzymes which metabolize the protease inhibitors (PIs and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs used for HIV treatment. Coadministration of NNRTIs and PIs with AL could potentially cause complex pharmacokinetic drug interactions. NNRTI by inducing CYP450 3A4 enzyme and PIs by inhibiting CYP450 3A4 enzymes could influence both artemether and lumefantrine concentrations and their active metabolites dihydroartemisinin and desbutyl-lumefantrine, predisposing patients to poor treatment response, toxicity, and risk for development of resistance. There are scanty data on these interactions and their consequences. Pharmacokinetic studies to evaluate these interactions in the target populations are urgently needed.

  7. Zooplankton Structure and Potential Food Web Interactions in the Plankton of a Subtropical Chain-of-Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl E. Havens

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the taxonomic and size structure of macro-zooplankton and its potential role in controlling phytoplankton in the Kissimmee Chain-of-Lakes, six shallow interconnected lakes in Florida, U.S. Macro-zooplankton species biomass and standard limnological attributes (temperature, pH, total phosphorus [TP], chlorophyll a [Chl a], and Secchi transparency were quantified on a bimonthly basis from April 1997 to February 1999. Concentrations of TP ranged from below 50 to over 150 μg l-1. Peak concentrations of particulate P coincided with maximal Chl a, and in one instance a high concentration of soluble reactive P followed. The cladoceran zooplankton was dominated by small species, including Eubosmina tubicen, Ceriodaphnia rigaudi, and Daphnia ambigua. The exotic daphnid, D. lumholtzii, periodically was abundant. The copepods were strongly dominated by Diaptomus dorsalis, a species previously shown to be highly resistant to fish predation. These results, and findings of controlled experiments on a nearby lake with a nearly identical zooplankton species complement, suggest that fish predation may be a major factor structuring the macro-zooplankton assemblage. Zooplankton biomass, on the other hand, may be affected by resource availability. There was a significant positive relationship between average biomass of macro-zooplankton and the average concentration of TP among the six lakes. No such relationship existed between zooplankton biomass and Chl a, suggesting that the predominant food web in these systems may be based on bacteria-plankton, as has been documented in nearby Lake Okeechobee. All of the zooplankton taxa encountered in the Kissimmee Chain-of-Lakes (except Mesocyclops edax are known bacteria grazers in Florida lakes. Phytoplankton biomass, measured as Chl a, was strongly associated with TP, both within and across lakes. Phytoplankton biomass was not associated with the biomass of zooplankton. These results, when

  8. LASSBio-897 Reduces Lung Injury Induced by Silica Particles in Mice: Potential Interaction with the A2A Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Vinicius F.; Ferreira, Tatiana P. T.; de Arantes, Ana C. S.; Noël, François; Tesch, Roberta; Sant’Anna, Carlos M. R.; Barreiro, Eliezer J. L.; Fraga, Carlos A. M.; Rodrigues e Silva, Patrícia M.; Martins, Marco A.

    2017-01-01

    Silicosis is a lethal fibro-granulomatous pulmonary disease highly prevalent in developing countries, for which no proper therapy is available. Among a small series of N-acylhydrazones, the safrole-derived compound LASSBio-897 (3-thienylidene-3, 4-methylenedioxybenzoylhydrazide) raised interest due to its ability to bind to the adenosine A2A receptor. Here, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic potential of LASSBio-897, exploring translation to a mouse model of silicosis and the A2A receptor as a site of action. Pulmonary mechanics, inflammatory, and fibrotic changes were assessed 28 days after intranasal instillation of silica particles in Swiss–Webster mice. Glosensor cAMP HEK293G cells, CHO cells stably expressing human adenosine receptors and ligand binding assay were used to evaluate the pharmacological properties of LASSBio-897 in vitro. Molecular docking studies of LASSBio-897 were performed using the genetic algorithm software GOLD 5.2. We found that the interventional treatment with the A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 reversed silica particle-induced airway hyper-reactivity as revealed by increased responses of airway resistance and lung elastance following aerosolized methacholine. LASSBio-897 (2 and 5 mg/kg, oral) similarly reversed pivotal lung pathological features of silicosis in this model, reducing levels of airway resistance and lung elastance, granuloma formation and collagen deposition. In competition assays, LASSBio-897 decreased the binding of the selective A2A receptor agonist [3H]-CGS21680 (IC50 = 9.3 μM). LASSBio-897 (50 μM) induced modest cAMP production in HEK293G cells, but it clearly synergized the cAMP production by adenosine in a mechanism sensitive to the A2A antagonist SCH 58261. This synergism was also seen in CHO cells expressing the A2A, but not those expressing A2B, A1 or A3 receptors. Based on the evidence that LASSBio-897 binds to A2A receptor, molecular docking studies were performed using the A2A receptor

