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Sample records for alpha-nucleus interaction potential

  1. {alpha}-nucleus potentials and photon-induced nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaviz, D. E-mail: redondo@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de; Babilon, M.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Hillier, R.; Mate, Z.; Mohr, P.; Rauscher, T.; Somorjai, E.; Zilges, A.; Zolnai, L

    2003-05-05

    New data for the {sup 112,124}Sn({alpha},{alpha}){sup 112,124}Sn reaction have been measured and are presently analyzed. Results of the {sup 112} Sn x {alpha} potential at the energy E{sub c.m.} {approx} 14 MeV are presented. The determination of this {alpha}-nucleus potential may allow a prediction of the {sup 112}Sn({alpha},{gamma}){sup 116}Te cross section.

  2. Alpha-nucleus potential for alpha-decay and sub-barrier fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, V Y

    2005-01-01

    The set of parameters for alpha-nucleus potential is derived by using the data for both the alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections around the barrier for reactions alpha+40Ca, alpha+59Co, alpha+208Pb. The alpha-decay half-lives are obtained in the framework of a cluster model using the WKB approximation. The evaluated alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections agreed well with the data. Fusion reactions between alpha-particle and heavy nuclei can be used for both the formation of very heavy nuclei and spectroscopic studies of the formed compound nuclei.

  3. Alpha-nucleus potential for alpha-decay and sub-barrier fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Ikezoe, H.

    2005-01-01

    The set of parameters for alpha-nucleus potential is derived by using the data for both the alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections around the barrier for reactions alpha+40Ca, alpha+59Co, alpha+208Pb. The alpha-decay half-lives are obtained in the framework of a cluster model using the WKB approximation. The evaluated alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections agreed well with the data. Fusion reactions between alpha-particle and heavy nuclei can be used for both the f...

  4. Determination of {alpha}-nucleus potentials by {alpha}-elastic scattering and its implications for the {gamma}-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaviz, D. E-mail: redondo@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de; Babilon, M.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Mate, Z.; Hillier, R.; Mohr, P.; Rauscher, T.; Somorjai, E.; Zilges, A.; Zolnai, L

    2003-05-19

    Complete angular distributions for the reactions {sup 112,124}Sn({alpha},{alpha}){sup 112,124}Sn have been measured at different energies around the Coulomb barrier. Preliminary results for the {sup 112}Sn x {alpha} and {sup 124}Sn x {alpha} potentials at the energy E{sub c.m.} {approx} 19 MeV are presented. The full determination of the a-nucleus potential for both nuclides may also help to understand the behaviour of {alpha}-nucleus potentials along an isotopic chain.

  5. Description of alpha-nucleus interaction cross sections for cosmic ray shielding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of high-energy alpha particles with target nuclei important for cosmic ray studies are discussed. Models for elastic, quasi-elastic, and breakup reactions are presented and compared with experimental data. Energy-dependent interaction cross sections and secondary spectra are presented based on theoretical models and the limited experimental data base.

  6. Diatomic interaction potential theory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Goodisman, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Diatomic Interaction Potential Theory, Volume 2: Applications discusses the variety of applicable theoretical material and approaches in the calculations for diatomic systems in their ground states. The volume covers the descriptions and illustrations of modern calculations. Chapter I discusses the calculation of the interaction potential for large and small values of the internuclear distance R (separated and united atom limits). Chapter II covers the methods used for intermediate values of R, which in principle means any values of R. The Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction schemes des

  7. Higgs Potential from Derivative Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Quadri, A

    2016-01-01

    A formulation of the linear $\\sigma$ model with derivative interactions is studied. The theory is on-shell equivalent to the model with a quartic Higgs potential. The mass of the scalar mode only appears in the quadratic part and not in the interaction vertices, unlike in the ordinary formulation of the theory. Renormalization of the model is discussed. A natural non power-counting renormalizable extension of the theory is presented. The model is physically equivalent to the inclusion of a dimension six effective operator $\\partial_\\mu (\\Phi^\\dagger \\Phi) \\partial^\\mu (\\Phi^\\dagger \\Phi)$. The resulting UV divergences are arranged in a perturbation series around the power-counting renormalizable theory. UV completion of the non-power-counting renormalizable model through a symmetric deformation of the propagator of the massive physical scalar is addressed.

  8. Developing a general interaction potential for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Stephen H; Røyne, Anja; Kristiansen, Kai; Rapp, Michael V; Das, Saurabh; Gebbie, Matthew A; Lee, Dong Woog; Stock, Philipp; Valtiner, Markus; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2015-02-24

    We review direct force measurements on a broad class of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These measurements have enabled the development of a general interaction potential per unit area, W(D) = -2γ(i)Hy exp(-D/D(H)) in terms of a nondimensional Hydra parameter, Hy, that applies to both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between extended surfaces. This potential allows one to quantitatively account for additional attractions and repulsions not included in the well-known combination of electrostatic double layer and van der Waals theories, the so-called Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The interaction energy is exponentially decaying with decay length D(H) ≈ 0.3-2 nm for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, with the exact value of D(H) depending on the precise system and conditions. The pre-exponential factor depends on the interfacial tension, γ(i), of the interacting surfaces and Hy. For Hy > 0, the interaction potential describes interactions between partially hydrophobic surfaces, with the maximum hydrophobic interaction (i.e., two fully hydrophobic surfaces) corresponding to Hy = 1. Hydrophobic interactions between hydrophobic monolayer surfaces measured with the surface forces apparatus (SFA) are shown to be well described by the proposed interaction potential. The potential becomes repulsive for Hy < 0, corresponding to partially hydrophilic (hydrated) interfaces. Hydrated surfaces such as mica, silica, and lipid bilayers are discussed and reviewed in the context of the values of Hy appropriate for each system.

  9. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A M; DeWitt, B A; Lukes, A L

    2000-07-01

    Potential and documented interactions between alternative therapy agents and warfarin are discussed. An estimated one third of adults in the United States use alternative therapies, including herbs. A major safety concern is potential interactions of alternative medicine products with prescription medications. This issue is especially important with respect to drugs with narrow therapeutic indexes, such as warfarin. Herbal products that may potentially increase the risk of bleeding or potentiate the effects of warfarin therapy include angelica root, arnica flower, anise, asafoetida, bogbean, borage seed oil, bromelain, capsicum, celery, chamomile, clove, fenugreek, feverfew, garlic, ginger ginkgo, horse chestnut, licorice root, lovage root, meadowsweet, onion, parsley, passionflower herb, poplar, quassia, red clover, rue, sweet clover, turmeric, and willow bark. Products that have been associated with documented reports of potential interactions with warfarin include coenzyme Q10, danshen, devil's claw, dong quai, ginseng, green tea, papain, and vitamin E. Interpretation of the available information on herb-warfarin interactions is difficult because nearly all of it is based on in vitro data, animal studies, or individual case reports. More study is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions. There is evidence that a wide range of alternative therapy products have the potential to interact with warfarin. Pharmacists and other health care professionals should question all patients about use of alternative therapies and report documented interactions to FDA's MedWatch program.

  10. A new interaction potential for swarming models

    CERN Document Server

    Carrillo, J A; Panferov, V

    2012-01-01

    We consider a self-propelled particle system which has been used to describe certain types of collective motion of animals, such as fish schools and bird flocks. Interactions between particles are specified by means of a pairwise potential, repulsive at short ranges and attractive at longer ranges. The exponentially decaying Morse potential is a typical choice, and is known to reproduce certain types of collective motion observed in nature, particularly aligned flocks and rotating mills. We introduce a class of interaction potentials, that we call Quasi-Morse, for which flock and rotating mills states are also observed numerically, however in that case the corresponding macroscopic equations allow for explicit solutions in terms of special functions, with coefficients that can be obtained numerically without solving the particle evolution. We compare thus obtained solutions with long-time dynamics of the particle systems and find a close agreement for several types of flock and mill solutions.

  11. Potential interaction between pomegranate juice and warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komperda, Kathy E

    2009-08-01

    To my knowledge, no published reports have described an interaction between pomegranate juice and warfarin. Investigators from previous animal and in vitro studies have reported a potential for pomegranate juice to inhibit metabolism involving the cytochrome P450 system, an effect that could translate into a clinical drug-diet interaction with warfarin. This case report describes a 64-year-old Caucasian woman who was treated with warfarin for recurrent deep vein thrombosis. She had been receiving a relatively stable dosage of warfarin 4 mg/day for several months, with stable international normalized ratios (INRs). During that time, the patient was consuming pomegranate juice 2-3 times/week. She stopped drinking the juice, and her INRs became subtherapeutic. Her dosage of warfarin was increased to maintain therapeutic anticoagulation. No rechallenge with pomegranate juice was performed. Use of the Drug Interaction Probability Scale indicated a possible relationship between the patient's subtherapeutic INR and the pomegranate juice. Although this potential interaction needs to be explored further, clinicians should be aware of the interaction and thoroughly interview and closely monitor their patients who are receiving warfarin.

  12. PRESENTATION POTENTIAL USING IN PEDAGOGICAL INTERACTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Ershova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The given article is aimed at considering multimedia presentation potential and its influence on strengthening classroom teacher-student interaction. In the article the importance of using this kind of activity in the study process is pointed in connection with educational state policy on the one hand. On the other hand, gained students’ skills as a final result of work with presentations met employers’ demand for both parent and world labour-markets and bring competitive benefit to the candidates. Scientific novelty and results. Multimedia presentation is considered as a specific complex of classroom activities. The students are oriented on the self analysis and presentation assessment. It is shown that well-organized process of peer students’ assessment allows to simultaneously helping in solving the didactic and methodical problems. To this purpose the system of assessment criteria should be developed. It has to be clear for students for making assessment feasible and time-saving. The example of a possible variant of criteria system is described; quality of the presentations prepared by students can be defined based on such system criteria. The author also analyzed software products of the three main platforms (Windows, Linux, MacOs which have different tools and allow to follow users’ needs for creating presentations. In the article there is a comparative table of the two most popular software development: the program Microsoft PowerPoint and the web-service Prezi for realizing the relevance of their use in the study process. Practical significance of the present article concludes in author’s suggestions of some recommendations for presentation potential use as a tool of improving pedagogical interaction process with contemporary students. 

  13. Interaction of elementary waves for equations of potential flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈恕行; 王辉

    1997-01-01

    Interaction of elementary waves for equations of unsteady potential flow in gas dynamics is considered . Under the assumptions on weakness of strength of the elementary waves the structure of solutions has been given in various cases of interaction of simple wave with shock, or interaction between simple waves or shocks. Hence the complete results on interaction of weak elementary waves for second-order equation of potential flow are obtained.

  14. Potential Flow Interactions With Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddhavarapu, Sudhir S.; Meiburg, Eckart

    1999-01-01

    The effect of convective melt motion on the growth of morphological instabilities in crystal growth has been the focus of many studies in the past decade. While most of the efforts have been directed towards investigating the linear stability aspects, relatively little attention has been devoted to experimental and numerical studies. In a pure morphological case, when there is no flow, morphological changes in the solid-liquid interface are governed by heat conduction and solute distribution. Under the influence of a convective motion, both heat and solute are redistributed, thereby affecting the intrinsic morphological phenomenon. The overall effect of the convective motion could be either stabilizing or destabilizing. Recent investigations have predicted stabilization by a flow parallel to the interface. In the case of non-parallel flows, e.g., stagnation point flow, Brattkus and Davis have found a new flow-induced morphological instability that occurs at long wavelengths and also consists of waves propagating against the flow. Other studies have addressed the nonlinear aspects (Konstantinos and Brown, Wollkind and Segel)). In contrast to the earlier studies, our present investigation focuses on the effects of the potential flow fields typically encountered in Hele-Shaw cells. Such a Hele-Shaw cell can simulate a gravity-free environment in the sense that buoyancy-driven convection is largely suppressed, and hence negligible. Our interest lies both in analyzing the linear stability of the solidification process in the presence of potential flow fields, as well as in performing high-accuracy nonlinear simulations. Linear stability analysis can be performed for the flow configuration mentioned above. It is observed that a parallel potential flow is stabilizing and gives rise to waves traveling downstream. We have built a highly accurate numerical scheme which is validated at small amplitudes by comparing with the analytically predicted results for the pure

  15. Discrete Time Markovian Agents Interacting Through a Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Budhiraja, Amarjit; Rubenthaler, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    A discrete time stochastic model for a multiagent system given in terms of a large collection of interacting Markov chains is studied. The evolution of the interacting particles is described through a time inhomogeneous transition probability kernel that depends on the 'gradient' of the potential field. The particles, in turn, dynamically modify the potential field through their cumulative input. Interacting Markov processes of the above form have been suggested as models for active biological transport in response to external stimulus such as a chemical gradient. One of the basic mathematical challenges is to develop a general theory of stability for such interacting Markovian systems and for the corresponding nonlinear Markov processes that arise in the large agent limit. Such a theory would be key to a mathematical understanding of the interactive structure formation that results from the complex feedback between the agents and the potential field. It will also be a crucial ingredient in developing simulat...

  16. Helium-3 Microscopic Optical Model Potential Based on Skyrme Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The helium-3 microscopic optical potential is obtained by Green function method through nuclear matter approximation and local density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The reaction cross

  17. Calculation of Interaction Potentials between Spherical and Deformed Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gao-Long; XU Xin-Xing; BAI Chun-Lin; YU Ning; ZHANG Huan-Qiao; LIU Zu-Hua; ZHANG Chun-Lei; LIN Cheng-Jian; YANG Feng; AN Guang-Peng; JIA Hui-Ming; WU Zhen-Dong

    2007-01-01

    The interaction potential for spherical-deformed reaction partners is calculated. The shape, separation and orientation dependence of the interaction potential and fusion cross section of the system 32S+154Sm are investigated within the double-folding model of the deformed nuclei. The effective nucleon-nucleon interaction is taken to be the M3Y-Reid potential. The density is considered for three terms of the expansion using the truncated multipole expansion method, which is a deformed Fermi shape with quadrupole and hexadecapole for the density distribution of 154Sm. It is found for the interaction potential that the height and the position of barrier strongly depend on the deformations, the orientation angle of the deformed nucleus, and hence produce great effects on fusion cross section. The integrated fusion cross section is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendel Mombaque dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r. Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000 and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p < 0.00. The clinical impact was prevalent sedation and cardiotoxicity. Conclusions: the PDDI identified in this study of moderate and higher severity are events that not only affect the therapeutic response leading to toxicity in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs.

  19. Incidence of potential drug-drug interactions with antidiabetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samardzic, I; Bacic-Vrca, V

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to achieve normoglycemia more than one antidiabetic agent is usually needed. Diabetes is associated with several comorbidities and patients with diabetes are often treated with multiple medications. Therefore, patients with diabetes are especially exposed to drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence and type of potential DDIs of antidiabetic drugs in patients with diabetes. This retrospective study analyzed pharmacy record data of 225 patients with diabetes mellitus. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients who were taking at least one antidiabetic agent during the period of six months were included. We investigated associated therapy in that period in order to identify potential DDIs with antidiabetic therapy. Potential interactions were identified by Lexicomp Lexi-Interat Online (Lexi-Comp, Inc., Hudson, USA) software which categorizes potential DDIs according to clinical significance in five types (A, B, C, D and X). Categories C, D and X are of clinical concern and always require medical attention (therapy monitoring, therapy modification or avoiding combination). We found that 80.9% of patients had at least one potential category C interaction while there were no D and X interactions. Most frequently encountered potential DDI (n = 176) included antidiabetic drugs and thiazide or thiazide like diuretics. Patients with diabetes are exposed to a large number of potential clinically significant DDIs that may require appropriate monitoring. Using databases of DDIs could be helpful in reducing the risk of potential clinically significant DDIs.

  20. Risk factors for potential drug interactions in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Gonzalez Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz; Petersen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify patient- and practice-related factors associated with potential drug interactions. Methods: A register analysis study in general practices in the county of Funen, Denmark. Prescription data were retrieved from a population-based prescription database (Odense University...... Pharmacoepidemiologic Database, OPED) covering prescriptions to all inhabitants in the county of Funen, Denmark. All individuals exposed to concurrent use of two or more drugs (polypharmacy) were identified. Combinations of drugs with potential interactions were registered and classified as major, moderate, or minor......, depending on the severity of outcome and the quality of documentation. A two-level random coefficient logistic regression model was used to investigate factors related to potential drug interactions. Results: One-third of the population was exposed to polypharmacy, and 6% were exposed to potential drug...

  1. Effective polarization interaction potentials of the partially ionized dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T S [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, K N [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Omarbakiyeva, Yu A [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Roepke, G [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-04-28

    The effective polarization interaction potential between charged and neutral particles is considered for a partially ionized plasma. This pseudopotential is deduced taking into account quantum-mechanical effects at short distances as well as screening effects at large distances. Furthermore, a cutoff radius is obtained using a modified effective-range theory. Explicit results for parameters describing the interaction of the atom with charged particles are given.

  2. Generation of directional EOF by interactive oscillatory zeta potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chih-Yu; Wang, Chang-Yi; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2008-11-01

    A steady directional EOF due to a nonlinear interaction between oscillatory axial electrical fields and oscillatory wall potentials (zeta potentials) is presented. This is a new mechanism to produce such a mean flow. It is found that the flow velocity depends not on the external driving frequency but on the phase angle difference between the electric fields and the zeta potentials. The formulation can also be reduced to the static EOF straightforwardly. For the purpose of theoretical demonstration, we use the Debye-Huckel approximation for the zeta potential. Results of planar and cylindrical capillaries are given.

  3. Electron interactions in graphene through an effective Coulomb potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Joao N. B.; Adam, Shaffique

    A recent numerical work [H.-K. Tang et al, PRL 115, 186602 (2015)] considering graphene's π-electrons interacting through an effective Coulomb potential that is finite at short-distances, stressed the importance of the sp2 -electrons in determining the semimetal to Mott insulator phase transition in graphene. Some years ago, I. F. Herbut [PRL 97, 146401 (2006)] studied such a transition by mapping graphene's π-electrons into a Gross-Neveu model. From a different perspective, D. T. Son [PRB 75, 235423 (2007)] put the emphasis on the long-range interactions by modelling graphene as Dirac fermions interacting through a bare Coulomb potential. Here we build on these works and explore the phase diagram of Dirac fermions interacting through an effective Coulomb-like potential screened at short-distances. The interaction potential used allows for analytic results that controllably switch between the two perspectives above. This work was supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01 and CA2DM medium-sized centre program) and by the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College (R-607-265-01312).

  4. Observational evidences of the Yukawa Potential Interacting Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Man Ho

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations in galaxies and clusters indicate dark matter density profiles exhibit core-like structures which contradict to the numerical simulation results of collisionless cold dark matter. On the other hand, it has been shown that cold dark matter particles interacting through a Yukawa potential could naturally explain the cores in dwarf galaxies. In this article, I use the Yukawa Potential interacting dark matter model to derive two simple scaling relations on the galactic and cluster scales respectively, which give excellent agreements with observations. Also, in our model, the masses of the force carrier and dark matter particle can be constrained by the observational data.

  5. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  6. Interacting Bose gas confined in a Kronig-Penney potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, O. A.; Solís, M. A.

    We analyze the effect of the 1D periodic Kronig-Penney potential, composed of barriers of width b and separated a distance a, over an interacting Bose gas. At T = 0 , the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved analytically in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions for repulsive or attractive interaction between bosons. By applying the boundary conditions for periodic solutions as well as the normalization of the wave function, we arrive to a set of nonlinear equations from which we obtain the density profile and the chemical potential of the condensate as a function of the particle momentum. The profiles for attractive and repulsive interactions are compared with that of the non-interacting case. For attractive interaction we are able to observe a pronounced spatial localization in the middle of every two barriers. We reproduce the well known results when the Kronig-Penney potential becomes a Dirac Comb. We acknowledge partial support from Grants PAPIIT IN111613 and CONACyT 221030.

  7. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torquato, Salvatore [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  8. Market potential for interactive audio-visual media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurdijk, A.; Limonard, S.

    2005-01-01

    NM2 (New Media for a New Millennium) develops tools for interactive, personalised and non-linear audio-visual content that will be tested in seven pilot productions. This paper looks at the market potential for these productions from a technological, a business and a users' perspective. It shows tha

  9. A single particle effective potential for interacting positron and positronium

    CERN Document Server

    Zubiaga, A; Puska, M

    2013-01-01

    We have studied small systems composed by an atom and a positron or a positronium atom. We have used many-body quantum mechanical calculations to describe the correlation effects of light particles. Explicitly correlated gaussian for the basis functions and a stochastical variational optimization method has allowed to obtain accurate wavefunctions and energies. We have discussed the chemistry of positrons in those systems by means of analyzing the densities of the light particles (electrons and positrons). During the discussion, we propose an effective potential that describes the properties of the positron in those systems, valid also when it forms a Ps cluster. The effective potential is a mean field description of the interaction of the positron that can be used to calculate the distribution of the positron and its interaction energy. This potential can be a step forward for an accurate single particle description of the positron in cases when it forms positronium, specially molecular soft matter.

  10. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  11. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  12. Interaction Potential between Parabolic Rotator and an Outside Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At micro/nanoscale, the interaction potential between parabolic rotator and a particle located outside the rotator is studied on the basis of the negative exponential pair potential 1/Rn between particles. Similar to two-dimensional curved surfaces, we confirm that the potential of the three-dimensional parabolic rotator and outside particle can also be expressed as a unified form of curvatures; that is, it can be written as the function of curvatures. Furthermore, we verify that the driving forces acting on the particle may be induced by the highly curved micro/nano-parabolic rotator. Curvatures and the gradient of curvatures are the essential elements forming the driving forces. Through the idealized numerical experiments, the accuracy of the curvature-based potential is preliminarily proved.

  13. Interaction potentials and thermodynamic properties of two component semiclassical plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Ismagambetova, T. N. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan); Gabdullin, M. T. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, NNLOT, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, the effective interaction potential in two component semiclassical plasma, taking into account the long-range screening and the quantum-mechanical diffraction effects at short distances, is obtained on the basis of dielectric response function method. The structural properties of the semiclassical plasma are considered. The thermodynamic characteristics (the internal energy and the equation of state) are calculated using two methods: the method of effective potentials and the method of micropotentials with screening effect taken into account by the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the HNC approximation.

  14. Cosmological solutions in string theory with dilaton self interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mora, C

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present homogeneous and isotropic cosmological solutions for the low energy limit of string theory with a self interacting potential for the scalar field. For a potential that is a linear combination of two exponential, a family of exact solutions are found for the different spatial curvatures. Among this family a non singular accelerating solution for positive curvature is singled out and the violation of the energy conditions for that solution is studied, and also its astrophysical consequences. The string coupling for this solution is finite. (Author)

  15. POTENTIALS OF INTERACTIVE TEACHING TECHNIQUES TO TRAIN EXPERTS IN PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Krikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various interactive teaching methods and techniques are extensively used in modern higher schools. Their implementation is considered to be one of the most significant and efficient ways to improve quality of pharmaceutical professional training. Efficiency of these interactive techniques applied at the Department of Economics and Management of Pharmaceutical Business of Smolensk State Medical University has been comprehensively investigated and assessed. Obtained results are presented in the paper, as well as students’ survey data as consumers of educational services. Fifth year full-time students were involved into the study. Students’ awareness on potentials and significance of applied interactive teaching methods, as well as their interest in innovative forms to gain professional knowledge comprised 93.3%. Potentials of interactive techniques to teach students to deal with a diversity of real life practical professional tasks and problems are particularly emphasized in the study (86.7% students.

  16. Localization of interacting Fermi gases in quasiperiodic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilati, Sebastiano; Varma, Vipin Kerala

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the zero-temperature metal-insulator transition in a one-dimensional two-component Fermi gas in the presence of a quasiperiodic potential resulting from the superposition of two optical lattices of equal intensity but incommensurate periods. A mobility edge separating (low-energy) Anderson localized and (high-energy) extended single-particle states appears in this continuous-space model beyond a critical intensity of the quasiperiodic potential. To discern the metallic phase from the insulating phase in the interacting many-fermion system, we employ unbiased quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations combined with the many-particle localization length familiar from the modern theory of the insulating state. In the noninteracting limit, the critical optical-lattice intensity for the metal-insulator transition predicted by the QMC simulations coincides with the Anderson localization transition of the single-particle eigenstates. We show that weak repulsive interactions induce a shift of this critical point towards larger intensities, meaning that repulsion favors metallic behavior. This shift appears to be linear in the interaction parameter, suggesting that even infinitesimal interactions can affect the position of the critical point.

  17. Comparing Extended System Interactions with Motions in Softened Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Eric I

    2015-01-01

    Using an $N$-body evolution code that does not rely on softened potentials, I have created a suite of interacting binary cluster simulations. The motions of the centers-of-mass of the clusters have been tracked and compared to the trajectories of point masses interacting via one of four different softened potential prescriptions. There is a robust, nearly linear relationship between the impact parameter of the cluster interaction and the point-mass softening length that best approximates the cluster centers-of-mass motion. In an $N$-body simulation that adopts a fixed softening length, such a relationship leads to regimes where two-body effects, like dynamical friction, can be either larger or smaller than the corresponding cluster situation. Further consideration of more specific $N$-body simulations leads to an estimate that roughly 10 per cent of point-mass interactions in an $N$-body simulation will experience two-body effects larger than those for equivalent clusters.

  18. Potential interaction and potential investigation of science center exhibits and visitors' interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busque, Laurier

    This research consisted of studying the characteristics of interaction and investigation potential present in museum or science center exhibits. Categories (strong and weak) for the characteristics of interaction potential and investigation potential were established. Fifteen exhibits were chosen from the Museum of Science (Ottawa) and from two science centers (Sudbury and Toronto); these were representative of the established characteristics and categories. A test was constructed that measured the interest in an exhibit in a museum or a science center. The final analysis of the test (20 items) reflects a coefficient of homogeneity (Cronbach alpha) of 0.97 (n = 278). In terms of the characteristics of interaction potential and investigation potential, a significant difference among the ranks of interest was not found once they were regrouped under the categories of strong and weak. The hypothesis of a relationship between the interaction potential and visitors' interest in an exhibit in a museum or science center and the hypothesis of a relationship between the investigation potential and the interest aroused were both rejected. In regards to the interaction potential, median ranks of interest in exhibits of 8.6 for the strong category and of 7.5 for the weak category were observed. In terms of the investigation potential, median ranks of interest of 7.0 for the strong category and of 9.1 for the weak category were observed. In the case of investigation potential, even if the difference is not significant, there is an indication that the strong investigation potential seems to have the effect of creating disinterest in the presentation of an exhibit in a museum or in a science center. In the context of new museum and science centers, the view of developing exhibits which are primarily objects which stimulate interest must be maintained. If this is done with exhibits that arc interactive and have an investigative approach, it is necessary for those in charge of

  19. Potential interaction between warfarin and high dietary protein intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, Lori B; Hester, E Kelly; Donaldson, Amy R

    2008-04-01

    A 55-year-old Caucasian man was receiving warfarin therapy after undergoing aortic valve replacement. His international normalized ratio (INR) was stabilized with warfarin 95 mg/week for 5 weeks. Commencement of a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet resulted in a series of subtherapeutic INRs that led to a 16% increase in the dosage requirement to maintain therapeutic INRs. After the patient discontinued the diet, his INR increased, and several dosage reductions were required until his INR stabilized with his original dosage of 95 mg/week. Two additional case reports have described a possible interaction between warfarin and a high-protein diet. The potential for increased dietary protein intake to raise serum albumin levels and/or cytochrome P450 activity has been postulated as mechanisms for the resulting decrease in INRs. Given the available animal and human data that demonstrate alterations in drug metabolism in the presence of altered dietary protein intake, an increase in warfarin metabolism due to cytochrome P450 activation appears to be the most likely cause. In addition to the previously reported cases, this case indicates a potential interaction between warfarin and a high-protein diet. Because of the popularity of high-protein diets and because of the risks associated with inadequate or excessive warfarin anticoagulation, patients and health care providers should be aware of this interaction to ensure appropriate monitoring when warranted.

  20. Spatial coincidence modulates interaction between visual and somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürmann, Martin; Kolev, Vasil; Menzel, Kristina; Yordanova, Juliana

    2002-05-07

    The time course of interaction between concurrently applied visual and somatosensory stimulation with respect to evoked potentials (EPs) was studied. Visual stimuli, either in the left or right hemifield, and electric stimuli to the left wrist were delivered either alone or simultaneously. Visual and somatosensory EPs were summed and compared to bimodal EPs (BiEP, response to actual combination of both modalities). Temporal coincidence of stimuli lead to sub-additive or over-additive amplitudes in BiEPs in several time windows between 75 and 275 ms. Additional effects of spatial coincidence (left wrist with left hemifield) were found between 75 and 300 ms and beyond 450 ms. These interaction effects hint at a temporo-spatial pattern of multiple brain areas participating in the process of multimodal integration.

  1. Gender differences, polypharmacy, and potential pharmacological interactions in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Duarte Venturini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to analyze pharmacological interactions among drugs taken by elderly patients and their age and gender differences in a population from Porto Alegre, Brazil. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the database provided by the Institute of Geriatric and Gerontology, Porto Alegre, Brazil. The database was composed of 438 elderly and includes information about the patients' disease, therapy regimens, utilized drugs. All drugs reported by the elderly patients were classified using the Anatomical Therapeutic and Chemical Classification System. The drug-drug interactions and their severity were assessed using the Micromedex® Healthcare Series. RESULTS: Of the 438 elderly patients in the data base, 376 (85.8% used pharmacotherapy, 274 were female, and 90.4% of females used drugs. The average number of drugs used by each individual younger than 80 years was 3.2±2.6. Women younger than 80 years old used more drugs than men in the same age group whereas men older than 80 years increased their use of drugs in relation to other age groups. Therefore, 32.6% of men and 49.2% of women described at least one interaction, and 8.1% of men and 10.6% of women described four or more potential drug-drug interactions. Two-thirds of drug-drug interactions were moderate in both genders, and most of them involved angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, loop and thiazide diuretics, and β-blockers. CONCLUSION: Elderly patients should be closely monitored, based on drug class, gender, age group and nutritional status.

  2. Potential interaction between proton pump inhibitor and clopidogrel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Kurniawan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Clopidogrel is an anti-platelet agent commonly used in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular (CV disease. Although formerly considered safe, several studies reported that the use of clopidogrel may cause a significant increase in the rate of gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. This adverse effect could be minimized by coadministration of proton pump inhibitor (PPI. However, since PPI and clopidogrel share the same metabolic pathway, it has been hypothesized that the administration of PPI following clopidogrel therapy may cause a reduction in its anti-platelet effect, thereby increasing the risk of CV events. Recent studies found no significant inhibition in the activation of clopidogrel by CYP2C19 with administration of PPI in vitro. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies, as well as clinical studies, reported conflicting results regarding the potential interaction between PPI and clopidogrel. Until now, the available study investigated the PPI-clopidogrel interaction are primarily observational. The COGENT study is the only prospective, placebo-controlled trial examined the PPI-clopidogrel interaction. This study revealed no significant increase in CV events in patients receiving PPI following clopidogrel therapy, compared to the control group. Though remains controversial, current expert consensus recommended the administration of PPI in patients receiving clopidogrel, particularly in high-risk patients. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:57-62Keywords: Cardiovascular, clopidogrel, gastrointestinal, proton pump inhibitor

  3. [St. John's wort: a pharmaceutical with potentially dangerous interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rätz, A E; von Moos, M; Drewe, J

    2001-05-10

    Over-the-counter preparations of St. John's wort are widely used as 'natural' herbal medicine alternative to traditional antidepressants. The antidepressant effect has been shown in numerous placebo controlled studies. The mechanism of action is assumed to be at least in part, similar to conventional antidepressants, due to presynaptic serotonin reuptake inhibition as well as GABA-modulation and inhibition of monoaminoxidases. Because of its favorable safety profile compared to conventional antidepressants, the use of St. John's wort preparations has gained high acceptance with doctors and patients. However, any biologically active compound contains a certain risk of untoward effects and/or interactions which often are neither known nor recognised with the use of herbal remedies. Thus, doctors, pharmacists, and patients might feel themselves in false safety. Recently, a variety of case reports of potentially hazardous interactions due to drug combinations with St. John's wort have been published (e.g. cellular rejection of pancreas-, kidney- as well as heart transplants with ciclosporin therapy, rise of INR with oral anticoagulants, bleeding with oral contraceptives, reduction of plasma concentration of digoxin, indinavir, amitriptyline, and theophylline). We report a case of irregular bleeding with oral contraception and discuss these drug interactions and the mechanisms.

  4. Strongly Interacting Matter at Finite Chemical Potential: Hybrid Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Search for a proper and realistic equation of state (EOS) for strongly interacting matter used in the study of the QCD phase diagram still appears as a challenging problem. Recently, we constructed a hybrid model description for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) as well as hadron gas (HG) phases where we used an excluded volume model for HG and a thermodynamically consistent quasiparticle model for the QGP phase. The hybrid model suitably describes the recent lattice results of various thermodynamical as well as transport properties of the QCD matter at zero baryon chemical potential (μB). In this paper, we extend our investigations further in obtaining the properties of QCD matter at finite value of μB and compare our results with the most recent results of lattice QCD calculation.

  5. Schematic potential energy for interaction between isobutene and zeolite mordenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Serrano, L A [Programa de Crudo Maya, IMP, AP 15-805, DF 07730 (Mexico); Flores-Sandoval, C A [Programa de Crudo Maya, IMP, AP 15-805, DF 07730 (Mexico); Zaragoza, I P [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, IMP, AP 15-805, DF 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    A schematic representation of the potential energy for the interaction between isobutene and H mordenite was presented by using eight different positions (P1-P8) of C{sub 1} or C{sub 2} atoms located in front of the acid hydrogen (H{sup +}). In all cases a {pi} complex was formed yielding different values of the adsorption energy. In some cases of the adsorption point in P1-P8 the frontier orbitals are shown. The P8 position exhibits the highest value obtained for the adsorption energy, where the C{sub 1} atom is in front of the H{sup +}. Calculations were of all electron type employing HF/6-31G**.

  6. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W M M S Bandara; Gamini Seneviratne; S A Kulasooriya

    2006-12-01

    Plants benefit extensively by harbouring endophytic microbes. They promote plant growth and confer enhanced resistance to various pathogens. However, the way the interactions among endophytes influence the plant productivity has not been explained. Present study experimentally showed that endophytes isolated from rice (Oryza sativa) used as the test plant produced two types of interactions; biofilms (bacteria attached to mycelia) and mixed cultures with no such attachments. Acidity, as measured by pH in cultures with biofilms was higher than that of fungi alone, bacteria alone or the mixed cultures. Production of indoleacetic acid like substances (IAAS) of biofilms was higher than that of mixed cultures, fungi or bacteria. Bacteria and fungi produced higher quantities of IAAS than mixed cultures. In mixed cultures, the potential of IAAS production of resident microbes was reduced considerably. There was a negative relationship between IAAS and pH of the biofilms, indicating that IAAS was the main contributor to the acidity. However, such a relationship was not observed in mixed cultures. Microbial acid production is important for suppressing plant pathogens. Thus the biofilm formation in endophytic environment seems to be very important for healthy and improved plant growth. However, it is unlikely that an interaction among endophytes takes place naturally in the endophytic environment, due to physical barriers of plant tissues. Further, critical cell density dependant quorum sensing that leads to biofilm formation may not occur in the endophytic environment as there is a limited space. As such in vitro production and application of beneficial biofilmed inocula of endophytes are important for improved plant production in any agro-ecosystem. The conventional practice of plant inoculation with monocultures or mixed cultures of effective microbes may not give the highest microbial effect, which may only be achieved by biofilm formation.

  7. Ciprofloxacin and Clozapine: A Potentially Fatal but Underappreciated Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Meyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Clozapine provides a 50%–60% response rate in refractory schizophrenia but has a narrow therapeutic index and is susceptible to pharmacokinetic interactions, particularly with strong inhibitors or inducers of cytochrome P450 (CYP 1A2. Case Report. We report the case of a 28-year-old nonsmoking female with intellectual disability who was maintained for 3 years on clozapine 100 mg orally twice daily. The patient was treated for presumptive urinary tract infection with ciprofloxacin 500 mg orally twice daily and two days later collapsed and died despite resuscitation efforts. The postmortem femoral clozapine plasma level was dramatically elevated at 2900 ng/mL, and the cause of death was listed as acute clozapine toxicity. Conclusion. Given the potentially fatal pharmacokinetic interaction between clozapine and ciprofloxacin, clinicians are advised to monitor baseline clozapine levels prior to adding strong CYP450 1A2 inhibitors, reduce the clozapine dose by at least two-thirds if adding a 1A2 inhibitor such as ciprofloxacin, check subsequent steady state clozapine levels, and adjust the clozapine dose to maintain levels close to those obtained at baseline.

  8. Antiparkinsonian potential of interaction of LEK-8829 with bromocriptine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivin, M; Sprah, L; Sket, D

    1998-05-22

    The ergoline derivative, LEK-8829 (9,10-didehydro-N-methyl-(2-propynyl)-6-methyl-8-aminomethylerg oline), has been proposed as a potential atypical antipsychotic drug with antagonistic actions at dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2 and 5-HT1A receptors (Krisch et al., 1994, 1996). LEK-8829 also induces contralateral turning in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine-induced unilateral lesion of dopamine nigrostriatal neurons. Turning is blocked by SCH-23390 (R(+)-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzaze pine), a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist. It has been suggested that LEK-8829 could have beneficial effects in parkinsonian patients suffering from psychotic episodes induced as a side-effect of antiparkinsonian treatment with dopamine D2 receptor agonists. Therefore, we now investigated the interaction of LEK-8829 with the dopamine D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine (2-bromo-alpha-ergokryptine) in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. Treatment with either LEK-8829 (3 mg kg(-1)) or bromocriptine (3 mg kg(-1)) induced a vigorous contralateral turning response. The cumulated number of turns induced by the treatment with both drugs combined was not significantly different from the cumulated number of turns induced by single-drug treatment. The pretreatment with SCH-23390 (1 mg kg(-1)) did not have a significant effect on the bromocriptine-induced turning but significantly decreased the turning observed after the combined LEK-8829/bromocriptine treatment. We conclude that in the 6-hydroxydopamine model, the turning behaviour mediated by the LEK-8829/bromocriptine combination may be the result of opposing activity of both drugs at dopamine D2 receptors with concomitant stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors by LEK-8829. Therefore, LEK-8829 may have a potential for the therapy of parkinsonism complicated by dopamine D2 receptor agonist drug-induced psychosis.

  9. Commercially available interactive video games in burn rehabilitation: therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Ingrid S; Bagley, Anita; Kawada, Jason; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2012-06-01

    Commercially available interactive video games (IVG) like the Nintendo Wii™ (NW) and PlayStation™II Eye Toy (PE) are increasingly used in the rehabilitation of patients with burn. Such games have gained popularity in burn rehabilitation because they encourage range of motion (ROM) while distracting from pain. However, IVGs were not originally designed for rehabilitation purposes but rather for entertainment and may lack specificity for achieving rehabilitative goals. Objectively evaluating the specific demands of IVGs in relation to common burn therapy goals will determine their true therapeutic benefit and guide their use in burn rehabilitation. Upper extremity (UE) motion of 24 normal children was measured using 3D motion analysis during play with the two types of IVGs most commonly described for use after burn: NW and PE. Data was analyzed using t-tests and One-way Analysis of Variance. Active range of motion for shoulder flexion and abduction during play with both PE and NW was within functional range, thus supporting the idea that IVGs offer activities with therapeutic potential to improve ROM. PE resulted in higher demands and longer duration of UE motion than NW, and therefore may be the preferred tool when UE ROM or muscular endurance are the goals of rehabilitation. When choosing a suitable IVG for application in rehabilitation, the user's impairment together with the therapeutic attributes of the IVG should be considered to optimize outcome.

  10. Probiotics: Interaction with gut microbiome and antiobesity potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Tulika; Singh, Satvinder; Sharma, Raj Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Obesity is a metabolic disorder afflicting people globally. There has been a pivotal advancement in the understanding of the intestinal microbiota composition and its implication in extraintestinal (metabolic) diseases. Therefore, any agent modulating gut microbiota may produce an influential effect in preventing the pathogenesis of disease. Probiotics are live microbes that, when administered in adequate amounts, have been shown to confer health benefits to the host. Over the years, probiotics have been a part of the human diet in the form of different fermented foods consumed around the world. Their influence on different physiologic functions in the host is increasingly being documented. The antiobesity potential of probiotics is also gaining wide attention because of increasing evidence of the role of gut microbiota in energy homeostasis and fat accumulation. Probiotics have also been shown to interact with the resident bacterial members already present in the gut by altering their properties, which may also affect the metabolic pathways involved in the regulation of fat metabolism. The underlying pathways governing the antiobesity effects of probiotics remain unclear. However, it is hoped that the evidence presented and discussed in this review will encourage and thus drive more extensive research in this field.

  11. Induced gravity with Higgs potential. Elementary interactions and quantum processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezares Roder, Nils Manuel

    2010-07-01

    This work is intended to first serve as introduction in fundamental subjects of physics in order to be then able to review the mechanism of symmetry breakdown and its essential character in physics. It introduces the concept of scalar-tensor theories of gravity based on Bergmann-Wagoner models with a Higgs potential. The main physical context aimed is the problem of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the one hand, there is gravitation. Within this context, we have Dark Matter as an especially relevant concept. This work entails the following main contributions: - General features of Einstein's theory are introduced together with generalities of the different elementary interactions of physics from which the concepts of dark sectors and Higgs Mechanism are derived. - The concept of symmetry breaking and especially the Higgs Mechanism of mass generation are discussed in their relevance for the most different subjects of physics, especially in relation to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics with elementary Higgs fields. - Scalar-Tensor Theories are introduced in order to build in them the process of Higgs Mechanism. This is then fulfilled with a theory of induced gravity with a Higgs potential which seems renormalizable according to deWitt's power counting criterion, and with mass-generating Higgs fields which only couple gravitationally as well as with Higgs fields which act analogously to cosmon fields. - Further, the energy density of the gravitational field is derived for the specific model of induced gravity from an analogy to electrodynamics. It is shown that a nonvanishing value of pressure related to the scalar field is necessary in order to reproduce standard linear solar-relativistic dynamics. Within astrophysical considerations for flat rotation curves of galaxies, a possible dark-matter behavior is concluded within spherical symmetry. The scalar field and the dark-matter profile of total energy density are derived. An analogous

  12. Asymptotic Near Nucleus Structure of the Electron-Interaction Potential in Local Effective Potential Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Viraht; Qian, Zhixin

    2007-03-01

    In previous work, it has been shown that for spherically symmetric or sphericalized systems, the asymptotic near nucleus structure of the electron-interaction potential is vee(r) = vee(0) + βr + γr^2. In this paper we prove via time-independent Quantal Density Functional Theory[1](Q-DFT): (i) correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle and Coulomb repulsion do not contribute to the linear structure;(ii) these Pauli and Coulomb correlations contribute quadratically; (iii) the linear structure is solely due to Correlation-Kinetic effects, the coefficient β being determined analytically. By application of adiabatic coupling constant perturbation theory via QDFT we further prove: (iv) the Kohn-Sham (KS-DFT) `exchange' potential vx(r) approaches the nucleus linearly, this structure being due solely to lowest- order Correlation-Kinetic effects: (v) the KS-DFT `correlation' potential vc(r) also approaches the nucleus linearly, being solely due to higher-order Correlation-Kinetic contributions. The above conclusions are equally valid for system of arbitrary symmetry, provided spherical averages of the properties are employed. 1 Quantal Density Functional Theory, V. Sahni (Springer-Verlag 2004)

  13. Interaction potentials for water from accurate cluster calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2006-03-15

    The abundance of water in nature, its function as a universal solvent and its role in many chemical and biological processes that are responsible for sustaining life on earth is the driving force behind the need for understanding its behavior under different conditions, and in various environments. The availability of models that describe the properties of either pure water/ice or its mixtures with a variety of solutes ranging from simple chemical species to complex biological molecules and environmental interfaces is therefore crucial in order to be able to develop predictive paradigms that attempt to model solvation and reaction and transport in aqueous environments. In attempting to develop these models the question naturally arises 'is water different/more complex than other hydrogen bonded liquids'. This proposition has been suggested based on the 'anomalous' behavior of its macroscopic properties such as the density maximum at 4 C, the non-monotonic behavior of its compressibility with temperature, the anomalous behavior of its relaxation time below typical temperatures of the human body, the large value and non-monotonic dependence below 35 C of the specific heat of constant pressure, the smaller than expected value of the coefficient of thermal expansion. This suggestion infers that simple models used to describe the relevant inter- and intra-molecular interactions will not suffice in order to reproduce the behavior of these properties under a wide temperature range. To this end, explicit microscopic level detailed information needs to be incorporated into the models in order to capture the appropriate physics at the molecular level. From the simple model of Bernal and Fowler, which was the first attempt to develop an empirical model for water back in 1933, this process has yielded ca. 50 different models to date. A recent review provides a nearly complete account of this effort coupled to the milestones in the area of molecular

  14. Effective potentials for atom-atom interaction at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Bo

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the concept and design of effective atom-atom potentials that accurately describe any physical processes involving only states around the threshold. The existence of such potentials gives hope to a quantitative, and systematic, understanding of quantum few-atom and quantum many-atom systems at relatively low temperatures.

  15. The Stability of Icosahedral Cluster and the Range of Interaction Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Feng; WANG Jin-Lan; SHEN Wei-Feng; WANG Bao-Lin; LI Hui; WANG Guang-Hou

    2001-01-01

    The relation between the stability of icosahedral clusters and the range of interaction potential is discussed.We found that the stability of icosahedral clusters nay decrease with decreasing range of interaction potential. A simple formula about the critical number of icosahedral clusters and the range of interaction potential (M1/3c = A1 + A2r2eff)was proposed. The calculation of the stability of icosahedral fullerence molecular clusters shows that our idea is right.``

  16. MicroRNAs and potential target interactions in psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibert, John Robert; Løvendorf, Marianne B.; Litman, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease often seen in patients with a genetic susceptibility. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are endogenous, short RNA molecules that can bind to parts of mRNA target genes, thus inhibiting their translation and causing accelerated turnover or transcript...... degradation. MicroRNAs are important in the pathogenesis of human diseases such as immunological disorders, as they regulate a broad range of biological processes. OBJECTIVE: We investigated miRNA-mRNA interactions in involved (PP) and non-involved (PN) psoriatic skin compared with healthy skin (NN). METHODS......: Biopsies were obtained from PP, PN and NN, the miRNA and mRNA expression was analyzed by microarray techniques and a subset of miRNAs and mRNAs were validated by q-RT-PCR. Novel target interactions in psoriasis were found using PubMed, miRBase and RNAhybrid. In addition, TIMP3 protein expression...

  17. Bubble-bubble interaction: A potential source of cavitation noise

    CERN Document Server

    Ida, Masato

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between microbubbles through pressure pulses has been studied to show that it can be a source of cavitation noise. A recent report demonstrated that the acoustic noise generated by a shrimp originates from the collapse of a cavitation bubble produced when the shrimp closes its snapper claw. The recorded acoustic signal contains a broadband noise that consists of positive and negative pulses, but a theoretical model for single bubbles fails to reproduce the negative ones. Using a nonlinear multibubble model we have shown here that the negative pulses can be explained by considering the interaction of microbubbles formed after the cavitation bubble has collapsed and fragmented: Positive pulses produced at the collapse of the microbubbles hit and impulsively compress neighboring microbubbles to generate reflected pulses whose amplitudes are negative. Discussing the details of the noise generation process, we have found that no negative pulses are generated if the internal pressure of the reflecti...

  18. In vitro interactions between Armillaria species and potential biocontrol fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keča Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between Armillaria species and seven other fungi were tested in vitro. Tree antagonistic (Trichoderma viride, Trichotecium roseum and Penicillium sp. and four decaying (Hypholoma fasciculare¸ Hypholoma capnoides, Phlebiopsis gigantea, and Pleurotus ostreatus fungi were chosen for this study. The best results were noted for Trichoderma viride, because fungus was able to kill both mycelia and rhizomorphs of Armillaria species, while Hypholoma spp. inhibited both growth of Armillaria colonies and rhizomorph production.

  19. Improved Interaction Potentials for Charged Residues in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions dominate the structure and free energy of biomolecules. To obtain accurate free energies involving charged groups from molecular simulations, OPLS-AA parameters have been reoptimized using Monte Carlo free energy perturbation. New parameters fit a self-consistent, exper...... directly in molecular simulations with no modification of neutral residues needed and are envisioned to be particular important in simulations where charged residues change environment....

  20. Fluid-Structure Interaction Using Retarded Potential and ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-19

    but require the formuation and factoring of a global stiffness matrix. This is very costly and even prohibitive especially for Manuacript approved...Dimensional Retarded Potential Fluid - Finite Element Structural Analysis, NRL Memorandum, Report 5903, May 1987. 20. Tamm. M. A., A Parametric Patch

  1. A constructive model potential method for atomic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottcher, C.; Dalgarno, A.

    1974-01-01

    A model potential method is presented that can be applied to many electron single centre and two centre systems. The development leads to a Hamiltonian with terms arising from core polarization that depend parametrically upon the positions of the valence electrons. Some of the terms have been introduced empirically in previous studies. Their significance is clarified by an analysis of a similar model in classical electrostatics. The explicit forms of the expectation values of operators at large separations of two atoms given by the model potential method are shown to be equivalent to the exact forms when the assumption is made that the energy level differences of one atom are negligible compared to those of the other.

  2. On critical stability of three quantum charges interacting through delta potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    We consider three one dimensional quantum, charged and spinless particles interacting through delta potentials. We derive sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of at least one bound state.......We consider three one dimensional quantum, charged and spinless particles interacting through delta potentials. We derive sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of at least one bound state....

  3. Technological Dangers and the Potential of Human-Robot Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The ethical debate on social robotics has become one of the cutting edge topics of our time. When it comes to both academic and non-academic debates, the methodological framework is, with few exceptions, typically and tacitly grounded in an us-versus-them perspective. It is as though we were...... technological dangers and opportunities. Finally, aiming for the very limits of the theory, I discuss the contours of a praxis facilitating being-with-robots beyond conceptualization. Basically, this mode of being, pertaining to non-technological HRI, bypasses Heidegger’s warnings, and potentially facilitates...

  4. Hyperon-nucleon single-particle potentials with low-momentum interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Djapo, Haris; Wambach, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Single-particle potentials in Hartree-Fock approximation for different hyperon-nucleon (YN) channels are calculated in the framework of the effective low-momentum YN interaction V_lowk. In contrast to the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the available experimental data for the YN interaction are scarce. As a consequence no unique YN low-momentum potential V_lowk can be predicted from the various bare potentials. The resulting momentum- and density-dependent single-particle potentials for several different bare OBE models and for chiral effective field theory are compared to each other.

  5. The response of the polarized Fermi mixture to an artificial vector potential: The interaction strength and imbalance chemical potential effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, N.; Safiee, Z.

    2017-03-01

    We consider a polarized Fermi mixture (with normal-superfluid phase separation), subjected to artificial vector potential. We concentrate on the BCS regime with various interaction strengths and numerically obtain the polarisability of the system. We obtain the functional dependence of the polarisability of the system on frequency and the relevant physical parameters, namely the interaction strength, the mass ratio, the average and imbalance chemical potentials. Also, we find the special frequency (ωs), for which the rate of the response of system to the potential is changed and the cut-off frequency (ωcutoff), for which the response starts to become infinity. We investigate the behavior of the curves of polarisability versus proper physical parameters for ω physical parameters. Finally, the system's response can be controlled by relevant physical parameters, such as interaction strength.

  6. Host-Symbiont Interactions for Potentially Managing Heteropteran Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Souza Prado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects in the suborder Heteroptera, the so-called true bugs, include over 40,000 species worldwide. This insect group includes many important agricultural pests and disease vectors, which often have bacterial symbionts associated with them. Some symbionts have coevolved with their hosts to the extent that host fitness is compromised with the removal or alteration of their symbiont. The first bug/microbial interactions were discovered over 50 years ago. Only recently, mainly due to advances in molecular techniques, has the nature of these associations become clearer. Some researchers have pursued the genetic modification (paratransgenesis of symbionts for disease control or pest management. With the increasing interest and understanding of the bug/symbiont associations and their ecological and physiological features, it will only be a matter of time before pest/vector control programs utilize this information and technique. This paper will focus on recent discoveries of the major symbiotic systems in Heteroptera, highlighting how the understanding of the evolutionary and biological aspects of these relationships may lead to the development of alternative techniques for efficient heteropteran pest control and suppression of diseases vectored by Heteroptera.

  7. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bogetti-Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug interactions (contraindicated/severe (n=64 and those with non-severe drug-drug interactions (moderate/minor/absent (n=117. Additional socio-demographic, clinical and caregiver data were included. Potential drug-drug interactions were identified using Micromedex Drug Reax 2.0® database. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were enrolled, including 57 men (31.5% and 124 women (68.5% with a mean age of 80.11±8.28 years. One hundred and seven (59.1% patients in our population had potential drug-drug interactions, of which 64 (59.81% were severe/contraindicated. The main severe potential drug-drug interactions were caused by the combinations citalopram/anti-platelet (11.6%, clopidogrel/omeprazole (6.1%, and clopidogrel/aspirin (5.5%. Depression, the use of a higher number of medications, dementia severity and caregiver burden were the most significant factors associated with severe potential drug-drug interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Older people with dementia experience many severe potential drug-drug interactions. Anti-depressants, antiplatelets, anti-psychotics and omeprazole were the drugs most commonly involved in these interactions. Despite their frequent use, anti-dementia drugs were not involved in severe potential drug-drug interactions. The number and type of medications taken, dementia severity and depression in patients in addition to caregiver burden should be considered to avoid possible drug interactions in this population.

  8. On the theory of interaction potentials in ionic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, Roberto [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Soto-Bubert, Andres [Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejercito 441, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: roberto.acevedo@umayor.cl

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research work is to report a more comprehensive and detailed study of both, the intermolecular and intramolecular potencial functions with reference to the various families of the elpasolite type crystals. The cohesive energy has been thought as a sum of three terms; the long range (Coulombic), the Born and the van der Waals contributions to the total energy. The Born-Mayer-Buckingham potential{sup 1} has been employed in all of these current studies and a number of convergence tests are analyzed from a formal viewpoint. Our work has been focused to the following systems: Cs{sub 2}NaLnF{sub 6}, Cs{sub 2}NaLnCl{sub 6}, Cs{sub 2}NaLnBr{sub 6}, Rb{sub 2}NaLnF{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}KLnF{sub 6} in the Fm3m space group. A substantial amount of theoretical models have been analyzed and several computing simulations have been undertaken to estimate the reticular energies and the corresponding heat of formation for these crystals. To achieve this goal, a Born-Haber thermodynamic cycle has been introduced in our model. It is shown that the calculated energy values are reasonable and follow the expected trend along the lanthanide series in the periodic chart. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the current and proposed generalized model. The most likely sources for improvement are discussed in detail. New convergence tests as well as some master equations have been introduced to study the various diagonal contributions to the total energy.

  9. Phase transition of strongly interacting matter with a chemical potential dependent Polyakov loop potential

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Guo-yun; Di Toro, Massimo; Colonna, Maria; Gao, Xue-yan; Gao, Ning

    2016-01-01

    We construct a hadron-quark two-phase model based on the Walecka-quantum hadrodynamics and the improved Polyakov-Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model with an explicit chemical potential dependence of Polyakov-loop potential ($\\mu$PNJL model). With respect to the original PNJL model, the confined-deconfined phase transition is largely affected at low temperature and large chemical potential. Using the two-phase model, we investigate the equilibrium transition between hadronic and quark matter at finite chemical potentials and temperatures. The numerical results show that the transition boundaries from nuclear to quark matter move towards smaller chemical potential (lower density) when the $\\mu$-dependent Polyakov loop potential is taken. In particular, for charge asymmetric matter, we compute the local asymmetry of $u, d$ quarks in the hadron-quark coexisting phase, and analyse the isospin-relevant observables possibly measurable in heavy-ion collision (HIC) experiments. In general new HIC data on the location and proper...

  10. Artificial abelian gauge potentials induced by dipole-dipole interactions between Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Cesa, A

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the influence of dipole-dipole interactions between Rydberg atoms on the generation of abelian artificial gauge potentials and fields. When two Rydberg atoms are driven by a uniform laser field, we show that the combined atom-atom and atom-field interactions give rise to new, non-uniform, artificial gauge potentials. We identify the mechanism responsible for the emergence of these gauge potentials. Analytical expressions for the latter indicate that the strongest artificial magnetic fields are reached in the regime intermediate between the dipole blockade regime and the regime in which the atoms are sufficiently far apart such that atom-light interaction dominates over atom-atom interactions. We discuss the differences and similarities of artificial gauge fields originating from resonant dipole-dipole and van der Waals interactions. We also give an estimation of experimentally attainable artificial magnetic fields resulting from this mechanism.

  11. Student Interactions with CD-ROM Storybooks: A Look at Potential Relationships between Multiple Intelligence Strengths and Levels of Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at the potential relationship that may exist between students' intelligence strengths, in particular their spatial and kinesthetic strengths, and their combined cognitive and metacognitive levels of interaction with a CD-ROM storybook. The multiple intelligence strengths of a sample of students, measured via the MIDAS/My…

  12. Stability of stationary states of non-local equations with singular interaction potentials

    KAUST Repository

    Fellner, Klemens

    2011-04-01

    We study the large-time behaviour of a non-local evolution equation for the density of particles or individuals subject to an external and an interaction potential. In particular, we consider interaction potentials which are singular in the sense that their first derivative is discontinuous at the origin.For locally attractive singular interaction potentials we prove under a linear stability condition local non-linear stability of stationary states consisting of a finite sum of Dirac masses. For singular repulsive interaction potentials we show the stability of stationary states of uniformly bounded solutions under a convexity condition.Finally, we present numerical simulations to illustrate our results. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Peculiar features of the interaction potential between hydrogen and antihydrogen at intermediate separations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Teck-Ghee; Wong Cheuk-Yin; Wang Lee-Shien

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the interaction potential between a hydrogen and an antihydrogen using the second-order perturbation theory within the framework of the four-body system in a separable two-body basis. It finds that the H-H interaction potential possesses the peculiar features of a shallow local minimum located around interatomic separations of r ~ 6a.u. and a barrier rising at r<~ 5a.u.

  14. Dynamic interaction potential and the scattering cross sections of the semiclassical plasma particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Shalenov, E. O.; Gabdullina, G. L. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71al Farabi Street, Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-04-15

    The dynamic model of the charged particles interaction in non-ideal semiclassical plasma is presented. This model takes into account the quantum mechanical diffraction effect and the dynamic screening effect. On the basis of the dynamic interaction potential, the electron scattering cross sections are investigated. Comparison with the results obtained on the basis of other models and conclusions were made.

  15. Reactive Boundary Conditions as Limits of Interaction Potentials for Brownian and Langevin Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, S Jonathan; Isaacson, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    A popular approach to modeling bimolecular reactions between diffusing molecules is through the use of reactive boundary conditions. One common model is the Smoluchowski partial absorption condition, which uses a Robin boundary condition in the separation coordinate between two possible reactants. This boundary condition can be interpreted as an idealization of a reactive interaction potential model, in which a potential barrier must be surmounted before reactions can occur. In this work we show how the reactive boundary condition arises as the limit of an interaction potential encoding a steep barrier within a shrinking region in the particle separation, where molecules react instantly upon reaching the peak of the barrier. The limiting boundary condition is derived by the method of matched asymptotic expansions, and shown to depend critically on the relative rate of increase of the barrier height as the width of the potential is decreased. Limiting boundary conditions for the same interaction potential in b...