  9. LASSBio-897 Reduces Lung Injury Induced by Silica Particles in Mice: Potential Interaction with the A2A Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius F. Carvalho

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Silicosis is a lethal fibro-granulomatous pulmonary disease highly prevalent in developing countries, for which no proper therapy is available. Among a small series of N-acylhydrazones, the safrole-derived compound LASSBio-897 (3-thienylidene-3, 4-methylenedioxybenzoylhydrazide raised interest due to its ability to bind to the adenosine A2A receptor. Here, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic potential of LASSBio-897, exploring translation to a mouse model of silicosis and the A2A receptor as a site of action. Pulmonary mechanics, inflammatory, and fibrotic changes were assessed 28 days after intranasal instillation of silica particles in Swiss–Webster mice. Glosensor cAMP HEK293G cells, CHO cells stably expressing human adenosine receptors and ligand binding assay were used to evaluate the pharmacological properties of LASSBio-897 in vitro. Molecular docking studies of LASSBio-897 were performed using the genetic algorithm software GOLD 5.2. We found that the interventional treatment with the A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 reversed silica particle-induced airway hyper-reactivity as revealed by increased responses of airway resistance and lung elastance following aerosolized methacholine. LASSBio-897 (2 and 5 mg/kg, oral similarly reversed pivotal lung pathological features of silicosis in this model, reducing levels of airway resistance and lung elastance, granuloma formation and collagen deposition. In competition assays, LASSBio-897 decreased the binding of the selective A2A receptor agonist [3H]-CGS21680 (IC50 = 9.3 μM. LASSBio-897 (50 μM induced modest cAMP production in HEK293G cells, but it clearly synergized the cAMP production by adenosine in a mechanism sensitive to the A2A antagonist SCH 58261. This synergism was also seen in CHO cells expressing the A2A, but not those expressing A2B, A1 or A3 receptors. Based on the evidence that LASSBio-897 binds to A2A receptor, molecular docking studies were performed using the

  10. The importance of ‘double embeddedness’: The potential of migrants in international interactions and in the creation of national images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantović Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper closely examines the influence of trans-migrants on the formation and development of interactions between the country of origin and the adopted country, based on the previous ethnoantropological, politicological, sociological and communicological researches. The potential of migrant activities is studied in interactions between countries, societies and cultures, as well as in the formation of national and country images. The dual identity and dual ideology of trans-migrants is viewed as an important factor for possible improvement of international relations, while avoiding unnecessary segregations and conflicts. Therefore, research of different aspects of cultural, economic and political cooperation with members of various migrant groups could lead to results that could stimulate overall improvement of international communication and other interactions, minimalising 'problematic' differences between societies. The results of the research can also be used to form a well-thought activity wich is important for an appropriate functioning in global processes. Non-existence of the activity could result in an inability of a country to successfully communicate in international relations but also with its own citizens. The aim of this work is to incite further research and discussions about the relations between the migrants, the country of origin and the adopted country, with the diaspora acting as the potential springboard for future development of international relations while applying the scientific conclusions on the creation of the national strategy in a sense of defining the international relations and the policy of identity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 47016: Interdisciplinarno istraživanje kulturnog i jezičkog nasleđa Srbije. Izrada multimedijalnog internet portala ‘Pojmovnik srpske kulture’

  11. Use of Spectroscopic, Zeta Potential and Molecular Dynamic Techniques to Study the Interaction between Human Holo-Transferrin and Two Antagonist Drugs: Comparison of Binary and Ternary Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Saberi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the binding of ropinirole hydrochloride (ROP and aspirin (ASA to human holo-transferrin (hTf has been investigated by spectroscopic approaches (fluorescence quenching, synchronous fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism, resonance light scattering, as well as zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques, under simulated physiological conditions. Fluorescence analysis was used to estimate the effect of the ROP and ASA drugs on the fluorescence of hTf as well as to define the binding and quenching properties of binary and ternary complexes. The synchronized fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrated some micro-environmental and conformational changes around the Trp and Tyr residues with a faint red shift. Thermodynamic analysis displayed the van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds interactions are the major acting forces in stabilizing the complexes. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of complexes are static mechanism. The effect of the drugs aggregating on the hTf resulted in an enhancement of the resonance light scattering (RLS intensity. The average binding distance between were computed according to the forster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The circular dichroism (CD spectral examinations indicated that the binding of the drugs induced a conformational change of hTf. Measurements of the zeta potential indicated that the combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between ROP, ASA and hTf formed micelle-like clusters. The molecular modeling confirmed the experimental results. This study is expected to provide important insight into the interaction of hTf with ROP and ASA to use in various toxicological and therapeutic processes.

  12. Distance to high-voltage power lines and risk of childhood leukemia--an analysis of confounding by and interaction with other potential risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Pedersen

    Full Text Available We investigated whether there is an interaction between distance from residence at birth to nearest power line and domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution, respectively, in relation to childhood leukemia risk. Further, we investigated whether adjusting for potential confounders alters the association between distance to nearest power line and childhood leukemia. We included 1024 cases aged <15, diagnosed with leukemia during 1968-1991, from the Danish Cancer Registry and 2048 controls randomly selected from the Danish childhood population and individually matched by gender and year of birth. We used geographical information systems to determine the distance between residence at birth and the nearest 132-400 kV overhead power line. Concentrations of domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution (NOx at the front door were estimated using validated models. We found a statistically significant interaction between distance to nearest power line and domestic radon regarding risk of childhood leukemia (p = 0.01 when using the median radon level as cut-off point but not when using the 75th percentile (p = 0.90. We found no evidence of an interaction between distance to nearest power line and traffic-related air pollution (p = 0.73. We found almost no change in the estimated association between distance to power line and risk of childhood leukemia when adjusting for socioeconomic status of the municipality, urbanization, maternal age, birth order, domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution. The statistically significant interaction between distance to nearest power line and domestic radon was based on few exposed cases and controls and sensitive to the choice of exposure categorization and might, therefore, be due to chance.

  13. Fe3O4 nanoparticles and nanocomposites with potential application in biomedicine and in communication technologies: Nanoparticle aggregation, interaction, and effective magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allia, P.; Barrera, G.; Tiberto, P.; Nardi, T.; Leterrier, Y.; Sangermano, M.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles with a size of 5-6 nm with potential impact on biomedicine and information/communication technologies were synthesized by thermal decomposition of Fe(acac)3 and subsequently coated with a silica shell exploiting a water-in-oil synthetic procedure. The as-produced powders (comprised of either Fe3O4 or Fe3O4@silica nanoparticles) were mixed with a photocurable resin obtaining two magnetic nanocomposites with the same nominal amount of magnetic material. The static magnetic properties of the two nanopowders and the corresponding nanocomposites were measured in the 10 K-300 K temperature range. Magnetic measurements are shown here to be able to give unambiguous information on single-particle properties such as particle size and magnetic anisotropy as well as on nanoparticle aggregation and interparticle interaction. A comparison between the size distribution functions obtained from magnetic measurements and from TEM images shows that figures estimated from properly analyzed magnetic measurements are very close to the actual values. In addition, the present analysis allows us to determine the value of the effective magnetic anisotropy and to estimate the anisotropy contribution from the surface. The Field-cooled/zero field cooled curves reveal a high degree of particle aggregation in the Fe3O4 nanopowder, which is partially reduced by silica coating and strongly decreased by dissolution in the host polymer. In all considered materials, the nanoparticles are magnetically interacting, the interaction strength being a function of nanoparticle environment and being the lowest in the nanocomposite containing bare, well-separate Fe3O4 particles. All samples behave as interacting superparamagnetic materials instead of ideal superparamagnets and follow the corresponding scaling law.