  16. Expanding Interaction Potentials within Virtual Environments: Investigating the Usability of Speech and Manual Input Modes for Decoupled Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Stedmon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed technologies and ubiquitous computing now support users who may be detached or decoupled from traditional interactions. In order to investigate the potential usability of speech and manual input devices, an evaluation of speech input across different user groups and a usability assessment of independent-user and collaborative-user interactions was conducted. Whilst the primary focus was on a formative usability evaluation, the user group evaluation provided a formal basis to underpin the academic rigor of the exercise. The results illustrate that using a speech interface is important in understanding user acceptance of such technologies. From the usability assessment it was possible to translate interactions and make them compatible with innovative input devices. This approach to interaction is still at an early stage of development, and the potential or validity of this interfacing concept is still under evaluation; however, as a concept demonstrator, the results of these initial evaluations demonstrate the potential usability issues of both input devices as well as highlighting their suitability for advanced virtual applications.

  17. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itse...... of such interaction for advanced drug delivery are presented.......Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself...

  18. [Potential drug-drug interactions among elderly using antihypertensives from the Brazilian List of Essential Medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mibielli, Pablo; Rozenfeld, Suely; Matos, Guacira Corrêa de; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of potential interactions between antihypertensives and other drugs. A household survey was conducted with individuals 60 years or older residing in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Potential moderately or very severe drug-drug interactions with antihypertensives, documented as suspected, probable or established, were identified. A total of 577 elderly were interviewed (mean age = 72 years), 45.2% of whom were using antihypertensives, of which 31.0% were subject to potential drug-drug interactions. Most of the interactions were moderately severe. Compared to the other elderly, those with potential drug-drug interactions showed more than fourfold odds of using five or more medicines and more than twofold odds of having been hospitalized in the previous year. Among the most frequent pairs of interactions, 75% cause a reduction in the hypotensive effect (65/87), which can result in low effectiveness of blood pressure control, prescribing of more drugs, and risk of other adverse events and interactions.

  19. Potential Drug-drug Interactions in Post-CCU of a Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Aghajani, Mohammad; Sistanizad, Mohammad; Abbasinazari, Mohammad; Abiar Ghamsari, Mahdieh; Ayazkhoo, Ladan; Safi, Olia; Kazemi, Katayoon; Kouchek, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) can lead to increased toxicity or reduction in therapeutic efficacy. This study was designed to assess the incidence of potential drug interactions (PDI) and rank their clinical value in post coronary care unit (Post-CCU) of a teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. In this prospective study, three pharmacists with supervision of a clinical pharmacist actively gathered necessary information for detection of DDIs. Data were tabulated according to the combinations of drugs in treatment chart. Verification of potential drug interactions was carried out using the online Lexi-Interact™ 2011. A total of 203 patients (113 males and 90 females) were enrolled in the study. The mean age of patients was 61 ± 12.55 years (range = 26-93). A total of 90 drugs were prescribed to 203 patients and most prescribed drugs were atorvastatin, clopidogrel and metoprolol. Mean of drugs was 11.22 per patient. A total of 3166 potential drug interactions have been identified by Lexi- Interact™, 149 (4.71%) and 55 (1.73%) of which were categorized as D and X, respectively. The most serious interactions were clopidogrel+omeprazole and metoprolol+salbutamol. Drug interactions leading to serious adverse effects are to be cautiously watched for when multiple drugs are used simultaneously. In settings with multiple drug use attendance of a pharmacist or clinical pharmacist, taking the responsibility for monitoring drug interactions and notifying the physician about potential problems could decrease the harm in patient and increase the patient safety.

  20. Soliton-potential interaction in the Nonlinear Klein-Gordon Model

    CERN Document Server

    Saadatmand, Danial

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of solitons with external potentials in nonlinear Klein-Gordon field theory is investigated using an improved model. Presented model is constructed with a better approximation for adding the potential to the lagrangian through the metric of background space-time. The results of the model are compared with the another model and the differences are discussed.

  1. Chemical Potential Dependence of the Dressed-Quark Propagator from an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; PING Jia-Lun; SUN Wei-Min; CHANG Chao-Hsi; WANG Fan

    2002-01-01

    We exhibit a method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagatorfrom an effective quark-quark interaction model. Within this approach we explore the chemical potential dependenceof the dressed-quark propagator, which provides a means of determining the behavior of the chiral and deconfinementorder parameters. A comparison with the results of previous researches is given.

  2. Potential of Root Exudates from Wetland Plants and Their Potential Role for Denitrification and Allelopathic Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhai, Xu

    chemicals to suppress the growth of native species. Phragmites australis is recognized as the most invasive species in wetland ecosystems in North America, and allelopathy has been reported to be involved in the invasion success of the introduced exotic P. australis. The composition of the root exudates may...... vary among different Phragmites haplotypes and consequently affect their invasion potential. The studies presented in this dissertation aimed at investigating the quantity and composition of the organic carbon released in root exudates from three common wetland species as affected by temperature...... plants contribute to nitrogen removal in high nitrate and low BOD wastewater. Also, the compositions and quantity of root exudates differed among the species of the Phragmites genus and the Phragmites haplotypes. The research could not confirm that gallic acid in root exudates is responsible...

  3. Collisional interactions between self-interacting nonrelativistic boson stars: Effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations but may be approximated in the nonrelativistic regime with a coupled Schrödinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  4. Potential drug-drug interactions in intensive care units of a hospital in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Oliveira-Paula

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions are important causes of adverse reactions in health units. The high consumption of medicines in intensive care units predisposes patients to potential drug-drug interactions. This study aimed at examining the frequency and the characteristics of drug-drug interactions in intensive care units of Hospital Universitario of Universidade Estadual de Londrina. We analyzed the prescriptions of patients over 18 years, admitted from January to May 2010, who remained hospitalized for at least four days. The analysis of drug-drug interactions was carried out using the Micromedex Drug-Reax® system. The interactions were classified by severity, time required for the onset of adverse effects, mechanism of action and quality of scientific evidence. Moreover, the possible adverse events were analyzed, as well as the recommended strategies of management and monitoring. Altogether, 198 different potential drug-drug interactions were identified with the occurrence of 1242 episodes. Of these, 43% were characterized by moderate interactions, 35% major, 16% minor and 6% contraindicated. The therapeutic inefficacy was the most frequent possible adverse event (18% and the main recommended strategy of management was the dose adjustment (35.6%. The most frequent interactions were: fentanyl + midazolam (8.6%, phenytoin + ranitidine (5.5% and midazolam + ranitidine (4.8%. These results demonstrate the importance of drug-drug interactions as a significant adverse event in intensive care units and thus, preventive measures are required to minimize this problem.

  5. Antiepileptic drugs: are women aware of interactions with oral contraceptives and potential teratogenicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Alison M; Davis, Anne R; Kritzer, Jordana; Yoon, Ava; Camus, Adela

    2009-04-01

    Women with epilepsy (WWE)'s knowledge of the interaction between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and oral contraceptives (OCs) and the potential teratogenicity of AEDs has received limited study. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire study (English or Spanish) among young WWE (18-44 years) to assess demographic characteristics, current AED use, and knowledge of AED interactions with OCs and teratogenicity. We used the Food and Drug Administration's classification system to categorize each AED's teratogenic potential. Participants (n=148) had a mean age of 32 years (SD 8); 32% spoke Spanish and described themselves as Hispanic. Among women prescribed a cytochrome p450-inducing AED, 65% were unaware of decreased OC efficacy. Forty percent of those prescribed Category D AEDs were unaware of potential teratogenic effects. WWE have limited knowledge of the potential interaction between AEDs and OCs and the teratogenic effects of AEDs. Educational efforts should highlight the reproductive health effects of AEDs in WWE.

  6. Potential drug-drug interactions in cardiothoracic intensive care unit of a pulmonary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanegan, Behrooz; Alehashem, Maryam; Bastani, Marjan; Baniasadi, Shadi

    2015-02-01

    Little is known about clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in respiratory settings. DDIs are more likely to occur in critically ill patients due to complex pharmacotherapy regimens and organ dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to identify the pattern of potential DDIs (pDDIs) occurring in cardiothoracic intensive care unit (ICU) of a pulmonary hospital. A prospective observational study was conducted for 6 months. All pDDIs for admitted patients in cardiothoracic ICU were identified with Lexi-Interact program and assessed by a clinical pharmacologist. The interacting drugs, reliability, mechanisms, potential outcomes, and clinical management were evaluated for severe and contraindicated interactions. The study included 195 patients. Lung cancer (14.9%) was the most common diagnosis followed by tracheal stenosis (14.3%). The rate of pDDIs was 720.5/100 patients. Interactions were more commonly observed in transplant patients. 17.7% of pDDIs were considered as severe and contraindicated interactions. Metabolism (54.8%) and additive (24.2%) interactions were the most frequent mechanisms leading to pDDIs, and azole antifungals and fluoroquinolones were the main drug classes involved. The pattern of pDDIs in cardiothoracic ICU differs from other ICU settings. Specialized epidemiological knowledge of drug interactions may help clinical practitioners to reduce the risk of adverse drug events.

  7. Consistency of multi-time Dirac equations with general interaction potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, Dirk-André; Nickel, Lukas

    2016-07-01

    In 1932, Dirac proposed a formulation in terms of multi-time wave functions as candidate for relativistic many-particle quantum mechanics. A well-known consistency condition that is necessary for existence of solutions strongly restricts the possible interaction types between the particles. It was conjectured by Petrat and Tumulka that interactions described by multiplication operators are generally excluded by this condition, and they gave a proof of this claim for potentials without spin-coupling. Under suitable assumptions on the differentiability of possible solutions, we show that there are potentials which are admissible, give an explicit example, however, show that none of them fulfills the physically desirable Poincaré invariance. We conclude that in this sense, Dirac's multi-time formalism does not allow to model interaction by multiplication operators, and briefly point out several promising approaches to interacting models one can instead pursue.

  8. Thermodynamic stability of a weakly interacting Fermi gas trapped in a harmonic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Men Fu-Dian; Liu Hui; Zhu Hou-Yu

    2008-01-01

    Based on the theoretical results derived from pseudopotential method and local approximation,this paper studies the thermodynamic stability of a weakly interacting Fermi gas trapped in a harmonic potential by using analytical method of thermodynamics.The effects of the interparticle interactions as well as external potential on the thermodynamic stability of the system are discussed.It is shown that the system is stable as for the complete average,but as for local parts,the system is unstable anywhere.This instability shows that the stability conditions of mechanics cannot be satisfied anywhere,and the stability conditions of thermostatics cannot be satisfied somewhere.In addition,the interactions and external potential have direct effects on the local stability of the system.

  9. Prevalence and factors associated with potential drug interactions among elderly in a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Riani Gotardelo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of potential drug interactions and the factors associated with them among elderly patients covered by the Family Health Strategy in the municipality of Timóteo, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional study, using stratified random sampling. A total of 273 household interviews were conducted in subjects aged 60 years or older, after obtaining informed consent, using a questionnaire containing questions related to identification, demography, health conditions and medication use. Drug interactions were identified and classified according to the software Micromedex®. Results: The overall prevalence of potential drug interactions was 55.6%, a total of 466 cases, of which 5.6% were mild, 81.6% moderate and 12.8% of greater severity. Therapeutic classes most frequently involved were anti-inflammatory drugs and especially drugs used in cardiovascular disease. The absence of hospitalization in the last four months was significantly associated with a lower chance of serious drug interactions and most patients who did not have any moderate drug interactions used only drugs prescribed by physicians. Conclusions: The prevalence of potential drug interactions was similar to that described in the literature, demonstrating the high frequency of this phenomenon among the elderly. The absence of prior hospitalization and drug prescription by physicians were associated with a lower frequency of interactions. The prescription of multiple drugs simultaneously to elderly patients can compromise the safety and health of this population, requiring, by caregivers, observation for the occurrence of potential drug interactions.

  10. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Bogetti-Salazar; Cesar González-González; Teresa Juárez-Cedillo; Sergio Sánchez-García; Oscar Rosas-Carrasco

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug inte...

  11. Host-pathogen Interaction at the Intestinal Mucosa Correlates With Zoonotic Potential of Streptococcus suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrando, Maria Laura; de Greeff, Astrid; van Rooijen, Willemien J. M.;

    2015-01-01

    of SS2 infection. Methods. We developed a noninvasive in vivo model to study oral SS2 infection in piglets. We compared in vitro interaction of S. suis with human and porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Results. Two out of 15 piglets showed clinical symptoms compatible with S. suis infection 24...... be considered a food-borne pathogen. S. suis interaction with human and pig IEC correlates with S. suis serotype and genotype, which can explain the zoonotic potential of SS2....

  12. Equation of state and interaction potential of helium under high temperatures and high densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamics statistic method, the improved variational perturbation theory and the modified quantum mechanics correction model have been used to calculate the equation of state of liquid helium at pressure from 0.7 to 108 GPa. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The EXP-6 potential (α = 13.1) can more accurately describe the interaction of helium atoms than other potentials in the scheme. Finally, a comparison is shown between our interatomic potentials and other potentials.

  13. Equation of state and interaction potential of helium under high temperatures and high densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG JinWen; YAN YuanHong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamics statistic method, the improved variational perturbation theory and the modified quantum mechanics correction model have been used to calculate the equation of state of liquid helium at pressure from 0.7 to 108 GPa. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The EXP-6 potential (α=13.1) can more accurately describe the interaction of helium atoms than other potentials in the scheme. Finally, s comparison is shown between our interatomic potentials and other potentials.

  14. The dynamical behaviour of homogeneous scalar-field spacetimes with general self-interaction potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Giambó, Roberto; Magli, Giulio

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of homogeneous Robertson--Walker cosmological models with a self-interacting scalar field source is examined here in full generality, requiring only the scalar field potential to be bounded from below and divergent when the field diverges. In this way we are able to give a unified treatment of all the already studied cases - such as positive potentials which exhibit asymptotically polynomial or exponential behaviors - together with its extension to a much wider set of physically sensible potentials. Since the set includes potentials with negative inferior bound, we are able to give, in particular, the analysis of the asymptotically anti De Sitter states for such cosmologies.

  15. Intermolecular interaction potentials of methane-argon complex calculated using LDA approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Yu-Lin; Chen Xiang-Rong; Zhou Xiao-Lin; Yang Xiang-Dong; Wang Hai-Yan

    2004-01-01

    The intermolecular interaction potential for methane-argon complex is calculated by local density approximation (LDA) approaches. The calculated potential has a minimum when the intermolecular distance of methane-argon complex is 6.75 a.u.; the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0163eV which has good agreement with experimental data. We also have made a nonlinear fitting of our results for the Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function and obtain that V(R) = 143794365.332/R12 - 3032.093/R6 (R in a.u. and V(R) in eV).

  16. Intermolecular interaction of thiosemicarbazone derivatives to solvents and a potential Aedes aegypti target

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João Bosco P.; Hallwass, Fernando; da Silva, Aluizio G.; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo; Ramos, Mozart N.; Espíndola, José Wanderlan P.; de Oliveira, Ana Daura T.; Brondani, Dalci José; Leite, Ana Cristina L.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-08-01

    DFT calculations were used to access information about structure, energy and electronic properties of series of phenyl- and phenoxymethyl-(thio)semicarbazone derivatives with demonstrated activity against the larvae of Aedes aegypti in stage L4. The way as the thiosemicarbazone derivatives can interact with solvents like DMSO and water were analyzed from the comparison between calculated and experimental 1H NMR chemical shifts. The evidences of thiosemicarbazone derivatives making H-bond interaction to solvent have provide us insights on how they can interact with a potential A. aegypti's biological target, the Sterol Carrier Protein-2.

  17. Cosmological model with fermion and tachyon fields interacting via Yukawa-type potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ribas, Marlos O; Kremer, Gilberto M

    2016-01-01

    A model for the universe with tachyonic and fermionic fields interacting through a Yukawa-type potential is investigated. It is shown that the tachyonic field answers for the initial accelerated regime and for the subsequent decelerated regime so that it behaves as an inflaton at early times and as a matter field at intermediate times, while the fermionic field has the role of a dark energy constituent, since it leads to an accelerated regime at later times. The interaction between the fields via a Yukawa-type potential controls the duration of the decelerated era, since a stronger coupling makes a shorter decelerated period.

  18. A Riccati equation based approach to isotropic scalar field cosmologies with arbitrary self-interaction potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Harko, Tiberiu; Mak, M K

    2014-01-01

    Gravitationally coupled scalar fields $\\phi $, distinguished by the choice of an effective self-interaction potential $V(\\phi )$, simulating a temporarily non-vanishing cosmological term, can generate both inflation and late time acceleration. In scalar field cosmological models the evolution of the Hubble function is determined, in terms of the interaction potential, by a Riccati type equation. In the present work we investigate scalar field cosmological models that can be obtained as solutions of the Riccati evolution equation for the Hubble function. Four exact integrability cases of the field equations are presented, representing classes of general solutions of the Riccati evolution equation, and their cosmological properties are investigated in detail.

  19. Cosmological model with fermion and tachyon fields interacting via Yukawa-type potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Marlos O.; Devecchi, Fernando P.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2016-02-01

    A model for the universe with tachyonic and fermionic fields interacting through a Yukawa-type potential is investigated. It is shown that the tachyonic field answers for the initial accelerated regime and for the subsequent decelerated regime so that it behaves as an inflaton at early times and as a matter field at intermediate times, while the fermionic field has the role of a dark energy constituent, since it leads to an accelerated regime at later times. The interaction between the fields via a Yukawa-type potential controls the duration of the decelerated era, since a stronger coupling makes a shorter decelerated period.

  20. Mean field propagation of infinite dimensional Wigner measures with a singular two-body interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ammari, Zied

    2011-01-01

    We consider the quantum dynamics of many bosons systems in the mean field limit with a singular pair-interaction potential, including the attractive or repulsive Coulombic case in three dimensions. By using a measure transportation technique, we show that Wigner measures propagate along the nonlinear Hartree flow. Such property was previously proved only for bounded potentials in our previous works with a slightly different strategy.

  1. Evolution of a quantum system of many particles interacting via the generalized Yukawa potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoliubov, N. N.; Rasulova, M. Yu.; Avazov, U. A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the evolution of a system of N particles that have identical masses and charges and interact via the generalized Yukawa potential. The system is placed in a bounded region. The evolution of such a system is described by the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) chain of quantum kinetic equations. Using semigroup theory, we prove the existence of a unique solution of the BBGKY chain of quantum kinetic equations with the generalized Yukawa potential.

  2. A review of potential harmful interactions between anticoagulant/antiplatelet agents and Chinese herbal medicines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risks attributed to drug-herb interactions, even when known, are often ignored or underestimated, especially for those involving anti-clotting drugs and Chinese medicines. The aim of this study was to structurally search and evaluate the existing evidence-based data associated with potential drug interactions between anticoagulant/antiplatelet drugs and Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs and evaluate the documented mechanisms, consequences, and/or severity of interactions. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Information related to anticoagulant/antiplatelet drug-CHM interactions was retrieved from eight interaction-based textbooks, four web resources and available primary biomedical literature. The primary literature searches were conducted in English and/or Chinese from January 2000 through December 2011 using the secondary databases (e.g., PubMed, Airiti Library, China Journal full-text database. The search terms included the corresponding medical subject headings and key words. Herbs or natural products not used as a single entity CHM or in Chinese Medicinal Prescriptions were excluded from further review. The corresponding mechanisms and severity ratings of interactions were retrieved using MicroMedex®, Lexicomp® and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database®. Finally, we found 90 single entity CHMs contributed to 306 documented drug-CHM interactions. A total of 194 (63.4% interactions were verified for its evidence describing possible mechanisms and severity. Of them, 155 interactions (79.9% were attributable to pharmacodynamic interactions, and almost all were rated as moderate to severe interactions. The major consequences of these interactions were increased bleeding risks due to the additive anticoagulant or antiplatelet effects of the CHMs, specifically danshen, dong quai, ginger, ginkgo, licorice, and turmeric. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Conventional anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs were documented to have harmful interactions

  3. Protein-protein interactions: principles, techniques, and their potential role in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shagufta H; Ahmad, Faizan; Ahmad, Nihal; Flynn, Daniel C; Kumar, Raj

    2011-06-01

    A vast network of genes is inter-linked through protein-protein interactions and is critical component of almost every biological process under physiological conditions. Any disruption of the biologically essential network leads to pathological conditions resulting into related diseases. Therefore, proper understanding of biological functions warrants a comprehensive knowledge of protein-protein interactions and the molecular mechanisms that govern such processes. The importance of protein-protein interaction process is highlighted by the fact that a number of powerful techniques/methods have been developed to understand how such interactions take place under various physiological and pathological conditions. Many of the key protein-protein interactions are known to participate in disease-associated signaling pathways, and represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Thus, controlling protein-protein interactions offers a rich dividend for the discovery of new drug targets. Availability of various tools to study and the knowledge of human genome have put us in a unique position to understand highly complex biological network, and the mechanisms involved therein. In this review article, we have summarized protein-protein interaction networks, techniques/methods of their binding/kinetic parameters, and the role of these interactions in the development of potential tools for drug designing.

  4. PDZ Domains and Viral Infection: Versatile Potentials of HPV-PDZ Interactions in relation to Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Nagasaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is caused by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, and a unique characteristic of these is a PDZ (P̲SD-95/D̲lg/Z̲O-1-binding motif in their E6 proteins. Through this motif HPV E6 interacts with a variety of PDZ domain-containing proteins and targets them mainly for degradation. These E6-PDZ interactions exhibit extraordinarily different functions in relation to HPV-induced malignancy, depending upon various cellular contexts; for example, Dlg and Scrib show different distribution patterns from what is seen in normal epithelium, both in localization and in amount, and their loss may be a late-stage marker in malignant progression. Recent studies show that interactions with specific forms of the proteins may have oncogenic potential. In addition, it is interesting that PDZ proteins make a contribution to the stabilization of E6 and viral episomal maintenance during the course of HPV life cycle. Various posttranslational modifications also greatly affect their functions. Phosphorylation of hDlg and hScrib by certain kinases regulates several important signaling cascades, and E6-PDZ interactions themselves are regulated through PKA-dependent phosphorylation. Thus these interactions naturally have great potential for both predictive and therapeutic applications, and, with development of screening tools for identifying novel targets of their interactions, comprehensive spatiotemporal analysis is currently underway.

  5. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-03-10

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself, would be the real substance the organs and cells firstly encounter. Consequently, the behavior of nanomaterials in vivo is uncontrollable and some undesired effects may occur, like rapid clearance from blood stream; risk of capillary blockage; loss of targeting capacity; and potential toxicity. Therefore, protein-nanomaterial interaction is a great challenge for nanomaterial systems and should be inhibited. However, this interaction can also be used to functionalize nanomaterials by forming a selected protein corona. Unlike other decoration using exogenous molecules, nanomaterials functionalized by selected protein corona using endogenous proteins would have greater promise for clinical use. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive understanding of protein-nanomaterial interaction. Importantly, a discussion about how to use such interaction is launched and some possible applications of such interaction for advanced drug delivery are presented.

  6. On Local Smooth Solutions for the Vlasov Equation with the Potential of Interactions {\\pm} r^{-2}

    CERN Document Server

    Zhidkov, P E

    2003-01-01

    For the initial value problem for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions {\\pm} r^{-2} we prove the existence and uniqueness of a local solution with values in the Schwartz space S of infinitely differentiable functions rapidly decaying at infinity.

  7. On the configuration of systems of interacting particle with minimum potential energy per particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ventevogel, W.J.; Nijboer, B.R.A.

    1979-01-01

    In continuation of previous work we extend the class of two-body potentials, either repulsive or of generalized Lennard-Jones type, for which it can be proved that among all configurations of an infinite one-dimensional system of interacting particles (with fixed density in the case of repulsive int

  8. Critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation for weakly interacting bose gas in a potential trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Xuecai; YE; Yutang; WU; Yunfeng; XIE; Kang; CHENG; Lin

    2005-01-01

    The critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation at minimum momentum state for weakly interacting Bose gases in a power-law potential and the deviation of the critical temperature from ideal bose gas are studied. The effect of interaction on the critical temperature is ascribed to the ratiao α/λc, where α is the scattering length for s wave and λc is de Broglie wavelength at critical temperature. As α/λc<<1/(2π)2, the interaction is negligible. The presented deviation of the critical temperature for three dimensional harmonic potential is well in agreement with recent measurement of critical temperature for 87Rb bose gas trapped in a harmonic well.

  9. Potential pharmacokinetic interactions between antiretrovirals and medicinal plants used as complementary and African traditional medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Adrienne C; Kanfer, Isadore

    2011-11-01

    The use of traditional/complementary/alternate medicines (TCAMs) in HIV/AIDS patients who reside in Southern Africa is quite common. Those who use TCAMs in addition to antiretroviral (ARV) treatment may be at risk of experiencing clinically significant pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions, particularly between the TCAMs and the protease inhibitors (PIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Mechanisms of PK interactions include alterations to the normal functioning of drug efflux transporters, such as P-gp and/or CYP isoenzymes, such a CYP3A4 that mediate the absorption and elimination of drugs in the small intestine and liver. Specific mechanisms include inhibition and activation of these proteins and induction via the pregnane X receptor (PXR). Several clinical studies and case reports involving ARV-herb PK interactions have been reported. St John's Wort, Garlic and Cat's Claw exhibited potentially significant interactions, each with a PI or NNRTI. The potential for these herbs to induce PK interactions with drugs was first identified in reports of in vitro studies. Other in vitro studies have shown that several African traditional medicinal (ATM) plants and extracts may also demonstrate PK interactions with ARVs, through effects on CYP3A4, P-gp and PXR. The most complex effects were exhibited by Hypoxis hemerocallidea, Sutherlandia frutescens, Cyphostemma hildebrandtii, Acacia nilotica, Agauria salicifolia and Elaeodendron buchananii. Despite a high incidence of HIV/AIDs in the African region, only one clinical study, between efavirenz and Hypoxis hemerocallidea has been conducted. However, several issues/concerns still remain to be addressed and thus more studies on ATMs are warranted in order for more meaningful data to be generated and the true potential for such interactions to be determined.

  10. Time evolution of initial states that extend beyond the potential interaction region in quantum decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Calderón, Gastón; Villavicencio, Jorge; Hernández-Maldonado, Alberto; Romo, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the decay of initial states that possess a tail that extends beyond the interaction potential region, for potentials of arbitrary shape that vanish exactly after a distance. This is the case for a relevant class of artificial quantum structures. We obtain that along the internal interaction region, the time evolution of the decaying wave function is formed by two terms. The first one refers to the proper decay of the internal portion of the initial state, whereas the second one, that arises from the external tail, yields a transient contribution that tunnels into the internal region, builds up to a value, and then decays. We obtain that depending on the parameters of the initial state, the nonexponential tail decaying contribution may be larger than the contribution of the proper nonexponential term. These results are illustrated by an exactly solvable model and the Heidelberg potential for decay of ultracold atoms and open the possibility to control initial states in artificial decaying systems.

  11. Evaluation of screening length corrections for interaction potentials in impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Wataru, E-mail: take@sp.ous.ac.jp

    2013-10-15

    Since in impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) data analysis the interaction potential represented by the screening length as the screening effect is not satisfactorily established up to the present, we introduce commonly the correction factor in the screening length. Previously, Yamamura, Takeuchi and Kawamura (YTK) have suggested the theory taking the shell effect of electron distributions into account for the correction factor to Firsov screening length in the Moliere potential. The application of YTK theory to the evaluation of screening length corrections for the interaction potentials in ICISS manifested that the screening length corrections calculated by the YTK theory agree almost with those determined by simulations or numerical calculations in ICISS and its variants data analyses, being superior to the evaluation of screening length corrections with the O’Connor and Biersack (OB) formula.

  12. Many-Body Coarse-Grained Interactions using Gaussian Approximation Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    John, S T

    2016-01-01

    This thesis introduces a framework that is able to describe general many-body coarse-grained interactions. We make use of this to describe the free energy surface as a cluster expansion in terms of monomer, dimer, and trimer terms. The contributions to the free energy due to these terms are inferred from MD results of the underlying all-atom model using Gaussian Approximation Potentials, a type of machine-learning potential based on Gaussian process regression. This provides CG interactions that are much more accurate than is possible with site-based pair potentials. While slower than these, it can still be faster than all-atom simulations for solvent-free CG models of systems with a large amount of solvent, as is common in biomolecular simulations.

  13. Insect antimicrobial peptides show potentiating functional interactions against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnamaeian, Mohammad; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Dobslaff, Kristin; Wiesner, Jochen; Twyman, Richard M; Zuchner, Thole; Sadd, Ben M; Regoes, Roland R; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and proteins are important components of innate immunity against pathogens in insects. The production of AMPs is costly owing to resource-based trade-offs, and strategies maximizing the efficacy of AMPs at low concentrations are therefore likely to be advantageous. Here, we show the potentiating functional interaction of co-occurring insect AMPs (the bumblebee linear peptides hymenoptaecin and abaecin) resulting in more potent antimicrobial effects at low concentrations. Abaecin displayed no detectable activity against Escherichia coli when tested alone at concentrations of up to 200 μM, whereas hymenoptaecin affected bacterial cell growth and viability but only at concentrations greater than 2 μM. In combination, as little as 1.25 μM abaecin enhanced the bactericidal effects of hymenoptaecin. To understand these potentiating functional interactions, we investigated their mechanisms of action using atomic force microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based quenching assays. Abaecin was found to reduce the minimal inhibitory concentration of hymenoptaecin and to interact with the bacterial chaperone DnaK (an evolutionarily conserved central organizer of the bacterial chaperone network) when the membrane was compromised by hymenoptaecin. These naturally occurring potentiating interactions suggest that combinations of AMPs could be used therapeutically against Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that have acquired resistance to common antibiotics.

  14. Potential drug–drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualetti G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Pasqualetti, Sara Tognini, Valeria Calsolaro, Antonio Polini, Fabio Monzani Geriatrics Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug–drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug–drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug–drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with

  15. Frequency of potential interactions between drugs in medical prescriptions in a city in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genici Weyh Bleich

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Drug interactions form part of current clinical practice and they affect between 3 and 5% of polypharmacy patients. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions for adult and elderly patients. TYPE OF STUDY AND SETTING: Cross-sectional pharmacoepidemiological survey in the Parque Verde housing project, municipality of Cascavel, Paraná, Brazil, between December 2006 and February 2007. METHODS: Stratified cluster sampling, proportional to the total number of homes in the housing project, was used. The sample consisted of 95 homes and 96 male or female patients aged 19 or over, with medical prescriptions for at least two pharmaceutical drugs. Interactions were identified using DrugDigest, Medscape and Micromedex softwares. RESULTS: Most of the patients were female (69.8%, married (59.4% and in the age group of 60 years or over (56.3%, with an income less than or equal to three minimum monthly salaries (81.3% and less than eight years of schooling (69.8%; 90.6% of the patients were living with another person. The total number of pharmaceutical drugs was 406 (average of 4.2 medications per patient. The drugs most prescribed were antihypertensives (47.5%. The frequency of drug interactions was 66.6%. Among the 154 potential drug interactions, 4.6% were classified as major, 65.6% as moderate and 20.1% as minor. CONCLUSION: The high frequency of drug prescriptions with a potential for differentiated interactions indicates a situation that has so far been little explored, albeit a reality in household surveys.

  16. Association of COMT and COMT-DRD2 interaction with creative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun eZhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that genes involved in dopamine (DA transmission may contribute to creativity. Among these genes, the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT and the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2 are the most promising candidates. Our previous study has revealed evidence for the involvement of DRD2 in creative potential. The present study extended our previous study by systematically exploring the association of COMT with creative potential as well as the interaction between COMT and DRD2. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs covering COMT were genotyped in 543 healthy Chinese college students whose creative potentials were assessed by divergent thinking tests. Single SNP analysis showed that rs174697 was nominally associated with verbal originality, two SNPs (rs737865 and rs5993883 were nominally associated with figural fluency, and two SNPs (rs737865 and rs4680 were nominally associated with figural originality. Haplotype analysis showed that, the TCT and CCT haplotype (rs737865-rs174675-rs5993882 were nominally associated with figural originality, and the TATGCAG and CGCGGGA haplotype (rs4646312-rs6269-rs4633-rs6267-rs4818-rs4680-rs769224 were nominally associated with figural originality and verbal flexibility, respectively. However, none of these nominal findings survived correction for multiple testing. Gene-gene interaction analysis identified one significant four-way interaction of rs174675 (COMT, rs174697 (COMT, rs1076560 (DRD2 and rs4436578 (DRD2 on verbal fluency, one significant four-way interaction of rs174675 (COMT, rs4818 (COMT, rs1076560 (DRD2 and rs4648317 (DRD2 on verbal flexibility, and one significant three-way interaction of rs5993883 (COMT, rs4648319 (DRD2 and rs4648317 (DRD2 on figural flexibility. In conclusion, the present study provides nominal evidence for the involvement of COMT in creative potential and suggests that DA related genes may act in coordination to contribute to creativity.

  17. A new method for detecting interactions between the senses in event-related potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondan, Matthias; Röder, B.

    2006-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) can be used in multisensory research to determine the point in time when different senses start to interact, for example, the auditory and the visual system. For this purpose, the ERP to bimodal stimuli (AV) is often compared to the sum of the ERPs to auditory (A...... - (A + V), but common activity is eliminated because two ERPs are subtracted from two others. With this new comparison technique, the first auditory-visual interaction starts around 80 ms after stimulus onset for the present experimental setting. It is possible to apply the new comparison method...

  18. A Study on Potential of Integrating Multimodal Interaction into Musical Conducting Education

    CERN Document Server

    Siang, Gilbert Phuah Leong; Yong, Pang Yee

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid development of computer technology, computer music has begun to appear in the laboratory. Many potential utility of computer music is gradually increasing. The purpose of this paper is attempted to analyze the possibility of integrating multimodal interaction such as vision-based hand gesture and speech interaction into musical conducting education. To achieve this purpose, this paper is focus on discuss some related research and the traditional musical conducting education. To do so, six musical conductors had been interviewed to share their musical conducting learning/ teaching experience. These interviews had been analyzed in this paper to show the syllabus and the focus of musical conducting education for beginners.

  19. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute “Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine,” 14513 Teltow (Germany); Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Heyda, Jan [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, 166 28 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  20. Interactions of neuropathy inducers and potentiators/promoters with soluble esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, Jorge; Mangas, Iris; Sogorb, Miguel Ángel; Vilanova, Eugenio

    2013-03-25

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) cause neurotoxic disorders through interactions with well-known target esterases, such as acetylcholinesterase and neuropathy target esterase (NTE). However, the OPs can potentially interact with other esterases of unknown significance. Therefore, identifying, characterizing and elucidating the nature and functional significance of the OP-sensitive pool of esterases in the central and peripheral nervous systems need to be investigated. Kinetic models have been developed and applied by considering multi-enzymatic systems, inhibition, spontaneous reactivation, the chemical hydrolysis of the inhibitor and "ongoing inhibition" (inhibition during the substrate reaction time). These models have been applied to discriminate enzymatic components among the esterases in nerve tissues of adult chicken, this being the experimental model for delayed neuropathy and to identify different modes of interactions between OPs and soluble brain esterases. The covalent interaction with the substrate catalytic site has been demonstrated by time-progressive inhibition during ongoing inhibition. The interaction of sequential exposure to an esterase inhibitor has been tested in brain soluble fraction where exposure to one inhibitor at a non inhibitory concentration has been seen to modify sensitivity to further exposure to others. The effect has been suggested to be caused by interaction with sites other than the inhibition site at the substrate catalytic site. This kind of interaction among esterase inhibitors should be considered to study the potentiation/promotion phenomenon, which is observed when some esterase inhibitors enhance the severity of the OP induced neuropathy if they are dosed after a non neuropathic low dose of a neuropathy inducer.

  1. Concomitant therapy in people with epilepsy: potential drug-drug interactions and patient awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Sara; Rasaby, Sivan; Ekstein, Dana

    2014-02-01

    People with epilepsy (PWE) may use prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs for the treatment of concomitant diseases. Combinations of these drugs, as well as dietary supplements, with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may lead to reduced control of seizures and of coexisting medical conditions and increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aims of this study were to obtain comprehensive lists of medications, dietary supplements, botanicals, and specific food components used by adult PWE and to evaluate the potential for interactions involving AEDs and patients' awareness of such potential interactions. We conducted a prospective, questionnaire-based study of PWE attending the Hadassah-Hebrew University Epilepsy Clinic over a period of 7months. The questionnaire interview included the listing of medications, medicinal herbs, dietary supplements, and specific food components consumed and the knowledge of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and it was conducted by a pharmacist. Drug-drug interactions were analyzed via the Micromedex online database. Out of 179 patients who attended the clinic over the study period, we interviewed 73 PWE, of which 71 were included in our final analysis. The mean number of AEDs consumed per subject was 1.7 (SD: 0.8, range: 1-4). Forty (56%) subjects were also treated with other prescription and/or OTC medications, and thirty-four (48%) took dietary supplements. Drug families most prone to DDIs involving AEDs included antipsychotic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and statins. Two-thirds of study participants (67%) knew that DDIs may lead to ADRs, but only half (56%) were aware of the potential for reduced seizure control. Only 44% always reported treatment with AEDs to medical professionals. This study provides for the first time a comprehensive picture of prescription and OTC drugs and food supplements used by PWE. Despite a considerable potential for DDIs involving AEDs, patient awareness is limited

  2. Medicinal plant reported with adverse reactions in Cuba: potential interactions with conventional drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Martínez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Herbal drugs are a mixture of active compounds and the chemical complexity of each formulation increase with the possibility of interactions between them and conventional drugs. Many mechanisms are implicated in the interactions; scientific community has dedicated the attentions to enzymes as P-gp and CYP450. Aims: To investigate in the literature the principal plants with suspicions of adverse reactions in Cuba and their potential interactions with conventional drugs. Methods: PubMed was the database used as source of information until February 2014. Key words: Herb-Drug, Drug-Plant, Herbal–Drug, Interactions with scientific names of plants was used. Information was structured and analysed with EndNote X4. Analysis and integration of the information: Allium sativum L. (garlic was the plant with the high number of studies related with CYP450 and P-gp. Plants with great demand as Morinda citrifolia L. (noni, Psidium guajava L. (guayaba, Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger and Eucalyptus spp. (eucalyptus have a very small number of studies. The professionals of the health should keep in mind the possibility of interactions between herbal products and conventional drugs to increase the effectiveness of phytotherapy. Conclusions: It is necessary enhance reports and investigations and to put to disposition of the system of health information on the interactions of plants and to stimulate the investigation that offers information for the rational use of our medicinal plants.

  3. Electrostatic potential profile and nonlinear current in an interacting one-dimensional molecular wire

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Lakshmi; Swapan K Pati

    2003-10-01

    We consider an interacting one-dimensional molecular wire attached to two metal electrodes on either side of it. The electrostatic potential profile across the wire-electrode interface has been deduced solving the Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently. Since the Poisson distribution crucially depends on charge densities, we have considered different Hamiltonian parameters to model the nanoscale wire. We find that for very weak electron correlations, the potential gradient is almost zero in the middle of the wire but are large near the chain ends. However, for strong correlations, the potential is essentially a ramp function. The nonlinear current, obtained from the scattering formalism, is found to be less with the ramp potential than for weak correlations. Some of the interesting features in current-voltage characteristics have been explained using one-electron formalism and instabilities in the system.

  4. Scalar-fluid interacting dark energy: Cosmological dynamics beyond the exponential potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Jibitesh; Khyllep, Wompherdeiki; Tamanini, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    We extend the dynamical systems analysis of scalar-fluid interacting dark energy models performed in C. G. Boehmer et al., Phys. Rev. D 91, 123002 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.123002 by considering scalar field potentials beyond the exponential type. The properties and stability of critical points are examined using a combination of linear analysis, computational methods and advanced mathematical techniques, such as center manifold theory. We show that the interesting results obtained with an exponential potential can generally be recovered also for more complicated scalar field potentials. In particular, employing power law and hyperbolic potentials as examples, we find late time accelerated attractors, transitions from dark matter to dark energy domination with specific distinguishing features, and accelerated scaling solutions capable of solving the cosmic coincidence problem.

  5. Hyperon Single-Particle Potentials Calculated from SU6 Quark-Model Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, M; Fujita, T; Nakamoto, C; Suzuki, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction recently developed by the Kyoto-Niigata group, we calculate NN, Lambda N and Sigma N G-matrices in ordinary nuclear matter. This is the first attempt to discuss the Lambda and Sigma single-particle potentials in nuclear medium, based on the realistic quark-model potential. The Lambda potential has the depth of more than 40 MeV, which is more attractive than the value expected from the experimental data of Lambda-hypernuclei. The Sigma potential turns out to be repulsive, the origin of which is traced back to the strong Pauli repulsion in the Sigma N (I=3/2) ^3S_1 state.

  6. Reconstructing interaction potentials in thin films from real-space images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gienger, Jonas; Severin, Nikolai; Rabe, Jürgen P; Sokolov, Igor M

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that an inverse Monte Carlo approach allows one to reconstruct effective interaction potentials from real-space images. The method is exemplified on monomolecular ethanol-water films imaged with scanning force microscopy, which provides the spatial distribution of the molecules. Direct Monte Carlo simulations with the reconstructed potential allow for obtaining characteristics of the system which are unavailable in the experiment, such as the heat capacity of the monomolecularly thin film, and for a prediction of the critical temperature of the demixing transition.

  7. Isospin effects of the Skyrme potential and the momentum dependent interaction at intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wen-Jun; LIU Jian-Ye

    2008-01-01

    We improve the isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamical model by including isospin effects in the Skyrme potential and the momentum dependent interaction to obtain an isospin dependent Skyrme potential and an isospin dependent momentum interaction. We investigate the isospin effects of Skyrme potential and momentum dependent interaction on the isospin fractionation ratio and the dynamical mechanism in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. It is found that the isospin dependent Skyrme potential and the isospin dependent momentum interaction produce some important isospin effects in the isospin fractionation ratio.

  8. Understanding consumer motivations for interacting in online food communities – potential for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lina; Sørensen, Bjarne Taulo; Tudoran, Ana Alina

    This study contributes to the understanding of online user communities as a potential source of innovation. That would require an interest from users in interacting in such communities. In order to establish interaction, users must provide as well as consume information. However, depending...... on the innovation task, one may be more important than the other. It is therefore important to understand, how companies can increase user willingness to engage in these different interaction forms. This study investigates the influence of various motivation factors and user interests on intention to provide...... or consume information in online food communities. A survey was conducted among 1009 respondents followed by analysis based on Structural Equation Modelling. Results revealed the effect of motivation factors to be stronger than basic consumer interests indicating that companies can influence the intended...

  9. Potential costs of heterospecific sexual interactions in golden orbweb spiders (Nephila spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones-Lebrón, Shakira G; Kralj-Fišer, Simona; Gregorič, Matjaž; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Čandek, Klemen; Haddad, Charles R; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2016-11-15

    Though not uncommon in other animals, heterospecific mating is rarely reported in arachnids. We investigated sexual interactions among four closely related and syntopical African golden orbweb spiders, Nephila inaurata, N. fenestrata, N. komaci, and N. senegalensis. In two South African localities, female webs were often inhabited by heterospecific males that sometimes outnumbered conspecifics. Species association of males with females was random in nature. In subsequent laboratory choice experiments, N. inaurata males chose heterospecific females in 30% of trials. We also observed natural mating interactions between N. inaurata males and N. komaci females, and between N. komaci males and N. inaurata females in laboratory experiments. While heterospecific mating in the laboratory never produced offspring, conspecific mating did. We discuss potential ecological and evolutionary consequences of heterospecific mating interactions in Nephila that may be particularly costly to the rarer species.

  10. Interaction potential of microparticles in a plasma: role of collisions with plasma particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapak, S A; Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G

    2001-10-01

    The interaction potential of two charged microparticles in a plasma is studied. Violation of the plasma equilibrium around the dust particles due to plasma-particle inelastic collisions results in three effects: long-range (non-Yukawa) electrostatic repulsion, attraction due to ion shadowing, and attraction or repulsion due to neutral shadowing (depending on the sign of the temperature difference between the particle surface and neutral gas). An analytical expression for the total potential is obtained and compared with previous theoretical results. The relative contribution of these effects is studied in two limiting cases-an isotropic bulk plasma and the plasma sheath region. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental results on pair particle interaction. The possibility of the so-called dust molecule formation is discussed.

  11. Multiple scattering of low energy ions in matter: Influence of energy loss and interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekhtiche, A. [Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), BP 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Faculté des Sciences et de la Technologie, Université Yahia Farès de Médéa (Algeria); Khalal-Kouache, K., E-mail: kkouache@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), BP 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of inelastic energy loss and interaction potential on transmitted ions at low energy is studied. For this purpose, angular distributions of slow He{sup +} ions transmitted through thin Ag films are calculated using the theory of multiple scattering. Thin films (20–50 Å at 2 keV and 50–200 Å at 10 keV) are considered so that the total path length of transmitted ions can be approximated by the value of the target thickness in this calculation. The corresponding values of the relative energy loss ΔE/E are comprised between 0.04 and 0.17. We show that even if low values of the thickness are considered, the total energy loss of ions in the target should be included in the calculation. These calculated angular distributions are also influenced by the potential used to describe the interaction between the incident ion and the target atom.

  12. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A., E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4630 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter was carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons has been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. The final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV) and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP{sub 3} through IP{sub 6}.

  13. Physical interactions between DNA and sepiolite nanofibers, and potential application for DNA transfer into mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Smirnov, Fidel Antonio; Piétrement, Olivier; Aranda, Pilar; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Ayache, Jeanne; Le Cam, Eric; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Nanofibers of sepiolite, a natural silicate belonging to the clay minerals family, might constitute a potential promising nanocarrier for the non-viral transfer of bio-molecules. We show here that sepiolite nanofibers efficiently bind different types of DNA molecules through electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding, cation bridges, and van der Waals forces. Moreover, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy identified the external silanol groups as the main sites of interaction with the DNA. Furthermore, as a proof of concept, we show that sepiolite is able to stably transfer plasmid DNA into mammalian cells and that the efficiency can be optimized. Indeed, sonication of sepiolite 100-fold stimulated DNA transfection efficiency. These results open the way to the use of sepiolite-based biohybrids as a novel class of nanoplatform for gene transfer with potential clinical applications. PMID:27808269

  14. Herbal medicines in Brazil: pharmacokinetic profile and potential herb-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzari, Andre L D A; Prieto, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of active compounds found in herbal medicines can serve as substrate for enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. When a medicinal plant is co-administered with a conventional drug and little or no information is known about the pharmacokinetics of the plant metabolites, there is an increased risk of potential herb-drug interactions. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms in a population may act to predispose individuals to adverse reactions. The use of herbal medicines is rapidly increasing in many countries, particularly Brazil where the vast biodiversity is a potential source of new and more affordable treatments for numerous conditions. Accordingly, the Brazilian Unified Public Health System (SUS) produced a list of 71 plant species of interest, which could be made available to the population in the near future. Physicians at SUS prescribe a number of essential drugs and should herbal medicines be added to this system the chance of herb-drug interactions further increases. A review of the effects of these medicinal plants on Phase 1 and Phase 2 metabolic mechanisms and the transporter P-glycoprotein was conducted. The results have shown that approximately half of these medicinal plants lack any pharmacokinetic data. Moreover, most of the studies carried out are in vitro. Only a few reports on herb-drug interactions with essential drugs prescribed by SUS were found, suggesting that very little attention is being given to the safety of herbal medicines. Here we have taken this information to discuss the potential interactions between herbal medicines and essential drugs prescribed to Brazilian patients whilst taking into account the most common polymorphisms present in the Brazilian population. A number of theoretical interactions are pinpointed but more pharmacokinetic studies and pharmacovigilance data are needed to ascertain their clinical significance.

  15. Potential drug-drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug-drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug-drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug-drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms.

  16. Effect of taurine and potential interactions with caffeine on cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Shimada, Kayoko; Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Azuma, Junichi; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2014-05-01

    The major impetus behind the rise in energy drink popularity among adults is their ability to heighten mental alertness, improve physical performance and supply energy. However, accompanying the exponential growth in energy drink usage have been recent case reports and analyses from the National Poison Data System, raising questions regarding the safety of energy drinks. Most of the safety concerns have centered on the effect of energy drinks on cardiovascular and central nervous system function. Although the effects of caffeine excess have been widely studied, little information is available on potential interactions between the other active ingredients of energy drinks and caffeine. One of the active ingredients often mentioned as a candidate for interactions with caffeine is the beta-amino acid, taurine. Although taurine is considered a conditionally essential nutrient for humans and is thought to play a key role in several human diseases, clinical studies evaluating the effects of taurine are limited. However, based on this review regarding possible interactions between caffeine and taurine, we conclude that taurine should neutralize several untoward effects of caffeine excess. In agreement with this conclusion, the European Union's Scientific Committee on Food published a report in March 2003 summarizing its investigation into potential interactions of the ingredients in energy drinks. At the cardiovascular level, they concluded that "if there are any interactions between caffeine and taurine, taurine might reduce the cardiovascular effects of caffeine." Although these interactions remain to be further examined in humans, the physiological functions of taurine appear to be inconsistent with the adverse cardiovascular symptoms associated with excessive consumption of caffeine-taurine containing beverages.

  17. Advances in adult asthma diagnosis and treatment in 2012: potential therapeutics and gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Andrea J

    2013-01-01

    In the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in 2012, research reports related to asthma in adults clustered around mechanisms of disease, with a special focus on their potential for informing new therapies. There was also consideration of the effect of the environment on health from pollution, climate change, and epigenetic influences, underlining the importance of understanding gene-environment interactions in the pathogenesis of asthma and response to treatment.

  18. Formation of chain structures in systems of charged grains interacting via isotropic pair potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaulina, O. S.; Lisina, I. I.; Koss, K. G., E-mail: Xeniya.Koss@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Conditions for the formation of chain structures of charged grains confined in the gravitational field by external electric fields are studied analytically and numerically. The relationships between the parameters of the pair interaction potential, the number of grains, and the electric field gradient in the trap are found. A criterion for the violation of stable equilibrium in a quasi-one-dimensional chain of grains and the formation of a new configuration in the system is proposed.

  19. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Anders S., E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang, E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Elstner, Marcus [Theoretische Chemische Biologie, Universität Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  20. Semi-Empirical Effective Interactions for Inelastic Scattering Derived from the Reid Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiase, J. O.; Sharma, L. K.; Winkoun, D. P.; Hosaka, A.

    2001-09-01

    An effective local interaction suitable for inelastic scattering is constructed from the Reid soft - core potential. We proceed in two stages: We first calculated a set of relative two - body matrix elements in a variational approach using the Reid soft-core potential folded with two-body correlation functions. In the second stage we constructed a potential for inelastic scattering by fitting the matrix elements to a sum of Yukawa central, tensor and spin-orbit terms to the set of relative two - body matrix elements obtained in the first stage by a least squares fitting procedure. The ranges of the new potential were selected to ensure the OPEP tails in the relevant channels as well as the short - range part of the interaction. It is found that the results of our variational techniques are very similar to the G - matrix calculations of Bertsch and co - workers in the singlet - even, triplet - even, tensor - even and spin-orbit odd channels thus putting our calculations of two - body matrix elements of nuclear forces in these channels on a sound footing. However, there exist major differences in the singlet - odd, triplet - odd, tensor - odd and spin - orbit even channels which casts some doubt on our understanding of nuclear forces in these channels.

  1. Potential interactions of central nervous system drugs used in the elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Bueno Morrone

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of CNS drugs and to identify the most frequently observed potential drug interactions in the elderly living in Southern Brazil. METHODS: A population-based, transversal and observational study was carried out during 2006-2007. Four hundred and eighty elderly individuals of both genders were randomly recruited and interviewed. A validated pharmacotherapeutic questionnaire and the Micromedex® Healthcare Series were utilized to analyze potential drug interactions. A severity rating scale employing the categories of "mild", "moderate" and "severe" was used to describe the interactions. RESULTS: A population of elderly living in Southern Brazil was interviewed and 98 reported using CNS drugs, 74.5% female and 25.5% male. Out of these patients, 32.0% reported severe or moderate pharmacological interactions related to the use of other drugs. Alprazolam and imipramine were reported to potentially interact with tobacco. Twenty potential moderate drug/ethanol interactions were found. The potential drug/caffeine interactions were classified as mild on the severity scale. CONCLUSION: Elderly being prescribed drugs that act on the CNS should be closely monitored, and furthermore, should be warned against potential drug-drug, drug-ethanol, and drug-tobacco interactions.OBJETIVO: Descrever o uso de medicamentos que atuam no sistema nervoso central (SNC e identificar as possíveis interações mais frequentes com esses medicamentos em idosos do sul do Brasil. MÉTODOS: Estudo de base populacional, transversal e observacional, realizado durante 2006-2007. Quatrocentos e oitenta idosos de ambos os sexos foram randomizados e entrevistados. Foram utilizados um questionário farmacoterapêutico validado e o programa Micromedex® Healthcare Series para analisar as potenciais interações com os medicamentos. Foi utilizada uma escala para descrever a gravidade das interações nas categorias de "leve", "moderada" e "grave". RESULTADOS

  2. Study of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions in Prescriptions of University- Based Pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mousavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs are adverse reactions caused by a combination of drugs; they are often predictable and therefore avoidable or manageable. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nature, type and prevalence of potential DDIs in prescriptions dispensed in university-based community pharmacies in Tehran, Iran.Methods: From July 2012 to February 2014, sample of 1260 prescriptions were collected from community and outpatient hospital pharmacies affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS, Iran. The prescriptions were assessed using the reference text “drug interaction facts”. The identified DDIs were categorized according to their level of significance into three classes (minor, moderate, major.Results: At least one drug-drug interaction was present in 339 (26.9% of prescriptions and a total of 751 cases of interactions were found in prescriptions. Major DDIs represented 7.3% of all DDIs detected, whereas moderate DDIs were 75% of all DDIs. The mean number of drugs per prescriptions was 3.2, with a median of 4 (range, 2-10.There was a positive association between number of prescribed drugs and occurrence of DDIs (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.9-2.4. The prescriptions of medical specialist had greater risk of occurrence of moderate severity DDIs than general practitioners (OR: 1.52, 95%CI: 1.08-2.15.Conclusion: Despite the prescriptions were collected from university-based pharmacies, but the overall prevalence of potential DDIs were high among patients. Physicians should be aware of potentially harmful DDIs. Meanwhile Pharmacists can contribute to the detection and prevention of drug-related injuries. Appropriate education, collaborating drug selection and pharmaceutical care are strongly recommended for physicians and pharmacists.

  3. Whitebark pine facilitation at treeline: potential interactions for disruption by an invasive pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomback, Diana F; Blakeslee, Sarah C; Wagner, Aaron C; Wunder, Michael B; Resler, Lynn M; Pyatt, Jill C; Diaz, Soledad

    2016-08-01

    In stressful environments, facilitation often aids plant establishment, but invasive plant pathogens may potentially disrupt these interactions. In many treeline communities in the northern Rocky Mountains of the U.S. and Canada, Pinus albicaulis, a stress-tolerant pine, initiates tree islands at higher frequencies than other conifers - that is, leads to leeward tree establishment more frequently. The facilitation provided by a solitary (isolated) P. albicaulis leading to tree island initiation may be important for different life-history stages for leeward conifers, but it is not known which life-history stages are influenced and protection provided. However, P. albicaulis mortality from the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola potentially disrupts these facilitative interactions, reducing tree island initiation. In two Rocky Mountain eastern slope study areas, we experimentally examined fundamental plant-plant interactions which might facilitate tree island formation: the protection offered by P. albicaulis to leeward seed and seedling life-history stages, and to leeward krummholz conifers. In the latter case, we simulated mortality from C. ribicola for windward P. albicaulis to determine whether loss of P. albicaulis from C. ribicola impacts leeward conifers. Relative to other common solitary conifers at treeline, solitary P. albicaulis had higher abundance. More seeds germinated in leeward rock microsites than in conifer or exposed microsites, but the odds of cotyledon seedling survival during the growing season were highest in P. albicaulis microsites. Planted seedling survival was low among all microsites examined. Simulating death of windward P. albicaulis by C. ribicola reduced shoot growth of leeward trees. Loss of P. albicaulis to exotic disease may limit facilitation interactions and conifer community development at treeline and potentially impede upward movement as climate warms.

  4. Dirac equation for the Hulthén potential within the Yukawa-type tensor interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oktay Aydo(g)du; Elham Maghsoodi; Hassan Hassanabadi

    2013-01-01

    Using the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method,pseudospin and spin symmetric solutions of the Dirac equation for the scalar and vector Hulthén potentials with the Yukawa-type tensor potential are obtained for an arbitrary spin-orbit coupling quantum number κ.We deduce the energy eigenvalue equations and corresponding upper-and lower-spinor wave functions in both the pseudospin and spin symmetry cases.Numerical results of the energy eigenvalue equations and the upper-and lower-spinor wave functions are presented to show the effects of the external potential and particle mass parameters as well as pseudospin and spin symmetric constants on the bound-state energies and wave functions in the absence and presence of the tensor interaction.

  5. Unexplored regions in QFT: delocalization of quantum matter through interactions with zero mass potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Schroer, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Massive quantum matter of prescribed spin permits infinitely many possibilities of covariantization in terms of spinorial (undotted/dotted) pointlike fields, whereas massless finite helicity representations lead to large gap in this spinorial spectrum which quantum field theorists usually try to fill by inventing an indefinite metric vectorpotential (Gupta-Bleuler, BRST) outside the quantum theoretic realm. Only after completing the computation the expecration of the gauge invariant observables are obtained. The full range of covariant possiblities (without indefinite metric) is restored if one allows localization along semiinfinite strings in addition to pointlike localization. These stringlike potentials fluctuate in the direction of the string (points in a lower de Sitter space) and absorb part of the short distance singularity: there always exists a potential with the smallest short distance dimension allowed by unitarity: sdd=1. In case the interaction with the potential remains linear (QED), there is a ...

  6. Mapping of the interaction sites of galanthamine: a quantitative analysis through pairwise potentials and quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Nicolas; Kone, Soleymane; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-01

    A quantitative analysis of the interaction sites of the anti-Alzheimer drug galanthamine with molecular probes (water and benzene molecules) representative of its surroundings in the binding site of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been realized through pairwise potentials calculations and quantum chemistry. This strategy allows a full and accurate exploration of the galanthamine potential energy surface of interaction. Significantly different results are obtained according to the distances of approaches between the various molecular fragments and the conformation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent. The geometry of the most relevant complexes has then been fully optimized through MPWB1K/6-31 + G(d,p) calculations, final energies being recomputed at the LMP2/aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) level of theory. Unexpectedly, galanthamine is found to interact mainly from its hydrogen-bond donor groups. Among those, CH groups in the vicinity of the ammonium group are prominent. The trends obtained provide rationales to the predilection of the equatorial orientation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent for binding to AChE. The analysis of the interaction energies pointed out the independence between the various interaction sites and the rigid character of galanthamine. The comparison between the cluster calculations and the crystallographic observations in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals allows the validation of the theoretical methodology. In particular, the positions of several water molecules appearing as strongly conserved in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals are predicted by the calculations. Moreover, the experimental position and orientation of lateral chains of functionally important aminoacid residues are in close agreement with the ones predicted theoretically. Our study provides relevant information for a rational drug design of galanthamine based AChE inhibitors.