  14. Prevalência de potenciais interações medicamentosas droga-droga em unidades de terapia intensiva Potential drug interactions prevalence in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean André Hammes

    2008-12-01

    presence of another drug. They are usually unpredictable and undesirable. A study was conducted to verify the prevalence and clinical value of potential drug interactions in intensive care units METHODS: All patients, of three intensive care units were included in a cross-sectional study, over a period of two months. Patients with less than a 2 days length of stay were excluded. Data were collected from twenty-four hour prescriptions and all possible paired combinations drug-drug were recorded. Prevalence and clinical value (significance were checked at the end of follow-up. RESULTS: One hundred and forty patients were analyzed, 67.1% presented with some significant potential drug interactions and of the 1069 prescriptions, 39.2% disclosed the same potential. Of 188 different potential drug interactions, 29 were considered highly significant. Univariate analysis showed that in the group with significant potential drug interactions a higher number of different drugs, drugs/day had been used, there were more prescribing physicians and extended stay in intensive care units. Adjusted to the multivariate logistic regression model, only the number of drugs/day correlated with increased risk of significant potential drug interaction (p = 0.0011 and, furthermore that use of more than 6 drugs/day increased relative risk by 9.8 times. CONCLUSIONS: Critically ill patients are submitted to high risk of potential drug interactions and the number of drugs/day has a high positive predictive value for these interactions. Therefore, it is imperative that critical care physicians be constantly alert to recognize this problem and provide appropriate mechanisms for management, thereby reducing adverse outcomes.

  15. Prioritization of potential drug targets against P. aeruginosa by core proteomic analysis using computational subtractive genomics and Protein-Protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Reaz; Jamil, Faiza

    2018-03-08

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic gram-negative bacterium that has the capability to acquire resistance under hostile conditions and become a threat worldwide. It is involved in nosocomial infections. In the current study, potential novel drug targets against P. aeruginosa have been identified using core proteomic analysis and Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) studies. The non-redundant reference proteome of 68 strains having complete genome and latest assembly version of P. aeruginosa were downloaded from ftp NCBI RefSeq server in October 2016. The standalone CD-HIT tool was used to cluster ortholog proteins (having >=80% amino acid identity) present in all strains. The pan-proteome was clustered in 12,380 Clusters of Orthologous Proteins (COPs). By using in-house shell scripts, 3252 common COPs were extracted out and designated as clusters of core proteome. The core proteome of PAO1 strain was selected by fetching PAO1's proteome from common COPs. As a result, 1212 proteins were shortlisted that are non-homologous to the human but essential for the survival of the pathogen. Among these 1212 proteins, 321 proteins are conserved hypothetical proteins. Considering their potential as drug target, those 321 hypothetical proteins were selected and their probable functions were characterized. Based on the druggability criteria, 18 proteins were shortlisted. The interacting partners were identified by investigating the PPIs network using STRING v10 database. Subsequently, 8 proteins were shortlisted as 'hub proteins' and proposed as potential novel drug targets against P. aeruginosa. The study is interesting for the scientific community working to identify novel drug targets against MDR pathogens particularly P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interaction of carvacrol with the Ascaris suum nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, potential mechanism of antinematodal action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trailović, Saša M; Marjanović, Djordje S; Nedeljković Trailović, Jelena; Robertson, Alan P; Martin, Richard J

    2015-08-01

    Essential plant oils (or their active principles) are safe to use and a potentially attractive alternative to current antiparasitic drugs. In the present study, we tested the effects of carvacrol on the isolated tissues of Ascaris suum and investigated potential interactions with other antiparasitic drugs. We used somatic muscle flaps for contraction assays, as well as for electrophysiological investigations. Carvacrol 300 μM highly significantly inhibited contractions caused by 1, 3, 10, 30, and 100 μM of ACh (p = 0.0023, p = 0.0002, p = 0.0002, p acetylcholine was 8.87 μM (log EC50 = 0.95 ± 0.26), while R max was 2.53 ± 0.24 g. The EC50 of acetylcholine in the presence of 300 μM of carvacrol was 27.71 μM (log EC50 = 1.44 ± 0.28) and the R max decreased to 1.63 ± 0.32 g. Furthermore, carvacrol highly significant potentiates inhibitory effect of GABA and piperazine on the contractions induced by ACh. However, carvacrol (100 and 300 μM), did not produce any changes in the membrane potential or conductance of the A. suum muscle cell. While, 300 μM of carvacrol showed a significant inhibitory effect on ACh-induced depolarization response. The mean control depolarization was 13.58 ± 0.66 mV and decreased in presence of carvacrol to 4.50 ± 1.02 mV (p < 0.0001). Mean control Δg was 0.168 ± 0.017 μS, while in the presence of 300 μM of carvacrol, Δg significantly decreased to 0.060 ± 0.018 ΔS (p = 0.0017). The inhibitory effect on contractions may be the explanation of the antinematodal potential of carvacrol. Moreover, inhibition of depolarizations caused by ACh and reduction of conductance changes directly points to an interaction with the nAChR in A. suum.

  17. Distance to High-Voltage Power Lines and Risk of Childhood Leukemia – an Analysis of Confounding by and Interaction with Other Potential Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Camilla; Bräuner, Elvira V; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an interaction between distance from residence at birth to nearest power line and domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution, respectively, in relation to childhood leukemia risk. Further, we investigated whether adjusting for potential confounders alters....... We used geographical information systems to determine the distance between residence at birth and the nearest 132-400 kV overhead power line. Concentrations of domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution (NOx at the front door) were estimated using validated models. We found a statistically...... and traffic-related air pollution (p = 0.73). We found almost no change in the estimated association between distance to power line and risk of childhood leukemia when adjusting for socioeconomic status of the municipality, urbanization, maternal age, birth order, domestic radon and traffic-related air...

  18. RNA sequencing indicates that atrazine induces multiple detoxification genes in Daphnia magna and this is a potential source of its mixture interactions with other chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Allison M; Sengupta, Namrata; Saski, Christopher A; Noorai, Rooksana E; Baldwin, William S

    2017-12-01

    Atrazine is an herbicide with several known toxicologically relevant effects, including interactions with other chemicals. Atrazine increases the toxicity of several organophosphates and has been shown to reduce the toxicity of triclosan to D. magna in a concentration dependent manner. Atrazine is a potent activator in vitro of the xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptor, HR96, related to vertebrate constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X-receptor (PXR). RNA sequencing (RNAseq) was performed to determine if atrazine is inducing phase I-III detoxification enzymes in vivo, and estimate its potential for mixture interactions. RNAseq analysis demonstrates induction of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), cytochrome P450s (CYPs), glucosyltransferases (UDPGTs), and xenobiotic transporters, of which several are verified by qPCR. Pathway analysis demonstrates changes in drug, glutathione, and sphingolipid metabolism, indicative of HR96 activation. Based on our RNAseq data, we hypothesized as to which environmentally relevant chemicals may show altered toxicity with co-exposure to atrazine. Acute toxicity tests were performed to determine individual LC 50 and Hillslope values as were toxicity tests with binary mixtures containing atrazine. The observed mixture toxicity was compared with modeled mixture toxicity using the Computational Approach to the Toxicity Assessment of Mixtures (CATAM) to assess whether atrazine is exerting antagonism, additivity, or synergistic toxicity in accordance with our hypothesis. Atrazine-triclosan mixtures showed decreased toxicity as expected; atrazine-parathion, atrazine-endosulfan, and to a lesser extent atrazine-p-nonylphenol mixtures showed increased toxicity. In summary, exposure to atrazine activates HR96, and induces phase I-III detoxification genes that are likely responsible for mixture interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Consumer Mobile Apps for Potential Drug-Drug Interaction Check: Systematic Review and Content Analysis Using the Mobile App Rating Scale (MARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ben Yb; Sharafoddini, Anis; Tran, Nam; Wen, Emily Y; Lee, Joon