  7. Intermolecular Interaction Potentials of CH4-Ne Complex Calculated with Local Density Approximation Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu-Lin; CHENG Xiao-Hong; CHEN Xiang-Rong; YANG Xiang-Dong; ZHU Jun

    2004-01-01

    @@ The intermolecular interactions potentials for two configurations of CH4-Ne complex are calculated with local density approximation methods in the frame of density functional theory. It is found that the calculated potentials have two minima when the distance between the carbon atom of CH4 and the Ne atom takes R = 5.80 a.u.and 6.20a. u. for both the two configurations. For the edge configuration, the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0669536 eV and 0.0671416 eV. For the face configuration, the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0737956 eV and 0.0645506 eV. The global minimum occurs at R = 5.80 a.u. for the face configuration with a depth of the potential 0.0737956 eV. The depths of our calculation are in better agreement with the experimental data than the quantum chemical calculation approach, while the position of minimum potential for our calculation is underestimated.

  8. Microorganisms in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste and their interactions with radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkouk, A.; Liebe, M.; Luetke, L.; Moll, H.; Stumpf, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2015-07-01

    The long-term safety of nuclear waste in a deep geological repository is an important issue in our society. Microorganisms indigenous to potential host rocks are able to influence the oxidation state, speciation and therefore the mobility of radionuclides as well as gas generation or canister corrosion. Therefore, for the safety assessment of such a repository it is necessary to know which microorganisms are present in the potential host rocks (e.g. clay, salt) and if these microorganisms can influence the performance of a repository. Microbial diversity in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste was analyzed by culture-independent molecular biological methods (e.g. 16S rRNA gene retrieval) as well as enrichment and isolation of indigenous microbes. Among other isolates, a Paenibacillus strain, as a representative of Firmicutes, was recovered in R2A media under anaerobic conditions from Opalinus clay from the Mont Terri in Switzerland. Accumulation experiments and potentiometric titrations showed a strong interaction of Paenibacillus sp. cells with U(VI) within a broad pH range (3-7). Additionally, the interactions of the halophilic archaeal strain Halobacterium noricense DSM 15987, a salt rock representative reference strain, with U(VI) at high ionic strength was investigated. After 48 h the cells were still alive at uranium concentrations up to 60 μM, which demonstrates that Halobacterium noricense can tolerate uranium concentrations up to this level. The formed uranium sorption species were examined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The results about the microbial communities present in potential host rocks for nuclear waste repositories and their interactions with radionuclides contribute to the safety assessment of a prospective nuclear waste repository.

  9. Subsystem-DFT potential-energy curves for weakly interacting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüns, Danny; Klahr, Kevin; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Visscher, Lucas; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2015-06-14

    Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (DFT) within the local-density approximation (LDA) or the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) is known to fail for the correct description of London dispersion interactions. Often, not even bound potential-energy surfaces are obtained for van der Waals complexes, unless special correction schemes are employed. In contrast to that, there has been some evidence for the fact that subsystem-based density functional theory produces interaction energies for weakly bound systems which are superior to Kohn-Sham DFT results without dispersion corrections. This is usually attributed to an error cancellation between the approximate exchange-correlation and non-additive kinetic-energy functionals employed in subsystem DFT. Here, we investigate the accuracy of subsystem DFT for weakly interacting systems in detail, paying special attention to the shape of the potential-energy surfaces (PESs). Our test sets include the extensive S22x5 and S66x8 data sets. Our results indicate that subsystem DFT PESs strongly vary depending on the functional. LDA results are usually quite good, but behave differently from their KS counterparts. GGA results from the popular Perdew-Wang (PW91) set of functionals produce PESs that are often, but not in general overbinding. Results from Becke-Perdew (BP86) GGAs, by contrast, show the typical problems known from the corresponding KS results. We provide some preliminary results for empirical corrections for both PW91 and BP86 in subsystem DFT.

  10. A method for computing the inter-residue interaction potentials for reduced amino acid alphabet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhinav Luthra; Anupam Nath Jha; G K Ananthasuresh; Saraswathi Vishveswara

    2007-08-01

    Inter-residue potentials are extensively used in the design and evaluation of protein structures. However, dealing with all (20×20) interactions becomes computationally difficult in extensive investigations. Hence, it is desirable to reduce the alphabet of 20 amino acids to a smaller number. Currently, several methods of reducing the residue types exist; however a critical assessment of these methods is not available. Towards this goal, here we review and evaluate different methods by comparing with the complete (20×20) matrix of Miyazawa-Jernigan potential, including a method of grouping adopted by us, based on multi dimensional scaling (MDS). The second goal of this paper is the computation of inter-residue interaction energies for the reduced amino acid alphabet, which has not been explicitly addressed in the literature until now. By using a least squares technique, we present a systematic method of obtaining the interaction energy values for any type of grouping scheme that reduces the amino acid alphabet. This can be valuable in designing the protein structures.

  11. Accuracy of simple folding model in the calculation of the direct part of real − interaction potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keshab C Panda; Binod C Sahu; Jhasaketan Bhoi

    2014-05-01

    The direct part of real − interaction potential is calculated in the simple folding model using density-dependent Brink–Boeker effective interaction. The simple folding potentials calculated from the short- and finite-range components of this effective interaction are compared with their corresponding double folding results obtained from the oscillator model wave function to establish the relative accuracy of the model. It is found that the direct part of real – interaction potential calculated in the simple folding model is reliable.

  12. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  13. Assessment of potential drug–drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Murtaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug–drug interactions (DDIs may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug–drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug–drug interactions (pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug–drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55% or major severity (45%; established (24.2%, theoretical (18.8% or probable (57% type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001, hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001 and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001. We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs.

  14. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Muhammad Yasir Ghani; Azhar, Saira; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Khan, Tahir M

    2016-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug-drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug-drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55%) or major severity (45%); established (24.2%), theoretical (18.8%) or probable (57%) type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001), hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001) and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001). We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs.

  15. Language learning, recasts, and interaction involving AAC: background and potential for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michael T; Soto, Gloria; Nelson, Keith

    2017-03-01

    For children with typical development, language is learned through everyday discursive interaction. Adults mediate child participation in such interactions through the deployment of a range of co-constructive strategies, including repeating, questioning, prompting, expanding, and reformulating the child's utterances. Adult reformulations of child utterances, also known as recasts, have also been shown to relate to the acquisition of linguistic structures in children with language and learning disabilities and children and adults learning a foreign language. In this paper we discuss the theoretical basis and empirical evidence for the use of different types of recasts as a major language learning catalyst, and what may account for their facilitative effects. We consider the occurrence of different types of recasts in AAC-mediated interactions and their potential for language facilitation, within the typical operational and linguistic constraints of such interactions. We also consider the benefit of explicit and corrective forms of recasts for language facilitation in conversations with children who rely on AAC. We conclude by outlining future research directions.

  16. Clinical relevancy and risks of potential drug–drug interactions in intensive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Aline Teotonio; Stahlschmidt, Rebeca; Granja, Silvia; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Moriel, Patricia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the potential Drug–Drug Interactions (pDDI) found in prescription orders of adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Brazilian public health system hospital; quantify and qualify the pDDI regarding their severity and risks to the critical patient, using the database from Micromedex®. Methods Prospective study (January–December of 2011) collecting and evaluating 369 prescription orders (convenient sampling), one per patient. Results During the study 1844 pDDIs were identified and distributed in 405 pairs (medication A × medication B combination). There was an average of 5.00 ± 5.06 pDDIs per prescription order, the most prevalent being moderate and important interactions, present in 74% and 67% of prescription orders, respectively. In total, there were 9 contraindicated, 129 important and 204 moderate pDDIs. Among them 52 had as management recommendation to “avoid concomitant use” or “suspension of medication”, while 306 had as recommendation “continuous and adequate monitoring”. Conclusion The high number of pDDIs found in the study combined with the evaluation of the clinical relevancy of the most frequent pDDIs in the ICU shows that moderate and important interactions are highly incident. As the majority of them demand monitoring and adequate management, being aware of these interactions is major information for the safe and individualized risk management. PMID:27134536

  17. Entangling spin-spin interactions of ions in individually controlled potential wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew; Colombe, Yves; Brown, Kenton; Knill, Emanuel; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David

    2014-03-01

    Physical systems that cannot be modeled with classical computers appear in many different branches of science, including condensed-matter physics, statistical mechanics, high-energy physics, atomic physics and quantum chemistry. Despite impressive progress on the control and manipulation of various quantum systems, implementation of scalable devices for quantum simulation remains a formidable challenge. As one approach to scalability in simulation, here we demonstrate an elementary building-block of a configurable quantum simulator based on atomic ions. Two ions are trapped in separate potential wells that can individually be tailored to emulate a number of different spin-spin couplings mediated by the ions' Coulomb interaction together with classical laser and microwave fields. We demonstrate deterministic tuning of this interaction by independent control of the local wells and emulate a particular spin-spin interaction to entangle the internal states of the two ions with 0.81(2) fidelity. Extension of the building-block demonstrated here to a 2D-network, which ion-trap micro-fabrication processes enable, may provide a new quantum simulator architecture with broad flexibility in designing and scaling the arrangement of ions and their mutual interactions. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  18. Analytical Determination of the Confinement Potential and Coupling Constant of Spin--Orbit Interactions of Electrons in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Dineykhan, M; Zhaugasheva, S A; Al Farabi Kazakh State National University. Almaty

    2005-01-01

    Multilayer nanocrystalline structure is represented by the electrostatic field inducted by total image charge, and the confinement potential for electrons is determined. Assuming that at a given distance the confinement potential is equal to the Coulomb repulsion and an interaction between electrons becomes spin-orbit, the constant of the spin-orbit interaction of electrons in nanostructures is determined. The dependence of the constant of the spin-orbit interaction on environment parameters and the distance between electrons is studied.

  19. Influence of Solvent-Solvent and Solute-Solvent Interaction Properties on Solvent-Mediated Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shi-Qi

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed universal calculational recipe for solvent-mediated potential is applied to calculate excess potential of mean force between two large Lennard-Jones (LJ) or hard core attractive Yukawa particles immersed in small LJ solvent bath at supercritical state. Comparison between the present prediction with a hypernetted chain approximation adopted for solute-solute correlation at infinitely dilute limit and existing simulation data shows high accuracy for the region with large separation, and qualitative reliability for the solute particle contact region. The calculational simplicity of the present recipe allows for a detailed investigation on the effect of the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction details on the excess potential of mean force. The resultant conclusion is that gathering of solvent particles near a solute particle leads to repulsive excess PMF, while depletion of solvent particles away from the solute particle leads to attractive excess PMF, and minor change of the solvent-solvent interaction range has large influence on the excess PMF.

  20. Research on the potential use of interactive materials on astronomy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Macedo, Josue

    2016-07-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences, using the mixed methodology, combined with the three pedagogical moments. Among other aspects, the viability of the use of resources was noticed, involving digital technologies and interactive materials on teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options for future teachers and meet their training needs.

  1. Arsenic: A Review of the Element's Toxicity, Plant Interactions, and Potential Methods of Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettick, Bryan E; Cañas-Carrell, Jaclyn E; French, Amanda D; Klein, David M

    2015-08-19

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring element with a long history of toxicity. Sites of contamination are found worldwide as a result of both natural processes and anthropogenic activities. The broad scope of arsenic toxicity to humans and its unique interaction with the environment have led to extensive research into its physicochemical properties and toxic behavior in biological systems. The purpose of this review is to compile the results of recent studies concerning the metalloid and consider the chemical and physical properties of arsenic in the broad context of human toxicity and phytoremediation. Areas of focus include arsenic's mechanisms of human toxicity, interaction with plant systems, potential methods of remediation, and protocols for the determination of metals in experimentation. This assessment of the literature indicates that controlling contamination of water sources and plants through effective remediation and management is essential to successfully addressing the problems of arsenic toxicity and contamination.

  2. Antinucleon-nucleus interaction near threshold from the Paris $\\bar NN$ potential

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E; Loiseau, B; Wycech, S

    2015-01-01

    A general algorithm for handling the energy dependence of hadron-nucleon amplitudes in the nuclear medium, consistently with their density dependence, has been recently applied to antikaons, eta mesons and pions interacting with nuclei. Here we apply this approach to antiprotons below threshold, analyzing experimental results for antiprotonic atoms across the periodic table. It is also applied to antiproton and antineutron interaction with nuclei up to 400~MeV/c, comparing with elastic scattering and annihilation cross sections. The underlying $\\bar pN$ scattering amplitudes are derived from the Paris $\\bar NN$ potential, including modifications in the medium. Emphasis is placed on the role of the $P$-wave amplitudes with respect to the repulsive $S$-wave amplitudes.

  3. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection.

  4. Experimenting with ecosystem interaction networks in search of threshold potentials in real-world marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, Simon F; Hewitt, Judi E; Parkes, Samantha; Lohrer, Andrew M; Pilditch, Conrad; Woodin, Sarah A; Wethey, David S; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Asnaghi, Valentina; De Juan, Silvia; Kraan, Casper; Rodil, Ivan; Savage, Candida; Van Colen, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Thresholds profoundly affect our understanding and management of ecosystem dynamics, but we have yet to develop practical techniques to assess the risk that thresholds will be crossed. Combining ecological knowledge of critical system interdependencies with a large-scale experiment, we tested for breaks in the ecosystem interaction network to identify threshold potential in real-world ecosystem dynamics. Our experiment with the bivalves Macomona liliana and Austrovenus stutchburyi on marine sandflats in New Zealand demonstrated that reductions in incident sunlight changed the interaction network between sediment biogeochemical fluxes, productivity, and macrofauna. By demonstrating loss of positive feedbacks and changes in the architecture of the network, we provide mechanistic evidence that stressors lead to break points in dynamics, which theory predicts predispose a system to a critical transition.

  5. Radiative bound-state-formation cross-sections for dark matter interacting via a Yukawa potential

    CERN Document Server

    Petraki, Kalliopi; de Vries, Jordy

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the cross-sections for the radiative formation of bound states by dark matter whose interactions are described in the non-relativistic regime by a Yukawa potential. These cross-sections are important for cosmological and phenomenological studies of dark matter with long-range interactions, residing in a hidden sector, as well as for TeV-scale WIMP dark matter. We provide the leading-order contributions to the cross-sections for the dominant capture processes occurring via emission of a vector or a scalar boson. We offer a detailed inspection of their features, including their velocity dependence within and outside the Coulomb regime, and their resonance structure. For pairs of annihilating particles, we compare bound-state formation with annihilation.

  6. Antinucleon-nucleus interaction near threshold from the Paris N bar N potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Loiseau, B.; Wycech, S.

    2015-11-01

    A general algorithm for handling the energy dependence of hadron-nucleon amplitudes in the nuclear medium, consistently with their density dependence, has been recently applied to antikaons, eta mesons and pions interacting with nuclei. Here we apply this approach to antiprotons below threshold, analyzing experimental results for antiprotonic atoms across the periodic table. It is also applied to antiproton and antineutron interactions with nuclei up to 400 MeV/c, comparing with elastic scattering and annihilation cross sections. The underlying p bar N scattering amplitudes are derived from the Paris N bar N potential, including in-medium modifications. Emphasis is placed on the role of the P-wave amplitudes with respect to the repulsive S-wave amplitudes.

  7. Matter-Wave Solitons in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates with Tunable Interactions and Time Varying Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣恒农; 左苗

    2011-01-01

    We present three families of exact matter-wave soliton solutions for an effective one-dimension two- component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with tunable interactions, harmonic potential and gain or loss term. We investigate the dynamics of bright-bright solitons, bright-dark solitons and dark-dark solitons for the time-dependent expulsive harmonic trap potential, periodically modulated harmonic trap potential, and kinklike modulated harmonic trap potential. Through the Feshbach resonance, these dynamics can be realized in experiments by suitable control of time-dependent trap parameters, atomic interactions, and interaction with thermal cloud.

  8. Baryon interactions in lattice QCD: the direct method vs. the HAL QCD potential method

    CERN Document Server

    Iritani, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    We make a detailed comparison between the direct method and the HAL QCD potential method for the baryon-baryon interactions, taking the $\\Xi\\Xi$ system at $m_\\pi= 0.51$ GeV in 2+1 flavor QCD and using both smeared and wall quark sources. The energy shift $\\Delta E_\\mathrm{eff}(t)$ in the direct method shows the strong dependence on the choice of quark source operators, which means that the results with either (or both) source are false. The time-dependent HAL QCD method, on the other hand, gives the quark source independent $\\Xi\\Xi$ potential, thanks to the derivative expansion of the potential, which absorbs the source dependence to the next leading order correction. The HAL QCD potential predicts the absence of the bound state in the $\\Xi\\Xi$($^1$S$_0$) channel at $m_\\pi= 0.51$ GeV, which is also confirmed by the volume dependence of finite volume energy from the potential. We also demonstrate that the origin of the fake plateau in the effective energy shift $\\Delta E_\\mathrm{eff}(t)$ at $t \\sim 1$ fm can b...

  9. Solid phase stability of a double-minimum interaction potential system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suematsu, Ayumi; Yoshimori, Akira, E-mail: a.yoshimori@cmt.phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Saiki, Masafumi; Matsui, Jun [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Odagaki, Takashi [School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan)

    2014-06-28

    We study phase stability of a system with double-minimum interaction potential in a wide range of parameters by a thermodynamic perturbation theory. The present double-minimum potential is the Lennard-Jones-Gauss potential, which has a Gaussian pocket as well as a standard Lennard-Jones minimum. As a function of the depth and position of the Gaussian pocket in the potential, we determine the coexistence pressure of crystals (fcc and bcc). We show that the fcc crystallizes even at zero pressure when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the first or third nearest neighbor site of the fcc crystal. The bcc crystal is more stable than the fcc crystal when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the second nearest neighbor sites of the bcc crystal. The stable crystal structure is determined by the position of the Gaussian pocket. These results show that we can control the stability of the solid phase by tuning the potential function.

  10. Host-microbiome interaction and cancer: potential application in precision medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra V Contreras

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been experimentally shown that host-microbial interaction plays a major role in shaping the wellness or disease of the human body. Microorganisms coexisting in human tissues provide a variety of benefits that contribute to proper functional activity in the host through the modulation of fundamental processes such as signal transduction, immunity and metabolism. The unbalance of this microbial profile, or dysbiosis, has been correlated with the genesis and evolution of complex diseases such as cancer. Although this latter disease has been thoroughly studied using different high-throughput technologies, its heterogeneous nature makes its understanding and proper treatment in patients a remaining challenge in clinical settings. Notably, given the outstanding role of host-microbiome interactions, the ecological interactions with microorganisms have become a new significant aspect in the systems that can contribute to the diagnosis and potential treatment of solid cancers. As a part of expanding precision medicine in the area of cancer research, efforts aimed at effective treatments for various kinds of cancer based on the knowledge of genetics, biology of the disease and host-microbiome interactions might improve the prediction of disease risk and implement potential microbiota-directed therapeutics. In this review, we present the state of the art of sequencing and metabolome technologies, computational methods and schemes in systems biology that have addressed recent breakthroughs of uncovering relationships or associations between microorganisms and cancer. Together, microbiome studies extend the horizon of new personalized treatments against cancer from the perspective of precision medicine through a synergistic strategy integrating clinical knowledge, high-throughput data, bioinformatics and systems biology.

  11. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of CYP1a interaction potential of terminalia arjuna bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Varghese

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia arjuna Wight and Arn. (Combretaceae is a tree having an extensive medicinal potential in cardiovascular disorders. Triterpenoids are mainly responsible for cardiovascular properties. Aqueous, hydroalcoholic and alcoholic extract of T. arjuna, arjunic acid and arjungenin were examined for their potential to inhibit CYP1A enzyme in rat and human liver microsomes. IC 50 values of aqueous, hydroalcoholic and alcoholic extract of T. arjuna was found to be 11.4, 28.9 and 44.6 μg/ml in rat liver microsomes while 30.0, 29.7 and 39.0 μg/ml in human liver microsomes, respectively for CYP1A. However IC 50 values of arjunic acid and arjungenin for both rat liver microsomes and human liver microsomes were found to be >50 μM. Arjunic acid and arjungenin did not show inhibition of CYP1A enzyme up to concentrations of 50 μM. These in vitro data indicate that Terminalia arjuna extracts contain constituents that can potently inhibit the activity of CYP1A, which could in turn lead to undesirable pharmacokinetic drug-herb interactions in vivo. Based on the in vitro data, interaction potential of the aqueous extract of Terminalia arjuna orally in rats was investigated. A probe substrate, phenacetin, was used to index the activity of CYP1A. In vivo pharmacokinetic study of coadministration of aqueous extract of Terminalia arjuna and phenacetin, revealed that the aqueous extract did not lead to any significant change in the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenacetin as compared with control group. Though there was no in vivo-in vitro correlation, drug interactions could arise with drugs having a narrow therapeutic range and extensively cleared by CYP1A enzyme, which could lead to undesirable side effects.

  12. Predicting potential responses to future climate in an alpine ungulate: interspecific interactions exceed climate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tom H E; Stephens, Philip A; Apollonio, Marco; Willis, Stephen G

    2014-12-01

    The altitudinal shifts of many montane populations are lagging behind climate change. Understanding habitual, daily behavioural rhythms, and their climatic and environmental influences, could shed light on the constraints on long-term upslope range-shifts. In addition, behavioural rhythms can be affected by interspecific interactions, which can ameliorate or exacerbate climate-driven effects on ecology. Here, we investigate the relative influences of ambient temperature and an interaction with domestic sheep (Ovis aries) on the altitude use and activity budgets of a mountain ungulate, the Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra). Chamois moved upslope when it was hotter but this effect was modest compared to that of the presence of sheep, to which they reacted by moving 89-103 m upslope, into an entirely novel altitudinal range. Across the European Alps, a range-shift of this magnitude corresponds to a 46% decrease in the availability of suitable foraging habitat. This highlights the importance of understanding how factors such as competition and disturbance shape a given species' realised niche when predicting potential future responses to change. Furthermore, it exposes the potential for manipulations of species interactions to ameliorate the impacts of climate change, in this case by the careful management of livestock. Such manipulations could be particularly appropriate for species where competition or disturbance already strongly restricts their available niche. Our results also reveal the potential role of behavioural flexibility in responses to climate change. Chamois reduced their activity when it was warmer, which could explain their modest altitudinal migrations. Considering this behavioural flexibility, our model predicts a small 15-30 m upslope shift by 2100 in response to climate change, less than 4% of the altitudinal shift that would be predicted using a traditional species distribution model-type approach (SDM), which assumes that species' behaviour

  13. Scalar-field cosmological and collapse models with general self-interaction potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giambo, Roberto; Giannoni, Fabio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita di Camerino (Italy); Magli, Giulio, E-mail: roberto.giambo@unicam.i, E-mail: fabio.giannoni@unicam.i, E-mail: magli@mate.polimi.i [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of the investigation of a wide class of self-interacting, self-gravitating homogeneous scalar fields models, characterized by quite general conditions on the scalar field potential, and including both asymptotically polynomial and exponential behaviors. We show that the generic evolution is always divergent in a finite time, and this result is used to construct cosmological models as well as radiating collapsing star models of the Vaidya type - for the latter it turns out that black holes are generically formed.

  14. A case of a potential drug interaction between clobazam and etravirine-based antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarato, Mark; Yoong, Deborah; Kovacs, Colin; Gough, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 isoforms primarily involved in clobazam metabolism are CYP3A4 and 2C19. Drugs that modulate these enzymes would then be expected to alter the exposure of clobazam and its major metabolites. Etravirine, a second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor has been shown to induce CYP3A4, while inhibiting CYP2C9 and CYP2C19. We report a case in which a potential drug interaction between clobazam and etravirine may have led to increased concentrations of clobazam and its pharmacologically active metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam, causing neurotoxic symptoms.

  15. Isotropization in Bianchi type-I cosmological model with fermions and bosons interacting via Yukawa potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, M. O.; Samojeden, L. L.; Devecchi, F. P.; Kremer, G. M.

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate a model for the early Universe in a Bianchi type-I metric, where the sources of the gravitational field are a fermionic and a bosonic field, interacting through a Yukawa potential, following the standard model of elementary particles. It is shown that the fermionic field has a negative pressure, while the boson has a small positive pressure. The fermionic field is the responsible for an accelerated regime at early times, but since the total pressure tends to zero for large times, a transition to a decelerated regime occurs. Here the Yukawa potential answers for the duration of the accelerated regime, since by decreasing the value of its coupling constant the transition accelerated-decelerated occurs in later times. The isotropization which occurs for late times is due to the presence of the fermionic field as one of the sources of the gravitational field.

  16. Isotropization in Bianchi type-I cosmological model with fermions and bosons interacting via Yukawa potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ribas, M O; Devecchi, F P; Kremer, G M

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate a model for the early Universe in a Bianchi type-I metric, where the sources of the gravitational field are a fermionic and a bosonic field, interacting through a Yukawa potential, following the standard model of elementary particles. It is shown that the fermionic field has a negative pressure, while the boson has a small positive pressure. The fermionic field is the responsible for an accelerated regime at early times, but since the total pressure tends to zero for large times, a transition to a decelerated regime occurs. Here the Yukawa potential answers for the duration of the accelerated regime, since by decreasing the value of its coupling constant the transition accelerated-decelerated occurs in later times. The isotropization which occurs for late times is due to the presence of the fermionic field as one of the sources of the gravitational field.

  17. The interaction of anticipatory anxiety and emotional picture processing: an event-related brain potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublatzky, Florian; Flaisch, Tobias; Stockburger, Jessica; Schmälzle, Ralf; Schupp, Harald T

    2010-07-01

    The present study examined the interaction of anticipatory anxiety and selective emotion processing. Toward this end, a rapid stream of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant pictures was presented in alternating blocks of threat-of-shock or safety, which were signaled by colored picture frames. The main finding is that pleasant pictures elicited a sustained negative difference potential over occipital regions during threat as compared to safety periods. In contrast, unpleasant and neutral picture processing did not vary as a function of threat-of-shock. Furthermore, in both the safety and threat-of-shock conditions, emotional pictures elicited an enlarged early posterior negativity and late positive potential. These data show that the activation of the fear/anxiety network exerts valence-specific effects on affective picture processing. Pleasant stimuli mismatching the current state of anticipatory anxiety apparently draw more attentional resources.

  18. A C-code for the double folding interaction potential of two spherical nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a C-code designed to obtain the nucleus-nucleus potential by using the double folding model (DFM) and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier. The program calculates the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei. The most important output parameters are the Coulomb barrier energy and the radius. Since many researchers use a Woods-Saxon profile for the nuclear term of the potential we provide an option in our code for fitting the DFM potential by such a profile. Program summaryProgram title: DFMSPH Catalogue identifier: AEFH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5929 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 115 740 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: PC Operating system: Windows XP (with the GCC-compiler version 2) RAM: Below 10 Mbyte Classification: 17.9 Nature of problem: The code calculates in a semimicroscopic way the bare interaction potential between two colliding spherical nuclei as a function of the center of mass distance. The height and the position of the Coulomb barrier are found. The calculated potential is approximated by a conventional Woods-Saxon profile near the barrier. Dependence of the barrier parameters upon the characteristics of the effective NN forces (like, e.g. the range of the exchange part of the nuclear term) can be investigated. Solution method: The nucleus-nucleus potential is calculated using the double folding model with the Coulomb and the effective M3Y NN interactions. For the direct parts of the Coulomb and the nuclear terms, the Fourier transform method is used. In order to calculate the exchange parts the density matrix expansion method

  19. Interaction of landscape varibles on the potential geographical distribution of parrots in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plasencia–Vázquez, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The loss, degradation, and fragmentation of forested areas are endangering parrot populations. In this study, we determined the influence of fragmentation in relation to vegetation cover, land use, and spatial configuration of fragments on the potential geographical distribution patterns of parrots in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. We used the potential geographical distribution for eight parrot species, considering the recently published maps obtained with the maximum entropy algorithm, and we incorporated the probability distribution for each species. We calculated 71 metrics/variables that evaluate forest fragmentation, spatial configuration of fragments, the ratio occupied by vegetation, and the land use in 100 plots of approximately 29 km², randomly distributed within the presence and absence areas predicted for each species. We also considered the relationship between environmental variables and the distribution probability of species. We used a partial least squares regression to explore patterns between the variables used and the potential distribution models. None of the environmental variables analyzed alone determined the presence/absence or the probability distribution of parrots in the Peninsula. We found that for the eight species, either due to the presence/absence or the probability distribution, the most important explanatory variables were the interaction among three variables, particularly the interactions among the total forest area, the total edge, and the tropical semi–evergreen medium– height forest. Habitat fragmentation influenced the potential geographical distribution of these species in terms of the characteristics of other environmental factors that are expressed together with the geographical division, such as the different vegetation cover ratio and land uses in deforested areas.

  20. An accurate H2-H2 interaction potential from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Phong; Johnson, J. Karl

    2000-03-01

    We have calculated the potential energy surface extrapolated to the complete basis set limit using coupled-cluster theory with singles, doubles, and perturbational triples excitations [CCSD(T)] for the rigid monomer model of (H2)2. There is significant anisotropy among the 37 unique angular configurations selected to represent the surface. A four term spherical harmonics expansion model was chosen to fit the surface. The calculated potential energy surface reproduces the quadrupole moment to within 0.58% and the experimental well depth to within 1%. The second virial coefficient has been computed from the fitted potential energy surface. The usual semiclassical treatment of quantum mechanical effects on the second virial coefficient was applied in the temperature range of 100-500 K. We have developed a new technique for computing the quantum second virial coefficient by combining Feynman's path integral formalism and Monte Carlo integration. The calculated virial coefficient compares very well with published experimental measurements. Integral elastic cross sections were calculated for the scattering of para-H2/para-H2 by use of the close-coupling method. The interaction potential model from this work is able to reproduce the experimental cross sections in the relative kinetic velocity range of 900-2300 m/s.

  1. Spatial representation in the social interaction potential metric: an analysis of scale and parameter sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Farber, Steven

    2016-10-01

    The social interaction potential (SIP) metric measures urban structural constraints on social interaction opportunities of a metropolitan region based on the time geographic concept of joint accessibility. Previous implementations of the metric used an interaction surface based on census tracts and the locations of their centroids. This has been shown to be a shortcoming, as the metric strongly depends on the scale of the zoning system in the region, making it difficult to compare the SIP metric between metropolitan regions. This research explores the role of spatial representation in the SIP metric and identifies a suitable grid-based representation that allows for comparison between regions while retaining cost-effectiveness with respect to computational burden. We also report on findings from an extensive sensitivity analysis investigating the SIP metric's input parameters such as a travel flow congestion factor and the length of the allowable time budget for social activities. The results provide new insights on the role of the modifiable areal unit problem in the computation of time geographic measures of accessibility.

  2. Potential-of-mean-force description of ionic interactions and structural hydration in biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group; Soumpasis, D.M. [Max-Planck-Inst for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany). Biocomputation Group

    1994-10-01

    To understand the functioning of living organisms on a molecular level, it is crucial to dissect the intricate interplay of the immense number of biological molecules. Most of the biochemical processes in cells occur in a liquid environment formed mainly by water and ions. This solvent environment plays an important role in biological systems. The potential-of-mean-force (PMF) formalism attempts to describe quantitatively the interactions of the solvent with biological macromolecules on the basis of an approximate statistical-mechanical representation. At its current status of development, it deals with ionic effects on the biomolecular structure and with the structural hydration of biomolecules. The underlying idea of the PMF formalism is to identify the dominant sources of interactions and incorporate these interactions into the theoretical formalism using PMF`s (or particle correlation functions) extracted from bulk-liquid systems. In the following, the authors shall briefly outline the statistical-mechanical foundation of the PMF formalism and introduce the PMF expansion formalism, which is intimately linked to superposition approximations for higher-order particle correlation functions. The authors shall then sketch applications, which describe the effects of the ionic environment on nucleic-acid structure. Finally, the authors shall present the more recent extension of the PMF idea to describe quantitatively the structural hydration of biomolecules. Results for the interface of ice and water and for the hydration of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) will be discussed.

  3. Pressure Effects on the Intermolecular Interaction Potential of Condensed Protein Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the intermolecular interaction potential of proteins as a function of their solution conditions is essential for understanding protein aggregation, crystallization, and the phase behavior of proteins in general. Here, we report on a combined small-angle X-ray scattering and liquid-state theoretical approach to study dense lysozyme solutions as a function of temperature and pressure, but also in the presence of salts and osmolytes of different nature. We show that the pressure-dependent interaction potential of lysozyme changes in a nonlinear fashion over a wide range of temperatures, salt and protein concentrations, indicating that changes of the bulk water structure mediate the pressure dependence of the intermolecular forces. We present also results on the effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the phase behavior of dense lysozyme solutions in the liquid-liquid phase-coexistence region. As also shown in this study, the application of pressure can be used to fine-tune the second virial coefficient of protein solutions, which can be used to control nucleation rates and hence protein crystallization, or to prevent protein aggregation. Moreover, these results are also important for understanding the hydration behavior of biological matter under extreme environmental conditions, and the high stability of dense protein solutions (as they occur intracellularly) in organisms thriving under hydrostatic pressure conditions such as in the deep sea, where pressures up to the 100 MPa-level are reached.

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of fluids whose particles interact with a logarithmic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, D M; Rickayzen, G; Powles, J G

    2008-04-07

    Monte Carlo simulations of a model fluid in which the particles interact via a continuous potential that has a logarithmic divergence at a pair separation of sigma, which we introduced in J. G. Powles et al., Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 455, 3725 (1999), have been carried out. The potential has the form, phi(r)= -epsilon ln(fr), where epsilon sets the energy scale and fr=1-(sigma/r)m. The value of m chosen was 12 but the qualitative trends depend only weakly on the value of m, providing it is greater than 3. The potential is entirely repulsive and has a logarithmic divergence as approximately -ln(r/sigma-1) in the r-->sigma limit. Predictions of the previous paper that the internal energy can be computed at all temperatures using the standard statistical mechanics formula for continuous potentials are verified here. The pressure can be calculated using the usual virial expression for continuous potentials, although there are practical limitations in resolving the increasingly important contribution from the r-->sigma limit at reduced temperatures greater than approximately 5. The mean square force F2 and infinite frequency shear Ginfinity and bulk Kinfinity moduli are only finite for T*=kBT/epsilon<1. The logarithmic fluid's physical properties become increasingly more like that of the hard sphere fluid with increasing temperature, showing a sharp transition in the behavior of the mean square force and infinite frequency elastic constants at T*=1. The logarithmic fluid is shown to exhibit a solid-fluid phase transition.

  5. Prevalence of potential drug interactions in patients in an intensive care unit of a university hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Max Moreira Reis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of potential drug interactions at the intensive care unit of a university hospital in Brazil and to analyze their clinical significance. METHODS: This cross-sectional retrospective study included 299 patients who had been hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the hospital. The drugs administered during the first 24 hours of hospitalization, in the 50th length-ofstay percentile and at the time of discharge were analyzed to identify potential drug-drug and drug-enteral nutrition interactions using DRUG-REAXH software. The drugs were classified according to the anatomical therapeutic chemical classification. RESULTS: The median number of medications per patient was smaller at the time of discharge than in the 50th length-of-stay percentile and in the first 24 hours of hospitalization. There was a 70% prevalence of potential drug interactions at the intensive care unit at the studied time points of hospitalization. Most of the drug interactions were either severe or moderate, and the scientific evidence for the interactions was, in general, either good or excellent. Pharmacodynamic interactions presented a subtle predominance in relation to pharmacokinetic interactions. The occurrence of potential drug interactions was associated with the number of medications administered and the length of stay. Medications that induced cytochrome P450, drugs that prolong the QT interval and cardiovascular drugs were pharmacotherapy factors associated with potential drug interactions. CONCLUSION: The study showed that potential drug interactions were prevalent in the intensive care unit due to the complexity of the pharmacotherapies administered. The interactions were associated with the number of drugs, the length of stay and the characteristics of the administered medications.

  6. A C-code for the double folding interaction potential for reactions involving deformed target nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a C-code designed to obtain the interaction potential between a spherical projectile nucleus and an axial-symmetrical deformed target nucleus and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier, by using the double folding model (DFM). The program calculates the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei as well as of the angle between the axis of symmetry of the target nucleus and the beam direction. The most important output parameters are the Coulomb barrier energy and the radius. Since many researchers use a Woods-Saxon profile for the nuclear term of the potential we provide an option in our code for fitting the DFM potential by such a profile near the barrier. Program summaryProgram title: DFMDEF Catalogue identifier: AENI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2245 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 215442 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C. Computer: PC, Mac. Operating system: Windows XP (with the GCC-compiler version 2), MacOS, Linux. RAM: 100 MB with average parameters set Classification: 17.9. Nature of problem: The code calculates in a semimicroscopic way the bare interaction potential between a spherical projectile nucleus and a deformed but axially symmetric target nucleus as a function of the center of mass distance as well as of the angle between the axis of symmetry of the target nucleus and the beam direction. The height and the position of the Coulomb barrier are found. The calculated potential is approximated by a conventional Woods-Saxon profile near the barrier. Dependence of the barrier parameters upon the characteristics of the effective NN forces (like, e

  7. Incidence of Potential Drug-Drug Interaction and Related Factors in Hospitalized Neurological Patients in two Iranian Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Namazi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reciprocal drug interactions are among the most common causes of adverse drug reactions. We investigated the incidence and related risk factors associated with mutual drug interactions in relation to prescriptions written in the neurology wards of two major teaching hospitals in Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: Data was collected from hand-written prescriptions on a daily basis. Mutual drug interactions were identified using Lexi-Comp 2012 version 1.9.1. Type D and X drug interactions were considered as potential drug-drug interactions. The potential risk factors associated with drug-drug interactions included the patient’s age and gender, number of medications and orders, length of hospitalization and the type of neurological disorder. To determine potential drug-drug interactions, relevant interventions were suggested to the physicians or nurses and the outcome of the interventions were documented. Results: The study comprised 589 patients, of which 53% were males and 47% females, with a mean age of 56.65±18.19 SD years. A total of 4942 drug orders and 3784 medications were prescribed among which 4539 drug-drug interactions were detected, including 4118 type C, 403 type D, and 18 type X. Using a logistic regression model, the number of medications, length of hospitalization and non-vascular type of the neurological disorder were found to be significantly associated with potential drug-drug interactions. From the total interventions, 74.24% were accepted by physicians and nurses. Conclusion: Potentially hazardous reciprocal drug interactions are common among patients in neurology wards. Clinical pharmacists can play a critical role in the prevention of drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients.

  8. Plant-Microbial Interactions Define Potential Mechanisms of Organic Matter Priming in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhalnina, K.; Cho, H. J.; Hao, Z.; Mansoori, N.; Karaoz, U.; Jenkins, S.; White, R. A., III; Lipton, M. S.; Deng, K.; Zhou, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Northen, T.; Firestone, M. K.; Brodie, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, metabolic processes of plants and microorganisms are closely coupled, and together with soil minerals, their interactions regulate the turnover of soil organic C (SOC). Plants provide readily assimilable metabolites for microorganisms through exudation, and it has been hypothesized that increasing concentrations of exudate C may either stimulate or suppress rates of SOC mineralization (rhizosphere priming). Both positive and negative rhizosphere priming has been widely observed, however the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. To begin to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying rhizosphere priming, we isolated a broad range of soil bacteria from a Mediterranean grassland dominated by annual grass. Thirty-nine heterotrophic bacteria were selected for genome sequencing and both rRNA gene analysis and metagenome coverage suggest that these isolates represent naturally abundant strain variants. We analyzed their genomes for potential metabolic traits related to life in the rhizosphere and the decomposition of polymeric SOC. While the two dominant groups, Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, were enriched in polymer degrading enzymes, Alphaproteobacterial isolates contained greater gene copies of transporters related to amino acid, organic acid and auxin uptake or export, suggesting an enhanced metabolic potential for life in the root zone. To verify this metabolic potential, we determined the enzymatic activities of these isolates and revealed preferences of strains to degrade certain polymers (xylan, cellulose or lignin). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy is being used to determine which polymeric components of plant roots are targeted by specific strains and how exudates may impact their degradation. To verify the potential of isolates to assimilate root exudates and export key metabolites we are using LC-MS/MS based exometabolomic profiling. The traits hypothesized and verified here (transporters, enzymes, exudate uptake

  9. Permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach to fitting potential energy surfaces. III. Molecule-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2014-07-01

    The permutation invariant polynomial-neural network (PIP-NN) method for constructing highly accurate potential energy surfaces (PESs) for gas phase molecules is extended to molecule-surface interaction PESs. The symmetry adaptation in the NN fitting of a PES is achieved by employing as the input symmetry functions that fulfill both the translational symmetry of the surface and permutation symmetry of the molecule. These symmetry functions are low-order PIPs of the primitive symmetry functions containing the surface periodic symmetry. It is stressed that permutationally invariant cross terms are needed to avoid oversymmetrization. The accuracy and efficiency are demonstrated in fitting both a model PES for the H2 + Cu(111) system and density functional theory points for the H2 + Ag(111) system.

  10. An Invariance Principle for the Tagged Particle Process in Continuum with Singular Interaction Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Conrad, Florian; Grothaus, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of a tagged particle in an infinite particle environment moving according to a stochastic gradient dynamics. For singular interaction potentials this tagged particle dynamics was constructed first in [FG11], using closures of pre-Dirichlet forms which were already proposed in [GP87] and [Osa98]. The environment dynamics and the coupled dynamics of the tagged particle and the environment were constructed separately. Here we continue the analysis of these processes: Proving an essential m-dissipativity result for the generator of the coupled dynamics from [FG11], we show that this dynamics does not only contain the environment dynamics (as one component), but is, given the latter, the only possible choice for being the coupled process. Moreover, we identify the uniform motion of the environment as the reversed motion of the tagged particle. (Since the dynamics are constructed as martingale solutions on configuration space, this is not immediate.) Furthermore, we prove ergodicity of the ...

  11. Atomic size zone interaction potential between two ground-state cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhaoying; Wu, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    The complex-source-point model are already used in the exact solution for the urtrashort pulse and nonparaxial beam. In this letter we have used the complex-source-point model to deduce the interaction potential equation for the separation R between two atoms which is comparable with the size of the atoms. We show the result and the characteristics of the numerical calculation. Since the singular point around R=0 is removed by using the complex-source-point model, so that we can obtain the result force around R=0. With the decreasing of the distance between two atoms, the force switches from the electromagnetic force to the strong force by use our equation.

  12. Helical configurations of elastic rods in the presence of a long-range interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lillo, S; Lupo, G; Sommacal, M, E-mail: Matteo.Sommacal@pg.infn.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica and INSTM-Village, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, Via Vanvitelli 1, 06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2010-02-26

    Recently, the integrability of the stationary Kirchhoff equations describing an elastic rod folded in the shape of a circular helix was proven. In this paper we explicitly work out the solutions to the stationary Kirchhoff equations in the presence of a long-range potential which describes the average constant force due to a Morse-type interaction acting among the points of the rod. The average constant force results to be parallel to the normal vector to the central line of the folded rod; this condition remarkably permits to preserve the integrability (indeed the solvability) of the corresponding Kirchhoff equations if the elastic rod features constant or periodic stiffnesses and vanishing intrinsic twist. Furthermore, we discuss the elastic energy density with respect to the radius and pitch of the helix, showing the existence of stationary points, namely stable and unstable configurations, for plausible choices of the featured parameters corresponding to a real bio-polymer.

  13. Helical configurations of elastic rods in the presence of a long-range interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lillo, S.; Lupo, G.; Sommacal, M.

    2010-02-01

    Recently, the integrability of the stationary Kirchhoff equations describing an elastic rod folded in the shape of a circular helix was proven. In this paper we explicitly work out the solutions to the stationary Kirchhoff equations in the presence of a long-range potential which describes the average constant force due to a Morse-type interaction acting among the points of the rod. The average constant force results to be parallel to the normal vector to the central line of the folded rod; this condition remarkably permits to preserve the integrability (indeed the solvability) of the corresponding Kirchhoff equations if the elastic rod features constant or periodic stiffnesses and vanishing intrinsic twist. Furthermore, we discuss the elastic energy density with respect to the radius and pitch of the helix, showing the existence of stationary points, namely stable and unstable configurations, for plausible choices of the featured parameters corresponding to a real bio-polymer.

  14. The emotion potential of simple sentences: additive or interactive effects of nouns and adjectives?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eLüdtke

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of studies on affective processes in reading focus on single words. The most robust finding is a processing advantage for positively valenced words, which has been replicated in the rare studies investigating effects of affective features of words during sentence or story comprehension. Here we were interested in how the different valences of words in a sentence influence its processing and supralexical affective evaluation. Using a sentence verification task we investigated how comprehension of simple declarative sentences containing a noun and an adjective depends on the valences of both words. The results are in line with the assumed general processing advantage for positive words. We also observed a clear interaction effect, as can be expected from the affective priming literature: sentences with emotionally congruent words (e.g., The grandpa is clever were verified faster than sentences containing emotionally incongruent words (e.g., The grandpa is lonely. The priming effect was most prominent for sentences with positive words suggesting that both, early processing as well as later meaning integration and situation model construction, is modulated by affective processing. In a second rating task we investigated how the emotion potential of supralexical units depends on word valence. The simplest hypothesis predicts that the supralexical affective structure is a linear combination of the valences of the nouns and adjectives (Bestgen, 1994. Overall, our results do not support this: The observed clear interaction effect on ratings indicate that especially negative adjectives dominated supralexical evaluation, i.e. a sort of negativity bias in sentence evaluation. Future models of sentence processing thus should take interactive affective effects into account.

  15. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  16. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a potentiator of neuropathy, alters the interaction of organophosphorus compounds with soluble brain esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estévez, Jorge

    2012-11-19

    Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) is a protease and esterase inhibitor that causes protection or potentiation/promotion of organophosphorus delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) depending on whether it is dosed before or after an inducer of delayed neuropathy. The molecular target of promotion has not yet been identified. Kinetic data of esterase inhibition were first obtained for PMSF with a soluble chicken brain fraction and then analyzed using a kinetic model with a multienzymatic system in which inhibition occurred with the simultaneous chemical hydrolysis of the inhibitor and ongoing inhibition (inhibition during the substrate reaction). The best fitting model was a model with resistant fraction, Eα (28%), and two sensitive enzymatic entities, Eβ (61%) and Eγ (11%), with I(50) at 20 min of 70 and 447 μM, respectively. The estimated constant of the chemical hydrolysis of PMSF was kh = 0.23 min(-1). Eα, which is sensitive to mipafox and resistant to PMSF, became less sensitive to mipafox when the preparation was preincubated with PMSF. Its Eα I(50) (30 min) of mipafox increased with the PMSF concentration used to preincubate it. Eγ is sensitive to both PMSF and mipafox, and after preincubation with PMSF, Eγ became less sensitive to mipafox and was totally resistant after preincubation with 10 μM PMSF or more. The sensitivity of Eα to paraoxon (I(50) 30 min from 9 to 11 nM) diminished after PMSF preincubation (I(50) 30 min 185 nM) and showed no spontaneous reactivation capacity. The nature of these interactions is unknown but might be due to covalent binding at sites other than the substrate catalytic center. Such interactions should be considered to interpret the potentiation/promotion phenomenon of PMSF and to understand the effects of multiple exposures to chemicals.

  17. Clementine juice has the potential for drug interactions - In vitro comparison with grapefruit and mandarin juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, Dirk; Hohmann, Nicolas; Kiemel, Dominik; Gattuso, Giuseppe; Barreca, Davide; Mikus, Gerd; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Schwenger, Vedat; Weiss, Johanna

    2017-01-15

    Adverse drug interactions due to grapefruit juice are well known prompting warnings even in drug labels. Similar issues have not been reported for clementines and available data is scarce, despite of genetic descent. We observed substantially increased tacrolimus trough concentrations in a renal transplant patient consuming high clementine amounts and, thus, scrutinised the effects of clementine juice on drug metabolism and drug transporters in vitro and compared it to the effects of mandarin and grapefruit juice. All citrus juices profoundly induced several drug transporters and drug metabolising enzymes, whereas the effects of grapefruit juice were most pronounced (e.g. 156-fold and 34-fold induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 mRNA by grapefruit juice and clementine juice, respectively). However, the juices also inhibited e.g. CYP3A4, raising the question which effect prevails in vivo. Using an enzymatic activity assay, we demonstrated that at least in vitro CYP3A4 inhibition prevails for both grapefruit and clementine juice, whereas for CYP1A2 induction appears to predominate. Thus, inhibition of CYP3A4 is presumably the underlying reason for the observed increase in the concentrations of the CYP3A4 substrate tacrolimus in the patient. Taken together, our data indicate that clementine juice as well as grapefruit juice and to a lesser extent also mandarin juice can induce several important drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters, but also inhibit some of these proteins. Our data indicate that clementine juice similar to grapefruit juice bears the potential for profound interactions with drugs potentially leading to adverse drug effects e.g. through over-exposure to CYP3A4 substrates.

  18. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl-Emiliane Tien Chow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10m and oxygen-starved basin (200m waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n=5010 had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI’s non-redundant ‘nr’ database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  19. Interaction potential for water dimer from symmetry-adapted perturbation theory based on density functional description of monomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukowski, R.; Szalewicz, K.; Groenenboom, G.C.; Avoird, A. van der

    2006-01-01

    A new six-dimensional interaction potential for the water dimer has been obtained by fitting interaction energies computed at 2510 geometries using a variant of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) based on density functional theory (DFT) description of monomers, referred to as SAPT(DFT). The

  20. Therapeutic potential of mitotic interaction between the nucleoporin Tpr and aurora kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Hashizume, Chieko; Dowaki, Takayuki; Wong, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Spindle poles are defined by centrosomes; therefore, an abnormal number or defective structural organization of centrosomes can lead to loss of spindle bipolarity and genetic integrity. Previously, we showed that Tpr (translocated promoter region), a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), interacts with Mad1 and dynein to promote proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Tpr also associates with p53 to induce autophagy. Here, we report that Tpr depletion induces mitotic catastrophe and enhances the rate of tetraploidy and polyploidy. Mechanistically, Tpr interacts, via its central domain, with Aurora A but not Aurora B kinase. In Tpr-depleted cells, the expression levels, centrosomal localization and phosphorylation of Aurora A were all reduced. Surprisingly, an Aurora A inhibitor, Alisertib (MLN8237), also disrupted centrosomal localization of Tpr and induced mitotic catastrophe and cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Strikingly, over-expression of Aurora A disrupted Tpr centrosomal localization only in cells with supernumerary centrosomes but not in bipolar cells. Our results highlight the mutual regulation between Tpr and Aurora A and further confirm the importance of nucleoporin function in spindle pole organization, bipolar spindle assembly, and mitosis; functions that are beyond the conventional nucleocytoplasmic transport and NPC structural roles of nucleoporins. Furthermore, the central coiled-coil domain of Tpr binds to and sequesters extra Aurora A to safeguard bipolarity. This Tpr domain merits further investigation for its ability to inhibit Aurora kinase and as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer treatment.

  1. Inverse Effectiveness and Multisensory Interactions in Visual Event-Related Potentials with Audiovisual Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushmakin, Maxim; Kim, Sunah; Wallace, Mark T.; Puce, Aina; James, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become evident that neural responses previously considered to be unisensory can be modulated by sensory input from other modalities. In this regard, visual neural activity elicited to viewing a face is strongly influenced by concurrent incoming auditory information, particularly speech. Here, we applied an additive-factors paradigm aimed at quantifying the impact that auditory speech has on visual event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited to visual speech. These multisensory interactions were measured across parametrically varied stimulus salience, quantified in terms of signal to noise, to provide novel insights into the neural mechanisms of audiovisual speech perception. First, we measured a monotonic increase of the amplitude of the visual P1-N1-P2 ERP complex during a spoken-word recognition task with increases in stimulus salience. ERP component amplitudes varied directly with stimulus salience for visual, audiovisual, and summed unisensory recordings. Second, we measured changes in multisensory gain across salience levels. During audiovisual speech, the P1 and P1-N1 components exhibited less multisensory gain relative to the summed unisensory components with reduced salience, while N1-P2 amplitude exhibited greater multisensory gain as salience was reduced, consistent with the principle of inverse effectiveness. The amplitude interactions were correlated with behavioral measures of multisensory gain across salience levels as measured by response times, suggesting that change in multisensory gain associated with unisensory salience modulations reflects an increased efficiency of visual speech processing. PMID:22367585

  2. Potential RNA polymerase II-induced interactions of transcription factor TFIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S; Lee, D K; Roeder, R G

    1993-10-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor TFIIB is required for initiation by RNA polymerase II and serves as a target of some regulatory factors. The carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB contains a large imperfect direct repeat reminiscent of the structural organization of the TATA-binding component (TBP) of TFIID, as well as sequence homology to conserved regions of bacterial sigma factors. The present study shows that the carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB, like that of TBP, is folded into a compact protease-resistant core. The TFIIB core, unlike the TBP core, is inactive in transcription but retains structural features that enable it to form a complex with promoter-bound TFIID. The protease-susceptible amino terminus appears to contain components responsible for direct interaction with RNA polymerase II (in association with TFIIF) either on the promoter (in association with TFIID) or independently. In addition, core TFIIB (but not intact TFIIB) extends the footprint of TBP on promoter DNA, suggesting that TFIIB has a cryptic DNA-binding potential. These results are consistent with a model in which TFIIB, in a manner functionally analogous to that of bacterial sigma factors, undergoes an RNA polymerase II-dependent conformational change with resultant DNA interactions during the pathway leading to a functional preinitiation complex.

  3. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula; Alemayehu Berhanie; Habtamu Tigistu; Yishak Abraham; Yosheph Getachew; Tahir Mehmood Khan; Chandrashekhar Unakal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, clinical significance and the associated risk factors of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at internal medicine ward of University of Gondar (UOG) hospital.Method:medicine ward of UOG hospital from April 29, 2013 to June 2, 2013. Data was collected from medical records and by interviewing the patients face to face. Descriptive analysis was conducted for back ground characteristics and logistic regression was used to determine the associated risk factors.Result:A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients treated in internal interacting combinations with 4.13 potential DDIs per patient. Among 413 potential DDIs most were of moderate interactions 61.2% (n=253) followed by 26% (n=107) of minor interactions and 12.8% (n=53) of major interactions. There was significant association of occurrence of potential DDIs only with taking three or more medications.Conclusion:We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal In our study, we have identified a total number of 413 potential DDIs and 184 types of medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  4. Visuo-tactile interactions in the congenitally deaf: A behavioral and event-related potential study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eHauthal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory deprivation is known to be accompanied by alterations in visual processing. Yet not much is known about tactile processing and the interplay of the intact sensory modalities in the deaf. We presented visual, tactile, and visuo-tactile stimuli to congenitally deaf and hearing individuals in a speeded detection task. Analyses of multisensory responses showed a redundant signals effect that was attributable to a coactivation mechanism in both groups, although the redundancy gain was less in the deaf. In hearing but not deaf participants, N200 latencies of somatosensory event-related potentials were modulated by simultaneous visual stimulation. In deaf but not hearing participants, however, there was a modulation of N200 latencies of visual event-related potentials due to simultaneous tactile stimulation. A comparison of unisensory responses between groups revealed larger N200 amplitudes for visual and shorter N200 latencies for tactile stimuli in the deaf. P300 amplitudes in response to both stimuli were larger in deaf participants. The differences in visual and tactile processing between deaf and hearing participants, however, were not reflected in behavior. The electroencephalography (EEG results suggest an asymmetry in visuo-tactile interactions between deaf and hearing individuals. Visuo-tactile enhancements could neither be fully explained by perceptual deficiency nor by inverse effectiveness. Instead, we suggest that results might be explained by a shift in the relative importance of touch and vision in deaf individuals.

  5. The role of the ion-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions in the formation of the two-ion average force interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ajrian, E A; Sidorenko, S N

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the ion-molecule and intermolecular interactions on the formation of inter-ion average force potentials is investigated within the framework of a classical ion-dipole model of electrolyte solutions. These potentials are shown to possess the Coulomb asymptotics at large distances while in the region of mean distances they reveal creation and disintegration of solvent-shared ion pairs. The calculation results provide a qualitatively authentic physical picture which is experimentally observed in strong electrolytes solutions. In particular, an increased interaction between an ion and a molecule enhances formation of ion pairs in which the ions are separated by one solvent molecule

  6. Potential energy curves for the interaction of Ag(5s) and Ag(5p) with noble gas atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Loreau, J; Dalgarno, A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of ground and excited states of a silver atom with noble gases (NG), including helium. Born-Oppenheimer potential energy curves are calculated with quantum chemistry methods and spin-orbit effects in the excited states are included by assuming a spin-orbit splitting independent of the internuclear distance. We compare our results with experimentally available spectroscopic data, as well as with previous calculations. Because of strong spin-orbit interactions, excited Ag-NG potential energy curves cannot be fitted to Morse-like potentials. We find that the labeling of the observed vibrational levels has to be shifted by one unit.

  7. A study of potential drug-drug interactions among hospitalized cardiac patients in a teaching hospital in Western Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Drug-drug interaction (DDI is of major concern in patients with complex therapeutic regimens. The involvement of cardiovascular medicines in drug interaction is even higher. However, reports of DDI between these groups of drugs are few. The study aims to identify the potential DDI among hospitalized cardiac patients. Furthermore, we assessed the possible risk factors associated with these interactions. Subjects and Methods: The prospective observational study was conducted from May 2012 to August 2012 among hospitalized cardiac patients. Cardiac patients who were taking at least two drugs and who had a hospital stay of at least 24 h were enrolled. The medications of the patients were analyzed for possible interactions using the standard drug interaction database - Micromedex -2 (Thomson Reuters × 2.0. Results: From a total of 150 enrolled patients, at least one interacting drug combination was identified among 32 patients. The incidence of potential DDI was 21.3%. A total of 48 potentially hazardous drug interactions were identified. Atorvastatin/azithromycin (10.4%, enalapril/metformin (10.4%, enalapril/potassium chloride (10.4%, atorvastatin/clarithromycin (8.3% and furosemide/gentamicin (6.3% were the most common interacting pairs. Drugs most commonly involved were atorvastatin, enalapril, digoxin, furosemide, clopidogrel and warfarin. Majority of interactions were of moderate severity (62.5% and pharmacokinetic (58.3% in nature. Increased number of medicines, prolonged hospital stays and comorbid conditions were the risk factors found associated with the potential DDI. Conclusions: This study highlighted the need of intense monitoring of patients who have identified risk factors to help detect and prevent them from serious health hazards associated with drug interactions.

  8. Hydrodynamic interactions of two nearly touching Brownian spheres in a stiff potential: Effect of fluid inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiom, Milad, E-mail: milad.radiom@unige.ch; Ducker, William, E-mail: wducker@vt.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States); Robbins, Brian; Paul, Mark [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The hydrodynamic interaction of two closely spaced micron-scale spheres undergoing Brownian motion was measured as a function of their separation. Each sphere was attached to the distal end of a different atomic force microscopy cantilever, placing each sphere in a stiff one-dimensional potential (0.08 Nm{sup −1}) with a high frequency of thermal oscillations (resonance at 4 kHz). As a result, the sphere’s inertial and restoring forces were significant when compared to the force due to viscous drag. We explored interparticle gap regions where there was overlap between the two Stokes layers surrounding each sphere. Our experimental measurements are the first of their kind in this parameter regime. The high frequency of oscillation of the spheres means that an analysis of the fluid dynamics would include the effects of fluid inertia, as described by the unsteady Stokes equation. However, we find that, for interparticle separations less than twice the thickness of the wake of the unsteady viscous boundary layer (the Stokes layer), the hydrodynamic interaction between the Brownian particles is well-approximated by analytical expressions that neglect the inertia of the fluid. This is because elevated frictional forces at narrow gaps dominate fluid inertial effects. The significance is that interparticle collisions and concentrated suspensions at this condition can be modeled without the need to incorporate fluid inertia. We suggest a way to predict when fluid inertial effects can be ignored by including the gap-width dependence into the frequency number. We also show that low frequency number analysis can be used to determine the microrheology of mixtures at interfaces.

  9. Potential impact of climate-related changes is buffered by differential responses to recruitment and interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Menge, Bruce A.

    2011-08-01

    Detection of ecosystem responsiveness to climatic perturbations can provide insight into climate change consequences. Recent analyses linking phytoplankton abundance and mussel recruitment to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) revealed a paradox. Despite large increases in mussel recruitment beginning in 2000, adult mussel responses were idiosyncratic by site and intertidal zone, with no response at one long-term site, and increases in the low zone (1.5% per year) and decreases in the mid zone (1.3% per year) at the other. What are the mechanisms underlying these differential changes? Species interactions such as facilitation by barnacles and predation are potential determinants of successful mussel colonization. To evaluate these effects, we analyzed patterns of barnacle recruitment, determined if predation rate covaried with the increase in mussel recruitment, and tested facilitation interactions in a field experiment. Neither magnitude nor season of barnacle recruitment changed meaningfully with site or zone from the 1990s to the 2000s. In contrast to the relationship between NPGO and local-scale mussel recruitment, relationships between local-scale patterns of barnacle recruitment and climate indices were weak. Despite differences in rates of prey recruitment and abundance of sea stars in 1990–1991, 1999–2000, and 2007–2008, predation rates were nearly identical in experiments before, during, and after 1999–2000. The facilitation experiment showed that mussels M. trossulus only became abundant when barnacle recruitment was allowed, when abundance of barnacles reached high abundance of ∼50% cover, and when mussel recruitment was sufficiently high. Thus, in the low zone minimal changes in mussel abundance despite sharply increased recruitment rates are consistent with the hypothesis that change in adult mussel cover was buffered by the relative insensitivity of barnacle recruitment to climatic fluctuations, and a resultant lack of change in

  10. Interspecies interactions and potential Influenza A virus risk in small swine farms in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCune Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent avian influenza epidemic in Asia and the H1N1 pandemic demonstrated that influenza A viruses pose a threat to global public health. The animal origins of the viruses confirmed the potential for interspecies transmission. Swine are hypothesized to be prime "mixing vessels" due to the dual receptivity of their trachea to human and avian strains. Additionally, avian and human influenza viruses have previously been isolated in swine. Therefore, understanding interspecies contact on smallholder swine farms and its potential role in the transmission of pathogens such as influenza virus is very important. Methods This qualitative study aimed to determine swine-associated interspecies contacts in two coastal areas of Peru. Direct observations were conducted at both small-scale confined and low-investment swine farms (n = 36 and in open areas where swine freely range during the day (n = 4. Interviews were also conducted with key stakeholders in swine farming. Results In both locations, the intermingling of swine and domestic birds was common. An unexpected contact with avian species was that swine were fed poultry mortality in 6/20 of the farms in Chancay. Human-swine contacts were common, with a higher frequency on the confined farms. Mixed farming of swine with chickens or ducks was observed in 36% of all farms. Human-avian interactions were less frequent overall. Use of adequate biosecurity and hygiene practices by farmers was suboptimal at both locations. Conclusions Close human-animal interaction, frequent interspecies contacts and suboptimal biosecurity and hygiene practices pose significant risks of interspecies influenza virus transmission. Farmers in small-scale swine production systems constitute a high-risk population and need to be recognized as key in preventing interspecies pathogen transfer. A two-pronged prevention approach, which offers educational activities for swine farmers about sound hygiene and

  11. Interplay between interaction and nonidentical coupling for a Bose–Einstein Condensate in a triple-well potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Shiguang, E-mail: rong_shiguang@sina.com [Department of Physics, Hunan University of Science & Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Xie, Qiongtao [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158 (China); Hai, Wenhua [Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2015-09-18

    Highlights: • The interplay between interaction and nonidentical coupling gives rive to a “two negatives make a positive” effect. • In the weak interaction regime, the beating phenomenon is found. • In the strong interaction region, the collapse and revival sequences can appear instead of the beating sequences. - Abstract: We investigate the effect of interaction and nonidentical coupling on the tunneling dynamics of a Bose–Einstein Condensate trapped in a triple-well potential. In certain parameter regions, we find a “two negatives make a positive” effect. While interaction or nonidentical coupling by itself can suppress the tunneling between the wells, both together enhance the tunneling. In addition, it is shown that under appropriate conditions, the mean-field dynamics displays beating phenomenon in the weak interaction regime. We present a physical explanation for such beating phenomenon. The effect of quantum fluctuation on the beating structure is also discussed numerically.

  12. Water structure near single and multi-layer nanoscopic hydrophobic plates of varying separation and interaction potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malay Rana; Amalendu Chandra

    2008-06-01

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of water containing two nanoscopic hydrophobic plates to investigate the modifications of the density and hydrogen bond distributions of water in the vicinity of the surfaces. Our primary goal is to look at the effects of plate thickness, solute–solvent interaction and also interplate separation on the solvent structure in the confined region between two graphite-like plates and also near the outer surfaces of the plates. The thickness of the plates is varied by considering single and triple-layer graphite plates and the interaction potential is varied by tuning the attractive strength of the 12–6 pair interaction potential between a carbon atom of the graphite plates and a water molecule. The calculations are done for four different values of the tuning parameter ranging from fully Lennard–Jones to pure repulsive pair interactions. It is found that both the solvation characteristics and hydrogen bond distributions can depend rather strongly on the strength of the attractive part of the solute–water interaction potential. The thickness of the plates, however, is found to have only minor effects on the density profiles and hydrogen bond network. This indicates that the long range electrostatic interactions between water molecules on the two opposite sides of the same plate do not make any significant contribution to the overall solvation structure of these hydrophobic plates. The solvation characteristics are primarily determined by the balance between the loss of energy due to hydrogen bond network disruption, cavity repulsion potential and offset of the same by attractive component of the solute–water interactions. Our studies with different system sizes show that the essential features of solvation properties, e.g. wetting and dewetting characteristics for different interplate separations and interaction potentials, are also present in relatively smaller systems consisting of a few hundred

  13. Vortices in a rotating two-component Bose–Einstein condensate with tunable interactions and harmonic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei, E-mail: xfzhang@ntsc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China); Du, Zhi-Jing [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China); Tan, Ren-Bing [Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331 (China); Dong, Rui-Fang; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China)

    2014-07-15

    We consider a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations modeling a rotating two-component Bose–Einstein condensate with tunable interactions and harmonic potential, with emphasis on the structure of vortex states by varying the strength of inter-component interaction, rotational frequency, and the aspect ratio of the harmonic potential. Our results show that the inter-component interaction greatly enhances the effect of rotation. For the case of isotropic harmonic potential and small inter-component interaction, the initial vortex structure remains unchanged. As the ratio of inter- to intra-component interactions increases, each component undergoes a transition from a vortex lattice (vortex line) in an isotropic (anisotropic) harmonic potential to an alternatively arranged stripe pattern, and eventually to the interwoven “serpentine” vortex sheets. Moreover, in the case of anisotropic harmonic potential the system can develop to a rotating droplet structure. -- Highlights: •Different vortex structures are obtained within the full parameter space. •Effects of system parameters on the ground state structure are discussed. •Phase transition between different vortex structures is also examined. •Present one possible way to obtain the rotating droplet structure. •Provide many possibilities to manipulate vortex in two-component BEC.

  14. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  15. In vitro interactions of extracellular histones with LDL suggest a potential pro-atherogenic role.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan D Pemberton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear histones have previously been shown to aggregate LDL in vitro, suggestive of a possible pro-atherogenic role. Recent studies indicate that histones are released during acute inflammation, and therefore might interact with circulating lipoproteins in vivo. In view of the associative link between inflammation and cardiovascular disease, the behaviour of histones was investigated using in vitro models of LDL retention and foam cell formation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Heparin agarose beads were used as a model of a matrix rich in sulphated glycosaminoglycans, to which histones bind strongly. Histone-modified beads were observed to pull down more LDL from solution than untreated beads, indicating that histones can function as bridging molecules, enhancing LDL retention. Furthermore, addition of heparin inhibited histone-induced aggregation of LDL. To model foam cell formation, murine RAW 264.7 macrophages were incubated for 24 h in the presence of LDL, histones, LDL plus histones or vehicle control. Cells incubated with LDL in the presence of histones accumulated significantly more intracellular lipid than with LDL or histone alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are consistent with a potential pro-atherogenic role for extracellular histones, which should be investigated further.

  16. Cadmium promotes breast cancer cell proliferation by potentiating the interaction between ERalpha and c-Jun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewit, Christina L; Gengler, Bridget; Vegas, Esera; Puckett, Rachel; Louie, Maggie C

    2010-05-01

    Cadmium is an environmental contaminant that enters the body through diet or cigarette smoke. It affects multiple cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Recently, cadmium has been shown to function as an endocrine disruptor, to stimulate estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) activity and promote uterine and mammary gland growth in mice. Although cadmium exposure has been associated with the development of breast cancer, the mechanism of action of cadmium remains unclear. To address this deficit, we examined the effects of cadmium treatment on breast cancer cells. We found that ERalpha is required for both cadmium-induced cell growth and modulation of gene expression. We also determined that ERalpha translocates to the nucleus in response to cadmium exposure. Additionally, we provide evidence that cadmium potentiates the interaction between ERalpha and c-Jun and enhances recruitment of this transcription factor complex to the proximal promoters of cyclin D1 and c-myc, thus increasing their expression. This study provides a mechanistic link between cadmium exposure and ERalpha and demonstrates that cadmium plays an important role in the promotion of breast cancer.

  17. Interactions of biotic and abiotic environmental factors in an ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, and the potential for selection mosaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeksema Jason D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic selection mosaics, in which species exert different evolutionary impacts on each other in different environments, may drive diversification in coevolving species. We studied the potential for geographic selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions by testing whether the interaction between bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don and one of its common ectomycorrhizal fungi (Rhizopogon occidentalis Zeller and Dodge varies in outcome, when different combinations of plant and fungal genotypes are tested under a range of different abiotic and biotic conditions. Results We used a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment to test the main and interactive effects of plant lineage (two maternal seed families, fungal lineage (two spore collections, soil type (lab mix or field soil, and non-mycorrhizal microbes (with or without on the performance of plants and fungi. Ecological outcomes, as assessed by plant and fungal performance, varied widely across experimental environments, including interactions between plant or fungal lineages and soil environmental factors. Conclusion These results show the potential for selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions, and indicate that these interactions are likely to coevolve in different ways in different environments, even when initially the genotypes of the interacting species are the same across all environments. Hence, selection mosaics may be equally as effective as genetic differences among populations in driving divergent coevolution among populations of interacting species.

  18. Effective potentials for charge-helium and charge-singly-ionized helium interactions in a dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T.S.; Amirov, S.M.; Moldabekov, Zh.A. [Institute for Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-06-15

    The effective electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials arising as a result of partial screening of the helium nucleus field by bound electrons, taking into account both screening by free charged particles and quantum diffraction effect in dense plasmas were derived. The impact of quantum effects on screening was analyzed. It was shown that plasma polarization around the atom leads to the additional repulsion (attraction) between the electron (proton) and the helium atom. The method of constructing the full electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials as the sum of the derived potentials with the polarization potential and exchange potential is discussed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, David; Ertaylan, Gokhan; Boucher, Charles Ab; Sloot, Peter Ma

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally and dynamicall

  20. Deuteron - $\\alpha$ interaction by inversion of RGM S-matrix determination of spin-orbit potential for spin-1 projectile

    CERN Document Server

    MacIntosh, R S

    1997-01-01

    The iterative-perturbative (IP) procedure for S-matrix to potential inversion is applied to spin-one projectiles for the restricted case of vector spin-orbit interaction only. In order to evaluate this extension of IP inversion we have inverted the multi-channel RGM $S_{lj}$ of Kanada et al for deuterons scattering from $^4$He with deuteron distortion and then compared the central components with those derived from RGM with spin set to zero. Attention is given to the question of how well the resulting potentials are established. Reliable spin-1 inversion is demonstrated. Results relating to inversion, to deuteron-nucleus interactions and to RGM are presented and suggest the range of nuclear interaction information which the procedure makes possible. Unusual non-locality and parity dependence effects are found; these are of possible relevance to generic properties of nuclear potentials.

  1. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  2. Interacting He and Ar atoms: Revised theoretical interaction potential, dipole moment, and collision-induced absorption spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Wilfried; Frommhold, Lothar

    2015-09-21

    Coupled cluster quantum chemical calculations of the potential energy surface and the induced dipole surface are reported for the He-Ar van der Waals collisional complex. Spectroscopic parameters are derived from global analytical fits while an accurate value for the long-range dipole coefficient D7 is obtained by perturbation methods. Collision-induced absorption spectra are computed quantum mechanically and compared with existing measurements.

  3. Potential interaction between zinc ions and a cyclodextrin-based diclofenac formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Imad I; El-Sabawi, Dina; Abdel Jalil, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Complexes of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with hydroxypropyl betacyclodextrin (HPβCD) were prepared by co-evaporation in a 1:1 ratio and characterized in light of previously reported data. Phase solubility diagrams were obtained for DF-Na with HPβCD in the presence and absence of zinc ions. Dissolution profiles were obtained for DF-Na and its HPβCD complex at acidic (pH 1.2) as well as in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8), in the presence and absence of zinc. HPβCD, as expected, was shown to improve the dissolution of DF-Na in acidic medium but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). The presence of zinc ions decreased the in vitro dissolution of DF-HPβCD complex in acidic medium (pH 1.2) but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). It was confirmed that the precipitate that was formed by zinc ions in the presence of HPβCD and DF-Na contained no cyclodextrin and most likely it was a mixture of the complexes: DF2-Zn and DF-Zn with some molecules of water. In vivo experiments on rats have shown that HPβCD has no statistically significant effect on absorption or bioavailability of DF-Na in spite of the observed improvement of its in vitro dissolution by HPβCD. Moreover, zinc ions were shown to decrease the absorption rate of DF-Na in rats model but did neither significantly alter the absorption nor bioavailability of DF-HPβCD complex. The zinc induced precipitates of DF were shown to have significantly different crystalline properties when HPβCD was present. Therefore, the pharmaceutical details of a DF-Na preparation should be considered when designing the formulation and predicting possible interaction between DF-Na (or other potential NSAIDs) and zinc metal.

  4. Herbal medicinals: selected clinical considerations focusing on known or potential drug-herb interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L G

    1998-11-09

    Herbal medicinals are being used by an increasing number of patients who typically do not advise their clinicians of concomitant use. Known or potential drug-herb interactions exist and should be screened for. If used beyond 8 weeks, Echinacea could cause hepatotoxicity and therefore should not be used with other known hepatoxic drugs, such as anabolic steroids, amiodarone, methotrexate, and ketoconazole. However, Echinacea lacks the 1,2 saturated necrine ring associated with hepatoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may negate the usefulness of feverfew in the treatment of migraine headaches. Feverfew, garlic, Ginkgo, ginger, and ginseng may alter bleeding time and should not be used concomitantly with warfarin sodium. Additionally, ginseng may cause headache, tremulousness, and manic episodes in patients treated with phenelzine sulfate. Ginseng should also not be used with estrogens or corticosteroids because of possible additive effects. Since the mechanism of action of St John wort is uncertain, concomitant use with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors is ill advised. Valerian should not be used concomitantly with barbiturates because excessive sedation may occur. Kyushin, licorice, plantain, uzara root, hawthorn, and ginseng may interfere with either digoxin pharmacodynamically or with digoxin monitoring. Evening primrose oil and borage should not be used with anticonvulsants because they may lower the seizure threshold. Shankapulshpi, an Ayurvedic preparation, may decrease phenytoin levels as well as diminish drug efficacy. Kava when used with alprazolam has resulted in coma. Immunostimulants (eg, Echinacea and zinc) should not be given with immunosuppressants (eg, corticosteroids and cyclosporine). Tannic acids present in some herbs (eg, St John wort and saw palmetto) may inhibit the absorption of iron. Kelp as a source of iodine may interfere with thyroid replacement therapies. Licorice

  5. Uptake of munitions materiels (TNT, RDX) by crop plants and potential interactions of nitrogen nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.J.; Harvey, S.D.; Cataldo, D.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Mitchell, W. [USABRDL, Ft. Detrick, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Munitions materiel such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and their combustion/decomposition products can accumulate/cycle in terrestrial environs. High soil organic matter and fertility have been previously shown to negatively correlate with both TNT or RDX uptake in plants such as grass, wheat, and bean. The present study was therefore conducted using low fertility soil to assess uptake and distribution patterns of C-radiolabelled TNT and RDX (15 and 30 {micro}g/g) within corn (Zea mays), spinach (Spinacea oleraceae), carrot (Daucus carota), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown to maturity in growth chambers. Uptake by the plants at maturity (90- to 120-days) ranged from 1.8 to 2.7% of total amended {sup 14}C-TNT for carrots and corn respectively and 17 to 33% of total amended {sup 14}C-RDX for corn and carrots respectively. Distribution patterns of total radiolabel indicate that the TNT-derived label was primarily retained within the roots (60 to 85%) while the RDX-derived label was distributed to the shoots (85 to 97%). Less than 0.01 {micro}g/g dry wt. TNT was found in all analyzed shoot tissues with > 90% of the TNT-derived radiolabel in the form of polar metabolites. Concentrations of RDX in shoot tissues of corn exceeded 180 {micro}g/g dry wt. Alfalfa grown in unfertilized, fertilized (NO{sub 3}), or unfertilized-inoculated (Rhizobia) soil exhibited a 70 to 100% increase in dry wt. after 45 days in the TNT-amended (15 {micro}g/g) fertilized and unfertilized-inoculated plants versus the controls. A potential TNT/nitrogen interaction will be discussed.

  6. Potential for electropositive metal to reduce the interactions of Atlantic sturgeon with fishing gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyoucos, Ian; Bushnell, Peter; Brill, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrhynchus) populations have been declared either endangered or threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Effective measures to repel sturgeon from fishing gear would be beneficial to both fish and fishers because they could reduce both fishery-associated mortality and the need for seasonal and area closures of specific fisheries. Some chondrostean fishes (e.g., sturgeons and paddlefishes) can detect weak electric field gradients (possibly as low as 5 Μv/cm) due to arrays of electroreceptors (ampullae of Lorenzini) on their snout and gill covers. Weak electric fields, such as those produced by electropositive metals (typically mixtures of the lanthanide elements), could therefore potentially be used as a deterrent. To test this idea, we recorded the behavioral responses of juvenile Atlantic sturgeon (31-43 cm fork length) to electropositive metal (primarily a mixture of the lanthanide elements neodymium and praseodymium) both in the presence and absence of food stimuli. Trials were conducted in an approximately 2.5 m diameter × 0.3 m deep tank, and fish behaviors were recorded with an overhead digital video camera. Video records were subsequently digitized (x, y coordinate system), the distance between the fish and the electropositive metal calculated, and data summarized by compiling frequency distributions with 5-cm bins. Juvenile sturgeon showed clear avoidance of electropositive metal but only when food was present. On the basis of our results, we conclude that the electropositive metals, or other sources of weak electric fields, may eventually be used to reduce the interactions of Atlantic sturgeon with fishing gear, but further investigation is needed.

  7. Collisional interactions between self-interacting non-relativistic boson stars: effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, but may be approximated in the non-relativistic regime with a coupled Schr\\"odinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  8. Development of immune-specific interaction potentials and their application in the multi-agent-system VaccImm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelke, Anna Lena; von Eichborn, Joachim; Murgueitio, Manuela S; Worth, Catherine L; Castiglione, Filippo; Preissner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Peptide vaccination in cancer therapy is a promising alternative to conventional methods. However, the parameters for this personalized treatment are difficult to access experimentally. In this respect, in silico models can help to narrow down the parameter space or to explain certain phenomena at a systems level. Herein, we develop two empirical interaction potentials specific to B-cell and T-cell receptor complexes and validate their applicability in comparison to a more general potential. The interaction potentials are applied to the model VaccImm which simulates the immune response against solid tumors under peptide vaccination therapy. This multi-agent system is derived from another immune system simulator (C-ImmSim) and now includes a module that enables the amino acid sequence of immune receptors and their ligands to be taken into account. The multi-agent approach is combined with approved methods for prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-binding peptides and the newly developed interaction potentials. In the analysis, we critically assess the impact of the different modules on the simulation with VaccImm and how they influence each other. In addition, we explore the reasons for failures in inducing an immune response by examining the activation states of the immune cell populations in detail.In summary, the present work introduces immune-specific interaction potentials and their application to the agent-based model VaccImm which simulates peptide vaccination in cancer therapy.

  9. Development of immune-specific interaction potentials and their application in the multi-agent-system VaccImm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena Woelke

    Full Text Available Peptide vaccination in cancer therapy is a promising alternative to conventional methods. However, the parameters for this personalized treatment are difficult to access experimentally. In this respect, in silico models can help to narrow down the parameter space or to explain certain phenomena at a systems level. Herein, we develop two empirical interaction potentials specific to B-cell and T-cell receptor complexes and validate their applicability in comparison to a more general potential. The interaction potentials are applied to the model VaccImm which simulates the immune response against solid tumors under peptide vaccination therapy. This multi-agent system is derived from another immune system simulator (C-ImmSim and now includes a module that enables the amino acid sequence of immune receptors and their ligands to be taken into account. The multi-agent approach is combined with approved methods for prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC-binding peptides and the newly developed interaction potentials. In the analysis, we critically assess the impact of the different modules on the simulation with VaccImm and how they influence each other. In addition, we explore the reasons for failures in inducing an immune response by examining the activation states of the immune cell populations in detail.In summary, the present work introduces immune-specific interaction potentials and their application to the agent-based model VaccImm which simulates peptide vaccination in cancer therapy.

  10. The feto-maternal interface: setting the stage for potential immune interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Berthold

    2007-06-01

    Human implantation and placentation comprise the direct contact of fetal with maternal tissues culminating in the erosion of maternal tissues by fetal cells. A complex interplay of maternal and fetal factors is key to maintain pregnancy until delivery. Immunological interactions can be found at different stages, such as blastocyst attachment, trophoblast invasion into maternal tissues, and flow of maternal blood through the placenta. These interactions need tightly controlled mechanisms to avoid rejection of the conceptus. In this study, these sites of interaction are introduced on a morphological level to help immunologists create their hypotheses on how the immunological interactions may work.

  11. [Evaluation of potential drug interactions in primary health care prescriptions in Vitória da Conquista, Bahia (Brazil)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Danyllo Fábio Lessa; de Moura, Cristiano Soares; de Medeiros, Danielle Souto

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions are risk factors for the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The risk for drug interactions includes factors related to prescription that are intrinsic to the patient. This study sought to evaluate the potential drug interactions in primary care prescriptions in Vitória da Conquista in the state of Bahia to fill the knowledge gap on this topic in Brazil. Information about several variables derived from the primary health care prescriptions was collected and drug interactions were evaluated based on information from Medscape and Micromedex(R) databases. Polypharmacy frequency and its association with the occurrence of drug interactions were also evaluated. Results revealed a 48,9% frequency of drug interactions, 74,9% of moderate or greater severity, 8,6% of prescriptions in polypharmacy that in the chi-square test showed a positive association with the occurrence of drug interactions (p < 0,001). Prescriptions from primary care in Vitória da Conquista in the state of Bahia showed a high frequency of drug interactions, however it is necessary to analyze other risk factors for their occurrence at this level of health care.

  12. Interactions among Future Study Abroad Students: Exploring Potential Intercultural Learning Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, C.; Beaven, A.; Pugliese, R.

    2015-01-01

    The study presented in this article aims to explore if and how intercultural learning may take place in students' class interaction. It is grounded in the assumption that interculturality is not a clear-cut feature inherent to interactions occurring when individuals with presumed different linguistic and cultural/national backgrounds talk to…

  13. The potential interaction between oral anticoagulants and acetaminophen in everyday practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Geven, LM; Kuitert, NA; Risselada, A; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The drug-drug interaction between oral anticoagulants (especially warfarin) and acetaminophen has been described, but evidence is conflicting and evidence for a similar interaction between acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon and acetaminophen is limited. Therefore, a study was performed to det

  14. On local smooth solutions for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions ±r−2

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Zhidkov

    2004-01-01

    For the initial value problem for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions ±r−2, we prove the existence and uniqueness of a local solution with values in the Schwartz space S of infinitely differentiable functions rapidly decaying at infinity.

  15. In-vitro evaluation of the P-glycoprotein interactions of a series of potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, André Huss; Rønsted, Nina; Jäger, Anna Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Drug compounds interacting with the blood-brain barrier efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) might have limited access to brain tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether nine potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids of the crinine, lycorine and galanthamine types...

  16. The APP-Interacting Protein FE65 is Required for Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Long-Term Potentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Moon, Changjong; Hu, Qubai; Wang, Baiping; Martin, George; Sun, Zhongsheng; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    FE65 is expressed predominantly in the brain and interacts with the C-terminal domain of [beta]-amyloid precursor protein (APP). We examined hippocampus-dependent memory and in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) at the CA1 synapses with isoform-specific FE65 knockout (p97FE65[superscript -/-]) mice. When examined using the Morris water maze,…

  17. Prevalence of potential drug–drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  18. The influence of prejudice and stereotypes on anticipated affect : feelings about a potentially negative interaction with another ethnic group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Ernestine; Finchilescu, Gillian; Brix, Louise; Wijnants, Nienke; Koomen, Willem

    2008-01-01

    In this research we investigated whether feelings about an imagined potentially negative interaction with a member of another ethnic group was affected more by valence than content of stereotypes, and whether the differential influence of perception and meta-perception was similar for dominant and d

  19. The effect of temperature, interaction range, and pair potential on the formation of dodecagonal quasicrystals in core-corona systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattabhiraman, Harini; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-03-01

    A two-dimensional dodecagonal quasicrystal was previously reported by Dotera et al (2014 Nature 506 208) in a system of particles interacting with a hard core of diameter σ and a repulsive square shoulder of diameter δ =1.40σ . In the current work, we examine the formation of this quasicrystal using bond orientational order parameters, correlation functions and tiling distributions. We find that this dodecagonal quasicrystal forms from a fluid phase. We further study the effect of the width of the repulsive shoulder by simulating the system over a range of values of δ. For the range of densities and temperatures considered, we observe the formation of the dodecagonal quasicrystal between δ =1.30σ and 1.44σ . We also study the effect of shape of the interaction potential by simulating the system using three other interaction potentials with two length scales, namely hard-core plus a linear ramp, modified exponential, or Buckingham (exp-6) potential. We observe the presence of the quasicrystal in all three systems. However, depending on the shape of the potential, the formation of the quasicrystal takes place at lower temperatures (or higher interaction strengths). Using free-energy calculations, we demonstrate that the quasicrystal is thermodynamically stable in the square-shoulder and linear-ramp system.

  20. A study of potential drug-drug interactions among critically ill patients at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeeta Gupta

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: The present study showed high concomitant administration of potentially interacting drugs. The prevalence confirmed the association of age and polypharmacy. Vigilant prescribing approach is needed to prevent hazardous outcomes of pDDI. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(4.000: 1281-1285

  1. Comparative aspects of spin-dependent interaction potentials for spin-1/2 and spin-1 matter fields

    CERN Document Server

    Malta, P C; Veiga, K; Helayël-Neto, J A

    2015-01-01

    This paper sets out to establish a comparative study between classes of spin- and velocity-dependent current-current interaction potentials for spin-1/2 and spin-1 matter sources in the non-relativistic regime. Both (neutral massive) scalar and vector particles are considered to mediate the interactions between scalar, pseudo-scalar, vector and pseudo-vector matter currents. We contemplate specific cases in which our results may describe the electromagnetic interaction with a massive (Proca-type) photon exchanged between two spin-1/2 or two spin-1 carriers. We highlight the similarities and peculiarities of the potentials for the two different types of charged matter and also focus our attention to the comparison between two different field representations for spin-1 matter particles. We believe that our results may contribute to a further discussion of the relation between charge, spin and extensibility.

  2. Variable separation solutions and interacting waves of a coupled system of the modified KdV and potential BLMP equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xiao-yan, E-mail: xytang@sjtu.edu.cn [Institute of System Science, School of Information Science Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Faculty of Science, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Li, Jing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liang, Zu-feng [Department of Physics, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Wang, Jian-yong [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-04-01

    The multilinear variable separation approach (MLVSA) is applied to a coupled modified Korteweg–de Vries and potential Boiti–Leon–Manna–Pempinelli equations, as a result, the potential fields u{sub y} and v{sub y} are exactly the universal quantity applicable to all multilinear variable separable systems. The generalized MLVSA is also applied, and it is found that u{sub y} (v{sub y}) is rightly the subtraction (addition) of two universal quantities with different parameters. Then interactions between periodic waves are discussed, for instance, the elastic interaction between two semi-periodic waves and non-elastic interaction between two periodic instantons. An attractive phenomenon is observed that a dromion moves along a semi-periodic wave.

  3. Excited state potential energy surfaces and their interactions in Fe(IV)=O active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, Shaun D; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-12-21

    The non-heme ferryl active sites are of significant interest for their application in biomedical and green catalysis. These sites have been shown to have an S = 1 or S = 2 ground spin state; the latter is functional in biology. Low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (LT MCD) spectroscopy probes the nature of the excited states in these species including ligand-field (LF) states that are otherwise difficult to study by other spectroscopies. In particular, the temperature dependences of MCD features enable their unambiguous assignment and thus determination of the low-lying excited states in two prototypical S = 1 and S = 2 NHFe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O complexes. Furthermore, some MCD bands exhibit vibronic structures that allow mapping of excited-state interactions and their effects on the potential energy surfaces (PESs). For the S = 2 species, there is also an unusual spectral feature in both near-infrared absorption and MCD spectra - Fano antiresonance (dip in Abs) and Fano resonance (sharp peak in MCD) that indicates the weak spin-orbit coupling of an S = 1 state with the S = 2 LF state. These experimental data are correlated with quantum-chemical calculations that are further extended to analyze the low-lying electronic states and the evolution of their multiconfigurational characters along the Fe-O PESs. These investigations show that the lowest-energy states develop oxyl Fe(III) character at distances that are relevant to the transition state (TS) for H-atom abstraction and define the frontier molecular orbitals that participate in the reactivity of S = 1 vs. S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O active sites. The S = 1 species has only one available channel that requires the C-H bond of a substrate to approach perpendicular to the Fe-oxo bond (the π channel). In contrast, there are three channels (one σ and two π) available for the S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O system allowing C-H substrate approach

  4. Theory of Auger-electron and appearance-potential spectroscopy for interacting valence-band electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolting, W.; Geipel, G.; Ertl, K.

    1991-12-01

    A theory of Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) and appearance-potential spectroscopy (APS) is presented for interacting electrons in a nondegenerate energy band, described within the framework of the Hubbard model. Both types of spectroscopy are based on the same two-particle spectral density. A diagrammatic vertex-correction method (Matsubara formalism) is used to express this function in terms of the one-particle spectral density. The latter is approximately determined for arbitrary temperature T, arbitrary coupling strength U/W (U, the intra-atomic Coulomb matrix element; W, the width of the ``free'' Bloch band), and arbitrary band occupations n (0QDOS) in relation to the Bloch density of states (BDOS), where, however, spontaneous magnetic order is excluded, irrespective of the band filling n. The AE (AP) spectra consist of only one structure a few eV wide (``bandlike'') which is strongly n dependent, but only slightly T dependent, being rather well approximated by a simple self-convolution of the occupied (unoccupied) QDOS. For strongly correlated electrons the Bloch band splits into two quasiparticle subbands. This leads for n1. For sufficiently strong correlations U/W additional satellites appear that refer to situations where the two excited quasiparticles (quasiholes) propagate as tightly bound pairs through the lattice without being scattered by other charge carriers. As soon as the satellite splits off from the bandlike part of the spectrum, it takes almost the full spectral weight, conveying the impression of an ``atomiclike'' AE (AP) line shape. The satellite has almost exactly the structure of the free BDOS. If the particle density n as well as the hole density 2-n exceed certain critical values determined by U/W and the BDOS ρ0(E), spontaneous ferromagnetism becomes possible in the strongly correlated electron band. The magnetic phase transition gives rise to a distinctive T dependence for the QDOS and hence also for the AE and AP line shapes

  5. Chromosome conformation capture uncovers potential genome-wide interactions between human conserved non-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Robyr

    Full Text Available Comparative analyses of various mammalian genomes have identified numerous conserved non-coding (CNC DNA elements that display striking conservation among species, suggesting that they have maintained specific functions throughout evolution. CNC function remains poorly understood, although recent studies have identified a role in gene regulation. We hypothesized that the identification of genomic loci that interact physically with CNCs would provide information on their functions. We have used circular chromosome conformation capture (4C to characterize interactions of 10 CNCs from human chromosome 21 in K562 cells. The data provide evidence that CNCs are capable of interacting with loci that are enriched for CNCs. The number of trans interactions varies among CNCs; some show interactions with many loci, while others interact with few. Some of the tested CNCs are capable of driving the expression of a reporter gene in the mouse embryo, and associate with the oligodendrocyte genes OLIG1 and OLIG2. Our results underscore the power of chromosome conformation capture for the identification of targets of functional DNA elements and raise the possibility that CNCs exert their functions by physical association with defined genomic regions enriched in CNCs. These CNC-CNC interactions may in part explain their stringent conservation as a group of regulatory sequences.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of crystalline UF6 using the pair interaction potentials of the uranium and fluorine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekunov, G. S.; Nekrasov, K. A.; Boyarchenkov, A. S.; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya.

    2016-09-01

    A model of uranium hexafluoride is suggested that is based on the empirical pair potentials of U-U, F-F, U-F used for both intra- and intermolecular interactions. The potentials for this model are obtained from the lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficient of UF6 crystal using the molecular dynamics simulation under the periodic boundary conditions with constant volume and temperature. Within the framework of the model, the thermal expansion and sublimation of crystalline UF6 are investigated. A set of potential parameters is identified that provides satisfactory simulation of both UF6 crystal and the dependence of the UF6 saturated vapor pressure on temperature.

  7. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boucher Charles AB

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally and dynamically, we have constructed an HIV-1 human protein interaction network. This network was analyzed for important proteins and processes that are specific for the HIV life-cycle. In order to expose viral strategies, network motif analysis was carried out showing reoccurring patterns in virus-host dynamics. Results Our analyses show that human proteins interacting with HIV form a densely connected and central sub-network within the total human protein interaction network. The evaluation of this sub-network for connectivity and centrality resulted in a set of proteins essential for the HIV life-cycle. Remarkably, we were able to associate proteins involved in RNA polymerase II transcription with hubs and proteasome formation with bottlenecks. Inferred network motifs show significant over-representation of positive and negative feedback patterns between virus and host. Strikingly, such patterns have never been reported in combined virus-host systems. Conclusions HIV infection results in a reprioritization of cellular processes reflected by an increase in the relative importance of transcriptional machinery and proteasome formation. We conclude that during the evolution of HIV, some patterns of interaction have been selected for resulting in a system where virus proteins preferably interact with central human proteins for direct control and with proteasomal proteins for indirect control over the cellular processes. Finally, the patterns described by network motifs illustrate how virus and host interact with one another.

  8. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with hydrides as potential hydrogen storage media: A survey of intermolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surya, V.J.; Iyakutti, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu (India); Venkataramanan, N.S.; Mizuseki, H.; Kawazoe, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    In this paper, we have analyzed the intermolecular interactions between H{sub 2} and single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-hydride complexes and project their capability as a practicable hydrogen storage medium (HSM). In this respect, we have investigated the type of interactions namely van der Waals, electrostatic, and orbital interactions to understand the molecular hydrogen binding affinity of various systems. We found that the charge transfer effects coupled with induced electrostatic interactions are responsible for synergetic action of SWCNT and hydrides on adsorption of H{sub 2} molecules at ambient conditions. Also we have calculated the thermodynamically usable capacity of hydrogen in all the systems. This study enables one to identify and design potential hydrogen storage materials. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Influence of protein interactions on oxidation/reduction midpoint potentials of cofactors in natural and de novo metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, T L; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2013-01-01

    As discussed throughout this special issue, oxidation and reduction reactions play critical roles in the function of many organisms. In photosynthetic organisms, the conversion of light energy drives oxidation and reduction reactions through the transfer of electrons and protons in order to create energy-rich compounds. These reactions occur in proteins such as cytochrome c, a heme-containing water-soluble protein, the bacteriochlorophyll-containing reaction center, and photosystem II where water is oxidized at the manganese cluster. A critical measure describing the ability of cofactors in proteins to participate in such reactions is the oxidation/reduction midpoint potential. In this review, the basic concepts of oxidation/reduction reactions are reviewed with a summary of the experimental approaches used to measure the midpoint potential of metal cofactors. For cofactors in proteins, the midpoint potential not only depends upon the specific chemical characteristics of cofactors but also upon interactions with the surrounding protein, such as the nature of the coordinating ligands and protein environment. These interactions can be tailored to optimize an oxidation/reduction reaction carried out by the protein. As examples, the midpoint potentials of hemes in cytochromes, bacteriochlorophylls in reaction centers, and the manganese cluster of photosystem II are discussed with an emphasis on the influence that protein interactions have on these potentials. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems.

  10. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of Cell Biology Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan eFarhadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  11. The potential drug-drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors and warfarin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Hansen, Morten Rix

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been suggested to increase the effect of warfarin, and clinical guidelines recommend careful monitoring of international normalized ratio (INR) when initiating PPI among warfarin users. However, this drug-drug interaction is sparsely investigated...

  12. Plant Virus–Insect Vector Interactions: Current and Potential Future Research Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Krin S. Mann; Karyn N. Johnson

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition and transmission by an insect vector is central to the infection cycle of the majority of plant pathogenic viruses. Plant viruses can interact with their insect host in a variety of ways including both non-persistent and circulative transmission; in some cases, the latter involves virus replication in cells of the insect host. Replicating viruses can also elicit both innate and specific defense responses in the insect host. A consistent feature is that the interaction of the virus...

  13. Plant Virus–Insect Vector Interactions: Current and Potential Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf G. Dietzgen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition and transmission by an insect vector is central to the infection cycle of the majority of plant pathogenic viruses. Plant viruses can interact with their insect host in a variety of ways including both non-persistent and circulative transmission; in some cases, the latter involves virus replication in cells of the insect host. Replicating viruses can also elicit both innate and specific defense responses in the insect host. A consistent feature is that the interaction of the virus with its insect host/vector requires specific molecular interactions between virus and host, commonly via proteins. Understanding the interactions between plant viruses and their insect host can underpin approaches to protect plants from infection by interfering with virus uptake and transmission. Here, we provide a perspective focused on identifying novel approaches and research directions to facilitate control of plant viruses by better understanding and targeting virus–insect molecular interactions. We also draw parallels with molecular interactions in insect vectors of animal viruses, and consider technical advances for their control that may be more broadly applicable to plant virus vectors.

  14. Plant Virus-Insect Vector Interactions: Current and Potential Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzgen, Ralf G; Mann, Krin S; Johnson, Karyn N

    2016-11-09

    Acquisition and transmission by an insect vector is central to the infection cycle of the majority of plant pathogenic viruses. Plant viruses can interact with their insect host in a variety of ways including both non-persistent and circulative transmission; in some cases, the latter involves virus replication in cells of the insect host. Replicating viruses can also elicit both innate and specific defense responses in the insect host. A consistent feature is that the interaction of the virus with its insect host/vector requires specific molecular interactions between virus and host, commonly via proteins. Understanding the interactions between plant viruses and their insect host can underpin approaches to protect plants from infection by interfering with virus uptake and transmission. Here, we provide a perspective focused on identifying novel approaches and research directions to facilitate control of plant viruses by better understanding and targeting virus-insect molecular interactions. We also draw parallels with molecular interactions in insect vectors of animal viruses, and consider technical advances for their control that may be more broadly applicable to plant virus vectors.

  15. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions among outpatients receiving cardiovascular medications at Jimma University specialized hospital, South West Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legese Chelkeba

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quality of pharmacotherapy is highly dependent on the process of choosing a drug in relation to nature of the disease. Several factors should be considered in choosing optimal pharmacotherapeutics strategy including efficacy, safety, availability and cost of the drugs. The objective of this study was to assess potential drug-drug interactions and risk factors in outpatients taking cardiovascular drugs at Jimma University specialized hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from Feb. to April, 2011on patients visiting the cardiac clinic of Jimma University Specialized hospital. A sample of 332 outpatients who were taking cardiovascular medications at study clinic was studied. MicroMedex software was used to screen drug-drug interactions and SPSS for windows software versions-16.0 was used for data analysis. Results: A total of 1249 drugs with average of 3.76 drugs per prescription were prescribed for the 332 patients. The frequency of potential DDIs was found to be 241 (72.6%. Among these 200 (67.3% were of "moderate" severity and 164 (55.2% were delayed in onset. The most common potential DDI observed was between Enalapril and Furosemide (20%. Patients who prescribed many drugs (AOR=4.09; P=0.00 by medical intern had a higher risk of developing potential DDIs (AOR=4.6; P=0.00. Conclusions: Patients with cardiovascular disorders are subjected to high risk of potential drug-drug interactions and the number of drugs prescribed and educational level of the prescribers has a high significantly associated with the occurrence of potential drug-drug interactions. Therefore, it is imperative that further studies need to be conducted to identify reasons for and tackle the problem and provide appropriate mechanisms for management. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(2.000: 144-152

  16. Transitioning from microbiome composition to microbial community interactions: the potential of the metaorganism Hydra as an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Deines

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Animals are home to complex microbial communities, which are shaped through interactions within the community, interactions with the host, and through environmental factors. The advent of high-throughput sequencing methods has led to novel insights in changing patterns of community composition and structure. However, deciphering the different types of interactions among community members, with their hosts and their interplay with their environment is still a challenge of major proportion. The emerging fields of synthetic microbial ecology and community systems biology have the potential to decrypt these complex relationships. Studying host-associated microbiota across multiple spatial and temporal scales will bridge the gap between individual microorganism studies and large-scale whole community surveys. Here, we discuss the unique potential of Hydra as an emerging experimental model in microbiome research. Through in vivo, in vitro, and in silico approaches the interaction structure of host-associated microbial communities and the effects of the host on the microbiota and its interactions can be disentangled. Research in the model system Hydra can unify disciplines from molecular genetics to ecology, opening up the opportunity to discover fundamental rules that govern microbiome community stability.

  17. Metabolism-mediated interaction potential of standardized extract of Tinospora cordifolia through rat and human liver microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv Bahadur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tinospora cordifolia is used for treatment of several diseases in Indian system of medicine. In the present study, the inhibition potential of T. cordifolia extracts and its constituent tinosporaside to cause herb-drug interactions through rat and human liver cytochrome enzymes was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Bioactive compound was quantified through reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography, to standardize the plant extracts and interaction potential of standardized extract. Interaction potential of the test sample was evaluated through cytochrome P450-carbon monoxide complex (CYP450-CO assay with pooled rat liver microsome. Influence on individual recombinant human liver microsomes such as CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP1A2 isozymes was analyzed through fluorescence microplate assay, and respective IC 50 values were determined. Results: The content of tinosporaside was found to be 1.64% (w/w in T. cordifolia extract. Concentration-dependent inhibition was observed through T. cordifolia extract. Observed IC 50 (μg/ml value was 136.45 (CYP3A4, 144.37 (CYP2D6, 127.55 (CYP2C9, and 141.82 (CYP1A2. Tinosporaside and extract showed higher IC 50 (μg/ml value than the known inhibitors. T. cordifolia extract showed significantly less interaction potential and indicates that the selected plant has not significant herb-drug interactions relating to the inhibition of major CYP450 isozymes. Conclusions: Plant extract showed significantly higher IC 50 value than respective positive inhibitors against CYP3A4, 2D6, 2C9, and 1A2 isozymes. Consumption of T. cordifolia may not cause any adverse effects when consumed along with other xenobiotics.

  18. Metabolism-mediated interaction potential of standardized extract of Tinospora cordifolia through rat and human liver microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Shiv; Mukherjee, Pulok K.; Milan Ahmmed, S. K.; Kar, Amit; Harwansh, Ranjit K.; Pandit, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tinospora cordifolia is used for treatment of several diseases in Indian system of medicine. In the present study, the inhibition potential of T. cordifolia extracts and its constituent tinosporaside to cause herb-drug interactions through rat and human liver cytochrome enzymes was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Bioactive compound was quantified through reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography, to standardize the plant extracts and interaction potential of standardized extract. Interaction potential of the test sample was evaluated through cytochrome P450-carbon monoxide complex (CYP450-CO) assay with pooled rat liver microsome. Influence on individual recombinant human liver microsomes such as CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP1A2 isozymes was analyzed through fluorescence microplate assay, and respective IC50 values were determined. Results: The content of tinosporaside was found to be 1.64% (w/w) in T. cordifolia extract. Concentration-dependent inhibition was observed through T. cordifolia extract. Observed IC50 (μg/ml) value was 136.45 (CYP3A4), 144.37 (CYP2D6), 127.55 (CYP2C9), and 141.82 (CYP1A2). Tinosporaside and extract showed higher IC50 (μg/ml) value than the known inhibitors. T. cordifolia extract showed significantly less interaction potential and indicates that the selected plant has not significant herb-drug interactions relating to the inhibition of major CYP450 isozymes. Conclusions: Plant extract showed significantly higher IC50 value than respective positive inhibitors against CYP3A4, 2D6, 2C9, and 1A2 isozymes. Consumption of T. cordifolia may not cause any adverse effects when consumed along with other xenobiotics. PMID:27721546

  19. The evaluation of statins as potential inhibitors of the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Angela T; Kriel, Frederik H; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A; Mosebi, Salerwe; Abrahams, Shaakira; Hewer, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    Lovastatin was identified through virtual screening as a potential inhibitor of the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction. In an AlphaScreen assay, lovastatin inhibited the purified recombinant protein-protein interaction (IC50 = 1.97 ± 0.45 μm) more effectively than seven other tested statins. None of the eight statins, however, yielded antiviral activity in vitro, while only pravastatin lactone yielded detectable inhibition of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer activity (31.65% at 100 μm). A correlation between lipophilicity and increased cellular toxicity of the statins was observed.

  20. Potential drug-drug interactions in a Brazilian teaching hospital: age-related differences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Oliveira Melo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes to measure frequency and to characterize the profile of potential drug interactions (pDDI in a general medicine ward of a teaching hospital. Data about identification and clinical status of patients were extracted from medical records between March to August 2006. The occurrence of pDDI was analyzed using the database monographs Micromedex® DrugReax® System. From 5,336 prescriptions with two or more drugs, 3,097 (58.0% contained pDDI. The frequency of major and well document pDDI was 26.5%. Among 647 patients, 432 (66.8% were exposed to at least one pDDI and 283 (43.7% to major pDDI. The multivariate analysis identified that factors related to higher rates of major pDDI were the same age (p< 0.0001, length of stay (p< 0.0001, prevalence of hypertension [OR=3.42 (p< 0.0001] and diabetes mellitus [OR=2.1 (p< 0.0001], cardiovascular diseases (p< 0.0001 and the number of prescribed drugs (Spearman’s correlation=0.640622, p< 0.0001. Between major pDDI, the main risk was hemorrhage (50.3%, the most frequent major pDDI involved combination of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Among moderate pDDI, 3,866 (90.8% involved medicines for the treatment of chronic non-communicable diseases, mainly hypertension. In HU-USP, the profile of pDDI was similar among adults and elderly (the most frequent pDDI and major pDDI were same, the difference was only the frequency in either group. The efforts of the clinical pharmacists should be directed to elderly patients with cardiovascular compromise, mainly in use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Furthermore, hospital managers should increase the integration between levels of health care to promote safety patient after discharge.Keywords: Drug interactions. Aged. Internal Medicine. Hospitals, University. RESUMOInterações medicamentosas potenciais em um hospital escolar brasileiro: diferenças relacionadas à idade?O estudo tem por objetivo descrever o perfil de intera

  1. Propagation-of-uncertainty from contact angle and streaming potential measurements to XDLVO model assessments of membrane-colloid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Satish; Childress, Amy; Brant, Jonathan

    2014-08-15

    Membrane fouling assessed from a fundamental standpoint within the context of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model. The DLVO model requires that the properties of the membrane and foulant(s) be quantified. Membrane surface charge (zeta potential) and free energy values are characterized using streaming potential and contact angle measurements, respectively. Comparing theoretical assessments for membrane-colloid interactions between research groups requires that the variability of the measured inputs be established. The impact that such variability in input values on the outcome from interfacial models must be quantified to determine an acceptable variance in inputs. An interlaboratory study was conducted to quantify the variability in streaming potential and contact angle measurements when using standard protocols. The propagation of uncertainty from these errors was evaluated in terms of their impact on the quantitative and qualitative conclusions on extended DLVO (XDLVO) calculated interaction terms. The error introduced into XDLVO calculated values was of the same magnitude as the calculated free energy values at contact and at any given separation distance. For two independent laboratories to draw similar quantitative conclusions regarding membrane-foulant interfacial interactions the standard error in contact angle values must be⩽2.5°, while that for the zeta potential values must be⩽7 mV.

  2. One spatial dimensional finite volume three-body interaction for a short-range potential

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we use McGuire's model to describe scattering of three spinless identical particles in one spatial dimension, we first present analytic solutions of Faddeev's equation for scattering of three spinless particles in free space. The three particles interaction in finite volume is derived subsequently, and the quantization conditions by matching wave functions in free space and finite volume are presented in terms of two-body scattering phase shifts. The quantization conditions obtained in this work for short range interaction are L\\"uscher's formula like and consistent with Yang's results in \\cite{Yang:1967bm}.

  3. Organo-mineral interactions mask the true sorption potential of biochars in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neera; Kookana, Rai S

    2009-03-01

    The sorption of carbaryl (1-naphthyl methyl carbamate) and ethion [O,O,O',O'-tetraethyl S,S'-methylene bis(phosphorodithioate)] was studied in whole soils as well as after treatment of soil with 2% hydrofluoric acid (HF) to remove paramagnetic materials and to oxidize most forms of labile carbon by photo-oxidation with high energy (UV) on organo-mineral interactions of char in whole soils. This has implications for the modification of surfaces of the freshly applied biochars in soils due to organo-mineral interactions.

  4. Identification of potential target levels for Central Baltic Sea fishing mortalities, taking multispecies interactions into account

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Morten; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Eero, Margit

    2012-01-01

    The main biological interactions between Baltic cod, herring and sprat have been modelled in a stochastic multispecies (SMS) model. Based on this, a simple approach has been developed to quantify candidates for FMSY proxies (fishing mortality that produces the maximum sustainable yield) in a mult......The main biological interactions between Baltic cod, herring and sprat have been modelled in a stochastic multispecies (SMS) model. Based on this, a simple approach has been developed to quantify candidates for FMSY proxies (fishing mortality that produces the maximum sustainable yield...

  5. Involvement of platelet-tumor cell interaction in immune evasion. Potential role of podocalyxin-like protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAmo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides their essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are involved in the onset of cancer metastasis by interacting with tumor cells. Platelets release secretory factors that promote tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Furthermore, the formation of platelet-tumor cell aggregates in the bloodstream provides cancer cells with an immune escape mechanism by protecting circulating malignant cells from immune-mediated lysis by natural killer (NK cells. Platelet-tumor cell interaction is accomplished by specific adhesion molecules, including integrins, selectins, and their ligands. Podocalyxin-like protein 1 (PCLP1 is a selectin ligand protein which overexpression has been associated with several aggressive cancers. PCLP1 expression enhances cell adherence to platelets in an integrin-dependent process and through the interaction with P-selectin expressed on activated platelets. However, the involvement of PCLP1-induced tumor-platelet interaction in tumor immune evasion still remains unexplored. The identification of selectin ligands involved in the interaction of platelets with tumor cells may provide help for the development of effective therapies to restrain cancer cell dissemination. This article summarizes the current knowledge on molecules that participate in platelet-tumor cell interaction as well as discusses the potential role of PCLP1 as a molecule implicated in tumor immune evasion.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Potential Keratan Sulfate, Chondroitin Sulfate A, and Hyaluronic Acid Molecular Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Abigail H.; Zhang, Yuntao; Tasheva, Elena S.; Conrad, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Corneal glycosaminoglycans KS, CSA, and HA bind many intracellular and extracellular proteins and thus may influence the conformation or availability of these proteins to participate in other biological interactions. KS binds SLIT2 and may convert it from a neurorepellant to a neuroattractant.

  7. Targeting CD47-SIRPα interactions for potentiating therapeutic antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction by phagocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X.W.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the role of CD47-SIRPα interactions in therapeutic antibody-dependent tumor cell destruction by human phagocytes and also explore the killing mechanism(s) by which human phagocytes, and in particular human neutrophils, mediat

  8. Stepping into futures: exploring the potential of interactive media for participatory scenarios on social ecological systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, J.M.; Kok, K.; Lammeren, van R.J.A.; Veldkamp, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a strategy for the development of interactive media scenarios to help communicate uncertainties and complexities in coupled human and natural systems. Insights arising from Complex Adaptive Systems theory advocate the need for more adaptive perspectives on natural resources

  9. SoundScapes: non-formal learning potentials from interactive VEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony; Petersson, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Non-formal learning is evident from an inhabited information space that is created from non-invasive multi-dimensional sensor technologies that source human gesture. Libraries of intuitive interfaces empower natural interaction where the gesture is mapped to the multisensory content. Large screen...

  10. DFMSPH14: A C-code for the double folding interaction potential of two spherical nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    This is a new version of the DFMSPH code designed to obtain the nucleus-nucleus potential by using the double folding model (DFM) and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier. The new version uses the charge, proton, and neutron density distributions provided by the user. Also we added an option for fitting the DFM potential by the Gross-Kalinowski profile. The main functionalities of the original code (e.g. the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei, the Coulomb barrier characteristics, etc.) have not been modified.

  11. Two Interacting Electrons in a Spherical Gaussian Confining Potential Quantum Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2004-01-01

    Two-electron states of a three-dimensional spherical GaAs quantum dot (QD) with a Gaussian confining potential confinement are studied. Calculations are made by using the method of few-body physics within the effectivemass approximation. We have calculated the energy levels of single and triplet states as functions of the range and depth of the confining potential well in the spherical QDs. The same calculations performed with the parabolic approximation of the Gaussian potential lead to the results, which are qualitatively and quantitatively different.

  12. Ion beam interaction with a potential dip formed in front of an electron-absorbing boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailung, H; Pal, A R; Adhikary, N C; Gogoi, H K; Chutia, Joyanti [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Materials Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Paschim Boragaon, Guwahati-35, Assam (India)

    2006-02-15

    Evolution of a potential dip in front of an electron absorbing plate has been experimentally investigated. A potential drop of the order of T{sub e}/2 exists between the bulk plasma and the boundary of the electron space charge region where the potential minimum occurs. The dip parameters are found to obey Child's law. Necessary ion pumping is provided by the floating teflon sheet covering the back of the plate. An ion beam launched towards the plate is found to be effective to modify the dip and subsequently suppress it.

  13. Threshold behavior of interaction potential for the system 7Li + 64Ni: Comparison with 6Li + 64Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Md. Moin; Das, Mili; Roy, Subinit; Sinha, M.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Datta, U.; Ramachandran, K.; Shrivastava, A.

    2016-09-01

    The elastic scattering angular distributions for the system 7Li + 64Ni were measured in the bombarding energy range of 12 MeV ≤Elab ≤ 26.4 MeV. A phenomenological optical model analysis was performed for the measured data. The strengths of the fitted potential components at the surface were estimated to extract their variation with energy. Further analyses of the measured angular distributions were performed with a hybrid potential composed of a renormalized folded real and a phenomenological imaginary potential. Both the model potentials predict similar energy dependent behavior for the effective interaction potential around the barrier. Unlike the heavy targets, 7Li + 64Ni does not show a normal threshold behavior. It also does not clearly exhibit a behavior similar to 6Li + 64Ni. The real potential for 7Li + 64Ni does not exhibit any significant energy dependence and the imaginary potential strength remains almost independent of energy above the Coulomb barrier (∼ 14 MeV). However, at energies below the barrier, a sudden drop in the imaginary potential strength is observed.

  14. Vapour–liquid equilibria of the two- and three-dimensional monoatomic classical fluids interacting via double Yukawa potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Pathania; P K Ahluwalia

    2006-12-01

    We have carried out Monte Carlo simulations in Gibbs ensemble for two-and three-dimensional double Yukawa fluid. We have compared liquid–vapour equilibrium curve with that of Lennard-Jones, when parameters occurring in double Yukawa potential are chosen to fit Lennard-Jones potential. The results are in good agreement. The role of repulsive and attractive contributions for the potential on the liquid–vapour coexistence region as well as on critical temperature and critical density has been studied. The critical temperature is found to be more sensitive than the critical density to the variation in repulsive and attractive parts of the potential. Also, the range of the attractive interaction directly influences range of the liquid–vapour coexistence region. It has been found that smaller the values of the attractive parameter, larger is the coexistence region.

  15. Interactions between Ions and Lysenin Nanochannels and their Potential Applications as Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Faouri, Radwan Awwad

    Lysenin is classified as a pore-forming toxin protein that is isolated from the earthworm Eisenia fetida and consists of 297 amino acids. Lysenin inserts large conducting pores (3.0-4.7 nm in diameter) into artificial membranes (BLM) which include sphingomyelin. These pores (channels) are open and oriented upon insertion into the bilayer lipid membrane. Lysenin channels gate at positive voltages (voltage-induced gating), but not at negative voltages. Lysenin pores also exhibit activity modulation in response to changes in ionic strength and pH, indicating that electrostatic interaction is responsible for Lysenin conductance activities. In this line of inquiries, and by modulating Lysenin electrostatic interactions, it was hypothesized that the electrical properties of Lysenin pores (channels) could be influenced by multivalent ions. The macroscopic conductance of Lysenin channels was inhibited by addition of multivalent ions. The inhibition was concentration dependent and reversible by addition of chelating or precipitating agents. The ability of the examined multivalent ions to inhibit pore conductance depended on ionic charge and size. Taken together, these results indicate that the Lysenin channel has a binding site that is placed inside the channel and interacts electrostatically with multivalent ions resulting in a conductance response related to ionic number and size. The high sensitivity of Lysenin pores toward trivalent ions indicates that Lysenin channels could be used to develop novel biosensors for multivalent ion detection in environmental samples. The dynamic interaction of Lysenin with multivalent ions was modeled based on the conductivity of the bulk solution and the status of Lysenin channels. The purpose of the model was to provide a mechanistic understanding of Lysenin gating. Using the experimental data, an equilibrium rate constant of the interaction between Lysenin and each multivalent ion was estimated. Each rate constant was related to the

  16. A Statistical Analysis of Protein-Protein Interaction with Knowledge-Based Potential at Residue Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林巍; 孙飞; 饶子和

    2003-01-01

    Protein-protein recognition is an important step in biological processes, which still largely remains elusive.The inter-residue contact potential, CPij, describes the propensity of contact between two types of residue.In this study, several different CPij variants were examined with the objective of discriminating the binding potential of surface pairs.Using solvent mediated inter-molecule contact potential (SM-IMCPij), an evaluation model was deduced and tested.Using the evaluation model it was found that the SM-IMCPij gives a better performance than either residue mediated IMCPij(RM-IMCPij) or folding-residue contact potential (FCPij).The results suggest that the evaluation model provides a fast, effective, and discriminative method for the evaluation of proposed binding interfaces.

  17. Analytical determination of the two-body gravitational interaction potential at the 4th post-Newtonian approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2013-01-01

    We complete the analytical determination, at the 4th post-Newtonian approximation, of the main radial potential describing the gravitational interaction of two bodies within the effective one-body formalism. The (non logarithmic) coefficient a_5 (nu) measuring this 4th post-Newtonian interaction potential is found to be linear in the symmetric mass ratio nu. Its nu-independent part a_5 (0) is obtained by an analytical gravitational self-force calculation that unambiguously resolves the formal infrared divergencies which currently impede its direct post-Newtonian calculation. Its nu-linear part a_5 (nu) - a_5 (0) is deduced from recent results of Jaranowski and Sch\\"afer, and is found to be significantly negative.

  18. Clinical relevancy and determinants of potential drug–drug interactions in chronic kidney disease patients: results from a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ahsan Saleem,1,2 Imran Masood,1 Tahir Mehmood Khan3 1Department of Pharmacy, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur, Pakistan; 2Pharmacy Services Department, Integrated Medical Center, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan; 3School of Pharmacy, Monash University, Sunway Campus, Selangor, Malaysia Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD alters the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses of various renally excreted drugs and increases the risk of drug-related problems, such as drug–drug interactions.Objectives: To assess the pattern, determinants, and clinical relevancy of potential drug–drug interactions (pDDIs in CKD patients.Materials and methods: This study retrospectively reviewed medical charts of all CKD patients admitted in the nephrology unit of a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan from January 2013 to December 2014. The Micromedex Drug-Reax® system was used to screen patient profiles for pDDIs, and IBM SPSS version 20 was used to carry out statistical analysis.Results: We evaluated 209 medical charts and found pDDIs in nearly 78.5% CKD patients. Overall, 541 pDDIs were observed, of which, nearly 60.8% patients had moderate, 41.1% had minor, 27.8% had major, and 13.4% had contraindicated interactions. Among those interactions, 49.4% had good evidence, 44.0% had fair, 6.3% had excellent evidence, and 35.5% interactions had delayed onset of action. The potential adverse outcomes of pDDIs included postural hypotension, QT prolongation, ceftriaxone–calcium precipitation, cardiac arrhythmias, and reduction in therapeutic effectiveness. The occurrence of pDDIs was found strongly associated with the age of <60 years, number of prescribed medicines ≥5, hypertension, and the lengthy hospitalization of patients.Conclusion: The occurrence of pDDIs was high in CKD patients. It was observed that CKD patients with an older age, higher number of prescribed medicines, lengthy hospitalization, and hypertension were at

  19. Multireference configuration interaction potential curve and analytical potential energy function of the ground and low-lying excited states of CdSe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Feng; Yang Chuan-Lu; Hu Zhen-Yan; Wang Mei-Shan

    2007-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of the ground state (3Π) and three low-lying excited states (1∑, 3∑,1Π) of CdSe dimer have been studied by emploging quasirelativistic effective core potentials on the basis of the complete active space self-consistent field method followed by multireference configuration interaction calculation. The four PECs are fitted to analytical potential energy functions using the Murrel-Sorbie potential function. Based on the PECs,the vibrational levels of the four states are determined by solving the Schr(o)dinger equation of nuclear motion, and corresponding spectroscopic contants are accurately calculated. The equilibrium positions as well as the spectroscopic constants and the vibrational levels are reported. By our analysis, the 3Π state, of which the dissociation asymptote is Cd(1S) + Se(3p), is identified as a ground state of CdSe dimer, and the corresponding dissociation energy is estimated to be 0.39eV. However, the first excited state is only 1132.49cm-1 above the ground state and the 3∑ state is the highest in the four calculated states.

  20. Fermionic particles with position-dependent mass in the presence of inversely quadratic Yukawa potential and tensor interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Bahar; F Yasuk

    2013-02-01

    Approximate solutions of the Dirac equation with position-dependent mass are presented for the inversely quadratic Yukawa potential and Coulomb-like tensor interaction by using the asymptotic iteration method. The energy eigenvalues and the corresponding normalized eigenfunctions are obtained in the case of position-dependent mass and arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number k state and approximation on the spin-orbit coupling term.

  1. One-electron self-interaction and the asymptotics of the Kohn-Sham potential: an impaired relation

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Tobias; Kronik, Leeor; Kümmel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    One-electron self-interaction and an incorrect asymptotic behavior of the Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation potential are among the most prominent limitations of many present-day density functionals. However, a one-electron self-interaction-free energy does not necessarily lead to the correct long-range potential. This is here shown explicitly for local hybrid functionals. Furthermore, carefully studying the ratio of the von Weizs\\"acker kinetic energy density to the (positive) Kohn-Sham kinetic energy density, $\\tau_\\mathrm{W}/\\tau$, reveals that this ratio, which frequently serves as an iso-orbital indicator and is used to eliminate one-electron self-interaction effects in meta-generalized-gradient approximations and local hybrid functionals, can fail to approach its expected value in the vicinity of orbital nodal planes. This perspective article suggests that the nature and consequences of one-electron self-interaction and some of the strategies for its correction need to be reconsidered.

  2. Chiral interactions of light induced by low-dimensional dynamics in complex potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Sunkyu; Piao, Xianji; Min, Bumki; Park, Namkyoo

    2014-01-01

    Chirality is a universal feature in nature, as observed in fermion interactions and DNA helicity. Much attention has been given to the chiral interactions of light, not only regarding its physical interpretation but also focusing on intriguing phenomena in excitation, absorption, generation, and refraction. Although recent progress in metamaterials and 3-dimensional writing technology has spurred artificial enhancements of optical chirality, most approaches are founded on the same principle of the mixing of electric and magnetic responses. However, due to the orthogonal form of electric and magnetic fields, intricate designs are commonly required for mixing. Here, we propose an alternative route to optical chirality, exploiting the nonmagnetic mixing of amplifying and decaying electric modes based on non-Hermitian theory. We show that a 1-dimensional helical eigenmode can exist singularly in a complex anisotropic material, in sharp contrast to the 2-dimensional eigenspaces employed in previous approaches. We ...

  3. [Multi-sensory interaction in tinnitus: visual evoked potentials and somatosensory stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráiz, C; Hernández-Calvín, F J; Plaza, G; Toledano, A; De los Santos, G

    2003-05-01

    Anomalous cross-modal interactions along the audiovestibular, visual and soma-tosensorial pathways could be the responsible for aberrant signals, clinically expressed as phantom perceptions. This results in tinnitus that can be modified by gaze movements or somatosensorial stimulation through skin, orofacial (jaw) and cervical movements. This phenomenon has also been described in some patients with acute unilateral deafferentation of the auditory peripheral system as a result of surgery to remove a tumour in the posterior fossal. Neuroimaging preliminary studies (PET, f-MRI) describe multisensorial interactions and cortical reorganisation processes in chronic tinnitus. Treatment approaches are still unknown although counselling regarding the benignity of the process and the high percentage of habituation to the symptom is the most effective framework. We present our experience in four cases.

  4. The potential of plant viruses to promote genotypic diversity via genotype x environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Mölken, Tamara; Stuefer, Josef F.

    2011-01-01

    † Background and Aims Genotype by environment (G × E) interactions are important for the long-term persistence of plant species in heterogeneous environments. It has often been suggested that disease is a key factor for the maintenance of genotypic diversity in plant populations. However, empirical...... evidence for this contention is scarce. Here virus infection is proposed as a possible candidate for maintaining genotypic diversity in their host plants. † Methods The effects of White clover mosaic virus (WClMV) on the performance and development of different Trifolium repens genotypes were analysed...... and the G × E interactions were examined with respect to genotypespecific plant responses to WClMV infection. Thus, the environment is defined as the presence or absence of the virus. † Key Results WClMV had a negative effect on plant performance as shown by a decrease in biomass and number of ramets...

  5. Lambda alpha, Sigma alpha and Xi alpha potentials derived from the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Suzuki, Y

    2006-01-01

    We calculate Lambda alpha, Sigma alpha and Xi alpha potentials from the nuclear-matter G-matrices of the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction. The alpha-cluster wave function is assumed to be a simple harmonic-oscillator shell-model wave function. A new method is proposed to derive the direct and knock-on terms of the interaction Born kernel from the hyperon-nucleon G-matrices, with explicit treatments of the nonlocality and the center-of-mass motion between the hyperon and alpha. We find that the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interactions, FSS and fss2, yield a reasonable bound-state energy for 5 He Lambda, -3.18 -- -3.62 MeV, in spite of the fact that they give relatively large depths for the Lambda single-particle potentials, 46 -- 48 MeV, in symmetric nuclear matter. An equivalent local potential derived from the Wigner transform of the nonlocal Lambda alpha kernel shows a strong energy dependence for the incident Lambda-particle, indicating the importance of the strangeness-exchange process in the o...

  6. Potential costs of heterospecific sexual interactions in golden orbweb spiders (Nephila spp.)

    OpenAIRE

    Quiñones-Lebrón, Shakira G.; Simona Kralj-Fišer; Matjaž Gregorič; Tjaša Lokovšek; Klemen Čandek; Charles R. Haddad; Matjaž Kuntner

    2016-01-01

    Though not uncommon in other animals, heterospecific mating is rarely reported in arachnids. We investigated sexual interactions among four closely related and syntopical African golden orbweb spiders, Nephila inaurata, N. fenestrata, N. komaci, and N. senegalensis. In two South African localities, female webs were often inhabited by heterospecific males that sometimes outnumbered conspecifics. Species association of males with females was random in nature. In subsequent laboratory choice exp...

  7. Interaction of retinal guanylate cyclase with the alpha subunit of transducin: potential role in transducin localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Nair, K Saidas; Levay, Konstantin; Peshenko, Igor V; Crabb, John W; Dizhoor, Alexander M; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2009-02-01

    Vertebrate phototransduction is mediated by cGMP, which is generated by retGC (retinal guanylate cyclase) and degraded by cGMP phosphodiesterase. Light stimulates cGMP hydrolysis via the G-protein transducin, which directly binds to and activates phosphodiesterase. Bright light also causes relocalization of transducin from the OS (outer segments) of the rod cells to the inner compartments. In the present study, we show experimental evidence for a previously unknown interaction between G(alphat) (the transducin alpha subunit) and retGC. G(alphat) co-immunoprecipitates with retGC from the retina or from co-transfected COS-7 cells. The retGC-G(alphat) complex is also present in cones. The interaction also occurs in mice lacking RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signalling 9), a protein previously shown to associate with both G(alphat) and retGC. The G(alphat)-retGC interaction is mediated primarily by the kinase homology domain of retGC, which binds GDP-bound G(alphat) stronger than the GTP[S] (GTPgammaS; guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate) form. Neither G(alphat) nor G(betagamma) affect retGC-mediated cGMP synthesis, regardless of the presence of GCAP (guanylate cyclase activating protein) and Ca2+. The rate of light-dependent transducin redistribution from the OS to the inner segments is markedly accelerated in the retGC-1-knockout mice, while the migration of transducin to the OS after the onset of darkness is delayed. Supplementation of permeabilized photoreceptors with cGMP does not affect transducin translocation. Taken together, these results suggest that the protein-protein interaction between G(alphat) and retGC represents a novel mechanism regulating light-dependent translocation of transducin in rod photoreceptors.

  8. Two-Particle Cluster Theory for Biaxial Nematic Phase Based on a Recently Proposed Interaction Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-Dong; ZHANG Yan-Jun; SUN Zong-Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ Two-particle cluster theory is applied to study the biaxial nematic phase formed by biaxial molecules interacting with a simplified model proposed by Sonnet et al. [Phys. Rev. E 67 (2003) 061701]. For the temperature dependences of the internal energy per particle and of the order parameters, the two-particle theory yields an improved result compared with mean field theory. Concerning the phase diagram, the two-particle theory gives the numerical result in qualitative agreement with the mean field theory.

  9. Correlation in narrow nanorods: a variational potential-configuration interaction scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planelles, J; Climente, J I; Royo, M; Movilla, J L [Departament de Quimica-Fisica i AnalItica, UJI, Box 224, E-12080 Castello (Spain)], E-mail: josep.planelles@qfa.uji.es

    2009-05-27

    Full configuration interaction calculations for two electrons in narrow semiconductor nanorods are carried out employing different orbital basis sets. It is shown that the usual configurations built from single-particle states cannot yield a correct singlet-triplet energetic order regardless of the basis size, as they miss the correlation energy. Mean-field optimized orbitals partially correct this drawback. A new approach is introduced, based on a simple variational procedure, which yields robust results.

  10. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  11. The rovibrational structure of the Ar-CO complex from a model interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianturco, F. A.; Paesani, F.

    2001-07-01

    The full three-variable potential-energy surface for the Ar-CO complex, V(R,θ,rCO), has been calculated using a recently developed scheme which combines density-functional theory (DFT) with the long-range dispersion contributions obtained from perturbation theory. The two adiabatic surfaces given by integration of the full potential over the vibrational coordinate of CO have been then used to calculate the bound states of the van der Waals complex for both vCO=0 and vCO=1. Calculations of the wave functions and of the frequencies of various rotational and rovibrational transitions provide overall good agreement both with the experiments and with the results obtained using the most recent, and more computationally demanding, potential-energy surfaces for the title system.

  12. Dynamical Screening of Gravitational Interaction and Planetary Motions in Modified Solar Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Bashkirov, A G; Pechernikova, G V

    2001-01-01

    A density disturbance in a system of gravitating mass, induced by a moving selected body gives rise to a dynamical screening of Newtonian potential of this body. When applied to the solar planetary system it means that as a result of the motion of the Sun in the Galaxy its effective force potential appears more weak than the Newtonian potential. The relevant modifications of main relations of the solar dynamics are considered here and it is found in particular that the reestimated period of the Earth revolution around the Sun rises in 1 second per year and semimajor axis of the Earth orbit increases on 4 kilometers. Similar relations are obtained for other planets too. It may be supposed that the inclusion of these effects can help to explain the observable anomalous acceleration of spacecrafts Pioneer 10 and 11.

  13. Correlation energy and dispersion interaction in the ab initio potential energy curve of the neon dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytautas, Laimutis; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    A close approximation to the empirical potential energy curve of the neon dimer is obtained by coupled-cluster singles plus doubles plus noniterative triples calculations by using nonaugmented correlation-consistent basis sets without counterpoise corrections and complementing them by three-term extrapolations to the complete basis set limit. The potential energy is resolved into a self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock contribution and a correlation contribution. The latter is shown to decay in the long-range region in accordance with the empirical dispersion expansion.

  14. Overdamped motion of interacting particles in general confining potentials: time-dependent and stationary-state analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Nobre, F. D.; Curado, E. M. F.

    2012-12-01

    By comparing numerical and analytical results, it is shown that a system of interacting particles under overdamped motion is very well described by a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation, which can be associated with nonextensive statistical mechanics. The particle-particle interactions considered are repulsive, motivated by three different physical situations: (i) modified Bessel function, commonly used in vortex-vortex interactions, relevant for the flux-front penetration in disordered type-II superconductors; (ii) Yukawa-like forces, useful for charged particles in plasma, or colloidal suspensions; (iii) derived from a Gaussian potential, common in complex fluids, like polymer chains dispersed in a solvent. Moreover, the system is subjected to a general confining potential, φ( x) = ( α| x| z )/ z ( α > 0 , z > 1), so that a stationary state is reached after a sufficiently long time. Recent numerical and analytical investigations, considering interactions of type (i) and a harmonic confining potential ( z = 2), have shown strong evidence that a q-Gaussian distribution, P( x,t), with q = 0, describes appropriately the particle positions during their time evolution, as well as in their stationary state. Herein we reinforce further the connection with nonextensive statistical mechanics, by presenting numerical evidence showing that: (a) in the case z = 2, different particle-particle interactions only modify the diffusion parameter D of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation; (b) for z ≠ 2, all cases investigated fit well the analytical stationary solution P st( x), given in terms of a q-exponential (with the same index q = 0) of the general external potential φ( x). In this later case, we propose an approximate time-dependent P( x,t) (not known analytically for z ≠ 2), which is in very good agreement with the simulations for a large range of times, including the approach to the stationary state. The present work suggests that a wide variety of physical phenomena

  15. The atom-surface interaction potential for He-NaCl: A model based on pairwise additivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Jeremy M.; Fowler, P. W.

    1986-08-01

    The recently developed semi-empirical model of Fowler and Hutson is applied to the He-NaCl atom-surface interaction potential. Ab initio self-consistent field calculations of the repulsive interactions between He atoms and in-crystal Cl - and Na + ions are performed. Dispersion coefficients involving in-crystal ions are also calculated. The atom-surface potential is constructed using a model based on pairwise additivity of atom-ion forces. With a small adjustment of the repulsive part, this potential gives good agreement with the experimental bound state energies obtained from selective adsorption resonances in low-energy atom scattering experiments. Close-coupling calculations of the resonant scattering are performed, and good agreement with the experimental peak positions and intensity patterns is obtained. It is concluded that there are no bound states deeper than those observed in the selective adsorption experiments, and that the well depth of the He-NaCl potential is 6.0 ± 0.2 meV.

  16. Interactions Between Pre-Processing and Classification Methods for Event-Related-Potential Classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farquhar, J.D.R.; Hill, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Detecting event related potentials (ERPs) from single trials is critical to the operation of many stimulus-driven brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The low strength of the ERP signal compared to the noise (due to artifacts and BCI irrelevant brain processes) makes this a challenging signal det

  17. Chemical Potential Dependence of the Dressed—Quark Propagator from an Effective Quark—Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONGHong-Shi; PINGJia-Lun; 等

    2002-01-01

    We exhibit a method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagator from the dressed-quark propagator,which provides a means of determining the behavior of the chiral and deconfinement order parameters.A comparison with the results of previous researches is given.

  18. Application of Receiver Operating Characteristic Analysis to Refine the Prediction of Potential Digoxin Drug Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ellens, Harma; Deng, Shibing; Coleman, JoAnn; Bentz, Joe; Taub, Mitchell E.; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Chung, Sophie P.; Herédi-Szabó, Krisztina; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Palm, Johan; Balimane, Praveen; Zhang, Lei; Jamei, Masoud; Hanna, Imad; O’Connor, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the 2012 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance on drug-drug interactions (DDIs), a new molecular entity that inhibits P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may need a clinical DDI study with a P-gp substrate such as digoxin when the maximum concentration of inhibitor at steady state divided by IC50 ([I1]/IC50) is ≥0.1 or concentration of inhibitor based on highest approved dose dissolved in 250 ml divide by IC50 ([I2]/IC50) is ≥10. In this article, refined criteria are presented, determined by...

  19. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies of tedizolid to assess the potential for peripheral or central monoamine oxidase interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, S; Bartizal, K; Minassian, S L; Fang, E; Prokocimer, P

    2013-07-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a novel oxazolidinone prodrug whose active moiety, tedizolid, has improved potency against Gram-positive pathogens and pharmacokinetics, allowing once-daily administration. Given linezolid warnings for drug-drug and drug-food interactions mediated by monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition, including sporadic serotonergic toxicity, these studies evaluated tedizolid for potential MAO interactions. In vitro, tedizolid and linezolid were reversible inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B; the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for tedizolid was 8.7 μM for MAO-A and 5.7 μM for MAO-B and 46.0 and 2.1 μM, respectively, with linezolid. Tedizolid phosphate was negative in the mouse head twitch model of serotonergic activity. Two randomized placebo-controlled crossover clinical studies assessed the potential of 200 mg/day tedizolid phosphate (at steady state) to enhance pressor responses to coadministered oral tyramine or pseudoephedrine. Sensitivity to tyramine was determined by comparing the concentration of tyramine required to elicit a ≥ 30-mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure (TYR30) when administered with placebo versus tedizolid phosphate. The geometric mean tyramine sensitivity ratio (placebo TYR30/tedizolid phosphate TYR30) was 1.33; a ratio of ≥ 2 is considered clinically relevant. In the pseudoephedrine study, mean maximum systolic blood pressure was not significantly different when pseudoephedrine was coadministered with tedizolid phosphate versus placebo. In summary, tedizolid is a weak, reversible inhibitor of MAO-A and MAO-B in vitro. Provocative testing in humans and animal models failed to uncover significant signals that would suggest potential for hypertensive or serotonergic adverse consequences at the therapeutic dose of tedizolid phosphate. Clinical studies are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01539473 (tyramine interaction study conducted at Covance Clinical Research Center, Evansville, IN) and NCT01577459

  20. An in vitro approach to assessing a potential drug interaction between MDMA (ecstasy) and caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, C; Daly, F; O'Boyle, K M

    2014-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) is a popular recreational drug which causes long-term neurotoxicity and increased risk of fatality. In rats, MDMA toxicity is exacerbated by co-administration of caffeine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caffeine altered the effects of MDMA in a battery of in vitro tests selected to model some of the known actions of MDMA in vivo. In cytotoxicity studies, caffeine modestly enhanced the effect of MDMA on neuronal N2a cell viability but not that of liver, intestinal or kidney cells. MDMA inhibited the formation of fluorescent metabolites by CYP2D6≫CYP3A4>CYP1A2 but this was not altered by caffeine. Similarly, the inhibition of synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake by MDMA was not affected by the presence of caffeine. Thus, these in vitro tests failed to detect any substantial interaction between caffeine and MDMA, highlighting the difficulty of modelling in vivo drug interactions using in vitro tests. However, the results show that the inhibition of synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake by MDMA was greater at 41°C and 25°C than at 37°C which raises the possibility that MDMA's effect on SERT in vivo may be increased as body temperature increases, contributing to its harmful effects in users.

  1. Delayed drug interactions in psychiatry: armodafinil and risperidone as a potential case in point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-12-01

    Modafinil or armodafinil (ar/mod) augmentation of antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia patients may be considered with a view to reduce negative symptoms associated with the illness or excessive daytime drowsiness due to any cause. The available data suggest that there is no role for ar/mod in reducing negative symptom burden. A recent pharmacokinetic (PK) study suggested that armodafinil (250 mg/d) reduces key PK parameters of risperidone by about 50%, and key PK parameters of 9-hydroxyrisperidone (paliperidone) by about 20%-30%, probably through induction of CYP3A4. Ar/mod augmentation is therefore best avoided in patients receiving risperidone or paliperidone (and most other atypical antipsychotic drugs, as well, because most atypical antipsychotics are metabolized by enzymes that ar/mod induce). If the ar/mod-antipsychotic drug combination is necessary, for whatever reason, then the dose of the atypical antipsychotic drug may need to be appropriately raised. If this is not done, relapse may occur; because the relapse may postdate the introduction of ar/mod by many months, the causal role of a metabolic drug interaction may not be suspected, and physicians may attribute the relapse to the natural course of the illness. Physicians need to be aware that any agent that induces the metabolism of psychotropic drugs that are used in maintenance therapy may, through lowered psychotropic drug levels, result in a delayed drug interaction that is characterized by illness relapse.

  2. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  3. Analysis of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions and Its Clinical Manifestation of Pediatric Prescription on 2 Pharmacies in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa I. Barliana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI in prescription have high incidence around the world, including Indonesia. However, scientific evidence regarding DDI in Indonesia is not available. Therefore, in this study we have conducted survey in 2 pharmacies in Bandung against pediatric prescription given by pediatrician. These prescriptions then analyzed the potential for DDI contained in the prescription and clinical manifestation. The analysis showed that in pharmacy A, there are 33 prescriptions (from a total of 155 prescriptions that have potential DDI, or approximately 21.19% (2 prescriptions have the potential DDI major categories, 23 prescriptions categorized as moderate, and 8 prescriptions as minor. In Pharmacy B, there are 6 prescriptions (from a total of 40 prescriptions or 15% of potential DDI (4 prescriptions categorized as moderate and 2 prescriptions as minor. This result showed that potential DDI happened less than 50% in pediatric prescription from both pharmacies. However, this should get attention because DDI should not happen in a prescription considering its clinical manifestations caused by DDI. Moreover, current pharmaceutical care refers to patient oriented than product oriented. In addition, further study for the pediatric prescription on DDI incidence in large scale need to be investigated.

  4. The rovibrational structure of the He-CO complex from a model interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianturco, F. A.; Paesani, F.

    The full dimensional potential energy surface for the He-CO complex, V (R, θ, rCO), has been calculated using a recently developed scheme which combines density functional theory with the long range dispersion contributions obtained from perturbative theory. Then the two adiabatic surfaces obtained by the integration of the full potential over the vibrational coordinate of CO have been used to calculate the bound states of the van der Waals complex for both vCO = 0 and vCO = 1. Calculations of the wavefunctions and of the frequencies of various rotational and rovibrational transitions is seen to provide good overall agreement with the available experiments on the title system.

  5. A water-like model under confinement for hydrophobic and hydrophilic particle-plate interaction potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Krott, Leandro B.; BARBOSA, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations were employed to study a water-like model confined between hydrophobic and hydrophilic plates. The phase behavior of this system is obtained for different distances between the plates and particle-plate potentials. For both hydrophobic and hydrophilic walls there are the formation of layers. Crystallization occurs at lower temperature at the contact layer than at the middle layer. In addition, the melting temperature decreases as the plates become more hydrophobi...

  6. Dirac particles interacting with the improved Frost-Musulin potential within the effective mass formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Ahmet; Aydogdu, Oktay; Salti, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    We mainly investigate the dynamics of spin-1/2 particles with position-dependent mass for the improved Frost-Musulin potential under spin-pseudospin symmetry. First, we find an approximate analytical solution of the Dirac equation both for bound and scattering states under spin-pseudospin symmetry and then we see that the normalized solutions are given in terms of the Gauss hypergeometric functions. In further steps, we analyze our results numerically.

  7. Potential drug–drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Giuseppe Pasqualetti, Sara Tognini, Valeria Calsolaro, Antonio Polini, Fabio Monzani Geriatrics Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse ...

  8. Evaluation and comparison of classical interatomic potentials through a user-friendly interactive web-interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Kamal; Congo, Faical Yannick P.; Liang, Tao; Becker, Chandler; Hennig, Richard G.; Tavazza, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Classical empirical potentials/force-fields (FF) provide atomistic insights into material phenomena through molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Despite their wide applicability, a systematic evaluation of materials properties using such potentials and, especially, an easy-to-use user-interface for their comparison is still lacking. To address this deficiency, we computed energetics and elastic properties of variety of materials such as metals and ceramics using a wide range of empirical potentials and compared them to density functional theory (DFT) as well as to experimental data, where available. The database currently consists of 3248 entries including energetics and elastic property calculations, and it is still increasing. We also include computational tools for convex-hull plots for DFT and FF calculations. The data covers 1471 materials and 116 force-fields. In addition, both the complete database and the software coding used in the process have been released for public use online (presently at http://www.ctcms.nist.gov/∼knc6/periodic.html) in a user-friendly way designed to enable further material design and discovery. PMID:28140407

  9. Evaluation and comparison of classical interatomic potentials through a user-friendly interactive web-interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Kamal; Congo, Faical Yannick P.; Liang, Tao; Becker, Chandler; Hennig, Richard G.; Tavazza, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Classical empirical potentials/force-fields (FF) provide atomistic insights into material phenomena through molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Despite their wide applicability, a systematic evaluation of materials properties using such potentials and, especially, an easy-to-use user-interface for their comparison is still lacking. To address this deficiency, we computed energetics and elastic properties of variety of materials such as metals and ceramics using a wide range of empirical potentials and compared them to density functional theory (DFT) as well as to experimental data, where available. The database currently consists of 3248 entries including energetics and elastic property calculations, and it is still increasing. We also include computational tools for convex-hull plots for DFT and FF calculations. The data covers 1471 materials and 116 force-fields. In addition, both the complete database and the software coding used in the process have been released for public use online (presently at http://www.ctcms.nist.gov/∼knc6/periodic.html) in a user-friendly way designed to enable further material design and discovery.

  10. Accurate and efficient calculation of van der Waals interactions within density functional theory by local atomic potential approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y Y; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Lee, Kyuho; Zhang, S B

    2008-10-21

    Density functional theory (DFT) in the commonly used local density or generalized gradient approximation fails to describe van der Waals (vdW) interactions that are vital to organic, biological, and other molecular systems. Here, we propose a simple, efficient, yet accurate local atomic potential (LAP) approach, named DFT+LAP, for including vdW interactions in the framework of DFT. The LAPs for H, C, N, and O are generated by fitting the DFT+LAP potential energy curves of small molecule dimers to those obtained from coupled cluster calculations with single, double, and perturbatively treated triple excitations, CCSD(T). Excellent transferability of the LAPs is demonstrated by remarkable agreement with the JSCH-2005 benchmark database [P. Jurecka et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)], which provides the interaction energies of CCSD(T) quality for 165 vdW and hydrogen-bonded complexes. For over 100 vdW dominant complexes in this database, our DFT+LAP calculations give a mean absolute deviation from the benchmark results less than 0.5 kcal/mol. The DFT+LAP approach involves no extra computational cost other than standard DFT calculations and no modification of existing DFT codes, which enables straightforward quantum simulations, such as ab initio molecular dynamics, on biomolecular systems, as well as on other organic systems.

  11. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan Haddad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated, MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated, MAN158 (phosphate-coated, and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated. All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of −0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration. A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  12. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  13. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com.

  14. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com .

  15. Fundamentals of nanoscale polymer-protein interactions and potential contributions to solid-state nanobioarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Jong-in

    2014-08-26

    Protein adsorption onto polymer surfaces is a very complex, ubiquitous, and integrated process, impacting essential areas of food processing and packaging, health devices, diagnostic tools, and medical products. The nature of protein-surface interactions is becoming much more complicated with continuous efforts toward miniaturization, especially for the development of highly compact protein detection and diagnostic devices. A large body of literature reports on protein adsorption from the perspective of ensemble-averaged behavior on macroscopic, chemically homogeneous, polymeric surfaces. However, protein-surface interactions governing the nanoscale size regime may not be effectively inferred from their macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. Recently, research efforts have been made to produce periodically arranged, nanoscopic protein patterns on diblock copolymer surfaces solely through self-assembly. Intriguing protein adsorption phenomena are directly probed on the individual biomolecule level for a fundamental understanding of protein adsorption on nanoscale surfaces exhibiting varying degrees of chemical heterogeneity. Insight gained from protein assembly on diblock copolymers can be effectively used to control the surface density, conformation, orientation, and biofunctionality of prebound proteins in highly miniaturized applications, now approaching the nanoscale. This feature article will highlight recent experimental and theoretical advances made on these fronts while focusing on single-biomolecule-level investigations of protein adsorption behavior combined with surface chemical heterogeneity on the length scale commensurate with a single protein. This article will also address advantages and challenges of the self-assembly-driven patterning technology used to produce protein nanoarrays and its implications for ultrahigh density, functional, and quantifiable protein detection in a highly miniaturized format.

  16. Impact of educational intervention on the pattern and incidence of potential drug-drug interactions in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar PR

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the impact of educational intervention on the pattern and incidence of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs. Method: All patients admitted to Internal Medicine wards of Manipal Teaching Hospital during the study period were included. Patient details were collected using a patient profile form and the datum from the filled forms was analyzed using Micromedex electronic database. An intervention was carried out through a presentation during clinical meeting and personal discussion. The target groups for the intervention included doctors and the nurses. Results: Altogether 435 patients during preintervention and 445 during postintervention were studied. The incidence of potential DDIs was 53% (preintervention and 41% (postintervention [chi-square =11.27, p=0.001]. The average number of drugs per patient was 8.53 (pre-intervention and 7.32 (post-intervention [t=3.493, p=0.001]. Sixty-four percent of the potential DDIs were of ‘Moderate’ type and 58% had a ‘Delayed’ onset in both the phases. Seventy percent of the potential DDIs during the pre-intervention phase and 61% during post-intervention phase had a ‘Good’ documentation status. Pharmacokinetic mechanism accounted for 45% of the potential DDIs during pre-intervention and 36% in the post-intervention phase. Cardiovascular drugs accounted for 36% of the potential DDIs during pre-intervention and 33.2% during post-intervention phase. Furosemide was the high risk drug responsible for DDIs in both phases. The most common potential DDIs observed were between amlodipine and atenolol (4.82% (preintervention and frusemide and aspirin (5.20% (postintervention. Conclusion: There was an association between potential DDIs and age, sex, and polypharmacy.

  17. Potential drug-drug interactions in pediatric wards of Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia:A cross sectional study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henok Getachew; Mohammed Assen; Feser Dula; Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, level of severity of potential drug–drug in-teractions (PDDIs) and the associated factors for PDDIs in hospitalized pediatric patients of Gondar University Hospital. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted for a period of 3 months from March to May 2014 in pediatric wards of Gondar University Hospital. Systematic random sampling technique was used to select charts from all pediatric patients' charts with every 7th interval to get sample size of 384. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to compute crude odds ratio and adjusted odds ratio respectively. Sta-tistical significance was set at P value Results: A total of 176 (45.8%) patients had at least one PDDI. A total of 393 PDDIs, which were comprised of 283 types of interacting combinations, were identified. Of the total of 393 PDDIs, most were of moderate severity [201 (51%)] followed by minor [152 (39%)] and major severity [40 (10%)]. The most common interacting pairs of major severity were gentamicin + furosemide (6), cotrimoxazole + methotrexate (4) and phenytoin + artemether (4). The occurrence of PDDIs was significantly associated with age and polypharmacy. Conclusions: The study showed that most of the interactions had moderate severity followed by minor severity. Age and polypharmacy were found to show statistically significant association with the occurrence of PDDIs. Due to sensitive nature of pediatrics population, close monitoring is recommended for the detection and management of PDDIs to prevent its negative consequences.

  18. A protocol for a randomized clinical trial of interactive video dance: potential for effects on cognitive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovancevic Jelena

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical exercise has the potential to affect cognitive function, but most evidence to date focuses on cognitive effects of fitness training. Cognitive exercise also may influence cognitive function, but many cognitive training paradigms have failed to provide carry-over to daily cognitive function. Video games provide a broader, more contextual approach to cognitive training that may induce cognitive gains and have carry over to daily function. Most video games do not involve physical exercise, but some novel forms of interactive video games combine physical activity and cognitive challenge. Methods/Design This paper describes a randomized clinical trial in 168 postmenopausal sedentary overweight women that compares an interactive video dance game with brisk walking and delayed entry controls. The primary endpoint is adherence to activity at six months. Additional endpoints include aspects of physical and mental health. We focus this report primarily on the rationale and plans for assessment of multiple cognitive functions. Discussion This randomized clinical trial may provide new information about the cognitive effects of interactive videodance. It is also the first trial to examine physical and cognitive effects in older women. Interactive video games may offer novel strategies to promote physical activity and health across the life span. The study is IRB approved and the number is: PRO08080012 ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01443455

  19. Formal aspects of the interaction of particles with infinite and semi-infinite periodic potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Estrada, R.F. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica); Villalon, M.E. (Division de Fisica de Radiaciones, Junta de Energia Nuclear, Madrid-3 (Spain))

    1978-01-11

    The dynamics and the scattering of quantum particles in infinite and semi-infinite periodic potentials are studied inside a unified and global framework. The particle wave function in the infinite and semi-infinite crystal and the energy for the infinite problem are given by related integral equations (written over a periodicity cell) of the Brillouin-Wigner type. All these equations are controlled mathematically and, in particular, the singular cases of a quasi-momentum crossing a Brillouin zone and an energy crossing the border of a gap, which are treated, respectively, in the infinite and semi-infinite problems.

  20. Mobilities and Interaction Potentials for the O(+)-He and O(-)-He Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-15

    potential for HeO’ : Simpson, Maclagan, and Har- The main restriction on Eqs. (I) and (2) is that the land report the whole V(r) curve, and Frenking e...and a more elaborate tit rule therefore holds to a very good approximation, al- by Lin and Bardsley7 using Monte Carlo simulation. Of all J. Chem. Phys...analyses are summarized in Table a Monte Carlo simulation and imposed the constraint that II. Given only the mobility data. it is impossible to deter- the

  1. Model of waterlike fluid under confinement for hydrophobic and hydrophilic particle-plate interaction potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krott, Leandro B; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations were employed to study a waterlike model confined between hydrophobic and hydrophilic plates. The phase behavior of this system is obtained for different distances between the plates and particle-plate potentials. For both hydrophobic and hydrophilic walls, there are the formation of layers. Crystallization occurs at lower temperature at the contact layer than at the middle layer. In addition, the melting temperature decreases as the plates become more hydrophobic. Similarly, the temperatures of maximum density and extremum diffusivity decrease with hydrophobicity.

  2. Structural transitions and long-time self-diffusion of interacting colloids confined by a parabolic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euán-Díaz, Edith C; Herrera-Velarde, Salvador; Misko, Vyacheslav R; Peeters, François M; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2015-01-14

    We report on the ordering and dynamics of interacting colloidal particles confined by a parabolic potential. By means of Brownian dynamics simulations, we find that by varying the magnitude of the trap stiffness, it is possible to control the dimension of the system and, thus, explore both the structural transitions and the long-time self-diffusion coefficient as a function of the degree of confinement. We particularly study the structural ordering in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the confinement. Further analysis of the local distribution of the first-neighbors layer allows us to identify the different structural phases induced by the parabolic potential. These results are summarized in a structural state diagram that describes the way in which the colloidal suspension undergoes a structural re-ordering while increasing the confinement. To fully understand the particle dynamics, we take into account hydrodynamic interactions between colloids; the parabolic potential constricts the available space for the colloids, but it does not act on the solvent. Our findings show a non-linear behavior of the long-time self-diffusion coefficient that is associated to the structural transitions induced by the external field.

  3. Syntrophic interactions improve power production in formic acid fed MFCs operated with set anode potentials or fixed resistances

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Dan

    2011-10-24

    Formic acid is a highly energetic electron donor but it has previously resulted in low power densities in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different set anode potentials (-0.30, -0.15, and +0.15V; vs. a standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) were used to evaluate syntrophic interactions in bacterial communities for formic acid degradation relative to a non-controlled, high resistance system (1,000Ω external resistance). No current was generated at -0.30V, suggesting a lack of direct formic acid oxidation (standard reduction potential: -0.40V). More positive potentials that allowed for acetic acid utilization all produced current, with the best performance at -0.15V. The anode community in the -0.15V reactor, based on 16S rDNA clone libraries, was 58% Geobacter sulfurreducens and 17% Acetobacterium, with lower proportions of these genera found in the other two MFCs. Acetic acid was detected in all MFCs suggesting that current generation by G. sulfurreducens was dependent on acetic acid production by Acetobacterium. When all MFCs were subsequently operated at an external resistance for maximum power production (100Ω for MFCs originally set at -0.15 and +0.15V; 150Ω for the control), they produced similar power densities and exhibited the same midpoint potential of -0.15V in first derivative cyclic voltammetry scans. All of the mixed communities converged to similar proportions of the two predominant genera (ca. 52% G. sulfurreducens and 22% Acetobacterium). These results show that syntrophic interactions can be enhanced through setting certain anode potentials, and that long-term performance produces stable and convergent communities. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. In vitro metabolism and drug-drug interaction potential of UTL-5g, a novel chemo- and radioprotective agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianmei; Shaw, Jiajiu; Dubaisi, Sarah; Valeriote, Frederick; Li, Jing

    2014-12-01

    N-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-1,2-oxazole-3-carboxamide (UTL-5g), a potential chemo- and radioprotective agent, acts as a prodrug requiring bioactivation to the active metabolite 5-methylisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid (ISOX). UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and 2,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) has been identified in porcine and rabbit liver esterases. The purpose of this study was to provide insights on the metabolism and drug interaction potential of UTL-5g in humans. The kinetics of UTL-5g hydrolysis was determined in human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant human carboxylesterases (hCE1b and hCE2). The potential of UTL-5g and its metabolites for competitive inhibition and time-dependent inhibition of microsomal cytochrome P450 (P450) was examined in HLM. UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and DCA in HLM were NADPH-independent, with a maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) of 11.1 nmol/min per mg and substrate affinity (Km) of 41.6 µM. Both hCE1b and hCE2 effectively catalyzed UTL-5g hydrolysis, but hCE2 exhibited ∼30-fold higher catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) than hCE1b. UTL-5g and DCA competitively inhibited microsomal CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19 (IC50 values 5g. Factors influencing carboxylesterase activities may have a significant impact on the pharmacological and therapeutic effects of UTL-5g. UTL-5g has the potential to inhibit P450-mediated metabolism through competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition. Caution is particularly needed for potential drug interactions involving competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2 in the future clinical development of UTL-5g.

  5. Protein-Ligand Binding Potential of Mean Force Calculations with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange on Alchemical Interaction Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Minh, David D L

    2015-01-01

    A binding potential of mean force (BPMF) is a free energy of noncovalent association in which one binding partner is flexible and the other is rigid. I have developed a method to calculate BPMFs for protein-ligand systems. The method is based on replica exchange sampling from multiple thermodynamic states at different temperatures and protein-ligand interaction strengths. Protein-ligand interactions are represented by interpolating precomputed electrostatic and van der Waals grids. Using a simple estimator for thermodynamic length, thermodynamic states are initialized at approximately equal intervals. The method is demonstrated on the Astex diverse set, a database of 85 protein-ligand complexes relevant to pharmacy or agriculture. Fifteen independent simulations of each complex were started using poses from crystallography, docking, or the lowest-energy pose observed in the other simulations. Benchmark simulations completed within three days on a single processor. Overall, protocols initialized using the ther...

  6. Alginate stabilized gold nanoparticle as multidrug carrier: Evaluation of cellular interactions and hemolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Soma; Sherly, M Caroline Diana; Rekha, M R; Sreenivasan, K

    2016-01-20

    This work delineates the synthesis of curcumin (Ccm) and methotrexate (MTX) conjugated biopolymer stabilized AuNPs (MP@Alg-Ccm AuNPs). The dual drug conjugated nano-vector was characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques. Hydrodynamic diameter and surface charge of the AuNPs were determined by DLS analysis and the spherical particles were visualized by TEM. MP@Alg-Ccm AuNPs exhibited improved cytotoxic potential against C6 glioma and MCF-7 cancer cell lines and was found to be highly hemocompatible. MP@Alg-Ccm AuNPs also exhibited active targeting efficiency against MCF-7 cancer cells due to the presence of "antifolate" drug MTX. Thus MP@Alg-Ccm AuNPs may find potential application in targeted combination chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer. The study is also interesting from the synthetic point of view because, here generation of AuNPs was done using "green chemical" alginate and dual drug conjugated AuNPs were created in two simple reaction steps using "green solvent" water.

  7. The role of internal waves in larval fish interactions with potential predators and prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Adam T.; Cowen, Robert K.; Guigand, Cedric M.; Hare, Jonathan A.; Tang, Dorothy

    2014-09-01

    Tidally driven internal wave packets in coastal environments have the potential to influence patchiness of larval fishes, prey, and gelatinous predators. We used the In Situ Ichthyoplankton Imaging System (ISIIS) to synoptically sample larval fishes, copepods, and planktonic predators (ctenophores, hydromedusae, chaetognaths, and polychaetes) across these predictable features in the summer near Stellwagen Bank, Massachusetts, USA. Full water column profiles and fixed depth transects (∼10 m depth) were used to quantify vertical and horizontal components of the fish and invertebrate distributions during stable and vertically mixed conditions associated with tidally generated internal waves. Larval fishes, consisting mostly of Urophycis spp., Merluccius bilinearis, and Labridae, were concentrated near the surface, with larger sizes generally occupying greater depths. During stable water column conditions, copepods formed a near surface thin layer several meters above the chlorophyll-a maximum that was absent when internal waves were propagating. In contrast, ctenophores and other predators were much more abundant at depth, but concentrations near 10 m increased immediately after the internal hydraulic jump mixed the water column. During the propagation of internal waves, the fine-scale abundance of larval fishes was more correlated with the abundance of gelatinous predators and less correlated with copepods compared to the stable conditions. Vertical oscillations caused by the internal hydraulic jump can disperse patches of zooplankton and force surface dwelling larval fishes into deeper water where probability of predator contact is increased, creating conditions potentially less favorable for larval fish growth and survival on short time scales.

  8. Potenciais interações medicamentosas em pacientes com artrite reumatoide Potential drug interactions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Bagatini

    2011-02-01

    risk of potential undesirable interactions between medications used for managing RA and those used for non-chronic diseases. METHODS: A cohort study was carried out with 103 RA patients registered at the Strategy of Access to Medications from the Brazilian Health Ministry, at the School of Pharmacy of the city of Florianópolis, state of Santa Catarina. Patients were monthly followed up by use of form completion. Drug interactions were identified by use of the Drugdex System - Thomson Micromedex® - Interactions database. RESULTS: Polypharmacy was found in 95.1% of the patients, and 19 potential undesirable interactions were observed between the drugs used by 74 patients (mean of 3.0 ± 1.2 interactions/patient. All potential interactions were related to methotrexate. Omeprazole was the major representative, accounting for 29.3% of the interactions, followed by diclofenac sodium (17.6%, and metamizole sodium (13.2%. CONCLUSION: Considering that this study confirms that polypharmacy is a common therapeutic practice in RA patients, it is worth emphasizing the need for greater surveillance regarding the adverse effects or effectiveness reduction of certain drugs due to drug interaction

  9. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists such as ...... also key figures in the philosophical discussions of nature and science - from philosophical tendencies like logical empiricism via critical rationalism to various neo-Kantian trends....

  10. Adaptation of hybrid human-computer interaction systems using EEG error-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Biasiucci, Andrea; Forster, Killian; Roggen, Daniel; Troster, Gerhard; Millan, Jose Del R

    2010-01-01

    Performance improvement in both humans and artificial systems strongly relies in the ability of recognizing erroneous behavior or decisions. This paper, that builds upon previous studies on EEG error-related signals, presents a hybrid approach for human computer interaction that uses human gestures to send commands to a computer and exploits brain activity to provide implicit feedback about the recognition of such commands. Using a simple computer game as a case study, we show that EEG activity evoked by erroneous gesture recognition can be classified in single trials above random levels. Automatic artifact rejection techniques are used, taking into account that subjects are allowed to move during the experiment. Moreover, we present a simple adaptation mechanism that uses the EEG signal to label newly acquired samples and can be used to re-calibrate the gesture recognition system in a supervised manner. Offline analysis show that, although the achieved EEG decoding accuracy is far from being perfect, these signals convey sufficient information to significantly improve the overall system performance.

  11. Trophic mechanisms for exercise-induced stress resilience: Potential role of interactions between BDNF and galanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip V Holmes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Current concepts of the neurobiology of stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression emphasize disruptions in neural plasticity and neurotrophins. The potent trophic actions of exercise therefore represent not only an effective means for prevention and treatment of these disorders, they also afford the opportunity to employ exercise paradigms as a basic research tool to uncover the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these disorders. Novel approaches to studying stress-related disorders focus increasingly on trophic factor signaling in corticolimbic circuits that both mediate and regulate cognitive, behavioral, and physiological responses to deleterious stress. Recent evidence demonstrates that the neural plasticity supported by these trophic mechanisms is vital for establishing and maintaining resilience to stress. Therapeutic interventions that promote these mechanisms, be they pharmacological, behavioral, or environmental, may therefore prevent or reverse stress-related mental illness by enhancing resilience. The present paper will provide an overview of trophic mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of resilience by voluntary exercise with an emphasis on BDNF, galanin, and interactions between these two trophic factors.

  12. Wave turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential

    CERN Document Server

    Gallet, Basile; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-01-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave Turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well-suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wavenumber, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bo...

  13. Strange Stars with Realistic Quark Vector Interaction and Phenomenological Density-dependent Scalar Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, M; Dey, J; Ray, S; Samanta, B C; Dey, Mira; Bombaci, Ignazio; Dey, Jishnu; Ray, Subharthi

    1998-01-01

    We derive an equation of state (EOS) for strange matter, starting from an interquark potential which (i) has asymptotic freedom built into it, (ii) shows confinement at zero density ($\\rho_B = 0$) and deconfinement at high $\\rho_B$, and (iii) gives a stable configuration for chargeless, $\\beta$-stable quark matter. This EOS is then used to calculate the structure of Strange Stars, and in particular their mass-radius relation. Our present results confirm and reinforce the recent claim\\cite{li,b} that the compact objects associated with the x-ray pulsar Her X-1, and with the x-ray burster 4U 1820-30 are strange stars.

  14. Phage-Host Interactions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the Potential for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb

    , the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance has led to increased attention to the use of phages for controlling F. psychrophilum infections in aquaculture. In a synopsis and four scientific papers, this PhD project studies the potential and optimizes the use of phage therapy for treatment and prevention...... of F. psychrophilum infections in rainbow trout fry. In the first paper, studies of the controlling effect of different phages infecting F. psychrophilum in liquid cultures showed that a high initial phage concentration was crucial for fast and effective bacterial lysis in the cultures and sensitive...... cells could be maintained at a low level throughout the rest of the experiment. Surprisingly, no difference was observed between infection with single phages or phage cocktails. At the end of incubation phage-sensitive strains dominated in the cultures with low initial phage concentrations and phage...

  15. Angle-Dependent Ionization of Small Molecules by Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction and an Absorbing Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2015-06-04

    The angle-dependence of strong field ionization of O2, N2, CO2, and CH2O has been studied theoretically using a time-dependent configuration interaction approach with a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). Calculation of the ionization yields as a function of the direction of polarization of the laser pulse produces three-dimensional surfaces of the angle-dependent ionization probability. These three-dimensional shapes and their variation with laser intensity can be interpreted in terms of ionization from the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lower lying orbitals, and the Dyson orbitals for the ground and excited states of the cations.

  16. Role of Structure and Entropy in Determining Differences in Dynamics for Glass Formers with Different Interaction Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Atreyee; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth; Bhattacharyya, Sarika Maitra

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of two model liquids with different interaction potentials, exhibiting similar structure but significantly different dynamics at low temperatures. By evaluating the configurational entropy, we show that the differences in the dynamics of these systems can be understood in terms of their thermodynamic differences. Analyzing their structure, we demonstrate that differences in pair correlation functions between the two systems, through their contribution to the entropy, dominate the differences in their dynamics, and indeed overestimate the differences. Including the contribution of higher order structural correlations to the entropy leads to smaller estimates for the relaxation times, as well as smaller differences between the two studied systems.

  17. Helmholtz free energy and equation of state of an fcc crystal with the interaction of hard sphere Yukawa potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moradi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available  The Helmholtz free energy and equation of the state of an fcc crystal are calculated, where the interaction between the molecules is hard sphere-Yukawa potential. Here the perturbational density functional method is used. This method is introduced by Ebner and co-workers. In this method the density functional Taylor expansion is applied for the crystal configuration up to second order. And for the uniform parts an exact expression is used. The results are compared with those obtained by Monte Carlo computer simulation. The agreement is good.

  18. Seaweed-coral interactions: variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential effects on coral resilience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta M Bonaldo

    Full Text Available Tropical reefs are in global decline with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. Negative associations between macroalgae and corals are well documented, but the mechanisms involved, the dynamics of the interactions, and variance in effects of different macroalgal-coral pairings are poorly investigated. We assessed the frequency, magnitude, and dynamics of macroalgal-coral competition involving allelopathic and non-allelopathic macroalgae on three, spatially grouped pairs of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs and non-MPAs in Fiji. In non-MPAs, biomass of herbivorous fishes was 70-80% lower, macroalgal cover 4-9 fold higher, macroalgal-coral contacts 5-15 fold more frequent and 23-67 fold more extensive (measured as % of colony margin contacted by macroalgae, and coral cover 51-68% lower than in MPAs. Coral contacts with allelopathic macroalgae occurred less frequently than expected by chance across all sites, while contact with non-allelopathic macroalgae tended to occur more frequently than expected. Transplants of allelopathic macroalgae (Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Galaxaura filamentosa against coral edges inflicted damage to Acropora aspera and Pocillopora damicornis more rapidly and extensively than to Porites cylindrica and Porites lobata, which appeared more resistant to these macroalgae. Montipora digitata experienced intermediate damage. Extent of damage from macroalgal contact was independent of coral colony size for each of the 10 macroalgal-coral pairings we established. When natural contacts with Galaxaura filamentosa were removed in the field, recovery was rapid for Porites lobata, but Pocillopora damicornis did not recover and damage continued to expand. As macroalgae increase on overfished tropical reefs, allelopathy could produce feedbacks that suppress coral resilience, prevent coral recovery, and promote the stability of algal beds in habitats previously available to corals.

  19. Seaweed-coral interactions: variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential effects on coral resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldo, Roberta M; Hay, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Tropical reefs are in global decline with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. Negative associations between macroalgae and corals are well documented, but the mechanisms involved, the dynamics of the interactions, and variance in effects of different macroalgal-coral pairings are poorly investigated. We assessed the frequency, magnitude, and dynamics of macroalgal-coral competition involving allelopathic and non-allelopathic macroalgae on three, spatially grouped pairs of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and non-MPAs in Fiji. In non-MPAs, biomass of herbivorous fishes was 70-80% lower, macroalgal cover 4-9 fold higher, macroalgal-coral contacts 5-15 fold more frequent and 23-67 fold more extensive (measured as % of colony margin contacted by macroalgae), and coral cover 51-68% lower than in MPAs. Coral contacts with allelopathic macroalgae occurred less frequently than expected by chance across all sites, while contact with non-allelopathic macroalgae tended to occur more frequently than expected. Transplants of allelopathic macroalgae (Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Galaxaura filamentosa) against coral edges inflicted damage to Acropora aspera and Pocillopora damicornis more rapidly and extensively than to Porites cylindrica and Porites lobata, which appeared more resistant to these macroalgae. Montipora digitata experienced intermediate damage. Extent of damage from macroalgal contact was independent of coral colony size for each of the 10 macroalgal-coral pairings we established. When natural contacts with Galaxaura filamentosa were removed in the field, recovery was rapid for Porites lobata, but Pocillopora damicornis did not recover and damage continued to expand. As macroalgae increase on overfished tropical reefs, allelopathy could produce feedbacks that suppress coral resilience, prevent coral recovery, and promote the stability of algal beds in habitats previously available to corals.

  20. Smart RISUG: A potential new contraceptive and its magnetic field-mediated sperm interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi K Jha

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Rakhi K Jha1,2, Pradeep K Jha1,3, Sujoy K Guha11School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India; 2Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, ChCS University, Meerut, UP, India; 3Department of Management studies, VIET, UP Tech. Univ., Lucknow, UP, IndiaAbstract: The rationale and technique underlying a novel concept of noninvasive fertility control by a new Cuproferrogel contraceptive drug, iron oxide–copper–styrene maleic anhydride–dimethyl sulphoxide (Fe3O4–Cu–SMA–DMSO composite named ‘Smart RISUG’ (smart reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance in presence of pulsed magnetic field (PMF; 1 mT to 800 mT is explained. It was synthesized by dispersing iron oxide particles and copper particles into SMA-DMSO (male contraceptive RISUG and characterized for particle distribution, particle size measurement and transmittance peaks, etc. Interaction of the RISUG particles as well as Smart RISUG particles with Albino rat sperm cell was studied in presence as well as absence of PMF. To find an explanation to increased reaching of the Smart RISUG drug into sperm under influence of magnetic field, the transport properties were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Smart RISUG could be mobilized into sperm cell membrane at the PMF, 760 mT in about 50 seconds. Adoption of novel drug Smart RISUG involving new technique may open the pathway for non surgical control of drug distribution, detection and restoration of the normal fertility after removal of the contraceptive from the male/female reproductive tube in presence of electromagnetic field.Keywords: smart RISUG, pulsed magnetic field, noninvasive fertility control, drug distribution, sperm cell

  1. Addition theorems for Slater-type orbitals and their application to multicenter multielectron integrals of central and noncentral interaction potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseinov, Israfil

    2003-06-01

    By the use of complete orthonormal sets of psi(alpha)-ETOs (alpha=1, 0, m1, m2,...) introduced by the author, new addition theorems are derived for STOs and arbitrary central and noncentral interaction potentials (CIPs and NCIPs). The expansion coefficients in these addition theorems are expressed through the Gaunt and Gegenbauer coefficients. Using the addition theorems obtained for STOs and potentials, general formulae in terms of three-center overlap integrals are established for the multicenter t-electron integrals of CIPs and NCIPs that arise in the solution of the N-electron atomic and molecular problem (2hthN) when a Hylleraas approximation in Hartree-Fock-Roothaan theory is employed. With the help of expansion formulae for translation of STOs, the three-center overlap integrals are expressed through the two-center overlap integrals. The formulae obtained are valid for arbitrary quantum numbers, screening constants and location of orbitals.

  2. Relativistic symmetries with the trigonometric P(o)schl-Teller potential plus Coulomb-like tensor interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Babatunde J.Falaye; Sameer M.Ikhdair

    2013-01-01

    The Dirac equation is solved to obtain its approximate bound states for a spin-1/2 particle in the presence of trigonometric P(o)schl-Teller (tPT) potential including a Coulomb-like tensor interaction with arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number κ using an approximation scheme to substitute the centrifugal terms κ(κ ± 1)r-2.In view of spin and pseudo-spin (p-spin) symmetries,the relativistic energy eigenvalues and the corresponding two-component wave functions of a particle moving in the field of attractive and repulsive tPT potentials are obtained using the asymptotic iteration method (AIM).We present numerical results in the absence and presence of tensor coupling A and for various values of spin and p-spin constants and quantum numbers n and κ.The non-relativistic limit is also obtained.

  3. Systems integration of biodefense omics data for analysis of pathogen-host interactions and identification of potential targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B McGarvey

    Full Text Available The NIAID (National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases Biodefense Proteomics program aims to identify targets for potential vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics for agents of concern in bioterrorism, including bacterial, parasitic, and viral pathogens. The program includes seven Proteomics Research Centers, generating diverse types of pathogen-host data, including mass spectrometry, microarray transcriptional profiles, protein interactions, protein structures and biological reagents. The Biodefense Resource Center (www.proteomicsresource.org has developed a bioinformatics framework, employing a protein-centric approach to integrate and support mining and analysis of the large and heterogeneous data. Underlying this approach is a data warehouse with comprehensive protein + gene identifier and name mappings and annotations extracted from over 100 molecular databases. Value-added annotations are provided for key proteins from experimental findings using controlled vocabulary. The availability of pathogen and host omics data in an integrated framework allows global analysis of the data and comparisons across different experiments and organisms, as illustrated in several case studies presented here. (1 The identification of a hypothetical protein with differential gene and protein expressions in two host systems (mouse macrophage and human HeLa cells infected by different bacterial (Bacillus anthracis and Salmonella typhimurium and viral (orthopox pathogens suggesting that this protein can be prioritized for additional analysis and functional characterization. (2 The analysis of a vaccinia-human protein interaction network supplemented with protein accumulation levels led to the identification of human Keratin, type II cytoskeletal 4 protein as a potential therapeutic target. (3 Comparison of complete genomes from pathogenic variants coupled with experimental information on complete proteomes allowed the identification and

  4. Interactive role of trauma cytokines and erythropoietin and their therapeutic potential for acute and chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Augustinus; Lorenz, Katrin; Richter, Anja; Scheffler, Katja; Kern, Larissa; Ebert, Sabine; Giri, Shibashish; Behrens, Maria; Dornseifer, Ulf; Macchiarini, Paolo; Machens, Hans-Günther

    2011-02-01

    If controllable, stem cell activation following injury has the therapeutic potential for supporting regeneration in acute or chronic wounds. Human dermally-derived stem cells (FmSCs) were exposed to the cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the presence of erythropoietin (EPO). Cells were cultured under ischemic conditions and phenotypically characterized using flow cytometry. Topical EPO application was performed in three independent clinical wound healing attempts. The FmSCs expressed the receptor for EPO. EPO had a strong inhibitory effect on FmSC growth in the absence of IL-6 and TNF-α. With IL-6, the EPO effects were reversed to that of growth stimulation. TNF-α had the strongest stimulatory effect. In contrast, IL-1β had an inhibitory effect. Topically applied EPO considerably enhanced wound healing and improved wound conditions of acute and chronic wounds. Site specificity of stem cell activation is mediated by IL-6 and TNF-α. In trauma, EPO ceases its inhibitory role and reverts to a clinically relevant boosting function. EPO may be an important therapeutic tool for the topical treatment of acute and chronic wounds.

  5. Interaction of Ulocladium atrum, a Potential Biological Control Agent, with Botrytis cinerea and Grapevine Plantlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ronseaux

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of biological control agent, Ulocladium atrum (isolates U13 and U16 in protecting Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay against gray mold disease caused by Botrytis cinerea, and simulation of the foliar defense responses was investigated. A degraded mycelium structure during cultural assay on potato dextrose agar revealed that U. atrum isolates U13 and U16 were both antagonistic to B. cinerea, mainly when isolates were inoculated two days before Botrytis. Under in vitro conditions, foliar application of U. atrum protected grapevine leaves against gray mold disease. An increase in chitinase activity was induced by the presence of U. atrum isolates indicating that the biological control agents triggered plant defense mechanisms. Moreover, U13 has the potential to colonize the grapevine plantlets and to improve their growth. The ability of U. atrum isolates to exhibit an antagonistic effect against B. cinerea in addition to their aptitude to induce plant resistance and to promote grapevine growth may explain a part of their biological activity. Hence, this study suggests that U. atrum provides a suitable biocontrol agent against gray mold in grapevines.

  6. Interactions between mood and the structure of semantic memory: event-related potentials evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ana P; del Re, Elisabetta; Nestor, Paul G; McCarley, Robert W; Gonçalves, Óscar F; Niznikiewicz, Margaret

    2013-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that affect acts as modulator of cognitive processes and in particular that induced mood has an effect on the way semantic memory is used on-line. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine affective modulation of semantic information processing under three different moods: neutral, positive and negative. Fifteen subjects read 324 pairs of sentences, after mood induction procedure with 30 pictures of neutral, 30 pictures of positive and 30 pictures of neutral valence: 108 sentences were read in each mood induction condition. Sentences ended with three word types: expected words, within-category violations, and between-category violations. N400 amplitude was measured to the three word types under each mood induction condition. Under neutral mood, a congruency (more negative N400 amplitude for unexpected relative to expected endings) and a category effect (more negative N400 amplitude for between- than to within-category violations) were observed. Also, results showed differences in N400 amplitude for both within- and between-category violations as a function of mood: while positive mood tended to facilitate the integration of unexpected but related items, negative mood made their integration as difficult as unexpected and unrelated items. These findings suggest the differential impact of mood on access to long-term semantic memory during sentence comprehension.

  7. National Geothermal Data System: Interactive Assessment of Geothermal Energy Potential in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Lee [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Richard, Stephen [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Clark, Ryan; Patten, Kim; Love, Diane; Coleman, Celia; Chen, Genhan; Matti, Jordan; Pape, Estelle; Musil, Leah

    2012-01-30

    Geothermal-relevant geosciences data from all 50 states (www.stategeothermaldata.org), federal agencies, national labs, and academic centers are being digitized and linked in a distributed online network via the U.S. Department of Energy-funded National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) to foster geothermal energy exploration and development through use of interactive online ‘mashups,’data integration, and applications. Emphasis is first to make as much information as possible accessible online, with a long range goal to make data interoperable through standardized services and interchange formats. An initial set of thirty geoscience data content models is in use or under development to define a standardized interchange format: aqueous chemistry, borehole temperature data, direct use feature, drill stem test, earthquake hypocenter, fault feature, geologic contact feature, geologic unit feature, thermal/hot spring description, metadata, quaternary fault, volcanic vent description, well header feature, borehole lithology log, crustal stress, gravity, heat flow/temperature gradient, permeability, and feature descriptions data like developed geothermal systems, geologic unit geothermal properties, permeability, production data, rock alteration description, rock chemistry, and thermal conductivity. Map services are also being developed for isopach maps, aquifer temperature maps, and several states are working on geothermal resource overview maps. Content models are developed preferentially from existing community use in order to encourage widespread adoption and promulgate minimum metadata quality standards. Geoscience data and maps from other NGDS participating institutions, or “nodes” (USGS, Southern Methodist University, Boise State University Geothermal Data Coalition) are being supplemented with extensive land management and land use resources from the Western Regional Partnership (15 federal agencies and 5 Western states) to provide access to a comprehensive

  8. Alphacoronaviruses in New World bats: prevalence, persistence, phylogeny, and potential for interaction with humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Osborne

    Full Text Available Bats are reservoirs for many different coronaviruses (CoVs as well as many other important zoonotic viruses. We sampled feces and/or anal swabs of 1,044 insectivorous bats of 2 families and 17 species from 21 different locations within Colorado from 2007 to 2009. We detected alphacoronavirus RNA in bats of 4 species: big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus, 10% prevalence; long-legged bats (Myotis volans, 8% prevalence; little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus, 3% prevalence; and western long-eared bats (Myotis evotis, 2% prevalence. Overall, juvenile bats were twice as likely to be positive for CoV RNA as adult bats. At two of the rural sampling sites, CoV RNAs were detected in big brown and long-legged bats during the three sequential summers of this study. CoV RNA was detected in big brown bats in all five of the urban maternity roosts sampled throughout each of the periods tested. Individually tagged big brown bats that were positive for CoV RNA and later sampled again all became CoV RNA negative. Nucleotide sequences in the RdRp gene fell into 3 main clusters, all distinct from those of Old World bats. Similar nucleotide sequences were found in amplicons from gene 1b and the spike gene in both a big-brown and a long-legged bat, indicating that a CoV may be capable of infecting bats of different genera. These data suggest that ongoing evolution of CoVs in bats creates the possibility of a continued threat for emergence into hosts of other species. Alphacoronavirus RNA was detected at a high prevalence in big brown bats in roosts in close proximity to human habitations (10% and known to have direct contact with people (19%, suggesting that significant potential opportunities exist for cross-species transmission of these viruses. Further CoV surveillance studies in bats throughout the Americas are warranted.

  9. Alphacoronaviruses in New World Bats: Prevalence, Persistence, Phylogeny, and Potential for Interaction with Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Christina; Cryan, Paul M.; O'Shea, Thomas J.; Oko, Lauren M.; Ndaluka, Christina; Calisher, Charles H.; Berglund, Andrew D.; Klavetter, Mead L.; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Dominguez, Samuel R.; Montgomery, Joel Mark

    2011-01-01

    Bats are reservoirs for many different coronaviruses (CoVs) as well as many other important zoonotic viruses. We sampled feces and/or anal swabs of 1,044 insectivorous bats of 2 families and 17 species from 21 different locations within Colorado from 2007 to 2009. We detected alphacoronavirus RNA in bats of 4 species: big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), 10% prevalence; long-legged bats (Myotis volans), 8% prevalence; little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), 3% prevalence; and western long-eared bats (Myotis evotis), 2% prevalence. Overall, juvenile bats were twice as likely to be positive for CoV RNA as adult bats. At two of the rural sampling sites, CoV RNAs were detected in big brown and long-legged bats during the three sequential summers of this study. CoV RNA was detected in big brown bats in all five of the urban maternity roosts sampled throughout each of the periods tested. Individually tagged big brown bats that were positive for CoV RNA and later sampled again all became CoV RNA negative. Nucleotide sequences in the RdRp gene fell into 3 main clusters, all distinct from those of Old World bats. Similar nucleotide sequences were found in amplicons from gene 1b and the spike gene in both a big-brown and a long-legged bat, indicating that a CoV may be capable of infecting bats of different genera. These data suggest that ongoing evolution of CoVs in bats creates the possibility of a continued threat for emergence into hosts of other species. Alphacoronavirus RNA was detected at a high prevalence in big brown bats in roosts in close proximity to human habitations (10%) and known to have direct contact with people (19%), suggesting that significant potential opportunities exist for cross-species transmission of these viruses. Further CoV surveillance studies in bats throughout the Americas are warranted.

  10. Potential of water-washing of rape straw on thermal properties and interactions during co-combustion with bituminous coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiulin; Han, Lujia; Huang, Guangqun

    2017-03-07

    The aim of this work was to study the thermal properties and interactions during co-combustion of rape straw (RS) before and after water-washing with bituminous coal. A series of experiments was conducted to investigate the properties and interactions during co-combustion of RS with bituminous coal (at 10, 20, 40 and 60% RS). The feasibility and potential of water-washing as an RS pre-treatment was also explored. Reactivity and the amount of heat released followed a quadratic trend, while changes to the degree of interactions between the fuels conformed to a cosine curve. Water-washing increased the ignition and burn-out temperatures and slightly decreased reactivity. Demineralization negatively affected the previously synergistic co-firing relationship, nevertheless, the amount of heat released increased by 10.28% and the average activation energy (146kJ/mol) was lower than that of the unwashed blend (186kJ/mol). Overall, water-washing of RS could prove a useful pre-treatment before co-combustion with bituminous coal.

  11. Effective mass in bilayer graphene at low carrier densities: The role of potential disorder and electron-electron interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Tan, L. Z.; Zou, K.; Stabile, A. A.; Seiwell, D. J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Louie, Steven G.; Zhu, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a two-dimensional electron gas, the electron-electron interaction generally becomes stronger at lower carrier densities and renormalizes the Fermi-liquid parameters, such as the effective mass of carriers. We combine experiment and theory to study the effective masses of electrons and holes me* and mh* in bilayer graphene in the low carrier density regime on the order of 1 ×1011c m-2 . Measurements use temperature-dependent low-field Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations observed in high-mobility hexagonal boron nitride supported samples. We find that while me* follows a tight-binding description in the whole density range, mh* starts to drop rapidly below the tight-binding description at a carrier density of n =6 ×1011c m-2 and exhibits a strong suppression of 30% when n reaches 2 ×1011c m-2 . Contributions from the electron-electron interaction alone, evaluated using several different approximations, cannot explain the experimental trend. Instead, the effect of the potential fluctuation and the resulting electron-hole puddles play a crucial role. Calculations including both the electron-electron interaction and disorder effects explain the experimental data qualitatively and quantitatively. This Rapid Communication reveals an unusual disorder effect unique to two-dimensional semimetallic systems.

  12. Potential drug-drug interactions in medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohammad; Khan, Farmanullah; Noor, Sidra; Haider, Iqbal; Haq, Inam-Ul; Ali, Zahid; Shah, Zahir; Hassam, Mohsin

    2016-10-01

    Background Patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) present with severe and life-threatening illnesses. Most of them suffer from various comorbidities. They usually receive complex pharmacotherapy with large number of medicines which increase the risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Objective The present report aimed to investigate prevalence and levels of potential DDIs (pDDIs) in medical ICU. Methods Medications profiles of 416 patients were checked for pDDIs using Micromedex Drug-Reax(®). Prevalence, levels of severity and levels of documentation were reported. Results Of total 416 patients, 310 were exposed to pDDIs (overall prevalence = 74.5 %). Likewise, a prevalence rate of 13.9 % was recorded for contraindicated pDDIs, 52.2 % for major pDDI and 58.4 % for moderate pDDI. This study reported 740 interacting drug pairs that were presented in total 1686 pDDIs. Of 1686 pDDIs, 4.3 % were of contraindicated severity, 33.8 % of major severity and 49.6 % of moderate severity, whereas 45.5 % were of fair scientific evidence and 41.4 % of good scientific evidence. Conclusion In this study, pDDIs were found highly prevalent in ICU patients at a rate of 74.5 %. Most of the pDDIs had moderate severity; however, substantial number of interactions (38.1 %) had major and contraindicated severity.

  13. Restricted mobility of side chains on concave surfaces of solenoid proteins may impart heightened potential for intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, L; Gautham, N; Chaloin, Laurent; Kajava, Andrey V

    2015-09-01

    Significant progress has been made in the determination of the protein structures with their number today passing over a hundred thousand structures. The next challenge is the understanding and prediction of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. In this work we address this problem by analyzing curved solenoid proteins. Many of these proteins are considered as "hub molecules" for their high potential to interact with many different molecules and to be a scaffold for multisubunit protein machineries. Our analysis of these structures through molecular dynamics simulations reveals that the mobility of the side-chains on the concave surfaces of the solenoids is lower than on the convex ones. This result provides an explanation to the observed preferential binding of the ligands, including small and flexible ligands, to the concave surface of the curved solenoid proteins. The relationship between the landscapes and dynamic properties of the protein surfaces can be further generalized to the other types of protein structures and eventually used in the computer algorithms, allowing prediction of protein-ligand interactions by analysis of protein surfaces.

  14. A potential molecular model for studying apoptosis enhanced by the interaction of BCL-G with JAB1 in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pengfei; Wang, Xingye; Chen, Xiaolin; Wang, Yaping; Kang, Zhanzhan; Wang, Jingna; Zhang, Deli

    2016-09-27

    BCL-G, an apoptotic factor in Bcl-2 family, is involved in several kinds of diseases by interacting with several proteins. Although many studies on mouse and human BCL-G have been reported, porcine BCL-G (pBCL-G) has been little investigated. In this study, our results showed that pBCL-G was universally expressed in porcine tissues. The BH2 domain affected the subcellular distribution of pBCL-G protein. pBCL-G could interact with porcine JAB1 (pJAB1), by which its subcellular distribution was affected. pBCL-G promoted staurosporine-induced apoptosis that was significantly enhanced by interaction of pBCL-G with pJAB1. The apoptosis at least partially depended on the activated caspase-8, -9 and -3. Owing to the close phylogenetic distance between pigs and humans and their many physiological similarities, our findings may provide a potential molecular model to study human BCL-G and also may have implications in the treatment of diseases relevant with BCL-G.

  15. Prioritization of potential candidate disease genes by topological similarity of protein-protein interaction network and phenotype data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiawei; Liang, Shiyu

    2015-02-01

    Identifying candidate disease genes is important to improve medical care. However, this task is challenging in the post-genomic era. Several computational approaches have been proposed to prioritize potential candidate genes relying on protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. However, the experimental PPI network is usually liable to contain a number of spurious interactions. In this paper, we construct a reliable heterogeneous network by fusing multiple networks, a PPI network reconstructed by topological similarity, a phenotype similarity network and known associations between diseases and genes. We then devise a random walk-based algorithm on the reliable heterogeneous network called RWRHN to prioritize potential candidate genes for inherited diseases. The results of leave-one-out cross-validation experiments show that the RWRHN algorithm has better performance than the RWRH and CIPHER methods in inferring disease genes. Furthermore, RWRHN is used to predict novel causal genes for 16 diseases, including breast cancer, diabetes mellitus type 2, and prostate cancer, as well as to detect disease-related protein complexes. The top predictions are supported by literature evidence.

  16. Conjugation of cholesterol to HIV-1 fusion inhibitor C34 increases peptide-membrane interactions potentiating its action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Hollmann

    Full Text Available Recently, the covalent binding of a cholesterol moiety to a classical HIV-1 fusion inhibitor peptide, C34, was shown to potentiate its antiviral activity. Our purpose was to evaluate the interaction of cholesterol-conjugated and native C34 with membrane model systems and human blood cells to understand the effects of this derivatization. Lipid vesicles and monolayers with defined compositions were used as model membranes. C34-cholesterol partitions more to fluid phase membranes that mimic biological membranes. Importantly, there is a preference of the conjugate for liquid ordered membranes, rich in cholesterol and/or sphingomyelin, as observed both from partition and surface pressure studies. In human erythrocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, C34-cholesterol significantly decreases the membrane dipole potential. In PBMC, the conjugate was 14- and 115-fold more membranotropic than T-1249 and enfuvirtide, respectively. C34 or cholesterol alone did not show significant membrane activity. The enhanced interaction of C34-cholesterol with biological membranes correlates with its higher antiviral potency. Higher partitions for lipid-raft like compositions direct the drug to the receptor-rich domains where membrane fusion is likely to occur. This intermediary membrane binding step may facilitate the drug delivery to gp41 in its pre-fusion state.

  17. Effects of adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics interactions on the pair potential and thermophysical properties of helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencek, Wojciech; Przybytek, Michał; Komasa, Jacek; Mehl, James B; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2012-06-14

    The adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics (QED) contributions to the pair potential of helium were computed, fitted separately, and applied, together with the nonrelativistic Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential, in calculations of thermophysical properties of helium and of the properties of the helium dimer. An analysis of the convergence patterns of the calculations with increasing basis set sizes allowed us to estimate the uncertainties of the total interaction energy to be below 50 ppm for interatomic separations R smaller than 4 bohrs and for the distance R = 5.6 bohrs. For other separations, the relative uncertainties are up to an order of magnitude larger (and obviously still larger near R = 4.8 bohrs where the potential crosses zero) and are dominated by the uncertainties of the nonrelativistic BO component. These estimates also include the contributions from the neglected relativistic and QED terms proportional to the fourth and higher powers of the fine-structure constant α. To obtain such high accuracy, it was necessary to employ explicitly correlated Gaussian expansions containing up to 2400 terms for smaller R (all R in the case of a QED component) and optimized orbital bases up to the cardinal number X = 7 for larger R. Near-exact asymptotic constants were used to describe the large-R behavior of all components. The fitted potential, exhibiting the minimum of -10.996 ± 0.004 K at R = 5.608 0 ± 0.000 1 bohr, was used to determine properties of the very weakly bound (4)He(2) dimer and thermophysical properties of gaseous helium. It is shown that the Casimir-Polder retardation effect, increasing the dimer size by about 2 Å relative to the nonrelativistic BO value, is almost completely accounted for by the inclusion of the Breit-interaction and the Araki-Sucher contributions to the potential, of the order α(2) and α(3), respectively. The remaining retardation effect, of the order of α(4) and higher, is practically negligible for the bound

  18. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials: exploring the interactions with Caco-2 cells for potential oral drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyuco JC

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Jurja C Coyuco, Yuanjie Liu, Bee-Jen Tan, Gigi NC ChiuDepartment of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, SingaporeAbstract: Although carbon nanomaterials (CNMs have been increasingly studied for their biomedical applications, there is limited research on these novel materials for oral drug delivery. As such, this study aimed to explore the potential of CNMs in oral drug delivery, and the objectives were to evaluate CNM cytotoxicity and their abilities to modulate paracellular transport and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp efflux pump. Three types of functionalized CNMs were studied, including polyhydroxy small-gap fullerenes (OH-fullerenes, carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT-COOH and poly(ethylene glycol functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT-PEG, using the well-established Caco-2 cell monolayer to represent the intestinal epithelium. All three CNMs had minimum cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cells, as demonstrated through lactose dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. Of the three CNMs, fSWCNT-COOH significantly reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced transport of Lucifer Yellow across the Caco-2 monolayer. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fSWCNT-COOH treated cells had the highest perturbation in the distribution of ZO-1, a protein marker of tight junction, suggesting that fSWCNT-COOH could enhance paracellular permeability via disruption of tight junctions. This modulating effect of fSWCNT-COOH can be reversed over time. Furthermore, cellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate, rhodamine-123, was significantly increased in cells treated with fSWCNT-COOH, suggestive of P-gp inhibition. Of note, fSWCNT-PEG could increase rhodamine-123 accumulation without modifying the tight junction. Collectively, these results suggest that the functionalized CNMs could be useful as modulators for oral drug

  19. Incidence of potential drug interactions in a transplant centre setting and relevance of electronic alerts for clinical practice support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Polidori

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Adverse drug events may occur as a result of drug–drug interactions (DDIs. Information technology (IT systems can be an important decision-making tool for healthcare workers to identify DDIs.Objective The aim of the study is to analyse drug prescriptions in our main hospital units, in order to measure the incidence and severity of potential DDIs. The utility of clinical decision-support systems (CDSSs and computerised physician order entry (CPOE in term of alerts adherence was also assessed. DDIs were assessed using a Micromedex healthcare series database.Methods The system, adopted by the hospital, generates alerts for prescriptions with negative interactions and thanks to an ’acknowledgement function’ it is possible to verify physician adherence to alerts. This function, although used previously, became mandatory from September 2010. Physician adherence to alerts and mean monthly incidence of potential DDIs in analysed units, before and after the mandatory ‘acknowledgement function’, were calculated.Results The intensive care unit (ICU registered the greatest incidence of potential DDIs (49.0%, followed by the abdominal surgery unit and dialysis (43.4 and 42.0%, respectively. The cardiothoracic surgery unit (41.6%, step-down unit (38.3% and post-anaesthesia care unit (30.0% were comparable. The operating theatre and endoscopy registered the fewest potential DDIs (28.2 and 22.7%, respectively. Adherence to alerts after the ‘acknowledgement function’ increased by 25.0% in the ICU, 54.0% in the cardiothoracic surgery unit, 52.5% in the abdominal surgery unit, 58.0% in the stepdown unit, 67.0% in dialysis, 51.0% in endoscopy and 48.0% in the post-anaesthesia care unit. In the operating theatre, adherence to alerts decreased from 34.0 to 30.0%. The incidence of potential DDIs after mandatory use of the ’acknowledgement function’ decreased slightly in endoscopy (–2.9%, the abdominal surgery unit (–2.7%, dialysis (

  20. Thermal and transport properties of a non-relativistic quantum gas interacting through a delta-shell potential

    CERN Document Server

    Postnikov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This work extends the seminal work of Gottfried on the two-body quantum physics of particles interacting through a delta-shell potential to many-body physics by studying a system of non-relativistic particles when the thermal De-Broglie wavelength of a particle is smaller than the range of the potential and the density is such that average distance between particles is smaller than the range. The ability of the delta-shell potential to reproduce some basic properties of the deuteron are examined. Relations for moments of bound states are derived. The virial expansion is used to calculate the first quantum correction to the ideal gas pressure in the form of the second virial coefficient. Additionally, all thermodynamic functions are calculated up to the first order quantum corrections. For small departures from equilibrium, the net flows of mass, energy and momentum, characterized by the coefficients of diffusion, thermal conductivity and shear viscosity, respectively, are calculated. Properties of the gas are...

  1. A New Relativistic Study for Interactions in One-electron atoms (Spin ½ Particles with Modified Mie-type Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmadjid Maireche

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel theoretical analytical perform further investigation for the exact solvability of relativistic quantum spectrum systems for modified Mie-type potential (m.m.t. potential is discussed for spin-1/2 particles by means Boopp’s shift method instead to solving deformed Dirac equation with star product, in the framework of noncommutativity three dimensional real space (NC: 3D-RS. The exact corrections for excited states are found straightforwardly for interactions in one-electron atoms by means of the standard perturbation theory. Furthermore, the obtained corrections of energies are depended on four infinitesimal parameter ,which induced by position-position noncommutativity, in addition to the discreet atomic quantum numbers: and (the angular momentum quantum number and we have also shown that, the usual states in ordinary two and three dimensional spaces are canceled and has been replaced by new degenerated sub-states in the new quantum symmetries of (NC: 3D-RS and we have also applied our obtained results to the case of modified Krazer-Futes potential.

  2. {alpha}-{alpha} interaction reexamined in the context of the Sao Paulo potential: possible applications in astrophysics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasques, L.R.; Chamon, L.C.; Botero, D.F.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (DFN/USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear; Alves, L.F.M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (Brazil); Carlson, B.V. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (CTA/ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear; Rossi Junior, E.S. [Centro Universitario FIEO(UNIFIEO), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: We have analyzed a large set of {alpha}-{alpha} elastic scattering data for bombarding energies ranging from 0.6 to 29.5 MeV. The complete lack of open reaction channels at these somehow low energies results in a vanishing imaginary part for the optical interaction. This characteristic makes the {alpha}-{alpha} reaction particularly interesting as the corresponding elastic scattering cross sections and phase shifts become very sensitive to the real part of the interaction. The data were analyzed within the context of the velocity-dependent Sao Paulo potential, which is a successful theoretical model for the description of heavy-ion reactions from sub-barrier to intermediate energies. We have shown that, even in this low energy region, the velocity dependence of the Sao Paulo potential model is a necessary ingredient for describing the data. Despite the reasonable description obtained with the Sao Paulo potential, the analyses indicate the necessity of an additional weak dependence of the interaction on the angular momentum. These important characteristics open the possibility for studying reactions with astrophysical interested. In particular, predictions of the astrophysical S-factor for the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}) reaction will be presented. The understanding of the reaction rate for the {alpha}-capture process by a {sup 12}C nucleus is a crucial ingredient for predicting the stellar helium burning and the subsequent fate of stars as this reaction determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen towards the end of the Red Giants phase. It is well known that low mass stars evolve to White Dwarfs and this ratio determines the final abundance composition in White Dwarf matter and sets the trigger conditions for type Ia supernova explosions. The carbon-oxygen ratio also dictates the subsequent sequence of burning processes during the final stages of stellar evolution for massive stars. Thus, it has a key role in the determination of the abundance composition in

  3. Correlations between the zeta potentials of silica hydride-based stationary phases, analyte retention behaviour and their ionic interaction descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulsing, Chadin; Yang, Yuanzhong; Munera, Caesar; Tse, Colby; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2014-03-19

    In this study, the zeta potentials of type-B silica, bare silica hydride, the so-called Diamond Hydride™ and phenyl substituted silica hydride stationary phases have been measured in aqueous-organic media and correction procedures developed to account for the more negative zeta potential values in media containing different acetonitrile contents. Retention studies of 16 basic, acidic and neutral compounds were also performed with these four stationary phases with mobile phases containing 0.1% (v/v) formic acid and various acetonitrile-water compositions ranging from 0-90% (v/v) acetonitrile. The retention properties of these analytes were correlated to the corrected stationary phase zeta potentials measured under these different mobile phase conditions with R(2) values ranging from 0.01 to 1.00, depending on the stationary phase and analyte type. Using linear solvation energy relationships, stationary phase descriptors for each stationary phase have been developed for the different mobile phase conditions. Very high correlations of the zeta potentials with the ionic interaction descriptors were obtained for the type-B silica and the Diamond Hydride™ phases and good correlation with bare silica hydride material whilst there was no correlation observed for the phenyl substituted silica hydride phase. The nature of the retention mechanisms which gives rise to these different observations is discussed. The described methods represent a useful new approach to characterize and assess the retention properties of silica-hydride based chromatographic stationary phases of varying bonded-phase coverage and chemistries, as would be broadly applicable to other types of stationary phase used in the separation sciences.

  4. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 1014 W/cm2 to 3.5 × 1014 W/cm2. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  5. Dayside and nightside contributions to the cross polar cap potential: placing an upper limit on a viscous-like interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations of changes in size of the ionospheric polar cap allow the dayside and nightside reconnection rates to be quantified. From these it is straightforward to estimate the rate of antisunward transport of magnetic flux across the polar regions, quantified by the cross polar cap potential ΦPC. When correlated with upstream measurements of the north-south component of the IMF, ΦPC is found to increase for more negative Bz, as expected. However, we also find that ΦPC does not, on average, decrease to zero, even for strongly northward IMF. In the past this has been interpreted as evidence for a viscous interaction between the magnetosheath flow and the outer boundaries of the magnetosphere. In contrast, we show that this is the consequence of flows excited by tail reconnection, which is inherently uncorrelated with IMF Bz.

  6. Brewing and volatiles analysis of three tea beers indicate a potential interaction between tea components and lager yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Lei; Peng, Li-Juan; Ho, Chi-Tang; Yan, Shou-He; Meurens, Marc; Zhang, Zheng-Zhu; Li, Da-Xiang; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Bao, Guan-Hu; Gao, Xue-Ling; Ling, Tie-Jun

    2016-04-15

    Green tea, oolong tea and black tea were separately introduced to brew three kinds of tea beers. A model was designed to investigate the tea beer flavour character. Comparison of the volatiles between the sample of tea beer plus water mixture (TBW) and the sample of combination of tea infusion and normal beer (CTB) was accomplished by triangular sensory test and HS-SPME GC-MS analysis. The PCA of GC-MS data not only showed a significant difference between volatile features of each TBW and CTB group, but also suggested some key compounds to distinguish TBW from CTB. The results of GC-MS showed that the relative concentrations of many typical tea volatiles were significantly changed after the brewing process. More interestingly, the behaviour of yeast fermentation was influenced by tea components. A potential interaction between tea components and lager yeast could be suggested.

  7. Feynman Diagrams for Dispersion Interactions Out of Equilibrium -- Two-Body Potentials for Atoms with Initial Excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Haakh, Harald R; Henkel, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Diagrammatic techniques are well-known in the calculation of dispersion interactions between atoms or molecules. The multipolar coupling scheme combined with Feynman ordered diagrams significantly reduces the number of graphs compared to elementary stationary perturbation theory. We review calculations of van der Waals-Casimir-Polder forces, focusing on two atoms or molecules one of which is excited. In this case, calculations of the corresponding force are notorious for mathematical issues connected to the spontaneous decay of the excitation. Treating such unstable states in a full non-equilibrium theory provides a physical interpretation of apparent contradictions in previous results and underlines the importance of decay processes for the intermolecular potential. This may have important implications on reactions in biological systems, where excited states may be relatively long-lived and the resonant intermolecular force may result in directed Brownian motion.

  8. Interaction Potential of the Multitargeted Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Dovitinib with Drug Transporters and Drug Metabolising Enzymes Assessed in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Weiss

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dovitinib (TKI-258 is under development for the treatment of diverse cancer entities. No published information on its pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential is available. Thus, we assessed its interaction with important drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters and its efficacy in multidrug resistant cells in vitro. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1 inhibition was evaluated by calcein assay, inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2 by pheophorbide A efflux, and inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs by 8-fluorescein-cAMP uptake. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4, 2C19, and 2D6 was assessed by using commercial kits. Induction of transporters and enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Possible aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR activating properties were assessed by a reporter gene assay. Substrate characteristics were evaluated by growth inhibition assays in cells over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Dovitinib weakly inhibited CYP2C19, CYP3A4, P-gp and OATPs. The strongest inhibition was observed for BCRP (IC50 = 10.3 ± 4.5 μM. Among the genes investigated, dovitinib only induced mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, ABCC3 (coding for multidrug resistance-associated protein 3, and ABCG2 and suppressed mRNA expression of some transporters and drug metabolising enzymes. AhR reporter gene assay demonstrated that dovitinib is an activator of this nuclear receptor. Dovitinib retained its efficacy in cell lines over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Our analysis indicates that dovitinib will most likely retain its efficacy in tumours over-expressing P-gp or BCRP and gives first evidence that dovitinib might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions.

  9. GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

    2011-05-17

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  10. Interaction between bradykinin potentiating nonapeptide (BPP9a) and {beta}-cyclodextrin: A structural and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lula, Ivana; De Sousa, Frederico B. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Denadai, Angelo M.L. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, CEFET-MG, Campus VII, 35.183-006, Timoteo, MG (Brazil); Ferreira de Lima, Guilherme; Duarte, Helio Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mares Guia, Thiago R. dos [Departamento de Bioquimica e Imunologia, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Faljoni-Alario, Adelaide [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santoro, Marcelo M. [Departamento de Bioquimica e Imunologia, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Camargo, Antonio C.M. de [Center for Applied Toxinology CAT-CEPID, Laboratorio Especial de Toxicologia Aplicada, Instituto Butantan, 05503-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Robson A.S. dos [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofisica, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); and others

    2012-02-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the physical and chemical characterizations of the supramolecular complex formed between {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}CD) and bradykinin potentiating nonapeptide (BPP9a), an endogenous toxin found in Bothrops jararaca. Circular dichroism results indicate a conformational change in the BPP9a secondary structure upon its complexation with {beta}CD. Nuclear magnetic resonance results, mainly from NOESY experiments, and theoretical calculations showed a favorable interaction between the tryptophan residue of BPP9a and the {beta}CD cavity. Thermodynamic inclusion parameters were investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry, demonstrating that {beta}CD/BPP9a complex formation is an exothermic process that results in a reduction in entropy. Additionally, in vitro degradation study of BPP9a against trypsin (37 Degree-Sign C, pH 7.2) showed higher stability of peptide in presence of {beta}CD. This {beta}CD/BPP9a complex, which presents new chemical properties arising from the peptide inclusion process, may be useful as an antihypertensive drug in oral pharmaceutical formulations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd and NMR showed evidences for the existence of more than one structure in solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexation with {beta}CD reduces the conformational rigidity of the peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}CD cavity recognize Trp and/or Pro segments of BPP9a. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interactions involving disaggregation of BPP9a assemblies and binding with {beta}CD.

  11. FE65 regulates and interacts with the Bloom syndrome protein in dynamic nuclear spheres - potential relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrötter, Andreas; Mastalski, Thomas; Nensa, Fabian M; Neumann, Martin; Loosse, Christina; Pfeiffer, Kathy; Magraoui, Fouzi El; Platta, Harald W; Erdmann, Ralf; Theiss, Carsten; Uszkoreit, Julian; Eisenacher, Martin; Meyer, Helmut E; Marcus, Katrin; Müller, Thorsten

    2013-06-01

    The intracellular domain of the amyloid precursor protein (AICD) is generated following cleavage of the precursor by the γ-secretase complex and is involved in membrane to nucleus signaling, for which the binding of AICD to the adapter protein FE65 is essential. Here we show that FE65 knockdown causes a downregulation of the protein Bloom syndrome protein (BLM) and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein family and that elevated nuclear levels of FE65 result in stabilization of the BLM protein in nuclear mobile spheres. These spheres are able to grow and fuse, and potentially correspond to the nuclear domain 10. BLM plays a role in DNA replication and repair mechanisms and FE65 was also shown to play a role in DNA damage response in the cell. A set of proliferation assays in our work revealed that FE65 knockdown in HEK293T cells reduced cell replication. On the basis of these results, we hypothesize that nuclear FE65 levels (nuclear FE65/BLM containing spheres) may regulate cell cycle re-entry in neurons as a result of increased interaction of FE65 with BLM and/or an increase in MCM protein levels. Thus, FE65 interactions with BLM and MCM proteins may contribute to the neuronal cell cycle re-entry observed in brains affected by Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions to patients over 45 years of age in primary care, southern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Juarez Vieira Teixeira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few cross-sectional studies involving adults and elderly patients with major DDIs have been conducted in the primary care setting. The study aimed to investigate the prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs in patients treated in primary care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study involving patients aged 45 years or older was conducted at 25 Basic Health Units in the city of Maringá (southern Brazil from May to December 2010. The data were collected from prescriptions at the pharmacy of the health unit at the time of the delivery of medication to the patient. After delivery, the researcher checked the electronic medical records of the patient. A total of 827 patients were investigated (mean age: 64.1; mean number of medications: 4.4. DDIs were identified in the Micromedex® database. The prevalence of potential DDIs and major DDIs was 63.0% and 12.1%, respectively. In both the univariate and multivariate analyses, the number of drugs prescribed was significantly associated with potential DDIs, with an increasing risk from three to five drugs (OR = 4.74; 95% CI: 2.90-7.73 to six or more drugs (OR = 23.03; 95% CI: 10.42-50.91. Forty drugs accounted for 122 pairs of major DDIs, the most frequent of which involved simvastatin (23.8%, captopril/enalapril (16.4% and fluoxetine (16.4%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first large-scale study on primary care carried out in Latin America. Based on the findings, the estimated prevalence of potential DDIs was high, whereas clinically significant DDIs occurred in a smaller proportion. Exposing patients to a greater number of prescription drugs, especially three or more, proved to be a significant predictor of DDIs. Prescribers should be more aware of potential DDIs. Future studies should assess potential DDIs in primary care over a longer period of time.

  13. Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the hydrogen-peroxide−noble-gas interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncaratti, L. F., E-mail: lz@fis.unb.br; Leal, L. A.; Silva, G. M. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Pirani, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210 Salvador (Brazil); Gargano, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Quantum Theory Project, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    We consider the analytical representation of the potential energy surfaces of relevance for the intermolecular dynamics of weakly bound complexes of chiral molecules. In this paper we study the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}−Ng (Ng=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) systems providing the radial and the angular dependence of the potential energy surface on the relative position of the Ng atom. We accomplish this by introducing an analytical representation which is able to fit the ab initio energies of these complexes in a wide range of geometries. Our analysis sheds light on the role that the enantiomeric forms and the symmetry of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule play on the resulting barriers and equilibrium geometries. The proposed theoretical framework is useful to study the dynamics of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule, or other systems involving O–O and S–S bonds, interacting by non-covalent forces with atoms or molecules and to understand how the relative orientation of the O–H bonds changes along collisional events that may lead to a hydrogen bond formation or even to selectivity in chemical reactions.

  14. Protein adsorption on dopamine-melanin films: role of electrostatic interactions inferred from zeta-potential measurements versus chemisorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernsmann, Falk; Frisch, Benoît; Ringwald, Christian; Ball, Vincent

    2010-04-01

    We recently showed the possibility to build dopamine-melanin films of controlled thickness by successive immersions of a substrate in alkaline solutions of dopamine [F. Bernsmann, A. Ponche, C. Ringwald, J. Hemmerlé, J. Raya, B. Bechinger, J.-C. Voegel, P. Schaaf, V. Ball, J. Phys. Chem. C 113 (2009) 8234-8242]. In this work the structure and properties of such films are further explored. The zeta-potential of dopamine-melanin films is measured as a function of the total immersion time to build the film. It appears that the film bears a constant zeta-potential of (-39+/-3) mV after 12 immersion steps. These data are used to calculate the surface density of charged groups of the dopamine-melanin films at pH 8.5 that are mostly catechol or quinone imine chemical groups. Furthermore the zeta-potential is used to explain the adsorption of three model proteins (lysozyme, myoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin), which is monitored by quartz crystal microbalance. We come to the conclusion that protein adsorption on dopamine-melanin is not only determined by possible covalent binding between amino groups of the proteins and catechol groups of dopamine-melanin but that electrostatic interactions contribute to protein binding. Part of the adsorbed proteins can be desorbed by sodium dodecylsulfate solutions at the critical micellar concentration. The fraction of weakly bound proteins decreases with their isoelectric point. Additionally the number of available sites for covalent binding of amino groups on melanin grains is quantified.

  15. Synthesis and characterisation of glucose-functional glycopolymers and gold nanoparticles: study of their potential interactions with ovine red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Laura E; Phillips, Daniel J; Deller, Robert C; Davies, Gemma-Louise; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-03-20

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions can assist with the targeting of polymer- and nano-delivery systems. However, some potential protein targets are not specific to a single cell type, resulting in reductions in their efficacy due to undesirable non-specific cellular interactions. The glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) is expressed to different extents on most cells in the vasculature, including human red blood cells and on cancerous tissue. Glycosylated nanomaterials bearing glucose (or related) carbohydrates, therefore, could potentially undergo unwanted interactions with these transporters, which may compromise the nanomaterial function or lead to cell agglutination, for example. Here, RAFT polymerisation is employed to obtain well-defined glucose-functional glycopolymers as well as glycosylated gold nanoparticles. Agglutination and binding assays did not reveal any significant binding to ovine red blood cells, nor any haemolysis. These data suggest that gluco-functional nanomaterials are compatible with blood, and their lack of undesirable interactions highlights their potential for delivery and imaging applications.

  16. Molecular dynamics study of force acting on a model nano particle immersed in fluid with temperature gradient: Effect of interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Tetsuro; Iseki, Hirotaka; Hanasaki, Itsuo; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2016-11-01

    Thermophoresis of a nano particle in a fluid is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. In order to elucidate effective factors on the characteristics of thermophoresis, simple models for both the fluid and the nano particle are considered, namely, the surrounding fluid consists of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles and the model nano particle is a cluster consisting of several tens of LJ particles. Interaction between the fluid particle and the model nano particle is described by the LJ interaction potential or repulsive interaction potential with the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rule. As a preliminary result, the effect of mass on thermophoretic force acting on the model nano particle is investigated for both interaction potentials.

  17. Wild and domestic pig interactions at the wildlife-livestock interface of Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda, and the potential association with African Swine Fever outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther eKukielka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bushpigs (Potamochoerus larvatus and warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus, which are widely distributed in Eastern Africa, are likely to cohabitate in the same environment with domestic pigs, facilitating the transmission of shared pathogens. However, potential interactions between bushpig, warthog and domestic pig and the resulting potential circulation of infectious diseases have rarely been investigated in Africa to date. In order to understand the dynamics of such interactions and the potential influence of human behavior and husbandry practices on them, individual interviews (n=233 and participatory rural appraisals (n=11 were carried out among Ugandan pig farmers at the edge of Murchison Falls National Park, northern Uganda. In addition, as an example of possible implications of wild and domestic pig interactions, nonlinear multivariate analysis (multiple correspondence analyses was used to investigate the potential association between the aforementioned factors (interactions and human behavior and practices and farmer reported ASF outbreaks. No direct interactions between wild pigs and domestic pig were reported in our study area. However, indirect interactions were described by 83 (35.6 % of the participants and were identified to be more common at water sources during the dry season. Equally, eight (3.4% farmers declared exposing their domestic pig to raw hunting leftovers of wild pigs. The exploratory analysis performed suggested possible associations between the farmer reported ASF outbreaks and indirect interactions, free-range housing systems, dry season, and having a warthog burrow less than 3km from the household. Our study was useful to gather local knowledge and to identify knowledge gaps about potential interactions between wild and domestic pig in this area. This information could be useful to facilitate the design of future observational studies to better understand the potential transmission of pathogens between wild and

  18. Wild and Domestic Pig Interactions at the Wildlife–Livestock Interface of Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda, and the Potential Association with African Swine Fever Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukielka, Esther A.; Jori, Ferran; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Chenais, Erika; Masembe, Charles; Chavernac, David; Ståhl, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Bushpigs (BPs) (Potamochoerus larvatus) and warthogs (WHs) (Phacochoerus africanus), which are widely distributed in Eastern Africa, are likely to cohabitate in the same environment with domestic pigs (DPs), facilitating the transmission of shared pathogens. However, potential interactions between BP, WH, and DP, and the resulting potential circulation of infectious diseases have rarely been investigated in Africa to date. In order to understand the dynamics of such interactions and the potential influence of human behavior and husbandry practices on them, individual interviews (n = 233) and participatory rural appraisals (n = 11) were carried out among Ugandan pig farmers at the edge of Murchison Falls National Park, northern Uganda. In addition, as an example of possible implications of wild and DP interactions, non-linear multivariate analysis (multiple correspondence analyses) was used to investigate the potential association between the aforementioned factors (interactions and human behavior and practices) and farmer reported African swine fever (ASF) outbreaks. No direct interactions between wild pigs (WPs) and DP were reported in our study area. However, indirect interactions were described by 83 (35.6%) of the participants and were identified to be more common at water sources during the dry season. Equally, eight (3.4%) farmers declared exposing their DP to raw hunting leftovers of WPs. The exploratory analysis performed suggested possible associations between the farmer reported ASF outbreaks and indirect interactions, free-range housing systems, dry season, and having a WH burrow less than 3 km from the household. Our study was useful to gather local knowledge and to identify knowledge gaps about potential interactions between wild and DP in this area. This information could be useful to facilitate the design of future observational studies to better understand the potential transmission of pathogens between wild and DPs. PMID:27148545

  19. Wild and Domestic Pig Interactions at the Wildlife-Livestock Interface of Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda, and the Potential Association with African Swine Fever Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukielka, Esther A; Jori, Ferran; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Chenais, Erika; Masembe, Charles; Chavernac, David; Ståhl, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Bushpigs (BPs) (Potamochoerus larvatus) and warthogs (WHs) (Phacochoerus africanus), which are widely distributed in Eastern Africa, are likely to cohabitate in the same environment with domestic pigs (DPs), facilitating the transmission of shared pathogens. However, potential interactions between BP, WH, and DP, and the resulting potential circulation of infectious diseases have rarely been investigated in Africa to date. In order to understand the dynamics of such interactions and the potential influence of human behavior and husbandry practices on them, individual interviews (n = 233) and participatory rural appraisals (n = 11) were carried out among Ugandan pig farmers at the edge of Murchison Falls National Park, northern Uganda. In addition, as an example of possible implications of wild and DP interactions, non-linear multivariate analysis (multiple correspondence analyses) was used to investigate the potential association between the aforementioned factors (interactions and human behavior and practices) and farmer reported African swine fever (ASF) outbreaks. No direct interactions between wild pigs (WPs) and DP were reported in our study area. However, indirect interactions were described by 83 (35.6%) of the participants and were identified to be more common at water sources during the dry season. Equally, eight (3.4%) farmers declared exposing their DP to raw hunting leftovers of WPs. The exploratory analysis performed suggested possible associations between the farmer reported ASF outbreaks and indirect interactions, free-range housing systems, dry season, and having a WH burrow less than 3 km from the household. Our study was useful to gather local knowledge and to identify knowledge gaps about potential interactions between wild and DP in this area. This information could be useful to facilitate the design of future observational studies to better understand the potential transmission of pathogens between wild and DPs.

  20. Interaction potentials for multi-electron atoms in front of a LiF (0 0 1) surface from rainbow scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravielle, M.S. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (CONICET-UBA), Casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Miraglia, J.E., E-mail: miraglia@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (CONICET-UBA), Casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schüller, A.; Winter, H. [Institut für Physik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, D-12489 Berlin-Adlershof (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Pairwise interaction potentials for multi-electron atoms moving in front of a LiF (0 0 1) surface are investigated theoretically and experimentally. From angular distributions of fast He, N, S, Cl and Kr atoms grazingly scattered under axial surface channeling conditions, rainbow angles are experimentally determined for a wide range of energies for the motion normal to the surface plane. These angles are used as a benchmark to probe the pairwise potential model. In the simulations the scattering process is described by means of the surface eikonal approximation, while the atom–surface interaction is derived by adding binary interatomic potentials that include the proper asymptotic limit.

  1. On the analysis of protein-protein interactions via knowledge-based potentials for the prediction of protein-protein docking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Aloy, Patrick; Oliva, Baldo

    2011-01-01

    Development of effective methods to screen binary interactions obtained by rigid-body protein-protein docking is key for structure prediction of complexes and for elucidating physicochemical principles of protein-protein binding. We have derived empirical knowledge-based potential functions...... results were compared with a residue-pair potential scoring function (RPScore) and an atomic-detailed scoring function (Zrank). We have combined knowledge-based potentials to score protein-protein poses of decoys of complexes classified either as transient or as permanent protein-protein interactions...

  2. Randomized cross-over clinical trial to study potential pharmacokinetic interactions between cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Huw D; Porter, David J; Bartelink, Imke; Nobbs, Joy R; Cole, Michael; Elliott, Suzie; Newell, David R; Calvert, A Hilary; Highley, Martin; Boddy, Alan V

    2002-01-01

    Aims Cisplatin and carboplatin are often used in combination with etoposide. In a randomized cross-over study, the potential interaction between the two platinum drugs and the metabolism of etoposide was explored. In vitro investigations using human liver microsomes were also performed. Methods Etoposide was administered to 15 patients over 3 days, with the platinum drug administered on day 2. The alternate platinum drug was administered on the second course. The pharmacokinetics of etoposide were determined on all 3 days of each cycle. The effect of platinum drugs on etoposide metabolism by human liver enzymes was explored in vitro. Results Neither cisplatin nor carboplatin coadministration affected the pharmacokinetics of etoposide during cycle 1. When carboplatin was administered on course 2, etoposide AUC was 8% higher on day 2 compared with day 1 or day 3 (for day 2 vs day 3, 95% CI: −0.72, −0.08 mg ml−1 min). In contrast, cisplatin on course 2 increased the AUC of etoposide (28%) on day 3 (day 3 vs day 1, 95% CI: 0.67, 2.09 mg ml−1 min), with no effect on day 2. In vitro carboplatin and cisplatin (10–100 µm) inhibited the metabolism of etoposide, if rat liver microsomes were preincubated (30 min) with NADPH and the platinum complexes. With human liver microsomes a small effect on etoposide metabolism, but not on catechol formation, was observed. Conclusions The interaction between etoposide and platinum drugs is small and, given the pharmacokinetic variability seen with etoposide, the clinical impact is unlikely to be significant. PMID:11849199

  3. Wave-turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, Basile; Nazarenko, Sergey; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-07-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models, one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wave number, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave-turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bose-Einstein condensation. We then focus on nonlocal interactions in wave-number space: we study the decay of an ensemble of massive particles into massless ones. Under rather general conditions, these massless particles accumulate at low wave number. We study the dynamics of waves coexisting with such a strong condensate, and we compute rigorously a nonlocal Kolmogorov-Zakharov solution, where particles are transferred nonlocally to the condensate, while energy cascades towards large wave numbers through local interactions. This nonlocal cascading state constitutes the intermediate asymptotics between the initial distribution of waves and the thermodynamic state reached in the long-time limit.

  4. Wave-turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, Basile; Nazarenko, Sergey; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-07-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models, one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wave number, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave-turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bose-Einstein condensation. We then focus on nonlocal interactions in wave-number space: we study the decay of an ensemble of massive particles into massless ones. Under rather general conditions, these massless particles accumulate at low wave number. We study the dynamics of waves coexisting with such a strong condensate, and we compute rigorously a nonlocal Kolmogorov-Zakharov solution, where particles are transferred nonlocally to the condensate, while energy cascades towards large wave numbers through local interactions. This nonlocal cascading state constitutes the intermediate asymptotics between the initial distribution of waves and the thermodynamic state reached in the long-time limit.

  5. Non-chemical stressors and cumulative risk assessment: an overview of current initiatives and potential air pollutant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ari S; Sax, Sonja N; Wason, Susan C; Campleman, Sharan L

    2011-06-01

    Regulatory agencies are under increased pressure to consider broader public health concerns that extend to multiple pollutant exposures, multiple exposure pathways, and vulnerable populations. Specifically, cumulative risk assessment initiatives have stressed the importance of considering both chemical and non-chemical stressors, such as socioeconomic status (SES) and related psychosocial stress, in evaluating health risks. The integration of non-chemical stressors into a cumulative risk assessment framework has been largely driven by evidence of health disparities across different segments of society that may also bear a disproportionate risk from chemical exposures. This review will discuss current efforts to advance the field of cumulative risk assessment, highlighting some of the major challenges, discussed within the construct of the traditional risk assessment paradigm. Additionally, we present a summary of studies of potential interactions between social stressors and air pollutants on health as an example of current research that supports the incorporation of non-chemical stressors into risk assessment. The results from these studies, while suggestive of possible interactions, are mixed and hindered by inconsistent application of social stress indicators. Overall, while there have been significant advances, further developments across all of the risk assessment stages (i.e., hazard identification, exposure assessment, dose-response, and risk characterization) are necessary to provide a scientific basis for regulatory actions and effective community interventions, particularly when considering non-chemical stressors. A better understanding of the biological underpinnings of social stress on disease and implications for chemical-based dose-response relationships is needed. Furthermore, when considering non-chemical stressors, an appropriate metric, or series of metrics, for risk characterization is also needed. Cumulative risk assessment research will benefit

  6. Potential drug–drug interactions in HIV-perinatally infected adolescents on antiretroviral therapy in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Cordova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An increasing number of treatment-experienced perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHA are being transitioned from paediatric centres to adult HIV-care [1]. Most of them had been heavily exposed to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs, harbour drug-resistant viruses and require non-antiretroviral medication due to comorbidities [2]. This may predispose for clinically significant drug–drug interactions (CSDDIs [3]. There are no studies concerning CSDDIs in PHA. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of concomitant medications and CSDDIs in PHA who were transitioned for adult HIV-care to the Infectious Diseases Unit, Cosme Argerich Hospital, Buenos Aires City, Argentina. Materials and Methods: Descriptive pilot cross-sectional study (March to June 2014. PHA under ARVs at the time of the study were assessed for concomitant medication. CSDDIs were screened and categorized using the University of Liverpool Drug Interactions Program (www.hiv-druginteractions.org [4]. Results: Forty-five patients were included. Female sex: 53%. Median (IQR age: 20 years (18–22. CDC-stage C was observed in 27 (79%; 50% had ≥1 comorbidities including 3 with HCV co-infection. Drug abuse was observed in 6 (13%. The median of prior ARV regimens was 3 (3–5. Current ARV regimen included: PI: 87%, NNRTI: 27%, INSTI: 20%, enfuvirtide: 7% and CCR5 inhibitor: 4%. Median CD4 T-cell count: 568 cells/mL (279–771. Viral load <50 copies/mL: 80%. Sixty percent (27/45 had ≥1 co-medications (median 1. The most frequent co-medications were NSAIDs (40%, hormonal therapy (19% and antimicrobials (19%. Use of herbal supplements was observed in 10 (22%. Overall, 23 (51% had ≥ 1 CSDDIs: 19/27 (70% with co-medication (orange flag=18 and red flag=1; and 2/10 (20% with herbal supplements. ARV–ARV interactions were observed in 4/45 (9%: unboosted atazanavir+tenofovir (n=2, unboosted atazanavir+efavirenz (n=1 and lopinavir/ritonavir+efavirenz (n=1 (all orange flag. Considering

  7. Potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age in family medicine clinics in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Arreola Laura del Pilar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Mexico, inappropriate prescription of drugs with potential interactions causing serious risks to patient health has been little studied. Work in this area has focused mainly on hospitalized patients, with only specific drug combinations analyzed; moreover, the studies have not produced conclusive results. In the present study, we determined the frequency of potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, who used Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS family medicine clinics. In addition, we aimed to identify the associated factors for these interactions. Methods We collected information on general patient characteristics, medical histories, and medication (complete data. The study included 624 ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, with non-malignant pain syndrome, who made ambulatory visits to two IMSS family medicine clinics in Mexico City. The patients received 7-day prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics. The potential interactions were identified by using the Thompson Micromedex program. Data were analyzed using descriptive, bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The average number of prescribed drugs was 5.9 ± 2.5. About 80.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug-drug interactions and 3.8% of patients were prescribed drug combinations with interactions that should be avoided. Also, 64.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug disease interactions. The factors significantly associated with having one or more potential interactions included: taking 5 or more medicines (adjusted Odds Ratio (OR: 4.34, 95%CI: 2.76–6.83, patient age 60 years or older (adjusted OR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.01–2.74 and suffering from cardiovascular diseases (adjusted OR: 7.26, 95% CI: 4.61–11.44. Conclusion The high frequency of prescription of drugs with potential drug interactions showed in

  8. Measures of nonclassicality for a two-level atom interacting with power-law potential field under decoherence effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, S.; Berrada, K.; Alkhateeb, Sadah A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a useful quantum system to perform different tasks of quantum information and computational technologies. We explore the required optimal conditions for this system that are feasible with real experimental realization. We present an active way to control the variation of some measures of nonclassicality considering the time-dependent coupling and photon transition effects under a model that closely describes a realistic experimental scenario. We investigate qualitatively the quantum measures for a two-level atom system interacting with a quantum field initially defined in a coherent state in the framework of power-law potentials (PLPCSs). We study the nonlocal correlation in the whole system state using the negativity as a measure of entanglement in terms of the exponent parameter, number of photon transition, and phase damping effect. The influences of the different physical parameters on the statistical properties and purity of the field are also demonstrated during the time evolution. The results indicate that the preservation and enhancement of entanglement greatly benefit from the combination of the choice of the physical parameters. Finally, we explore an interesting relationship between the different quantum measures of non-classicality during the time evolution in the absence and presence of time-dependent coupling effect.

  9. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202-3489 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  10. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  11. The glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycle: importance of late postnatal development and potential reciprocal interactions between biosynthesis and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eHertz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard for studies of glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycling and its connections to brain biosynthesis from glucose of glutamate and GABA and their subsequent metabolism are the elegant in vivo studies by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR, showing the large fluxes in the cycle. However, simpler experiments in intact brain tissue (e.g. immunohistochemistry, brain slices, cultured brain cells and mitochondria have also made important contributions to the understanding of details, mechanisms and functional consequences of glutamate/GABA biosynthesis and degradation. The purpose of this review is to attempt to integrate evidence from different sources regarding i the enzyme(s responsible for the initial conversion of -ketoglutarate to glutamate; ii the possibility that especially glutamate oxidation is essentially confined to astrocytes; and iii the ontogenetically very late onset and maturation of glutamine-glutamate(GABA cycle function. Pathway models based on the functional importance of aspartate for glutamate synthesis suggest the possibility of interacting pathways for biosynthesis and degradation of glutamate and GABA and the use of transamination as the default mechanism for initiation of glutamate oxidation. The late development and maturation are related to the late cortical gliogenesis and convert brain cortical function from being purely neuronal to becoming neuronal-astrocytic. This conversion is associated with huge increases in energy demand and production, and the character of potentially incurred gains of function are discussed. These may include alterations in learning mechanisms, in mice indicated by lack of pairing of odor learning with aversive stimuli in newborn animals but the development of such an association 10-12 days later. The possibility is suggested that analogous maturational changes may contribute to differences in the way learning is accomplished in the newborn human brain and during later development.

  12. New potential antitumoral fluorescent tetracyclic thieno[3,2-b]pyridine derivatives: interaction with DNA and nanosized liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calhelha Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fluorescence properties of two new potential antitumoral tetracyclic thieno[3,2-b]pyridine derivatives were studied in solution and in liposomes of DPPC (dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, egg lecithin (phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk; Egg-PC and DODAB (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide. Compound 1, pyrido[2',3':3,2]thieno[4,5-d]pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-6-one, exhibits reasonably high fluorescence quantum yields in all solvents studied (0.20 ≤ ΦF ≤ 0.30, while for compound 2, 3-[(p-methoxyphenylethynyl]pyrido[2',3':3,2]thieno[4,5-d]pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-6-one, the values are much lower (0.01 ≤ ΦF ≤ 0.05. The interaction of these compounds with salmon sperm DNA was studied using spectroscopic methods, allowing the determination of intrinsic binding constants, K i = (8.7 ± 0.9 × 103 M-1 for compound 1 and K i = (5.9 ± 0.6 × 103 M-1 for 2, and binding site sizes of n = 11 ± 3 and n = 7 ± 2 base pairs, respectively. Compound 2 is the most intercalative compound in salmon sperm DNA (35%, while for compound 1 only 11% of the molecules are intercalated. Studies of incorporation of both compounds in liposomes of DPPC, Egg-PC and DODAB revealed that compound 2 is mainly located in the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer, while compound 1 prefers a hydrated and fluid environment.

  13. Gene Prospector: An evidence gateway for evaluating potential susceptibility genes and interacting risk factors for human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoury Muin J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified as a result of the human genome project and the rapid advance of high throughput genotyping technology. Genetic association studies, such as recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS, have provided a springboard for exploring the contribution of inherited genetic variation and gene/environment interactions in relation to disease. Given the capacity of such studies to produce a plethora of information that may then be described in a number of publications, selecting possible disease susceptibility genes and identifying related modifiable risk factors is a major challenge. A Web-based application for finding evidence of such relationships is key to the development of follow-up studies and evidence for translational research. We developed a Web-based application that selects and prioritizes potential disease-related genes by using a highly curated and updated literature database of genetic association studies. The application, called Gene Prospector, also provides a comprehensive set of links to additional data sources. Results We compared Gene Prospector results for the query "Parkinson" with a list of 13 leading candidate genes (Top Results from a curated, specialty database for genetic associations with Parkinson disease (PDGene. Nine of the thirteen leading candidate genes from PDGene were in the top 10th percentile of the ranked list from Gene Prospector. In fact, Gene Prospector included more published genetic association studies for the 13 leading candidate genes than PDGene did. Conclusion Gene Prospector provides an online gateway for searching for evidence about human genes in relation to diseases, other phenotypes, and risk factors, and provides links to published literature and other online data sources. Gene Prospector can be accessed via http://www.hugenavigator.net/HuGENavigator/geneProspectorStartPage.do.

  14. A method for creating interactive content for the iPod, and its potential use as a learning tool: Technical Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Edward J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Podcasting is currently a popular means of delivery of information with a large number of podcasts specifically tailored for educational purposes. It can be argued that the passive nature of this teaching methodology limits the educational benefit that can be derived from podcasts. This paper describes the development and construction of interactive material for the iPod, and a survey of student attitudes towards this type of learning material. Methods The development of interactive material for an iPod is described in detail. This material was developed and demonstrated to 50 medical students. These students completed a paper-based survey on the potential uses of this technology, before and after a 20 minute presentation in class of an interactive case-study on an iPod. Results A technical description of how to develop interactive content for the iPod was created. The results of the student survey indicate a favourable shift in student attitudes after viewing the interactive case. Despite only 15% of the students owning an iPod, 57% of the students were positive about having access to interactive iPod content and 59% believed they would use it whilst travelling. The percentage of students who felt podcasting was a useful means of learning increased from 9% to 41%. Conclusion The development of interactive content for the iPod is feasible. There are indications that students view interactive iPod cases as having value as an additional learning resource.

  15. Effects of a dimple potential on the ground-state properties of a quasi-one-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensate with two- and three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabulut, Elife Ö.

    2015-04-01

    The ground state of a quasi-one-dimensional interacting Bose gas confined by a harmonic plus Gaussian dimple potential is studied within the variational approach and also Gross–Pitaevskii mean-field approximation. The effect of the superimposed dimple trap on the order parameter, the chemical and effective potentials of the system is analyzed for repulsive and attractive two- as well as three-body interactions between the particles. The results obtained from both methods show that the characteristics of the trap such as the width and depth of the dimple affect the corresponding ground state properties of the system in a qualitatively similar way to the repulsive and attractive interatomic interactions, respectively. - Highlights: • We study the effects of a dimple potential on a quasi-1D Bose-Einstein condensate. • We used variational and Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field approaches. • The width of the dimple affects the system similarly to repulsive interaction. • The depth of the dimple affects the system similarly to attractive interaction.

  16. Distance to high-voltage power lines and risk of childhood leukaemia – an analysis of confounding by and interaction with other potential risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Camilla; Bräuner, Elvira V.; Rod, Naja H.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an interaction between distance from residence at birth to nearest power line and domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution, respectively, in relation to childhood leukemia risk. Further, we investigated whether adjusting for potential confounders alters...

  17. ARTE: French-German Experiments in Crossing the Borders. 'One Media – Three Screens' Convergence and Interactivity at its Full Potential?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiehl, Anna

    2014-01-01

    abstractThis contribution aims at discussing policies of convergence as well as at questioning whether the current strategies really exploit the options of digital media to its full potential – especially with regard to transmedia-storytelling, interactivity, participation and networking. By the par

  18. Exact Solutions of the Mass-Dependent Klein-Gordon Equation with the Vector Quark-Antiquark Interaction and Harmonic Oscillator Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Bahar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the asymptotic iteration and wave function ansatz method, we present exact solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation for the quark-antiquark interaction and harmonic oscillator potential in the case of the position-dependent mass.

  19. Characterization of the Oriskany and Berea Sandstones: Evaluating Biogeochemical Reactions of Potential Sandstone–Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verba, Circe [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Harris, Aubrey [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2016-07-07

    The Marcellus shale, located in the mid-Atlantic Appalachian Basin, has been identified as a source for natural gas and targeted for hydraulic fracturing recovery methods. Hydraulic fracturing is a technique used by the oil and gas industry to access petroleum reserves in geologic formations that cannot be accessed with conventional drilling techniques (Capo et al., 2014). This unconventional technique fractures rock formations that have low permeability by pumping pressurized hydraulic fracturing fluids into the subsurface. Although the major components of hydraulic fracturing fluid are water and sand, chemicals, such as recalcitrant biocides and polyacrylamide, are also used (Frac Focus, 2015). There is domestic concern that the chemicals could reach groundwater or surface water during transport, storage, or the fracturing process (Chapman et al., 2012). In the event of a surface spill, understanding the natural attenuation of the chemicals in hydraulic fracturing fluid, as well as the physical and chemical properties of the aquifers surrounding the spill site, will help mitigate potential dangers to drinking water. However, reports on the degradation pathways of these chemicals are limited in existing literature. The Appalachian Basin Marcellus shale and its surrounding sandstones host diverse mineralogical suites. During the hydraulic fracturing process, the hydraulic fracturing fluids come into contact with variable mineral compositions. The reactions between the fracturing fluid chemicals and the minerals are very diverse. This report: 1) describes common minerals (e.g. quartz, clay, pyrite, and carbonates) present in the Marcellus shale, as well as the Oriskany and Berea sandstones, which are located stratigraphically below and above the Marcellus shale; 2) summarizes the existing literature of the degradation pathways for common hydraulic fracturing fluid chemicals [polyacrylamide, ethylene glycol, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), glutaraldehyde

  20. Entecavir interacts with influx transporters hOAT1, hCNT2, hCNT3, but not with hOCT2: the potential for renal transporter-mediated cytotoxicity and drug-drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František eTrejtnar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Entecavir (ETV is one of the most potent agents for the treatment of the hepatitis B viral infection. The drug is principally eliminated by the kidney. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of ETV to interact in vitro with the renal SLC transporters hOAT1, hOCT2, hCNT2 and hCNT3. Potential drug-drug interactions of ETV at the renal transporters with antiviral drugs known to be excreted by the kidney (adefovir, tenofovir, cidofovir as well as transporter-dependent cytotoxicity were also examined. Interactions with the selected transporters along with cytotoxicity were studied in several transiently-transfected cellular models using specific substrates and inhibitors. ETV was found to be both a substrate and inhibitor of hOAT1 (IC50 = 175.3 µM, hCNT2 (IC50 = 241.9 µM and hCNT3 (IC50 = 278.4 µM transporters, although it interacted with the transporters with relatively low affinities. ETV inhibited the cellular uptake of adefovir, tenofovir and cidofovir by hOAT1; however, effective inhibition was shown at ETV concentrations exceeding therapeutic levels. In comparison with adefovir, tenofovir and cidofovir, ETV displayed no transporter-mediated cytotoxicity in cells transfected with hOAT1, hCNT2, and hCNT3. No significant interaction of ETV with hOCT2 was detected. The study demonstrates interactions of ETV with several human renal transporters. For the first time, an interaction of ETV with the hCNTs was proved. We show that the potency of ETV to cause nephrotoxicity and/or clinically significant drug-drug interactions related to the tested transporters is considerably lower than that of adefovir, tenofovir and cidofovir.

  1. Potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions dispensed in community and hospital pharmacies in East of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Dirin, Mandana Moradi; Mousavi, Sarah; Afshari, Amir Reza; Tabrizian, Kaveh; Ashrafi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aim to evaluate and compare type and prevalence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in prescriptions dispensed in both community and hospital setting in Zabol, Iran. Methods: A total of 2796 prescriptions were collected from community and inpatient and outpatient pharmacy of Amir-al-momenin only current acting hospital in Zabol, Iran. The prescriptions were processed using Lexi-Comp drug interaction software. The identified DDIs were categorized into five classes (A, B, C, ...

  2. A Multiple Interaction Analysis Reveals ADRB3 as a Potential Candidate for Gallbladder Cancer Predisposition via a Complex Interaction with Other Candidate Gene Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Rai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gallbladder cancer is the most common and a highly aggressive biliary tract malignancy with a dismal outcome. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, comprising the combined effect of multiple genetic variations of mild consequence along with numerous dietary and environmental risk factors. Previously, we demonstrated the association of several candidate gene variations with GBC risk. In this study, we aimed to identify the combination of gene variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility of GBC. Here, we performed Multifactor-Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis (CRT to investigate the gene–gene interactions and the combined effect of 14 SNPs in nine genes (DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634; FAS (rs2234767; FASL (rs763110; DCC (rs2229080, rs4078288, rs7504990, rs714; PSCA (rs2294008, rs2978974; ADRA2A (rs1801253; ADRB1 (rs1800544; ADRB3 (rs4994; CYP17 (rs2486758 involved in various signaling pathways. Genotyping was accomplished by PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assays. SPSS software version 16.0 and MDR software version 2.0 were used for all the statistical analysis. Single locus investigation demonstrated significant association of DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634, DCC (rs714, rs2229080, rs4078288 and ADRB3 (rs4994 polymorphisms with GBC risk. MDR analysis revealed ADRB3 (rs4994 to be crucial candidate in GBC susceptibility that may act either alone (p < 0.0001, CVC = 10/10 or in combination with DCC (rs714 and rs2229080, p < 0.0001, CVC = 9/10. Our CRT results are in agreement with the above findings. Further, in-silico results of studied SNPs advocated their role in splicing, transcriptional and/or protein coding regulation. Overall, our result suggested complex interactions amongst the studied SNPs and ADRB3 rs4994 as candidate influencing GBC susceptibility.

  3. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety.

  4. Multisensory interactions elicited by audiovisual stimuli presented peripherally in a visual attention task: a behavioral and event-related potential study in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinglong; Li, Qi; Bai, Ou; Touge, Tetsuo

    2009-12-01

    We applied behavioral and event-related potential measurements to study human multisensory interactions induced by audiovisual (AV) stimuli presented peripherally in a visual attention task in which an irrelevant auditory stimulus occasionally accompanied the visual stimulus. A stream of visual, auditory, and AV stimuli was randomly presented to the left or right side of the subjects; subjects covertly attended to the visual stimuli on either the left or right side and promptly responded to visual targets on that side. Behavioral results showed that responses to AV stimuli were faster and more accurate than those to visual stimuli only. Three event-related potential components related to AV interactions were identified: (1) over the right temporal area, approximately 200 to 220 milliseconds; (2) over the centromedial area, approximately 290 to 310 milliseconds; and (3) over the left and right ventral temporal area, approximately 290 to 310 milliseconds. We found that these interaction effects occurred slightly later than those reported in previously published AV interaction studies in which AV stimuli were presented centrally. Our results suggest that the retinotopic location of stimuli affects AV interactions occurring at later stages of cognitive processing in response to a visual attention task.

  5. Identification of New Potential Interaction Partners for Human Cytoplasmic Copper Chaperone Atox1: Roles in Gene Regulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Öhrvik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The human copper (Cu chaperone Atox1 delivers Cu to P1B type ATPases in the Golgi network, for incorporation into essential Cu-dependent enzymes. Atox1 homologs are found in most organisms; it is a 68-residue ferredoxin-fold protein that binds Cu in a conserved surface-exposed Cys-X-X-Cys (CXXC motif. In addition to its well-documented cytoplasmic chaperone function, in 2008 Atox1 was suggested to have functionality in the nucleus. To identify new interactions partners of Atox1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with a large human placenta library of cDNA fragments using Atox1 as bait. Among 98 million fragments investigated, 25 proteins were found to be confident interaction partners. Nine of these were uncharacterized proteins, and the remaining 16 proteins were analyzed by bioinformatics with respect to cell localization, tissue distribution, function, sequence motifs, three-dimensional structures and interaction networks. Several of the hits were eukaryotic-specific proteins interacting with DNA or RNA implying that Atox1 may act as a modulator of gene regulation. Notably, because many of the identified proteins contain CXXC motifs, similarly to the Cu transport reactions, interactions between these and Atox1 may be mediated by Cu.

  6. Potential role of gene-environment interactions in ion transport mechanisms in the etiology of renal cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Ivette A. G.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; van Engeland, Manon; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; Keszei, András P.; Hogervorst, Janneke G. F.; Schouten, Leo J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ion transport mechanism (ITM) in renal cell cancer (RCC) etiology using gene-environment interactions between candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated environmental factors, including dietary intakes of sodium, potassium and fluid, hypertension and diuretic medication. A literature-based selection of 13 SNPs in ten ITM genes were successfully genotyped in toenail DNA of 3,048 subcohort members and 419 RCC cases from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Diet and lifestyle were measured with baseline questionnaires. Cox regression analyses were conducted for main effects and gene-environment interactions. ADD1_rs4961 was significantly associated with RCC risk, showing a Hazard Ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.01–1.53) for the GT + TT (versus GG) genotype. Four of 65 tested gene-environment interactions were statistically significant. Three of these interactions clustered in SLC9A3_rs4957061, including the ones with fluid and potassium intake, and diuretic medication. For fluid intake, the RCC risk was significantly lower for high versus low intake in participants with the CC genotype (HR(95% CI): 0.47(0.26–0.86)), but not for the CT + TT genotype (P-interaction = 0.002). None of the main genetic effects and gene-environment interactions remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Data do not support the general hypothesis that the ITM is a disease mechanism in RCC etiology. PMID:27686058

  7. Exact equivalence between one-dimensional Bose gases interacting via hard-sphere and zero-range potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valiente, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    We prove the equivalence between the hard-sphere Bose gas and a system with momentum-dependent zero-range interactions in one spatial dimension, which we call extended hard-sphere Bose gas. The two-body interaction in the latter model has the advantage of being a regular pseudopotential. The most......, identified with the hard-sphere diameter only when it is positive. We are then able to obtain, directly in the thermodynamic limit, the ground-state energy of the strongly repulsive Lieb-Liniger gas and, more importantly, the energy of the lowest-lying super Tonks-Girardeau gas state with finite, strongly...... attractive interactions, in perturbation theory from the novel extended hard-sphere Bose gas....

  8. Effect of School Pretend Play on Preschoolers' Social Competence in Peer Interactions: Gender as a Potential Moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Wing-kai; Cheng, Rebecca Wing-yi

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the moderating effect of gender on the causal relationships between different school play activities (pretend and non-pretend play) and social competence in peer interactions among a sample of Hong Kong children. Participants were 60 Hong Kong preschoolers (mean age = 5.44, 36.67% female). Children with matched home pretend…

  9. Potential drug–drug interactions in pediatric wards of Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henok Getachew

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The study showed that most of the interactions had moderate severity followed by minor severity. Age and polypharmacy were found to show statistically significant association with the occurrence of PDDIs. Due to sensitive nature of pediatrics population, close monitoring is recommended for the detection and management of PDDIs to prevent its negative consequences.

  10. Potential for alcohol and drug interactions in older adults: evidence from the Irish longitudinal study on ageing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cousins, Gráinne

    2014-08-01

    Older adults are susceptible to adverse effects from the concomitant use of prescription medications and alcohol. This study estimates the prevalence of exposure to alcohol interactive (AI) medications and concomitant alcohol use by therapeutic class in a large, nationally representative sample of older adults.

  11. Constraining early and interacting dark energy with gravitational wave standard sirens: the potential of the eLISA mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, Chiara; Tamanini, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    We perform a forecast analysis of the capability of the eLISA space-based interferometer to constrain models of early and interacting dark energy using gravitational wave standard sirens. We employ simulated catalogues of standard sirens given by merging massive black hole binaries visible by eLISA, with an electromagnetic counterpart detectable by future telescopes. We consider three-arms mission designs with arm length of 1, 2 and 5 million km, 5 years of mission duration and the best-level low frequency noise as recently tested by the LISA Pathfinder. Standard sirens with eLISA give access to an intermediate range of redshift 1 lesssim z lesssim 8, and can therefore provide competitive constraints on models where the onset of the deviation from ΛCDM (i.e. the epoch when early dark energy starts to be non-negligible, or when the interaction with dark matter begins) occurs relatively late, at z lesssim 6. If instead early or interacting dark energy is relevant already in the pre-recombination era, current cosmological probes (especially the cosmic microwave background) are more efficient than eLISA in constraining these models, except possibly in the interacting dark energy model if the energy exchange is proportional to the energy density of dark energy.

  12. Ab initio interaction potentials and scattering lengths for ultracold mixtures of metastable helium and alkali-metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedziera, Dariusz; Mentel, Łukasz; Żuchowski, Piotr S.; Knoop, Steven

    2015-06-01

    We have obtained accurate ab initio +4Σ quartet potentials for the diatomic metastable triplet helium+alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb) systems, using all-electron restricted open-shell coupled cluster singles and doubles with noniterative triples corrections CCSD(T) calculations and accurate calculations of the long-range C6 coefficients. These potentials provide accurate ab initio quartet scattering lengths, which for these many-electron systems is possible, because of the small reduced masses and shallow potentials that result in a small amount of bound states. Our results are relevant for ultracold metastable triplet helium+alkali-metal mixture experiments.

  13. The fusion dynamics for a positive Q-value system: $^{27}$Al+$^{45}$Sc using SEDF and role of spin-orbit interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Dalip Singh

    2016-01-01

    The fusion dynamics for a positive Q-value systems: $^{27}$Al+$^{45}$Sc, at near and deep sub-barrier energies has been investigated using the proximity potentials of Skyrme energy density formalism in semi classical extended Thomas Fermi approach for arbitrarily chosen Skyrme forces: SLy4, SIV, SGII and Proximity77 of Blocki and co-workers. The calculated fusion excitation functions for the proximity potentials obtained for Skyrme forces mentioned above and for the Proximity77 have been compared with experimental data. The proximity potential for Skyrme force SIV is found to be the best and is used in the calculations of the quantities like logarithmic derivative, barriers distributions and $S$-factor. Further, the role of spin-orbit interaction potential in the fusion dynamics of this system has been investigated.

  14. Collecting high-order interactions in an effective pairwise intermolecular potential using the hydrated ion concept: The hydration of Cf{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbis, Elsa; Pappalardo, Rafael R.; Marcos, Enrique Sánchez, E-mail: sanchez@us.es [Departmento de Química Física, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Seville (Spain); Hernández-Cobos, Jorge [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2014-06-07

    This work proposes a new methodology to build interaction potentials between a highly charged metal cation and water molecules. These potentials, which can be used in classical computer simulations, have been fitted to reproduce quantum mechanical interaction energies (MP2 and BP86) for a wide range of [M(H{sub 2}O){sub n}]{sup m+}(H{sub 2}O){sub ℓ} clusters (n going from 6 to 10 and ℓ from 0 to 18). A flexible and polarizable water shell model (Mobile Charge Density of Harmonic Oscillator) has been coupled to the cation-water potential. The simultaneous consideration of poly-hydrated clusters and the polarizability of the interacting particles allows the inclusion of the most important many-body effects in the new polarizable potential. Applications have been centered on the californium, Cf(III) the heaviest actinoid experimentally studied in solution. Two different strategies to select a set of about 2000 structures which are used for the potential building were checked. Monte Carlo simulations of Cf(III)+500 H{sub 2}O for three of the intermolecular potentials predict an aquaion structure with coordination number close to 8 and average R{sub Cf−−O} in the range 2.43–2.48 Å, whereas the fourth one is closer to 9 with R{sub Cf−−O} = 2.54 Å. Simulated EXAFS spectra derived from the structural Monte Carlo distribution compares fairly well with the available experimental spectrum for the simulations bearing 8 water molecules. An angular distribution similar to that of a square antiprism is found for the octa-coordination.

  15. Physiological effects of climate warming on flowering plants and insect pollinators and potential consequences for their interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria L.SCAVEN; Nicole E.RAFFERTY

    2013-01-01

    Growing concern about the influence of climate change on flowering plants,pollinators,and the mutualistic interactions between them has led to a recent surge in research.Much of this research has addressed the consequences of warming for phenological and distributional shifts.In contrast,relatively little is known about the physiological responses of plants and insect pollinators to climate warming and,in particular,how these responses might affect plant-pollinator interactions.Here,we summabrize the direct physiological effects of temperature on flowering plants and pollinating insects to highlight ways in which plant and pollinator responses could affect floral resources for pollinators,and pollination success for plants,respectively.We also consider the overall effects of these responses on plant-pollinator interaction networks.Plant responses to warming,which include altered flower,nectar,and pollen production,could modify floral resource availability and reproductive output of pollinating insects.Similarly,pollinator responses,such as altered foraging activity,body size,and life span,could affect patterns of pollen flow and pollination success of flowering plants.As a result,network structure could be altered as interactions are gained and lost,weakened and strengthened,even without the gain or loss of species or temporal overlap.Future research that addresses not only how plant and pollinator physiology are affected by warming but also how responses scale up to affect interactions and networks should allow us to better understand and predict the effects of climate change on this important ecosystem service.

  16. One-dimensional scattering problem, self-adjoint extensions, renormalizations and point $\\delta$-interactions for Coulomb potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mineev, V S

    2003-01-01

    In the paper the one-dimensional one-center scattering problem with the initial potential $\\alpha |x|^{-1}$ on the whole axis is treated and reduced to the search for allowable self-adjoint extensions. Using the laws of conservation as necessary conditions in the singular point alongside with account of the analytical structure of fundamental solutions, it allows us to receive exact expressions for the wave functions (i.e. for the boundary conditions), scattering coefficients and the singular corrections to the potential, as well as the corresponding bound state spectrum. It turns out that the point $\\delta$-shaped correction to the potential should be present without fail at any choice of the allowable self-adjoint extension, moreover a form of these corrections corresponds to the form of renormalization terms obtained in quantum electrodynamics. Thus, the proposed method shows the unequivocal connection among the boundary conditions, scattering coefficients and $\\delta$-shaped additions to the potential. Ta...

  17. Cosmological solutions in string theory with dilaton self interaction potential; Soluciones cosmologicas en teoria de cuerdas con potencial de autointeraccion dilatonico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, C. [Departamento de Matematicas, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Biotecnologia, IPN, Av. Acueducto s/n Barrio La Laguna Ticoman, 07340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: cmora@acei.upibi.ipn.mx; Pimentel, L.O. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-lztapalapa, A.P. 44-534, 09340Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: lopr@xanum.uam.mx

    2003-07-01

    In this work we present homogeneous and isotropic cosmological solutions for the low energy limit of string theory with a self interacting potential for the scalar field. For a potential that is a linear combination of two exponential, a family of exact solutions are found for the different spatial curvatures. Among this family a non singular accelerating solution for positive curvature is singled out and the violation of the energy conditions for that solution is studied, and also its astrophysical consequences. The string coupling for this solution is finite. (Author)

  18. One-Range Addition Theorems in Terms of ψα-ETOs for STOs and Coulomb-Yukawa Like Correlated Interaction Potentials of Integer and Noninteger Indices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.I.Guseinov

    2008-01-01

    @@ The expansion formulas in terms of complete orthonormal sets of ψα-exponential type orbitals are established for the Slater type orbitals and Coulomb-Yukawa-like correlated interaction potentials of integer and noninteger indices. These relations are used in obtaining their unsymmetrical and symmetrical one-range addition theorems.The final results are especially useful in the calculations of multicentre multielectron integrals occurring when Hartree-Fock-Roothaan and explicitly correlated methods are employed.

  19. Internal Josephson-like tunnelling in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates affected by sign of the atomic interaction and external trapping potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Bo; Liu Xun-Xu

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the Josephson-like tunnelling in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates coupled with microwave field, which is in respond to various attractive and repulsive atomic interaction under the various aspect ratio of trapping potential. It is very interesting to find that the dynamic of Josephson-like tunnelling can be controlled from fast damped oscillations to nondamped oscillation, and relative number of atoms changes from asymmetric occupation to symmetric occupation correspondingly.

  20. Toward optimized potential functions for protein-protein interactions in aqueous solutions: osmotic second virial coefficient calculations using the MARTINI coarse-grained force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Austin C; Andrews, Casey T; Elcock, Adrian H

    2013-09-10

    Coarse-grained (CG) simulation methods are now widely used to model the structure and dynamics of large biomolecular systems. One important issue for using such methods - especially with regard to using them to model, for example, intracellular environments - is to demonstrate that they can reproduce experimental data on the thermodynamics of protein-protein interactions in aqueous solutions. To examine this issue, we describe here simulations performed using the popular coarse-grained MARTINI force field, aimed at computing the thermodynamics of lysozyme and chymotrypsinogen self-interactions in aqueous solution. Using molecular dynamics simulations to compute potentials of mean force between a pair of protein molecules, we show that the original parameterization of the MARTINI force field is likely to significantly overestimate the strength of protein-protein interactions to the extent that the computed osmotic second virial coefficients are orders of magnitude more negative than experimental estimates. We then show that a simple down-scaling of the van der Waals parameters that describe the interactions between protein pseudo-atoms can bring the simulated thermodynamics into much closer agreement with experiment. Overall, the work shows that it is feasible to test explicit-solvent CG force fields directly against thermodynamic data for proteins in aqueous solutions, and highlights the potential usefulness of osmotic second virial coefficient measurements for fully parameterizing such force fields.

  1. Potential pharmacokinetic interactions of therapeutic cytokines or cytokine modulators on small-molecule drugs: mechanistic understanding via studies using in vitro systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The potential pharmacokinetic interactions between macromolecules and small-molecule drugs have received more and more attention with the increasing development of macromolecule therapeutics. Studies have shown that cytokines can differentially modulate drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, which raises concerns on the potential interactions of therapeutic cytokines and cytokine modulators on the disposition of small-molecule drugs. Although many in vitro studies have been conducted to characterize the effects of cytokines on drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, these studies were limited to only a handful of cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon. It is also challenging to translate these in vitro results to in vivo. In addition, information on the impact of cytokine modulators on drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters is rather limited. More research is needed in this area. The present review is to provide a summary of the in vitro findings on the pharmacokinetic interactions of therapeutic cytokines and cytokine modulators on small-molecule drugs. Discussion on current challenges in assessing these interactions is also included.

  2. Interaction of the mu-opioid receptor with GPR177 (Wntless inhibits Wnt secretion: potential implications for opioid dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stagljar Igor

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid agonist drugs produce analgesia. However, long-term exposure to opioid agonists may lead to opioid dependence. The analgesic and addictive properties of opioid agonist drugs are mediated primarily via the mu-opioid receptor (MOR. Opioid agonists appear to alter neuronal morphology in key brain regions implicated in the development of opioid dependence. However, the precise role of the MOR in the development of these neuronal alterations remains elusive. We hypothesize that identifying and characterizing novel MOR interacting proteins (MORIPs may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved in the development of opioid dependence. Results GPR177, the mammalian ortholog of Drosophila Wntless/Evi/Sprinter, was identified as a MORIP in a modified split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen. GPR177 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that plays a critical role in mediating Wnt protein secretion from Wnt producing cells. The MOR/GPR177 interaction was validated in pulldown, coimmunoprecipitation, and colocalization studies using mammalian tissue culture cells. The interaction was also observed in rodent brain, where MOR and GPR177 were coexpressed in close spatial proximity within striatal neurons. At the cellular level, morphine treatment caused a shift in the distribution of GPR177 from cytosol to the cell surface, leading to enhanced MOR/GPR177 complex formation at the cell periphery and the inhibition of Wnt protein secretion. Conclusions It is known that chronic morphine treatment decreases dendritic arborization and hippocampal neurogenesis, and Wnt proteins are essential for these processes. We therefore propose that the morphine-mediated MOR/GPR177 interaction may result in decreased Wnt secretion in the CNS, resulting in atrophy of dendritic arbors and decreased neurogenesis. Our results demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for GPR177 in regulating cellular response to opioid drugs.

  3. Constraining early and interacting dark energy with gravitational wave standard sirens: the potential of the eLISA mission

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    We perform a forecast analysis of the capability of the eLISA space-based interferometer to constrain models of early and interacting dark energy using gravitational wave standard sirens. We employ simulated catalogues of standard sirens given by merging massive black hole binaries visible by eLISA, with an electromagnetic counterpart detectable by future telescopes. We consider three-arms mission designs with arm length of 1, 2 and 5 million km, 5 years of mission duration and the best-level low frequency noise as recently tested by the LISA Pathfinder. Standard sirens with eLISA give access to an intermediate range of redshift $1\\lesssim z \\lesssim 8$, and can therefore provide competitive constraints on models where the onset of the deviation from $\\Lambda$CDM (i.e.~the epoch when early dark energy starts to be non-negligible, or when the interaction with dark matter begins) occurs relatively late, at $z\\lesssim 6$. If instead early or interacting dark energy is relevant already in the pre-recombination er...

  4. Investigating the Conformational Structure and Potential Site Interactions of SOD Inhibitors on Ec-SOD in Marine Mud Crab Scylla serrata: A Molecular Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Sablok, Gaurav; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Chainy, G B N

    2016-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) act as a first line of the enzymatic antioxidant defense system to control cellular superoxide anion toxicity. Previously, several inhibitors have been widely identified and catalogued for inhibition of SOD activity; however, still the information about the mechanism of interaction and points toward the inhibitor interactions in structures of SODs in general and in extracellular (Ec)-SOD in particular is still in naive. In the present research, we present an insight to elucidate the molecular basis of interactions of SOD inhibitors with Ec-SOD in mud crab Scylla serrata using molecular modeling and docking approaches. Different inhibitors of SOD such as hydrogen peroxide [Formula: see text], potassium cyanide, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), [Formula: see text]-mercaptoethanol and dithiocarbamate were screened to understand the potential sites that may act as sites for cleavage or blocking in the protein. SOD-SDS and [Formula: see text] complex interactions indicate residues Pro72 and Asp102 of the predicted crab Ec-SOD as common targets. The GOLD result indicates that Pro72, Asp102 and Thr103 are commonly acting as the site of interaction in Ec-SOD of S. serrata with SOD inhibitors. For the first time, the results of this study provide an insight into the structural properties of Ec-SOD of S. serrata and define the possible involvements between the amino acids present in its active sites, i.e., in the regions from 70 to 84 and from 101 to 103 and different inhibitors.

  5. The chaperone and potential mannan-binding lectin (MBL) co-receptor calreticulin interacts with MBL through the binding site for MBL-associated serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagh, Rasmus; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga; Hansen, Paul R; Mangor, Julie; Thielens, Nicole; Arlaud, Gérard J; Kongerslev, Leif; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2008-02-01

    The chaperone calreticulin has been suggested to function as a C1q and collectin receptor. The interaction of calreticulin with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) was investigated by solid-phase binding assays. Calreticulin showed saturable and time-dependent binding to recombinant MBL, provided that MBL was immobilized on a solid surface or bound to mannan on a surface. The binding was non-covalent and biphasic with an initial salt-sensitive phase followed by a more stable salt-insensitive interaction. For plasma-derived MBL, known to be complexed with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), no binding was observed. Interaction of calreticulin with recombinant MBL was fully inhibited by recombinant MASP-2, MASP-3 and MAp19, but not by the MASP-2 D105G and MAp19 Y59A variants characterized by defective MBL binding ability. Furthermore, MBL point mutants with impaired MASP binding showed no interaction with calreticulin. Comparative analysis of MBL with complement component C1q, its counterpart of the classical pathway, revealed that they display similar binding characteristics for calreticulin, providing further indication that calreticulin is a common co-receptor/chaperone for both proteins. In conclusion, the potential MBL co-receptor calreticulin binds to MBL at the MASP binding site and the interaction may involve a conformational change in MBL.

  6. Interactions of surfactants with a water treatment protein from Moringa oleifera seeds in solution studied by zeta-potential and light scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaambwa, Habauka M; Rennie, Adrian R

    2012-04-01

    Protein extracted from Moringa oleifera (MO) seeds has been advocated as a cheap and environmental friendly alternative to ionic flocculants for water purification. However, the nature and mechanism of its interaction with particles in water, as well as with dissolved surface-active molecules, are not well understood. In this article, we report studies of the protein and its interaction with four surfactants using dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta-potential and turbidity measurements. Zeta-potential measurements identified points of charge reversal and the turbidity and DLS measurements were used to characterize the microstructure and size of protein-surfactant complexes. From the points of charge reversal, it was estimated that 7 anions are required to neutralize the positive charges of each protein molecule at pH 7. For protein mixtures with sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl di-acid sodium salt, the peak in turbidity corresponds to concentrations with a large change in zeta-potential. No turbidity was observed for protein mixtures with either the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 or the zwitterionic surfactant N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate. Changes of pH in the range 4-10 have little effect on the zeta-potential, turbidity, and the hydrodynamic radius reflecting the high isoelectric point of the protein. Addition of small amounts of salt has little effect on the size of protein in solution. These results are discussed in the context of the use of the MO protein in water treatment.

  7. Oscillatory interaction between dorsal root excitability and dorsal root potentials in the spinal cord of the turtle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgado-Lezama, R; Perrier, J F; Hounsgaard, J

    1999-01-01

    The response to dorsal root stimulation, at one to two times threshold, was investigated in the isolated cervical enlargement of the turtle spinal cord. At frequencies near 10 Hz the synaptic response in motoneurons and the cord dorsum potential, after an initial lag time, oscillated in amplitude...

  8. Chemical Potential for the Interacting Classical Gas and the Ideal Quantum Gas Obeying a Generalized Exclusion Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, F. J.; Olivares-Quiroz, L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we address the concept of the chemical potential [mu] in classical and quantum gases towards the calculation of the equation of state [mu] = [mu](n, T) where n is the particle density and "T" the absolute temperature using the methods of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two cases seldom discussed in elementary textbooks are…

  9. Web Based Interactive Software in International Business: The Case of the Global Market Potential System Online (GMPSO[C])

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janavaras, Basil J.; Gomes, Emanuel; Young, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to confirm whether students using the Global Market Potential System Online (GMPSO) web based software, (http://globalmarketpotential.com), for their class project enhanced their knowledge and understanding of international business. The challenge most business instructors and practitioners face is to determine how to bring the…

  10. Gold nanorods: their potential for photothermal therapeutics and drug delivery, tempered by the complexity of their biological interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Thompson, Lucas B; Boulos, Stefano P; Sisco, Patrick N; Murphy, Catherine J

    2012-02-01

    Gold nanorods have promising applications in the fields of drug delivery and photothermal therapy. These promises arise from the nanorods' unique optical and photothermal properties, the availability of synthetic protocols that can tune the size and shape of the particles, the ability to modify the surface and conjugate drugs/molecules to the nanorods, and the relative biocompatibility of gold nanorods. In this review, current progress in using gold nanorods as phototherapeutic agents and as drug delivery vehicles is summarized. Issues of dosage, toxicity and biological interactions at three levels (biological media alone; cells; whole organisms) are discussed, concluding with recommendations for future work in this area.

  11. Light sgoldstino's interactions analysis and prospects for potential discovery in electron beam dump experiment at CERN SPS

    OpenAIRE

    Astapov, K. O.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we have discussed light sgoldstino in context of MSSM model. We have analyzed couplings of scalar sgoldstino to SM particles, namely to photons, $Z^0$ bosons, leptons and quarks. We also took into account the impact on those interactions of the admixture of lightest MSSM Higgs scalar in the sgoldstino state. The signal rate of rare decays at CERN electron beam dump experiment NA64 for the scalar sgoldstino has been estimated. Expected signal rate allowed us to exclude som...

  12. van der Waals interactions and dipole polarizabilities of lanthanides: Tm(2F)-He and Yb(1S)-He potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, Alexei A.; Szczȩśniak, Małgorzata M.; Chałasiński, Grzegorz

    2006-03-01

    Anisotropic dipole polarizabilities of Tm(F2),Tm+2(F2), and Yb(S1) are calculated using the finite-field multireference averaged quadratic coupled cluster (MR-AQCC) (Tm and Tm+2) and RCCSD(T) (Yb) methods with small-core relativistic pseudopotentials ECP28MWB combined with the augmented ANO basis sets. The lanthanide atoms are strongly polarizable with the scalar part originating from the 6s electrons and the tensorial part from the open 4f shells. The adiabatic interaction potentials Σ+2,Π2,Δ2, and Φ2 of Tm(F2)-He and Tm+2(F2)-He were examined by the multireference approaches, multireference configuration interaction and MR-AQCC, using the basis sets designed in the polarizability calculations. A closed-shell lanthanide system Yb(S1)-He was included for comparison. The Tm-He Σ+2,Π2,Δ2, and Φ2 interaction potentials are very shallow and nearly degenerate (within 0.01cm-1), with the well depths in the range of 2.35-2.36cm-1 at R =6.17Å. The basis-set saturated well depths are expected to be larger by ca. 25%, as estimated using the bond-function augmented basis set. The interactions of lanthanide atoms with He are one order of magnitude less anisotropic than those involving first-row transition metal atoms. The suppression of anisotropy is chiefly attributed to the screening effected by the 6s shell. When these electrons are removed as in the di-cation complex Tm+2(F2)-He, the potentials deepen to a thousand wave number range and their anisotropy is enhanced 500-fold.

  13. {\\kappa} state solutions for the fermionic massive spin-1/2 particles interacting with double ring-shaped Kratzer and oscillator potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Oyewumi, K J; Onate, C A; Oluwadare, O J; Yahya, W A

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, an extensive survey on various wave equations of relativistic quantum mechanics with different types of potential interactions has been a line of great interest. In this regime, special attention has been given to the Dirac equation because the spin-1/2 fermions represent the most frequent building blocks of the molecules and atoms. Motivated by the considerable interest in this equation and its relativistic symmetries (spin and pseudospin) in the presence of solvable potential model, we attempt to obtain the relativistic bound states solution of the Dirac equation with double ring-shaped Kratzer and oscillator potentials under the condition of spin and pseudospin symmetries. The solutions are reported for arbitrary quantum number in a compact form. the analytic bound state energy eigenvalues and the associated upper- and lower-spinor components of two Dirac particles have been found. Several typical numerical results of the relativistic eigenenergies have also been presented. We found that t...

  14. Quantum dynamical simulation of the scattering of Ar from a frozen LiF(100) surface based on a first principles interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azuri, Asaf; Pollak, Eli, E-mail: eli.pollak@weizmann.ac.il [Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovoth (Israel)

    2015-07-07

    In-plane two and three dimensional diffraction patterns are computed for the vertical scattering of an Ar atom from a frozen LiF(100) surface. Suitable collimation of the incoming wavepacket serves to reveal the quantum mechanical diffraction. The interaction potential is based on a fit to an ab initio potential calculated using density functional theory with dispersion corrections. Due to the potential coupling found between the two horizontal surface directions, there are noticeable differences between the quantum angular distributions computed for two and three dimensional scattering. The quantum results are compared to analogous classical Wigner computations on the same surface and with the same conditions. The classical dynamics largely provides the envelope for the quantum diffractive scattering. The classical results also show that the corrugation along the [110] direction of the surface is smaller than along the [100] direction, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations of unimodal and bimodal scattering for the [110] and [100] directions, respectively.

  15. Dimensional reduction in Bose-Einstein condensed clouds of atoms confined in tight potentials of any geometry and any interaction strength

    CERN Document Server

    Sandin, P; Gulliksson, M; Smyrnakis, J; Magiropoulos, M; Kavoulakis, G M

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by numerous experiments on Bose-Einstein condensed atoms which have been performed in tight trapping potentials of various geometries (elongated and/or toroidal/annular), we develop a general method which allows us to reduce the corresponding three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the order parameter into an effectively one-dimensional equation, taking into account the interactions (i.e., treating the width of the transverse profile variationally) and the curvature of the trapping potential. As an application of our model we consider atoms which rotate in a toroidal trapping potential. We evaluate the state of lowest energy for a fixed value of the angular momentum within various approximations of the effectively one-dimensional model and compare our results with the full solution of the three-dimensional problem, thus getting evidence for the accuracy of our model.

  16. Dimensional reduction in Bose-Einstein condensed clouds of atoms confined in tight potentials of any geometry and any interaction strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandin, P.; Ögren, M.; Gulliksson, M.; Smyrnakis, J.; Magiropoulos, M.; Kavoulakis, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by numerous experiments on Bose-Einstein condensed atoms which have been performed in tight trapping potentials of various geometries [elongated and/or toroidal (annular)], we develop a general method which allows us to reduce the corresponding three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the order parameter into an effectively one-dimensional equation, taking into account the interactions (i.e., treating the width of the transverse profile variationally) and the curvature of the trapping potential. As an application of our model we consider atoms which rotate in a toroidal trapping potential. We evaluate the state of lowest energy for a fixed value of the angular momentum within various approximations of the effectively one-dimensional model and compare our results with the full solution of the three-dimensional problem, thus getting evidence for the accuracy of our model.

  17. An improved density functional theory description of the Ge(100)c(4×2) surface using the MBJLDA xc potential and spin-orbit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Phillip V; Radny, Marian W; Shah, G Ali

    2013-02-01

    The MBJLDA xc potential (modified Becke-Johnson exchange potential with local density approximation correlation) proposed by Tran and Blaha has been designed and shown to significantly improve the description of the fundamental energy gaps of a wide range of bulk materials. Recently we reported that combining this MBJLDA xc potential with spin-orbit interactions and local density approximation pseudopotentials within the plane wave density functional method led to results for bulk germanium that were at least as accurate as those obtained from far more sophisticated and computationally expensive methods such as the GW method. Here we demonstrate that the application of this approach to the Ge(100)c(4×2) surface yields results that are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data.

  18. Changes of antioxidant potential of pasta fortified with parsley (Petroselinum Crispum mill. leaves in the light of protein-phenolics interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Sęczyk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pasta is considered as an effective carrier of prohealth ingredients in food fortifi cation. The aim of this study was to examine the changes of antioxidant potential of wheat pasta affected by fortifi cation with powdered parsley leaves. A special attention was paid to effectiveness of fortifi cation in the light of proteinphenolic interactions. Material and methods. To improve antioxidant activity of pasta, part of wheat fl our was replaced with powdered parsley leaves from 1% to 4% (w/w. The total phenolics content was determined with Folin-Ciocalteau reagent. Antioxidant capacity was evaluated using in vitro assays – abilities to scavenge free radicals (ABTS and to reduce iron (III (FRAP. Predicted phenolic contents and antioxidant activity were calculated. To determine the protein-phenolics interactions SE-HPLC and SDS-PAGE techniques were used. Results. Fortifi cation of pasta had a positive effect on its phenolic contents and antioxidant properties. The highest phenolics level and antioxidant activity of pasta were obtained by supplementation with 4% of parsley leaves. However, in most cases experimental values were signifi cantly lower than those predicted. The protein profi les obtained after SDS-PAGE differed signifi cantly among control and enriched pasta. Furthermore, the addition of parsley leaves to pasta resulted in increase of peaks areas obtained by SE-HPLC. Results indicate the occurrence of the protein-phenolics interactions in fortifi ed pasta. Conclusion. Overall, the effectiveness of fortifi cation and consequently biological effect is limited by many factors including interactions between phenolics and pasta proteins. In the light of this results the study of potential interaction of bioactive supplements with food matrix should be taken into account during designing new functional food products.

  19. Review of potential interactions between stocked rainbow trout and listed Snake River sockeye salmon in Pettit Lake Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuscher, D.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if hatchery rainbow trout compete with or prey on juvenile Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka in Pettit Lake, Idaho. In 1995, a total of 8,570 age-0 sockeye and 4,000 hatchery rainbow trout were released in Pettit Lake. After releasing the fish, gillnets were set in the pelagic and littoral zones to collected diet and spatial distribution data. Interactions were assessed monthly from June 1995 through March 1996. Competition for food was discounted based on extremely low diet overlap results observed throughout the sample period. Conversely, predation interactions were more significant. A total of 119 rainbow trout stomachs were analyzed, two contained O. nerka. The predation was limited to one sample period, but when extrapolated to the whole rainbow trout populations results in significant losses. Total consumption of O. nerka by rainbow trout ranged from an estimated 10 to 23% of initial stocking numbers. Predation results contradict earlier findings that stocked rainbow trout do not prey on wild kokanee or sockeye in the Sawtooth Lakes. The contradiction may be explained by a combination of poorly adapted hatchery sockeye and a littoral release site that forced spatial overlap that was not occurring in the wild populations. Releasing sockeye in the pelagic zone may have reduced or eliminated predation losses to rainbow trout.

  20. Five ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for hydrated NaCl and NaF. I. Two-body interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M; Kamarchik, Eugene

    2016-03-21

    We report full-dimensional, ab initio-based potentials and dipole moment surfaces for NaCl, NaF, Na(+)H2O, F(-)H2O, and Cl(-)H2O. The NaCl and NaF potentials are diabatic ones that dissociate to ions. These are obtained using spline fits to CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z energies. In addition, non-linear least square fits using the Born-Mayer-Huggins potential are presented, providing accurate parameters based strictly on the current ab initio energies. The long-range behavior of the NaCl and NaF potentials is shown to go, as expected, accurately to the point-charge Coulomb interaction. The three ion-H2O potentials are permutationally invariant fits to roughly 20,000 coupled cluster CCSD(T) energies (awCVTZ basis for Na(+) and aVTZ basis for Cl(-) and F(-)), over a large range of distances and H2O intramolecular configurations. These potentials are switched accurately in the long range to the analytical ion-dipole interactions, to improve computational efficiency. Dipole moment surfaces are fits to MP2 data; for the ion-ion cases, these are well described in the intermediate- and long-range by the simple point-charge expression. The performance of these new fits is examined by direct comparison to additional ab initio energies and dipole moments along various cuts. Equilibrium structures, harmonic frequencies, and electronic dissociation energies are also reported and compared to direct ab initio results. These indicate the high fidelity of the new PESs.

  1. Kinetic interactions of a neuropathy potentiator (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) with the neuropathy target esterase and other membrane bound esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estévez, Jorge

    2014-02-01

    Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) is a protease and esterase inhibitor that causes protection, or potentiation/"promotion," of organophosphorus delayed neuropathy (OPIDN), depending on whether it is dosed before or after an inducer of delayed neuropathy, such as mipafox. The molecular target of the potentiation/promotion of OPIDN has not yet been identified. The kinetic data of phenyl valerate esterase inhibition by PMSF were obtained with membrane chicken brain fractions, the animal model and tissue in which neuropathy target esterase (NTE) was first described. Data were analyzed using a kinetic model with a multienzymatic system in which inhibition, simultaneous chemical hydrolysis of the inhibitor and "ongoing inhibition" (inhibition during the substrate reaction) were considered. Three main esterase components were discriminated: two sensitive enzymatic entities representing 44 and 41 %, with I 50 (20 min) of 35 and 198 μM at 37 °C, respectively, and a resistant fraction of 15 % of activity. The estimated constant of the chemical hydrolysis of PMSF was also calculated (kh = 0.28 min(-1)). Four esterase components were globally identified considering also previously data with paraoxon and mipafox: EPα (4-8 %), highly sensitive to paraoxon and mipafox, spontaneously reactivates after inhibition with paraoxon, and resistant to PMSF; EPβ (38-41 %), sensitive to paraoxon and PMSF, but practically resistant to mipafox, this esterase component has the kinetic characteristics expected for the PMSF potentiator target, even though paraoxon cannot be a potentiator in vivo due to high AChE inhibition; EPγ (NTE) (39-48 %), paraoxon-resistant and sensitive to the micromolar concentration of mipafox and PMSF; and EPδ (10 %), resistant to all the inhibitors assayed. This kinetic characterization study is needed for further isolation and molecular characterization studies, and these PMSF phenyl valerate esterase components will have to be considered in further studies

  2. Iron overload causes osteoporosis in thalassemia major patients through interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Perrotta, Silverio; Bellini, Giulia; Luongo, Livio; Tortora, Chiara; Siniscalco, Dario; Francese, Matteo; Torella, Marco; Nobili, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Maione, Sabatino

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bone resorption in β-thalassemia major is multifactorial and our understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remains incomplete. Considering the emerging importance of the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system in bone metabolism, it may be instructive to examine a potential role for this system in the development of osteoporosis in patients with β-thalassemia major and its relationship with iron overload and iron chelation therapy. This study demonstrates that, in thalassemic-derived osteoclasts, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression inversely correlates with femoral and lumbar bone mineral density, and directly correlates with ferritin levels and liver iron concentration. The vanilloid agonist resiniferatoxin dramatically reduces cathepsin K levels and osteoclast numbers in vitro, without affecting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. The iron chelators deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox decrease both tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K expression, as well as osteoclast activity. Taken together, these data show that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 activation/desensitization influences tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression and activity, and this effect is dependent on iron, suggesting a pivotal role for iron overload in the dysregulation of bone metabolism in patients with thalassemia major. Our applied pharmacology provides evidence for the potential of iron chelators to abrogate these effects by reducing osteoclast activity. Whether iron chelation therapy is capable of restoring bone health in humans requires further study, but the potential to provide dual benefits for patients with β-thalassemia major –preventing iron-overload and alleviating associated osteoporotic changes – is exciting. PMID:25216685

  3. Ab initio interaction potentials for X and B excited states of He-I{sub 2} for studying dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosmiti, Rita; Garcia-Gutierrez, Leonor; Delgado-Tellez, Laura; Valdes, Alvaro; Villarreal, Pablo; Delgado-Barrio, Gerardo, E-mail: rita@imaff.cfmac.csic.e [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-11-01

    Ab initio CCSD(T) and MRCI approaches were employed to construct potential energy surfaces of the ground and the B electronic excited states of He-I{sub 2} complex, while full quantum mechanical methods were applied to study its spectroscopy and dynamics. A description of the approach adopted, together with the results obtained and their comparison with recent experimental data, as well as further improvements are presented.

  4. Electron Flow in Multiheme Bacterial Cytochromes is a Balancing Act Between Heme Electronic Interaction and Redox Potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen

    2014-01-14

    The naturally widespread process of electron transfer from metal reducing bacteria to extracellular solid metal oxides entails unique biomolecular machinery optimized for long-range electron transport. To perform this function efficiently microorganisms have adapted multi-heme c-type cytochromes to arrange heme cofactors into wires that cooperatively span the cellular envelope, transmitting electrons along distances greater than 100 Angstroms. Implications and opportunities for bionanotechnological device design are self-evident. However, at the molecular level how these proteins shuttle electrons along their heme wires, navigating intraprotein intersections and interprotein interfaces effciently, remains a mystery so far inaccessible to experiment. To shed light on this critical topic, we carried out extensive computer simulations to calculate Marcus theory quantities for electron transfer along the ten heme cofactors in the recently crystallized outer membrane cytochrome MtrF. The combination of electronic coupling matrix elements with free energy calculations of heme redox potentials and reorganization energies for heme-to-heme electron transfer allows the step-wise and overall electron transfer rate to be estimated and understood in terms of structural and dynamical characteristics of the protein. By solving a master equation for electron hopping, we estimate an intrinsic, maximum possible electron flux through solvated MtrF of 104-105 s-1, consistent with recently measured rates for the related MtrCAB protein complex. Intriguingly, this flux must navigate thermodynamically uphill steps past low potential hemes. Our calculations show that the rapid electron transport through MtrF is the result of a clear correlation between heme redox potential and the strength of electronic coupling along the wire: Thermodynamically uphill steps occur only between electronically well connected stacked heme pairs. This suggests that the protein evolved to harbor low potential

  5. Potential energy curves for the interaction of a low-energy positron with matter: The case He+e{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohallem, Jose R. [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O. Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: rachid@fisica.ufmg.br; Rolim, Flavia [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade de Coimbra, FCT, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2007-02-15

    In this introductory exploration of the title theme, we treat a positron as a light nucleus and work within the quasi-molecule approximation to obtain, for the first time, adiabatic potential energy curves for its scattering by the He atom. We then show that different elastic and inelastic processes that contribute to the total scattering cross section can be rationalized in molecular terms as dissociation and non-adiabatic couplings. Particularly, some new insights on positronium yielding are presented.

  6. Interaction of deep levels and potential fluctuations in scattering and recombination phenomena in semi-insulating GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kažukauskas, V.; Storasta, J.; Vaitkus, J.-V.

    1996-08-01

    The complex influence of recombination centers and potential fluctuations of the band gap on the scattering and recombination phenomena in n-type semiinsulating liquid- encapsulated-Czochralski-grown GaAs were investigated by using the transient photoconductivity and photo-Hall effects. The inhomogeneities cause a hyperbolic decrease of nonequilibrium carrier concentration and the saturation of Hall mobility, while the exponential parts of the decay appear due to the recharge of deep levels. The mean recombination barrier heights of potential fluctuations were evaluated. We propose a complex ``island'' model of scattering and recombination centers, consisting of defect clusters and their associations around dislocations, surrounded by potential barriers. At low light intensities and at the temperatures below 330 K they are insulating for majority charge carriers, thus reducing an effective crystal volume and causing percolation transport effects. At the temperature higher than 330-360 K the main barrier of the island can be recharged or screened by nonequilibrium carriers and its fine barrier structure appears as an effective scatterer, causing a sharp decrease of the nonequilibrium Hall mobility. It was demonstrated that although doping with Sb reduce dislocation density, it can intensify the effect of smaller defects on transport phenomena.

  7. It's a dark, dark world: background evolution of interacting phiCDM models beyond simple exponential potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suprit; Singh, Parminder

    2016-05-01

    We study the background cosmological dynamics with a three component source content: a radiation fluid, a barotropic fluid to mimic the matter sector and a single scalar field which can act as dark energy giving rise to the late-time accelerated phase. Using the well-known dimensionless variables, we cast the dynamical equations into an autonomous system of ordinary differential equations (ASODE), which are studied by computing the fixed points and the conditions for their stability. The matter fluid and the scalar field are taken to be uncoupled at first and later, we consider a coupling between the two of the form Q = √(2/3)κβρṁphi where ρm is the barotropic fluid density. The key point of our analysis is that for the closure of ASODE, we only demand that the jerk, Γ = V V''/V'2 is a function of acceleration, z = -MpV'/V, that is, Γ = 1+f(z). In this way, we are able to accommodate a large class of potentials that goes beyond the simple exponential potentials. The analysis is completely generic and independent of the form of the potential for the scalar field. As an illustration and confirmation of the analysis, we consider f(z) of the forms μ/z2, μ/z, (μ-z)/z2 and (μ-z) to numerically compute the evolution of cosmological parameters with and without coupling. Implications of the approach and the results are discussed.

  8. Estimating spatial accessibility to facilities on the regional scale: an extended commuting-based interaction potential model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charreire Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing interest in the study of the relationships between individual health-related behaviours (e.g. food intake and physical activity and measurements of spatial accessibility to the associated facilities (e.g. food outlets and sport facilities. The aim of this study is to propose measurements of spatial accessibility to facilities on the regional scale, using aggregated data. We first used a potential accessibility model that partly makes it possible to overcome the limitations of the most frequently used indices such as the count of opportunities within a given neighbourhood. We then propose an extended model in order to take into account both home and work-based accessibility for a commuting population. Results Potential accessibility estimation provides a very different picture of the accessibility levels experienced by the population than the more classical "number of opportunities per census tract" index. The extended model for commuters increases the overall accessibility levels but this increase differs according to the urbanisation level. Strongest increases are observed in some rural municipalities with initial low accessibility levels. Distance to major urban poles seems to play an essential role. Conclusions Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that should integrate some aspects of travel behaviour. Our work supports the evidence that the choice of appropriate accessibility indices including both residential and non-residential environmental features is necessary. Such models have potential implications for providing relevant information to policy-makers in the field of public health.

  9. Ethanol-drug absorption interaction: potential for a significant effect on the plasma pharmacokinetics of ethanol vulnerable formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennernäs, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Generally, gastric emptying of a drug to the small intestine is controlled by gastric motor activity and is the main factor affecting the onset of absorption. Accordingly, the emptying rate from the stomach is mainly affected by the digestive state, the properties of the pharmaceutical formulation and the effect of drugs, posture and circadian rhythm. Variability in the gastric emptying of drugs is reflected in variability in the absorption rate and the shape of the plasma pharmacokinetic profile. When ethanol interacts with an oral controlled release product, such that the mechanism controlling drug release is impaired, the delivery of the dissolved dose into the small intestine and the consequent absorption may result in dangerously high plasma concentrations. For example, the maximal plasma concentration of hydromorphone has individually been shown to be increased as much as 16 times through in vivo testing as a result of this specific pharmacokinetic ethanol-drug formulation interaction. Thus, a pharmacokinetic ethanol-drug interaction is a very serious safety concern when substantially the entire dose from a controlled release product is rapidly emptied into the small intestine (dose dumping), having been largely dissolved in a strong alcoholic beverage in the stomach during a sufficient lag-time in gastric emptying. Based on the literature, a two hour time frame for screening the in vitro dissolution profile of a controlled release product in ethanol concentrations of up to 40% is strongly supported and may be considered as the absolute minimum standard. It is also evident that the dilution, absorption and metabolism of ethanol in the stomach are processes with a minor effect on the local ethanol concentration and that ethanol exposure will be highly dependent on the volume and ethanol concentration of the fluid ingested, together with the rate of intake and gastric emptying. When and in which patients a clinically significant dose dumping will happen is

  10. In Vitro Interaction of 5-Hydroxytrptamine with Cytosolic Molybdenum Hydroxylases as a Potential Inhibitor for Initial Rates Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Al-Mohizea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The role of 5-HT has been investigated in many behavioral activities. Thus, studies using raphe lesion showed that 5-HT is involved in sleep, general activity levels, habituation, aggression, pain sensitivity and morphine analgesia, avoidance behavior, self-stimulation and water consumption. Approach: The metabolic interaction between serotonin (5- hydroxytrptamine and indole-3-aldehyde and xanthine via aldehyde oxidase (EC 1.2.3.1 and xanthine oxidase (EC 1.1.3.22, respectively, were studied in liver tissue homogenate of Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs by following the decrease in substrate concentration using spectrophotometer. Homogenates of liver were incubated with indole-3-aldehyde in the presence and absence of serotonin or (chlorpromazine and allopurinol a potent and selective inhibitors for aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase, respectively. Oxidation of indole-3-aldehyde to indole-3-acetic acid was reduced up to 63.2% in the presence of serotonin (100 µM, while oxidation of xanthine to uric acid was reduced up to 51.6% under the same conditions. Results: In comparison, incubation of the substrates with their specific inhibitors (100 µM of chlorpromazine and 100 µM allopurinol give almost complete inhibition. These results demonstrate that in the guinea pig liver a metabolic interaction between serotonin and indole-3-aldehyde or xanthine via molybdenum hydroxylases system may take place in liver, which is the main tissue for xenobiotics detoxification. Conclusion: The overall conclusion from this research is that serotonin could be a protector for neurons and other tissue from the insult of oxidation of aldehydes and xanthines by molybdenum hydroxylases.

  11. Wastewater treatment plant effluent as a source of microplastics: review of the fate, chemical interactions and potential risks to aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziajahromi, Shima; Neale, Peta A; Leusch, Frederic D L

    2016-11-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent has been identified as a potential source of microplastics in the aquatic environment. Microplastics have recently been detected in wastewater effluent in Western Europe, Russia and the USA. As there are only a handful of studies on microplastics in wastewater, it is difficult to accurately determine the contribution of wastewater effluent as a source of microplastics. However, even the small amounts of microplastics detected in wastewater effluent may be a remarkable source given the large volumes of wastewater treatment effluent discharged to the aquatic environment annually. Further, there is strong evidence that microplastics can interact with wastewater-associated contaminants, which has the potential to transport chemicals to aquatic organisms after exposure to contaminated microplastics. In this review we apply lessons learned from the literature on microplastics in the aquatic environment and knowledge on current wastewater treatment technologies, with the aim of identifying the research gaps in terms of (i) the fate of microplastics in WWTPs, (ii) the potential interaction of wastewater-based microplastics with trace organic contaminants and metals, and (iii) the risk for aquatic organisms.

  12. Characterization of Long-Lasting Oatp Inhibition by Typical Inhibitor Cyclosporine A and In Vitro-In Vivo Discrepancy in Its Drug Interaction Potential in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Takayuki; Masuo, Yusuke; Kogi, Tatsuya; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Kato, Yukio

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative assessment of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is one of the major focuses in drug development. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate in vitro-in vivo discrepancy of DDI potential for prototypical organic anion transporting polypeptide (Oatp) inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) using rats. Plasma concentration of pravastatin, prototypical Oatp substrate, after oral administration was increased by CsA intravenously administered at 1 d before the pravastatin administration. The ratio of the area under the curve of pravastatin to the control was much higher than the R-values calculated using the plasma unbound concentrations of CsA and the inhibition constant (Ki) assessed in isolated hepatocytes, indicating in vitro-in vivo discrepancy. This interaction with pravastatin persisted for 3 d after CsA administration, demonstrating long-lasting inhibition in vivo. The Ki value for unbound CsA in the presence of serum was comparable with that in its absence. M1, the major metabolite of CsA inhibited pravastatin uptake at much higher concentration compared with its plasma unbound concentration. Thus, the DDI potential of CsA-mediated hepatic Oatp inhibition cannot be extrapolated from in vitro data, and this could be due to the long-lasting Oatp inhibition by CsA, but not the effect of plasma protein or metabolites.

  13. Image potential and stopping force in the interaction of fast ions with carbon nanotubes: The extended two-fluid hydrodynamic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karbunar, L., E-mail: ziloot@verat.net [School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Borka, D., E-mail: dusborka@vin.bg.ac.rs [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Radović, I., E-mail: iradovic@vin.bg.ac.rs [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the interaction of protons with carbon nanotubes under channeling conditions. • We use the linearized, 2D, two-fluid extended hydrodynamic model. • We analyze the influence of the angular mode for different types of nanotubes. • The image potential and stopping are calculated inside and outside the nanotube. • The angular and spatial distributions of channeled protons are computed. - Abstract: We study the interaction of charged particles with a (6, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) under channeling conditions by means of the linearized, two dimensional (2D), two-fluid extended hydrodynamic model. We use the model to calculate analytically and numerically the image potential and the stopping force for a proton moving parallel to the axis of the SWNT, both inside and outside the nanotube at the speeds from 0.5 a.u. to 15 a.u. The effects of different angular modes on the velocity dependence of the image potential are compared for a proton moving in different types of SWNTs. We also compute the spatial and angular distributions of protons in the 2D two-fluid extended hydrodynamic model and compare them with the 2D two-fluid hydrodynamic model with zero damping.

  14. Interaction between ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with human serum albumin as binary and ternary systems by multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahaki, Hanie, E-mail: hanieh.mahaki@gmail.com [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina; Chamani, Jamshidkhan [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reza Saberi, Mohammad [Medical Chemistry Department, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to describe the competition of ropinirole hydrochloride (RP) and aspirin (ASA) in binding to human serum albumin (HSA) in physiological buffer (pH=7.4) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta-potential measurements. Fluorescence analysis was used to define the binding and quenching properties of drug-HSA complexes in binary and ternary systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that in the presence of RP, the binding constant of HSA-ASA was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to result in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The effect of drugs on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD). The RLS method determined the critical aggregation concentration of drugs on HSA in binary and ternary systems that confirmed the zeta potential results. Structural modeling showed that the affinity of each of the drugs to HSA in binary and ternary systems confirms the spectroscopic results. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the interaction of ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined the critical induced aggregation concentration of both drugs on HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding mechanism of drugs as separate and simultaneous to HSA has been compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding site of both drugs as simultaneous effects on HSA has been determined.

  15. Realization of a Four Parameter Family of Generalized One-Dimensional Contact Interactions by Three Nearby Delta Potentials with Renormalized Strengths

    CERN Document Server

    Shigehara, T; Mishima, T; Cheon, T; Cheon, Taksu

    1999-01-01

    We propose a new method to construct a four parameter family of quantum-mechanical point interactions in one dimension, which is known as all possible self-adjoint extensions of the symmetric operator $T=-\\Delta \\lceil C^{\\infty}_{0}({\\bf R} \\backslash\\{0\\})$. It is achieved in the small distance limit of equally spaced three neighboring Dirac's $\\delta$ potentials. The strength for each $\\delta$ is appropriately renormalized according to the distance and it diverges, in general, in the small distance limit. The validity of our method is ensured by numerical calculations. In general cases except for usual $\\delta$, the wave function discontinuity appears around the interaction and one can observe such a tendency even at a finite distance level.

  16. The interaction of HAb18G/CD147 with integrin α6β1 and its implications for the invasion potential of human hepatoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Juan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HAb18G/CD147 plays pivotal roles in invasion by hepatoma cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Our previous study demonstrated that overexpression of HAb18G/CD147 promotes invasion by interacting with integrin α3β1. However, it has never been investigated whether α3β1 is solely responsible for this process or if other integrin family members also interact with HAb18G/CD147 in human hepatoma cells. Methods Human SMMC-7721 and FHCC98 cells were cultured and transfected with siRNA fragments against HAb18G/CD147. The expression levels of HAb18G/CD147 and integrin α6β1 were determined by immunofluorescent double-staining and confocal imaging analysis. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses were performed to examine the native conformations of HAb18G/CD147 and integrin α6β1. Invasion potential was evaluated with an invasion assay and gelatin zymography. Results We found that integrin α6β1 co-localizes and interacts with HAb18G/CD147 in human hepatoma cells. The enhancing effects of HAb18G/CD147 on invasion capacity and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs were partially blocked by integrin α6β1 antibodies (P 2+ mobilization, significantly reduced cell invasion potential and secretion of MMPs in human hepatoma cells (P Conclusion These results suggest that α6β1 interacts with HAb18G/CD147 to mediate tumor invasion and metastatic processes through the PI3K pathway.

  17. Impact of potential pregabalin or duloxetine drug–drug interactions on health care costs and utilization among Medicare members with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis JJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J Ellis,1 Alesia B Sadosky,2 Laura L Ten Eyck,1 Joseph C Cappelleri,2 Courtney R Brown,3 Brandon T Suehs,1 Bruce Parsons2 1Comprehensive Health Insights Inc., Louisville, KY, USA; 2Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA; 3Humana Inc., Louisville, KY, USA Purpose: To examine the impact of newly initiated pregabalin or duloxetine treatment on fibromyalgia (FM patients' encounters with potential drug–drug interactions (DDIs, the health care cost and utilization consequences of those interactions, and the impact of treatment on opioid utilization.Patients and methods: Subjects included those with an FM diagnosis, a pregabalin or duloxetine prescription claim (index event, ≥1 inpatient or ≥2 outpatient medical claims, and ≥12 months preindex and ≥6 postindex enrollment. Propensity score matching was used to help balance the pregabalin and duloxetine cohorts on baseline demographics and comorbidities. Potential DDIs were defined based on Micromedex 2.0 software and were identified by prescription claims.Results: No significant differences in baseline characteristics were found between matched pregabalin (n=794 and duloxetine cohorts (n=794. Potential DDI prevalence was significantly greater (P<0.0001 among duloxetine subjects (71.9% than among pregabalin subjects (4.0%. There were no significant differences in all-cause health care utilization or costs between pregabalin subjects with and without a potential DDI. By contrast, duloxetine subjects with a potential DDI had higher mean all-cause costs ($9,373 versus $7,228; P<0.0001 and higher mean number of outpatient visits/member (16.0 versus 13.0; P=0.0009 in comparison to duloxetine subjects without a potential DDI. There was a trend toward a statistically significant difference between pregabalin and duloxetine subjects in their respective pre- versus post-differences in use of ≥1 long-acting opioids (1.6% and 3.4%, respectively; P=0.077.Conclusion: The significantly higher prevalence of

  18. Inferring coarse-grain histone-DNA interaction potentials from high-resolution structures of the nucleosome

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The histone-DNA interaction in the nucleosome is a fundamental mechanism of genomic compaction and regulation, which remains largely unkown despite a growing structural knowledge of the complex. Here, we propose a framework for the extraction of a nanoscale histone-DNA force-field from a collection of high-resolution structures, which may be adapted to a larger class of protein-DNA complexes. We apply the procedure on a large crystallographic database extended by snapshots from molecular dynamics simulations. The comparison of the structural models first shows that, at the sites of histone-DNA contact, the DNA base-pairs are locally shifted outwards, consistent with locally repulsive forces exerted by the histones. In a second step, we show that the various force profiles of the analyzed structures derive locally from a unique, sequence-independent, quadratic repulsive force field, while the sequence preferences are entirely due to the internal DNA mechanics. We thus obtain the first knowledge-derived nanosca...

  19. Synthesis and bioactive evaluations of novel benzotriazole compounds as potential antimicrobial agents and the interaction with calf thymus DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu Ren; Hui Zhen Zhang; Shao Lin Zhang; Yun Lei Luo; Ling Zhang; Cheng He Zhou; Rong Xia Geng

    2015-12-01

    A novel series of benzotriazole derivatives were synthesized and characterized by NMR, IR and MS spectra. The bioactive assay manifested that most of the new compounds exhibited moderate to good antibacterial and antifungal activities against the tested strains in comparison to reference drugs chloromycin, norfloxacin and fluconazole. Especially, 2,4-dichlorophenyl substituted benzotriazole derivative 6f displayed good antibacterial activity against MRSA with MIC value of 4 g/mL, which was 2-fold more potent than Chloromycin, and it also displayed 3-fold stronger antifungal activity (MIC = 4 g/mL) than fluconazole (MIC = 16 g/mL) against Beer yeast. The preliminary interactive investigations of compound 6f with calf thymus DNA revealed that compound 6f could effectively intercalate into DNA to form compound 6f–DNA complex which might block DNA replication to exert antimicrobial activities. Molecular docking experiments suggested that compound 6f projected into base-pairs of DNA hexamer duplex forming two hydrogen bonds with guanine of DNA. The theoretical calculations were in accordance with the experimental results.

  20. Interactions of monocyte subpopulations generated from cord blood CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors with tumor cells: assessment of antitumor potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Malgorzata; Baran, Jaroslaw; Szatanek, Rafal; Mytar, Bozenna; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Gozdzik, Jolanta; Siedlar, Maciej; Zembala, Marek

    2012-11-01

    Monocytes and their subsets (CD14(++)CD16(+) and CD14(+)CD16(-)) generated from cord blood CD34(+) progenitor cells were used for determination of their capacity to interact with tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The studies in vitro included adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, cytotoxicity, production of toxic mediators: reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates (ROI and RNI, respectively), and finally their effect on transplantable human tumor growth in nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mice. The CD14(++)CD16(+) subset exhibited an increased adherence to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and cytotoxicity toward tumor cells in vitro. CD14(+)CD16(-) monocytes showed a higher production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates after stimulation with tumor cells, and more pronounced inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. The results revealed significant differences in the behavior of CD14(++)CD16(+) and CD14(+)CD16(-) monocyte subsets toward tumor cells, thus providing further evidence that CD34(+) cell-derived monocytes differ in this respect from blood monocytes. The protocol for generation of monocytes with antitumor reactivity described here may be useful to obtain monocytes from CD34(+) progenitor cells of cancer patients. This might offer a basis for a novel approach for various forms of cellular immunotherapy of cancer.

  1. Interactions of dietary carotenoids with singlet oxygen (1O2) and free radicals: potential effects for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Fritz; Edge, Ruth; Truscott, T George

    2012-01-01

    The dietary carotenoids provide photoprotection to photosynthetic organisms, the eye and the skin. The protection mechanisms involve both quenching of singlet oxygen and of damaging free radicals. The mechanisms for singlet oxygen quenching and protection against free radicals are quite different - indeed, under some conditions, quenching of free radicals can lead to a switch from a beneficial anti-oxidant process to damaging pro-oxidative situation. Furthermore, while skin protection involves β-carotene or lycopene from a tomato-rich diet, protection of the macula involves the hydroxyl-carotenoids (xanthophylls) zeaxanthin and lutein. Time resolved studies of singlet oxygen and free radicals and their interaction with carotenoids via pulsed laser and fast electron spectroscopy (pulse radiolysis) and the possible involvement of amino acids are discussed and used to (1) speculate on the anti- and pro-oxidative mechanisms, (2) determine the most efficient singlet oxygen quencher and (3) demonstrate the benefits to photoprotection of the eye from the xanthophylls rather than from hydrocarbon carotenoids such as β-carotene.

  2. Comparative Leave Transcriptome Analysis Emphasizing on Accumulation of Anthocyanins in Brassica: Molecular Regulation and Potential Interaction with Photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Adnan Mushtaq

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purple leaf pigmentation mainly associated with anthocyanins accumulation is common in Brassica but the mechanisms of its production and its potential physiological functions are poorly understood. Here, we performed the phenotypic, cytological, physiological and comparative leaves transcriptome analyses of 11 different varieties belonging to five Brassica species with purple or green leaves. We observed that the anthocyanin was accumulated in most of vegetative tissues in all Brassica species and also in reproduction organs of B. carinata. Anthocyanin accumulated in different part of purple leaves including adaxial and abaxial epidermal cells as well as palisade and spongy mesophyll cells. Leave transcriptome analysis showed that almost all late biosynthetic genes of anthocyanin especially Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase (DFR, Anthocyanidin Synthase (ANS and Transparent Testa 19 (TT19, were highly up-regulated in all purple leaves. However, only one of transcript factors in anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway, Transparent Testa 8 (TT8, was co-up regulated along with those genes in all purple leaves, indicating its pivotal role for anthocyanin production in Brassica. Interestingly, with the up-regulation of genes for anthocyanin synthesis, Cytosolic 6-phosphogluconolactonase (PLG5 which involved in the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway was up-regulated in all purple leaves and three genes FTSH PROTEASE 8 (FTS8, GLYCOLATE OXIDASE 1 (GOX1 and GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE 1;4 (GLN1;4 related to degradation of photo-damaged proteins in photosystem II and light respiration were down-regulated. These results highlighted the potential physiological functions of anthocyanin accumulation related to photosynthesis which might be of great worth in future.

  3. Comparative Leaves Transcriptome Analysis Emphasizing on Accumulation of Anthocyanins in Brassica: Molecular Regulation and Potential Interaction with Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad A; Pan, Qi; Chen, Daozong; Zhang, Qinghua; Ge, Xianhong; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    The purple leaf pigmentation mainly associated with anthocyanins accumulation is common in Brassica but the mechanisms of its production and its potential physiological functions are poorly understood. Here, we performed the phenotypic, cytological, physiological, and comparative leaves transcriptome analyses of 11 different varieties belonging to five Brassica species with purple or green leaves. We observed that the anthocyanin was accumulated in most of vegetative tissues in all species and also in reproduction organs of B. carinata. Anthocyanin accumulated in different part of purple leaves including adaxial and abaxial epidermal cells as well as palisade and spongy mesophyll cells. Leave transcriptome analysis showed that almost all late biosynthetic genes (LBGs) of anthocyanin, especially Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase (DFR), Anthocyanidin Synthase (ANS) and Transparent Testa 19 (TT19), were highly up-regulated in all purple leaves. However, only one of transcript factors in anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway, Transparent Testa 8 (TT8), was up regulated along with those genes in all purple leaves, indicating its pivotal role for anthocyanin production in Brassica. Interestingly, with the up-regulation of genes for anthocyanin synthesis, Cytosolic 6-phosphogluconolactonase (PLG5) which involved in the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway was up-regulated in all purple leaves and three genes FTSH PROTEASE 8 (FTS8), GLYCOLATE OXIDASE 1 (GOX1), and GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE 1;4 (GLN1;4) related to degradation of photo-damaged proteins in photosystem II and light respiration were down-regulated. These results highlighted the potential physiological functions of anthocyanin accumulation related to photosynthesis which might be of great worth in future.

  4. Modeling of human prokineticin receptors: interactions with novel small-molecule binders and potential off-target drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Levit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION: The Prokineticin receptor (PKR 1 and 2 subtypes are novel members of family A GPCRs, which exhibit an unusually high degree of sequence similarity. Prokineticins (PKs, their cognate ligands, are small secreted proteins of ∼80 amino acids; however, non-peptidic low-molecular weight antagonists have also been identified. PKs and their receptors play important roles under various physiological conditions such as maintaining circadian rhythm and pain perception, as well as regulating angiogenesis and modulating immunity. Identifying binding sites for known antagonists and for additional potential binders will facilitate studying and regulating these novel receptors. Blocking PKRs may serve as a therapeutic tool for various diseases, including acute pain, inflammation and cancer. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ligand-based pharmacophore models were derived from known antagonists, and virtual screening performed on the DrugBank dataset identified potential human PKR (hPKR ligands with novel scaffolds. Interestingly, these included several HIV protease inhibitors for which endothelial cell dysfunction is a documented side effect. Our results suggest that the side effects might be due to inhibition of the PKR signaling pathway. Docking of known binders to a 3D homology model of hPKR1 is in agreement with the well-established canonical TM-bundle binding site of family A GPCRs. Furthermore, the docking results highlight residues that may form specific contacts with the ligands. These contacts provide structural explanation for the importance of several chemical features that were obtained from the structure-activity analysis of known binders. With the exception of a single loop residue that might be perused in the future for obtaining subtype-specific regulation, the results suggest an identical TM-bundle binding site for hPKR1 and hPKR2. In addition, analysis of the intracellular regions highlights variable regions that may provide

  5. Design of Agents Interacting with Immunoregulating Proteins: Potential Inhibitors of the Phenylpyruvate Tautomerase Activity Catalysed by Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CARPY, Alain J. M.; HAASBROEK, P.P.; OLIVER, D. W.

    2003-01-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factor has been implicated in a number of immune and inflammatory processes. MIF presents particular opportunities for drug design and development with potential therapeutic applications. Drug design strategies taking into consideration of specific stereochemical and tautomeric requirements in the interaction of MIF with substrates and inhibitors allow several novel structures to be designed. Our investigations successfully explored the tautomeric and stereochemical aspects of new compounds of the 2-phenylpyruvic acid type, both experimentally, through synthesis and structural investigations and computationally, through molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics calculations. 1

  6. White light-mediated Cu (II)-5FU interaction augments the chemotherapeutic potential of 5-FU: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibber, Sandesh; Farhan, Mohd; Hassan, Iftekhar; Naseem, Imrana

    2011-10-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a potent photosensitizer used in colon and rectal cancers. 5-FU on galvanostatic electrolysis or radiation-induced oxidation of aqueous solution yields N(1)-C(5)-linked dimmer hydrate of 5-FU. Copper is presently associated with chromatin; in cancer cells the concentration of copper is very high. It has been shown to be capable of mediating the action of several anticancer drugs through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The objective of the present study is to determine the Cu (II)-mediated anticancer mechanism of 5-FU under photo-illumination as well as 5-FU alone. We have shown that a pro-oxidant action was enhanced when Cu (II) was used with 5-FU as compared to 5-FU alone. This may be due to the inhibition of dimerization of 5-FU when present in combination with Cu (II) under photo-illumination. It was also shown that 5-FU alone as well as in combination with Cu (II) was able to generate oxidative stress in lymphocyte which is inhibited by scavengers of ROS. Moreover, the results of Fourier-transformed infrared spectra lead to the conclusion that the dimerization of 5-FU was inhibited when used in combination with Cu (II). It was due to the interaction of 5-FU with Cu (II). Hence, we propose that during chemoradiotherapy with 5-FU, the endogenous copper is mobilized by 5-FU, leading to the generation of ROS which cause oxidative stress and possibly cancer cell death by apoptosis.

  7. Novel secreted isoform of adhesion molecule ICAM-4: Potential regulator of membrane-associated ICAM-4 interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gloria; Spring, Frances A.; Parons, Stephen F.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Peters, Luanne L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2003-02-18

    ICAM-4, a newly characterized adhesion molecule, is expressed early in human erythropoiesis and functions as a ligand for binding a4b1 and aV integrin-expressing cells. Within the bone marrow, erythroblasts surround central macrophages forming erythroblastic islands. Evidence suggests that these islands are highly specialized subcompartments where cell adhesion events, in concert with cytokines, play critical roles in regulating erythropoiesis and apoptosis. Since erythroblasts express a4b1 and ICAM-4 and macrophages exhibit aV, ICAM-4 is an attractive candidate for mediating cellular interactions within erythroblastic islands. To determine whether ICAM-4 binding properties are conserved across species, we first cloned and sequenced the murine homologue. The translated amino acid sequence showed 68 percent overall identity with human ICAM-4. Using recombinant murine ICAM-4 extracellular domains, we discovered that hematopoietic a4b1-expressing HEL cells and non-hematopoietic aV-expressing FLY cells adhered to mouse ICAM-4. Cell adhesion studies showed that FLY and HEL cells bound to mouse and human proteins with similar avidity. These data strongly suggest conservation of integrin-binding properties across species. Importantly, we characterized a novel second splice cDNA that would be predicted to encode an ICAM-4 isoform, lacking the membrane-spanning domain. Erythroblasts express both isoforms of ICAM-4. COS-7 cells transfected with GFP constructs of prototypic or novel ICAM-4 cDNA showed different cellular localization patterns. Moreover, analysis of tissue culture medium revealed that the novel ICAM-4 cDNA encodes a secreted protein. We postulate that secretion of this newly described isoform, ICAM-4S, may modulate binding of membrane-associated ICAM-4 and could thus play a critical regulatory role in erythroblast molecular attachments.

  8. ARTE: French-German Experiments in Crossing the Borders. 'One Media – Three Screens' Convergence and Interactivity at its Full Potential?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wiehl

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution aims at discussing policies of convergence as well as at questioning whether the current strategies really exploit the options of digital media to its full potential – especially with regard to transmedia-storytelling, interactivity, participation and networking. By the paradigm of the 'European Culture Channel' ARTE, we draw a sketch of the portfolio of existing and emerging new formats and user practices. In the second part, we examine one specific genre from this context: the web-or trans-media-documentary. Taking Prison Valley as a case study, we consider transformations on both the macro and the micro level. Eventually, we question whether ARTE fulfils its promise to be the first "100% bi-medial channel" (ARTE mission statement, or whether it promotes an 'extended side-by-sideness' of devices and practices – some first steps towards the synergetic potential of media convergence.

  9. Hosting the preimplantation embryo: potentials and limitations of different approaches for analysing embryo-endometrium interactions in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Susanne E; Wolf, Eckhard; Bauersachs, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing detailed investigations into embryo-maternal communication before implantation reveal that during early embryonic development a plethora of events are taking place. During the sexual cycle, remodelling and differentiation processes in the endometrium are controlled by ovarian hormones, mainly progesterone, to provide a suitable environment for establishment of pregnancy. In addition, embryonic signalling molecules initiate further sequences of events; of these molecules, prostaglandins are discussed herein as specifically important. Inadequate receptivity may impede preimplantation development and implantation, leading to embryonic losses. Because there are multiple factors affecting fertility, receptivity is difficult to comprehend. This review addresses different models and methods that are currently used and discusses their respective potentials and limitations in distinguishing key messages out of molecular twitter. Transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analyses generate comprehensive information and provide starting points for hypotheses, which need to be substantiated using further confirmatory methods. Appropriate in vivo and in vitro models are needed to disentangle the effects of participating factors in the embryo-maternal dialogue and to help distinguish associations from causalities. One interesting model is the study of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in normal recipient heifers. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to properly assess the importance of the uterine milieu for embryonic development and to use the large number of new findings to solve long-standing issues regarding fertility.

  10. It's a dark, dark world: Background evolution of interacting $\\phi$CDM models beyond simple exponential potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Suprit

    2015-01-01

    We study the background cosmological dynamics with a three component source content: radiation fluid, a barotropic fluid to mimic the matter sector and a single scalar field which can act as dark energy giving rise to the late-time accelerated phase. Using the well-known dimensionless variables, we cast the dynamical equations into an autonomous system of ordinary differential equations (ASODE), which are studied by computing the fixed points and the conditions for their stability. The matter fluid and the scalar field are taken to be uncoupled at first and later, we consider a coupling between the two of the form $Q = \\sqrt{2/3}\\kappa\\beta\\rho_m\\dot{\\phi}$ where $\\rho_m$ is the barotropic fluid density. The key point of our analysis is that for the closure of ASODE, we only demand that the jerk, $\\Gamma = V V"/V'^2$ is a function of acceleration, $z = - M_p V'/ V$, that is, $\\Gamma = 1+ f(z)$. In this way, we are able to accommodate a large class of potentials that goes beyond the simple exponential potentia...

  11. Resonances below the {\\rm{Ps}}(n=2) excitation threshold of the {{\\rm{e}}}^{+}-{\\rm{He}}(1{\\rm{s}}2{\\rm{s}}{}^{3}{{\\rm{S}}}^{{\\rm{e}}}) system interacting with screened potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Arijit; Ho, Yew Kam

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated the resonances in the {{{e}}}+-{{He}}{(}3{{{S}}}{{e}}) system interacting with screened potentials by using the stabilization method. Two types of screened potential have been considered: static screened Coulomb potential and exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potential. A model potential has been used to describe the interaction between the outer electron and the {{{He}}}+ ionic core. We have found two resonances below the {{Ps}}(n=2)-{{{He}}}+ threshold. For the unscreened case, our results are in nice agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  12. Artemether-Lumefantrine Combination Therapy for Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria: The Potential for Complex Interactions with Antiretroviral Drugs in HIV-Infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Byakika-Kibwika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of malaria in HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART poses significant challenges. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL is one of the artemisisnin-based combination therapies recommended for treatment of malaria. The drug combination is highly efficacious against sensitive and multidrug resistant falciparum malaria. Both artemether and lumefantrine are metabolized by hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450 enzymes which metabolize the protease inhibitors (PIs and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs used for HIV treatment. Coadministration of NNRTIs and PIs with AL could potentially cause complex pharmacokinetic drug interactions. NNRTI by inducing CYP450 3A4 enzyme and PIs by inhibiting CYP450 3A4 enzymes could influence both artemether and lumefantrine concentrations and their active metabolites dihydroartemisinin and desbutyl-lumefantrine, predisposing patients to poor treatment response, toxicity, and risk for development of resistance. There are scanty data on these interactions and their consequences. Pharmacokinetic studies to evaluate these interactions in the target populations are urgently needed.

  13. Physicochemical characterization of GBV-C E1 peptides as potential inhibitors of HIV-1 fusion peptide: interaction with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, Maria Jesús; Cruz, Antonio; Busquets, M Antònia; Haro, Isabel; Alsina, M Asunción; Pujol, Montserrat

    2012-10-15

    Four peptide sequences corresponding to the E1 protein of GBV-C: NCCAPEDIGFCLEGGCLV (P7), APEDIGFCLEGGCLVALG (P8), FCLEGGCLVALGCTICTD (P10) and QAGLAVRPGKSAAQLVGE (P18) were studied as they were capable of interfering with the HIV-1 fusion peptide (HIV-1 FP). In this work, the surface properties of the E1 peptide sequences are investigated and their physicochemical characterization is done by studying their interaction with model membranes; moreover, their mixtures with HIV-1 FP were also studied in order to observe whether they are capable to modify the HIV-1 FP interaction with model membranes as liposomes or monolayers. Physicochemical properties of peptides (pI and net charge) were predicted showing similarities between P7 and P8, and P10 and HIV-1 FP, whereas P18 appears to be very different from the rest. Circular dichroism experiments were carried out showing an increase of the percentage of α-helix of P7 and P8 when mixed with HIV-1 FP corroborating a conformational change that could be the cause of their inhibition ability. Penetration experiments show that all the peptides can spontaneously insert into phospholipid membranes. Analysis of compression isotherms indicates that the peptides interact with phospholipids and the E1 peptides modify the compression isotherms of HIV-1 FP, but there is one of the peptides that excelled as the best candidate for inhibiting the activity of HIV-1 FP, P7, and therefore, that could be potentially used in future anti-HIV-1 research.

  14. Potential for Drug-Drug Interactions between Antiretrovirals and HCV Direct Acting Antivirals in a Large Cohort of HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Poizot-Martin

    Full Text Available Development of direct acting antivirals (DAA offers new benefits for patients with chronic hepatitis C. The combination of these drugs with antiretroviral treatment (cART is a real challenge in HIV/HCV coinfected patients. The aim of this study was to describe potential drug-drug interactions between DAAs and antiretroviral drugs in a cohort of HIV/HCV coinfected patients.Cross-sectional study of all HIV/HCV coinfected patients attending at least one visit in 2012 in the multicenter French Dat'AIDS cohort. A simulation of drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral treatment and DAAs available in 2015 was performed.Of 16,634 HIV-infected patients, 2,511 had detectable anti-HCV antibodies, of whom 1,196 had a detectable HCV-RNA and were not receiving HCV treatment at the time of analysis. 97.1% of these patients were receiving cART and 81.2% had a plasma HIV RNA <50 copies/mL. cART included combinations of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with a boosted protease inhibitor in 43.6%, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in 17.3%, an integrase inhibitor in 15.4% and various combinations or antiretroviral drugs in 23.7% of patients. A previous treatment against HCV had been administered in 64.4% of patients. Contraindicated associations/potential interactions were expected between cART and respectively sofosbuvir (0.2%/0%, sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (0.2%/67.6%, daclatasvir (0%/49.4%, ombitasvir/boosted paritaprevir (with or without dasabuvir (34.4%/52.2% and simeprevir (78.8%/0%.Significant potential drug-drug interactions are expected between cART and the currently available DAAs in the majority of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and sofosbuvir/daclatasvir with or without ribavirin appeared the most suitable combinations in our population. A close collaboration between hepatologists and HIV/AIDS specialists appears necessary for the management of HCV treatment concomitantly to cART.

  15. Gradient Compression Garments as a Countermeasure to Post-Space Flight Orthostatic Intolerance: Potential Interactions with the Maximum Absorbency Garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. M. C.; Laurie, S. S.; Macias, B. R.; Willig, M.; Johnson, K.; Stenger, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    Astronauts and cosmonauts may experience symptoms of orthostatic intolerance during re-entry, landing, and for several days post-landing following short- and long-duration spaceflight. Presyncopal symptoms have been documented in approximately 20% of short-duration and greater than 60% of long-duration flyers on landing day specifically during 5-10 min of controlled (no countermeasures employed at the time of testing) stand tests or 80 deg head-up tilt tests. Current operational countermeasures to orthostatic intolerance include fluid loading prior to and whole body cooling during re-entry as well as compression garments that are worn during and for up to several days after landing. While both NASA and the Russian space program have utilized compression garments to protect astronauts and cosmonauts traveling on their respective vehicles, a "next-generation" gradient compression garment (GCG) has been developed and tested in collaboration with a commercial partner to support future space flight missions. Unlike previous compression garments used operationally by NASA that provide a single level of compression across only the calves, thighs, and lower abdomen, the GCG provides continuous coverage from the feet to below the pectoral muscles in a gradient fashion (from approximately 55 mm Hg at the feet to approximately 16 mmHg across the abdomen). The efficacy of the GCG has been demonstrated previously after a 14-d bed rest study without other countermeasures and after short-duration Space Shuttle missions. Currently the GCG is being tested during a stand test following long-duration missions (6 months) to the International Space Station. While results to date have been promising, interactions of the GCG with other space suit components have not been examined. Specifically, it is unknown whether wearing the GCG over NASA's Maximum Absorbency Garment (MAG; absorbent briefs worn for the collection of urine and feces while suited during re-entry and landing) will

  16. Potentiation of motor sub-networks for motor control but not working memory: Interaction of dACC and SMA revealed by resting-state directed functional connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.; Asemi, Avisa; Burgess, Ashley; Chowdury, Asadur; Bressler, Steven L.

    2017-01-01

    The dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex (dACC) and the Supplementary Motor Area (SMA) are known to interact during motor coordination behavior. We previously discovered that the directional influences underlying this interaction in a visuo-motor coordination task are asymmetric, with the dACC→SMA influence being significantly greater than that in the reverse direction. To assess the specificity of this effect, here we undertook an analysis of the interaction between dACC and SMA in two distinct contexts. In addition to the motor coordination task, we also assessed these effects during a (n-back) working memory task. We applied directed functional connectivity analysis to these two task paradigms, and also to the rest condition of each paradigm, in which rest blocks were interspersed with task blocks. We report here that the previously known asymmetric interaction between dACC and SMA, with dACC→SMA dominating, was significantly larger in the motor coordination task than the memory task. Moreover the asymmetry between dACC and SMA was reversed during the rest condition of the motor coordination task, but not of the working memory task. In sum, the dACC→SMA influence was significantly greater in the motor task than the memory task condition, and the SMA→dACC influence was significantly greater in the motor rest than the memory rest condition. We interpret these results as suggesting that the potentiation of motor sub-networks during the motor rest condition supports the motor control of SMA by dACC during the active motor task condition. PMID:28278267

  17. Potential impact of low-concentration silver nanoparticles on predator-prey interactions between predatory dragonfly nymphs and Daphnia magna as a prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Lok R; Dubey, Brajesh

    2012-07-17

    This study investigated the potential impacts of low-concentration citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (citrate-nAg; 2 μg L(-1) as total Ag) on the interactions of Daphnia magna Straus (as a prey) with the predatory dragonfly ( Anax junius : Odonata) nymph using the behavioral, survival, and reproductive end points. Four different toxicity bioassays were evaluated: (i) horizontal migration; (ii) vertical migration; (iii) 48 h survival; and (iv) 21 day reproduction; using four different treatment combinations: (i) Daphnia + citrate-nAg; (ii) Daphnia + predator; (iii) Daphnia + citrate-nAg + predator; and (iv) Daphnia only (control). Daphnia avoided the predators using the horizontal and vertical movements, indicating that Daphnia might have perceived a significant risk of predation. However, with citrate-nAg + predator treatment, Daphnia response did not differ from control in the vertical migration test, suggesting that Daphnia were unable to detect the presence of predator with citrate-nAg treatment and this may have potential implication on daphnids population structure owing to predation risk. The 48 h survival test showed a significant mortality of Daphnia individuals in the presence of predators, with or without citrate-nAg, in the test environment. Average reproduction of daphnids increased by 185% with low-concentration citrate-nAg treatment alone but was severely compromised in the presence of predators (decreased by 91.3%). Daphnia reproduction was slightly enhanced by approximately 128% with citrate-nAg + predator treatment. Potential mechanisms of these differential effects of low-concentration citrate-nAg, with or without predators, are discussed. Because silver dissolution was minimal, the observed toxicity could not be explained by dissolved Ag alone. These findings offer novel insights into how exposure to low-concentration silver nanoparticles could influence predator-prey interactions in the fresh water systems.

  18. A new Nonrelativistic Investigation for Interactions in One-electron Atoms with Modified Vibrational-Rotational Analysis of Supersingular plus Quadratic Potential: Extended Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmadjid Maireche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In our recent work, three-dimensional modified time-independent Schrödinger equation (MSE of modified vibrational-rotational analysis of supersingular plus quadratic potential (v.r.a.s.q. potential was solved using Boopp’s shift method instead to apply star product, in the framework of both noncommutativity three dimensional real space and phase (NC: 3D-RSP. Furthermore, the exact correction for ground state and first excited state are found straightforwardly for interactions in one-electron atoms has been solved using standard perturbation theory. Furthermore, the obtained corrections of energies are depended on infinitesimal parameters and which are induced by position-position and momentum-momentum noncommutativity, respectively, in addition to the discreet atomic quantum numbers: and . Moreover, the usual states in ordinary quantum mechanics for vibrational-rotational analysis of supersingular plus quadratic potential are canceled and has been replaced by new degenerated sub-states in the extended new quantum symmetries of (NC: 3D-RSP.

  19. Mixed micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid and selected hydrophobic bile acids: interaction parameter, partition coefficient of nitrazepam and mixed micelles haemolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poša, Mihalj; Tepavčević, Vesna

    2011-09-01

    The formation of mixed micelles built of 7,12-dioxolithocholic and the following hydrophobic bile acids was examined by conductometric method: cholic (C), deoxycholic (D), chenodeoxycholic (CD), 12-oxolithocholic (12-oxoL), 7-oxolithocholic (7-oxoL), ursodeoxycholic (UD) and hiodeoxycholic (HD). Interaction parameter (β) in the studied binary mixed micelles had negative value, suggesting synergism between micelle building units. Based on β value, the hydrophobic bile acids formed two groups: group I (C, D and CD) and group II (12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD and HD). Bile acids from group II had more negative β values than bile acids from group I. Also, bile acids from group II formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds in aggregates with both smaller (2) and higher (4) aggregation numbers, according to the analysis of their stereochemical (conformational) structures and possible structures of mixed micelles built of these bile acids and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. Haemolytic potential and partition coefficient of nitrazepam were higher in mixed micelles built of the more hydrophobic bile acids (C, D, CD) and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid than in micelles built only of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. On the other hand, these mixed micelles still had lower values of haemolytic potential than micelles built of C, D or CD. The mixed micelles that included bile acids: 12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD or HD did not significantly differ from the micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid, observing the values of their haemolytic potential.

  20. An Assessment of Density Functional Methods for Potential Energy Curves of Nonbonded Interactions: The XYG3 and B97-D Approximations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Sherrill, C David; Aprà, Edoardo; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2010-03-01

    A recently proposed double-hybrid functional called XYG3 and a semilocal GGA functional (B97-D) with a semiempirical correction for van der Waals interactions have been applied to study the potential energy curves along the dissociation coordinates of weakly bound pairs of molecules governed by London dispersion and induced dipole forces. Molecules treated in this work were the parallel sandwich, T-shaped, and parallel-displaced benzene dimer, (C6H6)2; hydrogen sulfide and benzene, H2S·C6H6; methane and benzene, CH4·C6H6; the methane dimer, (CH4)2; and the pyridine dimer, (C5H5N)2. We compared the potential energy curves of these functionals with previously published benchmarks at the coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triplets [CCSD(T)] complete-basis-set limit. Both functionals, XYG3 and B97-D, exhibited very good performance, reproducing accurate energies for equilibrium distances and a smooth behavior along the dissociation coordinate. Overall, we found an agreement within a few tenths of one kcal mol(-1) with the CCSD(T) results across the potential energy curves.

  1. 胶体微粒间相互作用势测量系统%Measurement System of Interaction Potential between Colloidal Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任洪亮; 周金华; 丁攀峰; 李银妹

    2011-01-01

    A mechanical chopper is designed based on the programmable logic controller, servo motor amplifier, servo motor and encoder. The interaction potential measurement system is constructed by the mechanical chopper and dual optical tweezers. The characteristic of the system such as the design of the chopper, the switching time of the blinking optical tweezers, the tuning range, the origin position return feature, the compatibility and the usability of the system are discussed. The system is used to measure the interaction potential of a pair polystyrene spheres. The result is consistent with the Darjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory, which demonstrates the reliability of the apparatus. In addition, the apparatus provides an effective technique for measuring the interaction potential between two micro colloidal particles.%设计出以可编程控制器、伺服电机放大器、伺服电机和编码器为主要部件的可编程机械斩光器,并将其与多光镊系统相耦合,构建了胶体微粒间相互作用势测量系统.利用该系统测量聚苯乙烯球悬浮液中两个小球之间的静电相互作用势,其结果与胶体稳定理论符合,验证了系统的可靠性.该斩光器具有良好的易用性、兼容性和可移植性.并且该系统能在可控的物理化学条件下从粒子层次直接测量胶体粒子间不同类型的相互作用势,为深入研究胶体的微观机制提供了一种有效的测量手段和技术平台.

  2. The Repellent DEET Potentiates Carbamate Effects via Insect Muscarinic Receptor Interactions: An Alternative Strategy to Control Insect Vector-Borne Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Abd-Ella

    Full Text Available Insect vector-borne diseases remain one of the principal causes of human mortality. In addition to conventional measures of insect control, repellents continue to be the mainstay for personal protection. Because of the increasing pyrethroid-resistant mosquito populations, alternative strategies to reconstitute pyrethroid repellency and knock-down effects have been proposed by mixing the repellent DEET (N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide with non-pyrethroid insecticide to better control resistant insect vector-borne diseases. By using electrophysiological, biochemichal, in vivo toxicological techniques together with calcium imaging, binding studies and in silico docking, we have shown that DEET, at low concentrations, interacts with high affinity with insect M1/M3 mAChR allosteric site potentiating agonist effects on mAChRs coupled to phospholipase C second messenger pathway. This increases the anticholinesterase activity of the carbamate propoxur through calcium-dependent regulation of acetylcholinesterase. At high concentrations, DEET interacts with low affinity on distinct M1/M3 mAChR site, counteracting the potentiation. Similar dose-dependent dual effects of DEET have also been observed at synaptic mAChR level. Additionally, binding and in silico docking studies performed on human M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes indicate that DEET only displays a low affinity antagonist profile on these M1/M3 mAChRs. These results reveal a selective high affinity positive allosteric site for DEET in insect mAChRs. Finally, bioassays conducted on Aedes aegypti confirm the synergistic interaction between DEET and propoxur observed in vitro, resulting in a higher mortality of mosquitoes. Our findings reveal an unusual allosterically potentiating action of the repellent DEET, which involves a selective site in insect. These results open exciting research areas in public health particularly in the control of the pyrethroid-resistant insect-vector borne diseases. Mixing low

  3. The Repellent DEET Potentiates Carbamate Effects via Insect Muscarinic Receptor Interactions: An Alternative Strategy to Control Insect Vector-Borne Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Ella, Aly; Stankiewicz, Maria; Mikulska, Karolina; Nowak, Wieslaw; Pennetier, Cédric; Goulu, Mathilde; Fruchart-Gaillard, Carole; Licznar, Patricia; Apaire-Marchais, Véronique; List, Olivier; Corbel, Vincent; Servent, Denis; Lapied, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Insect vector-borne diseases remain one of the principal causes of human mortality. In addition to conventional measures of insect control, repellents continue to be the mainstay for personal protection. Because of the increasing pyrethroid-resistant mosquito populations, alternative strategies to reconstitute pyrethroid repellency and knock-down effects have been proposed by mixing the repellent DEET (N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) with non-pyrethroid insecticide to better control resistant insect vector-borne diseases. By using electrophysiological, biochemichal, in vivo toxicological techniques together with calcium imaging, binding studies and in silico docking, we have shown that DEET, at low concentrations, interacts with high affinity with insect M1/M3 mAChR allosteric site potentiating agonist effects on mAChRs coupled to phospholipase C second messenger pathway. This increases the anticholinesterase activity of the carbamate propoxur through calcium-dependent regulation of acetylcholinesterase. At high concentrations, DEET interacts with low affinity on distinct M1/M3 mAChR site, counteracting the potentiation. Similar dose-dependent dual effects of DEET have also been observed at synaptic mAChR level. Additionally, binding and in silico docking studies performed on human M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes indicate that DEET only displays a low affinity antagonist profile on these M1/M3 mAChRs. These results reveal a selective high affinity positive allosteric site for DEET in insect mAChRs. Finally, bioassays conducted on Aedes aegypti confirm the synergistic interaction between DEET and propoxur observed in vitro, resulting in a higher mortality of mosquitoes. Our findings reveal an unusual allosterically potentiating action of the repellent DEET, which involves a selective site in insect. These results open exciting research areas in public health particularly in the control of the pyrethroid-resistant insect-vector borne diseases. Mixing low doses of DEET and a

  4. Effects of interfacial interaction potential on the sublimation rates of TNT films on a silica surface examined by QCM and AFM techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, R.; Ueda, A.; Liu, Y. C.; Wu, M.; Henderson, D. O.; Lareau, R. T.; Chamberlain, R. T.

    2003-04-01

    The study of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) sublimation rates from the bulk surface and a substrate surface have been evaluated quantitatively with both atomic force microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques. A first principle theoretical model is proposed, which allows obtaining three critical parameters, bulk sublimation rate, surface interaction potential, and the effective decay length, with no arbitrary parameters. The bulk sublimation rate predicted by the model is quantitatively confirmed by QCM experiments. The isothermal measurements with QCM showed that the sublimation activation energy of bulk TNT is 131 kJ/mol. More importantly, all results were obtained at one atmosphere and near room temperature. Thus, it should have direct impacts on explosive trace detection device applications.

  5. A self-interaction-free local hybrid functional: Accurate binding energies vis-\\`a-vis accurate ionization potentials from Kohn-Sham eigenvalues

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Tobias; Makmal, Adi; Kronik, Leeor; Kümmel, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    We present and test a new approximation for the exchange-correlation (xc) energy of Kohn-Sham density functional theory. It combines exact exchange with a compatible non-local correlation functional. The functional is by construction free of one-electron self-interaction, respects constraints derived from uniform coordinate scaling, and has the correct asymptotic behavior of the xc energy density. It contains one parameter that is not determined ab initio. We investigate whether it is possible to construct a functional that yields accurate binding energies and affords other advantages, specifically Kohn-Sham eigenvalues that reliably reflect ionization potentials. Tests for a set of atoms and small molecules show that within our local-hybrid form accurate binding energies can be achieved by proper optimization of the free parameter in our functional, along with an improvement in dissociation energy curves and in Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. However, the correspondence of the latter to experimental ionization potent...

  6. Propagation and interaction of matter-wave solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent scattering length and varying potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Biao; Li Yuqi [Nonlinear Science Center, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Zhang Xiaofei; Liu, W M, E-mail: biaolee2000@yahoo.com.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-09-14

    We present two families of one-soliton solutions and three families of two-soliton solutions for a generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which is characterized by the time-dependent scattering length and varying potentials. Then, we investigate the propagation of one-soliton and interactions of two-soliton by some selected control functions. The results show that the intensities of one- and two-soliton first increase rapidly to a peak value, and then decay very slowly to the background value; thus, the lifetimes of both one-soliton and two-soliton in Bose-Einstein condensates can be extended largely at least to the order of the lifetime of a Bose-Einstein condensate in real experiments. Our results open up new ways of considerable experimental interest for the management of matter-wave solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates.

  7. Highly interactive nature of flower-specific enhancers and promoters, and its potential impact on tissue-specific expression and engineering of multiple genes or agronomic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yang, Yazhou; Zhang, Jinjin; Wang, Xiping; Singer, Stacy; Liu, Zhongchi; Yang, Yingjun; Yan, Guohua; Liu, Zongrang

    2014-09-01

    Molecular stacking enables multiple traits to be effectively engineered in crops using a single vector. However, the co-existence of distinct plant promoters in the same transgenic unit might, like their mammalian counterparts, interfere with one another. In this study, we devised a novel approach to investigate enhancer-promoter and promoter-promoter interactions in transgenic plants and demonstrated that three of four flower-specific enhancer/promoters were capable of distantly activating a pollen- and stigma-specific Pps promoter (fused to the cytotoxic DT-A gene) in other tissues, as revealed by novel tissue ablation phenotypes in transgenic plants. The NtAGI1 enhancer exclusively activated stamen- and carpel-specific DT-A expression, thus resulting in tissue ablation in an orientation-independent manner; this activation was completely abolished by the insertion of an enhancer-blocking insulator (EXOB) between the NtAGI1 enhancer and Pps promoter. Similarly, AGL8 and AP1Lb1, but not AP1La, promoters also activated distinct tissue-specific DT-A expression and ablation, with the former causing global growth retardation and the latter ablating apical inflorescences. While the tissue specificity of the enhancer/promoters generally defined their activation specificities, the strength of their activity in particular tissues or developmental stages appeared to determine whether activation actually occurred. Our findings provide the first evidence that plant-derived enhancer/promoters can distantly interact/interfere with one another, which could pose potential problems for the tissue-specific engineering of multiple traits using a single-vector stacking approach. Therefore, our work highlights the importance of adopting enhancer-blocking insulators in transformation vectors to minimize promoter-promoter interactions. The practical and fundamental significance of these findings will be discussed.

  8. Incidence rate and pattern of clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions in a large outpatient population of a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Nabovati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine incidence rate, type, and pattern of clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs in a large outpatient population of a developing country. A retrospective, descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on outpatients’ prescriptions in Khorasan Razavi province, Iran, over 12 months. A list of 25 clinically relevant DDIs, which are likely to occur in the outpatient setting, was used as the reference. Most frequent clinically relevant pDDIs, most common drugs contributing to the pDDIs, and the pattern of pDDIs for each medical specialty were determined. Descriptive statistics were used to report the results. In total, out of 8,169,142 prescriptions, 6,096 clinically relevant pDDIs were identified. The most common identified pDDIs were theophyllines-quinolones, warfarin-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, benzodiazepines-azole antifungal agents, and anticoagulants-thyroid hormones. The most common drugs contributing to the identified pDDIs were ciprofloxacin, theophylline, warfarin, aminophylline, alprazolam, levothyroxine, and selegiline. While the incidence rate of clinically relevant pDDIs in prescriptions of general practitioners, internists, and cardiologists was the highest, the average pDDI incidence per 10,000 prescriptions of pulmonologists, infectious disease specialists, and cardiologists was highest. Although a small proportion of the analyzed prescriptions contained drug pairs with potential for clinically relevant DDIs, a significant number of outpatients have been exposed to the adverse effects associated with these interactions. It is recommended that in addition to training physicians and pharmacists, other effective interventions such as computerized alerting systems and electronic prescribing systems be designed and implemented.

  9. Herb-drug interaction of Fucus vesiculosus extract and amiodarone in rats: a potential risk for reduced bioavailability of amiodarone in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Márcio; Alves, Gilberto; Abrantes, João; Falcão, Amílcar

    2013-02-01

    Fucus vesiculosus is a seaweed claimed to be useful for obesity management. Therefore, considering the relationship between obesity and cardiovascular diseases, this work aimed to assess the potential for an herb-drug interaction among a standardized F. vesiculosus extract (GMP certificate) and amiodarone (a narrow therapeutic index drug) in rats. In a first pharmacokinetic study, rats were simultaneously co-administered with a single-dose of F. vesiculosus (575 mg/kg, p.o.) and amiodarone (50 mg/kg, p.o.); in a second study, rats were pre-treated during 14 days with F. vesiculosus (575 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and received amiodarone (50 mg/kg, p.o.) on the 15th day. Rats of the control groups received the corresponding volume of vehicle. After analysis of the pharmacokinetic data it deserves to be highlighted the significant decrease in the peak plasma concentration of amiodarone (55.4%) as well as the reduction of systemic exposure to the parent drug (~30%) following the simultaneous co-administration of F. vesiculosus extract and amiodarone. This paper reports, for the first time, the herb-drug interaction between F. vesiculosus and amiodarone, which determined a considerable decrease on amiodarone bioavailability in rats. Therefore, the therapeutic efficacy of amiodarone may be compromised by the concurrent administration of herbal slimming medicines/dietary supplements containing F. vesiculosus.

  10. Extension of the B3LYP - Dispersion-Correcting Potential Approach to the Accurate Treatment of both Inter- and Intramolecular Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DiLabio, Gino A; Torres, Edmanuel

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed that dispersion-correcting potentials (DCPs), atom-centered Gaussian-type functions developed for use with B3LYP (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2012, 3, 1738-1744) greatly improved the ability of the underlying functional to predict non-covalent interactions. However, the application of B3LYP-DCP for the {\\beta}-scission of the cumyloxyl radical led a calculated barrier height that was over-estimated by ca. 8 kcal/mol. We show in the present work that the source of this error arises from the previously developed carbon atom DCPs, which erroneously alters the electron density in the C-C covalent-bonding region. In this work, we present a new C-DCP with a form that was expected to influence the electron density farther from the nucleus. Tests of the new C-DCP, with previously published H-, N- and O-DCPs, with B3LYP-DCP/6-31+G(2d,2p) on the S66, S22B, HSG-A, and HC12 databases of non-covalently interacting dimers showed that it is one of the most accurate methods available for treating intermolecular i...

  11. Endogenous 17ß-estradiol is required for activity-dependent long-term potentiation in the striatum: interaction with the dopaminergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eTozzi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 17β-estradiol (E2, a neurosteroid synthesized by P450-aromatase (ARO, modulates various brain functions. We characterized the role of the locally synthesized E2 on striatal long-term synaptic plasticity and explored possible interactions between E2 receptors (ERs and dopamine (DA receptors in the dorsal striatum of adult male rats. Inhibition of E2 synthesis or antagonism of ERs prevented the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP in both medium spiny neurons (MSNs and cholinergic interneurons (ChIs. Activation of a D1-like DA receptor/cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway restored LTP. In MSNs exogenous E2 reversed the effect of ARO inhibition. Also antagonism of M1 muscarinic receptors prevented the D1-like receptor-mediated restoration of LTP confirming a role for ChIs in controlling the E2-mediated LTP of MSNs. A novel striatal interaction, occurring between ERs and D1-like receptors in both MSNs and ChIs, might be critical to regulate basal ganglia physiology and to compensate synaptic alterations in Parkinson's disease.

  12. LandCaRe DSS--an interactive decision support system for climate change impact assessment and the analysis of potential agricultural land use adaptation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenkel, Karl-Otto; Berg, Michael; Mirschel, Wilfried; Wieland, Ralf; Nendel, Claas; Köstner, Barbara

    2013-09-01

    Decision support to develop viable climate change adaptation strategies for agriculture and regional land use management encompasses a wide range of options and issues. Up to now, only a few suitable tools and methods have existed for farmers and regional stakeholders that support the process of decision-making in this field. The interactive model-based spatial information and decision support system LandCaRe DSS attempts to close the existing methodical gap. This system supports interactive spatial scenario simulations, multi-ensemble and multi-model simulations at the regional scale, as well as the complex impact assessment of potential land use adaptation strategies at the local scale. The system is connected to a local geo-database and via the internet to a climate data server. LandCaRe DSS uses a multitude of scale-specific ecological impact models, which are linked in various ways. At the local scale (farm scale), biophysical models are directly coupled with a farm economy calculator. New or alternative simulation models can easily be added, thanks to the innovative architecture and design of the DSS. Scenario simulations can be conducted with a reasonable amount of effort. The interactive LandCaRe DSS prototype also offers a variety of data analysis and visualisation tools, a help system for users and a farmer information system for climate adaptation in agriculture. This paper presents the theoretical background, the conceptual framework, and the structure and methodology behind LandCaRe DSS. Scenario studies at the regional and local scale for the two Eastern German regions of Uckermark (dry lowlands, 2600 km(2)) and Weißeritz (humid mountain area, 400 km(2)) were conducted in close cooperation with stakeholders to test the functionality of the DSS prototype. The system is gradually being transformed into a web version (http://www.landcare-dss.de) to ensure the broadest possible distribution of LandCaRe DSS to the public. The system will be continuously

  13. Interactions between pre-processing and classification methods for event-related-potential classification: best-practice guidelines for brain-computer interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, J; Hill, N J

    2013-04-01

    Detecting event related potentials (ERPs) from single trials is critical to the operation of many stimulus-driven brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The low strength of the ERP signal compared to the noise (due to artifacts and BCI irrelevant brain processes) makes this a challenging signal detection problem. Previous work has tended to focus on how best to detect a single ERP type (such as the visual oddball response). However, the underlying ERP detection problem is essentially the same regardless of stimulus modality (e.g., visual or tactile), ERP component (e.g., P300 oddball response, or the error-potential), measurement system or electrode layout. To investigate whether a single ERP detection method might work for a wider range of ERP BCIs we compare detection performance over a large corpus of more than 50 ERP BCI datasets whilst systematically varying the electrode montage, spectral filter, spatial filter and classifier training methods. We identify an interesting interaction between spatial whitening and regularised classification which made detection performance independent of the choice of spectral filter low-pass frequency. Our results show that pipeline consisting of spectral filtering, spatial whitening, and regularised classification gives near maximal performance in all cases. Importantly, this pipeline is simple to implement and completely automatic with no expert feature selection or parameter tuning required. Thus, we recommend this combination as a "best-practice" method for ERP detection problems.

  14. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY ON THE POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTION BETWEEN ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITOR OR ANGIOTENSIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND OTHER DRUGS IN END-STAGE CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honey Iskandar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing number of chronic renal failure (CRF patients had reflected an increase in the number of patients with diabetes and hypertension. Therefore, health practitioners would be faced with management of complicated medical problems for the patients of chronic renal disease. In this way, various complications of chronic renal failure would lead to polypharmacy, where the patients receive three to five drugs in a dose. Development of polypharmacy had made the potential of drug interaction greater. The objective was to determine whether CRF patients admitted to hospital with specific adverse drug reactions were likely to have been prescribed with interacting drugs. Retrospective study was designed. The study was conducted at the General Practice Rooms Floor 1 – Floor VI of Central Army Hospital Gatot Soebroto Jakarta. The study was conducted from December 2011 – February 2012. The data were collected in a retrospective way for a year (January – December 2011. End-stage CRF patients who were having hemodialysis therapy and receiving ACE Inhibitor drugs or Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonist (AIIRA and receiving treatment at the General Practice Rooms at Central Army Hospital Gatot Soebroto Jakarta. During the period of January – December 2011, 84 patients were treated with end-stage CRF at the Central Army Hospital and having routine hemodialysis and 44 patients were receiving therapy with ACE Inhibitor and AIIRA. Other drugs simultaneously given with ACE Inhibitor and AIIRA were captopril-spironolactone, captopril-aspirin, captopril-allopurinol, captopril-KSR, captopril-furosemide, lisinopril-furosemide and valsartan-mefenemic acid. An increase in adverse effects of the drugs was found based on the clinical evaluation and laboratory examination. The adverse effects included hyperkalemia (9,09%, decrease in anti-hypertension effect (6,8%, acute hypotension (40%, and declining renal function (11,36%. The study identifies drug interaction

  15. Effect of Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions on the energy spectrum, chemical potential, addition energy and spin-splitting in a many-electron parabolic GaAs quantum dot in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-11-01

    The effect of electron-electron interaction and the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions on the electronic properties of a many-electron system in a parabolically confined quantum dot placed in an external magnetic field is studied. With a simple and physically reasonable model potential for electron-electron interaction term, the problem is solved exactly to second-order in the spin-orbit coupling constants to obtain the energy spectrum, the chemical potential, addition energy and the spin-splitting energy.

  16. Oral treatments of Echinococcus multilocularis-infected mice with the antimalarial drug mefloquine that potentially interacts with parasite ferritin and cystatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küster, Tatiana; Stadelmann, Britta; Rufener, Reto; Risch, Corina; Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of oral treatments of Echinococcus multilocularis-infected mice with the antimalarial drug mefloquine (MEF) and identified proteins that bind to MEF in parasite extracts and human cells by affinity chromatography. In a pilot experiment, MEF treatment was applied 5 days per week and was intensified by increasing the dosage stepwise from 12.5 mg/kg to 200 mg/kg during 4 weeks followed by treatments of 100 mg/kg during the last 7 weeks. This resulted in a highly significant reduction of parasite weight in MEF-treated mice compared with mock-treated mice, but the reduction was significantly less efficacious compared with the standard treatment regimen of albendazole (ABZ). In a second experiment, MEF was applied orally in three different treatment groups at dosages of 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg, but only twice a week, for a period of 12 weeks. Treatment at 100 mg/kg had a profound impact on the parasite, similar to ABZ treatment at 200 mg/kg/day (5 days/week for 12 weeks). No adverse side effects were noted. To identify proteins in E. multilocularis metacestodes that physically interact with MEF, affinity chromatography of metacestode extracts was performed on MEF coupled to epoxy-activated Sepharose(®), followed by SDS-PAGE and in-gel digestion LC-MS/MS. This resulted in the identification of E. multilocularis ferritin and cystatin as MEF-binding proteins. In contrast, when human cells were exposed to MEF affinity chromatography, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase was identified as a MEF-binding protein. This indicates that MEF could potentially interact