    2018-03-28

    General consumers can now easily access drug information and quickly check for potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) through mobile health (mHealth) apps. With aging population in Canada, more people have chronic diseases and comorbidities leading to increasing numbers of medications. The use of mHealth apps for checking PDDIs can be helpful in ensuring patient safety and empowerment. The aim of this study was to review the characteristics and quality of publicly available mHealth apps that check for PDDIs. Apple App Store and Google Play were searched to identify apps with PDDI functionality. The apps' general and feature characteristics were extracted. The Mobile App Rating Scale (MARS) was used to assess the quality. A total of 23 apps were included for the review-12 from Apple App Store and 11 from Google Play. Only 5 of these were paid apps, with an average price of $7.19 CAD. The mean MARS score was 3.23 out of 5 (interquartile range 1.34). The mean MARS scores for the apps from Google Play and Apple App Store were not statistically different (P=.84). The information dimension was associated with the highest score (3.63), whereas the engagement dimension resulted in the lowest score (2.75). The total number of features per app, average rating, and price were significantly associated with the total MARS score. Some apps provided accurate and comprehensive information about potential adverse drug effects from PDDIs. Given the potentially severe consequences of incorrect drug information, there is a need for oversight to eliminate low quality and potentially harmful apps. Because managing PDDIs is complex in the absence of complete information, secondary features such as medication reminder, refill reminder, medication history tracking, and pill identification could help enhance the effectiveness of PDDI apps. ©Ben YB Kim, Anis Sharafoddini, Nam Tran, Emily Y Wen, Joon Lee. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 28.03.2018.

  20. Endogenous 17ß-estradiol is required for activity-dependent long-term potentiation in the striatum: interaction with the dopaminergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eTozzi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 17β-estradiol (E2, a neurosteroid synthesized by P450-aromatase (ARO, modulates various brain functions. We characterized the role of the locally synthesized E2 on striatal long-term synaptic plasticity and explored possible interactions between E2 receptors (ERs and dopamine (DA receptors in the dorsal striatum of adult male rats. Inhibition of E2 synthesis or antagonism of ERs prevented the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP in both medium spiny neurons (MSNs and cholinergic interneurons (ChIs. Activation of a D1-like DA receptor/cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway restored LTP. In MSNs exogenous E2 reversed the effect of ARO inhibition. Also antagonism of M1 muscarinic receptors prevented the D1-like receptor-mediated restoration of LTP confirming a role for ChIs in controlling the E2-mediated LTP of MSNs. A novel striatal interaction, occurring between ERs and D1-like receptors in both MSNs and ChIs, might be critical to regulate basal ganglia physiology and to compensate synaptic alterations in Parkinson's disease.

  1. Probing molecular interactions of poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) with lipid matrix models to interpret the therapeutic potential of the co-polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shubhadeep; Pal, Tapan K; Guha, Sujoy K

    2012-03-01

    To understand and maximize the therapeutic potential of poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) (SMA), a synthetic, pharmacologically-active co-polymer, its effect on conformation, phase behavior and stability of lipid matrix models of cell membranes were investigated. The modes of interaction between SMA and lipid molecules were also studied. While, attenuated total reflection-Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and static (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment