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Sample records for alpha-nucleus interaction potential

  1. alpha-nucleus potentials, alpha-decay half-lives, and shell closures for superheavy nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Systematic alpha-nucleus folding potentials are used to analyze alpha-decay half-lives of superheavy nuclei. Preformation factors of about several per cent are found for all nuclei under study. The systematic behavior of the preformation factors and the volume integrals of the potentials allows to predict alpha-decay energies and half-lives for unknown nuclei. Shell closures can be determined from measured alpha-decay energies using the discontinuity of the volume integral at shell closures. ...

  2. Elastic alpha scattering experiments and the alpha-nucleus optical potential at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, P; Fülöp, Zs; Galaviz, D; Gyürky, Gy; Somorjai, E

    2012-01-01

    High precision angular distribution data of ($\\alpha$,$\\alpha$) elastic scattering are presented for the nuclei $^{89}$Y, $^{92}$Mo, $^{106,110,116}$Cd, $^{112,124}$Sn, and $^{144}$Sm at energies around the Coulomb barrier. Such data with small experimental uncertainties over the full angular range (20-170 degrees) are the indispensable prerequisite for the extraction of local optical potentials and for the determination of the total reaction cross section $\\sigma_{\\rm{reac}}$. A systematic fitting procedure was applied to the presented experimental scattering data to obtain comprehensive local potential parameter sets which are composed of a real folding potential and an imaginary potential of Woods-Saxon surface type. The obtained potential parameters were used in turn to construct a new systematic $\\alpha$-nucleus potential with very few parameters. Although this new potential cannot reproduce the angular distributions with the same small deviations as the local potential, the new potential is able to pred...

  3. Direct study of the alpha-nucleus optical potential at astrophysical energies using the 64Zn(p,alpha)61Cu reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z; Kiss, G G; Szücs, T

    2014-01-01

    In the model calculations of heavy element nucleosynthesis processes the nuclear reaction rates are taken from statistical model calculations which utilize various nuclear input parameters. It is found that in the case of reactions involving alpha particles the calculations bear a high uncertainty owing to the largely unknown low energy alpha-nucleus optical potential. Experiments are typically restricted to higher energies and therefore no direct astrophysical consequences can be drawn. In the present work a (p,alpha) reaction is used for the first time to study the alpha-nucleus optical potential. The measured 64Zn(p,alpha)61Cu cross section is uniquely sensitive to the alpha-nucleus potential and the measurement covers the whole astrophysically relevant energy range. By the comparison to model calculations, direct evidence is provided for the incorrectness of global optical potentials used in astrophysical models.

  4. Nuclear structure approach to the calculation of the imaginary alpha-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic calculation of the second-order imaginary optical potential for 40(Ca(α,α) is made for incident energies of 31 and 100 MeV using RPA transition densities for intermediate excited states. The projectile is treated as an elementary particle, and the alpha-nucleon interaction is normalized by fitting 3- inelastic cross sections with a folded M3Y potential. The use of an optical Green's function for the intermediate propagator is found to be important. Equivalent local potentials are obtained and used to calculate elastic scattering cross sections. Agreement with low-angle experimental data is fair at 31 MeV, but at 100 MeV the calculated cross sections indicate much too little absorption. 9 figures, 1 table

  5. Diatomic interaction potential theory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Goodisman, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Diatomic Interaction Potential Theory, Volume 2: Applications discusses the variety of applicable theoretical material and approaches in the calculations for diatomic systems in their ground states. The volume covers the descriptions and illustrations of modern calculations. Chapter I discusses the calculation of the interaction potential for large and small values of the internuclear distance R (separated and united atom limits). Chapter II covers the methods used for intermediate values of R, which in principle means any values of R. The Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction schemes des

  6. Higgs Potential from Derivative Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Quadri, A

    2016-01-01

    A formulation of the linear $\\sigma$ model with derivative interactions is studied. The theory is on-shell equivalent to the model with a quartic Higgs potential. The mass of the scalar mode only appears in the quadratic part and not in the interaction vertices, unlike in the ordinary formulation of the theory. Renormalization of the model is discussed. A natural non power-counting renormalizable extension of the theory is presented. The model is physically equivalent to the inclusion of a dimension six effective operator $\\partial_\\mu (\\Phi^\\dagger \\Phi) \\partial^\\mu (\\Phi^\\dagger \\Phi)$. The resulting UV divergences are arranged in a perturbation series around the power-counting renormalizable theory. UV completion of the non-power-counting renormalizable model through a symmetric deformation of the propagator of the massive physical scalar is addressed.

  7. Developing a general interaction potential for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Stephen H; Røyne, Anja; Kristiansen, Kai; Rapp, Michael V; Das, Saurabh; Gebbie, Matthew A; Lee, Dong Woog; Stock, Philipp; Valtiner, Markus; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2015-02-24

    We review direct force measurements on a broad class of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These measurements have enabled the development of a general interaction potential per unit area, W(D) = -2γ(i)Hy exp(-D/D(H)) in terms of a nondimensional Hydra parameter, Hy, that applies to both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between extended surfaces. This potential allows one to quantitatively account for additional attractions and repulsions not included in the well-known combination of electrostatic double layer and van der Waals theories, the so-called Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The interaction energy is exponentially decaying with decay length D(H) ≈ 0.3-2 nm for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, with the exact value of D(H) depending on the precise system and conditions. The pre-exponential factor depends on the interfacial tension, γ(i), of the interacting surfaces and Hy. For Hy > 0, the interaction potential describes interactions between partially hydrophobic surfaces, with the maximum hydrophobic interaction (i.e., two fully hydrophobic surfaces) corresponding to Hy = 1. Hydrophobic interactions between hydrophobic monolayer surfaces measured with the surface forces apparatus (SFA) are shown to be well described by the proposed interaction potential. The potential becomes repulsive for Hy < 0, corresponding to partially hydrophilic (hydrated) interfaces. Hydrated surfaces such as mica, silica, and lipid bilayers are discussed and reviewed in the context of the values of Hy appropriate for each system.

  8. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A M; DeWitt, B A; Lukes, A L

    2000-07-01

    Potential and documented interactions between alternative therapy agents and warfarin are discussed. An estimated one third of adults in the United States use alternative therapies, including herbs. A major safety concern is potential interactions of alternative medicine products with prescription medications. This issue is especially important with respect to drugs with narrow therapeutic indexes, such as warfarin. Herbal products that may potentially increase the risk of bleeding or potentiate the effects of warfarin therapy include angelica root, arnica flower, anise, asafoetida, bogbean, borage seed oil, bromelain, capsicum, celery, chamomile, clove, fenugreek, feverfew, garlic, ginger ginkgo, horse chestnut, licorice root, lovage root, meadowsweet, onion, parsley, passionflower herb, poplar, quassia, red clover, rue, sweet clover, turmeric, and willow bark. Products that have been associated with documented reports of potential interactions with warfarin include coenzyme Q10, danshen, devil's claw, dong quai, ginseng, green tea, papain, and vitamin E. Interpretation of the available information on herb-warfarin interactions is difficult because nearly all of it is based on in vitro data, animal studies, or individual case reports. More study is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions. There is evidence that a wide range of alternative therapy products have the potential to interact with warfarin. Pharmacists and other health care professionals should question all patients about use of alternative therapies and report documented interactions to FDA's MedWatch program. PMID:10902065

  9. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A M; DeWitt, B A; Lukes, A L

    2000-07-01

    Potential and documented interactions between alternative therapy agents and warfarin are discussed. An estimated one third of adults in the United States use alternative therapies, including herbs. A major safety concern is potential interactions of alternative medicine products with prescription medications. This issue is especially important with respect to drugs with narrow therapeutic indexes, such as warfarin. Herbal products that may potentially increase the risk of bleeding or potentiate the effects of warfarin therapy include angelica root, arnica flower, anise, asafoetida, bogbean, borage seed oil, bromelain, capsicum, celery, chamomile, clove, fenugreek, feverfew, garlic, ginger ginkgo, horse chestnut, licorice root, lovage root, meadowsweet, onion, parsley, passionflower herb, poplar, quassia, red clover, rue, sweet clover, turmeric, and willow bark. Products that have been associated with documented reports of potential interactions with warfarin include coenzyme Q10, danshen, devil's claw, dong quai, ginseng, green tea, papain, and vitamin E. Interpretation of the available information on herb-warfarin interactions is difficult because nearly all of it is based on in vitro data, animal studies, or individual case reports. More study is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions. There is evidence that a wide range of alternative therapy products have the potential to interact with warfarin. Pharmacists and other health care professionals should question all patients about use of alternative therapies and report documented interactions to FDA's MedWatch program.

  10. A new interaction potential for swarming models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, J. A.; Martin, S.; Panferov, V.

    2013-10-01

    We consider a self-propelled particle system which has been used to describe certain types of collective motion of animals, such as fish schools and bird flocks. Interactions between particles are specified by means of a pairwise potential, repulsive at short ranges and attractive at longer ranges. The exponentially decaying Morse potential is a typical choice, and is known to reproduce certain types of collective motion observed in nature, particularly aligned flocks and rotating mills. We introduce a class of interaction potentials, that we call Quasi-Morse, for which flock and rotating mills states are also observed numerically, however in that case the corresponding macroscopic equations allow for explicit solutions in terms of special functions, with coefficients that can be obtained numerically without solving the particle evolution. We compare the obtained solutions with long-time dynamics of the particle systems and find a close agreement for several types of flock and mill solutions.

  11. A new interaction potential for swarming models

    CERN Document Server

    Carrillo, J A; Panferov, V

    2012-01-01

    We consider a self-propelled particle system which has been used to describe certain types of collective motion of animals, such as fish schools and bird flocks. Interactions between particles are specified by means of a pairwise potential, repulsive at short ranges and attractive at longer ranges. The exponentially decaying Morse potential is a typical choice, and is known to reproduce certain types of collective motion observed in nature, particularly aligned flocks and rotating mills. We introduce a class of interaction potentials, that we call Quasi-Morse, for which flock and rotating mills states are also observed numerically, however in that case the corresponding macroscopic equations allow for explicit solutions in terms of special functions, with coefficients that can be obtained numerically without solving the particle evolution. We compare thus obtained solutions with long-time dynamics of the particle systems and find a close agreement for several types of flock and mill solutions.

  12. Statistical systems with nonintegrable interaction potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukalov, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    Statistical systems composed of atoms interacting with each other trough nonintegrable interaction potentials are considered. Examples of these potentials are hard-core potentials and long-range potentials, for instance, the Lennard-Jones and dipolar potentials. The treatment of such potentials is known to confront several problems, e.g., the impossibility of using the standard mean-field approximations, such as Hartree and Hartree-Fock approximations, the impossibility of directly introducing coherent states, the difficulty in breaking the global gauge symmetry, which is required for describing Bose-Einstein condensed and superfluid systems, the absence of a correctly defined Fourier transform, which hampers the description of uniform matter as well as the use of local-density approximation for nonuniform systems. A novel iterative procedure for describing such systems is developed, starting from a correlated mean-field approximation, allowing for a systematic derivation of higher orders, and meeting no problems listed above. The procedure is applicable to arbitrary systems, whether equilibrium or nonequilibrium. The specification for equilibrium systems is presented. The method of extrapolating the expressions for observable quantities from weak coupling to strong coupling is described.

  13. Resonances in alpha-nuclei interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpeshin, F F [Fock Institute of Physics, St Petersburg State University, RU-198504 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); La Rana, G [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita di Napoli, Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Vardaci, Emanuele [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita di Napoli, Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Brondi, Augusto [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita di Napoli, Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Moro, Renata [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita di Napoli, Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Abramovich, S N [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre VNIIEF, RU-607190 Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Serov, V I [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre VNIIEF, RU-607190 Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod Region (Russian Federation)

    2007-03-15

    Tunnelling of {alpha} particles through the Coulomb barrier is considered. The main attention is given to the effect of sharp peaks arising in the case of coincidence of the {alpha} energy with that of a quasistaionary state within the barrier. The question of the {alpha}-nucleus potential is discussed in this light. The method is applied to the {alpha} decay of a compound nucleus of {sup 135}Pr. The appearance of the peaks in the spectrum of emitted particles is predicted. They can give rise to 'anomalous' properties of some neutron resonances. The peaks can also be observed in the incoming {alpha}-nucleus channel. Observation of the peaks would give unique information about the {alpha}-nucleus potential.

  14. PRESENTATION POTENTIAL USING IN PEDAGOGICAL INTERACTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Ershova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The given article is aimed at considering multimedia presentation potential and its influence on strengthening classroom teacher-student interaction. In the article the importance of using this kind of activity in the study process is pointed in connection with educational state policy on the one hand. On the other hand, gained students’ skills as a final result of work with presentations met employers’ demand for both parent and world labour-markets and bring competitive benefit to the candidates. Scientific novelty and results. Multimedia presentation is considered as a specific complex of classroom activities. The students are oriented on the self analysis and presentation assessment. It is shown that well-organized process of peer students’ assessment allows to simultaneously helping in solving the didactic and methodical problems. To this purpose the system of assessment criteria should be developed. It has to be clear for students for making assessment feasible and time-saving. The example of a possible variant of criteria system is described; quality of the presentations prepared by students can be defined based on such system criteria. The author also analyzed software products of the three main platforms (Windows, Linux, MacOs which have different tools and allow to follow users’ needs for creating presentations. In the article there is a comparative table of the two most popular software development: the program Microsoft PowerPoint and the web-service Prezi for realizing the relevance of their use in the study process. Practical significance of the present article concludes in author’s suggestions of some recommendations for presentation potential use as a tool of improving pedagogical interaction process with contemporary students. 

  15. Relativistic point interactions: Approximation by smooth potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rhonda J.

    1997-06-01

    We show that the four-parameter family of one-dimensional relativistic point interactions studied by Benvegnu and Dąbrowski may be approximated in the strong resolvent sense by smooth, local, short-range perturbations of the Dirac Hamiltonian. In addition, we prove that the nonrelativistic limits correspond to the Schrödinger point interactions studied extensively by the author and Paul Chernoff.

  16. Potential Flow Interactions With Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddhavarapu, Sudhir S.; Meiburg, Eckart

    1999-01-01

    The effect of convective melt motion on the growth of morphological instabilities in crystal growth has been the focus of many studies in the past decade. While most of the efforts have been directed towards investigating the linear stability aspects, relatively little attention has been devoted to experimental and numerical studies. In a pure morphological case, when there is no flow, morphological changes in the solid-liquid interface are governed by heat conduction and solute distribution. Under the influence of a convective motion, both heat and solute are redistributed, thereby affecting the intrinsic morphological phenomenon. The overall effect of the convective motion could be either stabilizing or destabilizing. Recent investigations have predicted stabilization by a flow parallel to the interface. In the case of non-parallel flows, e.g., stagnation point flow, Brattkus and Davis have found a new flow-induced morphological instability that occurs at long wavelengths and also consists of waves propagating against the flow. Other studies have addressed the nonlinear aspects (Konstantinos and Brown, Wollkind and Segel)). In contrast to the earlier studies, our present investigation focuses on the effects of the potential flow fields typically encountered in Hele-Shaw cells. Such a Hele-Shaw cell can simulate a gravity-free environment in the sense that buoyancy-driven convection is largely suppressed, and hence negligible. Our interest lies both in analyzing the linear stability of the solidification process in the presence of potential flow fields, as well as in performing high-accuracy nonlinear simulations. Linear stability analysis can be performed for the flow configuration mentioned above. It is observed that a parallel potential flow is stabilizing and gives rise to waves traveling downstream. We have built a highly accurate numerical scheme which is validated at small amplitudes by comparing with the analytically predicted results for the pure

  17. Van der Waals interactions: accuracy of pair potential approximations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Milton W; Kim, Hye-Young; Liebrecht, Michael

    2012-11-21

    Van der Waals interactions between single atoms and solids are discussed for the regime of large separation. A commonly employed approximation is to evaluate this interaction as a sum of two-body interactions between the adatom and the constituent atoms of the solid. The resulting potentials are here compared with known results in various geometries. Analogous comparisons are made for diatomic molecules near either single atoms or semi-infinite surfaces and for triatomic molecules' interactions with single atoms. PMID:23181315

  18. Large potential steps at weakly interacting metal-insulator interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bokdam, Menno; Brocks, Geert; Kelly, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Potential steps exceeding 1 eV are regularly formed at metal|insulator interfaces, even when the interaction between the materials at the interface is weak physisorption. From first-principles calculations on metal|h-BN interfaces we show that these potential steps are only indirectly sensitive to the interface bonding through the dependence of the binding energy curves on the van der Waals interaction. Exchange repulsion forms the main contribution to the interface potential step in the weak...

  19. Prospective study on microscopic potential with Gogny interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchon, G.; Dupuis, M. [DAM, DIF, CEA, Arpajon (France); Arellano, H.F. [University of Chile, Department of Physics - FCFM, Santiago (Chile); DAM, DIF, CEA, Arpajon (France)

    2015-12-15

    We present our current studies and future plans on microscopic potential based on effective nucleon-nucleon interaction and many-body theory. This framework treats in an unified way nuclear structure and reaction. It offers the opportunity to link the underlying effective interaction to nucleon scattering observables. The more consistently connected to a variety of reaction and structure experimental data the framework is, the more constrained the effective interaction will be. As a proof of concept, we present some recent results for both neutron and proton scattered from spherical target nucleus, namely {sup 40}Ca, using the Gogny D1S interaction. Possible fruitful cross-talks between microscopic potential, phenomenological potential and effective interaction are exposed. We then draw some prospective plans for the forthcoming years including scattering from spherical nuclei experiencing pairing correlations, scattering from axially deformed nuclei, and new effective interaction with reaction constraints. (orig.)

  20. Discrete Time Markovian Agents Interacting Through a Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Budhiraja, Amarjit; Rubenthaler, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    A discrete time stochastic model for a multiagent system given in terms of a large collection of interacting Markov chains is studied. The evolution of the interacting particles is described through a time inhomogeneous transition probability kernel that depends on the 'gradient' of the potential field. The particles, in turn, dynamically modify the potential field through their cumulative input. Interacting Markov processes of the above form have been suggested as models for active biological transport in response to external stimulus such as a chemical gradient. One of the basic mathematical challenges is to develop a general theory of stability for such interacting Markovian systems and for the corresponding nonlinear Markov processes that arise in the large agent limit. Such a theory would be key to a mathematical understanding of the interactive structure formation that results from the complex feedback between the agents and the potential field. It will also be a crucial ingredient in developing simulat...

  1. Calculation of Interaction Potentials between Spherical and Deformed Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gao-Long; XU Xin-Xing; BAI Chun-Lin; YU Ning; ZHANG Huan-Qiao; LIU Zu-Hua; ZHANG Chun-Lei; LIN Cheng-Jian; YANG Feng; AN Guang-Peng; JIA Hui-Ming; WU Zhen-Dong

    2007-01-01

    The interaction potential for spherical-deformed reaction partners is calculated. The shape, separation and orientation dependence of the interaction potential and fusion cross section of the system 32S+154Sm are investigated within the double-folding model of the deformed nuclei. The effective nucleon-nucleon interaction is taken to be the M3Y-Reid potential. The density is considered for three terms of the expansion using the truncated multipole expansion method, which is a deformed Fermi shape with quadrupole and hexadecapole for the density distribution of 154Sm. It is found for the interaction potential that the height and the position of barrier strongly depend on the deformations, the orientation angle of the deformed nucleus, and hence produce great effects on fusion cross section. The integrated fusion cross section is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Helium-3 Microscopic Optical Model Potential Based on Skyrme Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The helium-3 microscopic optical potential is obtained by Green function method through nuclear matter approximation and local density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The reaction cross

  3. An interatomic potential for W–N interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polvi, J.; Heinola, K.; Nordlund, K.

    2016-08-01

    N2 gas is routinely used as a seeding species in fusion plasma to control the amount of power emitted from the plasma by radiation to the tungsten walls of an ITER-like divertor. Nitrogen atoms interact with the plasma-facing materials beryllium and tungsten, and form chemical bonds with the wall surfaces, as well as with plasma hydrogen isotopes, thus raising a special interest in W–N and N–H interactions in the fusion community. In this work we describe the development of an analytical interatomic potential for W–N interactions and benchmark the potential against DFT calculation results for N defects in tungsten.

  4. Risk factors for potential drug interactions in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Gonzalez Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz; Petersen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify patient- and practice-related factors associated with potential drug interactions. Methods: A register analysis study in general practices in the county of Funen, Denmark. Prescription data were retrieved from a population-based prescription database (Odense University...... Pharmacoepidemiologic Database, OPED) covering prescriptions to all inhabitants in the county of Funen, Denmark. All individuals exposed to concurrent use of two or more drugs (polypharmacy) were identified. Combinations of drugs with potential interactions were registered and classified as major, moderate, or minor......, depending on the severity of outcome and the quality of documentation. A two-level random coefficient logistic regression model was used to investigate factors related to potential drug interactions. Results: One-third of the population was exposed to polypharmacy, and 6% were exposed to potential drug...

  5. Isospectral Bound State Potential from DDM3Y Effective Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, S K; Das, D; Saha, Swapan K

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigation of ${5/2}^+$ resonance state of $^{11}Be$ was carried out using Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SQM). The original two-body potential ($^{10}Be + n$) was constructed microscopically using a DDM3Y effective NN interaction. SQM converted this potential to an isospectral potential which is effective for detecting resonance states in the continuum. The resonance energy of the ${5/2}^+$ state is in good agreement with the experimental value.

  6. Interaction potential between discrete solitons in waveguide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khawaja, U; Al-Marzoug, S M; Bahlouli, H; Baizakov, B

    2016-08-01

    Using a variational approach, we obtained the interaction potential between two discrete solitons in optical waveguide arrays. The resulting potential bears the two features of soliton-soliton and soliton-waveguide interaction potentials where the former is similar to that of the continuum case and the latter is similar to the effective Pierls-Nabarro potential. The interplay between the two interaction potentials is investigated by studying its effect on the soliton molecule formation. It is found that the two solitons bind if their initial separation equals an odd number of waveguides, while they do not bind if their separation is an even number, which is a consequence of the two solitons being both either at the intersites (unstable) or being onsite (stable). We derived the equations of motion for the solitons' centre of mass and relative separation and provided analytic solutions for some specific cases. Favourable agreement between the analytical and numerical interaction potentials is obtained. Possible applications of our results to all-optical logic gates are pointed out. PMID:27505780

  7. The interaction between potential criminals' and victims' demands for guns

    OpenAIRE

    Baç, Mehmet; Bac, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    I develop a model with endogenous gun ownership and study the interaction between the demands for guns by heterogeneous potential offenders and victims. I show that the interaction depends on pervasiveness of guns, injury probabilities and, in particular, the impact of the gun on the probability of success against armed relative to unarmed adversaries. While the sanction on armed offense is maximal under plausible conditions, the sanction on unarmed offense balances direct deterrence benef...

  8. Scattering with absorptive interaction: Energy-dependent potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassing, W.; Stingl, M.; Weiguny, A.

    1983-05-01

    The energy dependence and analytic structure of the effective interaction for elastic scattering of composite particles are investigated using Feshbach's projection technique. A generalized Levinson theorem is established for complex, nonlocal, and energy-dependent interactions. The analytical results are illustrated by means of Argand diagrams for a solvable model and the effect of energy averaging is discussed. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Scattering theory, S matrix for absorptive, energy-dependent potentials, Levinson theorem.

  9. Generation of directional EOF by interactive oscillatory zeta potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chih-Yu; Wang, Chang-Yi; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2008-11-01

    A steady directional EOF due to a nonlinear interaction between oscillatory axial electrical fields and oscillatory wall potentials (zeta potentials) is presented. This is a new mechanism to produce such a mean flow. It is found that the flow velocity depends not on the external driving frequency but on the phase angle difference between the electric fields and the zeta potentials. The formulation can also be reduced to the static EOF straightforwardly. For the purpose of theoretical demonstration, we use the Debye-Huckel approximation for the zeta potential. Results of planar and cylindrical capillaries are given.

  10. Interactions between delta-like sources and potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, G T; Barone, F A

    2014-01-01

    The modified scalar boson propagator due to the presence of a hyperplane semi-transparent mirror is computed. From this, the classical interaction between static charges and the mirror is investigated employing delta-like potentials and sources. Although the calculations for hyperplane mirrors are performed in arbitrary dimensions, and in a completely general way, it is shown that the results give rise to the usual image method as a particular case. The interaction between a point-like mirror and a point-like source is also considered in $3+1$ dimensions, where a central $1/R^{2}$ attractive potential is also obtained as a special case.

  11. Interacting Bose gas confined in a Kronig-Penney potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, O. A.; Solís, M. A.

    We analyze the effect of the 1D periodic Kronig-Penney potential, composed of barriers of width b and separated a distance a, over an interacting Bose gas. At T = 0 , the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved analytically in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions for repulsive or attractive interaction between bosons. By applying the boundary conditions for periodic solutions as well as the normalization of the wave function, we arrive to a set of nonlinear equations from which we obtain the density profile and the chemical potential of the condensate as a function of the particle momentum. The profiles for attractive and repulsive interactions are compared with that of the non-interacting case. For attractive interaction we are able to observe a pronounced spatial localization in the middle of every two barriers. We reproduce the well known results when the Kronig-Penney potential becomes a Dirac Comb. We acknowledge partial support from Grants PAPIIT IN111613 and CONACyT 221030.

  12. Market potential for interactive audio-visual media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurdijk, A.; Limonard, S.

    2005-01-01

    NM2 (New Media for a New Millennium) develops tools for interactive, personalised and non-linear audio-visual content that will be tested in seven pilot productions. This paper looks at the market potential for these productions from a technological, a business and a users' perspective. It shows tha

  13. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torquato, Salvatore [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  14. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  15. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  16. Interaction Potential between Parabolic Rotator and an Outside Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At micro/nanoscale, the interaction potential between parabolic rotator and a particle located outside the rotator is studied on the basis of the negative exponential pair potential 1/Rn between particles. Similar to two-dimensional curved surfaces, we confirm that the potential of the three-dimensional parabolic rotator and outside particle can also be expressed as a unified form of curvatures; that is, it can be written as the function of curvatures. Furthermore, we verify that the driving forces acting on the particle may be induced by the highly curved micro/nano-parabolic rotator. Curvatures and the gradient of curvatures are the essential elements forming the driving forces. Through the idealized numerical experiments, the accuracy of the curvature-based potential is preliminarily proved.

  17. Cosmological solutions in string theory with dilaton self interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mora, C

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present homogeneous and isotropic cosmological solutions for the low energy limit of string theory with a self interacting potential for the scalar field. For a potential that is a linear combination of two exponential, a family of exact solutions are found for the different spatial curvatures. Among this family a non singular accelerating solution for positive curvature is singled out and the violation of the energy conditions for that solution is studied, and also its astrophysical consequences. The string coupling for this solution is finite. (Author)

  18. The interaction time of a packet with a potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    They study the evolution of a wave packet impinging onto a one-dimensional potential barrier. The transmission and reflection times discussed in the literature for stationary states do not correspond to the times required for the emergence of a transmitted or a reflected packet. They propose new definitions for the interaction time and the transmission and reflection times which are suitable for packets and fit better the actual time evolution of the packet

  19. Comparing Extended System Interactions with Motions in Softened Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Eric I

    2015-01-01

    Using an $N$-body evolution code that does not rely on softened potentials, I have created a suite of interacting binary cluster simulations. The motions of the centers-of-mass of the clusters have been tracked and compared to the trajectories of point masses interacting via one of four different softened potential prescriptions. There is a robust, nearly linear relationship between the impact parameter of the cluster interaction and the point-mass softening length that best approximates the cluster centers-of-mass motion. In an $N$-body simulation that adopts a fixed softening length, such a relationship leads to regimes where two-body effects, like dynamical friction, can be either larger or smaller than the corresponding cluster situation. Further consideration of more specific $N$-body simulations leads to an estimate that roughly 10 per cent of point-mass interactions in an $N$-body simulation will experience two-body effects larger than those for equivalent clusters.

  20. POTENTIALS OF INTERACTIVE TEACHING TECHNIQUES TO TRAIN EXPERTS IN PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Krikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various interactive teaching methods and techniques are extensively used in modern higher schools. Their implementation is considered to be one of the most significant and efficient ways to improve quality of pharmaceutical professional training. Efficiency of these interactive techniques applied at the Department of Economics and Management of Pharmaceutical Business of Smolensk State Medical University has been comprehensively investigated and assessed. Obtained results are presented in the paper, as well as students’ survey data as consumers of educational services. Fifth year full-time students were involved into the study. Students’ awareness on potentials and significance of applied interactive teaching methods, as well as their interest in innovative forms to gain professional knowledge comprised 93.3%. Potentials of interactive techniques to teach students to deal with a diversity of real life practical professional tasks and problems are particularly emphasized in the study (86.7% students.

  1. Potential interaction and potential investigation of science center exhibits and visitors' interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busque, Laurier

    This research consisted of studying the characteristics of interaction and investigation potential present in museum or science center exhibits. Categories (strong and weak) for the characteristics of interaction potential and investigation potential were established. Fifteen exhibits were chosen from the Museum of Science (Ottawa) and from two science centers (Sudbury and Toronto); these were representative of the established characteristics and categories. A test was constructed that measured the interest in an exhibit in a museum or a science center. The final analysis of the test (20 items) reflects a coefficient of homogeneity (Cronbach alpha) of 0.97 (n = 278). In terms of the characteristics of interaction potential and investigation potential, a significant difference among the ranks of interest was not found once they were regrouped under the categories of strong and weak. The hypothesis of a relationship between the interaction potential and visitors' interest in an exhibit in a museum or science center and the hypothesis of a relationship between the investigation potential and the interest aroused were both rejected. In regards to the interaction potential, median ranks of interest in exhibits of 8.6 for the strong category and of 7.5 for the weak category were observed. In terms of the investigation potential, median ranks of interest of 7.0 for the strong category and of 9.1 for the weak category were observed. In the case of investigation potential, even if the difference is not significant, there is an indication that the strong investigation potential seems to have the effect of creating disinterest in the presentation of an exhibit in a museum or in a science center. In the context of new museum and science centers, the view of developing exhibits which are primarily objects which stimulate interest must be maintained. If this is done with exhibits that arc interactive and have an investigative approach, it is necessary for those in charge of

  2. Gender differences, polypharmacy, and potential pharmacological interactions in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Duarte Venturini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to analyze pharmacological interactions among drugs taken by elderly patients and their age and gender differences in a population from Porto Alegre, Brazil. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the database provided by the Institute of Geriatric and Gerontology, Porto Alegre, Brazil. The database was composed of 438 elderly and includes information about the patients' disease, therapy regimens, utilized drugs. All drugs reported by the elderly patients were classified using the Anatomical Therapeutic and Chemical Classification System. The drug-drug interactions and their severity were assessed using the Micromedex® Healthcare Series. RESULTS: Of the 438 elderly patients in the data base, 376 (85.8% used pharmacotherapy, 274 were female, and 90.4% of females used drugs. The average number of drugs used by each individual younger than 80 years was 3.2±2.6. Women younger than 80 years old used more drugs than men in the same age group whereas men older than 80 years increased their use of drugs in relation to other age groups. Therefore, 32.6% of men and 49.2% of women described at least one interaction, and 8.1% of men and 10.6% of women described four or more potential drug-drug interactions. Two-thirds of drug-drug interactions were moderate in both genders, and most of them involved angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, loop and thiazide diuretics, and β-blockers. CONCLUSION: Elderly patients should be closely monitored, based on drug class, gender, age group and nutritional status.

  3. Microscopic positive-energy potential based on Gogny interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchon, G; Arellano, H F; Mau, N Vinh

    2014-01-01

    We present nucleon elastic scattering calculation based on Green's function formalism in the Random-Phase Approximation. For the first time, the Gogny effective interaction is used consistently throughout the whole calculation to account for the complex, non-local and energy-dependent optical potential. Effects of intermediate single-particle resonances are included and found to play a crucial role in the account for measured reaction cross section. Double counting of the particle-hole second-order contribution is carefully addressed. The resulting integro-differential Schr\\"odinger equation for the scattering process is solved without localization procedures. The method is applied to neutron and proton elastic scattering from $^{40}$Ca. A successful account for differential and integral cross sections, including analyzing powers, is obtained for incident energies up to 30 MeV. Discrepancies at higher energies are related to much too high volume integral of the real potential for large partial waves. Moreover...

  4. Potential interaction between proton pump inhibitor and clopidogrel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Kurniawan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Clopidogrel is an anti-platelet agent commonly used in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular (CV disease. Although formerly considered safe, several studies reported that the use of clopidogrel may cause a significant increase in the rate of gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. This adverse effect could be minimized by coadministration of proton pump inhibitor (PPI. However, since PPI and clopidogrel share the same metabolic pathway, it has been hypothesized that the administration of PPI following clopidogrel therapy may cause a reduction in its anti-platelet effect, thereby increasing the risk of CV events. Recent studies found no significant inhibition in the activation of clopidogrel by CYP2C19 with administration of PPI in vitro. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies, as well as clinical studies, reported conflicting results regarding the potential interaction between PPI and clopidogrel. Until now, the available study investigated the PPI-clopidogrel interaction are primarily observational. The COGENT study is the only prospective, placebo-controlled trial examined the PPI-clopidogrel interaction. This study revealed no significant increase in CV events in patients receiving PPI following clopidogrel therapy, compared to the control group. Though remains controversial, current expert consensus recommended the administration of PPI in patients receiving clopidogrel, particularly in high-risk patients. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:57-62Keywords: Cardiovascular, clopidogrel, gastrointestinal, proton pump inhibitor

  5. Schematic potential energy for interaction between isobutene and zeolite mordenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Serrano, L A [Programa de Crudo Maya, IMP, AP 15-805, DF 07730 (Mexico); Flores-Sandoval, C A [Programa de Crudo Maya, IMP, AP 15-805, DF 07730 (Mexico); Zaragoza, I P [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, IMP, AP 15-805, DF 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    A schematic representation of the potential energy for the interaction between isobutene and H mordenite was presented by using eight different positions (P1-P8) of C{sub 1} or C{sub 2} atoms located in front of the acid hydrogen (H{sup +}). In all cases a {pi} complex was formed yielding different values of the adsorption energy. In some cases of the adsorption point in P1-P8 the frontier orbitals are shown. The P8 position exhibits the highest value obtained for the adsorption energy, where the C{sub 1} atom is in front of the H{sup +}. Calculations were of all electron type employing HF/6-31G**.

  6. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W M M S Bandara; Gamini Seneviratne; S A Kulasooriya

    2006-12-01

    Plants benefit extensively by harbouring endophytic microbes. They promote plant growth and confer enhanced resistance to various pathogens. However, the way the interactions among endophytes influence the plant productivity has not been explained. Present study experimentally showed that endophytes isolated from rice (Oryza sativa) used as the test plant produced two types of interactions; biofilms (bacteria attached to mycelia) and mixed cultures with no such attachments. Acidity, as measured by pH in cultures with biofilms was higher than that of fungi alone, bacteria alone or the mixed cultures. Production of indoleacetic acid like substances (IAAS) of biofilms was higher than that of mixed cultures, fungi or bacteria. Bacteria and fungi produced higher quantities of IAAS than mixed cultures. In mixed cultures, the potential of IAAS production of resident microbes was reduced considerably. There was a negative relationship between IAAS and pH of the biofilms, indicating that IAAS was the main contributor to the acidity. However, such a relationship was not observed in mixed cultures. Microbial acid production is important for suppressing plant pathogens. Thus the biofilm formation in endophytic environment seems to be very important for healthy and improved plant growth. However, it is unlikely that an interaction among endophytes takes place naturally in the endophytic environment, due to physical barriers of plant tissues. Further, critical cell density dependant quorum sensing that leads to biofilm formation may not occur in the endophytic environment as there is a limited space. As such in vitro production and application of beneficial biofilmed inocula of endophytes are important for improved plant production in any agro-ecosystem. The conventional practice of plant inoculation with monocultures or mixed cultures of effective microbes may not give the highest microbial effect, which may only be achieved by biofilm formation.

  7. Asymptotic near-nucleus structure of the electron-interaction potential in local effective potential theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In local effective potential theories of electronic structure, the electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle, Coulomb repulsion, and correlation-kinetic effects, are all incorporated in the local electron-interaction potential vee(r). In previous work, it has been shown that for spherically symmetric or sphericalized systems, the asymptotic near-nucleus expansion of this potential is vee(r)=vee(0)+βr+O(r2), with vee(0) being finite. By assuming that the Schroedinger and local effective potential theory wave functions are analytic near the nucleus of atoms, we prove the following via quantal density functional theory (QDFT): (i) Correlations due to the Pauli principle and Coulomb correlations do not contribute to the linear structure; (ii) these Pauli and Coulomb correlations contribute quadratically; (iii) the linear structure is solely due to correlation-kinetic effects, the contributions of these effects being determined analytically. We also derive by application of adiabatic coupling constant perturbation theory via QDFT (iv) the asymptotic near-nucleus expansion of the Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham theory exchange vx(r) and correlation vc(r) potentials. These functions also approach the nucleus linearly with the linear term of vx(r) being solely due to the lowest-order correlation kinetic effects, and the linear term of vc(r) being due solely to the higher-order correlation kinetic contributions. The above conclusions are equally valid for systems of arbitrary symmetry, provided spherical averages of the properties are employed

  8. Commercially available interactive video games in burn rehabilitation: therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Ingrid S; Bagley, Anita; Kawada, Jason; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2012-06-01

    Commercially available interactive video games (IVG) like the Nintendo Wii™ (NW) and PlayStation™II Eye Toy (PE) are increasingly used in the rehabilitation of patients with burn. Such games have gained popularity in burn rehabilitation because they encourage range of motion (ROM) while distracting from pain. However, IVGs were not originally designed for rehabilitation purposes but rather for entertainment and may lack specificity for achieving rehabilitative goals. Objectively evaluating the specific demands of IVGs in relation to common burn therapy goals will determine their true therapeutic benefit and guide their use in burn rehabilitation. Upper extremity (UE) motion of 24 normal children was measured using 3D motion analysis during play with the two types of IVGs most commonly described for use after burn: NW and PE. Data was analyzed using t-tests and One-way Analysis of Variance. Active range of motion for shoulder flexion and abduction during play with both PE and NW was within functional range, thus supporting the idea that IVGs offer activities with therapeutic potential to improve ROM. PE resulted in higher demands and longer duration of UE motion than NW, and therefore may be the preferred tool when UE ROM or muscular endurance are the goals of rehabilitation. When choosing a suitable IVG for application in rehabilitation, the user's impairment together with the therapeutic attributes of the IVG should be considered to optimize outcome. PMID:22385641

  9. Probiotics: Interaction with gut microbiome and antiobesity potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Tulika; Singh, Satvinder; Sharma, Raj Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Obesity is a metabolic disorder afflicting people globally. There has been a pivotal advancement in the understanding of the intestinal microbiota composition and its implication in extraintestinal (metabolic) diseases. Therefore, any agent modulating gut microbiota may produce an influential effect in preventing the pathogenesis of disease. Probiotics are live microbes that, when administered in adequate amounts, have been shown to confer health benefits to the host. Over the years, probiotics have been a part of the human diet in the form of different fermented foods consumed around the world. Their influence on different physiologic functions in the host is increasingly being documented. The antiobesity potential of probiotics is also gaining wide attention because of increasing evidence of the role of gut microbiota in energy homeostasis and fat accumulation. Probiotics have also been shown to interact with the resident bacterial members already present in the gut by altering their properties, which may also affect the metabolic pathways involved in the regulation of fat metabolism. The underlying pathways governing the antiobesity effects of probiotics remain unclear. However, it is hoped that the evidence presented and discussed in this review will encourage and thus drive more extensive research in this field.

  10. Induced gravity with Higgs potential. Elementary interactions and quantum processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezares Roder, Nils Manuel

    2010-07-01

    This work is intended to first serve as introduction in fundamental subjects of physics in order to be then able to review the mechanism of symmetry breakdown and its essential character in physics. It introduces the concept of scalar-tensor theories of gravity based on Bergmann-Wagoner models with a Higgs potential. The main physical context aimed is the problem of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the one hand, there is gravitation. Within this context, we have Dark Matter as an especially relevant concept. This work entails the following main contributions: - General features of Einstein's theory are introduced together with generalities of the different elementary interactions of physics from which the concepts of dark sectors and Higgs Mechanism are derived. - The concept of symmetry breaking and especially the Higgs Mechanism of mass generation are discussed in their relevance for the most different subjects of physics, especially in relation to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics with elementary Higgs fields. - Scalar-Tensor Theories are introduced in order to build in them the process of Higgs Mechanism. This is then fulfilled with a theory of induced gravity with a Higgs potential which seems renormalizable according to deWitt's power counting criterion, and with mass-generating Higgs fields which only couple gravitationally as well as with Higgs fields which act analogously to cosmon fields. - Further, the energy density of the gravitational field is derived for the specific model of induced gravity from an analogy to electrodynamics. It is shown that a nonvanishing value of pressure related to the scalar field is necessary in order to reproduce standard linear solar-relativistic dynamics. Within astrophysical considerations for flat rotation curves of galaxies, a possible dark-matter behavior is concluded within spherical symmetry. The scalar field and the dark-matter profile of total energy density are derived. An analogous

  11. Induced gravity with Higgs potential. Elementary interactions and quantum processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is intended to first serve as introduction in fundamental subjects of physics in order to be then able to review the mechanism of symmetry breakdown and its essential character in physics. It introduces the concept of scalar-tensor theories of gravity based on Bergmann-Wagoner models with a Higgs potential. The main physical context aimed is the problem of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the one hand, there is gravitation. Within this context, we have Dark Matter as an especially relevant concept. This work entails the following main contributions: - General features of Einstein's theory are introduced together with generalities of the different elementary interactions of physics from which the concepts of dark sectors and Higgs Mechanism are derived. - The concept of symmetry breaking and especially the Higgs Mechanism of mass generation are discussed in their relevance for the most different subjects of physics, especially in relation to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics with elementary Higgs fields. - Scalar-Tensor Theories are introduced in order to build in them the process of Higgs Mechanism. This is then fulfilled with a theory of induced gravity with a Higgs potential which seems renormalizable according to deWitt's power counting criterion, and with mass-generating Higgs fields which only couple gravitationally as well as with Higgs fields which act analogously to cosmon fields. - Further, the energy density of the gravitational field is derived for the specific model of induced gravity from an analogy to electrodynamics. It is shown that a nonvanishing value of pressure related to the scalar field is necessary in order to reproduce standard linear solar-relativistic dynamics. Within astrophysical considerations for flat rotation curves of galaxies, a possible dark-matter behavior is concluded within spherical symmetry. The scalar field and the dark-matter profile of total energy density are derived. An analogous relation between

  12. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AerobiKa® Cardiology Medications Anticoagulant Medicine Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions COPD Medications Bronchodilators Anti-Inflammatories Antibiotics Managing Your Medications Devices ...

  13. Effective potentials for atom-atom interaction at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Bo

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the concept and design of effective atom-atom potentials that accurately describe any physical processes involving only states around the threshold. The existence of such potentials gives hope to a quantitative, and systematic, understanding of quantum few-atom and quantum many-atom systems at relatively low temperatures.

  14. Studies on pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of vinpocetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Vinpocetine, a semi-synthetic derivative of vincamine, is a popular dietary supplement used for the treatment of several central nervous system related disorders. Despite its wide use, no pharmacokinetic drug interaction studies are reported in literature. Due to increasing use of dietar...

  15. The Stability of Icosahedral Cluster and the Range of Interaction Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Feng; WANG Jin-Lan; SHEN Wei-Feng; WANG Bao-Lin; LI Hui; WANG Guang-Hou

    2001-01-01

    The relation between the stability of icosahedral clusters and the range of interaction potential is discussed.We found that the stability of icosahedral clusters nay decrease with decreasing range of interaction potential. A simple formula about the critical number of icosahedral clusters and the range of interaction potential (M1/3c = A1 + A2r2eff)was proposed. The calculation of the stability of icosahedral fullerence molecular clusters shows that our idea is right.``

  16. Bubble-bubble interaction: A potential source of cavitation noise

    CERN Document Server

    Ida, Masato

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between microbubbles through pressure pulses has been studied to show that it can be a source of cavitation noise. A recent report demonstrated that the acoustic noise generated by a shrimp originates from the collapse of a cavitation bubble produced when the shrimp closes its snapper claw. The recorded acoustic signal contains a broadband noise that consists of positive and negative pulses, but a theoretical model for single bubbles fails to reproduce the negative ones. Using a nonlinear multibubble model we have shown here that the negative pulses can be explained by considering the interaction of microbubbles formed after the cavitation bubble has collapsed and fragmented: Positive pulses produced at the collapse of the microbubbles hit and impulsively compress neighboring microbubbles to generate reflected pulses whose amplitudes are negative. Discussing the details of the noise generation process, we have found that no negative pulses are generated if the internal pressure of the reflecti...

  17. Solution of the Dirac Equation for Potential Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Alhaidari

    2002-01-01

    An effective approach for solving the three-dimensional Dirac equation for spherically symmetric local interactions, which we have introduced recently, is reviewed and consolidated. The merit of the approach is in producing Schrodinger-like equation for the spinor components that could simply be solved by correspondence with well-known exactly solvable non-relativistic problems. Taking the nonrelativistic limit will reproduce the nonrelativistic problem. The approach has been used successfull...

  18. In vitro interactions between Armillaria species and potential biocontrol fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keča Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between Armillaria species and seven other fungi were tested in vitro. Tree antagonistic (Trichoderma viride, Trichotecium roseum and Penicillium sp. and four decaying (Hypholoma fasciculare¸ Hypholoma capnoides, Phlebiopsis gigantea, and Pleurotus ostreatus fungi were chosen for this study. The best results were noted for Trichoderma viride, because fungus was able to kill both mycelia and rhizomorphs of Armillaria species, while Hypholoma spp. inhibited both growth of Armillaria colonies and rhizomorph production.

  19. Gender differences, polypharmacy, and potential pharmacological interactions in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Carina Duarte Venturini; Paula Engroff; Luísa Scheer Ely; Luísa Faria de Araújo Zago; Guilherme Schroeter; Irenio Gomes; Geraldo Attilio De Carli,; Fernanda Bueno Morrone

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to analyze pharmacological interactions among drugs taken by elderly patients and their age and gender differences in a population from Porto Alegre, Brazil. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the database provided by the Institute of Geriatric and Gerontology, Porto Alegre, Brazil. The database was composed of 438 elderly and includes information about the patients' disease, therapy regimens, utilized drugs. All drugs reported by the elderly patients were classif...

  20. The fusion of heavy ions in an interaction potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper contains the problems connected with fusion processes in heavy ions collision. Results of experimental fusion data for reactions: 9Be + 12C, 6Li + 28Si, 9Be + 28Si, 12C + 28Si, 12C + 16O and 16O + 16O are presented. Comparison of measured fusion cross sections with predictions of the fusion potential model have been made. The validity of this model for both light systems, like 9Be + 12C and heavy systems, like 35Cl + 62Ni, have been discussed. In conclusion, it should be stated that fusion cross sections could be correctly predicted by the potential model with a potential describing the elastic scattering data. (author)

  1. Theoretical studies of interaction potential and scattering cross section for He-CO system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new anisotropic interaction potential surface be fitted for He-CO system according to Maitland-Smith(MS) potential model. The scattering cross sections for the collision of CO with ground-state helium atom have been calculated by employing the fitting potential surface at collision energy of 27.7 meV. The results of the calculation indicate that the fitting potential surface can describe exactly the characteristic of interaction between CO and He. (authors)

  2. Improved Interaction Potentials for Charged Residues in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions dominate the structure and free energy of biomolecules. To obtain accurate free energies involving charged groups from molecular simulations, OPLS-AA parameters have been reoptimized using Monte Carlo free energy perturbation. New parameters fit a self-consistent, exper......Electrostatic interactions dominate the structure and free energy of biomolecules. To obtain accurate free energies involving charged groups from molecular simulations, OPLS-AA parameters have been reoptimized using Monte Carlo free energy perturbation. New parameters fit a self......-consistent, experimental set of hydration free energies for acetate (Asp), propionate (Glu), 4-methylimidazolium (Hip), n-butylammonium (Lys), and n-propylguanidinium (Arg), all resembling charged residue side chains, including -carbons. It is shown that OPLS-AA free energies depend critically on the type of water model...... setup (MAEs of ca. 1 kcal/mol) and noise from simulations (ca. 1 kcal/mol). The latter error of ~1 kcal/mol contrasts MAEs from standard OPLS-AA of up to 13 kcal/mol for the entire series of charged residues or up to 5 kcal/mol for the cationic series Lys, Arg, and Hip. The new parameters can be used...

  3. MicroRNAs and potential target interactions in psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibert, John Robert; Løvendorf, Marianne B.; Litman, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    with NN. Based on the miRNA and mRNA profiles miR-21, -205, -221 and -222 were found to have the following potential mRNA targets in psoriatic skin: PDCD4, TPM1, P57, C-KIT, RTN4, SHIP2, TIMP3, RECK and NFIB. The identified target mRNAs were likely to be involved in cellular growth, proliferation...

  4. A MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS STUDY OF B2O3 GLASS USING DIFFERENT INTERACTION POTENTIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERHOEF, AH; DENHARTOG, HW

    1992-01-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of B2O3 glass were carried out, using seven different interaction potential schemes. Two-body Born-Mayer-Huggins potentials and in some samples a[so three-body bond-angle interactions were applied. Structural and dynamical properties of the simulated systems were eval

  5. On critical stability of three quantum charges interacting through delta potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    We consider three one dimensional quantum, charged and spinless particles interacting through delta potentials. We derive sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of at least one bound state.......We consider three one dimensional quantum, charged and spinless particles interacting through delta potentials. We derive sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of at least one bound state....

  6. Technological Dangers and the Potential of Human-Robot Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The ethical debate on social robotics has become one of the cutting edge topics of our time. When it comes to both academic and non-academic debates, the methodological framework is, with few exceptions, typically and tacitly grounded in an us-versus-them perspective. It is as though we were...... technological dangers and opportunities. Finally, aiming for the very limits of the theory, I discuss the contours of a praxis facilitating being-with-robots beyond conceptualization. Basically, this mode of being, pertaining to non-technological HRI, bypasses Heidegger’s warnings, and potentially facilitates...

  7. No enhancement of the localization length for two interacting particles in a random potential

    OpenAIRE

    Römer, R. A.; Schreiber, M.

    1998-01-01

    We study two interacting particles in a random potential chain by means of the transfer matrix method. The dependence of the two-particle localization length $\\lambda_2$ on disorder and interaction strength is investigated. Our results demonstrate that the recently proposed enhancement of $\\lambda_2$ as compared to the results for single particles is entirely due to the finite size of the systems considered. This is shown for a Hubbard-like onsite interaction and also a long-range interaction.

  8. Evaluation of a Potential Clinical Interaction between Ceftriaxone and Calcium▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Emily; Raisch, Dennis W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Esterly, John S.; Becker, Tischa; Postelnick, Michael; McKoy, June M.; Trifilio, Steve; Yarnold, Paul R.; Scheetz, Marc H.

    2010-01-01

    In April 2009, the FDA retracted a warning asserting that ceftriaxone and intravenous calcium products should not be coadministered to any patient to prevent precipitation events leading to end-organ damage. Following that announcement, we sought to evaluate if the retraction was justified. A search of the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System was conducted to identify any ceftriaxone-calcium interactions that resulted in serious adverse drug events. Ceftazidime-calcium was used as a comparator agent. One hundred four events with ceftriaxone-calcium and 99 events with ceftazidime-calcium were identified. Adverse drug events were recorded according to the listed description of drug involvement (primary or secondary suspect) and were interpreted as probable, possible, unlikely, or unrelated. For ceftriaxone-calcium-related adverse events, 7.7% and 20.2% of the events were classified as probable and possible for embolism, respectively. Ceftazidime-calcium resulted in fewer probable embolic events (4%) but more possible embolic events (30.3%). Among cases that considered ceftriaxone or ceftazidime and calcium as the primary or secondary drug, one case was classified as a probable embolic event. That patient received ceftriaxone-calcium and died, although an attribution of causality was not possible. Our analysis suggests a lack of support for the occurrence of ceftriaxone-calcium precipitation events in adults. The results of the current analysis reinforce the revised FDA recommendations suggesting that patients >28 days old may receive ceftriaxone and calcium sequentially and provide a transparent and reproducible methodology for such evaluations. PMID:20086152

  9. Orchid-pollinator interactions and potential vulnerability to biological invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, Adam D; Battaglia, Loretta L; Schauber, Eric M; Sipes, Sedonia D

    2015-01-01

    an indirect threat to plant-pollinator interactions. PMID:26286221

  10. Expanding Interaction Potentials within Virtual Environments: Investigating the Usability of Speech and Manual Input Modes for Decoupled Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Stedmon; Victor Bayon; Gareth Griffiths

    2011-01-01

    Distributed technologies and ubiquitous computing now support users who may be detached or decoupled from traditional interactions. In order to investigate the potential usability of speech and manual input devices, an evaluation of speech input across different user groups and a usability assessment of independent-user and collaborative-user interactions was conducted. Whilst the primary focus was on a formative usability evaluation, the user group evaluation provided a formal basis to under...

  11. Effective potentials in concentrated colloid-polymer mixtures with competing interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurati, Marco; Valadez Perez, Nestor; Capellmann, Ronja; Egelhaaf, Stefan; Castañeda-Priego, Ramon

    We determine the effective potentials describing the interactions between colloidal particles in concentrated colloid-polymer mixtures in which depletion attraction competes with electrostatic repulsion. To obtain the potentials, the method of Monte-Carlo inversion is applied to experimental pair distribution functions obtained by confocal microscopy. Both fluid and gel states are investigated. We compare the results of the inversion method with those obtained by describing the interactions using a combination of a square well potential for the attractive component and a Yukawa potential for the repulsive component. This allows us to test the validity range of the one-component pair-potential.

  12. On the theory of interaction potentials in ionic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, Roberto [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Soto-Bubert, Andres [Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejercito 441, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: roberto.acevedo@umayor.cl

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research work is to report a more comprehensive and detailed study of both, the intermolecular and intramolecular potencial functions with reference to the various families of the elpasolite type crystals. The cohesive energy has been thought as a sum of three terms; the long range (Coulombic), the Born and the van der Waals contributions to the total energy. The Born-Mayer-Buckingham potential{sup 1} has been employed in all of these current studies and a number of convergence tests are analyzed from a formal viewpoint. Our work has been focused to the following systems: Cs{sub 2}NaLnF{sub 6}, Cs{sub 2}NaLnCl{sub 6}, Cs{sub 2}NaLnBr{sub 6}, Rb{sub 2}NaLnF{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}KLnF{sub 6} in the Fm3m space group. A substantial amount of theoretical models have been analyzed and several computing simulations have been undertaken to estimate the reticular energies and the corresponding heat of formation for these crystals. To achieve this goal, a Born-Haber thermodynamic cycle has been introduced in our model. It is shown that the calculated energy values are reasonable and follow the expected trend along the lanthanide series in the periodic chart. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the current and proposed generalized model. The most likely sources for improvement are discussed in detail. New convergence tests as well as some master equations have been introduced to study the various diagonal contributions to the total energy.

  13. Phase transition of strongly interacting matter with a chemical potential dependent Polyakov loop potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guo-yun; Tang, Zhan-duo; Di Toro, Massimo; Colonna, Maria; Gao, Xue-yan; Gao, Ning

    2016-07-01

    We construct a hadron-quark two-phase model based on the Walecka-quantum hadrodynamics and the improved Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model with an explicit chemical potential dependence of Polyakov loop potential (μ PNJL model). With respect to the original PNJL model, the confined-deconfined phase transition is largely affected at low temperature and large chemical potential. Using the two-phase model, we investigate the equilibrium transition between hadronic and quark matter at finite chemical potentials and temperatures. The numerical results show that the transition boundaries from nuclear to quark matter move towards smaller chemical potential (lower density) when the μ -dependent Polyakov loop potential is taken. In particular, for charge asymmetric matter, we compute the local asymmetry of u , d quarks in the hadron-quark coexisting phase, and analyze the isospin-relevant observables possibly measurable in heavy-ion collision (HIC) experiments. In general new HIC data on the location and properties of the mixed phase would bring relevant information on the expected chemical potential dependence of the Polyakov loop contribution.

  14. Controlling Soliton Collisions of Condensates by Time-Dependence of Both Interactions and External Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何章明; 王登龙; 丁建文; 颜晓红

    2012-01-01

    Considering time-dependence of both interactions and external potential,we analytically study the collisional behaviors of two bright solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates by using Darboux transformation.It is found that for a closed external potential,the soliton-soliton distance is decreased with nonlinearly increased interactions,while the amplitude of each soliton increases and its width decreases.For linearly increased interactions but nonlinearly decreased external potential,especially,the atom transfer between two solitons is observed,different from previous theory of no atom transfer in solitons collision in a fixed external potential.In addition,it is shown that the collisional type,such as head-on,"chase",or collision period between two solitons,can be controlled by tuning both interactions and external potential.The predicted phenomena can be observed under the condition of the current experiments and open possibilities for future application in atoms transport.

  15. Phase transition of strongly interacting matter with a chemical potential dependent Polyakov loop potential

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Guo-yun; Di Toro, Massimo; Colonna, Maria; Gao, Xue-yan; Gao, Ning

    2016-01-01

    We construct a hadron-quark two-phase model based on the Walecka-quantum hadrodynamics and the improved Polyakov-Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model with an explicit chemical potential dependence of Polyakov-loop potential ($\\mu$PNJL model). With respect to the original PNJL model, the confined-deconfined phase transition is largely affected at low temperature and large chemical potential. Using the two-phase model, we investigate the equilibrium transition between hadronic and quark matter at finite chemical potentials and temperatures. The numerical results show that the transition boundaries from nuclear to quark matter move towards smaller chemical potential (lower density) when the $\\mu$-dependent Polyakov loop potential is taken. In particular, for charge asymmetric matter, we compute the local asymmetry of $u, d$ quarks in the hadron-quark coexisting phase, and analyse the isospin-relevant observables possibly measurable in heavy-ion collision (HIC) experiments. In general new HIC data on the location and proper...

  16. Student Interactions with CD-ROM Storybooks: A Look at Potential Relationships between Multiple Intelligence Strengths and Levels of Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at the potential relationship that may exist between students' intelligence strengths, in particular their spatial and kinesthetic strengths, and their combined cognitive and metacognitive levels of interaction with a CD-ROM storybook. The multiple intelligence strengths of a sample of students, measured via the MIDAS/My…

  17. Velocity dependence of angular distributions in gas/solid--surface collisions: Relationship to the interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, J.W. Jr.; Doll, J.D.; Thompson, D.L.

    1978-10-15

    The angular and velocity distributions for gas/solid-surface collisions are examined. It is shown that the envelope of the scattered phase-space distribution is quite sensitive to the gas/surface interaction potential.

  18. Stability of stationary states of non-local equations with singular interaction potentials

    KAUST Repository

    Fellner, Klemens

    2011-04-01

    We study the large-time behaviour of a non-local evolution equation for the density of particles or individuals subject to an external and an interaction potential. In particular, we consider interaction potentials which are singular in the sense that their first derivative is discontinuous at the origin.For locally attractive singular interaction potentials we prove under a linear stability condition local non-linear stability of stationary states consisting of a finite sum of Dirac masses. For singular repulsive interaction potentials we show the stability of stationary states of uniformly bounded solutions under a convexity condition.Finally, we present numerical simulations to illustrate our results. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Potential drug interactions : exposure and management in hospital and ambulatory settings

    OpenAIRE

    Indermitte, Jörg Lorenz

    2006-01-01

    Health care professionals are responsible to ensure safe dispensing and use of drug regimens involving the use of drug combinations that may interact and cause serious adverse events. In the last 40 years an enormous amount of data on drug interactions has been published. But, although potential drug interactions are probably common only few of them manifest serious adverse events and often only in predisposed patients. Therefore, health care professionals feel inundated with h...

  20. Nuclear Physics without High-Momentum Potentials: Direct Construction of the Effective Interaction from Scattering Observables

    CERN Document Server

    McElvain, Kenneth S

    2016-01-01

    The standard approach to nuclear physics encodes phase shift information in an NN potential, then decodes that information in forming an effective interaction, appropriate to a low-momentum Hilbert space. Here we show that it is instead possible to construct the effective interaction directly from continuum phase shifts and mixing angles, eliminating all reference to a high momentum potential. The theory is rapidly convergent and well behaved, yielding sub-keV accuracy.

  1. Peculiar features of the interaction potential between hydrogen and antihydrogen at intermediate separations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Teck-Ghee; Wong Cheuk-Yin; Wang Lee-Shien

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the interaction potential between a hydrogen and an antihydrogen using the second-order perturbation theory within the framework of the four-body system in a separable two-body basis. It finds that the H-H interaction potential possesses the peculiar features of a shallow local minimum located around interatomic separations of r ~ 6a.u. and a barrier rising at r<~ 5a.u.

  2. Reactive Boundary Conditions as Limits of Interaction Potentials for Brownian and Langevin Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, S Jonathan; Isaacson, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    A popular approach to modeling bimolecular reactions between diffusing molecules is through the use of reactive boundary conditions. One common model is the Smoluchowski partial absorption condition, which uses a Robin boundary condition in the separation coordinate between two possible reactants. This boundary condition can be interpreted as an idealization of a reactive interaction potential model, in which a potential barrier must be surmounted before reactions can occur. In this work we show how the reactive boundary condition arises as the limit of an interaction potential encoding a steep barrier within a shrinking region in the particle separation, where molecules react instantly upon reaching the peak of the barrier. The limiting boundary condition is derived by the method of matched asymptotic expansions, and shown to depend critically on the relative rate of increase of the barrier height as the width of the potential is decreased. Limiting boundary conditions for the same interaction potential in b...

  3. Potential of Root Exudates from Wetland Plants and Their Potential Role for Denitrification and Allelopathic Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhai, Xu

    Root exudates from wetland plants have both positive and negative interactions among microbe, plants and ecosystems. Wetland species releasing organic carbon into the rhizosphere for providing energy to denitrifying bacteria fuel denitrification for removal nitrogen in subsurface flow constructed...... wetlands. Furthermore, environmental factors such as temperature and light-regime affect the photosynthetic carbon fixation, which continuously influence the compositions and quantity of root exudates released into rhizosphere. Conversely, root exudates from invasive species might contain some phytotoxic...... chemicals to suppress the growth of native species. Phragmites australis is recognized as the most invasive species in wetland ecosystems in North America, and allelopathy has been reported to be involved in the invasion success of the introduced exotic P. australis. The composition of the root exudates may...

  4. Expanding Interaction Potentials within Virtual Environments: Investigating the Usability of Speech and Manual Input Modes for Decoupled Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Stedmon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed technologies and ubiquitous computing now support users who may be detached or decoupled from traditional interactions. In order to investigate the potential usability of speech and manual input devices, an evaluation of speech input across different user groups and a usability assessment of independent-user and collaborative-user interactions was conducted. Whilst the primary focus was on a formative usability evaluation, the user group evaluation provided a formal basis to underpin the academic rigor of the exercise. The results illustrate that using a speech interface is important in understanding user acceptance of such technologies. From the usability assessment it was possible to translate interactions and make them compatible with innovative input devices. This approach to interaction is still at an early stage of development, and the potential or validity of this interfacing concept is still under evaluation; however, as a concept demonstrator, the results of these initial evaluations demonstrate the potential usability issues of both input devices as well as highlighting their suitability for advanced virtual applications.

  5. Chemical Potential Dependence of the Dressed-Quark Propagator from an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; PING Jia-Lun; SUN Wei-Min; CHANG Chao-Hsi; WANG Fan

    2002-01-01

    We exhibit a method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagatorfrom an effective quark-quark interaction model. Within this approach we explore the chemical potential dependenceof the dressed-quark propagator, which provides a means of determining the behavior of the chiral and deconfinementorder parameters. A comparison with the results of previous researches is given.

  6. Soliton-potential interaction in the Nonlinear Klein-Gordon Model

    CERN Document Server

    Saadatmand, Danial

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of solitons with external potentials in nonlinear Klein-Gordon field theory is investigated using an improved model. Presented model is constructed with a better approximation for adding the potential to the lagrangian through the metric of background space-time. The results of the model are compared with the another model and the differences are discussed.

  7. Collisional interactions between self-interacting nonrelativistic boson stars: Effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations but may be approximated in the nonrelativistic regime with a coupled Schrödinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  8. Hydrogen Bonding between Metal-Ion Complexes and Noncoordinated Water: Electrostatic Potentials and Interaction Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrić, Jelena M; Misini-Ignjatović, Majda Z; Murray, Jane S; Politzer, Peter; Zarić, Snežana D

    2016-07-01

    The hydrogen bonding of noncoordinated water molecules to each other and to water molecules that are coordinated to metal-ion complexes has been investigated by means of a search of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and through quantum chemical calculations. Tetrahedral and octahedral complexes that were both charged and neutral were studied. A general conclusion is that hydrogen bonds between noncoordinated water and coordinated water are much stronger than those between noncoordinated waters, whereas hydrogen bonds of water molecule in tetrahedral complexes are stronger than in octahedral complexes. We examined the possibility of correlating the computed interaction energies with the most positive electrostatic potentials on the interacting hydrogen atoms prior to interaction and obtained very good correlation. This study illustrates the fact that electrostatic potentials computed for ground-state molecules, prior to interaction, can provide considerable insight into the interactions. PMID:26989883

  9. Host-pathogen Interaction at the Intestinal Mucosa Correlates With Zoonotic Potential of Streptococcus suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrando, Maria Laura; de Greeff, Astrid; van Rooijen, Willemien J. M.;

    2015-01-01

    of SS2 infection. Methods. We developed a noninvasive in vivo model to study oral SS2 infection in piglets. We compared in vitro interaction of S. suis with human and porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Results. Two out of 15 piglets showed clinical symptoms compatible with S. suis infection 24...... be considered a food-borne pathogen. S. suis interaction with human and pig IEC correlates with S. suis serotype and genotype, which can explain the zoonotic potential of SS2....

  10. Equation of state and interaction potential of helium under high temperatures and high densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamics statistic method, the improved variational perturbation theory and the modified quantum mechanics correction model have been used to calculate the equation of state of liquid helium at pressure from 0.7 to 108 GPa. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The EXP-6 potential (α = 13.1) can more accurately describe the interaction of helium atoms than other potentials in the scheme. Finally, a comparison is shown between our interatomic potentials and other potentials.

  11. Equation of state and interaction potential of helium under high temperatures and high densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG JinWen; YAN YuanHong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamics statistic method, the improved variational perturbation theory and the modified quantum mechanics correction model have been used to calculate the equation of state of liquid helium at pressure from 0.7 to 108 GPa. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The EXP-6 potential (α=13.1) can more accurately describe the interaction of helium atoms than other potentials in the scheme. Finally, s comparison is shown between our interatomic potentials and other potentials.

  12. The dynamical behaviour of homogeneous scalar-field spacetimes with general self-interaction potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Giambó, Roberto; Magli, Giulio

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of homogeneous Robertson--Walker cosmological models with a self-interacting scalar field source is examined here in full generality, requiring only the scalar field potential to be bounded from below and divergent when the field diverges. In this way we are able to give a unified treatment of all the already studied cases - such as positive potentials which exhibit asymptotically polynomial or exponential behaviors - together with its extension to a much wider set of physically sensible potentials. Since the set includes potentials with negative inferior bound, we are able to give, in particular, the analysis of the asymptotically anti De Sitter states for such cosmologies.

  13. Intermolecular interaction potentials of methane-argon complex calculated using LDA approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Yu-Lin; Chen Xiang-Rong; Zhou Xiao-Lin; Yang Xiang-Dong; Wang Hai-Yan

    2004-01-01

    The intermolecular interaction potential for methane-argon complex is calculated by local density approximation (LDA) approaches. The calculated potential has a minimum when the intermolecular distance of methane-argon complex is 6.75 a.u.; the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0163eV which has good agreement with experimental data. We also have made a nonlinear fitting of our results for the Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function and obtain that V(R) = 143794365.332/R12 - 3032.093/R6 (R in a.u. and V(R) in eV).

  14. Intermolecular interaction of thiosemicarbazone derivatives to solvents and a potential Aedes aegypti target

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João Bosco P.; Hallwass, Fernando; da Silva, Aluizio G.; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo; Ramos, Mozart N.; Espíndola, José Wanderlan P.; de Oliveira, Ana Daura T.; Brondani, Dalci José; Leite, Ana Cristina L.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-08-01

    DFT calculations were used to access information about structure, energy and electronic properties of series of phenyl- and phenoxymethyl-(thio)semicarbazone derivatives with demonstrated activity against the larvae of Aedes aegypti in stage L4. The way as the thiosemicarbazone derivatives can interact with solvents like DMSO and water were analyzed from the comparison between calculated and experimental 1H NMR chemical shifts. The evidences of thiosemicarbazone derivatives making H-bond interaction to solvent have provide us insights on how they can interact with a potential A. aegypti's biological target, the Sterol Carrier Protein-2.

  15. Temperature-dependent optical potential and mean free path based on Skyrme interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical potentials and mean free paths of nucleons at finite temperatures are studied by utilizing effective Skyrme interactions which yield 'good' optical potentials at zero temperature. The results for nuclear matter (symmetric and asymmetric) are applied within the local density approximation of finite nuclei at various temperatures. Because of the limitation due to zero-range forces used and the assumptions of temperature independent nuclear densities and effective Skyrme interactions made, the calculations are expected to be limited to nucleon energies between 10 and 50 MeV above the Fermi energy and to nuclear temperatures of less than 8 MeV. (orig.)

  16. A Riccati equation based approach to isotropic scalar field cosmologies with arbitrary self-interaction potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Harko, Tiberiu; Mak, M K

    2014-01-01

    Gravitationally coupled scalar fields $\\phi $, distinguished by the choice of an effective self-interaction potential $V(\\phi )$, simulating a temporarily non-vanishing cosmological term, can generate both inflation and late time acceleration. In scalar field cosmological models the evolution of the Hubble function is determined, in terms of the interaction potential, by a Riccati type equation. In the present work we investigate scalar field cosmological models that can be obtained as solutions of the Riccati evolution equation for the Hubble function. Four exact integrability cases of the field equations are presented, representing classes of general solutions of the Riccati evolution equation, and their cosmological properties are investigated in detail.

  17. Mean field propagation of infinite dimensional Wigner measures with a singular two-body interaction potential

    OpenAIRE

    AMMARI, Zied; Nier, Francis

    2015-01-01

    49 pages International audience We consider the quantum dynamics of many bosons systems in the mean field limit with a singular pair-interaction potential, including the attractive or repulsive Coulombic case in three dimensions. By using a measure transportation technique, we show that Wigner measures propagate along the nonlinear Hartree flow. Such property was previously proved only for bounded potentials in our previous works with a slightly different strategy.

  18. Mean field propagation of infinite dimensional Wigner measures with a singular two-body interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ammari, Zied

    2011-01-01

    We consider the quantum dynamics of many bosons systems in the mean field limit with a singular pair-interaction potential, including the attractive or repulsive Coulombic case in three dimensions. By using a measure transportation technique, we show that Wigner measures propagate along the nonlinear Hartree flow. Such property was previously proved only for bounded potentials in our previous works with a slightly different strategy.

  19. Interacting particles in a periodically moving potential: Traveling wave and transport

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Rakesh; Chatterjee, Sakuntala; Pradhan, Punyabrata; Manna, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    We study a system of interacting particles in a periodically moving external potential, within the simplest possible description of paradigmatic symmetric exclusion process on a ring. The model describes diffusion of hardcore particles where the diffusion dynamics is locally modified at a uniformly moving defect site, mimicking the effect of the periodically moving external potential. The model, though simple, exhibits remarkably rich features in particle transport, such as polarity reversal ...

  20. A review of potential harmful interactions between anticoagulant/antiplatelet agents and Chinese herbal medicines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risks attributed to drug-herb interactions, even when known, are often ignored or underestimated, especially for those involving anti-clotting drugs and Chinese medicines. The aim of this study was to structurally search and evaluate the existing evidence-based data associated with potential drug interactions between anticoagulant/antiplatelet drugs and Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs and evaluate the documented mechanisms, consequences, and/or severity of interactions. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Information related to anticoagulant/antiplatelet drug-CHM interactions was retrieved from eight interaction-based textbooks, four web resources and available primary biomedical literature. The primary literature searches were conducted in English and/or Chinese from January 2000 through December 2011 using the secondary databases (e.g., PubMed, Airiti Library, China Journal full-text database. The search terms included the corresponding medical subject headings and key words. Herbs or natural products not used as a single entity CHM or in Chinese Medicinal Prescriptions were excluded from further review. The corresponding mechanisms and severity ratings of interactions were retrieved using MicroMedex®, Lexicomp® and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database®. Finally, we found 90 single entity CHMs contributed to 306 documented drug-CHM interactions. A total of 194 (63.4% interactions were verified for its evidence describing possible mechanisms and severity. Of them, 155 interactions (79.9% were attributable to pharmacodynamic interactions, and almost all were rated as moderate to severe interactions. The major consequences of these interactions were increased bleeding risks due to the additive anticoagulant or antiplatelet effects of the CHMs, specifically danshen, dong quai, ginger, ginkgo, licorice, and turmeric. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Conventional anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs were documented to have harmful interactions

  1. Variance heterogeneity analysis for detection of potentially interacting genetic loci: method and its limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Duijn Cornelia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presence of interaction between a genotype and certain factor in determination of a trait's value, it is expected that the trait's variance is increased in the group of subjects having this genotype. Thus, test of heterogeneity of variances can be used as a test to screen for potentially interacting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In this work, we evaluated statistical properties of variance heterogeneity analysis in respect to the detection of potentially interacting SNPs in a case when an interaction variable is unknown. Results Through simulations, we investigated type I error for Bartlett's test, Bartlett's test with prior rank transformation of a trait to normality, and Levene's test for different genetic models. Additionally, we derived an analytical expression for power estimation. We showed that Bartlett's test has acceptable type I error in the case of trait following a normal distribution, whereas Levene's test kept nominal Type I error under all scenarios investigated. For the power of variance homogeneity test, we showed (as opposed to the power of direct test which uses information about known interacting factor that, given the same interaction effect, the power can vary widely depending on the non-estimable direct effect of the unobserved interacting variable. Thus, for a given interaction effect, only very wide limits of power of the variance homogeneity test can be estimated. Also we applied Levene's approach to test genome-wide homogeneity of variances of the C-reactive protein in the Rotterdam Study population (n = 5959. In this analysis, we replicate previous results of Pare and colleagues (2010 for the SNP rs12753193 (n = 21, 799. Conclusions Screening for differences in variances among genotypes of a SNP is a promising approach as a number of biologically interesting models may lead to the heterogeneity of variances. However, it should be kept in mind that the absence of variance heterogeneity for

  2. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-03-10

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself, would be the real substance the organs and cells firstly encounter. Consequently, the behavior of nanomaterials in vivo is uncontrollable and some undesired effects may occur, like rapid clearance from blood stream; risk of capillary blockage; loss of targeting capacity; and potential toxicity. Therefore, protein-nanomaterial interaction is a great challenge for nanomaterial systems and should be inhibited. However, this interaction can also be used to functionalize nanomaterials by forming a selected protein corona. Unlike other decoration using exogenous molecules, nanomaterials functionalized by selected protein corona using endogenous proteins would have greater promise for clinical use. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive understanding of protein-nanomaterial interaction. Importantly, a discussion about how to use such interaction is launched and some possible applications of such interaction for advanced drug delivery are presented.

  3. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-03-10

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself, would be the real substance the organs and cells firstly encounter. Consequently, the behavior of nanomaterials in vivo is uncontrollable and some undesired effects may occur, like rapid clearance from blood stream; risk of capillary blockage; loss of targeting capacity; and potential toxicity. Therefore, protein-nanomaterial interaction is a great challenge for nanomaterial systems and should be inhibited. However, this interaction can also be used to functionalize nanomaterials by forming a selected protein corona. Unlike other decoration using exogenous molecules, nanomaterials functionalized by selected protein corona using endogenous proteins would have greater promise for clinical use. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive understanding of protein-nanomaterial interaction. Importantly, a discussion about how to use such interaction is launched and some possible applications of such interaction for advanced drug delivery are presented. PMID:26812004

  4. Optical model potential in the lowest order Brueckner theory and complex effective N-N interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Norio; Nagata, Sinobu; Matsuda, Takaaki.

    1983-08-01

    The optical model potential for a nucleon propagating inside the infinite nuclear medium is calculated in the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation. It is found that the resultant optical potential, especially its imaginary part, strongly depends on the strength of the tensor component and the short-range behavior of the used realistic nuclear force. Our results for the real part show a large anomaly just above the Fermi momentum especially in lower density. This anomaly mainly comes from the /sup 3/S/sub 1/ + /sup 3/D/sub 1/ state interaction. From the obtained transition matrix a complex effective N-N interaction with three-range-Gaussian form factor is constructed. This interaction reproduces the partial wave contributions to the optical potential in nuclear matter. By using the folding procedure, this effective interaction is applied to the p+/sup 40/Ca elastic scattering. The observed differential cross section and polarization are very well reproduced over a wide range of energies with only a renormalization of the imaginary potential strength. (author).

  5. On Local Smooth Solutions for the Vlasov Equation with the Potential of Interactions {\\pm} r^{-2}

    CERN Document Server

    Zhidkov, P E

    2003-01-01

    For the initial value problem for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions {\\pm} r^{-2} we prove the existence and uniqueness of a local solution with values in the Schwartz space S of infinitely differentiable functions rapidly decaying at infinity.

  6. Critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation for weakly interacting bose gas in a potential trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Xuecai; YE; Yutang; WU; Yunfeng; XIE; Kang; CHENG; Lin

    2005-01-01

    The critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation at minimum momentum state for weakly interacting Bose gases in a power-law potential and the deviation of the critical temperature from ideal bose gas are studied. The effect of interaction on the critical temperature is ascribed to the ratiao α/λc, where α is the scattering length for s wave and λc is de Broglie wavelength at critical temperature. As α/λc<<1/(2π)2, the interaction is negligible. The presented deviation of the critical temperature for three dimensional harmonic potential is well in agreement with recent measurement of critical temperature for 87Rb bose gas trapped in a harmonic well.

  7. Potential pharmacokinetic interactions between antiretrovirals and medicinal plants used as complementary and African traditional medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Adrienne C; Kanfer, Isadore

    2011-11-01

    The use of traditional/complementary/alternate medicines (TCAMs) in HIV/AIDS patients who reside in Southern Africa is quite common. Those who use TCAMs in addition to antiretroviral (ARV) treatment may be at risk of experiencing clinically significant pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions, particularly between the TCAMs and the protease inhibitors (PIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Mechanisms of PK interactions include alterations to the normal functioning of drug efflux transporters, such as P-gp and/or CYP isoenzymes, such a CYP3A4 that mediate the absorption and elimination of drugs in the small intestine and liver. Specific mechanisms include inhibition and activation of these proteins and induction via the pregnane X receptor (PXR). Several clinical studies and case reports involving ARV-herb PK interactions have been reported. St John's Wort, Garlic and Cat's Claw exhibited potentially significant interactions, each with a PI or NNRTI. The potential for these herbs to induce PK interactions with drugs was first identified in reports of in vitro studies. Other in vitro studies have shown that several African traditional medicinal (ATM) plants and extracts may also demonstrate PK interactions with ARVs, through effects on CYP3A4, P-gp and PXR. The most complex effects were exhibited by Hypoxis hemerocallidea, Sutherlandia frutescens, Cyphostemma hildebrandtii, Acacia nilotica, Agauria salicifolia and Elaeodendron buchananii. Despite a high incidence of HIV/AIDs in the African region, only one clinical study, between efavirenz and Hypoxis hemerocallidea has been conducted. However, several issues/concerns still remain to be addressed and thus more studies on ATMs are warranted in order for more meaningful data to be generated and the true potential for such interactions to be determined.

  8. Time evolution of initial states that extend beyond the potential interaction region in quantum decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Calderón, Gastón; Villavicencio, Jorge; Hernández-Maldonado, Alberto; Romo, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the decay of initial states that possess a tail that extends beyond the interaction potential region, for potentials of arbitrary shape that vanish exactly after a distance. This is the case for a relevant class of artificial quantum structures. We obtain that along the internal interaction region, the time evolution of the decaying wave function is formed by two terms. The first one refers to the proper decay of the internal portion of the initial state, whereas the second one, that arises from the external tail, yields a transient contribution that tunnels into the internal region, builds up to a value, and then decays. We obtain that depending on the parameters of the initial state, the nonexponential tail decaying contribution may be larger than the contribution of the proper nonexponential term. These results are illustrated by an exactly solvable model and the Heidelberg potential for decay of ultracold atoms and open the possibility to control initial states in artificial decaying systems.

  9. Evaluation of screening length corrections for interaction potentials in impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Wataru, E-mail: take@sp.ous.ac.jp

    2013-10-15

    Since in impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) data analysis the interaction potential represented by the screening length as the screening effect is not satisfactorily established up to the present, we introduce commonly the correction factor in the screening length. Previously, Yamamura, Takeuchi and Kawamura (YTK) have suggested the theory taking the shell effect of electron distributions into account for the correction factor to Firsov screening length in the Moliere potential. The application of YTK theory to the evaluation of screening length corrections for the interaction potentials in ICISS manifested that the screening length corrections calculated by the YTK theory agree almost with those determined by simulations or numerical calculations in ICISS and its variants data analyses, being superior to the evaluation of screening length corrections with the O’Connor and Biersack (OB) formula.

  10. Insect antimicrobial peptides show potentiating functional interactions against Gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnamaeian, Mohammad; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Dobslaff, Kristin; Wiesner, Jochen; Twyman, Richard M.; Zuchner, Thole; Sadd, Ben M.; Regoes, Roland R.; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and proteins are important components of innate immunity against pathogens in insects. The production of AMPs is costly owing to resource-based trade-offs, and strategies maximizing the efficacy of AMPs at low concentrations are therefore likely to be advantageous. Here, we show the potentiating functional interaction of co-occurring insect AMPs (the bumblebee linear peptides hymenoptaecin and abaecin) resulting in more potent antimicrobial effects at low concentrations. Abaecin displayed no detectable activity against Escherichia coli when tested alone at concentrations of up to 200 μM, whereas hymenoptaecin affected bacterial cell growth and viability but only at concentrations greater than 2 μM. In combination, as little as 1.25 μM abaecin enhanced the bactericidal effects of hymenoptaecin. To understand these potentiating functional interactions, we investigated their mechanisms of action using atomic force microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based quenching assays. Abaecin was found to reduce the minimal inhibitory concentration of hymenoptaecin and to interact with the bacterial chaperone DnaK (an evolutionarily conserved central organizer of the bacterial chaperone network) when the membrane was compromised by hymenoptaecin. These naturally occurring potentiating interactions suggest that combinations of AMPs could be used therapeutically against Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that have acquired resistance to common antibiotics. PMID:25833860

  11. Insect antimicrobial peptides show potentiating functional interactions against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnamaeian, Mohammad; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Dobslaff, Kristin; Wiesner, Jochen; Twyman, Richard M; Zuchner, Thole; Sadd, Ben M; Regoes, Roland R; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and proteins are important components of innate immunity against pathogens in insects. The production of AMPs is costly owing to resource-based trade-offs, and strategies maximizing the efficacy of AMPs at low concentrations are therefore likely to be advantageous. Here, we show the potentiating functional interaction of co-occurring insect AMPs (the bumblebee linear peptides hymenoptaecin and abaecin) resulting in more potent antimicrobial effects at low concentrations. Abaecin displayed no detectable activity against Escherichia coli when tested alone at concentrations of up to 200 μM, whereas hymenoptaecin affected bacterial cell growth and viability but only at concentrations greater than 2 μM. In combination, as little as 1.25 μM abaecin enhanced the bactericidal effects of hymenoptaecin. To understand these potentiating functional interactions, we investigated their mechanisms of action using atomic force microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based quenching assays. Abaecin was found to reduce the minimal inhibitory concentration of hymenoptaecin and to interact with the bacterial chaperone DnaK (an evolutionarily conserved central organizer of the bacterial chaperone network) when the membrane was compromised by hymenoptaecin. These naturally occurring potentiating interactions suggest that combinations of AMPs could be used therapeutically against Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that have acquired resistance to common antibiotics.

  12. Potential drug–drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualetti G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Pasqualetti, Sara Tognini, Valeria Calsolaro, Antonio Polini, Fabio Monzani Geriatrics Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug–drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug–drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug–drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with

  13. Reconstruction of the Tip-Surface Interaction Potential by Analysis of the Brownian Motion of an Atomic Force Microscope Tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Oscar H.; Kuipers, Laurens; Werf, van der Kees O.; Grooth, de Bart G.; Greve, Jan

    2000-01-01

    The thermal movement of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is used to reconstruct the tip-surface interaction potential. If a tip is brought into the vicinity of a surface, its movement is governed by the sum of the harmonic cantilever potential and the tip-surface interaction potential. By simula

  14. Association of COMT and COMT-DRD2 interaction with creative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun eZhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that genes involved in dopamine (DA transmission may contribute to creativity. Among these genes, the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT and the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2 are the most promising candidates. Our previous study has revealed evidence for the involvement of DRD2 in creative potential. The present study extended our previous study by systematically exploring the association of COMT with creative potential as well as the interaction between COMT and DRD2. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs covering COMT were genotyped in 543 healthy Chinese college students whose creative potentials were assessed by divergent thinking tests. Single SNP analysis showed that rs174697 was nominally associated with verbal originality, two SNPs (rs737865 and rs5993883 were nominally associated with figural fluency, and two SNPs (rs737865 and rs4680 were nominally associated with figural originality. Haplotype analysis showed that, the TCT and CCT haplotype (rs737865-rs174675-rs5993882 were nominally associated with figural originality, and the TATGCAG and CGCGGGA haplotype (rs4646312-rs6269-rs4633-rs6267-rs4818-rs4680-rs769224 were nominally associated with figural originality and verbal flexibility, respectively. However, none of these nominal findings survived correction for multiple testing. Gene-gene interaction analysis identified one significant four-way interaction of rs174675 (COMT, rs174697 (COMT, rs1076560 (DRD2 and rs4436578 (DRD2 on verbal fluency, one significant four-way interaction of rs174675 (COMT, rs4818 (COMT, rs1076560 (DRD2 and rs4648317 (DRD2 on verbal flexibility, and one significant three-way interaction of rs5993883 (COMT, rs4648319 (DRD2 and rs4648317 (DRD2 on figural flexibility. In conclusion, the present study provides nominal evidence for the involvement of COMT in creative potential and suggests that DA related genes may act in coordination to contribute to creativity.

  15. A Study on Potential of Integrating Multimodal Interaction into Musical Conducting Education

    CERN Document Server

    Siang, Gilbert Phuah Leong; Yong, Pang Yee

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid development of computer technology, computer music has begun to appear in the laboratory. Many potential utility of computer music is gradually increasing. The purpose of this paper is attempted to analyze the possibility of integrating multimodal interaction such as vision-based hand gesture and speech interaction into musical conducting education. To achieve this purpose, this paper is focus on discuss some related research and the traditional musical conducting education. To do so, six musical conductors had been interviewed to share their musical conducting learning/ teaching experience. These interviews had been analyzed in this paper to show the syllabus and the focus of musical conducting education for beginners.

  16. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Muhammad Yasir Ghani; Azhar, Saira; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Khan, Tahir M

    2016-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug-drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug-drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55%) or major severity (45%); established (24.2%), theoretical (18.8%) or probable (57%) type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs. PMID:27013915

  17. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute “Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine,” 14513 Teltow (Germany); Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Heyda, Jan [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, 166 28 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  18. Medicinal plant reported with adverse reactions in Cuba: potential interactions with conventional drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Martínez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Herbal drugs are a mixture of active compounds and the chemical complexity of each formulation increase with the possibility of interactions between them and conventional drugs. Many mechanisms are implicated in the interactions; scientific community has dedicated the attentions to enzymes as P-gp and CYP450. Aims: To investigate in the literature the principal plants with suspicions of adverse reactions in Cuba and their potential interactions with conventional drugs. Methods: PubMed was the database used as source of information until February 2014. Key words: Herb-Drug, Drug-Plant, Herbal–Drug, Interactions with scientific names of plants was used. Information was structured and analysed with EndNote X4. Analysis and integration of the information: Allium sativum L. (garlic was the plant with the high number of studies related with CYP450 and P-gp. Plants with great demand as Morinda citrifolia L. (noni, Psidium guajava L. (guayaba, Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger and Eucalyptus spp. (eucalyptus have a very small number of studies. The professionals of the health should keep in mind the possibility of interactions between herbal products and conventional drugs to increase the effectiveness of phytotherapy. Conclusions: It is necessary enhance reports and investigations and to put to disposition of the system of health information on the interactions of plants and to stimulate the investigation that offers information for the rational use of our medicinal plants.

  19. Electrostatic potential profile and nonlinear current in an interacting one-dimensional molecular wire

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Lakshmi; Swapan K Pati

    2003-10-01

    We consider an interacting one-dimensional molecular wire attached to two metal electrodes on either side of it. The electrostatic potential profile across the wire-electrode interface has been deduced solving the Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently. Since the Poisson distribution crucially depends on charge densities, we have considered different Hamiltonian parameters to model the nanoscale wire. We find that for very weak electron correlations, the potential gradient is almost zero in the middle of the wire but are large near the chain ends. However, for strong correlations, the potential is essentially a ramp function. The nonlinear current, obtained from the scattering formalism, is found to be less with the ramp potential than for weak correlations. Some of the interesting features in current-voltage characteristics have been explained using one-electron formalism and instabilities in the system.

  20. Hyperon Single-Particle Potentials Calculated from SU6 Quark-Model Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, M; Fujita, T; Nakamoto, C; Suzuki, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction recently developed by the Kyoto-Niigata group, we calculate NN, Lambda N and Sigma N G-matrices in ordinary nuclear matter. This is the first attempt to discuss the Lambda and Sigma single-particle potentials in nuclear medium, based on the realistic quark-model potential. The Lambda potential has the depth of more than 40 MeV, which is more attractive than the value expected from the experimental data of Lambda-hypernuclei. The Sigma potential turns out to be repulsive, the origin of which is traced back to the strong Pauli repulsion in the Sigma N (I=3/2) ^3S_1 state.

  1. The interaction potential of NO-H2 in ground and A Rydberg state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajón-Suárez, Pedro; Valentín-Rodríguez, Mónica; Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón

    2016-08-01

    The interaction potential for the ground and A Rydberg state of NO-H2 has been calculated using high level ab initio methods. The complex is very floppy in nature and large amplitude motions are expected to characterize its dynamics. The ground state is characterized by two very close-lying states which exhibit crossings. By analogy with other complexes the Rydberg state is characterized by much smaller well depth and larger intermolecular distance. We compare with model potentials used in previous molecular dynamics simulations of photoexcitation and relaxation and conclude on the importance of performing new studies.

  2. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself......, would be the real substance the organs and cells firstly encounter. Consequently, the behavior of nanomaterials in vivo is uncontrollable and some undesired effects may occur, like rapid clearance from blood stream; risk of capillary blockage; loss of targeting capacity; and potential toxicity...

  3. Potential of lateral interactions of CO on Pt (111) fitted to recent STM images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myshlyavtsev, Alexander V.; Stishenko, Pavel V.

    2015-12-01

    Monolayers of carbon monoxide (CO) on Pt(111) surfaces are one of the most studied adsorption systems. However, molecular models of this system still do not take into account the reliable potential of lateral interactions between adsorbed CO molecules. Recent advances in experimental technique have brought high-resolution real-space images of CO/Pt(111) monolayers. For example, Yang et al. (J. Phys. Chem. C 117 (2013) 16429-16437) found island structures for coverages from 0.11 to 0.25 ML. In this study we have shown that these island structures can be explained with long-range oscillating lateral interactions. Parameters of the proposed potential were fitted to experimental scanning tunneling microscopy images with a series of Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A., E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4630 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter was carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons has been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. The final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV) and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP{sub 3} through IP{sub 6}.

  5. Isospin effects of the Skyrme potential and the momentum dependent interaction at intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wen-Jun; LIU Jian-Ye

    2008-01-01

    We improve the isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamical model by including isospin effects in the Skyrme potential and the momentum dependent interaction to obtain an isospin dependent Skyrme potential and an isospin dependent momentum interaction. We investigate the isospin effects of Skyrme potential and momentum dependent interaction on the isospin fractionation ratio and the dynamical mechanism in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. It is found that the isospin dependent Skyrme potential and the isospin dependent momentum interaction produce some important isospin effects in the isospin fractionation ratio.

  6. Herbal medicines in Brazil: pharmacokinetic profile and potential herb-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzari, Andre L D A; Prieto, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of active compounds found in herbal medicines can serve as substrate for enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. When a medicinal plant is co-administered with a conventional drug and little or no information is known about the pharmacokinetics of the plant metabolites, there is an increased risk of potential herb-drug interactions. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms in a population may act to predispose individuals to adverse reactions. The use of herbal medicines is rapidly increasing in many countries, particularly Brazil where the vast biodiversity is a potential source of new and more affordable treatments for numerous conditions. Accordingly, the Brazilian Unified Public Health System (SUS) produced a list of 71 plant species of interest, which could be made available to the population in the near future. Physicians at SUS prescribe a number of essential drugs and should herbal medicines be added to this system the chance of herb-drug interactions further increases. A review of the effects of these medicinal plants on Phase 1 and Phase 2 metabolic mechanisms and the transporter P-glycoprotein was conducted. The results have shown that approximately half of these medicinal plants lack any pharmacokinetic data. Moreover, most of the studies carried out are in vitro. Only a few reports on herb-drug interactions with essential drugs prescribed by SUS were found, suggesting that very little attention is being given to the safety of herbal medicines. Here we have taken this information to discuss the potential interactions between herbal medicines and essential drugs prescribed to Brazilian patients whilst taking into account the most common polymorphisms present in the Brazilian population. A number of theoretical interactions are pinpointed but more pharmacokinetic studies and pharmacovigilance data are needed to ascertain their clinical significance.

  7. Mach-Zehnder interferometry with interacting Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mach-Zehnder interferometry with interacting Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential Particle-wave duality has enabled the construction of interferometers for massive particles such as electrons, neutrons, atoms or molecules. Implementing atom interferometry has required the development of analogues to the optical beam-splitters, phase shifters or recombiners to enable the coherent, i.e. phase-preserving manipulation of quantum superpositions. While initially demonstrating the wave nature of particles, atom interferometers have evolved into some of the most advanced devices for precision measurement, both for technological applications and tests of the fundamental laws of nature. Bose- Einstein condensates (BEC) of ultracold atoms are particular matter waves: they exhibit a collective many-body wave function and macroscopic coherence properties. As such, they have often been considered as an analogue to optical laser elds and it is natural to wonder whether BECs can provide to atom interferometry a similar boost as the laser brought to optical interferometry. One fundamental dierence between atomic BECs and lasers elds is the presence of atomic interactions, yielding an intrinsic non-linearity. On one hand, interactions can lead to eects destroying the phase coherence and limiting the interrogation time of trapped BEC interferometers. On the other hand, they can be used to generate nonclassical (e.g. squeezed) states to improve the sensitivity of interferometric measurements beyond the standard quantum limit (SQL). In this thesis, we present the realization of a full Mach-Zehnder interferometric sequence with trapped, interacting BECs con ned on an atom chip. Our interferometer relies on the coherent manipulation of a BEC in a magnetic double-well potential. For this purpose, we developed a novel type of matter-wave recombiner, an element which so far was missing in BEC atom optics. We have been able to exploit interactions to generate a squeezed

  8. Molecular Insights into the Potential Toxicological Interaction of 2-Mercaptothiazoline with the Antioxidant Enzyme—Catalase

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenxing Huang; Ming Huang; Chenyu Mi; Tao Wang; Dong Chen; Yue Teng

    2016-01-01

    2-mercaptothiazoline (2-MT) is widely used in many industrial fields, but its residue is potentially harmful to the environment. In this study, to evaluate the biological toxicity of 2-MT at protein level, the interaction between 2-MT and the pivotal antioxidant enzyme—catalase (CAT) was investigated using multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The results indicated that the CAT fluorescence quenching caused by 2-MT should be dominated by a static quenching mechanism throug...

  9. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T.; Danielle M Winget; White, Richard A.; Steven J Hallam; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities in...

  10. SEROTONERGIC/GLUTAMATERGIC INTERACTIONS: POTENTIATION OF PHENCYCLIDINE-INDUCED STIMULUS CONTROL BY CITALOPRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, J. C.; Eckler, J.R.; Rice, K. C.; Rabin, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    Previous investigations in our laboratory have found that the stimulus effects of the hallucinogenic serotonergic agonists DOM and LSD are potentiated by phencyclidine [PCP], a non-competitive NMDA antagonist. Also suggestive of behaviorally significant serotonergic/glutamatergic interactions is our finding that stimulus control by both PCP and LSD is partially antagonized by the mGlu2/3 agonist, LY 379268. These observations coupled with the fact that the stimulus effects of LSD and DOM are ...

  11. Effective interactions for valence-hole nuclei with modern meson-exchange potential models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the folded-diagram theory, the authors have studied the effective interaction appropriate for hole-hole nuclei in the mass regions of 16O and 40Ca, using the Bonn and Paris potential models. To sum up the folded diagrams the renormalization procedure of Lee and Suzuki has been employed, using a so-called Q-box in which were included all one-body and two-body irreducible valence-linked diagrams through third order in perturbation theory. Discrepancies for the mass dependence of the effective interaction for several JT configurations with respect to empirically deduced mass dependencies is reported. The role of core polarization processes through third order were found to be one of the mechanisms behind these discrepancies. Compared to the results obtained with the Paris potential, more attraction is introduced by the Bonn potential for all matrix elements of concerns, a result which agrees well with previous findings for the particle-particle interaction in the same mass regions. A qualitative agreements with experimental data is obtained. 31 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Anders S., E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang, E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Elstner, Marcus [Theoretische Chemische Biologie, Universität Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  13. Whitebark pine facilitation at treeline: potential interactions for disruption by an invasive pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomback, Diana F; Blakeslee, Sarah C; Wagner, Aaron C; Wunder, Michael B; Resler, Lynn M; Pyatt, Jill C; Diaz, Soledad

    2016-08-01

    In stressful environments, facilitation often aids plant establishment, but invasive plant pathogens may potentially disrupt these interactions. In many treeline communities in the northern Rocky Mountains of the U.S. and Canada, Pinus albicaulis, a stress-tolerant pine, initiates tree islands at higher frequencies than other conifers - that is, leads to leeward tree establishment more frequently. The facilitation provided by a solitary (isolated) P. albicaulis leading to tree island initiation may be important for different life-history stages for leeward conifers, but it is not known which life-history stages are influenced and protection provided. However, P. albicaulis mortality from the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola potentially disrupts these facilitative interactions, reducing tree island initiation. In two Rocky Mountain eastern slope study areas, we experimentally examined fundamental plant-plant interactions which might facilitate tree island formation: the protection offered by P. albicaulis to leeward seed and seedling life-history stages, and to leeward krummholz conifers. In the latter case, we simulated mortality from C. ribicola for windward P. albicaulis to determine whether loss of P. albicaulis from C. ribicola impacts leeward conifers. Relative to other common solitary conifers at treeline, solitary P. albicaulis had higher abundance. More seeds germinated in leeward rock microsites than in conifer or exposed microsites, but the odds of cotyledon seedling survival during the growing season were highest in P. albicaulis microsites. Planted seedling survival was low among all microsites examined. Simulating death of windward P. albicaulis by C. ribicola reduced shoot growth of leeward trees. Loss of P. albicaulis to exotic disease may limit facilitation interactions and conifer community development at treeline and potentially impede upward movement as climate warms. PMID:27551372

  14. Dirac equation for the Hulthén potential within the Yukawa-type tensor interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oktay Aydo(g)du; Elham Maghsoodi; Hassan Hassanabadi

    2013-01-01

    Using the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method,pseudospin and spin symmetric solutions of the Dirac equation for the scalar and vector Hulthén potentials with the Yukawa-type tensor potential are obtained for an arbitrary spin-orbit coupling quantum number κ.We deduce the energy eigenvalue equations and corresponding upper-and lower-spinor wave functions in both the pseudospin and spin symmetry cases.Numerical results of the energy eigenvalue equations and the upper-and lower-spinor wave functions are presented to show the effects of the external potential and particle mass parameters as well as pseudospin and spin symmetric constants on the bound-state energies and wave functions in the absence and presence of the tensor interaction.

  15. Intermolecular Interaction Potentials of CH4-Ne Complex Calculated with Local Density Approximation Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu-Lin; CHENG Xiao-Hong; CHEN Xiang-Rong; YANG Xiang-Dong; ZHU Jun

    2004-01-01

    @@ The intermolecular interactions potentials for two configurations of CH4-Ne complex are calculated with local density approximation methods in the frame of density functional theory. It is found that the calculated potentials have two minima when the distance between the carbon atom of CH4 and the Ne atom takes R = 5.80 a.u.and 6.20a. u. for both the two configurations. For the edge configuration, the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0669536 eV and 0.0671416 eV. For the face configuration, the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0737956 eV and 0.0645506 eV. The global minimum occurs at R = 5.80 a.u. for the face configuration with a depth of the potential 0.0737956 eV. The depths of our calculation are in better agreement with the experimental data than the quantum chemical calculation approach, while the position of minimum potential for our calculation is underestimated.

  16. Microorganisms in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste and their interactions with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term safety of nuclear waste in a deep geological repository is an important issue in our society. Microorganisms indigenous to potential host rocks are able to influence the oxidation state, speciation and therefore the mobility of radionuclides as well as gas generation or canister corrosion. Therefore, for the safety assessment of such a repository it is necessary to know which microorganisms are present in the potential host rocks (e.g. clay, salt) and if these microorganisms can influence the performance of a repository. Microbial diversity in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste was analyzed by culture-independent molecular biological methods (e.g. 16S rRNA gene retrieval) as well as enrichment and isolation of indigenous microbes. Among other isolates, a Paenibacillus strain, as a representative of Firmicutes, was recovered in R2A media under anaerobic conditions from Opalinus clay from the Mont Terri in Switzerland. Accumulation experiments and potentiometric titrations showed a strong interaction of Paenibacillus sp. cells with U(VI) within a broad pH range (3-7). Additionally, the interactions of the halophilic archaeal strain Halobacterium noricense DSM 15987, a salt rock representative reference strain, with U(VI) at high ionic strength was investigated. After 48 h the cells were still alive at uranium concentrations up to 60 μM, which demonstrates that Halobacterium noricense can tolerate uranium concentrations up to this level. The formed uranium sorption species were examined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The results about the microbial communities present in potential host rocks for nuclear waste repositories and their interactions with radionuclides contribute to the safety assessment of a prospective nuclear waste repository.

  17. Microorganisms in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste and their interactions with radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkouk, A.; Liebe, M.; Luetke, L.; Moll, H.; Stumpf, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2015-07-01

    The long-term safety of nuclear waste in a deep geological repository is an important issue in our society. Microorganisms indigenous to potential host rocks are able to influence the oxidation state, speciation and therefore the mobility of radionuclides as well as gas generation or canister corrosion. Therefore, for the safety assessment of such a repository it is necessary to know which microorganisms are present in the potential host rocks (e.g. clay, salt) and if these microorganisms can influence the performance of a repository. Microbial diversity in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste was analyzed by culture-independent molecular biological methods (e.g. 16S rRNA gene retrieval) as well as enrichment and isolation of indigenous microbes. Among other isolates, a Paenibacillus strain, as a representative of Firmicutes, was recovered in R2A media under anaerobic conditions from Opalinus clay from the Mont Terri in Switzerland. Accumulation experiments and potentiometric titrations showed a strong interaction of Paenibacillus sp. cells with U(VI) within a broad pH range (3-7). Additionally, the interactions of the halophilic archaeal strain Halobacterium noricense DSM 15987, a salt rock representative reference strain, with U(VI) at high ionic strength was investigated. After 48 h the cells were still alive at uranium concentrations up to 60 μM, which demonstrates that Halobacterium noricense can tolerate uranium concentrations up to this level. The formed uranium sorption species were examined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The results about the microbial communities present in potential host rocks for nuclear waste repositories and their interactions with radionuclides contribute to the safety assessment of a prospective nuclear waste repository.

  18. The study of interaction potentials and differential cross sections for collisions between He atoms and hydrogen halide molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙桂华; 杨向东; 朱俊; 王彩霞

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present the uniform interaction potentials for helium atoms and halogen hydride molecules (HF,HC1 and HBr). The differential cross sections are calculated using the above interaction potentials for the He-HF,HCl and HBr systems, respectively, and the results of the calculations are found to be in agreement with the existingtheoretical results and experimental data.

  19. Interaction grand potential between calcium-silicate-hydrate nanoparticles at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnaud, Patrick A; Labbez, Christophe; Miura, Ryuji; Suzuki, Ai; Miyamoto, Naoto; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Miyamoto, Akira; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2016-02-21

    Calcium-silicate-hydrate (or C-S-H), an inosilicate, is the major binding phase in cement pastes and concretes and a porous hydrated material made up of a percolated and dense network of crystalline nanoparticles of a mean apparent spherical diameter of ∼5 nm that are each stacks of multiple C-S-H layers. Interaction forces between these nanoparticles are at the origin of C-S-H chemical, physical, and mechanical properties at the meso- and macroscales. These particle interactions and the resulting properties may be affected significantly by nanoparticle density and environmental conditions such as the temperature, relative humidity, or concentration of chemical species in the bulk solution. In this study, we combined grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations and an extension of the mean force integration method to derive the pair potentials. This approach enables realistic simulation of the physical environment surrounding the C-S-H particles. We thus constructed the pair potentials for C-S-H nanoparticles of defined chemical stoichiometry at 10% relative humidity (RH), varying the relative crystallographic orientations at a constant particle density of ρpart ∼ 2.21 mmol L(-1). We found that cohesion between nanoparticles is affected strongly by both the aspect ratio and the crystallographic misorientation of interacting particles. This method and the findings underscore the importance of accounting for relative dimensions and orientation among C-S-H nanoparticles in descriptions of physical and simulated multiparticle aggregates or mesoscale systems. PMID:26866999

  20. A method for computing the inter-residue interaction potentials for reduced amino acid alphabet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhinav Luthra; Anupam Nath Jha; G K Ananthasuresh; Saraswathi Vishveswara

    2007-08-01

    Inter-residue potentials are extensively used in the design and evaluation of protein structures. However, dealing with all (20×20) interactions becomes computationally difficult in extensive investigations. Hence, it is desirable to reduce the alphabet of 20 amino acids to a smaller number. Currently, several methods of reducing the residue types exist; however a critical assessment of these methods is not available. Towards this goal, here we review and evaluate different methods by comparing with the complete (20×20) matrix of Miyazawa-Jernigan potential, including a method of grouping adopted by us, based on multi dimensional scaling (MDS). The second goal of this paper is the computation of inter-residue interaction energies for the reduced amino acid alphabet, which has not been explicitly addressed in the literature until now. By using a least squares technique, we present a systematic method of obtaining the interaction energy values for any type of grouping scheme that reduces the amino acid alphabet. This can be valuable in designing the protein structures.

  1. Accuracy of simple folding model in the calculation of the direct part of real − interaction potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keshab C Panda; Binod C Sahu; Jhasaketan Bhoi

    2014-05-01

    The direct part of real − interaction potential is calculated in the simple folding model using density-dependent Brink–Boeker effective interaction. The simple folding potentials calculated from the short- and finite-range components of this effective interaction are compared with their corresponding double folding results obtained from the oscillator model wave function to establish the relative accuracy of the model. It is found that the direct part of real – interaction potential calculated in the simple folding model is reliable.

  2. Assessment of potential drug–drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Murtaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug–drug interactions (DDIs may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug–drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug–drug interactions (pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug–drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55% or major severity (45%; established (24.2%, theoretical (18.8% or probable (57% type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001, hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001 and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001. We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs.

  3. Computation of Ship Hydrodynamic Interaction Forces in Restricted Waters using Potential Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueqian Zhou; Serge Sutulo; C. Guedes Soares

    2012-01-01

    A computer code based on the double-body potential flow model and the classic source panel method has been developed to study various problems of hydrodynamic interaction between ships and other objects with solid boundaries including the seabed.A peculiarity of the proposed implementation is the application of the so-called “moving-patch” method for simulating steady boundaries of large extensions.The method is based on an assumption that at any moment just the part of the boundary (“moving patch”) which lies close to the interacting ship is significant for the near-field interaction.For a specific case of the flat bottom,comparative computations were performed to determine optimal dimensions of the patch and of the constituting panels based on the trade-off between acceptable accuracy and reasonable efficiency.The method was applied to estimate the sway force on a ship hull moving obliquely across a dredged channel.The method was validated for a case of ship-to-ship interaction when tank data were available.This study also contains a description of a newly developed spline approximation algorithm necessary for creating consistent discretizations of ship hulls with various degrees of refinement.

  4. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S; Cui, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O and S are presented. The RMSD interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1...

  5. Entangling spin-spin interactions of ions in individually controlled potential wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew; Colombe, Yves; Brown, Kenton; Knill, Emanuel; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David

    2014-03-01

    Physical systems that cannot be modeled with classical computers appear in many different branches of science, including condensed-matter physics, statistical mechanics, high-energy physics, atomic physics and quantum chemistry. Despite impressive progress on the control and manipulation of various quantum systems, implementation of scalable devices for quantum simulation remains a formidable challenge. As one approach to scalability in simulation, here we demonstrate an elementary building-block of a configurable quantum simulator based on atomic ions. Two ions are trapped in separate potential wells that can individually be tailored to emulate a number of different spin-spin couplings mediated by the ions' Coulomb interaction together with classical laser and microwave fields. We demonstrate deterministic tuning of this interaction by independent control of the local wells and emulate a particular spin-spin interaction to entangle the internal states of the two ions with 0.81(2) fidelity. Extension of the building-block demonstrated here to a 2D-network, which ion-trap micro-fabrication processes enable, may provide a new quantum simulator architecture with broad flexibility in designing and scaling the arrangement of ions and their mutual interactions. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  6. Assessment of Potential Herb-Drug Interactions among Nigerian Adults with Type-2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezuruike, Udoamaka; Prieto, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that patients with diabetes do not rely only on prescription drugs for their disease management. The use of herbal medicines is one of the self-management practices adopted by these patients, often without the knowledge of their healthcare practitioners. This study assessed the potential for pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions (HDIs) amongst Nigerian adult diabetic patients. This was done through a literature analysis of the pharmacokinetic profile of their herbal medicines and prescription drugs, based on information obtained from 112 patients with type-2 diabetes attending two secondary health care facilities in Nigeria. Fifty percent of the informants used herbal medicines alongside their prescription drugs. Worryingly, 60% of the patients taking herbal medicines did not know their identity, thus increasing the risk of unidentified HDIs. By comparing the pharmacokinetic profile of eight identified herbs taken by the patients for the management of diabetes against those of the prescription drugs, several scenarios of potential HDIs were identified and their clinical relevance is discussed. The lack of clinical predictors points toward cultural factors as the influence for herb use, making it more difficult to identify these patients and in turn monitor potential HDIs. In identifying these possible interactions, we have highlighted the need for healthcare professionals to promote a proactive monitoring of patients' use of herbal medicines. PMID:27559312

  7. The prospects for producing ultracold NH$_3$ molecules by sympathetic cooling: a survey of interaction potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Zuchowski, Piotr S \\

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of producing ultracold NH3 molecules by sympathetic cooling in a bath of ultracold atoms. We consider the interactions of NH3 with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth atoms, and with Xe, using ab initio coupled-cluster calculations. For Rb-NH3 and Xe-NH3 we develop full potential energy surfaces, while for the other systems we characterize the stationary points (global and local minima and saddle points). We also calculate isotropic and anisotropic Van der Waals C6 coefficients for all the systems. The potential energy surfaces for interaction of NH3 with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth atoms all show deep potential wells and strong anisotropies. The well depths vary from 887 1/cm for Mg-NH3 to 5104 1/cm for Li-NH3. This suggests that all these systems will exhibit strong inelasticity whenever inelastic collisions are energetically allowed and that sympathetic cooling will work only when both the atoms and the molecules are already in their lowest internal states. Xe-NH3 is more wea...

  8. Influence of Solvent-Solvent and Solute-Solvent Interaction Properties on Solvent-Mediated Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shi-Qi

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed universal calculational recipe for solvent-mediated potential is applied to calculate excess potential of mean force between two large Lennard-Jones (LJ) or hard core attractive Yukawa particles immersed in small LJ solvent bath at supercritical state. Comparison between the present prediction with a hypernetted chain approximation adopted for solute-solute correlation at infinitely dilute limit and existing simulation data shows high accuracy for the region with large separation, and qualitative reliability for the solute particle contact region. The calculational simplicity of the present recipe allows for a detailed investigation on the effect of the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction details on the excess potential of mean force. The resultant conclusion is that gathering of solvent particles near a solute particle leads to repulsive excess PMF, while depletion of solvent particles away from the solute particle leads to attractive excess PMF, and minor change of the solvent-solvent interaction range has large influence on the excess PMF.

  9. Assessment of Potential Herb-Drug Interactions among Nigerian Adults with Type-2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezuruike, Udoamaka; Prieto, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that patients with diabetes do not rely only on prescription drugs for their disease management. The use of herbal medicines is one of the self-management practices adopted by these patients, often without the knowledge of their healthcare practitioners. This study assessed the potential for pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions (HDIs) amongst Nigerian adult diabetic patients. This was done through a literature analysis of the pharmacokinetic profile of their herbal medicines and prescription drugs, based on information obtained from 112 patients with type-2 diabetes attending two secondary health care facilities in Nigeria. Fifty percent of the informants used herbal medicines alongside their prescription drugs. Worryingly, 60% of the patients taking herbal medicines did not know their identity, thus increasing the risk of unidentified HDIs. By comparing the pharmacokinetic profile of eight identified herbs taken by the patients for the management of diabetes against those of the prescription drugs, several scenarios of potential HDIs were identified and their clinical relevance is discussed. The lack of clinical predictors points toward cultural factors as the influence for herb use, making it more difficult to identify these patients and in turn monitor potential HDIs. In identifying these possible interactions, we have highlighted the need for healthcare professionals to promote a proactive monitoring of patients' use of herbal medicines. PMID:27559312

  10. Research on the potential use of interactive materials on astronomy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Macedo, Josue

    2016-07-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences, using the mixed methodology, combined with the three pedagogical moments. Among other aspects, the viability of the use of resources was noticed, involving digital technologies and interactive materials on teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options for future teachers and meet their training needs.

  11. Arsenic: A Review of the Element's Toxicity, Plant Interactions, and Potential Methods of Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettick, Bryan E; Cañas-Carrell, Jaclyn E; French, Amanda D; Klein, David M

    2015-08-19

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring element with a long history of toxicity. Sites of contamination are found worldwide as a result of both natural processes and anthropogenic activities. The broad scope of arsenic toxicity to humans and its unique interaction with the environment have led to extensive research into its physicochemical properties and toxic behavior in biological systems. The purpose of this review is to compile the results of recent studies concerning the metalloid and consider the chemical and physical properties of arsenic in the broad context of human toxicity and phytoremediation. Areas of focus include arsenic's mechanisms of human toxicity, interaction with plant systems, potential methods of remediation, and protocols for the determination of metals in experimentation. This assessment of the literature indicates that controlling contamination of water sources and plants through effective remediation and management is essential to successfully addressing the problems of arsenic toxicity and contamination.

  12. Matter-Wave Solitons in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates with Tunable Interactions and Time Varying Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣恒农; 左苗

    2011-01-01

    We present three families of exact matter-wave soliton solutions for an effective one-dimension two- component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with tunable interactions, harmonic potential and gain or loss term. We investigate the dynamics of bright-bright solitons, bright-dark solitons and dark-dark solitons for the time-dependent expulsive harmonic trap potential, periodically modulated harmonic trap potential, and kinklike modulated harmonic trap potential. Through the Feshbach resonance, these dynamics can be realized in experiments by suitable control of time-dependent trap parameters, atomic interactions, and interaction with thermal cloud.

  13. Baryon interactions in lattice QCD: the direct method vs. the HAL QCD potential method

    CERN Document Server

    Iritani, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    We make a detailed comparison between the direct method and the HAL QCD potential method for the baryon-baryon interactions, taking the $\\Xi\\Xi$ system at $m_\\pi= 0.51$ GeV in 2+1 flavor QCD and using both smeared and wall quark sources. The energy shift $\\Delta E_\\mathrm{eff}(t)$ in the direct method shows the strong dependence on the choice of quark source operators, which means that the results with either (or both) source are false. The time-dependent HAL QCD method, on the other hand, gives the quark source independent $\\Xi\\Xi$ potential, thanks to the derivative expansion of the potential, which absorbs the source dependence to the next leading order correction. The HAL QCD potential predicts the absence of the bound state in the $\\Xi\\Xi$($^1$S$_0$) channel at $m_\\pi= 0.51$ GeV, which is also confirmed by the volume dependence of finite volume energy from the potential. We also demonstrate that the origin of the fake plateau in the effective energy shift $\\Delta E_\\mathrm{eff}(t)$ at $t \\sim 1$ fm can b...

  14. Solid phase stability of a double-minimum interaction potential system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suematsu, Ayumi; Yoshimori, Akira, E-mail: a.yoshimori@cmt.phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Saiki, Masafumi; Matsui, Jun [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Odagaki, Takashi [School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan)

    2014-06-28

    We study phase stability of a system with double-minimum interaction potential in a wide range of parameters by a thermodynamic perturbation theory. The present double-minimum potential is the Lennard-Jones-Gauss potential, which has a Gaussian pocket as well as a standard Lennard-Jones minimum. As a function of the depth and position of the Gaussian pocket in the potential, we determine the coexistence pressure of crystals (fcc and bcc). We show that the fcc crystallizes even at zero pressure when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the first or third nearest neighbor site of the fcc crystal. The bcc crystal is more stable than the fcc crystal when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the second nearest neighbor sites of the bcc crystal. The stable crystal structure is determined by the position of the Gaussian pocket. These results show that we can control the stability of the solid phase by tuning the potential function.

  15. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of CYP1a interaction potential of terminalia arjuna bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Varghese

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia arjuna Wight and Arn. (Combretaceae is a tree having an extensive medicinal potential in cardiovascular disorders. Triterpenoids are mainly responsible for cardiovascular properties. Aqueous, hydroalcoholic and alcoholic extract of T. arjuna, arjunic acid and arjungenin were examined for their potential to inhibit CYP1A enzyme in rat and human liver microsomes. IC 50 values of aqueous, hydroalcoholic and alcoholic extract of T. arjuna was found to be 11.4, 28.9 and 44.6 μg/ml in rat liver microsomes while 30.0, 29.7 and 39.0 μg/ml in human liver microsomes, respectively for CYP1A. However IC 50 values of arjunic acid and arjungenin for both rat liver microsomes and human liver microsomes were found to be >50 μM. Arjunic acid and arjungenin did not show inhibition of CYP1A enzyme up to concentrations of 50 μM. These in vitro data indicate that Terminalia arjuna extracts contain constituents that can potently inhibit the activity of CYP1A, which could in turn lead to undesirable pharmacokinetic drug-herb interactions in vivo. Based on the in vitro data, interaction potential of the aqueous extract of Terminalia arjuna orally in rats was investigated. A probe substrate, phenacetin, was used to index the activity of CYP1A. In vivo pharmacokinetic study of coadministration of aqueous extract of Terminalia arjuna and phenacetin, revealed that the aqueous extract did not lead to any significant change in the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenacetin as compared with control group. Though there was no in vivo-in vitro correlation, drug interactions could arise with drugs having a narrow therapeutic range and extensively cleared by CYP1A enzyme, which could lead to undesirable side effects.

  16. A new method for detecting interactions between the senses in event-related potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondan, Matthias; Röder, B.

    2006-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) can be used in multisensory research to determine the point in time when different senses start to interact, for example, the auditory and the visual system. For this purpose, the ERP to bimodal stimuli (AV) is often compared to the sum of the ERPs to auditory (A...... not contain common activity: This activity would be subtracted twice from one ERP and would, therefore, contaminate the result. In the present study, ERPs to unimodal, bimodal, and trimodal auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli (T) were recorded. We demonstrate that (T + TAV) - (TA + TV) is equivalent...

  17. Relativistic symmetries in trigonometric Poschl-Teller potential plus tensor interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Falaye, Babatunde J.; Sameer M. Ikhdair

    2013-01-01

    The Dirac equation is solved to obtain its approximate bound states for a spin-1/2 particle in the presence of trigonometric Poschl-Teller (tPT) potential including a Coulomb-like tensor interaction with arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number $\\kappa$ using an approximation scheme to substitute the centrifugal terms k(k+1)/r^2. In view of spin and pseudo-spin (p-spin) symmetries, the relativistic energy eigenvalues and the corresponding two-component wave functions of a particle moving in the fi...

  18. Scalar-field cosmological and collapse models with general self-interaction potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giambo, Roberto; Giannoni, Fabio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita di Camerino (Italy); Magli, Giulio, E-mail: roberto.giambo@unicam.i, E-mail: fabio.giannoni@unicam.i, E-mail: magli@mate.polimi.i [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of the investigation of a wide class of self-interacting, self-gravitating homogeneous scalar fields models, characterized by quite general conditions on the scalar field potential, and including both asymptotically polynomial and exponential behaviors. We show that the generic evolution is always divergent in a finite time, and this result is used to construct cosmological models as well as radiating collapsing star models of the Vaidya type - for the latter it turns out that black holes are generically formed.

  19. Baryon-baryon interactions described by the WKB-RGM quark-model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the baryon-baryon interactions predicted by the Kyoto-Niigata quark model, by using phase-shift equivalent local potentials obtained in the WKB-RGM method. The effect of flavor symmetry breaking is discussed by comparing the 1S0 potentials among the NN, ΣN(I=3/2), ΣΣ(I=2), ΞΣ(I=3/2) and ΞΞ(I=1) systems, which possess the simple flavor SU3 symmetry (22). It is characterized by the detailed balance between the reduction of the short-range repulsion, generated from the color-magnetic term, and the reduction of the medium-range attraction, generated from scalar-meson exchange. A special role of the Bryan-Scott term in the model fss2 is emphasized. (author)

  20. Isotropization in Bianchi type-I cosmological model with fermions and bosons interacting via Yukawa potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ribas, M O; Devecchi, F P; Kremer, G M

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate a model for the early Universe in a Bianchi type-I metric, where the sources of the gravitational field are a fermionic and a bosonic field, interacting through a Yukawa potential, following the standard model of elementary particles. It is shown that the fermionic field has a negative pressure, while the boson has a small positive pressure. The fermionic field is the responsible for an accelerated regime at early times, but since the total pressure tends to zero for large times, a transition to a decelerated regime occurs. Here the Yukawa potential answers for the duration of the accelerated regime, since by decreasing the value of its coupling constant the transition accelerated-decelerated occurs in later times. The isotropization which occurs for late times is due to the presence of the fermionic field as one of the sources of the gravitational field.

  1. A C-code for the double folding interaction potential of two spherical nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a C-code designed to obtain the nucleus-nucleus potential by using the double folding model (DFM) and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier. The program calculates the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei. The most important output parameters are the Coulomb barrier energy and the radius. Since many researchers use a Woods-Saxon profile for the nuclear term of the potential we provide an option in our code for fitting the DFM potential by such a profile. Program summaryProgram title: DFMSPH Catalogue identifier: AEFH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5929 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 115 740 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: PC Operating system: Windows XP (with the GCC-compiler version 2) RAM: Below 10 Mbyte Classification: 17.9 Nature of problem: The code calculates in a semimicroscopic way the bare interaction potential between two colliding spherical nuclei as a function of the center of mass distance. The height and the position of the Coulomb barrier are found. The calculated potential is approximated by a conventional Woods-Saxon profile near the barrier. Dependence of the barrier parameters upon the characteristics of the effective NN forces (like, e.g. the range of the exchange part of the nuclear term) can be investigated. Solution method: The nucleus-nucleus potential is calculated using the double folding model with the Coulomb and the effective M3Y NN interactions. For the direct parts of the Coulomb and the nuclear terms, the Fourier transform method is used. In order to calculate the exchange parts the density matrix expansion method

  2. Interaction of landscape varibles on the potential geographical distribution of parrots in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plasencia–Vázquez, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The loss, degradation, and fragmentation of forested areas are endangering parrot populations. In this study, we determined the influence of fragmentation in relation to vegetation cover, land use, and spatial configuration of fragments on the potential geographical distribution patterns of parrots in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. We used the potential geographical distribution for eight parrot species, considering the recently published maps obtained with the maximum entropy algorithm, and we incorporated the probability distribution for each species. We calculated 71 metrics/variables that evaluate forest fragmentation, spatial configuration of fragments, the ratio occupied by vegetation, and the land use in 100 plots of approximately 29 km², randomly distributed within the presence and absence areas predicted for each species. We also considered the relationship between environmental variables and the distribution probability of species. We used a partial least squares regression to explore patterns between the variables used and the potential distribution models. None of the environmental variables analyzed alone determined the presence/absence or the probability distribution of parrots in the Peninsula. We found that for the eight species, either due to the presence/absence or the probability distribution, the most important explanatory variables were the interaction among three variables, particularly the interactions among the total forest area, the total edge, and the tropical semi–evergreen medium– height forest. Habitat fragmentation influenced the potential geographical distribution of these species in terms of the characteristics of other environmental factors that are expressed together with the geographical division, such as the different vegetation cover ratio and land uses in deforested areas.

  3. Molecular Insights into the Potential Toxicological Interaction of 2-Mercaptothiazoline with the Antioxidant Enzyme—Catalase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenxing; Huang, Ming; Mi, Chenyu; Wang, Tao; Chen, Dong; Teng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    2-mercaptothiazoline (2-MT) is widely used in many industrial fields, but its residue is potentially harmful to the environment. In this study, to evaluate the biological toxicity of 2-MT at protein level, the interaction between 2-MT and the pivotal antioxidant enzyme—catalase (CAT) was investigated using multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The results indicated that the CAT fluorescence quenching caused by 2-MT should be dominated by a static quenching mechanism through formation of a 2-MT/CAT complex. Furthermore, the identifications of the binding constant, binding forces, and the number of binding sites demonstrated that 2-MT could spontaneously interact with CAT at one binding site mainly via Van der Waals’ forces and hydrogen bonding. Based on the molecular docking simulation and conformation dynamic characterization, it was found that 2-MT could bind into the junctional region of CAT subdomains and that the binding site was close to enzyme active sites, which induced secondary structural and micro-environmental changes in CAT. The experiments on 2-MT toxicity verified that 2-MT significantly inhibited CAT activity via its molecular interaction, where 2-MT concentration and exposure time both affected the inhibitory action. Therefore, the present investigation provides useful information for understanding the toxicological mechanism of 2-MT at the molecular level. PMID:27537873

  4. Spatial representation in the social interaction potential metric: an analysis of scale and parameter sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Farber, Steven

    2016-10-01

    The social interaction potential (SIP) metric measures urban structural constraints on social interaction opportunities of a metropolitan region based on the time geographic concept of joint accessibility. Previous implementations of the metric used an interaction surface based on census tracts and the locations of their centroids. This has been shown to be a shortcoming, as the metric strongly depends on the scale of the zoning system in the region, making it difficult to compare the SIP metric between metropolitan regions. This research explores the role of spatial representation in the SIP metric and identifies a suitable grid-based representation that allows for comparison between regions while retaining cost-effectiveness with respect to computational burden. We also report on findings from an extensive sensitivity analysis investigating the SIP metric's input parameters such as a travel flow congestion factor and the length of the allowable time budget for social activities. The results provide new insights on the role of the modifiable areal unit problem in the computation of time geographic measures of accessibility.

  5. Potential-of-mean-force description of ionic interactions and structural hydration in biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group; Soumpasis, D.M. [Max-Planck-Inst for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany). Biocomputation Group

    1994-10-01

    To understand the functioning of living organisms on a molecular level, it is crucial to dissect the intricate interplay of the immense number of biological molecules. Most of the biochemical processes in cells occur in a liquid environment formed mainly by water and ions. This solvent environment plays an important role in biological systems. The potential-of-mean-force (PMF) formalism attempts to describe quantitatively the interactions of the solvent with biological macromolecules on the basis of an approximate statistical-mechanical representation. At its current status of development, it deals with ionic effects on the biomolecular structure and with the structural hydration of biomolecules. The underlying idea of the PMF formalism is to identify the dominant sources of interactions and incorporate these interactions into the theoretical formalism using PMF`s (or particle correlation functions) extracted from bulk-liquid systems. In the following, the authors shall briefly outline the statistical-mechanical foundation of the PMF formalism and introduce the PMF expansion formalism, which is intimately linked to superposition approximations for higher-order particle correlation functions. The authors shall then sketch applications, which describe the effects of the ionic environment on nucleic-acid structure. Finally, the authors shall present the more recent extension of the PMF idea to describe quantitatively the structural hydration of biomolecules. Results for the interface of ice and water and for the hydration of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) will be discussed.

  6. Cubic-quintic long-range interactions with double well potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilifis, Panagiotis A.; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Rothos, Vassilis M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we examine the combined effects of cubic and quintic terms of the long-range type in the dynamics of a double well potential. Employing a two-mode approximation, we systematically develop two cubic-quintic ordinary differential equations and assess the contributions of the long-range interactions in each of the relevant prefactors, gauging how to simplify the ensuing dynamical system. Finally, we obtain a reduced canonical description for the conjugate variables of relative population imbalance and relative phase between the two wells and proceed to a dynamical systems analysis of the resulting pair of ordinary differential equations. While in the case of cubic and quintic interactions of the same kind (e.g. both attractive or both repulsive), only a symmetry-breaking bifurcation can be identified, a remarkable effect that emerges e.g. in the setting of repulsive cubic but attractive quintic interactions is a ‘symmetry-restoring’ bifurcation. Namely, in addition to the supercritical pitchfork that leads to a spontaneous symmetry breaking of the antisymmetric state, there is a subcritical pitchfork that eventually reunites the asymmetric daughter branch with the antisymmetric parent one. The relevant bifurcations, the stability of the branches and their dynamical implications are examined both in the reduced (ODE) and in the full (PDE) setting. The model is argued to be of physical relevance, especially so in the context of optical thermal media.

  7. A C-code for the double folding interaction potential for reactions involving deformed target nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a C-code designed to obtain the interaction potential between a spherical projectile nucleus and an axial-symmetrical deformed target nucleus and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier, by using the double folding model (DFM). The program calculates the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei as well as of the angle between the axis of symmetry of the target nucleus and the beam direction. The most important output parameters are the Coulomb barrier energy and the radius. Since many researchers use a Woods-Saxon profile for the nuclear term of the potential we provide an option in our code for fitting the DFM potential by such a profile near the barrier. Program summaryProgram title: DFMDEF Catalogue identifier: AENI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2245 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 215442 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C. Computer: PC, Mac. Operating system: Windows XP (with the GCC-compiler version 2), MacOS, Linux. RAM: 100 MB with average parameters set Classification: 17.9. Nature of problem: The code calculates in a semimicroscopic way the bare interaction potential between a spherical projectile nucleus and a deformed but axially symmetric target nucleus as a function of the center of mass distance as well as of the angle between the axis of symmetry of the target nucleus and the beam direction. The height and the position of the Coulomb barrier are found. The calculated potential is approximated by a conventional Woods-Saxon profile near the barrier. Dependence of the barrier parameters upon the characteristics of the effective NN forces (like, e

  8. Clinically Relevant Pharmacological Strategies That Reverse MDMA-Induced Brain Hyperthermia Potentiated by Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    MDMA-induced hyperthermia is highly variable, unpredictable, and greatly potentiated by the social and environmental conditions of recreational drug use. Current strategies to treat pathological MDMA-induced hyperthermia in humans are palliative and marginally effective, and there are no specific pharmacological treatments to counteract this potentially life-threatening condition. Here, we tested the efficacy of mixed adrenoceptor blockers carvedilol and labetalol, and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, in reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia. We injected rats with a moderate non-toxic dose of MDMA (9 mg/kg) during social interaction, and we administered potential treatment drugs after the development of robust hyperthermia (>2.5 °C), thus mimicking the clinical situation of acute MDMA intoxication. Brain temperature was our primary focus, but we also simultaneously recorded temperatures from the deep temporal muscle and skin, allowing us to determine the basic physiological mechanisms of the treatment drug action. Carvedilol was modestly effective in attenuating MDMA-induced hyperthermia by moderately inhibiting skin vasoconstriction, and labetalol was ineffective. In contrast, clozapine induced a marked and immediate reversal of MDMA-induced hyperthermia via inhibition of brain metabolic activation and blockade of skin vasoconstriction. Our findings suggest that clozapine, and related centrally acting drugs, might be highly effective for reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia in emergency clinical situations, with possible life-saving results. PMID:26105141

  9. Modeling Molecular Interactions in Water: From Pairwise to Many-Body Potential Energy Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Gerardo Andrés; Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor; Ojamäe, Lars; Lu, Jibao; Xu, Yao; Torabifard, Hedieh; Bartók, Albert P; Csányi, Gábor; Molinero, Valeria; Paesani, Francesco

    2016-07-13

    Almost 50 years have passed from the first computer simulations of water, and a large number of molecular models have been proposed since then to elucidate the unique behavior of water across different phases. In this article, we review the recent progress in the development of analytical potential energy functions that aim at correctly representing many-body effects. Starting from the many-body expansion of the interaction energy, specific focus is on different classes of potential energy functions built upon a hierarchy of approximations and on their ability to accurately reproduce reference data obtained from state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations and experimental measurements. We show that most recent potential energy functions, which include explicit short-range representations of two-body and three-body effects along with a physically correct description of many-body effects at all distances, predict the properties of water from the gas to the condensed phase with unprecedented accuracy, thus opening the door to the long-sought "universal model" capable of describing the behavior of water under different conditions and in different environments. PMID:27186804

  10. Thermal and transport properties of a nonrelativistic quantum gas interacting through a delta-shell potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work extends the seminal work of Gottfried on the two-body quantum physics of particles interacting through a delta-shell potential to many-body physics by studying a system of nonrelativistic particles when the thermal De-Broglie wavelength of a particle is larger than the range of the potential and the density is such that average distance between particles is larger than the above range. The ability of the delta-shell potential to reproduce some basic properties of the deuteron are examined. Relations for moments of bound-states are derived. The virial expansion is used to calculate the first quantum correction to the ideal gas pressure in the form of the second virial coefficient. Additionally, all thermodynamical functions are calculated up to the first-order quantum corrections. For small departures from equilibrium, the net flows of mass, energy and momentum, characterized by the coefficients of diffusion, thermal conductivity and shear viscosity, respectively, are calculated. Properties of the gas are examined for various values of physical parameters including the case of infinite scattering length when the unitary limit is achieved. (author)

  11. Plant-Microbial Interactions Define Potential Mechanisms of Organic Matter Priming in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhalnina, K.; Cho, H. J.; Hao, Z.; Mansoori, N.; Karaoz, U.; Jenkins, S.; White, R. A., III; Lipton, M. S.; Deng, K.; Zhou, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Northen, T.; Firestone, M. K.; Brodie, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, metabolic processes of plants and microorganisms are closely coupled, and together with soil minerals, their interactions regulate the turnover of soil organic C (SOC). Plants provide readily assimilable metabolites for microorganisms through exudation, and it has been hypothesized that increasing concentrations of exudate C may either stimulate or suppress rates of SOC mineralization (rhizosphere priming). Both positive and negative rhizosphere priming has been widely observed, however the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. To begin to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying rhizosphere priming, we isolated a broad range of soil bacteria from a Mediterranean grassland dominated by annual grass. Thirty-nine heterotrophic bacteria were selected for genome sequencing and both rRNA gene analysis and metagenome coverage suggest that these isolates represent naturally abundant strain variants. We analyzed their genomes for potential metabolic traits related to life in the rhizosphere and the decomposition of polymeric SOC. While the two dominant groups, Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, were enriched in polymer degrading enzymes, Alphaproteobacterial isolates contained greater gene copies of transporters related to amino acid, organic acid and auxin uptake or export, suggesting an enhanced metabolic potential for life in the root zone. To verify this metabolic potential, we determined the enzymatic activities of these isolates and revealed preferences of strains to degrade certain polymers (xylan, cellulose or lignin). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy is being used to determine which polymeric components of plant roots are targeted by specific strains and how exudates may impact their degradation. To verify the potential of isolates to assimilate root exudates and export key metabolites we are using LC-MS/MS based exometabolomic profiling. The traits hypothesized and verified here (transporters, enzymes, exudate uptake

  12. Baryon femtoscopy considering residual correlations as a tool to extract strong interaction potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymański Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the analysis of baryon-antibaryon femtoscopic correlations is presented. In particular, it is shown that taking into account residual correlations is crucial for the description of pΛ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ and p̄Λ correlation functions measured by the STAR experiment in Au–Au collisions at the centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √sNN = 200 GeV. This approach enables to obtain pΛ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ (p̄Λ source size consistent with the sizes extracted from correlations in pΛ (p̄Λ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ and lighter pair systems as well as with model predictions. Moreover, with this analysis it is possible to derive the unknown parameters of the strong interaction potential for baryon-antibaryon pairs under several assumptions.

  13. Atomic size zone interaction potential between two ground-state cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhaoying; Wu, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    The complex-source-point model are already used in the exact solution for the urtrashort pulse and nonparaxial beam. In this letter we have used the complex-source-point model to deduce the interaction potential equation for the separation R between two atoms which is comparable with the size of the atoms. We show the result and the characteristics of the numerical calculation. Since the singular point around R=0 is removed by using the complex-source-point model, so that we can obtain the result force around R=0. With the decreasing of the distance between two atoms, the force switches from the electromagnetic force to the strong force by use our equation.

  14. An Invariance Principle for the Tagged Particle Process in Continuum with Singular Interaction Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Conrad, Florian; Grothaus, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of a tagged particle in an infinite particle environment moving according to a stochastic gradient dynamics. For singular interaction potentials this tagged particle dynamics was constructed first in [FG11], using closures of pre-Dirichlet forms which were already proposed in [GP87] and [Osa98]. The environment dynamics and the coupled dynamics of the tagged particle and the environment were constructed separately. Here we continue the analysis of these processes: Proving an essential m-dissipativity result for the generator of the coupled dynamics from [FG11], we show that this dynamics does not only contain the environment dynamics (as one component), but is, given the latter, the only possible choice for being the coupled process. Moreover, we identify the uniform motion of the environment as the reversed motion of the tagged particle. (Since the dynamics are constructed as martingale solutions on configuration space, this is not immediate.) Furthermore, we prove ergodicity of the ...

  15. Study of potential drug-drug interactions between benzodiazepines and four commonly used antiepileptic drugs in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kartik N. Shah; Rana, Devang A.; Patel, Varsha J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines (BZD) is one of the commonly used drug groups for certain neurological diseases. As sometimes, the anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) may be used concomitantly with BZD there is a potential for drug-drug interactions. Study aimed to study potential drug-drug interactions between four commonly used AEDs (phenytoin, carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbitone, sodium valproate) and BZD (diazepam, clonazepam) in mice using maximal electroshock seizure (MES) method and pentylenetetra...

  16. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Winget, Danielle M; White, Richard A; Hallam, Steven J; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10 m) and oxygen-starved basin (200 m) waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n = 5010) had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P) waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI's non-redundant "nr" database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:25914678

  17. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  18. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Winget, Danielle M; White, Richard A; Hallam, Steven J; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10 m) and oxygen-starved basin (200 m) waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n = 5010) had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P) waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI's non-redundant "nr" database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  19. Evaluation of drug interaction potential of Labisia pumila (Kacip Fatimah) and its constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Vamshi K; Dale, Olivia R; Awortwe, Charles; Ali, Zulfiqar; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Khan, Shabana I

    2014-01-01

    Labisia pumila (Kacip Fatimah) is a popular herb in Malaysia that has been traditionally used in a number of women's health applications such as to improve libido, relieve postmenopausal symptoms, and to facilitate or hasten delivery in childbirth. In addition, the constituents of this plant have been reported to possess anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Clinical studies have indicated that cytochrome P450s (CYPs), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and Pregnane X receptor (PXR) are the three main modulators of drug-drug interactions which alter the absorption, distribution, and metabolism of drugs. Given the widespread use of Kacip Fatimah in dietary supplements, the current study focuses on determining the potential of its constituents to affect the activities of CYPs, P-gp, or PXR using in vitro assays which may provide useful information toward the risk of herb-drug interaction with concomitantly used drugs. Six compounds isolated from the roots of L. pumila (2 saponins and 4 alkyl phenols) were tested, in addition to the methanolic extract. The extract of L. pumila showed a significant time dependent inhibition (TDI) of CYP3A4, reversible inhibition of CYP2C9 and 2C19 and a weak inhibition of 1A2 and 2D6 as well as an inhibition of P-gp and rifampicin-induced PXR activation. The alkyl phenols inhibited CYP3A4 (TDI), CYP2C9, and 2C19 (reversible) while saponins inhibited P-gp and PXR. In conclusion, L. pumila and its constituents showed significant modulation of all three regulatory proteins (CYPs, P-gp, and PXR) suggesting a potential to alter the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of conventional drugs if used concomitantly. PMID:25152732

  20. Evaluation of drug interaction potential of Labisia pumila (Kacip Fatimah and its constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamshikrishna eManda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Labisia pumila (Kacip Fatimah is a popular herb in Malaysia that has been traditionally used in a number of women’s health applications such as to improve libido, relieve postmenopausal symptoms, and to facilitate or hasten delivery in childbirth. In addition, the constituents of this plant have been reported to possess anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Clinical studies have indicated that cytochrome P450s (CYPs, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, and Pregnane X receptor (PXR are the three main modulators of drug-drug interactions which alter the absorption, distribution, and metabolism of drugs. Given the widespread use of Kacip Fatimah in dietary supplements, the current study focuses on determining the potential of its constituents to affect the activities of CYPs, P-gp, or PXR using in vitro assays which may provide useful information towards the risk of herb-drug interaction with concomitantly used drugs. Six compounds isolated from the roots of Labisia pumila (2 saponins and 4 alkyl phenols were tested, in addition to the methanolic extract. The extract of Labisia pumila showed a significant time dependent inhibition (TDI of CYP3A4, reversible inhibition of CYP2C9 and 2C19 and a weak inhibition of 1A2 and 2D6 as well as an inhibition of P-gp and rifampicin-induced PXR activation. The alkyl phenols inhibited CYP3A4 (TDI, CYP2C9 and 2C19 (reversible while saponins inhibited P-gp and PXR. In conclusion, Labisia pumila and its constituents showed significant modulation of all three regulatory proteins (CYPs, P-gp and PXR suggesting a potential to alter the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of conventional drugs if used concomitantly.

  1. Does curcumin or pindolol potentiate fluoxetine′s antidepressant effect by a pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interaction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A.S. Murad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to study potentiation of fluoxetine′s antidepressant effect by curcumin or pindolol. Twenty eight groups of mice (n=8 were used in three sets of experiments. In the first set, 9 groups were subjected to the forced swimming test after being treated intraperitoneally with three vehicles, fluoxetine (5 and 20 mg/kg, curcumin (20 mg/kg, pindolol (32 mg/kg, curcumin+fluoxetine (5 mg/kg and pindolol+fluoxetine (5 mg/kg. One hour after the test, serum and brain fluoxetine and norfluoxetine levels were measured in mice receiving fluoxetine (5 and 20 mg/kg, curcumin+fluoxetine (5 mg/kg and pindolol+fluoxetine (5 mg/kg. In the second set, the test was done after pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine. In the third set, the locomotor activity was measured. The immobility duration was significantly decreased in fluoxetine (20 mg/kg, curcumin (20 mg/kg, curcumin+fluoxetine (5 mg/kg and pindolol+fluoxetine (5 mg/kg groups. These decreases were reversed with p-chlorophenylalanine. Fluoxetine and norfluoxetine levels were significantly higher in fluoxetine (20 mg/kg group with no differences in fluoxetine (5 mg/kg, curcumin+fluoxetine (5 mg/kg and pindolol+fluoxetine (5 mg/kg groups. Moreover, drugs failed to alter the locomotor activity indicating absence of central stimulation. In conclusion, curcumin, more than pindolol enhanced the antidepressant effect of a subeffective dose of fluoxetine in mice without increasing its serum or brain levels excluding any pharmacokinetic interaction. Reversal of this potentiation with p-chlorophenylalanine suggests a pharmacodynamic interaction through involvement of presynaptic 5-HT 1A receptors.

  2. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl-Emiliane Tien Chow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10m and oxygen-starved basin (200m waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n=5010 had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI’s non-redundant ‘nr’ database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  3. Interaction potential for water dimer from symmetry-adapted perturbation theory based on density functional description of monomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukowski, R.; Szalewicz, K.; Groenenboom, G.C.; Avoird, A. van der

    2006-01-01

    A new six-dimensional interaction potential for the water dimer has been obtained by fitting interaction energies computed at 2510 geometries using a variant of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) based on density functional theory (DFT) description of monomers, referred to as SAPT(DFT). The

  4. Therapeutic potential of mitotic interaction between the nucleoporin Tpr and aurora kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Hashizume, Chieko; Dowaki, Takayuki; Wong, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Spindle poles are defined by centrosomes; therefore, an abnormal number or defective structural organization of centrosomes can lead to loss of spindle bipolarity and genetic integrity. Previously, we showed that Tpr (translocated promoter region), a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), interacts with Mad1 and dynein to promote proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Tpr also associates with p53 to induce autophagy. Here, we report that Tpr depletion induces mitotic catastrophe and enhances the rate of tetraploidy and polyploidy. Mechanistically, Tpr interacts, via its central domain, with Aurora A but not Aurora B kinase. In Tpr-depleted cells, the expression levels, centrosomal localization and phosphorylation of Aurora A were all reduced. Surprisingly, an Aurora A inhibitor, Alisertib (MLN8237), also disrupted centrosomal localization of Tpr and induced mitotic catastrophe and cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Strikingly, over-expression of Aurora A disrupted Tpr centrosomal localization only in cells with supernumerary centrosomes but not in bipolar cells. Our results highlight the mutual regulation between Tpr and Aurora A and further confirm the importance of nucleoporin function in spindle pole organization, bipolar spindle assembly, and mitosis; functions that are beyond the conventional nucleocytoplasmic transport and NPC structural roles of nucleoporins. Furthermore, the central coiled-coil domain of Tpr binds to and sequesters extra Aurora A to safeguard bipolarity. This Tpr domain merits further investigation for its ability to inhibit Aurora kinase and as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer treatment.

  5. The interactive potential of post-modern film narrative - Frequency, Order and Simultaneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Sena Caires

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A considerable number of contemporary films are now using narrative models that allow several adaptations on digital and interactive operating systems. This trend is seen in films such as Memento by Christopher Nolan (2000, Irréversible by Gaspar Noé (2002 and Smoking / No Smoking by Alain Resnais (1993, concerning the chronological organization of their narrative parts – here it is a question of order. Or in films such as Elephant by Gus Van Sant (2003, Groundhog Day by Harold Ramis, 1993 and Rashômon by Akira Kurosawa (1950, for the diegetic repetition – a question of frequency. Or even, in films such as Magnolia by Paul Thomas Anderson (1999 and Short Cuts by Robert Altman, 1993 which use the idea of expansion or compression of the narrative – a question of simultaneity. To change the accessibility of the cinematographic experience and to constantly re-evaluate the way in which the narrative tool is used, is from now on considered the interactive potential of the contemporary film narrative.

  6. Liquid chloroform structure from computer simulation with a full ab initio intermolecular interaction potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have calculated the intermolecular interaction energies of the chloroform dimer in 12 orientations using the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. Single point energies of important geometries were calibrated by the coupled cluster with single and double and perturbative triple excitation method. Dunning's correlation consistent basis sets up to aug-cc-pVQZ have been employed in extrapolating the interaction energies to the complete basis set limit values. With the ab initio potential data we constructed a 5-site force field model for molecular dynamics simulations. We compared the simulation results with recent experiments and obtained quantitative agreements for the detailed atomwise radial distribution functions. Our results were also consistent with previous results using empirical force fields with polarization effects. Moreover, the calculated diffusion coefficients reproduced the experimental data over a wide range of thermodynamic conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ab initio force field which is capable of competing with existing empirical force fields for liquid chloroform

  7. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula; Alemayehu Berhanie; Habtamu Tigistu; Yishak Abraham; Yosheph Getachew; Tahir Mehmood Khan; Chandrashekhar Unakal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, clinical significance and the associated risk factors of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at internal medicine ward of University of Gondar (UOG) hospital.Method:medicine ward of UOG hospital from April 29, 2013 to June 2, 2013. Data was collected from medical records and by interviewing the patients face to face. Descriptive analysis was conducted for back ground characteristics and logistic regression was used to determine the associated risk factors.Result:A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients treated in internal interacting combinations with 4.13 potential DDIs per patient. Among 413 potential DDIs most were of moderate interactions 61.2% (n=253) followed by 26% (n=107) of minor interactions and 12.8% (n=53) of major interactions. There was significant association of occurrence of potential DDIs only with taking three or more medications.Conclusion:We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal In our study, we have identified a total number of 413 potential DDIs and 184 types of medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  8. Potential therapeutic hazards due to drug–drug interaction between topically and systemically coadministered medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan MJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mei-Juan Lan,1 Quan Zhou21Division of Nursing, 2Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People's Republic of ChinaWe read with great interest the study by Peniston et al1 who performed a randomized controlled trial to examine the frequency and type of adverse events (AEs in patients with osteoarthritis who received concurrent therapy of topical diclofenac sodium 1% gel (DSG, and drugs known to have potential drug–drug interactions (DDIs with diclofenac; and concluded that such co-medication had little impact on the frequency of AEs in this population.    The results of this study1 provide very useful information for clinical practice, ie, DSG may be a safe alternative to oral diclofenac when a pain reliever needs to be co-medicated with CYP2C9 substrates like warfarin antidiabetic sulfonylurea derivatives. DDIs between topically and systemically coadministered medications are easily neglected by clinicians, which brings about potential risk of patient safety. Peniston et al1 answered a scientific question in clinical therapeutics. We completely appreciate their rigorous study and original spirit of exploration. We would like to discuss and share our perspectives in the following paragraphs.View original article by Peniston and colleagues

  9. Potential drug–drug interactions in HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshikoya KA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kazeem A Oshikoya,1 Ibrahim A Oreagba,2 Saheed Lawal,2 Olufunsho Awodele,2 Olayinka O Ogunleye,1 Idowu O Senbanjo,3 Sunday O Olayemi,2 Veronica C Ezeaka,4,5 Edamisan O Temiye,4,5 Titilope A Adeyemo,4,6 Oluranti Opanuga,4,7 Olufunmilayo A Lesi,4,8 Sulaimon A Akanmu4,6 1Department of Pharmacology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 3Department of Paediatrics, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 4APIN Clinic, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria; 5Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 6Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 7Department of Pharmacy, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba Lagos, Nigeria; 8Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria Background: Multi-therapy is common in HIV-infected children, and the risk for clinically significant drug interactions (CSDIs is high. We investigated the prevalence of CSDIs between antiretroviral (ARV and co-prescribed drugs for children attending a large HIV clinic in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods: The case files of pediatric patients receiving treatment at the HIV clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH, Idi-Araba, between January 2005 and December 2010 were reviewed. The ARV and co-prescribed drug pairs were evaluated for potential interactions using the Liverpool HIV Pharmacology Group website. The potential interactions were rated as A (no known interaction, B (minor/no action needed, C (moderate/monitor therapy, D (major/therapy modification, and X (contraindicated/avoid combination. Results: Of the 310 cases reviewed, 208 (67.1% patients were at risk of CSDIs. Artemisinin-based combination therapy was prescribed for over one

  10. Convergence of the many-body expansion of interaction potentials: From van der Waals to covalent and metallic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The many-body expansion of the interaction potential between atoms and molecules is analyzed in detail for different types of interactions involving up to seven atoms. Elementary clusters of Ar, Na, Si, and, in particular, Au are studied, using first-principles wave-function- and density-functional-based methods to obtain the individual n-body contributions to the interaction energies. With increasing atom number the many-body expansion converges rapidly only for long-range weak interactions. Large oscillatory behavior is observed for other types of interactions. This is consistent with the fact that Au clusters up to a certain size prefer planar structures over the more compact three-dimensional Lennard-Jones-type structures. Several Au model potentials and semiempirical PM6 theory are investigated for their ability to reproduce the quantum results. We further investigate small water clusters as prototypes of hydrogen-bonded systems. Here, the many-body expansion converges rapidly, reflecting the localized nature of the hydrogen bond and justifying the use of two-body potentials to describe water-water interactions. The question of whether electron correlation contributions can be successfully modeled by a many-body interaction potential is also addressed

  11. Potential energy curves for the interaction of Ag(5s) and Ag(5p) with noble gas atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Loreau, J; Dalgarno, A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of ground and excited states of a silver atom with noble gases (NG), including helium. Born-Oppenheimer potential energy curves are calculated with quantum chemistry methods and spin-orbit effects in the excited states are included by assuming a spin-orbit splitting independent of the internuclear distance. We compare our results with experimentally available spectroscopic data, as well as with previous calculations. Because of strong spin-orbit interactions, excited Ag-NG potential energy curves cannot be fitted to Morse-like potentials. We find that the labeling of the observed vibrational levels has to be shifted by one unit.

  12. Hydrodynamic interactions of two nearly touching Brownian spheres in a stiff potential: Effect of fluid inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrodynamic interaction of two closely spaced micron-scale spheres undergoing Brownian motion was measured as a function of their separation. Each sphere was attached to the distal end of a different atomic force microscopy cantilever, placing each sphere in a stiff one-dimensional potential (0.08 Nm−1) with a high frequency of thermal oscillations (resonance at 4 kHz). As a result, the sphere’s inertial and restoring forces were significant when compared to the force due to viscous drag. We explored interparticle gap regions where there was overlap between the two Stokes layers surrounding each sphere. Our experimental measurements are the first of their kind in this parameter regime. The high frequency of oscillation of the spheres means that an analysis of the fluid dynamics would include the effects of fluid inertia, as described by the unsteady Stokes equation. However, we find that, for interparticle separations less than twice the thickness of the wake of the unsteady viscous boundary layer (the Stokes layer), the hydrodynamic interaction between the Brownian particles is well-approximated by analytical expressions that neglect the inertia of the fluid. This is because elevated frictional forces at narrow gaps dominate fluid inertial effects. The significance is that interparticle collisions and concentrated suspensions at this condition can be modeled without the need to incorporate fluid inertia. We suggest a way to predict when fluid inertial effects can be ignored by including the gap-width dependence into the frequency number. We also show that low frequency number analysis can be used to determine the microrheology of mixtures at interfaces

  13. Interaction of spirochetes with the host fibrinolytic system and potential roles in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Mônica Larucci; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T O

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenic spirochetes Borrelia burgdorferi, B. hermsii, B. recurrentis, Treponema denticola and Leptospira spp. are the etiologic agents of Lyme disease, relapsing fever, periodontitis and leptospirosis, respectively. Lyme borreliosis is a multi-systemic disorder and the most prevalent tick-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. Tick-borne relapsing fever is persistent in endemic areas worldwide, representing a significant burden in some African regions. Periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory disorder that often leads to tooth loss, is caused by several potential pathogens found in the oral cavity including T. denticola. Leptospirosis is considered the most widespread zoonosis, and the predominant human disease in tropical, undeveloped regions. What these diseases have in common is that they are a significant burden to healthcare costs in the absence of prophylactic measures. This review addresses the interaction of these spirochetes with the fibrinolytic system, plasminogen (Plg) binding to the surface of bacteria and the generation of plasmin (Pla) on their surface. The consequences on host-pathogen interactions when the spirochetes are endowed with this proteolytic activity are discussed on the basis of the results reported in the literature. Spirochetes equipped with Pla activity have been shown to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) components, in addition to digesting fibrin, facilitating bacterial invasion and dissemination. Pla generation triggers the induction of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) in a cascade of events that enhances the proteolytic capacity of the spirochetes. These activities in concert with the interference exerted by the Plg/Pla on the complement system - helping the bacteria to evade the immune system - should illuminate our understanding of the mechanisms involved in host infection. PMID:25914944

  14. Hydrodynamic interactions of two nearly touching Brownian spheres in a stiff potential: Effect of fluid inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiom, Milad, E-mail: milad.radiom@unige.ch; Ducker, William, E-mail: wducker@vt.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States); Robbins, Brian; Paul, Mark [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The hydrodynamic interaction of two closely spaced micron-scale spheres undergoing Brownian motion was measured as a function of their separation. Each sphere was attached to the distal end of a different atomic force microscopy cantilever, placing each sphere in a stiff one-dimensional potential (0.08 Nm{sup −1}) with a high frequency of thermal oscillations (resonance at 4 kHz). As a result, the sphere’s inertial and restoring forces were significant when compared to the force due to viscous drag. We explored interparticle gap regions where there was overlap between the two Stokes layers surrounding each sphere. Our experimental measurements are the first of their kind in this parameter regime. The high frequency of oscillation of the spheres means that an analysis of the fluid dynamics would include the effects of fluid inertia, as described by the unsteady Stokes equation. However, we find that, for interparticle separations less than twice the thickness of the wake of the unsteady viscous boundary layer (the Stokes layer), the hydrodynamic interaction between the Brownian particles is well-approximated by analytical expressions that neglect the inertia of the fluid. This is because elevated frictional forces at narrow gaps dominate fluid inertial effects. The significance is that interparticle collisions and concentrated suspensions at this condition can be modeled without the need to incorporate fluid inertia. We suggest a way to predict when fluid inertial effects can be ignored by including the gap-width dependence into the frequency number. We also show that low frequency number analysis can be used to determine the microrheology of mixtures at interfaces.

  15. Further insights in the ability of classical nonadditive potentials to model actinide ion-water interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réal, Florent; Trumm, Michael; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Masella, Michel; Vallet, Valérie

    2013-04-01

    Pursuing our efforts on the development of accurate classical models to simulate radionuclides in complex environments (Réal et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 2010, 114, 15913; Trumm et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 044509), this article places a large emphasis on the discussion of the influence of models/parameters uncertainties on the computed structural, dynamical, and temporal properties. Two actinide test cases, trivalent curium and tetravalent thorium, have been studied with three different potential energy functions, which allow us to account for the polarization and charge-transfer effects occurring in hydrated actinide ion systems. The first type of models considers only an additive energy term for modeling ion/water charge-transfer effects, whereas the other two treat cooperative charge-transfer interactions with two different analytical expressions. Model parameters are assigned to reproduce high-level ab initio data concerning only hydrated ion species in gas phase. For the two types of cooperative charge-transfer models, we define two sets of parameters allowing or not to cancel out possible errors inherent to the force field used to model water/water interactions at the ion vicinity. We define thus five different models to characterize the solvation of each ion. For both ions, our cooperative charge-transfer models lead to close results in terms of structure in solution: the coordination number is included within 8 and 9, and the mean ion/water oxygen distances are 2.45 and 2.49 Å, respectively, for Th(IV) and Cm(III). PMID:23233426

  16. A potential model investigation of the low-energy antikaon-nucleon interaction and antikaon-nucleus bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parameters of separable coupled channels s-wave potentials for the strong /bar K/N interaction are determined from low energy K-p scattering data with additional constraints from π-p → πΣK0 production data. The shifts and widths of the Coulomb bound states in kaonic hydrogen are calculated with these potentials and compared with experiment. Optical potentials are constructed from /bar K/N t-matrices derived from the separable potentials, and these optical potentials are used to calculate kaonic helium and kaonic carbon shifts and widths which are also compared with experiment. 68 refs., 50 figs., 9 tabs

  17. Potential impact of climate-related changes is buffered by differential responses to recruitment and interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Menge, Bruce A.

    2011-08-01

    Detection of ecosystem responsiveness to climatic perturbations can provide insight into climate change consequences. Recent analyses linking phytoplankton abundance and mussel recruitment to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) revealed a paradox. Despite large increases in mussel recruitment beginning in 2000, adult mussel responses were idiosyncratic by site and intertidal zone, with no response at one long-term site, and increases in the low zone (1.5% per year) and decreases in the mid zone (1.3% per year) at the other. What are the mechanisms underlying these differential changes? Species interactions such as facilitation by barnacles and predation are potential determinants of successful mussel colonization. To evaluate these effects, we analyzed patterns of barnacle recruitment, determined if predation rate covaried with the increase in mussel recruitment, and tested facilitation interactions in a field experiment. Neither magnitude nor season of barnacle recruitment changed meaningfully with site or zone from the 1990s to the 2000s. In contrast to the relationship between NPGO and local-scale mussel recruitment, relationships between local-scale patterns of barnacle recruitment and climate indices were weak. Despite differences in rates of prey recruitment and abundance of sea stars in 1990–1991, 1999–2000, and 2007–2008, predation rates were nearly identical in experiments before, during, and after 1999–2000. The facilitation experiment showed that mussels M. trossulus only became abundant when barnacle recruitment was allowed, when abundance of barnacles reached high abundance of ∼50% cover, and when mussel recruitment was sufficiently high. Thus, in the low zone minimal changes in mussel abundance despite sharply increased recruitment rates are consistent with the hypothesis that change in adult mussel cover was buffered by the relative insensitivity of barnacle recruitment to climatic fluctuations, and a resultant lack of change in

  18. Interspecies interactions and potential Influenza A virus risk in small swine farms in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCune Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent avian influenza epidemic in Asia and the H1N1 pandemic demonstrated that influenza A viruses pose a threat to global public health. The animal origins of the viruses confirmed the potential for interspecies transmission. Swine are hypothesized to be prime "mixing vessels" due to the dual receptivity of their trachea to human and avian strains. Additionally, avian and human influenza viruses have previously been isolated in swine. Therefore, understanding interspecies contact on smallholder swine farms and its potential role in the transmission of pathogens such as influenza virus is very important. Methods This qualitative study aimed to determine swine-associated interspecies contacts in two coastal areas of Peru. Direct observations were conducted at both small-scale confined and low-investment swine farms (n = 36 and in open areas where swine freely range during the day (n = 4. Interviews were also conducted with key stakeholders in swine farming. Results In both locations, the intermingling of swine and domestic birds was common. An unexpected contact with avian species was that swine were fed poultry mortality in 6/20 of the farms in Chancay. Human-swine contacts were common, with a higher frequency on the confined farms. Mixed farming of swine with chickens or ducks was observed in 36% of all farms. Human-avian interactions were less frequent overall. Use of adequate biosecurity and hygiene practices by farmers was suboptimal at both locations. Conclusions Close human-animal interaction, frequent interspecies contacts and suboptimal biosecurity and hygiene practices pose significant risks of interspecies influenza virus transmission. Farmers in small-scale swine production systems constitute a high-risk population and need to be recognized as key in preventing interspecies pathogen transfer. A two-pronged prevention approach, which offers educational activities for swine farmers about sound hygiene and

  19. Interplay between interaction and nonidentical coupling for a Bose–Einstein Condensate in a triple-well potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The interplay between interaction and nonidentical coupling gives rive to a “two negatives make a positive” effect. • In the weak interaction regime, the beating phenomenon is found. • In the strong interaction region, the collapse and revival sequences can appear instead of the beating sequences. - Abstract: We investigate the effect of interaction and nonidentical coupling on the tunneling dynamics of a Bose–Einstein Condensate trapped in a triple-well potential. In certain parameter regions, we find a “two negatives make a positive” effect. While interaction or nonidentical coupling by itself can suppress the tunneling between the wells, both together enhance the tunneling. In addition, it is shown that under appropriate conditions, the mean-field dynamics displays beating phenomenon in the weak interaction regime. We present a physical explanation for such beating phenomenon. The effect of quantum fluctuation on the beating structure is also discussed numerically

  20. Interplay between interaction and nonidentical coupling for a Bose–Einstein Condensate in a triple-well potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Shiguang, E-mail: rong_shiguang@sina.com [Department of Physics, Hunan University of Science & Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Xie, Qiongtao [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158 (China); Hai, Wenhua [Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2015-09-18

    Highlights: • The interplay between interaction and nonidentical coupling gives rive to a “two negatives make a positive” effect. • In the weak interaction regime, the beating phenomenon is found. • In the strong interaction region, the collapse and revival sequences can appear instead of the beating sequences. - Abstract: We investigate the effect of interaction and nonidentical coupling on the tunneling dynamics of a Bose–Einstein Condensate trapped in a triple-well potential. In certain parameter regions, we find a “two negatives make a positive” effect. While interaction or nonidentical coupling by itself can suppress the tunneling between the wells, both together enhance the tunneling. In addition, it is shown that under appropriate conditions, the mean-field dynamics displays beating phenomenon in the weak interaction regime. We present a physical explanation for such beating phenomenon. The effect of quantum fluctuation on the beating structure is also discussed numerically.

  1. Water structure near single and multi-layer nanoscopic hydrophobic plates of varying separation and interaction potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malay Rana; Amalendu Chandra

    2008-06-01

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of water containing two nanoscopic hydrophobic plates to investigate the modifications of the density and hydrogen bond distributions of water in the vicinity of the surfaces. Our primary goal is to look at the effects of plate thickness, solute–solvent interaction and also interplate separation on the solvent structure in the confined region between two graphite-like plates and also near the outer surfaces of the plates. The thickness of the plates is varied by considering single and triple-layer graphite plates and the interaction potential is varied by tuning the attractive strength of the 12–6 pair interaction potential between a carbon atom of the graphite plates and a water molecule. The calculations are done for four different values of the tuning parameter ranging from fully Lennard–Jones to pure repulsive pair interactions. It is found that both the solvation characteristics and hydrogen bond distributions can depend rather strongly on the strength of the attractive part of the solute–water interaction potential. The thickness of the plates, however, is found to have only minor effects on the density profiles and hydrogen bond network. This indicates that the long range electrostatic interactions between water molecules on the two opposite sides of the same plate do not make any significant contribution to the overall solvation structure of these hydrophobic plates. The solvation characteristics are primarily determined by the balance between the loss of energy due to hydrogen bond network disruption, cavity repulsion potential and offset of the same by attractive component of the solute–water interactions. Our studies with different system sizes show that the essential features of solvation properties, e.g. wetting and dewetting characteristics for different interplate separations and interaction potentials, are also present in relatively smaller systems consisting of a few hundred

  2. Questions of the optical potential for alpha-particles at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the high-priority elements for the accelerator driven systems (ADS) and fusion-reactor projects are also Zr, Mo and Li, so that the corresponding nuclear data for nucleon-, deuteron-, and α-particle interactions are of actual interest for neutron production, activation, heating, shielding requirements, and material damage estimation as well as radioactive waste transmutation projects. By using advanced nuclear models that account for details of nuclear structure and the quantum nature of the nuclear scattering, significant gains in accuracy can be achieved below 150 MeV, where intranuclear cascade calculations become less accurate. It is why this work reports on the progress of the analysis of optical potentials for nucleons, deuterons and α-particles on isotopes of these elements, and corresponding reaction cross sections calculations. The elastic-scattering angular distributions measured at deuteron energies between 3 and 50 MeV on the target nucleus 6Li, and between 1 and 14.7 MeV for the target nucleus 7Li have been thus analyzed by using the computer codes SCAT2 for pure elastic scattering processes and FRESCO for the coupled reaction channels for taking into account the effects of the elastic and inelastic alpha transfer in the d+6Li interaction. The good overall agreement obtained with the experimental data for both 6,7Li target nuclei from 1 to 50 MeV has finally proved suitable optical model potentials (OMPs). Within the double folding formalism of the alpha-nucleus optical potential, used previously for a semi-microscopic analysis of the alpha-particle elastic scattering on A∼100 nuclei at energies below 32 MeV, effects due to changes of the nuclear density at a finite temperature are considered. Parameterizations of the double-folding (DF) real potential as well as of a regional phenomenological potential have been used in the study of the (n,α) reaction cross sections for the target nuclei 92,95,98,100Mo. Taking the microscopic DF potentials

  3. Vortices in a rotating two-component Bose–Einstein condensate with tunable interactions and harmonic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei, E-mail: xfzhang@ntsc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China); Du, Zhi-Jing [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China); Tan, Ren-Bing [Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331 (China); Dong, Rui-Fang; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China)

    2014-07-15

    We consider a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations modeling a rotating two-component Bose–Einstein condensate with tunable interactions and harmonic potential, with emphasis on the structure of vortex states by varying the strength of inter-component interaction, rotational frequency, and the aspect ratio of the harmonic potential. Our results show that the inter-component interaction greatly enhances the effect of rotation. For the case of isotropic harmonic potential and small inter-component interaction, the initial vortex structure remains unchanged. As the ratio of inter- to intra-component interactions increases, each component undergoes a transition from a vortex lattice (vortex line) in an isotropic (anisotropic) harmonic potential to an alternatively arranged stripe pattern, and eventually to the interwoven “serpentine” vortex sheets. Moreover, in the case of anisotropic harmonic potential the system can develop to a rotating droplet structure. -- Highlights: •Different vortex structures are obtained within the full parameter space. •Effects of system parameters on the ground state structure are discussed. •Phase transition between different vortex structures is also examined. •Present one possible way to obtain the rotating droplet structure. •Provide many possibilities to manipulate vortex in two-component BEC.

  4. In vitro interactions of extracellular histones with LDL suggest a potential pro-atherogenic role.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan D Pemberton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear histones have previously been shown to aggregate LDL in vitro, suggestive of a possible pro-atherogenic role. Recent studies indicate that histones are released during acute inflammation, and therefore might interact with circulating lipoproteins in vivo. In view of the associative link between inflammation and cardiovascular disease, the behaviour of histones was investigated using in vitro models of LDL retention and foam cell formation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Heparin agarose beads were used as a model of a matrix rich in sulphated glycosaminoglycans, to which histones bind strongly. Histone-modified beads were observed to pull down more LDL from solution than untreated beads, indicating that histones can function as bridging molecules, enhancing LDL retention. Furthermore, addition of heparin inhibited histone-induced aggregation of LDL. To model foam cell formation, murine RAW 264.7 macrophages were incubated for 24 h in the presence of LDL, histones, LDL plus histones or vehicle control. Cells incubated with LDL in the presence of histones accumulated significantly more intracellular lipid than with LDL or histone alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are consistent with a potential pro-atherogenic role for extracellular histones, which should be investigated further.

  5. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  6. Interaction of the 106-126 prion peptide with lipid membranes and potential implication for neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation in the brain of an abnormally misfolded, protease-resistant, and β-sheet rich pathogenic isoform (PrPsc) of the cellular prion protein (PrPc). In the present work, we were interested to study the mode of prion protein interaction with the membrane using the 106-126 peptide and small unilamellar lipid vesicles as model. As previously demonstrated, we showed by MTS assay that PrP 106-126 induces alterations in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We demonstrated for the first time by lipid-mixing assay and by the liposome vesicle leakage test that PrP 106-126, a non-tilted peptide, induces liposome fusion thus a potential cell membrane destabilization, as supported by membrane integrity assay (LDH). By circular dichroism (CD) analysis we showed that the fusogenic property of PrP 106-126 in the presence of liposome is associated with a predominantly β-sheet structure. These data suggest that the fusogenic property associated with a predominant β-sheet structure exhibited by the prion peptides contributes to the neurotoxicity of these peptides by destabilizing cellular membranes. The latter might be attached at the membrane surface in a parallel orientation as shown by molecular modeling

  7. Interaction of Musicianship and Aging: A Comparison of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. O’Brien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The goal of this study was to begin to explore whether the beneficial auditory neural effects of early music training persist throughout life and influence age-related changes in neurophysiological processing of sound. Design. Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs elicited by harmonic tone complexes were examined, including P1-N1-P2, mismatch negativity (MMN, and P3a. Study Sample. Data from older adult musicians (n=8 and nonmusicians (n=8 (ages 55–70 years were compared to previous data from young adult musicians (n=40 and nonmusicians (n=20 (ages 18–33 years. Results. P1-N1-P2 amplitudes and latencies did not differ between older adult musicians and nonmusicians; however, MMN and P3a latencies for harmonic tone deviances were earlier for older musicians than older nonmusicians. Comparisons of P1-N1-P2, MMN, and P3a components between older and young adult musicians and nonmusicians suggest that P1 and P2 latencies are significantly affected by age, but not musicianship, while MMN and P3a appear to be more sensitive to effects of musicianship than aging. Conclusions. Findings support beneficial influences of musicianship on central auditory function and suggest a positive interaction between aging and musicianship on the auditory neural system.

  8. Wigner quantum systems. Two particles interacting via a harmonic potential-1: two-dimensional space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-canonical quantum system, consisting of two non-relativistic particles, interacting via a harmonic potential, is considered. The centre-of-mass position and momentum operators obey the canonical commutation relations, whereas the internal variables are assumed to be the odd generators of the Lie superalgebra sl(1,2). This assumption implies a set of constraints in the phase space, which are explicitly written in the paper. All finite dimensional irreducible representations of sl(1,2) are considered. Particular attention is paid to the physical representations, i.e. the representations, corresponding to Hermitian position and momentum operators. The properties of the physical observables are investigated. In particular, the operators of the internal Hamiltonian, the relative distance, the internal momentum and the orbital momentum commute with each other. The spectrum of these operators is finite. The distance between the constituents is preserved in time. It can take no more than three different values. For any non-negative integer or half-integer l there exists a representation, where the orbital momentum is l (in unit 2 slash-h). The position of any one of the particles cannot be localized, since the operators of the coordinates do not commute with each other. The constituents are smeared with a certain probability within a finite surface, which moves with a constant velocity together with the centre of mass. (author)

  9. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  10. Formalizing the potential of stereoscopic 3D user experience in interactive entertainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Jonas; Masuch, Maic

    2015-03-01

    The use of stereoscopic 3D vision affects how interactive entertainment has to be developed as well as how it is experienced by the audience. The large amount of possibly impacting factors and variety as well as a certain subtlety of measured effects on user experience make it difficult to grasp the overall potential of using S3D vision. In a comprehensive approach, we (a) present a development framework which summarizes possible variables in display technology, content creation and human factors, and (b) list a scheme of S3D user experience effects concerning initial fascination, emotions, performance, and behavior as well as negative feelings of discomfort and complexity. As a major contribution we propose a qualitative formalization which derives dependencies between development factors and user effects. The argumentation is based on several previously published user studies. We further show how to apply this formula to identify possible opportunities and threats in content creation as well as how to pursue future steps for a possible quantification.

  11. Spatial Interaction Modeling to Identify Potentially Exposed Populations during RDD or IND Terrorism Incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive no.5 (HSPD-5) Management of Domestic Incidents and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Incidents underscore the need to delineate radiological emergency guidance applicable to remedial action and recovery following an RDD or IND incident. Rapid delineation of the population potentially exposed to ionizing radiation from fallout during terrorist incidents involving RDDs or low-yield nuclear devices (≤ 20 KT) is necessary for effective medical response and incident management as part of the recovery process. This paper illustrates the application of spatial interaction models to allocate population data for a representative U.S. urban area (≅1.3M people; 1,612.27 km2 area) at a geographical scale relevant for accurately estimating risk given dose concentrations. Estimated total dose equivalents (TEDE) are calculated for isopleths moving away from the detonation point for typical release scenarios. Population is estimated within the TEDE zones using Euclidean distances between zip code polygon centroids generated in ArcGIS version 9.1 with distance decay determined by regression analysis to apportion origin-destination pairs to a population count and density matrix on a spatial basis for daytime and night-time release scenarios. (authors)

  12. Interactions of biotic and abiotic environmental factors in an ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, and the potential for selection mosaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeksema Jason D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic selection mosaics, in which species exert different evolutionary impacts on each other in different environments, may drive diversification in coevolving species. We studied the potential for geographic selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions by testing whether the interaction between bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don and one of its common ectomycorrhizal fungi (Rhizopogon occidentalis Zeller and Dodge varies in outcome, when different combinations of plant and fungal genotypes are tested under a range of different abiotic and biotic conditions. Results We used a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment to test the main and interactive effects of plant lineage (two maternal seed families, fungal lineage (two spore collections, soil type (lab mix or field soil, and non-mycorrhizal microbes (with or without on the performance of plants and fungi. Ecological outcomes, as assessed by plant and fungal performance, varied widely across experimental environments, including interactions between plant or fungal lineages and soil environmental factors. Conclusion These results show the potential for selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions, and indicate that these interactions are likely to coevolve in different ways in different environments, even when initially the genotypes of the interacting species are the same across all environments. Hence, selection mosaics may be equally as effective as genetic differences among populations in driving divergent coevolution among populations of interacting species.

  13. Effective potentials for charge-helium and charge-singly-ionized helium interactions in a dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T.S.; Amirov, S.M.; Moldabekov, Zh.A. [Institute for Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-06-15

    The effective electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials arising as a result of partial screening of the helium nucleus field by bound electrons, taking into account both screening by free charged particles and quantum diffraction effect in dense plasmas were derived. The impact of quantum effects on screening was analyzed. It was shown that plasma polarization around the atom leads to the additional repulsion (attraction) between the electron (proton) and the helium atom. The method of constructing the full electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials as the sum of the derived potentials with the polarization potential and exchange potential is discussed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. The potential use of SUISEKI as a protein interaction discovery tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, C; Valencia, A

    2001-01-01

    Relevant information about protein interactions is stored in textual sources. This sources are commonly used not only as archives of what is already known but also as information for generating new knowledge, particularly to pose hypothesis about new possible interactions that can be inferred from the existing ones. This task is the more creative part of scientific work in experimental systems. We present a large-scale analysis for the prediction of new interactions based on the interaction network for the ones already known and detected automatically in the literature. During the last few years it has became clear that part of the information about protein interactions could be extracted with automatic tools, even if these tools are still far from perfect and key problems such as detection of protein names are not completely solved. We have developed a integrated automatic approach, called SUISEKI (System for Information Extraction on Interactions), able to extract protein interactions from collections of Medline abstracts. Previous experiments with the system have shown that it is able to extract almost 70% of the interactions present in relatively large text corpus, with an accuracy of approximately 80% (for the best defined interactions) that makes the system usable in real scenarios, both at the level of extraction of protein names and at the level of extracting interaction between them. With the analysis of the interaction map of Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that interactions published in the years 2000/2001 frequently correspond to proteins or genes that were already very close in the interaction network deduced from the literature published before these years and that they are often connected to the same proteins. That is, discoveries are commonly done among highly connected entities. Some biologically relevant examples illustrate how interactions described in the year 2000 could have been proposed as reasonable working hypothesis with the information

  15. Argon Interaction with Gold Surfaces: Ab Initio-Assisted Determination of Pair Ar-Au Potentials for Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Romain; To, Quy-Dong; de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Léonard, Céline

    2015-07-01

    Global potentials for the interaction between the Ar atom and gold surfaces are investigated and Ar-Au pair potentials suitable for molecular dynamics simulations are derived. Using a periodic plane-wave representation of the electronic wave function, the nonlocal van-der-Waals vdW-DF2 and vdW-OptB86 approaches have been proved to describe better the interaction. These global interaction potentials have been decomposed to produce pair potentials. Then, the pair potentials have been compared with those derived by combining the dispersionless density functional dlDF for the repulsive part with an effective pairwise dispersion interaction. These repulsive potentials have been obtained from the decomposition of the repulsive interaction between the Ar atom and the Au2 and Au4 clusters and the dispersion coefficients have been evaluated by means of ab initio calculations on the Ar+Au2 complex using symmetry adapted perturbation theory. The pair potentials agree very well with those evaluated through periodic vdW-DF2 calculations. For benchmarking purposes, CCSD(T) calculations have also been performed for the ArAu and Ar+Au2 systems using large basis sets and extrapolations to the complete basis set limit. This work highlights that ab initio calculations using very small surface clusters can be used either as an independent cross-check to compare the performance of state-of-the-art vdW-corrected periodic DFT approaches or, directly, to calculate the pair potentials necessary in further molecular dynamics calculations. PMID:26046588

  16. Deuteron - $\\alpha$ interaction by inversion of RGM S-matrix determination of spin-orbit potential for spin-1 projectile

    CERN Document Server

    MacIntosh, R S

    1997-01-01

    The iterative-perturbative (IP) procedure for S-matrix to potential inversion is applied to spin-one projectiles for the restricted case of vector spin-orbit interaction only. In order to evaluate this extension of IP inversion we have inverted the multi-channel RGM $S_{lj}$ of Kanada et al for deuterons scattering from $^4$He with deuteron distortion and then compared the central components with those derived from RGM with spin set to zero. Attention is given to the question of how well the resulting potentials are established. Reliable spin-1 inversion is demonstrated. Results relating to inversion, to deuteron-nucleus interactions and to RGM are presented and suggest the range of nuclear interaction information which the procedure makes possible. Unusual non-locality and parity dependence effects are found; these are of possible relevance to generic properties of nuclear potentials.

  17. Approximate bound-state solutions of the dirac equation for the generalized Yukawa potential plus the generalized tensor interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we obtain the approximate analytical bound-state solutions of the Dirac particle with the generalized Yukawa potential within the framework of spin and pseudospin symmetries for the arbitrary κ state with a generalized tensor interaction. The generalized parametric Nikiforov-Uvarov method is used to obtain the energy eigenvalues and the corresponding wave functions in closed form. We also report some numerical results and present figures to show the effect of the tensor interaction.

  18. On the velocity and chemical-potential dependence of the heavy-quark interaction in N=4 SYM plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Avramis, S D; Zoakos, D; Avramis, Spyros D.; Sfetsos, Konstadinos; Zoakos, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    We consider the interaction of a heavy quark-antiquark pair moving in N=4 SYM plasma in the presence of non-vanishing chemical potentials. Of particular importance is the maximal length beyond which the interaction is practically turned off. We propose a simple phenomenological law that takes into account the velocity dependence of this screening length beyond the leading order and in addition its dependence on the R-charge. Our proposal is based on studies using rotating D3-branes.

  19. Potential role of lncRNA cyp2c91-protein interactions on diseases of the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Suravajhala, Prashanth; Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2015-01-01

    With unprecedented increase in next generation sequencing technologies, there has been a persistent interest on transcript profiles of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and protein-coding genes forming an interaction network. Apart from protein–protein interaction (PPI), gene network models such as Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) are used to functionally annotate lncRNAs in identifying their potential disease associations. To address this, studies have led to characterizing ...

  20. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  1. Analysis of eigenvalues for the energy dependent potentials and NN interaction in the quark compound bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trajectories of eigenvalues of the energy dependent potentials are discussed for the case of NN interaction in the quark compound bag (QCB) model. It is shown that the asymptotic behaviour of eigenvalues for the linearly energy dependent potentials is defined by the coefficient at the linear energy term in the potential. In the QCB model this coefficient depends on the nucleon component admixture in the bag wave function. The results of eigenvalue analysis are illUstrated with the simple example of the QCB potential describing phase shifts up to T<=0.8 GeV

  2. Abnormally large neutron polarizability or long-range strong-interaction potential at fast neutron scattering by heavy nuclei?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the discrepancy between the results obtained for different neutron energy ranges, when neutron polarizability is derived from the neutron scattering data, can be removed if one assumes that at the fast neutron scattering a strong-interaction long-range potential of Van der Waals (∝r-6) or Casimir-Polder (∝r-7) is observed. This strong-interaction long-range potential has possibly some experimental confirmation in the elastic p-p scattering. (orig.)

  3. Potential interaction between zinc ions and a cyclodextrin-based diclofenac formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Imad I; El-Sabawi, Dina; Abdel Jalil, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Complexes of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with hydroxypropyl betacyclodextrin (HPβCD) were prepared by co-evaporation in a 1:1 ratio and characterized in light of previously reported data. Phase solubility diagrams were obtained for DF-Na with HPβCD in the presence and absence of zinc ions. Dissolution profiles were obtained for DF-Na and its HPβCD complex at acidic (pH 1.2) as well as in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8), in the presence and absence of zinc. HPβCD, as expected, was shown to improve the dissolution of DF-Na in acidic medium but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). The presence of zinc ions decreased the in vitro dissolution of DF-HPβCD complex in acidic medium (pH 1.2) but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). It was confirmed that the precipitate that was formed by zinc ions in the presence of HPβCD and DF-Na contained no cyclodextrin and most likely it was a mixture of the complexes: DF2-Zn and DF-Zn with some molecules of water. In vivo experiments on rats have shown that HPβCD has no statistically significant effect on absorption or bioavailability of DF-Na in spite of the observed improvement of its in vitro dissolution by HPβCD. Moreover, zinc ions were shown to decrease the absorption rate of DF-Na in rats model but did neither significantly alter the absorption nor bioavailability of DF-HPβCD complex. The zinc induced precipitates of DF were shown to have significantly different crystalline properties when HPβCD was present. Therefore, the pharmaceutical details of a DF-Na preparation should be considered when designing the formulation and predicting possible interaction between DF-Na (or other potential NSAIDs) and zinc metal.

  4. Collisional interactions between self-interacting non-relativistic boson stars: effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, but may be approximated in the non-relativistic regime with a coupled Schr\\"odinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  5. A molecular H2 potential for heterogeneous simulations including polarization and many-body van der Waals interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Keith; Cioce, Christian R; Belof, Jonathan L; Space, Brian; Space, Brian B

    2012-05-21

    A highly accurate aniostropic intermolecular potential for diatomic hydrogen has been developed that is transferable for molecular modeling in heterogeneous systems. The potential surface is designed to be efficacious in modeling mixed sorbates in metal-organic materials that include sorption interactions with charged interfaces and open metal sites. The potential parameters are compatible for mixed simulations but still maintain high accuracy while deriving dispersion parameters from a proven polarizability model. The potential includes essential physical interactions including: short-range repulsions, dispersion, and permanent and induced electrostatics. Many-body polarization is introduced via a point-atomic polarizability model that is also extended to account for many-body van der Waals interactions in a consistent fashion. Permanent electrostatics are incorporated using point partial charges on atomic sites. However, contrary to expectation, the best potentials are obtained by permitting the charges to take on values that do not reproduce the first non-vanishing moment of the electrostatic potential surface, i.e., the quadrupole moment. Potential parameters are fit to match ab initio energies for a representative range of dimer geometries. The resulting potential is shown to be highly effective by comparing to electronic structure calculations for a thermal distribution of trimer geometries, and by reproducing experimental bulk pressure-density isotherms. The surface is shown to be superior to other similarly portable potential choices even in tests on homogeneous systems without strong polarizing fields. The present streamlined approach to developing such potentials allows for a simple adaptation to other molecules amenable to investigation by high-level electronic structure methods. PMID:22612090

  6. [Evaluation of potential drug interactions in primary health care prescriptions in Vitória da Conquista, Bahia (Brazil)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Danyllo Fábio Lessa; de Moura, Cristiano Soares; de Medeiros, Danielle Souto

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions are risk factors for the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The risk for drug interactions includes factors related to prescription that are intrinsic to the patient. This study sought to evaluate the potential drug interactions in primary care prescriptions in Vitória da Conquista in the state of Bahia to fill the knowledge gap on this topic in Brazil. Information about several variables derived from the primary health care prescriptions was collected and drug interactions were evaluated based on information from Medscape and Micromedex(R) databases. Polypharmacy frequency and its association with the occurrence of drug interactions were also evaluated. Results revealed a 48,9% frequency of drug interactions, 74,9% of moderate or greater severity, 8,6% of prescriptions in polypharmacy that in the chi-square test showed a positive association with the occurrence of drug interactions (p Conquista in the state of Bahia showed a high frequency of drug interactions, however it is necessary to analyze other risk factors for their occurrence at this level of health care.

  7. The potential interaction between oral anticoagulants and acetaminophen in everyday practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Geven, LM; Kuitert, NA; Risselada, A; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The drug-drug interaction between oral anticoagulants (especially warfarin) and acetaminophen has been described, but evidence is conflicting and evidence for a similar interaction between acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon and acetaminophen is limited. Therefore, a study was performed to det

  8. Interactions among Future Study Abroad Students: Exploring Potential Intercultural Learning Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, C.; Beaven, A.; Pugliese, R.

    2015-01-01

    The study presented in this article aims to explore if and how intercultural learning may take place in students' class interaction. It is grounded in the assumption that interculturality is not a clear-cut feature inherent to interactions occurring when individuals with presumed different linguistic and cultural/national backgrounds talk to…

  9. A study of potential drug-drug interactions among critically ill patients at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeeta Gupta

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: The present study showed high concomitant administration of potentially interacting drugs. The prevalence confirmed the association of age and polypharmacy. Vigilant prescribing approach is needed to prevent hazardous outcomes of pDDI. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(4.000: 1281-1285

  10. On local smooth solutions for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions ±r−2

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Zhidkov

    2004-01-01

    For the initial value problem for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions ±r−2, we prove the existence and uniqueness of a local solution with values in the Schwartz space S of infinitely differentiable functions rapidly decaying at infinity.

  11. In-vitro evaluation of the P-glycoprotein interactions of a series of potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, André Huss; Rønsted, Nina; Jäger, Anna Katharina;

    2012-01-01

    Drug compounds interacting with the blood-brain barrier efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) might have limited access to brain tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether nine potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids of the crinine, lycorine and galanthamine types...

  12. Two trapped particles interacting by a finite-range two-body potential in two spatial dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganov, Rostislav A.; Klaiman, Shachar; Alon, Ofir E.; Streltsov, Alexej I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2013-03-01

    We examine the problem of two particles confined in an isotropic harmonic trap, which interact via a finite-range Gaussian-shaped potential in two spatial dimensions. We derive an approximative transcendental equation for the energy and study the resulting spectrum as a function of the interparticle interaction strength. Both the attractive and repulsive systems are analyzed. We study the impact of the potential's range on the ground-state energy. We also explicitly verify by a variational treatment that in the zero-range limit the positive δ potential in two dimensions only reproduces the noninteracting results, if the Hilbert space in not truncated, and demonstrate that an extremely large Hilbert space is required to approach the ground state when one is to tackle the limit of zero-range interaction numerically. Finally, we establish and discuss the connection between our finite-range treatment and regularized zero-range results from the literature. The present results indicate that a finite-range interparticle potential is numerically amenable for treating the statics and the nonequilibrium dynamics of interacting many-particle systems (bosons) in two dimensions.

  13. The APP-Interacting Protein FE65 is Required for Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Long-Term Potentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Moon, Changjong; Hu, Qubai; Wang, Baiping; Martin, George; Sun, Zhongsheng; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    FE65 is expressed predominantly in the brain and interacts with the C-terminal domain of [beta]-amyloid precursor protein (APP). We examined hippocampus-dependent memory and in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) at the CA1 synapses with isoform-specific FE65 knockout (p97FE65[superscript -/-]) mice. When examined using the Morris water maze,…

  14. The influence of prejudice and stereotypes on anticipated affect : feelings about a potentially negative interaction with another ethnic group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Ernestine; Finchilescu, Gillian; Brix, Louise; Wijnants, Nienke; Koomen, Willem

    2008-01-01

    In this research we investigated whether feelings about an imagined potentially negative interaction with a member of another ethnic group was affected more by valence than content of stereotypes, and whether the differential influence of perception and meta-perception was similar for dominant and d

  15. Sources, potentials and fields in Lorenz and Coulomb gauge: Cancellation of instantaneous interactions for moving point charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the coupling of the electromagnetic sources (charge and current densities) to the scalar and vector potentials in classical electrodynamics, using Green function techniques. As is well known, the scalar potential shows an action-at-a-distance behavior in Coulomb gauge. The conundrum generated by the instantaneous interaction has intrigued physicists for a long time. Starting from the differential equations that couple the sources to the potentials, we here show in a concise derivation, using the retarded Green function, how the instantaneous interaction cancels in the calculation of the electric field. The time derivative of a specific additional term in the vector potential, present only in Coulomb gauge, yields a supplementary contribution to the electric field which cancels the gradient of the instantaneous Coulomb gauge scalar potential, as required by gauge invariance. This completely eliminates the contribution of the instantaneous interaction from the electric field. It turns out that a careful formulation of the retarded Green function, inspired by field theory, is required in order to correctly treat boundary terms in partial integrations. Finally, compact integral representations are derived for the Liénard–Wiechert potentials (scalar and vector) in Coulomb gauge which manifestly contain two compensating action-at-a-distance terms. - Highlights: ► We investigate action-at-a-distance effects in electrodynamics in detail. ► We calculate the instantaneous interactions for scalar and vector potentials. ► The cancellation mechanism involves the retarded Green function. ► The mechanism is confirmed on the example of moving point charges. ► The Green function has to be treated with care for nontrivial boundary terms.

  16. Comparative aspects of spin-dependent interaction potentials for spin-1/2 and spin-1 matter fields

    CERN Document Server

    Malta, P C; Veiga, K; Helayël-Neto, J A

    2015-01-01

    This paper sets out to establish a comparative study between classes of spin- and velocity-dependent current-current interaction potentials for spin-1/2 and spin-1 matter sources in the non-relativistic regime. Both (neutral massive) scalar and vector particles are considered to mediate the interactions between scalar, pseudo-scalar, vector and pseudo-vector matter currents. We contemplate specific cases in which our results may describe the electromagnetic interaction with a massive (Proca-type) photon exchanged between two spin-1/2 or two spin-1 carriers. We highlight the similarities and peculiarities of the potentials for the two different types of charged matter and also focus our attention to the comparison between two different field representations for spin-1 matter particles. We believe that our results may contribute to a further discussion of the relation between charge, spin and extensibility.

  17. Chromosome conformation capture uncovers potential genome-wide interactions between human conserved non-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Robyr

    Full Text Available Comparative analyses of various mammalian genomes have identified numerous conserved non-coding (CNC DNA elements that display striking conservation among species, suggesting that they have maintained specific functions throughout evolution. CNC function remains poorly understood, although recent studies have identified a role in gene regulation. We hypothesized that the identification of genomic loci that interact physically with CNCs would provide information on their functions. We have used circular chromosome conformation capture (4C to characterize interactions of 10 CNCs from human chromosome 21 in K562 cells. The data provide evidence that CNCs are capable of interacting with loci that are enriched for CNCs. The number of trans interactions varies among CNCs; some show interactions with many loci, while others interact with few. Some of the tested CNCs are capable of driving the expression of a reporter gene in the mouse embryo, and associate with the oligodendrocyte genes OLIG1 and OLIG2. Our results underscore the power of chromosome conformation capture for the identification of targets of functional DNA elements and raise the possibility that CNCs exert their functions by physical association with defined genomic regions enriched in CNCs. These CNC-CNC interactions may in part explain their stringent conservation as a group of regulatory sequences.

  18. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boucher Charles AB

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally and dynamically, we have constructed an HIV-1 human protein interaction network. This network was analyzed for important proteins and processes that are specific for the HIV life-cycle. In order to expose viral strategies, network motif analysis was carried out showing reoccurring patterns in virus-host dynamics. Results Our analyses show that human proteins interacting with HIV form a densely connected and central sub-network within the total human protein interaction network. The evaluation of this sub-network for connectivity and centrality resulted in a set of proteins essential for the HIV life-cycle. Remarkably, we were able to associate proteins involved in RNA polymerase II transcription with hubs and proteasome formation with bottlenecks. Inferred network motifs show significant over-representation of positive and negative feedback patterns between virus and host. Strikingly, such patterns have never been reported in combined virus-host systems. Conclusions HIV infection results in a reprioritization of cellular processes reflected by an increase in the relative importance of transcriptional machinery and proteasome formation. We conclude that during the evolution of HIV, some patterns of interaction have been selected for resulting in a system where virus proteins preferably interact with central human proteins for direct control and with proteasomal proteins for indirect control over the cellular processes. Finally, the patterns described by network motifs illustrate how virus and host interact with one another.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of crystalline UF6 using the pair interaction potentials of the uranium and fluorine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekunov, G. S.; Nekrasov, K. A.; Boyarchenkov, A. S.; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya.

    2016-09-01

    A model of uranium hexafluoride is suggested that is based on the empirical pair potentials of U-U, F-F, U-F used for both intra- and intermolecular interactions. The potentials for this model are obtained from the lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficient of UF6 crystal using the molecular dynamics simulation under the periodic boundary conditions with constant volume and temperature. Within the framework of the model, the thermal expansion and sublimation of crystalline UF6 are investigated. A set of potential parameters is identified that provides satisfactory simulation of both UF6 crystal and the dependence of the UF6 saturated vapor pressure on temperature.

  20. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of Cell Biology Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan eFarhadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  1. Chemisorption interaction between solvents and the gallium subgroup metals: a relationship with the ionization potential of the solvent molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data characterizing chemisorption metal-solvent interaction on Ga-, (In-Ga)-, (Tl-Ga) - and Hg - electrodes in various solvents have been considered from the viewpoint of quantum-chemical notions of chemical bond formation. It is shown that there is a correlation between parameters characterizing chemisorption metal-solvent interaction on the electrodes and the change in the value of the first adiabatic ionization potential of the solvent molecule, as well as the change in electron energy on the metal Fermi level

  2. Potential drug-drug interactions in a Brazilian teaching hospital: age-related differences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Oliveira Melo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes to measure frequency and to characterize the profile of potential drug interactions (pDDI in a general medicine ward of a teaching hospital. Data about identification and clinical status of patients were extracted from medical records between March to August 2006. The occurrence of pDDI was analyzed using the database monographs Micromedex® DrugReax® System. From 5,336 prescriptions with two or more drugs, 3,097 (58.0% contained pDDI. The frequency of major and well document pDDI was 26.5%. Among 647 patients, 432 (66.8% were exposed to at least one pDDI and 283 (43.7% to major pDDI. The multivariate analysis identified that factors related to higher rates of major pDDI were the same age (p< 0.0001, length of stay (p< 0.0001, prevalence of hypertension [OR=3.42 (p< 0.0001] and diabetes mellitus [OR=2.1 (p< 0.0001], cardiovascular diseases (p< 0.0001 and the number of prescribed drugs (Spearman’s correlation=0.640622, p< 0.0001. Between major pDDI, the main risk was hemorrhage (50.3%, the most frequent major pDDI involved combination of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Among moderate pDDI, 3,866 (90.8% involved medicines for the treatment of chronic non-communicable diseases, mainly hypertension. In HU-USP, the profile of pDDI was similar among adults and elderly (the most frequent pDDI and major pDDI were same, the difference was only the frequency in either group. The efforts of the clinical pharmacists should be directed to elderly patients with cardiovascular compromise, mainly in use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Furthermore, hospital managers should increase the integration between levels of health care to promote safety patient after discharge.Keywords: Drug interactions. Aged. Internal Medicine. Hospitals, University. RESUMOInterações medicamentosas potenciais em um hospital escolar brasileiro: diferenças relacionadas à idade?O estudo tem por objetivo descrever o perfil de intera

  3. Analytic ab initio-based molecular interaction potential for the BrOṡH2O complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Ross D.; Yeole, Sachin D.; Kais, Sabre; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2016-05-01

    Radical halogen oxide species play important roles within atmospheric processes, specifically those responsible for the removal of O3. To facilitate future investigations on this family of compounds, RCCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ-level electronic structure calculations were employed to generate individual-molecule optimized geometries, as well as to determine the global minimum energy structure for the BrOṡH2O complex. This information facilitated the generation of several one-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) scans for the BrOṡH2O complex. Scans were performed for both the ground state and the first excited state; this inclusion is due to a low-lying first electronic excited-state energy. These rigid-geometry PES scans were used both to generate a novel analytic interaction potential by modifying the existing Thole-type model used for water and to the fitted potential function. This interaction potential features anisotropic atomic polarizabilities facilitating appropriate modeling of the physics regarding the unpaired electron residing within the p-orbitals of the oxygen atom of the bromine oxide radical. The intention of this work is to facilitate future molecular dynamics simulations involving the interaction between the BrO radical and water clusters as a first step in devising possible novel chemistries taking place at the water interface of clouds within the atmosphere.

  4. One spatial dimensional finite volume three-body interaction for a short-range potential

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we use McGuire's model to describe scattering of three spinless identical particles in one spatial dimension, we first present analytic solutions of Faddeev's equation for scattering of three spinless particles in free space. The three particles interaction in finite volume is derived subsequently, and the quantization conditions by matching wave functions in free space and finite volume are presented in terms of two-body scattering phase shifts. The quantization conditions obtained in this work for short range interaction are L\\"uscher's formula like and consistent with Yang's results in \\cite{Yang:1967bm}.

  5. Involvement of platelet-tumor cell interaction in immune evasion. Potential role of podocalyxin-like protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAmo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides their essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are involved in the onset of cancer metastasis by interacting with tumor cells. Platelets release secretory factors that promote tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Furthermore, the formation of platelet-tumor cell aggregates in the bloodstream provides cancer cells with an immune escape mechanism by protecting circulating malignant cells from immune-mediated lysis by natural killer (NK cells. Platelet-tumor cell interaction is accomplished by specific adhesion molecules, including integrins, selectins, and their ligands. Podocalyxin-like protein 1 (PCLP1 is a selectin ligand protein which overexpression has been associated with several aggressive cancers. PCLP1 expression enhances cell adherence to platelets in an integrin-dependent process and through the interaction with P-selectin expressed on activated platelets. However, the involvement of PCLP1-induced tumor-platelet interaction in tumor immune evasion still remains unexplored. The identification of selectin ligands involved in the interaction of platelets with tumor cells may provide help for the development of effective therapies to restrain cancer cell dissemination. This article summarizes the current knowledge on molecules that participate in platelet-tumor cell interaction as well as discusses the potential role of PCLP1 as a molecule implicated in tumor immune evasion.

  6. Stepping into futures: exploring the potential of interactive media for participatory scenarios on social ecological systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, J.M.; Kok, K.; Lammeren, van R.J.A.; Veldkamp, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a strategy for the development of interactive media scenarios to help communicate uncertainties and complexities in coupled human and natural systems. Insights arising from Complex Adaptive Systems theory advocate the need for more adaptive perspectives on natural resources

  7. SoundScapes: non-formal learning potentials from interactive VEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony; Petersson, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Non-formal learning is evident from an inhabited information space that is created from non-invasive multi-dimensional sensor technologies that source human gesture. Libraries of intuitive interfaces empower natural interaction where the gesture is mapped to the multisensory content. Large screen...

  8. Identification of potential target levels for Central Baltic Sea fishing mortalities, taking multispecies interactions into account

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Morten; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Eero, Margit;

    2012-01-01

    The main biological interactions between Baltic cod, herring and sprat have been modelled in a stochastic multispecies (SMS) model. Based on this, a simple approach has been developed to quantify candidates for FMSY proxies (fishing mortality that produces the maximum sustainable yield) in a...

  9. Understanding consumer motivations for interacting in online food communities – potential for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lina; Sørensen, Bjarne Taulo; Tudoran, Ana Alina;

    on the innovation task, one may be more important than the other. It is therefore important to understand, how companies can increase user willingness to engage in these different interaction forms. This study investigates the influence of various motivation factors and user interests on intention to provide...

  10. Host-pathogen Interaction at the Intestinal Mucosa Correlates With Zoonotic Potential of Streptococcus suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrando, Maria Laura; de Greeff, Astrid; van Rooijen, Willemien J. M.;

    2015-01-01

    of SS2 infection. Methods. We developed a noninvasive in vivo model to study oral SS2 infection in piglets. We compared in vitro interaction of S. suis with human and porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Results. Two out of 15 piglets showed clinical symptoms compatible with S. suis infection 24...

  11. DFMSPH14: A C-code for the double folding interaction potential of two spherical nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    This is a new version of the DFMSPH code designed to obtain the nucleus-nucleus potential by using the double folding model (DFM) and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier. The new version uses the charge, proton, and neutron density distributions provided by the user. Also we added an option for fitting the DFM potential by the Gross-Kalinowski profile. The main functionalities of the original code (e.g. the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei, the Coulomb barrier characteristics, etc.) have not been modified.

  12. Threshold behavior of interaction potential for the system 7Li + 64Ni: Comparison with 6Li + 64Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Md. Moin; Das, Mili; Roy, Subinit; Sinha, M.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Datta, U.; Ramachandran, K.; Shrivastava, A.

    2016-09-01

    The elastic scattering angular distributions for the system 7Li + 64Ni were measured in the bombarding energy range of 12 MeV ≤Elab ≤ 26.4 MeV. A phenomenological optical model analysis was performed for the measured data. The strengths of the fitted potential components at the surface were estimated to extract their variation with energy. Further analyses of the measured angular distributions were performed with a hybrid potential composed of a renormalized folded real and a phenomenological imaginary potential. Both the model potentials predict similar energy dependent behavior for the effective interaction potential around the barrier. Unlike the heavy targets, 7Li + 64Ni does not show a normal threshold behavior. It also does not clearly exhibit a behavior similar to 6Li + 64Ni. The real potential for 7Li + 64Ni does not exhibit any significant energy dependence and the imaginary potential strength remains almost independent of energy above the Coulomb barrier (∼ 14 MeV). However, at energies below the barrier, a sudden drop in the imaginary potential strength is observed.

  13. Vapour–liquid equilibria of the two- and three-dimensional monoatomic classical fluids interacting via double Yukawa potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Pathania; P K Ahluwalia

    2006-12-01

    We have carried out Monte Carlo simulations in Gibbs ensemble for two-and three-dimensional double Yukawa fluid. We have compared liquid–vapour equilibrium curve with that of Lennard-Jones, when parameters occurring in double Yukawa potential are chosen to fit Lennard-Jones potential. The results are in good agreement. The role of repulsive and attractive contributions for the potential on the liquid–vapour coexistence region as well as on critical temperature and critical density has been studied. The critical temperature is found to be more sensitive than the critical density to the variation in repulsive and attractive parts of the potential. Also, the range of the attractive interaction directly influences range of the liquid–vapour coexistence region. It has been found that smaller the values of the attractive parameter, larger is the coexistence region.

  14. Analysis of Multiple HPV E6 PDZ Interactions Defines Type-Specific PDZ Fingerprints That Predict Oncogenic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Miranda; Myers, Michael P.; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    The high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins are characterised by the presence of a class I PDZ-binding motif (PBM) on their extreme carboxy termini. The PBM is present on the E6 proteins derived from all cancer-causing HPV types, but can also be found on some related non-cancer-causing E6 proteins. We have therefore been interested in investigating the potential functional differences between these different E6 PBMs. Using an unbiased proteomic approach in keratinocytes, we have directly compared the interaction profiles of these different PBMs. This has allowed us to identify the potential PDZ target fingerprints of the E6 PBMs from 7 different cancer-causing HPV types, from 3 HPV types with weak cancer association, and from one benign HPV type that possesses an ancestral PBM. We demonstrate a striking increase in the number of potential PDZ targets bound by each E6 PBM as cancer-causing potential increases, and show that the HPV-16 and HPV-18 PBMs have the most flexibility in their PDZ target selection. Furthermore, the specific interaction with hScrib correlates directly with increased oncogenic potential. In contrast, hDlg is bound equally well by all the HPV E6 PBMs analysed, indicating that this is an evolutionarily conserved interaction, and was most likely one of the original E6 PBM target proteins that was important for the occupation of a potential new niche. Finally, we present evidence that the cell junction components ZO-2 and β-2 syntrophin are novel PDZ domain–containing targets of a subset of high-risk HPV types. PMID:27483446

  15. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten-hydrogen-helium plasma-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusentino, Mary Alice; Hammond, Karl D.; Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-08-01

    We compare the hydrogen and helium clustering characteristics of three interatomic potential energy models intended for simulation of plasma-facing materials for fusion applications. Our simulations compare a Finnis-Sinclair potential and two different Tersoff-style bond order potentials created by Juslin et al. (2005) and Li et al. (2011), respectively, with respect to both helium and hydrogen clustering behavior in tungsten. We find significant differences between the Juslin and Li potentials in terms of both hydrogen and helium clustering behavior as well as the spatial distribution of hydrogen below the surface. These simulations are an important test on the road to more accurate models of gas clustering and surface evolution of tungsten divertors in ITER and other plasma devices.

  16. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten–hydrogen–helium plasma–surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusentino, Mary Alice, E-mail: mcusenti@utk.edu; Hammond, Karl D.; Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D., E-mail: bdwirth@utk.ed

    2015-08-15

    We compare the hydrogen and helium clustering characteristics of three interatomic potential energy models intended for simulation of plasma-facing materials for fusion applications. Our simulations compare a Finnis–Sinclair potential and two different Tersoff-style bond order potentials created by Juslin et al. (2005) and Li et al. (2011), respectively, with respect to both helium and hydrogen clustering behavior in tungsten. We find significant differences between the Juslin and Li potentials in terms of both hydrogen and helium clustering behavior as well as the spatial distribution of hydrogen below the surface. These simulations are an important test on the road to more accurate models of gas clustering and surface evolution of tungsten divertors in ITER and other plasma devices.

  17. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten–hydrogen–helium plasma–surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compare the hydrogen and helium clustering characteristics of three interatomic potential energy models intended for simulation of plasma-facing materials for fusion applications. Our simulations compare a Finnis–Sinclair potential and two different Tersoff-style bond order potentials created by Juslin et al. (2005) and Li et al. (2011), respectively, with respect to both helium and hydrogen clustering behavior in tungsten. We find significant differences between the Juslin and Li potentials in terms of both hydrogen and helium clustering behavior as well as the spatial distribution of hydrogen below the surface. These simulations are an important test on the road to more accurate models of gas clustering and surface evolution of tungsten divertors in ITER and other plasma devices

  18. Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like anomalies of a core-softened model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is now well established that water-like anomalies can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric potential with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened potential. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened potential on the existence and location of various water-like anomalies in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the potentials. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic anomalies. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened potentials have concluded that the structural anomaly region encloses the diffusion anomaly region, which in turn, encloses the density anomaly region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion anomaly region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural anomaly region. Also, density anomaly region is not completely enclosed by diffusion anomaly region in this case

  19. Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like anomalies of a core-softened model potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pant, Shashank [Department of Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research-Kolkata, Mohanpur-741252 (India); Gera, Tarun [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi, New Delhi, 110016 (India); Choudhury, Niharendu, E-mail: nihcho@barc.gov.in, E-mail: niharc2002@yahoo.com [Theoretical Chemistry Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India)

    2013-12-28

    It is now well established that water-like anomalies can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric potential with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened potential. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened potential on the existence and location of various water-like anomalies in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the potentials. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic anomalies. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened potentials have concluded that the structural anomaly region encloses the diffusion anomaly region, which in turn, encloses the density anomaly region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion anomaly region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural anomaly region. Also, density anomaly region is not completely enclosed by diffusion anomaly region in this case.

  20. Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like anomalies of a core-softened model potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2013-12-28

    It is now well established that water-like anomalies can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric potential with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened potential. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened potential on the existence and location of various water-like anomalies in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the potentials. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic anomalies. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened potentials have concluded that the structural anomaly region encloses the diffusion anomaly region, which in turn, encloses the density anomaly region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion anomaly region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural anomaly region. Also, density anomaly region is not completely enclosed by diffusion anomaly region in this case. PMID:24387380

  1. The Interaction Potential of an Open Nanotube and its Permeability: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bubenchikov Mikhail A.; Potekaev Alexander I; Bubenchikov Alexey M; Usenko Olesya V; Malozemov Alexander V; Tarasov Egor A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of the modified LJ-potential allowed revealing the universal effect of the open carbon tube on the molecular objects moving within or proximate to the tube. There has been established that there are modes of the molecule motion without the energy exchange with the atoms of the carbon framing, under which the moving molecules are subjected to the considerable activation in the tube. The potential holes being the sorption zones in fact are localized.

  2. Interaction of landscape varibles on the potential geographical distribution of parrots in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Plasencia–Vázquez, A. H.; Escalona–Segura, G.; Esparza–Olguín, L. G.

    2014-01-01

    The loss, degradation, and fragmentation of forested areas are endangering parrot populations. In this study, we determined the influence of fragmentation in relation to vegetation cover, land use, and spatial configuration of fragments on the potential geographical distribution patterns of parrots in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. We used the potential geographical distribution for eight parrot species, considering the recently published maps obtained with the maximum entropy algorithm, and ...

  3. Analytical determination of the two-body gravitational interaction potential at the 4th post-Newtonian approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2013-01-01

    We complete the analytical determination, at the 4th post-Newtonian approximation, of the main radial potential describing the gravitational interaction of two bodies within the effective one-body formalism. The (non logarithmic) coefficient a_5 (nu) measuring this 4th post-Newtonian interaction potential is found to be linear in the symmetric mass ratio nu. Its nu-independent part a_5 (0) is obtained by an analytical gravitational self-force calculation that unambiguously resolves the formal infrared divergencies which currently impede its direct post-Newtonian calculation. Its nu-linear part a_5 (nu) - a_5 (0) is deduced from recent results of Jaranowski and Sch\\"afer, and is found to be significantly negative.

  4. Potential Energy Curves and Transport Properties for the Interaction of He with Other Ground-state Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Harry; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The interactions of a He atom with a heavier atom are examined for 26 different elements, which are consecutive members selected from three rows (Li - Ne, Na - Ar, and K,Ca, Ga - Kr) and column 12 (Zn,Cd) of the periodic table. Interaction energies are determined wing high-quality ab initio calculations for the states of the molecule that would be formed from each pair of atoms in their ground states. Potential energies are tabulated for a broad range of Interatomic separation distances. The results show, for example, that the energy of an alkali interaction at small separations is nearly the same as that of a rare-gas interaction with the same electron configuration for the dosed shells. Furthermore, the repulsive-range parameter for this region is very short compared to its length for the repulsion dominated by the alkali-valence electron at large separations (beyond about 3-4 a(sub 0)). The potential energies in the region of the van der Waals minimum agree well with the most accurate results available. The ab initio energies are applied to calculate scattering cross sections and obtain the collision integrals that are needed to determine transport properties to second order. The theoretical values of Li-He total scattering cross sections and the rare-gas atom-He transport properties agree well (to within about 1%) with the corresponding measured data. Effective potential energies are constructed from the ab initio energies; the results have been shown to reproduce known transport data and can be readily applied to predict unknown transport properties for like-atom interactions.

  5. Multireference configuration interaction potential curve and analytical potential energy function of the ground and low-lying excited states of CdSe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Feng; Yang Chuan-Lu; Hu Zhen-Yan; Wang Mei-Shan

    2007-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of the ground state (3Π) and three low-lying excited states (1∑, 3∑,1Π) of CdSe dimer have been studied by emploging quasirelativistic effective core potentials on the basis of the complete active space self-consistent field method followed by multireference configuration interaction calculation. The four PECs are fitted to analytical potential energy functions using the Murrel-Sorbie potential function. Based on the PECs,the vibrational levels of the four states are determined by solving the Schr(o)dinger equation of nuclear motion, and corresponding spectroscopic contants are accurately calculated. The equilibrium positions as well as the spectroscopic constants and the vibrational levels are reported. By our analysis, the 3Π state, of which the dissociation asymptote is Cd(1S) + Se(3p), is identified as a ground state of CdSe dimer, and the corresponding dissociation energy is estimated to be 0.39eV. However, the first excited state is only 1132.49cm-1 above the ground state and the 3∑ state is the highest in the four calculated states.

  6. The EC bioethanol blend mandate policy: its effect on ACP sugar trade and potential interaction with EPA policies

    OpenAIRE

    Sukati, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to determine effects of the EC bioethanol blend mandate policy and its potential interaction with the EPA policies on EU/ACP countries. The research analysis focussed on welfare outcomes, changes in trade balance and output of bioethanol crops commodities due to these policies. Emphasis of our analysis was placed on sugar given the economic importance of this commodity to many ACP member states. Absence of an EU bioethanol partial equilbrium model means we had to design one ...

  7. Risk Assessment of Drug Interaction Potential and Concomitant Dosing Pattern on Targeted Toxicities in Pediatric Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Patel, Dimple; Dombrowsky, Erin; Bajaj, Gaurav; Skolnik, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation evaluated the impact of potential drug interactions on the incidence of reported toxicities seen with common dosing patterns in children with cancer, with the intent of being able to screen and reduce the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the future. Toxicity reported in pediatric cancer patients treated at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia from 2004 to 2010 were abstracted from a cancer tumor registry and merged with drug order profiles from the medical r...

  8. Fermionic particles with position-dependent mass in the presence of inversely quadratic Yukawa potential and tensor interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Bahar; F Yasuk

    2013-02-01

    Approximate solutions of the Dirac equation with position-dependent mass are presented for the inversely quadratic Yukawa potential and Coulomb-like tensor interaction by using the asymptotic iteration method. The energy eigenvalues and the corresponding normalized eigenfunctions are obtained in the case of position-dependent mass and arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number k state and approximation on the spin-orbit coupling term.

  9. Chiral interactions of light induced by low-dimensional dynamics in complex potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Sunkyu; Piao, Xianji; Min, Bumki; Park, Namkyoo

    2014-01-01

    Chirality is a universal feature in nature, as observed in fermion interactions and DNA helicity. Much attention has been given to the chiral interactions of light, not only regarding its physical interpretation but also focusing on intriguing phenomena in excitation, absorption, generation, and refraction. Although recent progress in metamaterials and 3-dimensional writing technology has spurred artificial enhancements of optical chirality, most approaches are founded on the same principle of the mixing of electric and magnetic responses. However, due to the orthogonal form of electric and magnetic fields, intricate designs are commonly required for mixing. Here, we propose an alternative route to optical chirality, exploiting the nonmagnetic mixing of amplifying and decaying electric modes based on non-Hermitian theory. We show that a 1-dimensional helical eigenmode can exist singularly in a complex anisotropic material, in sharp contrast to the 2-dimensional eigenspaces employed in previous approaches. We ...

  10. Diets of emerald and spottail shiners and potential interactions with other western Lake Erie planktivorous fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Kyle J.; Vondracek, Bruce; Parrish, Donna L.; Muth, Kenneth M.

    1992-01-01

    Emerald shiner (Notropis atherinoides) and spottail shiner (N. hudsonius) were abundant historically in western Lake Erie. Recent changes in the fish community suggest that shiners may not compete favorably with the invading white perch (Morone americana) or the gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum). We examined the diets of emerald and spottail shiner and compared them to other planktivores in western Lake Erie. Emerald and spottail shiner ate cladocerans such as Daphnia spp.,Leptodora, and Bythotrephes. Biologically significant overlaps (Schoener 1970 index ≥ 0.6) among zooplanktivores occurred from July through September, but most occurred during July. The frequency of significant diet overlaps among planktivores declined since an earlier study in the mid-1970s (Muth and Busch 1989) possibly indicating that competitive interactions have eased since 1975. In addition to competitive interactions, other factors such as increased eutrophication and predator mediated mortality likely played a role in planktivore community changes since the early 1970s.

  11. Lambda alpha, Sigma alpha and Xi alpha potentials derived from the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Suzuki, Y

    2006-01-01

    We calculate Lambda alpha, Sigma alpha and Xi alpha potentials from the nuclear-matter G-matrices of the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction. The alpha-cluster wave function is assumed to be a simple harmonic-oscillator shell-model wave function. A new method is proposed to derive the direct and knock-on terms of the interaction Born kernel from the hyperon-nucleon G-matrices, with explicit treatments of the nonlocality and the center-of-mass motion between the hyperon and alpha. We find that the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interactions, FSS and fss2, yield a reasonable bound-state energy for 5 He Lambda, -3.18 -- -3.62 MeV, in spite of the fact that they give relatively large depths for the Lambda single-particle potentials, 46 -- 48 MeV, in symmetric nuclear matter. An equivalent local potential derived from the Wigner transform of the nonlocal Lambda alpha kernel shows a strong energy dependence for the incident Lambda-particle, indicating the importance of the strangeness-exchange process in the o...

  12. Klein-Gordon Equation with Casimir Potential for Attosecond Laser Pulse Interaction with Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlovskii, Miroslaw P; Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Marciak-Kozlowska, Janina

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the Klein-Gordon equation (K-GE) is solved for the interaction of attosecond laser pulses with medium in which Casimir force operates. It is shown that for nanoscale structures, NEMS and MEMS, the attosecond laser pulses can be used as the tool for the investigation of the role played by Casimir force on the nanoscale. Key words: Casimir force; NEMS, MEMS, Attosecond laser pulses.

  13. Investigations of the potential schizophrenia susceptibility gene Kinase Interacting with Stathmin (KIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Bristow, Greg; Harrison, Paul J; Eastwood, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the gene encoding the serine threonine kinase KIS (Kinase Interacting with Stathmin, also known as UHMK1) have recently been associated with schizophrenia. However, little is known about the neurobiology of KIS or the mechanisms through which disease-associated SNPs may increase susceptibility to schizophrenia. The studies presented in this thesis focus on the distribution of KIS and its mRNA, address the mechanisms through which KIS may confer su...

  14. Two-Particle Cluster Theory for Biaxial Nematic Phase Based on a Recently Proposed Interaction Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-Dong; ZHANG Yan-Jun; SUN Zong-Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ Two-particle cluster theory is applied to study the biaxial nematic phase formed by biaxial molecules interacting with a simplified model proposed by Sonnet et al. [Phys. Rev. E 67 (2003) 061701]. For the temperature dependences of the internal energy per particle and of the order parameters, the two-particle theory yields an improved result compared with mean field theory. Concerning the phase diagram, the two-particle theory gives the numerical result in qualitative agreement with the mean field theory.

  15. The Potential for Signal Integration and Processing in Interacting Map Kinase Cascades

    OpenAIRE

    John H Schwacke; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2007-01-01

    The cellular response to environmental stimuli requires biochemical information processing through which sensory inputs and cellular status are integrated and translated into appropriate responses by way of interacting networks of enzymes. One such network, the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) kinase cascade is a highly conserved signal transduction module that propagates signals from cell surface receptors to various cytosolic and nuclear targets by way of a phosphorylation cascade. We have i...

  16. Interaction between blast wave and reticulated foam: assessing the potential for auditory protection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgeroth, J. M.; Nguyen, T.-T. N.; Proud, W. G.

    2014-05-01

    Injuries to the tympanic membrane (ear drum) are particularly common in individuals subjected to blast overpressure such as military personnel engaged in conflict. Here, the interaction between blast wave and reticulated foams of varying density and thickness has been investigated using shock tube apparatus. The degree of mitigation afforded by the foam samples is discussed in relation to an injury threshold which has been suggested by others for the tympanic membrane.

  17. Interaction of retinal guanylate cyclase with the alpha subunit of transducin: potential role in transducin localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Nair, K Saidas; Levay, Konstantin; Peshenko, Igor V; Crabb, John W; Dizhoor, Alexander M; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2009-02-01

    Vertebrate phototransduction is mediated by cGMP, which is generated by retGC (retinal guanylate cyclase) and degraded by cGMP phosphodiesterase. Light stimulates cGMP hydrolysis via the G-protein transducin, which directly binds to and activates phosphodiesterase. Bright light also causes relocalization of transducin from the OS (outer segments) of the rod cells to the inner compartments. In the present study, we show experimental evidence for a previously unknown interaction between G(alphat) (the transducin alpha subunit) and retGC. G(alphat) co-immunoprecipitates with retGC from the retina or from co-transfected COS-7 cells. The retGC-G(alphat) complex is also present in cones. The interaction also occurs in mice lacking RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signalling 9), a protein previously shown to associate with both G(alphat) and retGC. The G(alphat)-retGC interaction is mediated primarily by the kinase homology domain of retGC, which binds GDP-bound G(alphat) stronger than the GTP[S] (GTPgammaS; guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate) form. Neither G(alphat) nor G(betagamma) affect retGC-mediated cGMP synthesis, regardless of the presence of GCAP (guanylate cyclase activating protein) and Ca2+. The rate of light-dependent transducin redistribution from the OS to the inner segments is markedly accelerated in the retGC-1-knockout mice, while the migration of transducin to the OS after the onset of darkness is delayed. Supplementation of permeabilized photoreceptors with cGMP does not affect transducin translocation. Taken together, these results suggest that the protein-protein interaction between G(alphat) and retGC represents a novel mechanism regulating light-dependent translocation of transducin in rod photoreceptors.

  18. Fungal chitinases: function, regulation, and potential roles in plant/pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Thorsten; Göhre, Vera

    2016-05-01

    In the past decades our knowledge about fungal cell wall architecture increased tremendously and led to the identification of many enzymes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and remodeling, which are also of biotechnological interest. Fungal cell walls play an important role in conferring mechanic stability during cell division and polar growth. Additionally, in phytopathogenic fungi the cell wall is the first structure that gets into intimate contact with the host plant. A major constituent of fungal cell walls is chitin, a homopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine units. To ensure plasticity, polymeric chitin needs continuous remodeling which is maintained by chitinolytic enzymes, including lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases N-acetylglucosaminidases, and chitinases. Depending on the species and lifestyle of fungi, there is great variation in the number of encoded chitinases and their function. Chitinases can have housekeeping function in plasticizing the cell wall or can act more specifically during cell separation, nutritional chitin acquisition, or competitive interaction with other fungi. Although chitinase research made huge progress in the last decades, our knowledge about their role in phytopathogenic fungi is still scarce. Recent findings in the dimorphic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis show that chitinases play different physiological functions throughout the life cycle and raise questions about their role during plant-fungus interactions. In this work we summarize these functions, mechanisms of chitinase regulation and their putative role during pathogen/host interactions. PMID:26527115

  19. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  20. Correlation energy and dispersion interaction in the ab initio potential energy curve of the neon dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytautas, Laimutis; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    A close approximation to the empirical potential energy curve of the neon dimer is obtained by coupled-cluster singles plus doubles plus noniterative triples calculations by using nonaugmented correlation-consistent basis sets without counterpoise corrections and complementing them by three-term extrapolations to the complete basis set limit. The potential energy is resolved into a self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock contribution and a correlation contribution. The latter is shown to decay in the long-range region in accordance with the empirical dispersion expansion.

  1. Overdamped motion of interacting particles in general confining potentials: time-dependent and stationary-state analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Nobre, F. D.; Curado, E. M. F.

    2012-12-01

    By comparing numerical and analytical results, it is shown that a system of interacting particles under overdamped motion is very well described by a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation, which can be associated with nonextensive statistical mechanics. The particle-particle interactions considered are repulsive, motivated by three different physical situations: (i) modified Bessel function, commonly used in vortex-vortex interactions, relevant for the flux-front penetration in disordered type-II superconductors; (ii) Yukawa-like forces, useful for charged particles in plasma, or colloidal suspensions; (iii) derived from a Gaussian potential, common in complex fluids, like polymer chains dispersed in a solvent. Moreover, the system is subjected to a general confining potential, φ( x) = ( α| x| z )/ z ( α > 0 , z > 1), so that a stationary state is reached after a sufficiently long time. Recent numerical and analytical investigations, considering interactions of type (i) and a harmonic confining potential ( z = 2), have shown strong evidence that a q-Gaussian distribution, P( x,t), with q = 0, describes appropriately the particle positions during their time evolution, as well as in their stationary state. Herein we reinforce further the connection with nonextensive statistical mechanics, by presenting numerical evidence showing that: (a) in the case z = 2, different particle-particle interactions only modify the diffusion parameter D of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation; (b) for z ≠ 2, all cases investigated fit well the analytical stationary solution P st( x), given in terms of a q-exponential (with the same index q = 0) of the general external potential φ( x). In this later case, we propose an approximate time-dependent P( x,t) (not known analytically for z ≠ 2), which is in very good agreement with the simulations for a large range of times, including the approach to the stationary state. The present work suggests that a wide variety of physical phenomena

  2. The atom-surface interaction potential for He-NaCl: A model based on pairwise additivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Jeremy M.; Fowler, P. W.

    1986-08-01

    The recently developed semi-empirical model of Fowler and Hutson is applied to the He-NaCl atom-surface interaction potential. Ab initio self-consistent field calculations of the repulsive interactions between He atoms and in-crystal Cl - and Na + ions are performed. Dispersion coefficients involving in-crystal ions are also calculated. The atom-surface potential is constructed using a model based on pairwise additivity of atom-ion forces. With a small adjustment of the repulsive part, this potential gives good agreement with the experimental bound state energies obtained from selective adsorption resonances in low-energy atom scattering experiments. Close-coupling calculations of the resonant scattering are performed, and good agreement with the experimental peak positions and intensity patterns is obtained. It is concluded that there are no bound states deeper than those observed in the selective adsorption experiments, and that the well depth of the He-NaCl potential is 6.0 ± 0.2 meV.

  3. Chemical Potential Dependence of the Dressed—Quark Propagator from an Effective Quark—Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONGHong-Shi; PINGJia-Lun; 等

    2002-01-01

    We exhibit a method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagator from the dressed-quark propagator,which provides a means of determining the behavior of the chiral and deconfinement order parameters.A comparison with the results of previous researches is given.

  4. Interaction potential of Trigonella foenum graceum through cytochrome P450 mediated inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sk Milan Ahmmed

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: From the present study, we may conclude that the TFG or TG has very less potential to inhibit the CYP isozymes (CYP3A4, CYP2D6, so administration of this plant extract or its biomarker TG may be safe.

  5. Human-armadillo interaction in Ceará, Brazil: Potential for transmission of Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Ligia; Kendall, Carl; Sousa, Cesar Augusto Barros de; Frota, Cristiane Cunha; Graham, Jove; Rodrigues, Laura; Fernandes, Rafael Lima; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2015-12-01

    Several factors suggest that armadillos present an important risk for human leprosy infection. This study uses semi-structured interviews to better illustrate how human interaction with armadillos may increase the risk of leprosy transmission. The participants were all residents of the state of Ceará, in northeastern Brazil, all acknowledged contact with armadillos either through hunting, through cooking, or through consumption of its meat. This study raises important issues about contact between human beings and armadillos. The interviews provide evidence of numerous situations in which leprosy transmission via the armadillo is possible. At a minimum, people who hunt armadillos need to be made aware of the risk of infection. PMID:26232656

  6. The interactive potential of post-modern film narrative. Frequency, Order and Simultaneity.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Sena Caires

    2009-01-01

    A considerable number of contemporary films are now using narrative models that allow several adaptations on digital and interactive operating systems. This trend is seen in films such as Memento by Christopher Nolan (2000), Irréversible by Gaspar Noé (2002) and Smoking / No Smoking by Alain Resnais (1993), concerning the chronological organization of their narrative parts – here it is a question of order. Or in films such as Elephant by Gus Van Sant (2003), Groundhog Day by Harold Ramis, 199...

  7. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested......, and demonstrated in public settings. We then describe INTERACT, a proposed research project that stages the robotic marionettes in a live performance. The interdisciplinary project brings humanities research to bear on scientific and technological inquiry, and culminates in the development a live performance which...

  8. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists such as ......The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... also key figures in the philosophical discussions of nature and science - from philosophical tendencies like logical empiricism via critical rationalism to various neo-Kantian trends....

  9. An in vitro approach to assessing a potential drug interaction between MDMA (ecstasy) and caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, C; Daly, F; O'Boyle, K M

    2014-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) is a popular recreational drug which causes long-term neurotoxicity and increased risk of fatality. In rats, MDMA toxicity is exacerbated by co-administration of caffeine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caffeine altered the effects of MDMA in a battery of in vitro tests selected to model some of the known actions of MDMA in vivo. In cytotoxicity studies, caffeine modestly enhanced the effect of MDMA on neuronal N2a cell viability but not that of liver, intestinal or kidney cells. MDMA inhibited the formation of fluorescent metabolites by CYP2D6≫CYP3A4>CYP1A2 but this was not altered by caffeine. Similarly, the inhibition of synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake by MDMA was not affected by the presence of caffeine. Thus, these in vitro tests failed to detect any substantial interaction between caffeine and MDMA, highlighting the difficulty of modelling in vivo drug interactions using in vitro tests. However, the results show that the inhibition of synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake by MDMA was greater at 41°C and 25°C than at 37°C which raises the possibility that MDMA's effect on SERT in vivo may be increased as body temperature increases, contributing to its harmful effects in users.

  10. Potential herbs and herbal nutraceuticals: food applications and their interactions with food components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shaik Abdul; Panjagari, Narender Raju; Singh, R R B; Patil, G R

    2015-01-01

    Since ancient times, herbs have been used as natural remedies for curing many physiological disorders. Traditional medicinal literature appreciated their value as nature's gift to mankind for the healing of illnesses. Some of the herbs have also been used for culinary purposes, and few of them have been used in cheese manufacture both as coagulating agents and flavor ingredients. Scientific investigations regarding biological activity and toxicity of chemical moieties present in many herbs have been carried out over a period of time. Consequently, literature related to the use of herbs or their functional ingredients in foods and their interaction with food constituents has been appearing in recent times. This article presents the information regarding some biologically active constituents occurring in commonly used herbs, viz., alkaloids, anthraquinones, bitters, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, and essential oils, their physiological functionalities, and also the description of few herbs of importance, viz., Asparagus racemosus, Withania somnifera, Bacopa monniera, Pueraria tuberose, Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia belerica, Terminalia arjuna, and Aloe vera, in terms of their chemical composition, biological functionality, and toxicity. This article also reviews the use of herbs and their active ingredients in foods and their interactions with different food constituents. PMID:24915396

  11. Analysis of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions and Its Clinical Manifestation of Pediatric Prescription on 2 Pharmacies in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa I. Barliana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI in prescription have high incidence around the world, including Indonesia. However, scientific evidence regarding DDI in Indonesia is not available. Therefore, in this study we have conducted survey in 2 pharmacies in Bandung against pediatric prescription given by pediatrician. These prescriptions then analyzed the potential for DDI contained in the prescription and clinical manifestation. The analysis showed that in pharmacy A, there are 33 prescriptions (from a total of 155 prescriptions that have potential DDI, or approximately 21.19% (2 prescriptions have the potential DDI major categories, 23 prescriptions categorized as moderate, and 8 prescriptions as minor. In Pharmacy B, there are 6 prescriptions (from a total of 40 prescriptions or 15% of potential DDI (4 prescriptions categorized as moderate and 2 prescriptions as minor. This result showed that potential DDI happened less than 50% in pediatric prescription from both pharmacies. However, this should get attention because DDI should not happen in a prescription considering its clinical manifestations caused by DDI. Moreover, current pharmaceutical care refers to patient oriented than product oriented. In addition, further study for the pediatric prescription on DDI incidence in large scale need to be investigated.

  12. Effective medium potentials for molecule-surface interactions: H2 on Cu and Ni surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1989-01-01

    A new approximate method is developed for the calculation of the adiabatic potential energy surface for a molecule outside a metal surface. It is computationally fast enough to be useful in simulations of the dynamics of adsorbing and desorbing molecules. The method is characterized by the fact...... that the functional form of the total energy expression is derived from density functional theory, that each of the terms entering can be given a precise physical interpretation, and that most of the parameters entering can be calculated, within the local density approximation. The method is explicitly...... derived for H2 outside metal surfaces and the applicability is illustrated for H2 adsorbing on various Cu and Ni surfaces. Although very approximate, the calculated potentials seem to include a number of features observed experimentally: Ni is more active in dissociating H2 than Cu, and open surfaces are...

  13. A water-like model under confinement for hydrophobic and hydrophilic particle-plate interaction potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Krott, Leandro B.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations were employed to study a water-like model confined between hydrophobic and hydrophilic plates. The phase behavior of this system is obtained for different distances between the plates and particle-plate potentials. For both hydrophobic and hydrophilic walls there are the formation of layers. Crystallization occurs at lower temperature at the contact layer than at the middle layer. In addition, the melting temperature decreases as the plates become more hydrophobi...

  14. Interactions between mood and the structure of semantic memory: event-related potentials evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Ana P.; del Re, Elisabetta; Nestor, Paul G.; McCarley, Robert W.; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Niznikiewicz, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that affect acts as modulator of cognitive processes and in particular that induced mood has an effect on the way semantic memory is used on-line. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine affective modulation of semantic information processing under three different moods: neutral, positive and negative. Fifteen subjects read 324 pairs of sentences, after mood induction procedure with 30 pictures of neutral, 30 pictures of positive and 30 pictures of neutral ...

  15. How long does a wave packet interact with a potential barrier?

    CERN Document Server

    Begliuomini, A; Begliuomini, Andrea; Bracci, Luciano

    1996-01-01

    We examine the time evolution of a packet approaching a one dimensional potential barrier. The times required for the appearance of a reflected or a transmitted packet are definitely different from the reflection and transmission times presented in the literature for stationary problems. The depletion rate of the packet trapped within the barrier region depends only on the properties of the barrier. We propose new definitions for the dwell, reflection and transmission times suitable for a packet.

  16. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  17. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process. PMID:27104527

  18. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com . PMID:27167132

  19. Fundamentals of nanoscale polymer-protein interactions and potential contributions to solid-state nanobioarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Jong-in

    2014-08-26

    Protein adsorption onto polymer surfaces is a very complex, ubiquitous, and integrated process, impacting essential areas of food processing and packaging, health devices, diagnostic tools, and medical products. The nature of protein-surface interactions is becoming much more complicated with continuous efforts toward miniaturization, especially for the development of highly compact protein detection and diagnostic devices. A large body of literature reports on protein adsorption from the perspective of ensemble-averaged behavior on macroscopic, chemically homogeneous, polymeric surfaces. However, protein-surface interactions governing the nanoscale size regime may not be effectively inferred from their macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. Recently, research efforts have been made to produce periodically arranged, nanoscopic protein patterns on diblock copolymer surfaces solely through self-assembly. Intriguing protein adsorption phenomena are directly probed on the individual biomolecule level for a fundamental understanding of protein adsorption on nanoscale surfaces exhibiting varying degrees of chemical heterogeneity. Insight gained from protein assembly on diblock copolymers can be effectively used to control the surface density, conformation, orientation, and biofunctionality of prebound proteins in highly miniaturized applications, now approaching the nanoscale. This feature article will highlight recent experimental and theoretical advances made on these fronts while focusing on single-biomolecule-level investigations of protein adsorption behavior combined with surface chemical heterogeneity on the length scale commensurate with a single protein. This article will also address advantages and challenges of the self-assembly-driven patterning technology used to produce protein nanoarrays and its implications for ultrahigh density, functional, and quantifiable protein detection in a highly miniaturized format.

  20. A protocol for a randomized clinical trial of interactive video dance: potential for effects on cognitive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovancevic Jelena

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical exercise has the potential to affect cognitive function, but most evidence to date focuses on cognitive effects of fitness training. Cognitive exercise also may influence cognitive function, but many cognitive training paradigms have failed to provide carry-over to daily cognitive function. Video games provide a broader, more contextual approach to cognitive training that may induce cognitive gains and have carry over to daily function. Most video games do not involve physical exercise, but some novel forms of interactive video games combine physical activity and cognitive challenge. Methods/Design This paper describes a randomized clinical trial in 168 postmenopausal sedentary overweight women that compares an interactive video dance game with brisk walking and delayed entry controls. The primary endpoint is adherence to activity at six months. Additional endpoints include aspects of physical and mental health. We focus this report primarily on the rationale and plans for assessment of multiple cognitive functions. Discussion This randomized clinical trial may provide new information about the cognitive effects of interactive videodance. It is also the first trial to examine physical and cognitive effects in older women. Interactive video games may offer novel strategies to promote physical activity and health across the life span. The study is IRB approved and the number is: PRO08080012 ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01443455

  1. The Interaction of Src Kinase with β3 Integrin Tails: A Potential Therapeutic Target in Thrombosis and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Huveneers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of Src family kinases is an important event downstream of integrin adhesion signaling in many cell types. A particularly intriguing connection between an integrin and a Src family kinase was first discovered in platelets, where the selective direct interaction of αIIbβ3 integrins with c-Src promotes full kinase activation of c-Src through its local clustering by the cytoplasmic tail of the β3 integrin subunit. The same integrin β3-c-Src interaction not only drives platelet aggregation, but it also promotes the oncogenic potential of c-Src and drives tumor growth by αvβ3-expressing tumor cells, which may explain why increased activity of c-Src and elevated levels of integrin αvβ3 are often found in the same tumor types. Moreover, recent evidence from patient material and in vivo studies strongly indicate that this oncogenic signaling complex, consisting of c-Src and αvβ3, underlies tumor progression of human tumors. Here, we give an overview of the β3-c-Src interaction and its implications for signaling in platelets and tumor cells, and we mention the possibilities for therapeutic intervention that is aimed at disrupting the β3-c-Src interaction for antithrombotic and anticancer purposes.

  2. Potential gene interactions in the cell cycles of gametes, zygotes and embryonic stem cells and the development of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor ePrindull

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review is to explore whether potential gene interactions in the cell cycles of gametes, zygotes, and embryonic stem cells are associated with the development of cancer.Methods: MEDPILOT at the Central Library of the University of Cologne, Germany (Zentralbibliothek Köln that covers 5,800 international medical journals and 4,300 E-journals was used to collect data. The initial searches were done in December 2012 and additional searches in October 2013 to May 2015. The search terms included cancer development, gene interaction, and embryonic stem cells and the time period was between 1998 and 2015. A total of 148 articles in English language only were included in this review.Results: Transgenerational gene translation is implemented in the zygote through interactions of epigenetic isoforms of transcription factors from parental gametes, predominantly during the first two zygote cleavages. Pluripotent transcription factors may provide interacting links with mutated genes during zygote-to-embryonic stem cell switches. Translation of post-transcriptional carcinogenic genes is implemented by abnormally spliced, tumor-specific isoforms of gene-encoded mRNA/non-coding RNA variants of transcription factors employing de novo gene synthesis and neofunctionalization. Post-translationally, mutated genes are preserved in pre-neoplastic embryonic stem cell subpopulations that can give rise to overt cancer stem cells. Thus, transcription factors

  3. Potential drug-drug interactions in pediatric wards of Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia:A cross sectional study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henok Getachew; Mohammed Assen; Feser Dula; Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, level of severity of potential drug–drug in-teractions (PDDIs) and the associated factors for PDDIs in hospitalized pediatric patients of Gondar University Hospital. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted for a period of 3 months from March to May 2014 in pediatric wards of Gondar University Hospital. Systematic random sampling technique was used to select charts from all pediatric patients' charts with every 7th interval to get sample size of 384. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to compute crude odds ratio and adjusted odds ratio respectively. Sta-tistical significance was set at P value Results: A total of 176 (45.8%) patients had at least one PDDI. A total of 393 PDDIs, which were comprised of 283 types of interacting combinations, were identified. Of the total of 393 PDDIs, most were of moderate severity [201 (51%)] followed by minor [152 (39%)] and major severity [40 (10%)]. The most common interacting pairs of major severity were gentamicin + furosemide (6), cotrimoxazole + methotrexate (4) and phenytoin + artemether (4). The occurrence of PDDIs was significantly associated with age and polypharmacy. Conclusions: The study showed that most of the interactions had moderate severity followed by minor severity. Age and polypharmacy were found to show statistically significant association with the occurrence of PDDIs. Due to sensitive nature of pediatrics population, close monitoring is recommended for the detection and management of PDDIs to prevent its negative consequences.

  4. Accuracy of Potential Flow Methods to Solve Real-time Ship-Tug Interaction Effects within Ship Handling Simulators

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    B. Nirman Jayarathne

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic interaction effects between two vessels that are significantly different in size operating in close proximity can adversely affect the safety and handling of these vessels. Many ship handling simulator designers implement Potential Flow (PF solvers to calculate real-time interaction effects. However, these PF solvers struggle to accurately predict the complicated flow regimes that can occur, for example as the flow passes a wet transom hull or one with a drift angle. When it comes to predicting the interaction effects on a tug during a ship assist, it is essential to consider the rapid changes of the tug’s drift angle, as the hull acts against the inflow creating a complicated flow regime. This paper investigates the ability of the commercial PF solver, Futureship®, to predict the accurate interaction effects acting on tugs operating at a drift angle during ship handling operations through a case study. This includes a comparison against Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulations and captive model tests to examine the suitability of the PF method for such duties. Although the PF solver can be tuned to solve streamline bodies, it needs further improvement to deal with hulls at drift angles.

  5. Structural transitions and long-time self-diffusion of interacting colloids confined by a parabolic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euán-Díaz, Edith C; Herrera-Velarde, Salvador; Misko, Vyacheslav R; Peeters, François M; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2015-01-14

    We report on the ordering and dynamics of interacting colloidal particles confined by a parabolic potential. By means of Brownian dynamics simulations, we find that by varying the magnitude of the trap stiffness, it is possible to control the dimension of the system and, thus, explore both the structural transitions and the long-time self-diffusion coefficient as a function of the degree of confinement. We particularly study the structural ordering in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the confinement. Further analysis of the local distribution of the first-neighbors layer allows us to identify the different structural phases induced by the parabolic potential. These results are summarized in a structural state diagram that describes the way in which the colloidal suspension undergoes a structural re-ordering while increasing the confinement. To fully understand the particle dynamics, we take into account hydrodynamic interactions between colloids; the parabolic potential constricts the available space for the colloids, but it does not act on the solvent. Our findings show a non-linear behavior of the long-time self-diffusion coefficient that is associated to the structural transitions induced by the external field.

  6. Syntrophic interactions improve power production in formic acid fed MFCs operated with set anode potentials or fixed resistances

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Dan

    2011-10-24

    Formic acid is a highly energetic electron donor but it has previously resulted in low power densities in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different set anode potentials (-0.30, -0.15, and +0.15V; vs. a standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) were used to evaluate syntrophic interactions in bacterial communities for formic acid degradation relative to a non-controlled, high resistance system (1,000Ω external resistance). No current was generated at -0.30V, suggesting a lack of direct formic acid oxidation (standard reduction potential: -0.40V). More positive potentials that allowed for acetic acid utilization all produced current, with the best performance at -0.15V. The anode community in the -0.15V reactor, based on 16S rDNA clone libraries, was 58% Geobacter sulfurreducens and 17% Acetobacterium, with lower proportions of these genera found in the other two MFCs. Acetic acid was detected in all MFCs suggesting that current generation by G. sulfurreducens was dependent on acetic acid production by Acetobacterium. When all MFCs were subsequently operated at an external resistance for maximum power production (100Ω for MFCs originally set at -0.15 and +0.15V; 150Ω for the control), they produced similar power densities and exhibited the same midpoint potential of -0.15V in first derivative cyclic voltammetry scans. All of the mixed communities converged to similar proportions of the two predominant genera (ca. 52% G. sulfurreducens and 22% Acetobacterium). These results show that syntrophic interactions can be enhanced through setting certain anode potentials, and that long-term performance produces stable and convergent communities. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Protein-Ligand Binding Potential of Mean Force Calculations with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange on Alchemical Interaction Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Minh, David D L

    2015-01-01

    A binding potential of mean force (BPMF) is a free energy of noncovalent association in which one binding partner is flexible and the other is rigid. I have developed a method to calculate BPMFs for protein-ligand systems. The method is based on replica exchange sampling from multiple thermodynamic states at different temperatures and protein-ligand interaction strengths. Protein-ligand interactions are represented by interpolating precomputed electrostatic and van der Waals grids. Using a simple estimator for thermodynamic length, thermodynamic states are initialized at approximately equal intervals. The method is demonstrated on the Astex diverse set, a database of 85 protein-ligand complexes relevant to pharmacy or agriculture. Fifteen independent simulations of each complex were started using poses from crystallography, docking, or the lowest-energy pose observed in the other simulations. Benchmark simulations completed within three days on a single processor. Overall, protocols initialized using the ther...

  8. Self-spin-controlled rotation of spatial states of a Dirac electron in a cylindrical potential via spin orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, C. C.; Reeb, D.; Raymer, M. G.

    2008-10-01

    Solution of the Dirac equation predicts that when an electron with nonzero orbital angular momentum (OAM) propagates in a cylindrically symmetric potential, its spin and orbital degrees of freedom interact, causing the electron's phase velocity to depend on whether its spin angular momentum (SAM) and OAM vectors are oriented parallel or anti-parallel with respect to each other. This spin-orbit splitting of the electronic dispersion curves can result in a rotation of the electron's spatial state in a manner controlled by the electron's own spin z-component value. These effects persist at non-relativistic velocities. To clarify the physical origin of this effect, we compare solutions of the Dirac equation to perturbative predictions of the Schrödinger-Pauli equation with a spin-orbit term, using the standard Foldy-Wouthuysen Hamiltonian. This clearly shows that the origin of the effect is the familiar relativistic spin-orbit interaction.

  9. Alginate stabilized gold nanoparticle as multidrug carrier: Evaluation of cellular interactions and hemolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Soma; Sherly, M Caroline Diana; Rekha, M R; Sreenivasan, K

    2016-01-20

    This work delineates the synthesis of curcumin (Ccm) and methotrexate (MTX) conjugated biopolymer stabilized AuNPs (MP@Alg-Ccm AuNPs). The dual drug conjugated nano-vector was characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques. Hydrodynamic diameter and surface charge of the AuNPs were determined by DLS analysis and the spherical particles were visualized by TEM. MP@Alg-Ccm AuNPs exhibited improved cytotoxic potential against C6 glioma and MCF-7 cancer cell lines and was found to be highly hemocompatible. MP@Alg-Ccm AuNPs also exhibited active targeting efficiency against MCF-7 cancer cells due to the presence of "antifolate" drug MTX. Thus MP@Alg-Ccm AuNPs may find potential application in targeted combination chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer. The study is also interesting from the synthetic point of view because, here generation of AuNPs was done using "green chemical" alginate and dual drug conjugated AuNPs were created in two simple reaction steps using "green solvent" water.

  10. Potenciais interações medicamentosas em pacientes com artrite reumatoide Potential drug interactions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Bagatini

    2011-02-01

    risk of potential undesirable interactions between medications used for managing RA and those used for non-chronic diseases. METHODS: A cohort study was carried out with 103 RA patients registered at the Strategy of Access to Medications from the Brazilian Health Ministry, at the School of Pharmacy of the city of Florianópolis, state of Santa Catarina. Patients were monthly followed up by use of form completion. Drug interactions were identified by use of the Drugdex System - Thomson Micromedex® - Interactions database. RESULTS: Polypharmacy was found in 95.1% of the patients, and 19 potential undesirable interactions were observed between the drugs used by 74 patients (mean of 3.0 ± 1.2 interactions/patient. All potential interactions were related to methotrexate. Omeprazole was the major representative, accounting for 29.3% of the interactions, followed by diclofenac sodium (17.6%, and metamizole sodium (13.2%. CONCLUSION: Considering that this study confirms that polypharmacy is a common therapeutic practice in RA patients, it is worth emphasizing the need for greater surveillance regarding the adverse effects or effectiveness reduction of certain drugs due to drug interaction

  11. Ecosystem Interactions Underlie the Spread of Avian Influenza A Viruses with Pandemic Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Bahl

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite evidence for avian influenza A virus (AIV transmission between wild and domestic ecosystems, the roles of bird migration and poultry trade in the spread of viruses remain enigmatic. In this study, we integrate ecosystem interactions into a phylogeographic model to assess the contribution of wild and domestic hosts to AIV distribution and persistence. Analysis of globally sampled AIV datasets shows frequent two-way transmission between wild and domestic ecosystems. In general, viral flow from domestic to wild bird populations was restricted to within a geographic region. In contrast, spillover from wild to domestic populations occurred both within and between regions. Wild birds mediated long-distance dispersal at intercontinental scales whereas viral spread among poultry populations was a major driver of regional spread. Viral spread between poultry flocks frequently originated from persistent lineages circulating in regions of intensive poultry production. Our analysis of long-term surveillance data demonstrates that meaningful insights can be inferred from integrating ecosystem into phylogeographic reconstructions that may be consequential for pandemic preparedness and livestock protection.

  12. Spironolactone pharmacokinetics and actions in the dog: Influence on the potential spironolactone-digoxin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if administration of spironolactone to achieve steady-state concentrations to dogs at steady-state digoxin concentration resulted in an increased serum digoxin concentration in dogs. Serum digoxin concentration and AcS tolerance were measured in dogs at steady-state spironolactone-digoxin concentration to determine if an increase in serum digoxin concentration resulted from spironolactone administration and if this resulted in increased cardiac effects of digoxin. To determine if a spironolactone-digoxin interaction occurred at the canine myocardial digitalis receptor in vitro, the effects of spironolactone and its metabolites on Na{sup +},K{sup +}-ATPase activity and ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding were studied. Spironolactone, canrenone, or K{sup +} canrenoate did not inhibit canine myocardial K{sup +}-dependent MFPase activity or the concentration-response curve for digoxin inhibition of K{sup +}-dependent MFPase. In contrast, 0.1 mM spironolactone or canrenone competitively antagonized ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding to canine myocardium. Neither 0.24 {mu}M spironolactone, 0.59 {mu}M canrenone, or 1.27 {mu}M 7{alpha}-thiomethylspirolactone, concentrations of spironolactone and its metabolites found after a therapeutic dose of spironolactone in man, altered ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding to canine myocardium.

  13. Ecosystem Interactions Underlie the Spread of Avian Influenza A Viruses with Pandemic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Justin; Pham, Truc T.; Hill, Nichola J.; Hussein, Islam T. M.; Ma, Eric J.; Easterday, Bernard C.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Wentworth, David E.; Kayali, Ghazi; Krauss, Scott; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.; Swartz, Michael D.; Smith, Gavin J. D.; Runstadler, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence for avian influenza A virus (AIV) transmission between wild and domestic ecosystems, the roles of bird migration and poultry trade in the spread of viruses remain enigmatic. In this study, we integrate ecosystem interactions into a phylogeographic model to assess the contribution of wild and domestic hosts to AIV distribution and persistence. Analysis of globally sampled AIV datasets shows frequent two-way transmission between wild and domestic ecosystems. In general, viral flow from domestic to wild bird populations was restricted to within a geographic region. In contrast, spillover from wild to domestic populations occurred both within and between regions. Wild birds mediated long-distance dispersal at intercontinental scales whereas viral spread among poultry populations was a major driver of regional spread. Viral spread between poultry flocks frequently originated from persistent lineages circulating in regions of intensive poultry production. Our analysis of long-term surveillance data demonstrates that meaningful insights can be inferred from integrating ecosystem into phylogeographic reconstructions that may be consequential for pandemic preparedness and livestock protection. PMID:27166585

  14. Adaptation of hybrid human-computer interaction systems using EEG error-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Biasiucci, Andrea; Forster, Killian; Roggen, Daniel; Troster, Gerhard; Millan, Jose Del R

    2010-01-01

    Performance improvement in both humans and artificial systems strongly relies in the ability of recognizing erroneous behavior or decisions. This paper, that builds upon previous studies on EEG error-related signals, presents a hybrid approach for human computer interaction that uses human gestures to send commands to a computer and exploits brain activity to provide implicit feedback about the recognition of such commands. Using a simple computer game as a case study, we show that EEG activity evoked by erroneous gesture recognition can be classified in single trials above random levels. Automatic artifact rejection techniques are used, taking into account that subjects are allowed to move during the experiment. Moreover, we present a simple adaptation mechanism that uses the EEG signal to label newly acquired samples and can be used to re-calibrate the gesture recognition system in a supervised manner. Offline analysis show that, although the achieved EEG decoding accuracy is far from being perfect, these signals convey sufficient information to significantly improve the overall system performance.

  15. Trophic mechanisms for exercise-induced stress resilience: Potential role of interactions between BDNF and galanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip V Holmes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Current concepts of the neurobiology of stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression emphasize disruptions in neural plasticity and neurotrophins. The potent trophic actions of exercise therefore represent not only an effective means for prevention and treatment of these disorders, they also afford the opportunity to employ exercise paradigms as a basic research tool to uncover the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these disorders. Novel approaches to studying stress-related disorders focus increasingly on trophic factor signaling in corticolimbic circuits that both mediate and regulate cognitive, behavioral, and physiological responses to deleterious stress. Recent evidence demonstrates that the neural plasticity supported by these trophic mechanisms is vital for establishing and maintaining resilience to stress. Therapeutic interventions that promote these mechanisms, be they pharmacological, behavioral, or environmental, may therefore prevent or reverse stress-related mental illness by enhancing resilience. The present paper will provide an overview of trophic mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of resilience by voluntary exercise with an emphasis on BDNF, galanin, and interactions between these two trophic factors.

  16. Wave turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential

    CERN Document Server

    Gallet, Basile; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-01-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave Turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well-suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wavenumber, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bo...

  17. Surface Electrical Potentials of Root Cell Plasma Membranes: Implications for Ion Interactions, Rhizotoxicity, and Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Min Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many crop plants are exposed to heavy metals and other metals that may intoxicate the crop plants themselves or consumers of the plants. The rhizotoxicity of heavy metals is influenced strongly by the root cell plasma membrane (PM surface’s electrical potential (ψ0. The usually negative ψ0 is created by negatively charged constituents of the PM. Cations in the rooting medium are attracted to the PM surface and anions are repelled. Addition of ameliorating cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+ to the rooting medium reduces the effectiveness of cationic toxicants (e.g., Cu2+ and Pb2+ and increases the effectiveness of anionic toxicants (e.g., SeO42− and H2AsO4−. Root growth responses to ions are better correlated with ion activities at PM surfaces ({IZ}0 than with activities in the bulk-phase medium ({IZ}b (IZ denotes an ion with charge Z. Therefore, electrostatic effects play a role in heavy metal toxicity that may exceed the role of site-specific competition between toxicants and ameliorants. Furthermore, ψ0 controls the transport of ions across the PM by influencing both {IZ}0 and the electrical potential difference across the PM from the outer surface to the inner surface (Em,surf. Em,surf is a component of the driving force for ion fluxes across the PM and controls ion-channel voltage gating. Incorporation of {IZ}0 and Em,surf into quantitative models for root metal toxicity and uptake improves risk assessments of toxic metals in the environment. These risk assessments will improve further with future research on the application of electrostatic theory to heavy metal phytotoxicity in natural soils and aquatic environments.

  18. Role of Structure and Entropy in Determining Differences in Dynamics for Glass Formers with Different Interaction Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Atreyee; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth; Bhattacharyya, Sarika Maitra

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of two model liquids with different interaction potentials, exhibiting similar structure but significantly different dynamics at low temperatures. By evaluating the configurational entropy, we show that the differences in the dynamics of these systems can be understood in terms of their thermodynamic differences. Analyzing their structure, we demonstrate that differences in pair correlation functions between the two systems, through their contribution to the entropy, dominate the differences in their dynamics, and indeed overestimate the differences. Including the contribution of higher order structural correlations to the entropy leads to smaller estimates for the relaxation times, as well as smaller differences between the two studied systems.

  19. Helmholtz free energy and equation of state of an fcc crystal with the interaction of hard sphere Yukawa potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moradi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available  The Helmholtz free energy and equation of the state of an fcc crystal are calculated, where the interaction between the molecules is hard sphere-Yukawa potential. Here the perturbational density functional method is used. This method is introduced by Ebner and co-workers. In this method the density functional Taylor expansion is applied for the crystal configuration up to second order. And for the uniform parts an exact expression is used. The results are compared with those obtained by Monte Carlo computer simulation. The agreement is good.

  20. Seaweed-coral interactions: variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential effects on coral resilience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta M Bonaldo

    Full Text Available Tropical reefs are in global decline with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. Negative associations between macroalgae and corals are well documented, but the mechanisms involved, the dynamics of the interactions, and variance in effects of different macroalgal-coral pairings are poorly investigated. We assessed the frequency, magnitude, and dynamics of macroalgal-coral competition involving allelopathic and non-allelopathic macroalgae on three, spatially grouped pairs of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs and non-MPAs in Fiji. In non-MPAs, biomass of herbivorous fishes was 70-80% lower, macroalgal cover 4-9 fold higher, macroalgal-coral contacts 5-15 fold more frequent and 23-67 fold more extensive (measured as % of colony margin contacted by macroalgae, and coral cover 51-68% lower than in MPAs. Coral contacts with allelopathic macroalgae occurred less frequently than expected by chance across all sites, while contact with non-allelopathic macroalgae tended to occur more frequently than expected. Transplants of allelopathic macroalgae (Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Galaxaura filamentosa against coral edges inflicted damage to Acropora aspera and Pocillopora damicornis more rapidly and extensively than to Porites cylindrica and Porites lobata, which appeared more resistant to these macroalgae. Montipora digitata experienced intermediate damage. Extent of damage from macroalgal contact was independent of coral colony size for each of the 10 macroalgal-coral pairings we established. When natural contacts with Galaxaura filamentosa were removed in the field, recovery was rapid for Porites lobata, but Pocillopora damicornis did not recover and damage continued to expand. As macroalgae increase on overfished tropical reefs, allelopathy could produce feedbacks that suppress coral resilience, prevent coral recovery, and promote the stability of algal beds in habitats previously available to corals.

  1. Moving shocks through metallic grids: their interaction and potential for blast wave mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreopoulos, Y.; Xanthos, S.; Subramaniam, K.

    2007-07-01

    Numerical simulations and laboratory measurements have been used to illuminate the interaction of a moving shock wave impacting on metallic grids at various shock strengths and grid solidities. The experimental work was carried out in a large scale shock tube facility while computational work simulated the flow field with a time-dependent inviscid and a time-dependent viscous model. The pressure drop measured across the grids is a result of two phenomena which are associated with the impact of the shock on the metallic grids. First are the reflection and refraction of the incoming shock on the grid itself. This appears to be the main inviscid mechanism associated with the reduction of the strength of the transmitted shock. Second, viscous phenomena are present during the reflection and refraction of the wave as well as during the passage of the induced flow of the air through the grid. The experimental data of pressure drop across the grid obtained in the present investigation are compared with those obtained from computations. The numerical results slightly overpredict the experimental data of relative pressure drop which increases substantially with grid solidity at fixed flow Mach numbers. The processes of shock reflection and refraction are continuous and they can be extended in duration by using thicker grids that will result in lower compression rates of the structural loading and increase the viscous losses associated with these phenomena which will further attenuate the impacting shock. Preliminary theoretical analysis suggests that the use of a graded porosity/solidity material will result in higher pressure drop than a constant porosity/solidity material and thus provide effective blast mitigation.

  2. Smart RISUG: A potential new contraceptive and its magnetic field-mediated sperm interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi K Jha

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Rakhi K Jha1,2, Pradeep K Jha1,3, Sujoy K Guha11School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India; 2Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, ChCS University, Meerut, UP, India; 3Department of Management studies, VIET, UP Tech. Univ., Lucknow, UP, IndiaAbstract: The rationale and technique underlying a novel concept of noninvasive fertility control by a new Cuproferrogel contraceptive drug, iron oxide–copper–styrene maleic anhydride–dimethyl sulphoxide (Fe3O4–Cu–SMA–DMSO composite named ‘Smart RISUG’ (smart reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance in presence of pulsed magnetic field (PMF; 1 mT to 800 mT is explained. It was synthesized by dispersing iron oxide particles and copper particles into SMA-DMSO (male contraceptive RISUG and characterized for particle distribution, particle size measurement and transmittance peaks, etc. Interaction of the RISUG particles as well as Smart RISUG particles with Albino rat sperm cell was studied in presence as well as absence of PMF. To find an explanation to increased reaching of the Smart RISUG drug into sperm under influence of magnetic field, the transport properties were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Smart RISUG could be mobilized into sperm cell membrane at the PMF, 760 mT in about 50 seconds. Adoption of novel drug Smart RISUG involving new technique may open the pathway for non surgical control of drug distribution, detection and restoration of the normal fertility after removal of the contraceptive from the male/female reproductive tube in presence of electromagnetic field.Keywords: smart RISUG, pulsed magnetic field, noninvasive fertility control, drug distribution, sperm cell

  3. Adiabatic tunneling of Bose—Einstein condensates with modulated atom interaction in a double-well potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the adiabatic tunneling of Bose—Einstein condensates in a symmetric double-well potential when the interaction strength between the atoms is modulated linearly or in a cosine periodic form. It is shown that the system evolves along a nonlinear eigenstate path. In the case of linear modulation under the adiabatic approximation conditions, the tunneling probability of the condensate atoms to the other potential well is half. However, when the system is periodically scanned in the adiabatic process, we find an interesting phenomenon. A small change in the cycle period can lead to the condensate atoms returning to the right well or tunneling to the left well. The system comes from a linear eigenstate back to a nonlinear one, which is completely different from the linear eigenstate evolution. We explain the results by using the energy level and the phase diagram. (general)

  4. Ion focusing and interaction potential for spherical and rodlike obstacles in a supersonic plasma flow: numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parameter dependence of the ion focus behind perfectly conducting or alternatively perfectly insulating spherical grains for different electron to ion temperature ratios is studied. For elongated, insulating dust grains we study the potential and plasma density wakes in drifting plasma for rods or plates of different lengths and different inclination angles. These two characteristics (i.e., the rod length and the inclination angle are important for the exact charge distribution on the surface and the wake pattern. For this case we discuss also the interaction potential between two elongated grains in a flowing plasma.Our simulations are carried out in two spatial dimensions by a Particle-in-Cell code, treating ions and electrons as individual particles. These studies can be relevant for finite size dust grains suspended in a plasma sheath or larger objects in space, e.g., meteoroids.

  5. Relativistic symmetries in the Rosen-Morse potential and tensor interaction using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sameer M Ikhdair; Majid Hamzavi

    2013-01-01

    Approximate analytical bound-state solutions of the Dirac particle in the fields of attractive and repulsive RosenMorse (RM) potentials including the Coulomb-like tensor (CLT) potential are obtained for arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number K.The Pekeris approximation is used to deal with the spin-orbit coupling terms K(K ± 1)r-2.In the presence of exact spin and pseudospin (p-spin) symmetries,the energy eigenvalues and the corresponding normalized two-component wave functions are found by using the parametric generalization of the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method.The numerical results show that the CLT interaction removes degeneracies between the spin and p-spin state doublets.

  6. Relativistic symmetries with the trigonometric P(o)schl-Teller potential plus Coulomb-like tensor interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Babatunde J.Falaye; Sameer M.Ikhdair

    2013-01-01

    The Dirac equation is solved to obtain its approximate bound states for a spin-1/2 particle in the presence of trigonometric P(o)schl-Teller (tPT) potential including a Coulomb-like tensor interaction with arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number κ using an approximation scheme to substitute the centrifugal terms κ(κ ± 1)r-2.In view of spin and pseudo-spin (p-spin) symmetries,the relativistic energy eigenvalues and the corresponding two-component wave functions of a particle moving in the field of attractive and repulsive tPT potentials are obtained using the asymptotic iteration method (AIM).We present numerical results in the absence and presence of tensor coupling A and for various values of spin and p-spin constants and quantum numbers n and κ.The non-relativistic limit is also obtained.

  7. Systems integration of biodefense omics data for analysis of pathogen-host interactions and identification of potential targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B McGarvey

    Full Text Available The NIAID (National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases Biodefense Proteomics program aims to identify targets for potential vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics for agents of concern in bioterrorism, including bacterial, parasitic, and viral pathogens. The program includes seven Proteomics Research Centers, generating diverse types of pathogen-host data, including mass spectrometry, microarray transcriptional profiles, protein interactions, protein structures and biological reagents. The Biodefense Resource Center (www.proteomicsresource.org has developed a bioinformatics framework, employing a protein-centric approach to integrate and support mining and analysis of the large and heterogeneous data. Underlying this approach is a data warehouse with comprehensive protein + gene identifier and name mappings and annotations extracted from over 100 molecular databases. Value-added annotations are provided for key proteins from experimental findings using controlled vocabulary. The availability of pathogen and host omics data in an integrated framework allows global analysis of the data and comparisons across different experiments and organisms, as illustrated in several case studies presented here. (1 The identification of a hypothetical protein with differential gene and protein expressions in two host systems (mouse macrophage and human HeLa cells infected by different bacterial (Bacillus anthracis and Salmonella typhimurium and viral (orthopox pathogens suggesting that this protein can be prioritized for additional analysis and functional characterization. (2 The analysis of a vaccinia-human protein interaction network supplemented with protein accumulation levels led to the identification of human Keratin, type II cytoskeletal 4 protein as a potential therapeutic target. (3 Comparison of complete genomes from pathogenic variants coupled with experimental information on complete proteomes allowed the identification and

  8. An Event-related Potential Study on the Interaction between Lighting Level and Stimulus Spatial Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretié, Luis; Ruiz-Padial, Elisabeth; Mendoza, María T.

    2015-01-01

    Due to heterogeneous photoreceptor distribution, spatial location of stimulation is crucial to study visual brain activity in different light environments. This unexplored issue was studied through occipital event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded from 40 participants in response to discrete visual stimuli presented at different locations and in two environmental light conditions, low mesopic (L, 0.03 lux) and high mesopic (H, 6.5 lux), characterized by a differential photoreceptor activity balance: rod > cone and rod < cone, respectively. Stimuli, which were exactly the same in L and H, consisted of squares presented at fixation, at the vertical periphery (above or below fixation) or at the horizontal periphery (left or right). Analyses showed that occipital ERPs presented important L vs. H differences in the 100 to 450 ms window, which were significantly modulated by spatial location of stimulation: differences were greater in response to peripheral stimuli than to stimuli presented at fixation. Moreover, in the former case, significance of L vs. H differences was even stronger in response to stimuli presented at the horizontal than at the vertical periphery. These low vs. high mesopic differences may be explained by photoreceptor activation and their retinal distribution, and confirm that ERPs discriminate between rod– and cone-originated visual processing. PMID:26635588

  9. An event-related potential study on the interaction between lighting level and stimulus spatial location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis eCarretié

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to heterogeneous photoreceptor distribution, spatial location of stimulation is crucial to study visual brain activity in different light environments. This unexplored issue was studied through occipital event-related potentials (ERPs recorded from 40 participants in response to discrete visual stimuli presented at different locations and in two environmental light conditions, low mesopic (L, 0.03 lux and high mesopic (H, 6.5 lux, characterized by a differential photoreceptor activity balance: rod>cone and rod

  10. Interaction of Ulocladium atrum, a Potential Biological Control Agent, with Botrytis cinerea and Grapevine Plantlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ronseaux

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of biological control agent, Ulocladium atrum (isolates U13 and U16 in protecting Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay against gray mold disease caused by Botrytis cinerea, and simulation of the foliar defense responses was investigated. A degraded mycelium structure during cultural assay on potato dextrose agar revealed that U. atrum isolates U13 and U16 were both antagonistic to B. cinerea, mainly when isolates were inoculated two days before Botrytis. Under in vitro conditions, foliar application of U. atrum protected grapevine leaves against gray mold disease. An increase in chitinase activity was induced by the presence of U. atrum isolates indicating that the biological control agents triggered plant defense mechanisms. Moreover, U13 has the potential to colonize the grapevine plantlets and to improve their growth. The ability of U. atrum isolates to exhibit an antagonistic effect against B. cinerea in addition to their aptitude to induce plant resistance and to promote grapevine growth may explain a part of their biological activity. Hence, this study suggests that U. atrum provides a suitable biocontrol agent against gray mold in grapevines.

  11. Interactions between mood and the structure of semantic memory: event-related potentials evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ana P; del Re, Elisabetta; Nestor, Paul G; McCarley, Robert W; Gonçalves, Óscar F; Niznikiewicz, Margaret

    2013-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that affect acts as modulator of cognitive processes and in particular that induced mood has an effect on the way semantic memory is used on-line. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine affective modulation of semantic information processing under three different moods: neutral, positive and negative. Fifteen subjects read 324 pairs of sentences, after mood induction procedure with 30 pictures of neutral, 30 pictures of positive and 30 pictures of neutral valence: 108 sentences were read in each mood induction condition. Sentences ended with three word types: expected words, within-category violations, and between-category violations. N400 amplitude was measured to the three word types under each mood induction condition. Under neutral mood, a congruency (more negative N400 amplitude for unexpected relative to expected endings) and a category effect (more negative N400 amplitude for between- than to within-category violations) were observed. Also, results showed differences in N400 amplitude for both within- and between-category violations as a function of mood: while positive mood tended to facilitate the integration of unexpected but related items, negative mood made their integration as difficult as unexpected and unrelated items. These findings suggest the differential impact of mood on access to long-term semantic memory during sentence comprehension.

  12. National Geothermal Data System: Interactive Assessment of Geothermal Energy Potential in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Lee [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Richard, Stephen [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Clark, Ryan; Patten, Kim; Love, Diane; Coleman, Celia; Chen, Genhan; Matti, Jordan; Pape, Estelle; Musil, Leah

    2012-01-30

    Geothermal-relevant geosciences data from all 50 states (www.stategeothermaldata.org), federal agencies, national labs, and academic centers are being digitized and linked in a distributed online network via the U.S. Department of Energy-funded National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) to foster geothermal energy exploration and development through use of interactive online ‘mashups,’data integration, and applications. Emphasis is first to make as much information as possible accessible online, with a long range goal to make data interoperable through standardized services and interchange formats. An initial set of thirty geoscience data content models is in use or under development to define a standardized interchange format: aqueous chemistry, borehole temperature data, direct use feature, drill stem test, earthquake hypocenter, fault feature, geologic contact feature, geologic unit feature, thermal/hot spring description, metadata, quaternary fault, volcanic vent description, well header feature, borehole lithology log, crustal stress, gravity, heat flow/temperature gradient, permeability, and feature descriptions data like developed geothermal systems, geologic unit geothermal properties, permeability, production data, rock alteration description, rock chemistry, and thermal conductivity. Map services are also being developed for isopach maps, aquifer temperature maps, and several states are working on geothermal resource overview maps. Content models are developed preferentially from existing community use in order to encourage widespread adoption and promulgate minimum metadata quality standards. Geoscience data and maps from other NGDS participating institutions, or “nodes” (USGS, Southern Methodist University, Boise State University Geothermal Data Coalition) are being supplemented with extensive land management and land use resources from the Western Regional Partnership (15 federal agencies and 5 Western states) to provide access to a comprehensive

  13. Alphacoronaviruses in New World Bats: Prevalence, Persistence, Phylogeny, and Potential for Interaction with Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Christina; Cryan, Paul M.; O'Shea, Thomas J.; Oko, Lauren M.; Ndaluka, Christina; Calisher, Charles H.; Berglund, Andrew D.; Klavetter, Mead L.; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Dominguez, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    Bats are reservoirs for many different coronaviruses (CoVs) as well as many other important zoonotic viruses. We sampled feces and/or anal swabs of 1,044 insectivorous bats of 2 families and 17 species from 21 different locations within Colorado from 2007 to 2009. We detected alphacoronavirus RNA in bats of 4 species: big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), 10% prevalence; long-legged bats (Myotis volans), 8% prevalence; little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), 3% prevalence; and western long-eared bats (Myotis evotis), 2% prevalence. Overall, juvenile bats were twice as likely to be positive for CoV RNA as adult bats. At two of the rural sampling sites, CoV RNAs were detected in big brown and long-legged bats during the three sequential summers of this study. CoV RNA was detected in big brown bats in all five of the urban maternity roosts sampled throughout each of the periods tested. Individually tagged big brown bats that were positive for CoV RNA and later sampled again all became CoV RNA negative. Nucleotide sequences in the RdRp gene fell into 3 main clusters, all distinct from those of Old World bats. Similar nucleotide sequences were found in amplicons from gene 1b and the spike gene in both a big-brown and a long-legged bat, indicating that a CoV may be capable of infecting bats of different genera. These data suggest that ongoing evolution of CoVs in bats creates the possibility of a continued threat for emergence into hosts of other species. Alphacoronavirus RNA was detected at a high prevalence in big brown bats in roosts in close proximity to human habitations (10%) and known to have direct contact with people (19%), suggesting that significant potential opportunities exist for cross-species transmission of these viruses. Further CoV surveillance studies in bats throughout the Americas are warranted.

  14. Biological aspects of the potential interaction between androgen suppression and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a basic axiom of radiotherapy that the radiation dose required for tumor eradication increases with increasing tumor volume. These Patterns of Care Studies and prospective studies using rebiopsy have shown that this holds true for prostate cancer as well. Despite our best endeavors with conventional dose, there remains a substantial element of local failure following radiotherapy, and this is T-stage related. Unlikely many other solid tumors, a convenient method of volume reduction exists for prostate carcinoma. Approximately 90% demonstrate shrinkage following androgen suppression, an effect that is more pronounced at the primary site than metastatic sites. Transrectal ultrasound studies have shown a median of 40% prostatic tumor volume reduction after 3-4 months of androgen suppression. With more protracted androgen suppression the shrinkage progresses and a small minority of patients may actually have a complete response determined pathologically. Animal models demonstrate clearly that the TCD50 of androgen dependent tumors may be decreased by prior androgen depression. This effect is most pronounced if radiation is deferred until the time of maximal tumor regression. The advantage is lost if the tumor is allowed to regrow in an androgen independent fashion to its original volume. It is not clear whether this benefit of neoadjuvant androgen suppression results solely from volume shrinkage. The potential for synergy exists as both radiation and androgen suppression have an element of apoptosis as a common pathway of cell death. Although apoptosis is certainly the major cause of cell death from androgen suppression its' contribution to radiation cell kill in prostatic adenocarcinomas is yet to be evaluated. If the two effects are additive and not synergistic, then sequence should be unimportant. Animal models, however, demonstrate that the TCD50 of androgen dependent tumors is not significantly reduced by adjuvant androgen suppression. Human data is still

  15. Conjugation of cholesterol to HIV-1 fusion inhibitor C34 increases peptide-membrane interactions potentiating its action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Hollmann

    Full Text Available Recently, the covalent binding of a cholesterol moiety to a classical HIV-1 fusion inhibitor peptide, C34, was shown to potentiate its antiviral activity. Our purpose was to evaluate the interaction of cholesterol-conjugated and native C34 with membrane model systems and human blood cells to understand the effects of this derivatization. Lipid vesicles and monolayers with defined compositions were used as model membranes. C34-cholesterol partitions more to fluid phase membranes that mimic biological membranes. Importantly, there is a preference of the conjugate for liquid ordered membranes, rich in cholesterol and/or sphingomyelin, as observed both from partition and surface pressure studies. In human erythrocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, C34-cholesterol significantly decreases the membrane dipole potential. In PBMC, the conjugate was 14- and 115-fold more membranotropic than T-1249 and enfuvirtide, respectively. C34 or cholesterol alone did not show significant membrane activity. The enhanced interaction of C34-cholesterol with biological membranes correlates with its higher antiviral potency. Higher partitions for lipid-raft like compositions direct the drug to the receptor-rich domains where membrane fusion is likely to occur. This intermediary membrane binding step may facilitate the drug delivery to gp41 in its pre-fusion state.

  16. Effects of adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics interactions on the pair potential and thermophysical properties of helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencek, Wojciech; Przybytek, Michał; Komasa, Jacek; Mehl, James B; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2012-06-14

    The adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics (QED) contributions to the pair potential of helium were computed, fitted separately, and applied, together with the nonrelativistic Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential, in calculations of thermophysical properties of helium and of the properties of the helium dimer. An analysis of the convergence patterns of the calculations with increasing basis set sizes allowed us to estimate the uncertainties of the total interaction energy to be below 50 ppm for interatomic separations R smaller than 4 bohrs and for the distance R = 5.6 bohrs. For other separations, the relative uncertainties are up to an order of magnitude larger (and obviously still larger near R = 4.8 bohrs where the potential crosses zero) and are dominated by the uncertainties of the nonrelativistic BO component. These estimates also include the contributions from the neglected relativistic and QED terms proportional to the fourth and higher powers of the fine-structure constant α. To obtain such high accuracy, it was necessary to employ explicitly correlated Gaussian expansions containing up to 2400 terms for smaller R (all R in the case of a QED component) and optimized orbital bases up to the cardinal number X = 7 for larger R. Near-exact asymptotic constants were used to describe the large-R behavior of all components. The fitted potential, exhibiting the minimum of -10.996 ± 0.004 K at R = 5.608 0 ± 0.000 1 bohr, was used to determine properties of the very weakly bound (4)He(2) dimer and thermophysical properties of gaseous helium. It is shown that the Casimir-Polder retardation effect, increasing the dimer size by about 2 Å relative to the nonrelativistic BO value, is almost completely accounted for by the inclusion of the Breit-interaction and the Araki-Sucher contributions to the potential, of the order α(2) and α(3), respectively. The remaining retardation effect, of the order of α(4) and higher, is practically negligible for the bound

  17. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials: exploring the interactions with Caco-2 cells for potential oral drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyuco JC

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Jurja C Coyuco, Yuanjie Liu, Bee-Jen Tan, Gigi NC ChiuDepartment of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, SingaporeAbstract: Although carbon nanomaterials (CNMs have been increasingly studied for their biomedical applications, there is limited research on these novel materials for oral drug delivery. As such, this study aimed to explore the potential of CNMs in oral drug delivery, and the objectives were to evaluate CNM cytotoxicity and their abilities to modulate paracellular transport and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp efflux pump. Three types of functionalized CNMs were studied, including polyhydroxy small-gap fullerenes (OH-fullerenes, carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT-COOH and poly(ethylene glycol functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT-PEG, using the well-established Caco-2 cell monolayer to represent the intestinal epithelium. All three CNMs had minimum cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cells, as demonstrated through lactose dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. Of the three CNMs, fSWCNT-COOH significantly reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced transport of Lucifer Yellow across the Caco-2 monolayer. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fSWCNT-COOH treated cells had the highest perturbation in the distribution of ZO-1, a protein marker of tight junction, suggesting that fSWCNT-COOH could enhance paracellular permeability via disruption of tight junctions. This modulating effect of fSWCNT-COOH can be reversed over time. Furthermore, cellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate, rhodamine-123, was significantly increased in cells treated with fSWCNT-COOH, suggestive of P-gp inhibition. Of note, fSWCNT-PEG could increase rhodamine-123 accumulation without modifying the tight junction. Collectively, these results suggest that the functionalized CNMs could be useful as modulators for oral drug

  18. Optical potential obtained from relativistic-mean-field theory-based microscopic nucleon-nucleon interaction: applied to cluster radioactive decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, BirBikram; Bhuyan, M.; Patra, S. K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2012-02-01

    A microscopic nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is derived from the popular relativistic-mean-field (RMF) theory Lagrangian and used to obtain the optical potential by folding it with the RMF densities of cluster and daughter nuclei. The NN-interaction is remarkably related to the inbuilt fundamental parameters of RMF theory, and the results of the application of the so obtained optical potential, made to exotic cluster radioactive decays and α+α scattering, are found comparable to that for the well-known, phenomenological M3Y effective NN-interaction. The RMF-based NN-interaction can also be used to calculate a number of other nuclear observables.

  19. Wnt isoform-specific interactions with coreceptor specify inhibition or potentiation of signaling by LRP6 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yan; Bourhis, Eric; Chiu, Cecilia; Stawicki, Scott; DeAlmeida, Venita I; Liu, Bob Y; Phamluong, Khanhky; Cao, Tim C; Carano, Richard A D; Ernst, James A; Solloway, Mark; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Hannoush, Rami N; Wu, Yan; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike

    2010-01-01

    β-Catenin-dependent Wnt signaling is initiated as Wnt binds to both the receptor FZD and coreceptor LRP5/6, which then assembles a multimeric complex at the cytoplasmic membrane face to recruit and inactivate the kinase GSK3. The large number and sequence diversity of Wnt isoforms suggest the possibility of domain-specific ligand-coreceptor interactions, and distinct binding sites on LRP6 for Wnt3a and Wnt9b have recently been identified in vitro. Whether mechanistically different interactions between Wnts and coreceptors might mediate signaling remains to be determined. It is also not clear whether coreceptor homodimerization induced extracellularly can activate Wnt signaling, as is the case for receptor tyrosine kinases. We generated monoclonal antibodies against LRP6 with the unexpected ability to inhibit signaling by some Wnt isoforms and potentiate signaling by other isoforms. In cell culture, two antibodies characterized further show reciprocal activities on most Wnts, with one antibody antagonizing and the other potentiating. We demonstrate that these antibodies bind to different regions of LRP6 protein, and inhibition of signaling results from blocking Wnt binding. Antibody-mediated dimerization of LRP6 can potentiate signaling only when a Wnt isoform is also able to bind the complex, presumably recruiting FZD. Endogenous autocrine Wnt signaling in different tumor cell lines can be either antagonized or enhanced by the LRP6 antibodies, indicating expression of different Wnt isoforms. As anticipated from the roles of Wnt signaling in cancer and bone development, antibody activities can also be observed in mice for inhibition of tumor growth and in organ culture for enhancement of bone mineral density. Collectively, our results indicate that separate binding sites for different subsets of Wnt isoforms determine the inhibition or potentiation of signaling conferred by LRP6 antibodies. This complexity of coreceptor-ligand interactions may allow for

  20. An R package "VariABEL" for genome-wide searching of potentially interacting loci by testing genotypic variance heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struchalin Maksim V

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hundreds of new loci have been discovered by genome-wide association studies of human traits. These studies mostly focused on associations between single locus and a trait. Interactions between genes and between genes and environmental factors are of interest as they can improve our understanding of the genetic background underlying complex traits. Genome-wide testing of complex genetic models is a computationally demanding task. Moreover, testing of such models leads to multiple comparison problems that reduce the probability of new findings. Assuming that the genetic model underlying a complex trait can include hundreds of genes and environmental factors, testing of these models in genome-wide association studies represent substantial difficulties. We and Pare with colleagues (2010 developed a method allowing to overcome such difficulties. The method is based on the fact that loci which are involved in interactions can show genotypic variance heterogeneity of a trait. Genome-wide testing of such heterogeneity can be a fast scanning approach which can point to the interacting genetic variants. Results In this work we present a new method, SVLM, allowing for variance heterogeneity analysis of imputed genetic variation. Type I error and power of this test are investigated and contracted with these of the Levene's test. We also present an R package, VariABEL, implementing existing and newly developed tests. Conclusions Variance heterogeneity analysis is a promising method for detection of potentially interacting loci. New method and software package developed in this work will facilitate such analysis in genome-wide context.

  1. Thermal and transport properties of a non-relativistic quantum gas interacting through a delta-shell potential

    CERN Document Server

    Postnikov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This work extends the seminal work of Gottfried on the two-body quantum physics of particles interacting through a delta-shell potential to many-body physics by studying a system of non-relativistic particles when the thermal De-Broglie wavelength of a particle is smaller than the range of the potential and the density is such that average distance between particles is smaller than the range. The ability of the delta-shell potential to reproduce some basic properties of the deuteron are examined. Relations for moments of bound states are derived. The virial expansion is used to calculate the first quantum correction to the ideal gas pressure in the form of the second virial coefficient. Additionally, all thermodynamic functions are calculated up to the first order quantum corrections. For small departures from equilibrium, the net flows of mass, energy and momentum, characterized by the coefficients of diffusion, thermal conductivity and shear viscosity, respectively, are calculated. Properties of the gas are...

  2. {alpha}-{alpha} interaction reexamined in the context of the Sao Paulo potential: possible applications in astrophysics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasques, L.R.; Chamon, L.C.; Botero, D.F.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (DFN/USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear; Alves, L.F.M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (Brazil); Carlson, B.V. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (CTA/ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear; Rossi Junior, E.S. [Centro Universitario FIEO(UNIFIEO), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: We have analyzed a large set of {alpha}-{alpha} elastic scattering data for bombarding energies ranging from 0.6 to 29.5 MeV. The complete lack of open reaction channels at these somehow low energies results in a vanishing imaginary part for the optical interaction. This characteristic makes the {alpha}-{alpha} reaction particularly interesting as the corresponding elastic scattering cross sections and phase shifts become very sensitive to the real part of the interaction. The data were analyzed within the context of the velocity-dependent Sao Paulo potential, which is a successful theoretical model for the description of heavy-ion reactions from sub-barrier to intermediate energies. We have shown that, even in this low energy region, the velocity dependence of the Sao Paulo potential model is a necessary ingredient for describing the data. Despite the reasonable description obtained with the Sao Paulo potential, the analyses indicate the necessity of an additional weak dependence of the interaction on the angular momentum. These important characteristics open the possibility for studying reactions with astrophysical interested. In particular, predictions of the astrophysical S-factor for the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}) reaction will be presented. The understanding of the reaction rate for the {alpha}-capture process by a {sup 12}C nucleus is a crucial ingredient for predicting the stellar helium burning and the subsequent fate of stars as this reaction determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen towards the end of the Red Giants phase. It is well known that low mass stars evolve to White Dwarfs and this ratio determines the final abundance composition in White Dwarf matter and sets the trigger conditions for type Ia supernova explosions. The carbon-oxygen ratio also dictates the subsequent sequence of burning processes during the final stages of stellar evolution for massive stars. Thus, it has a key role in the determination of the abundance composition in

  3. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 1014 W/cm2 to 3.5 × 1014 W/cm2. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length

  4. Brewing and volatiles analysis of three tea beers indicate a potential interaction between tea components and lager yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Lei; Peng, Li-Juan; Ho, Chi-Tang; Yan, Shou-He; Meurens, Marc; Zhang, Zheng-Zhu; Li, Da-Xiang; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Bao, Guan-Hu; Gao, Xue-Ling; Ling, Tie-Jun

    2016-04-15

    Green tea, oolong tea and black tea were separately introduced to brew three kinds of tea beers. A model was designed to investigate the tea beer flavour character. Comparison of the volatiles between the sample of tea beer plus water mixture (TBW) and the sample of combination of tea infusion and normal beer (CTB) was accomplished by triangular sensory test and HS-SPME GC-MS analysis. The PCA of GC-MS data not only showed a significant difference between volatile features of each TBW and CTB group, but also suggested some key compounds to distinguish TBW from CTB. The results of GC-MS showed that the relative concentrations of many typical tea volatiles were significantly changed after the brewing process. More interestingly, the behaviour of yeast fermentation was influenced by tea components. A potential interaction between tea components and lager yeast could be suggested.

  5. Kirkwood-Buff Integrals for Aqueous Urea Solutions Based upon the Quantum Chemical Electrostatic Potential and Interaction Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shuntaro; Furuta, Tadaomi; Shimizu, Seishi

    2016-08-11

    Cosolvents, such as urea, affect protein folding and binding, and the solubility of solutes. The modeling of cosolvents has been facilitated significantly by the rigorous Kirkwood-Buff (KB) theory of solutions, which can describe structural thermodynamics over the entire composition range of aqueous cosolvent mixtures based only on the solution density and the KB integrals (KBIs), i.e., the net excess radial distribution functions from the bulk. Using KBIs to describe solution thermodynamics has given rise to a clear guideline that an accurate prediction of KBIs is equivalent to accurate modeling of cosolvents. Taking urea as an example, here we demonstrate that an improvement in the prediction of KBIs comes from an improved reproduction of high-level quantum chemical (QC) electrostatic potential and molecular pairwise interaction energies. This rational approach to the improvement of the KBI prediction stems from a comparison of existing force fields, AMOEBA, and the generalized AMBER force field, as well as the further optimization of the former to enable better agreement with QC interaction energies. Such improvements would pave the way toward a rational and systematic determination of the transferable force field parameters for a number of important small molecule cosolvents. PMID:27434200

  6. GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

    2011-05-17

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  7. Interaction between bradykinin potentiating nonapeptide (BPP9a) and {beta}-cyclodextrin: A structural and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lula, Ivana; De Sousa, Frederico B. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Denadai, Angelo M.L. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, CEFET-MG, Campus VII, 35.183-006, Timoteo, MG (Brazil); Ferreira de Lima, Guilherme; Duarte, Helio Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mares Guia, Thiago R. dos [Departamento de Bioquimica e Imunologia, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Faljoni-Alario, Adelaide [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santoro, Marcelo M. [Departamento de Bioquimica e Imunologia, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Camargo, Antonio C.M. de [Center for Applied Toxinology CAT-CEPID, Laboratorio Especial de Toxicologia Aplicada, Instituto Butantan, 05503-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Robson A.S. dos [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofisica, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); and others

    2012-02-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the physical and chemical characterizations of the supramolecular complex formed between {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}CD) and bradykinin potentiating nonapeptide (BPP9a), an endogenous toxin found in Bothrops jararaca. Circular dichroism results indicate a conformational change in the BPP9a secondary structure upon its complexation with {beta}CD. Nuclear magnetic resonance results, mainly from NOESY experiments, and theoretical calculations showed a favorable interaction between the tryptophan residue of BPP9a and the {beta}CD cavity. Thermodynamic inclusion parameters were investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry, demonstrating that {beta}CD/BPP9a complex formation is an exothermic process that results in a reduction in entropy. Additionally, in vitro degradation study of BPP9a against trypsin (37 Degree-Sign C, pH 7.2) showed higher stability of peptide in presence of {beta}CD. This {beta}CD/BPP9a complex, which presents new chemical properties arising from the peptide inclusion process, may be useful as an antihypertensive drug in oral pharmaceutical formulations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd and NMR showed evidences for the existence of more than one structure in solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexation with {beta}CD reduces the conformational rigidity of the peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}CD cavity recognize Trp and/or Pro segments of BPP9a. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interactions involving disaggregation of BPP9a assemblies and binding with {beta}CD.

  8. Potential role of lncRNA cyp2c91-protein interactions on diseases of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suravajhala, Prashanth; Kogelman, Lisette J A; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2015-01-01

    With unprecedented increase in next generation sequencing technologies, there has been a persistent interest on transcript profiles of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and protein-coding genes forming an interaction network. Apart from protein-protein interaction (PPI), gene network models such as Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) are used to functionally annotate lncRNAs in identifying their potential disease associations. To address this, studies have led to characterizing transcript structures and understanding expression profiles mediating regulatory roles. In the current exploratory analysis, we show how a lncRNA - cyp2c91 contributes to the transcriptional regulation localized to cytoplasm thereby making refractory environment for transcription. By applying network methods and pathway analyses on genes related to a disease such as obesity and systemic lupus erythematosus, we show that we can gain deeper insight in biological processes such as the perturbances in immune system, and get a better understanding of the systems biology of diseases. PMID:26284111

  9. Potential role of lncRNA cyp2c91-protein interactions on diseases of the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth eSuravajhala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With unprecedented increase in next generation sequencing (NGS technologies, there has been a persistent interest on transcript profiles of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs and protein-coding genes forming an interaction network. Apart from protein-protein interaction (PPI, gene network models such as Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis are used to functionally annotate lncRNAs in identifying their potential disease associations. To address this, studies have led to characterizing transcript structures and understanding expression profiles mediating regulatory roles. In the current exploratory analysis, we show how a lncRNA - cyp2c91 contributes to the transcriptional regulation localized to cytoplasm thereby making refractory environment for transcription. By applying network methods and pathway analyses on genes related to a disease such as obesity and systemic lupus erythematosus, we show that we can gain deeper insight in biological processes such as the perturbances in immune system, and get a better understanding of the systems biology of diseases.

  10. A new phenomenological tau-alpha interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Heiberg-Andersen, H; Vaagen, J S

    2003-01-01

    We present a potential model, with distinctive features, reproducing angular distributions and analyzing power data for tau-alpha scattering from 20 to 30 MeV tau energy with regular variation of the parameters. The distinctive features are: (1) a spin-orbit term which incorporates the influence of central depression in the alpha nucleus, and, (2) central terms which are strongly parity dependent. The parity dependence of the real central term is such that the odd-parity component has both a greater rms radius and greater volume integral than the even-parity component. These parity dependence characteristics had been predicted by the inversion of the RGM S-matrix. Our result supports a considerable contribution from three-nucleon exchange processes. The predicted 1/2 sup - level of sup 7 Be is shifted 3 MeV relative to a previous one-level R-matrix formula fit, and depends strongly on the geometry of the spin-orbit potential.

  11. Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the hydrogen-peroxide−noble-gas interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncaratti, L. F., E-mail: lz@fis.unb.br; Leal, L. A.; Silva, G. M. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Pirani, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210 Salvador (Brazil); Gargano, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Quantum Theory Project, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    We consider the analytical representation of the potential energy surfaces of relevance for the intermolecular dynamics of weakly bound complexes of chiral molecules. In this paper we study the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}−Ng (Ng=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) systems providing the radial and the angular dependence of the potential energy surface on the relative position of the Ng atom. We accomplish this by introducing an analytical representation which is able to fit the ab initio energies of these complexes in a wide range of geometries. Our analysis sheds light on the role that the enantiomeric forms and the symmetry of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule play on the resulting barriers and equilibrium geometries. The proposed theoretical framework is useful to study the dynamics of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule, or other systems involving O–O and S–S bonds, interacting by non-covalent forces with atoms or molecules and to understand how the relative orientation of the O–H bonds changes along collisional events that may lead to a hydrogen bond formation or even to selectivity in chemical reactions.

  12. Synthesis and characterisation of glucose-functional glycopolymers and gold nanoparticles: study of their potential interactions with ovine red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Laura E; Phillips, Daniel J; Deller, Robert C; Davies, Gemma-Louise; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-03-20

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions can assist with the targeting of polymer- and nano-delivery systems. However, some potential protein targets are not specific to a single cell type, resulting in reductions in their efficacy due to undesirable non-specific cellular interactions. The glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) is expressed to different extents on most cells in the vasculature, including human red blood cells and on cancerous tissue. Glycosylated nanomaterials bearing glucose (or related) carbohydrates, therefore, could potentially undergo unwanted interactions with these transporters, which may compromise the nanomaterial function or lead to cell agglutination, for example. Here, RAFT polymerisation is employed to obtain well-defined glucose-functional glycopolymers as well as glycosylated gold nanoparticles. Agglutination and binding assays did not reveal any significant binding to ovine red blood cells, nor any haemolysis. These data suggest that gluco-functional nanomaterials are compatible with blood, and their lack of undesirable interactions highlights their potential for delivery and imaging applications.

  13. Deduction of the He-Fe interaction potential in eV-range from experimental data by computer simulation in grazing ion-surface scattering: Row-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In glancing-angle scattering of keV-ions from a crystal surface, the ion reflection takes place in the eV-part of the interaction potentials. The elastic interactions are determined by the energy transverse to atomic rows, which can be of the order of 10 eV. A row-model using averaged potentials according to the Lindhard cylindrical potential has been developed using step-by-step integration of Newton's equations of motion. Previously [D. Danailov, K. Gaertner, A. Caro, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 153 (1999) 191; presented on COSIRES, Okayama, 1998] we reported that zig-zag trajectories within surface channels and the corresponding multimode azimuthal angular distributions of reflected ions are very sensitive to the interaction potential used in the simulation. Here we simulate the scattering of 15 keV He-atoms from Fe(1 0 0) surfaces at different angles of incidence comparable with previously published experimental results [D. Danailov, T. Igel, R. Pfandzelter, H. Winter, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 164-165 (2000) 583]. Our results show that for interaction energies below about 4 eV the well-known 'universal' potential works well. However, for energies between 4 and 13 eV the 'individual' He-Fe potential (D. Danailov, K. Gaertner, A. Caro, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 153 (1999) 191; presented on COSIRES, Okayama, 1998) gives a better agreement with the experimental data. For interaction energies above 13 eV both potentials are similar. We have constructed a mixed He-Fe potential, which describes the experimental observations well. The row-model enables us to deduce the He-Fe interaction potential in the eV-range. In addition, a shift in the experimental angular spectra compared with the calculated spectra indicates that the atomistic rows undergo an elastic horizontal bend due to the scattering and an order of magnitude smaller vertical displacement

  14. Wild and Domestic Pig Interactions at the Wildlife–Livestock Interface of Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda, and the Potential Association with African Swine Fever Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukielka, Esther A.; Jori, Ferran; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Chenais, Erika; Masembe, Charles; Chavernac, David; Ståhl, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Bushpigs (BPs) (Potamochoerus larvatus) and warthogs (WHs) (Phacochoerus africanus), which are widely distributed in Eastern Africa, are likely to cohabitate in the same environment with domestic pigs (DPs), facilitating the transmission of shared pathogens. However, potential interactions between BP, WH, and DP, and the resulting potential circulation of infectious diseases have rarely been investigated in Africa to date. In order to understand the dynamics of such interactions and the potential influence of human behavior and husbandry practices on them, individual interviews (n = 233) and participatory rural appraisals (n = 11) were carried out among Ugandan pig farmers at the edge of Murchison Falls National Park, northern Uganda. In addition, as an example of possible implications of wild and DP interactions, non-linear multivariate analysis (multiple correspondence analyses) was used to investigate the potential association between the aforementioned factors (interactions and human behavior and practices) and farmer reported African swine fever (ASF) outbreaks. No direct interactions between wild pigs (WPs) and DP were reported in our study area. However, indirect interactions were described by 83 (35.6%) of the participants and were identified to be more common at water sources during the dry season. Equally, eight (3.4%) farmers declared exposing their DP to raw hunting leftovers of WPs. The exploratory analysis performed suggested possible associations between the farmer reported ASF outbreaks and indirect interactions, free-range housing systems, dry season, and having a WH burrow less than 3 km from the household. Our study was useful to gather local knowledge and to identify knowledge gaps about potential interactions between wild and DP in this area. This information could be useful to facilitate the design of future observational studies to better understand the potential transmission of pathogens between wild and DPs. PMID:27148545

  15. Wild and domestic pig interactions at the wildlife-livestock interface of Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda, and the potential association with African Swine Fever outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther eKukielka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bushpigs (Potamochoerus larvatus and warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus, which are widely distributed in Eastern Africa, are likely to cohabitate in the same environment with domestic pigs, facilitating the transmission of shared pathogens. However, potential interactions between bushpig, warthog and domestic pig and the resulting potential circulation of infectious diseases have rarely been investigated in Africa to date. In order to understand the dynamics of such interactions and the potential influence of human behavior and husbandry practices on them, individual interviews (n=233 and participatory rural appraisals (n=11 were carried out among Ugandan pig farmers at the edge of Murchison Falls National Park, northern Uganda. In addition, as an example of possible implications of wild and domestic pig interactions, nonlinear multivariate analysis (multiple correspondence analyses was used to investigate the potential association between the aforementioned factors (interactions and human behavior and practices and farmer reported ASF outbreaks. No direct interactions between wild pigs and domestic pig were reported in our study area. However, indirect interactions were described by 83 (35.6 % of the participants and were identified to be more common at water sources during the dry season. Equally, eight (3.4% farmers declared exposing their domestic pig to raw hunting leftovers of wild pigs. The exploratory analysis performed suggested possible associations between the farmer reported ASF outbreaks and indirect interactions, free-range housing systems, dry season, and having a warthog burrow less than 3km from the household. Our study was useful to gather local knowledge and to identify knowledge gaps about potential interactions between wild and domestic pig in this area. This information could be useful to facilitate the design of future observational studies to better understand the potential transmission of pathogens between wild and

  16. Wild and Domestic Pig Interactions at the Wildlife-Livestock Interface of Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda, and the Potential Association with African Swine Fever Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukielka, Esther A; Jori, Ferran; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Chenais, Erika; Masembe, Charles; Chavernac, David; Ståhl, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Bushpigs (BPs) (Potamochoerus larvatus) and warthogs (WHs) (Phacochoerus africanus), which are widely distributed in Eastern Africa, are likely to cohabitate in the same environment with domestic pigs (DPs), facilitating the transmission of shared pathogens. However, potential interactions between BP, WH, and DP, and the resulting potential circulation of infectious diseases have rarely been investigated in Africa to date. In order to understand the dynamics of such interactions and the potential influence of human behavior and husbandry practices on them, individual interviews (n = 233) and participatory rural appraisals (n = 11) were carried out among Ugandan pig farmers at the edge of Murchison Falls National Park, northern Uganda. In addition, as an example of possible implications of wild and DP interactions, non-linear multivariate analysis (multiple correspondence analyses) was used to investigate the potential association between the aforementioned factors (interactions and human behavior and practices) and farmer reported African swine fever (ASF) outbreaks. No direct interactions between wild pigs (WPs) and DP were reported in our study area. However, indirect interactions were described by 83 (35.6%) of the participants and were identified to be more common at water sources during the dry season. Equally, eight (3.4%) farmers declared exposing their DP to raw hunting leftovers of WPs. The exploratory analysis performed suggested possible associations between the farmer reported ASF outbreaks and indirect interactions, free-range housing systems, dry season, and having a WH burrow less than 3 km from the household. Our study was useful to gather local knowledge and to identify knowledge gaps about potential interactions between wild and DP in this area. This information could be useful to facilitate the design of future observational studies to better understand the potential transmission of pathogens between wild and DPs. PMID:27148545

  17. On the analysis of protein-protein interactions via knowledge-based potentials for the prediction of protein-protein docking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Aloy, Patrick; Oliva, Baldo

    2011-01-01

    Development of effective methods to screen binary interactions obtained by rigid-body protein-protein docking is key for structure prediction of complexes and for elucidating physicochemical principles of protein-protein binding. We have derived empirical knowledge-based potential functions...... results were compared with a residue-pair potential scoring function (RPScore) and an atomic-detailed scoring function (Zrank). We have combined knowledge-based potentials to score protein-protein poses of decoys of complexes classified either as transient or as permanent protein-protein interactions...

  18. Randomized cross-over clinical trial to study potential pharmacokinetic interactions between cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Huw D; Porter, David J; Bartelink, Imke; Nobbs, Joy R; Cole, Michael; Elliott, Suzie; Newell, David R; Calvert, A Hilary; Highley, Martin; Boddy, Alan V

    2002-01-01

    Aims Cisplatin and carboplatin are often used in combination with etoposide. In a randomized cross-over study, the potential interaction between the two platinum drugs and the metabolism of etoposide was explored. In vitro investigations using human liver microsomes were also performed. Methods Etoposide was administered to 15 patients over 3 days, with the platinum drug administered on day 2. The alternate platinum drug was administered on the second course. The pharmacokinetics of etoposide were determined on all 3 days of each cycle. The effect of platinum drugs on etoposide metabolism by human liver enzymes was explored in vitro. Results Neither cisplatin nor carboplatin coadministration affected the pharmacokinetics of etoposide during cycle 1. When carboplatin was administered on course 2, etoposide AUC was 8% higher on day 2 compared with day 1 or day 3 (for day 2 vs day 3, 95% CI: −0.72, −0.08 mg ml−1 min). In contrast, cisplatin on course 2 increased the AUC of etoposide (28%) on day 3 (day 3 vs day 1, 95% CI: 0.67, 2.09 mg ml−1 min), with no effect on day 2. In vitro carboplatin and cisplatin (10–100 µm) inhibited the metabolism of etoposide, if rat liver microsomes were preincubated (30 min) with NADPH and the platinum complexes. With human liver microsomes a small effect on etoposide metabolism, but not on catechol formation, was observed. Conclusions The interaction between etoposide and platinum drugs is small and, given the pharmacokinetic variability seen with etoposide, the clinical impact is unlikely to be significant. PMID:11849199

  19. Selective interaction of lansoprazole and astemizole with tau polymers: potential new clinical use in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Leonel E; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Saavedra, Iván N; Davies, Peter; Maccioni, Ricardo B

    2010-01-01

    We describe the interactions of two benzimidazole derivatives, astemizole (AST) and lansoprazole (LNS), with anomalous aggregates of tau protein (neurofibrillary tangles). Interestingly, these compounds, with important medical applications in the treatment of allergies and gastrointestinal disorders respectively, specifically bind to aggregated variants of tau protein and to paired helical filaments isolated from brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. These ligands appear to be a powerful tool to tag brain-isolated tau-aggregates and heparin-induced polymers of recombinant tau. The interactions of AST and LNS with tau aggregates were assessed by classical radioligand assays, surface plasmon resonance, and bioinformatic approaches. The affinity of AST and LNS for tau aggregates was comparatively higher than that for amyloid-beta polymers according to our data. This is relevant since senile plaques are also abundant but are not pathognomonic in AD patients. Immunochemical studies on paired helical filaments from brains of AD patients and surface plasmon resonance studies confirm these findings. The capacity of these drugs to penetrate the blood-brain barrier was evaluated: i) in vitro by parallel artificial membrane permeability assay followed by experimental Log P determinations; and ii) in vivo by pharmacokinetic studies comparing distribution profiles in blood and brain of mice using HPLC/UV. Importantly, our studies indicate that the brain/blood concentration ratios for these compounds were suitable for their use as PET radiotracers. Since neurofibrillary tangles are positively correlated with cognitive impairment, we concluded that LNS and AST have a great potential in PET neuroimaing for in vivo early detection of AD and in reducing the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. PMID:20110603

  20. Wave-turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, Basile; Nazarenko, Sergey; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-07-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models, one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wave number, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave-turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bose-Einstein condensation. We then focus on nonlocal interactions in wave-number space: we study the decay of an ensemble of massive particles into massless ones. Under rather general conditions, these massless particles accumulate at low wave number. We study the dynamics of waves coexisting with such a strong condensate, and we compute rigorously a nonlocal Kolmogorov-Zakharov solution, where particles are transferred nonlocally to the condensate, while energy cascades towards large wave numbers through local interactions. This nonlocal cascading state constitutes the intermediate asymptotics between the initial distribution of waves and the thermodynamic state reached in the long-time limit.

  1. Wave-turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, Basile; Nazarenko, Sergey; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-07-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models, one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wave number, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave-turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bose-Einstein condensation. We then focus on nonlocal interactions in wave-number space: we study the decay of an ensemble of massive particles into massless ones. Under rather general conditions, these massless particles accumulate at low wave number. We study the dynamics of waves coexisting with such a strong condensate, and we compute rigorously a nonlocal Kolmogorov-Zakharov solution, where particles are transferred nonlocally to the condensate, while energy cascades towards large wave numbers through local interactions. This nonlocal cascading state constitutes the intermediate asymptotics between the initial distribution of waves and the thermodynamic state reached in the long-time limit.

  2. Risk assessment of drug interaction potential and concomitant dosing pattern on targeted toxicities in pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Patel, Dimple; Dombrowsky, Erin; Bajaj, Gaurav; Skolnik, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    This investigation evaluated the impact of potential drug interactions on the incidence of reported toxicities seen with common dosing patterns in children with cancer, with the intent of being able to screen and reduce the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the future. Toxicity reported in pediatric cancer patients treated at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from 2004 to 2010 were abstracted from a cancer tumor registry and merged with drug order profiles from the medical record system. Analysis datasets were created in SAS and permutation algorithms were used to identify pairwise drug combinations associated with specific toxicity occurrence. Relative risk of toxicity based on dosing pattern was assessed via comparison to control patients. A total of 326 of 1,713 patients (19%) had reportable toxicities. Neutrophil count decreases and alanine aminotransferase increases represented the highest occurring, corresponding to 28.8% and 31.9% prevalence among patients reporting toxicity, respectively. Of coadministered drug pairs, acetaminophen-diphenhydramine occurred most frequently; however, methotrexate-vincristine was the highest occurring pair linked to a single toxicity (hepatotoxicity). Toxicity was highly associated with the diagnoses of leukemia (52.1%) or neuroblastoma (28.5%). Comparison of the dosing interval (≤30 versus >30 min) suggested that risk of toxicity can be associated with the timing of coadministration, with ≤30 min increasing the risk of hepatotoxicity with fentanyl-midazolam and methotrexate-midazolam combinations. Knowledge of drug interactions in children with cancer may help reduce the incidence of ADRs by providing pharmacotherapy options that may reduce the likelihood of toxicity. PMID:23595361

  3. Further insights in the ability of classical non additive potentials to model actinide ion-water interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pursuing our efforts on the development of accurate classical models to simulate radionuclides in complex environments (Real et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 2010, 114, 15913; Trumm et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 044509), this article places a large emphasis on the discussion of the influence of models/parameters uncertainties on the computed structural, dynamical, and temporal properties. Two actinide test cases, trivalent curium and tetravalent thorium, have been studied with three different potential energy functions, which allow us to account for the polarization and charge-transfer effects occurring in hydrated actinide ion systems. The first type of models considers only an additive energy term for modeling ion/water charge-transfer effects, whereas the other two treat cooperative charge-transfer interactions with two different analytical expressions. Model parameters are assigned to reproduce high-level ab initio data concerning only hydrated ion species in gas phase. For the two types of cooperative charge-transfer models, we define two sets of parameters allowing or not to cancel out possible errors inherent to the force field used to model water/water interactions at the ion vicinity. We define thus five different models to characterize the solvation of each ion. For both ions, our cooperative charge-transfer models lead to close results in terms of structure in solution: the coordination number is included within 8 and 9, and the mean ion/water oxygen distances are 2.45 and 2.49 Angstroms, respectively, for Th(IV) and Cm(III). (authors)

  4. Potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age in family medicine clinics in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Arreola Laura del Pilar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Mexico, inappropriate prescription of drugs with potential interactions causing serious risks to patient health has been little studied. Work in this area has focused mainly on hospitalized patients, with only specific drug combinations analyzed; moreover, the studies have not produced conclusive results. In the present study, we determined the frequency of potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, who used Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS family medicine clinics. In addition, we aimed to identify the associated factors for these interactions. Methods We collected information on general patient characteristics, medical histories, and medication (complete data. The study included 624 ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, with non-malignant pain syndrome, who made ambulatory visits to two IMSS family medicine clinics in Mexico City. The patients received 7-day prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics. The potential interactions were identified by using the Thompson Micromedex program. Data were analyzed using descriptive, bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The average number of prescribed drugs was 5.9 ± 2.5. About 80.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug-drug interactions and 3.8% of patients were prescribed drug combinations with interactions that should be avoided. Also, 64.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug disease interactions. The factors significantly associated with having one or more potential interactions included: taking 5 or more medicines (adjusted Odds Ratio (OR: 4.34, 95%CI: 2.76–6.83, patient age 60 years or older (adjusted OR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.01–2.74 and suffering from cardiovascular diseases (adjusted OR: 7.26, 95% CI: 4.61–11.44. Conclusion The high frequency of prescription of drugs with potential drug interactions showed in

  5. Effects on the Non-Relativistic Dynamics of a Charged Particle Interacting with a Chern-Simons Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, F; Martins, J; Oguri, V

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen atom in two dimensions, described by a Schr\\"odinger equation with a Chern-Simons potential, is numerically solved. Both its wave functions and eigenvalues were determined for small values of the principal quantum number $n$ The only possible states correspond to $l=0$ . How the result depends on the topological mass of the photon is also discussed. In the case $n=1$, the energy of the fundamental state corresponding to different choice for the photon mass scale are found to be comprehended in the interval $-3,5 \\times 10^{-3} eV \\leq E \\leq -9,0 \\times 10^{-2} eV$, corresponding to a mean radius of the electron in the range $ (5.637 \\pm 0.005) \\times 10^{-8} \\leq \\leq (48.87 \\pm 0.03) \\times 10^{-8} cm$. In any case, the planar atom is found to be very weekly bounded showing some features similar to the Rydberg atoms in three dimensions with a Coulombian interaction.

  6. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202-3489 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  7. Measures of nonclassicality for a two-level atom interacting with power-law potential field under decoherence effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, S.; Berrada, K.; Alkhateeb, Sadah A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a useful quantum system to perform different tasks of quantum information and computational technologies. We explore the required optimal conditions for this system that are feasible with real experimental realization. We present an active way to control the variation of some measures of nonclassicality considering the time-dependent coupling and photon transition effects under a model that closely describes a realistic experimental scenario. We investigate qualitatively the quantum measures for a two-level atom system interacting with a quantum field initially defined in a coherent state in the framework of power-law potentials (PLPCSs). We study the nonlocal correlation in the whole system state using the negativity as a measure of entanglement in terms of the exponent parameter, number of photon transition, and phase damping effect. The influences of the different physical parameters on the statistical properties and purity of the field are also demonstrated during the time evolution. The results indicate that the preservation and enhancement of entanglement greatly benefit from the combination of the choice of the physical parameters. Finally, we explore an interesting relationship between the different quantum measures of non-classicality during the time evolution in the absence and presence of time-dependent coupling effect.

  8. Adiabatic and sudden interaction potentials in the fusion-fission of heavy ion collisions: Asymmetric target-projectile combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is now well known that many reactions giving measurable fusion cross-sections also show a fission of the compound system formed, similar to the low energy fission of the known fissioning nuclei. Recently, both the fusion excitation functions and the mass equilibration in the fragmentation of the composite system were measured for a large number of systems with 94208Pb on different targets of 26Mg, 48Ca, 50Ti, 52Cr, 58Fe and 64Ni. From a theoretical point of view, it is relevant to ask the question: how do the colliding nuclei fuse and then why does the compound system formed fission instead of going to the ground state to give a stable system. In this Letter, we attempt to show that the fusion of asymmetric colliding nuclei is due to the overcoming of the interaction barriers in adiabatic potentials and the fission of the compound system should perhaps occur as a sudden process, like the one in the spontaneous fission phenomenon. We have made our calculations for the compound systems with 102<=Z<=110 and for the asymmetric target-projectile combinations of the experiments of Ref. 1, using the fragmentation theory whose basis is the asymmetric two-centre shell model

  9. Tweaking Dendrimers and Dendritic Nanoparticles for Controlled Nano-bio Interactions: Potential Nanocarriers for Improved Cancer Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno, Jason; Hsu, Hao-Jui; Hong, Seungpyo

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown great promise in the treatment of cancer, with a demonstrated potential in targeted drug delivery. Among a myriad of nanocarriers that have been recently developed, dendrimers have attracted a great deal of scientific interests due to their unique chemical and structural properties that allow for precise engineering of their characteristics. Despite this, the clinical translation of dendrimers has been hindered due to their drawbacks, such as scale-up issues, rapid systemic elimination, inefficient tumor accumulation, and limited drug loading. In order to overcome these limitations, a series of reengineered dendrimers have been recently introduced using various approaches, including: i) modifications of structure and surfaces; ii) integration with linear polymers; and iii) hybridization with other types of nanocarriers. Chemical modifications and surface engineering have tailored dendrimers to improve their pharmacokinetics and tissue permeation. Copolymerization of dendritic polymers with linear polymers has resulted in various amphiphilic copolymers with self-assembly capabilities and improved drug loading efficiencies. Hybridization with other nanocarriers integrates advantageous characteristics of both systems, which includes prolonged plasma circulation times and enhanced tumor targeting. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the newly emerging drug delivery systems that involve reengineering of dendrimers in an effort to precisely control their nano-bio interactions, mitigating their inherent weaknesses. PMID:26453160

  10. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10(14) W/cm(2) to 3.5 × 10(14) W/cm(2). Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length. PMID:25381499

  11. Gene Prospector: An evidence gateway for evaluating potential susceptibility genes and interacting risk factors for human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoury Muin J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified as a result of the human genome project and the rapid advance of high throughput genotyping technology. Genetic association studies, such as recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS, have provided a springboard for exploring the contribution of inherited genetic variation and gene/environment interactions in relation to disease. Given the capacity of such studies to produce a plethora of information that may then be described in a number of publications, selecting possible disease susceptibility genes and identifying related modifiable risk factors is a major challenge. A Web-based application for finding evidence of such relationships is key to the development of follow-up studies and evidence for translational research. We developed a Web-based application that selects and prioritizes potential disease-related genes by using a highly curated and updated literature database of genetic association studies. The application, called Gene Prospector, also provides a comprehensive set of links to additional data sources. Results We compared Gene Prospector results for the query "Parkinson" with a list of 13 leading candidate genes (Top Results from a curated, specialty database for genetic associations with Parkinson disease (PDGene. Nine of the thirteen leading candidate genes from PDGene were in the top 10th percentile of the ranked list from Gene Prospector. In fact, Gene Prospector included more published genetic association studies for the 13 leading candidate genes than PDGene did. Conclusion Gene Prospector provides an online gateway for searching for evidence about human genes in relation to diseases, other phenotypes, and risk factors, and provides links to published literature and other online data sources. Gene Prospector can be accessed via http://www.hugenavigator.net/HuGENavigator/geneProspectorStartPage.do.

  12. The glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycle: importance of late postnatal development and potential reciprocal interactions between biosynthesis and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eHertz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard for studies of glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycling and its connections to brain biosynthesis from glucose of glutamate and GABA and their subsequent metabolism are the elegant in vivo studies by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR, showing the large fluxes in the cycle. However, simpler experiments in intact brain tissue (e.g. immunohistochemistry, brain slices, cultured brain cells and mitochondria have also made important contributions to the understanding of details, mechanisms and functional consequences of glutamate/GABA biosynthesis and degradation. The purpose of this review is to attempt to integrate evidence from different sources regarding i the enzyme(s responsible for the initial conversion of -ketoglutarate to glutamate; ii the possibility that especially glutamate oxidation is essentially confined to astrocytes; and iii the ontogenetically very late onset and maturation of glutamine-glutamate(GABA cycle function. Pathway models based on the functional importance of aspartate for glutamate synthesis suggest the possibility of interacting pathways for biosynthesis and degradation of glutamate and GABA and the use of transamination as the default mechanism for initiation of glutamate oxidation. The late development and maturation are related to the late cortical gliogenesis and convert brain cortical function from being purely neuronal to becoming neuronal-astrocytic. This conversion is associated with huge increases in energy demand and production, and the character of potentially incurred gains of function are discussed. These may include alterations in learning mechanisms, in mice indicated by lack of pairing of odor learning with aversive stimuli in newborn animals but the development of such an association 10-12 days later. The possibility is suggested that analogous maturational changes may contribute to differences in the way learning is accomplished in the newborn human brain and during later development.

  13. New potential antitumoral fluorescent tetracyclic thieno[3,2-b]pyridine derivatives: interaction with DNA and nanosized liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calhelha Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fluorescence properties of two new potential antitumoral tetracyclic thieno[3,2-b]pyridine derivatives were studied in solution and in liposomes of DPPC (dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, egg lecithin (phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk; Egg-PC and DODAB (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide. Compound 1, pyrido[2',3':3,2]thieno[4,5-d]pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-6-one, exhibits reasonably high fluorescence quantum yields in all solvents studied (0.20 ≤ ΦF ≤ 0.30, while for compound 2, 3-[(p-methoxyphenylethynyl]pyrido[2',3':3,2]thieno[4,5-d]pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-6-one, the values are much lower (0.01 ≤ ΦF ≤ 0.05. The interaction of these compounds with salmon sperm DNA was studied using spectroscopic methods, allowing the determination of intrinsic binding constants, K i = (8.7 ± 0.9 × 103 M-1 for compound 1 and K i = (5.9 ± 0.6 × 103 M-1 for 2, and binding site sizes of n = 11 ± 3 and n = 7 ± 2 base pairs, respectively. Compound 2 is the most intercalative compound in salmon sperm DNA (35%, while for compound 1 only 11% of the molecules are intercalated. Studies of incorporation of both compounds in liposomes of DPPC, Egg-PC and DODAB revealed that compound 2 is mainly located in the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer, while compound 1 prefers a hydrated and fluid environment.

  14. Two-dimensional array of particles originating from dipole-dipole interaction as evidenced by potential curve measurements at vertical oil/water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Kozawa, Daichi; Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Sugiman, Nao; Øye, Gisle; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Naoya; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method to evaluate the interaction potential energy between the particles adsorbed at an oil/water interface as a function of interparticle distance. The method is based on the measurement of the interparticle distance at a vertical oil/water interface, at which the gravitational force is naturally applied to compress the particle monolayer in the in-plane direction. We verified the method by examining whether we obtained the same potential curve upon varying the gravitationa...

  15. Modulational and oscillatory instabilities of Bose–Einstein condensates with two- and three-body interactions trapped in an optical lattice potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explain how the modulational and oscillatory instabilities can be generated in Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) with two- and three-body interactions trapped in a periodic optical lattice with driving harmonic potential. We solve a cubic–quintic Gross–Pitaevskii (GP) equation with external trapping potentials by using both analytical and numerical methods. Using the time-dependent variational approach, we derive and analyze the variational equations for the time evolution of the amplitude and phase of modulational perturbation, and effective potential of the system. Through the effective potential, we obtain the modulational instability condition of the BECs with two- and three-body interactions and shown the effects of the optical potential on the dynamics of the system. We perform direct numerical simulations to support our analytical results, and good agreement is observed. - Highlights: • A cubic–quintic Gross–Pitaevskii equation with optical lattice (OL) and harmonic potentials is used. • We find the stability domain and time-dependent criteria for modulational instability. • Matter waves are generated through the modulational and oscillatory instabilities for four different possible cases. • Tuning the strength of OL shrinks and grows the bandwidth of unstable wave numbers. • In condensates with two- and three-body interactions, oscillatory instability can be realized

  16. A method for creating interactive content for the iPod, and its potential use as a learning tool: Technical Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Edward J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Podcasting is currently a popular means of delivery of information with a large number of podcasts specifically tailored for educational purposes. It can be argued that the passive nature of this teaching methodology limits the educational benefit that can be derived from podcasts. This paper describes the development and construction of interactive material for the iPod, and a survey of student attitudes towards this type of learning material. Methods The development of interactive material for an iPod is described in detail. This material was developed and demonstrated to 50 medical students. These students completed a paper-based survey on the potential uses of this technology, before and after a 20 minute presentation in class of an interactive case-study on an iPod. Results A technical description of how to develop interactive content for the iPod was created. The results of the student survey indicate a favourable shift in student attitudes after viewing the interactive case. Despite only 15% of the students owning an iPod, 57% of the students were positive about having access to interactive iPod content and 59% believed they would use it whilst travelling. The percentage of students who felt podcasting was a useful means of learning increased from 9% to 41%. Conclusion The development of interactive content for the iPod is feasible. There are indications that students view interactive iPod cases as having value as an additional learning resource.

  17. Exact equivalence between one-dimensional Bose gases interacting via hard-sphere and zero-range potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valiente, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    We prove the equivalence between the hard-sphere Bose gas and a system with momentum-dependent zero-range interactions in one spatial dimension, which we call extended hard-sphere Bose gas. The two-body interaction in the latter model has the advantage of being a regular pseudopotential. The most...

  18. Effects of a dimple potential on the ground-state properties of a quasi-one-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensate with two- and three-body interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ground state of a quasi-one-dimensional interacting Bose gas confined by a harmonic plus Gaussian dimple potential is studied within the variational approach and also Gross–Pitaevskii mean-field approximation. The effect of the superimposed dimple trap on the order parameter, the chemical and effective potentials of the system is analyzed for repulsive and attractive two- as well as three-body interactions between the particles. The results obtained from both methods show that the characteristics of the trap such as the width and depth of the dimple affect the corresponding ground state properties of the system in a qualitatively similar way to the repulsive and attractive interatomic interactions, respectively. - Highlights: • We study the effects of a dimple potential on a quasi-1D Bose-Einstein condensate. • We used variational and Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field approaches. • The width of the dimple affects the system similarly to repulsive interaction. • The depth of the dimple affects the system similarly to attractive interaction

  19. Effects of a dimple potential on the ground-state properties of a quasi-one-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensate with two- and three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabulut, Elife Ö.

    2015-04-01

    The ground state of a quasi-one-dimensional interacting Bose gas confined by a harmonic plus Gaussian dimple potential is studied within the variational approach and also Gross–Pitaevskii mean-field approximation. The effect of the superimposed dimple trap on the order parameter, the chemical and effective potentials of the system is analyzed for repulsive and attractive two- as well as three-body interactions between the particles. The results obtained from both methods show that the characteristics of the trap such as the width and depth of the dimple affect the corresponding ground state properties of the system in a qualitatively similar way to the repulsive and attractive interatomic interactions, respectively. - Highlights: • We study the effects of a dimple potential on a quasi-1D Bose-Einstein condensate. • We used variational and Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field approaches. • The width of the dimple affects the system similarly to repulsive interaction. • The depth of the dimple affects the system similarly to attractive interaction.

  20. Two-dimensional array of particles originating from dipole-dipole interaction as evidenced by potential curve measurements at vertical oil/water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Kozawa, Daichi; Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Sugiman, Nao; Øye, Gisle; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Naoya; Ogata, Yukio H

    2014-08-28

    We propose a new method to evaluate the interaction potential energy between the particles adsorbed at an oil/water interface as a function of interparticle distance. The method is based on the measurement of the interparticle distance at a vertical oil/water interface, at which the gravitational force is naturally applied to compress the particle monolayer in the in-plane direction. We verified the method by examining whether we obtained the same potential curve upon varying the gravitational acceleration by tilting the interface. The present method is applicable in the force range from ∼0.1 to ∼100 pN, determined by the effective weight of the particles at the interface. The method gives a rather simple procedure to estimate a long range interaction among the particles adsorbed at oil/water interfaces. We applied this method to polystyrene particles at the decane/aqueous surfactant solution interface, and obtained the interparticle potential curves. All the potential curves obtained by the present method indicated that the interparticle repulsion is due to the electrical dipole-dipole interaction based on the negative charge of the particles. The mechanism of the dipole-dipole interaction is further discussed on the basis of the effects of surfactants. PMID:25005863

  1. Exact Solutions of the Mass-Dependent Klein-Gordon Equation with the Vector Quark-Antiquark Interaction and Harmonic Oscillator Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Bahar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the asymptotic iteration and wave function ansatz method, we present exact solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation for the quark-antiquark interaction and harmonic oscillator potential in the case of the position-dependent mass.

  2. Study of potential drug-drug interactions between benzodiazepines and four commonly used antiepileptic drugs in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik N. Shah

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Clonazepam potentiates the action of all the four anti-epileptics while diazepam potentiates only phenytoin and CBZ against MES seizures. Clonazepam but not diazepam potentiates the action of sodium valproate against PTZ seizures. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(5.000: 830-835

  3. General hydrophobic interaction potential for surfactant/lipid bilayers from direct force measurements between light-modulated bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, Stephen H., Jr.; Lee, C. Ted; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2011-01-01

    We establish and quantify correlations among the molecular structures, interaction forces, and physical processes associated with light-responsive self-assembled surfactant monolayers or bilayers at interfaces. Using the surface forces apparatus (SFA), the interaction forces between adsorbed monolayers and bilayers of an azobenzene-functionalized surfactant can be drastically and controllably altered by light-induced conversion of trans and cis molecular conformations. These reversible confor...

  4. A Multiple Interaction Analysis Reveals ADRB3 as a Potential Candidate for Gallbladder Cancer Predisposition via a Complex Interaction with Other Candidate Gene Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Rai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gallbladder cancer is the most common and a highly aggressive biliary tract malignancy with a dismal outcome. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, comprising the combined effect of multiple genetic variations of mild consequence along with numerous dietary and environmental risk factors. Previously, we demonstrated the association of several candidate gene variations with GBC risk. In this study, we aimed to identify the combination of gene variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility of GBC. Here, we performed Multifactor-Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis (CRT to investigate the gene–gene interactions and the combined effect of 14 SNPs in nine genes (DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634; FAS (rs2234767; FASL (rs763110; DCC (rs2229080, rs4078288, rs7504990, rs714; PSCA (rs2294008, rs2978974; ADRA2A (rs1801253; ADRB1 (rs1800544; ADRB3 (rs4994; CYP17 (rs2486758 involved in various signaling pathways. Genotyping was accomplished by PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assays. SPSS software version 16.0 and MDR software version 2.0 were used for all the statistical analysis. Single locus investigation demonstrated significant association of DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634, DCC (rs714, rs2229080, rs4078288 and ADRB3 (rs4994 polymorphisms with GBC risk. MDR analysis revealed ADRB3 (rs4994 to be crucial candidate in GBC susceptibility that may act either alone (p < 0.0001, CVC = 10/10 or in combination with DCC (rs714 and rs2229080, p < 0.0001, CVC = 9/10. Our CRT results are in agreement with the above findings. Further, in-silico results of studied SNPs advocated their role in splicing, transcriptional and/or protein coding regulation. Overall, our result suggested complex interactions amongst the studied SNPs and ADRB3 rs4994 as candidate influencing GBC susceptibility.

  5. Basis sets for the evaluation of van der Waals complex interaction energies: Ne-N2 intermolecular potential and microwave spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Fernández, Berta

    2014-01-30

    In order to obtain efficient basis sets for the evaluation of van der Waals complex intermolecular potentials, we carry out systematic basis set studies. For this, interaction energies at representative geometries on the potential energy surfaces are evaluated using the CCSD(T) correlation method and large polarized LPol-n and augmented polarization-consistent aug-pc-2 basis sets extended with different sets of midbond functions. On the basis of the root mean square errors calculated with respect to the values for the most accurate potentials available, basis sets are selected for fitting the corresponding interaction energies and getting analytical potentials. In this work, we study the Ne-N2 van der Waals complex and after the above procedure, the aug-pc-2-3321 and the LPol-ds-33221 basis set results are fitted. The obtained potentials are characterized by T-shaped global minima at distances between the Ne atom and the N2 center of mass of 3.39 Å, with interaction energies of -49.36 cm(-1) for the aug-pc-2-3321 surface and -50.28 cm(-1) for the LPol-ds-33221 surface. Both sets of results are in excellent agreement with the reference surface. To check the potentials further microwave transition frequencies are calculated that agree well with the experimental and the aV5Z-33221 values. The success of this study suggests that it is feasible to carry out similar accurate calculations of interaction energies and ro-vibrational spectra at reduced cost for larger complexes than has been possible hitherto. PMID:24375320

  6. A Multiple Interaction Analysis Reveals ADRB3 as a Potential Candidate for Gallbladder Cancer Predisposition via a Complex Interaction with Other Candidate Gene Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rajani; Kim, Jong Joo; Misra, Sanjeev; Kumar, Ashok; Mittal, Balraj

    2015-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is the most common and a highly aggressive biliary tract malignancy with a dismal outcome. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, comprising the combined effect of multiple genetic variations of mild consequence along with numerous dietary and environmental risk factors. Previously, we demonstrated the association of several candidate gene variations with GBC risk. In this study, we aimed to identify the combination of gene variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility of GBC. Here, we performed Multifactor-Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis (CRT) to investigate the gene-gene interactions and the combined effect of 14 SNPs in nine genes (DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634); FAS (rs2234767); FASL (rs763110); DCC (rs2229080, rs4078288, rs7504990, rs714); PSCA (rs2294008, rs2978974); ADRA2A (rs1801253); ADRB1 (rs1800544); ADRB3 (rs4994); CYP17 (rs2486758)) involved in various signaling pathways. Genotyping was accomplished by PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assays. SPSS software version 16.0 and MDR software version 2.0 were used for all the statistical analysis. Single locus investigation demonstrated significant association of DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634), DCC (rs714, rs2229080, rs4078288) and ADRB3 (rs4994) polymorphisms with GBC risk. MDR analysis revealed ADRB3 (rs4994) to be crucial candidate in GBC susceptibility that may act either alone (p ADRB3 rs4994 as candidate influencing GBC susceptibility. PMID:26602921

  7. Identification of New Potential Interaction Partners for Human Cytoplasmic Copper Chaperone Atox1: Roles in Gene Regulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Öhrvik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The human copper (Cu chaperone Atox1 delivers Cu to P1B type ATPases in the Golgi network, for incorporation into essential Cu-dependent enzymes. Atox1 homologs are found in most organisms; it is a 68-residue ferredoxin-fold protein that binds Cu in a conserved surface-exposed Cys-X-X-Cys (CXXC motif. In addition to its well-documented cytoplasmic chaperone function, in 2008 Atox1 was suggested to have functionality in the nucleus. To identify new interactions partners of Atox1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with a large human placenta library of cDNA fragments using Atox1 as bait. Among 98 million fragments investigated, 25 proteins were found to be confident interaction partners. Nine of these were uncharacterized proteins, and the remaining 16 proteins were analyzed by bioinformatics with respect to cell localization, tissue distribution, function, sequence motifs, three-dimensional structures and interaction networks. Several of the hits were eukaryotic-specific proteins interacting with DNA or RNA implying that Atox1 may act as a modulator of gene regulation. Notably, because many of the identified proteins contain CXXC motifs, similarly to the Cu transport reactions, interactions between these and Atox1 may be mediated by Cu.

  8. Potential role of gene-environment interactions in ion transport mechanisms in the etiology of renal cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Ivette A. G.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; van Engeland, Manon; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; Keszei, András P.; Hogervorst, Janneke G. F.; Schouten, Leo J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ion transport mechanism (ITM) in renal cell cancer (RCC) etiology using gene-environment interactions between candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated environmental factors, including dietary intakes of sodium, potassium and fluid, hypertension and diuretic medication. A literature-based selection of 13 SNPs in ten ITM genes were successfully genotyped in toenail DNA of 3,048 subcohort members and 419 RCC cases from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Diet and lifestyle were measured with baseline questionnaires. Cox regression analyses were conducted for main effects and gene-environment interactions. ADD1_rs4961 was significantly associated with RCC risk, showing a Hazard Ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.01–1.53) for the GT + TT (versus GG) genotype. Four of 65 tested gene-environment interactions were statistically significant. Three of these interactions clustered in SLC9A3_rs4957061, including the ones with fluid and potassium intake, and diuretic medication. For fluid intake, the RCC risk was significantly lower for high versus low intake in participants with the CC genotype (HR(95% CI): 0.47(0.26–0.86)), but not for the CT + TT genotype (P-interaction = 0.002). None of the main genetic effects and gene-environment interactions remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Data do not support the general hypothesis that the ITM is a disease mechanism in RCC etiology. PMID:27686058

  9. Physiological effects of climate warming on flowering plants and insect pollinators and potential consequences for their interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. SCAVEN, Nicole E. RAFFERTY

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing concern about the influence of climate change on flowering plants, pollinators, and the mutualistic interactions between them has led to a recent surge in research. Much of this research has addressed the consequences of warming for phenological and distributional shifts. In contrast, relatively little is known about the physiological responses of plants and insect pollinators to climate warming and, in particular, how these responses might affect plant-pollinator interactions. Here, we summarize the direct physiological effects of temperature on flowering plants and pollinating insects to highlight ways in which plant and pollinator responses could affect floral resources for pollinators, and pollination success for plants, respectively. We also consider the overall effects of these responses on plant-pollinator interaction networks. Plant responses to warming, which include altered flower, nectar, and pollen production, could modify floral resource availability and reproductive output of pollinating insects. Similarly, pollinator responses, such as altered foraging activity, body size, and life span, could affect patterns of pollen flow and pollination success of flowering plants. As a result, network structure could be altered as interactions are gained and lost, weakened and strengthened, even without the gain or loss of species or temporal overlap. Future research that addresses not only how plant and pollinator physiology are affected by warming but also how responses scale up to affect interactions and networks should allow us to better understand and predict the effects of climate change on this important ecosystem service [Current Zoolo­gy 59 (3: 418–426, 2013].

  10. Spin filtering and scaling of spin-dependent potentials in quasi-one-dimensional electron liquids with Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, N.-Y.; Wu, G. Y.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate theoretically the spin-filtering effect in a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) electron liquid with spin-orbit interaction. The Q1D system considered is formed from a two-dimensional electron-gas (2DEG) subject to both a lateral confining potential and an interface potential perpendicular to the 2DEG. Spin and charge degrees of freedom in the system are mixed by the interface potential through the Rashba mechanism of spin-orbit interaction [A. V. Moroz and C. H. W. Barnes, Phys. Rev. B 60, 14272 (1999)] and we show that when a spin-dependent δ potential is further introduced into the system, for example, via implantation of magnetic/ferromagnetic impurities, the mixing leads to the spin-filtering effect which favors electrons with a certain spin orientation to transport through the δ potential. In particular, we calculate the scaling dimension of electron scattering both by spin-flip and by spin-independent δ potentials when the temperature is varied and show that, in the spin-flip case, the scaling of electron scattering with temperature varies with spin orientation. Conductance is calculated for both spin and charge transport, and the spin-filtering effect is discussed quantitatively in terms of the conductance.

  11. New theoretical insight into the interactions and properties of formic acid: development of a quantum-based pair potential for formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Szczepan; Gee, Richard H; Balasubramanian, Krishnan; Fried, Laurence E

    2005-10-01

    We performed ab initio quantum-chemical studies for the development of intra- and intermolecular interaction potentials for formic acid for use in molecular-dynamics simulations of formic acid molecular crystal. The formic acid structures considered in the ab initio studies include both the cis and trans monomers which are the conformers that have been postulated as part of chains constituting liquid and crystal phases under extreme conditions. Although the cis to trans transformation is not energetically favored, the trans isomer was found as a component of stable gas-phase species. Our decomposition scheme for the interaction energy indicates that the hydrogen-bonded complexes are dominated by the Hartree-Fock forces while parallel clusters are stabilized by the electron correlation energy. The calculated three-body and higher interactions are found to be negligible, thus rationalizing the development of an atom-atom pair potential for formic acid based on high-level ab initio calculations of small formic acid clusters. Here we present an atom-atom pair potential that includes both intra- and inter molecular degrees of freedom for formic acid. The newly developed pair potential is used to examine formic acid in the condensed phase via molecular-dynamics simulations. The isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressure obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations is in good agreement with experiment. Further, the calculated equilibrium melting temperature is found to be in good agreement with experiment. PMID:16238411

  12. New Theoretical Insight into the Interactions and Properties of Formic Acid: Development of a Quantum-Based Pair Potential for Formic Acid.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roszak, S; Gee, R; Balasubramanian, K; Fried, L

    2005-08-08

    We performed ab initio quantum chemical studies for the development of intra and intermolecular interaction potentials for formic acid for use in molecular dynamics simulations of formic acid molecular crystal. The formic acid structures considered in the ab initio studies include both the cis and trans monomers which are the conformers that have been postulated as part of chains constituting liquid and crystal phases under extreme conditions. Although the cis to trans transformation is not energetically favored, the trans isomer was found as a component of stable gas-phase species. Our decomposition scheme for the interaction energy indicates that the hydrogen bonded complexes are dominated by the Hartree-Fock forces while parallel clusters are stabilized by the electron correlation energy. The calculated three-body and higher interactions are found to be negligible, thus rationalizing the development of an atom-atom pair potential for formic acid based on high-level ab initio calculations of small formic acid clusters. Here we present an atom-atom pair potential that includes both intra- and inter-molecular degrees of freedom for formic acid. The newly developed pair potential is used to examine formic acid in the condensed phase via molecular dynamics simulations. The isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressure obtained from molecular dynamics simulations is in good agreement with experiment. Further, the calculated equilibrium melting temperature is found to be in good agreement with experiment.

  13. Multiple-scattering effects in proton- and alpha-nucleus reactions with Glauber theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the total reaction and elastic differential cross sections for proton-nucleus and 4He-nucleus reactions in the framework of the Glauber theory which describes multiplescattering processes. The input wave functions are obtained using the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method and prepared for a wide range of mass numbers, O, Ca, Ni, Sn, and Pb isotopes. The theory reproduces experimental data very well. An effect of the multiple scattering is discussed by comparing with a standard optical-limit approximation. We see that the multiple-scattering effects play a crucial role, especially in enhancing the elastic differential cross sections at large scattering angles

  14. College Chemistry Students' Understanding of Potential Energy in the Context of Atomic-Molecular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nicole M.; Cooper, Melanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the energy changes that occur as atoms and molecules interact forms the foundation for understanding the macroscopic energy changes that accompany chemical processes. In order to identify ways to scaffold students' understanding of the connections between atomic-molecular and macroscopic energy perspectives, we conducted a…

  15. Constraining early and interacting dark energy with gravitational wave standard sirens: the potential of the eLISA mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, Chiara; Tamanini, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    We perform a forecast analysis of the capability of the eLISA space-based interferometer to constrain models of early and interacting dark energy using gravitational wave standard sirens. We employ simulated catalogues of standard sirens given by merging massive black hole binaries visible by eLISA, with an electromagnetic counterpart detectable by future telescopes. We consider three-arms mission designs with arm length of 1, 2 and 5 million km, 5 years of mission duration and the best-level low frequency noise as recently tested by the LISA Pathfinder. Standard sirens with eLISA give access to an intermediate range of redshift 1 lesssim z lesssim 8, and can therefore provide competitive constraints on models where the onset of the deviation from ΛCDM (i.e. the epoch when early dark energy starts to be non-negligible, or when the interaction with dark matter begins) occurs relatively late, at z lesssim 6. If instead early or interacting dark energy is relevant already in the pre-recombination era, current cosmological probes (especially the cosmic microwave background) are more efficient than eLISA in constraining these models, except possibly in the interacting dark energy model if the energy exchange is proportional to the energy density of dark energy.

  16. Potential for alcohol and drug interactions in older adults: evidence from the Irish longitudinal study on ageing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cousins, Gráinne

    2014-08-01

    Older adults are susceptible to adverse effects from the concomitant use of prescription medications and alcohol. This study estimates the prevalence of exposure to alcohol interactive (AI) medications and concomitant alcohol use by therapeutic class in a large, nationally representative sample of older adults.

  17. Ab initio interaction potentials and scattering lengths for ultracold mixtures of metastable helium and alkali-metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedziera, Dariusz; Mentel, Łukasz; Żuchowski, Piotr S.; Knoop, Steven

    2015-06-01

    We have obtained accurate ab initio +4Σ quartet potentials for the diatomic metastable triplet helium+alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb) systems, using all-electron restricted open-shell coupled cluster singles and doubles with noniterative triples corrections CCSD(T) calculations and accurate calculations of the long-range C6 coefficients. These potentials provide accurate ab initio quartet scattering lengths, which for these many-electron systems is possible, because of the small reduced masses and shallow potentials that result in a small amount of bound states. Our results are relevant for ultracold metastable triplet helium+alkali-metal mixture experiments.

  18. The fusion dynamics for a positive Q-value system: $^{27}$Al+$^{45}$Sc using SEDF and role of spin-orbit interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Dalip Singh

    2016-01-01

    The fusion dynamics for a positive Q-value systems: $^{27}$Al+$^{45}$Sc, at near and deep sub-barrier energies has been investigated using the proximity potentials of Skyrme energy density formalism in semi classical extended Thomas Fermi approach for arbitrarily chosen Skyrme forces: SLy4, SIV, SGII and Proximity77 of Blocki and co-workers. The calculated fusion excitation functions for the proximity potentials obtained for Skyrme forces mentioned above and for the Proximity77 have been compared with experimental data. The proximity potential for Skyrme force SIV is found to be the best and is used in the calculations of the quantities like logarithmic derivative, barriers distributions and $S$-factor. Further, the role of spin-orbit interaction potential in the fusion dynamics of this system has been investigated.

  19. Collecting high-order interactions in an effective pairwise intermolecular potential using the hydrated ion concept: The hydration of Cf{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbis, Elsa; Pappalardo, Rafael R.; Marcos, Enrique Sánchez, E-mail: sanchez@us.es [Departmento de Química Física, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Seville (Spain); Hernández-Cobos, Jorge [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2014-06-07

    This work proposes a new methodology to build interaction potentials between a highly charged metal cation and water molecules. These potentials, which can be used in classical computer simulations, have been fitted to reproduce quantum mechanical interaction energies (MP2 and BP86) for a wide range of [M(H{sub 2}O){sub n}]{sup m+}(H{sub 2}O){sub ℓ} clusters (n going from 6 to 10 and ℓ from 0 to 18). A flexible and polarizable water shell model (Mobile Charge Density of Harmonic Oscillator) has been coupled to the cation-water potential. The simultaneous consideration of poly-hydrated clusters and the polarizability of the interacting particles allows the inclusion of the most important many-body effects in the new polarizable potential. Applications have been centered on the californium, Cf(III) the heaviest actinoid experimentally studied in solution. Two different strategies to select a set of about 2000 structures which are used for the potential building were checked. Monte Carlo simulations of Cf(III)+500 H{sub 2}O for three of the intermolecular potentials predict an aquaion structure with coordination number close to 8 and average R{sub Cf−−O} in the range 2.43–2.48 Å, whereas the fourth one is closer to 9 with R{sub Cf−−O} = 2.54 Å. Simulated EXAFS spectra derived from the structural Monte Carlo distribution compares fairly well with the available experimental spectrum for the simulations bearing 8 water molecules. An angular distribution similar to that of a square antiprism is found for the octa-coordination.

  20. Physiological effects of climate warming on flowering plants and insect pollinators and potential consequences for their interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria L.SCAVEN; Nicole E.RAFFERTY

    2013-01-01

    Growing concern about the influence of climate change on flowering plants,pollinators,and the mutualistic interactions between them has led to a recent surge in research.Much of this research has addressed the consequences of warming for phenological and distributional shifts.In contrast,relatively little is known about the physiological responses of plants and insect pollinators to climate warming and,in particular,how these responses might affect plant-pollinator interactions.Here,we summabrize the direct physiological effects of temperature on flowering plants and pollinating insects to highlight ways in which plant and pollinator responses could affect floral resources for pollinators,and pollination success for plants,respectively.We also consider the overall effects of these responses on plant-pollinator interaction networks.Plant responses to warming,which include altered flower,nectar,and pollen production,could modify floral resource availability and reproductive output of pollinating insects.Similarly,pollinator responses,such as altered foraging activity,body size,and life span,could affect patterns of pollen flow and pollination success of flowering plants.As a result,network structure could be altered as interactions are gained and lost,weakened and strengthened,even without the gain or loss of species or temporal overlap.Future research that addresses not only how plant and pollinator physiology are affected by warming but also how responses scale up to affect interactions and networks should allow us to better understand and predict the effects of climate change on this important ecosystem service.

  1. One-dimensional scattering problem, self-adjoint extensions, renormalizations and point $\\delta$-interactions for Coulomb potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mineev, V S

    2003-01-01

    In the paper the one-dimensional one-center scattering problem with the initial potential $\\alpha |x|^{-1}$ on the whole axis is treated and reduced to the search for allowable self-adjoint extensions. Using the laws of conservation as necessary conditions in the singular point alongside with account of the analytical structure of fundamental solutions, it allows us to receive exact expressions for the wave functions (i.e. for the boundary conditions), scattering coefficients and the singular corrections to the potential, as well as the corresponding bound state spectrum. It turns out that the point $\\delta$-shaped correction to the potential should be present without fail at any choice of the allowable self-adjoint extension, moreover a form of these corrections corresponds to the form of renormalization terms obtained in quantum electrodynamics. Thus, the proposed method shows the unequivocal connection among the boundary conditions, scattering coefficients and $\\delta$-shaped additions to the potential. Ta...

  2. A Stochastic System with Infinite Interacting Components to Model the Time Evolution of the Membrane Potentials of a Population of Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaginuma, K.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a new class of interacting particle systems with a countable number of interacting components. The system represents the time evolution of the membrane potentials of an infinite set of interacting neurons. We prove the existence and uniqueness of the process, using a perfect simulation procedure. We show that this algorithm is successful, that is, we show that the number of steps of the algorithm is almost surely finite. We also construct a perfect simulation procedure for the coupling of a process with a finite number of neurons and the process with an infinite number of neurons. As a consequence, we obtain an upper bound for the error that we make when sampling from a finite set of neurons instead of the infinite set of neurons.

  3. Spectra of barium, radium, and element 120; application of the combined correlation potential, singles-doubles, and configuration interaction ab initio method

    OpenAIRE

    Ginges, J. S. M.; Dzuba, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We apply a version of the recently developed approach combining the correlation potential, linearized singles-doubles coupled-cluster, and the configuration interaction methods to the spectra of the heavy alkaline earths barium, radium, and element 120. Quantum electrodynamics radiative corrections are included. We have found unprecedented agreement between ab initio theory and experiment for the spectra of barium and radium, and we make accurate predictions for missing and unreliable data fo...

  4. ARTE: French-German Experiments in Crossing the Borders. 'One Media – Three Screens' Convergence and Interactivity at its Full Potential?

    OpenAIRE

    Wiehl, Anna

    2014-01-01

    abstractThis contribution aims at discussing policies of convergence as well as at questioning whether the current strategies really exploit the options of digital media to its full potential – especially with regard to transmedia-storytelling, interactivity, participation and networking. By the paradigm of the 'European Culture Channel' ARTE, we draw a sketch of the portfolio of existing and emerging new formats and user practices. In the second part, we examine one specific genre from this ...

  5. Internal Josephson-like tunnelling in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates affected by sign of the atomic interaction and external trapping potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Bo; Liu Xun-Xu

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the Josephson-like tunnelling in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates coupled with microwave field, which is in respond to various attractive and repulsive atomic interaction under the various aspect ratio of trapping potential. It is very interesting to find that the dynamic of Josephson-like tunnelling can be controlled from fast damped oscillations to nondamped oscillation, and relative number of atoms changes from asymmetric occupation to symmetric occupation correspondingly.

  6. An investigation of the potential of interactive simulations for developing system thinking skills in elementary school: a case study with fifth- and sixth- graders

    OpenAIRE

    Evagorou, Maria; Korfiatis, Kostas; Nicolaou, Christiana; Constantinou, Costas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a simulation-based learning environment on elementary school students? (11- to 12- year old) development of system thinking skills. The learning environment included interactive simulations using the Stagecast Creator software to simulate the ecosystem of a marsh. Simulations are an important tool in any effort to develop system thinking, because they have the potential to highlight the dynamic nature of systems. B...

  7. Endogenous 17β-estradiol is required for activity-dependent long-term potentiation in the striatum: interaction with the dopaminergic system

    OpenAIRE

    Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Tantucci, Michela; Durante, Valentina; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Giampà, Carmela; Di Mauro, Michela; Mazzocchetti, Petra; Costa, Cinzia; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Grassi, Silvarosa; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico; Calabresi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2), a neurosteroid synthesized by P450-aromatase (ARO), modulates various brain functions. We characterized the role of the locally synthesized E2 on striatal long-term synaptic plasticity and explored possible interactions between E2 receptors (ERs) and dopamine (DA) receptors in the dorsal striatum of adult male rats. Inhibition of E2 synthesis or antagonism of ERs prevented the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in both medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and cholinergic int...

  8. Endogenous 17ß-estradiol is required for activity-dependent long-term potentiation in the striatum: interaction with the dopaminergic system

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro eTozzi; Antonio ede Iure; Michela eTantucci; Valentina eDurante; Ana eQuiroga-Varela; Carmela eGiampà; Michela eDi Mauro; Petra eMazzocchetti; Cinzia eCosta; Massimiliano eDi Filippo; Silvarosa eGrassi; Vito Enrico Pettorossi; Paolo eCalabresi

    2015-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2), a neurosteroid synthesized by P450-aromatase (ARO), modulates various brain functions. We characterized the role of the locally synthesized E2 on striatal long-term synaptic plasticity and explored possible interactions between E2 receptors (ERs) and dopamine (DA) receptors in the dorsal striatum of adult male rats. Inhibition of E2 synthesis or antagonism of ERs prevented the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in both medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and cholinergic int...

  9. Extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence and associated factors of drug-drug interaction and potential adverse drug reactions in Gondar Teaching Referral Hospital, North West Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Endalkachew Admassie; Tesfahun Melese; Woldeselassie Mequanent; Wubshet Hailu; B Akshaya Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence, and associated factors for the occurrence of drug–drug interaction (DDI) and potential adverse drug reaction (ADR) in Gondar University Teaching Referral Hospital. Institutional-based retrospective cross-sectional study. This study was conducted on prescriptions of both in and out-patients for a period of 3 months at Gondar University Hospital. Both bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to...

  10. Spectra of barium, radium, and element 120; application of the combined correlation potential, singles-doubles, and configuration interaction ab initio method

    CERN Document Server

    Ginges, J S M

    2015-01-01

    We apply a version of the recently developed approach combining the correlation potential, linearized singles-doubles coupled-cluster, and the configuration interaction methods to the spectra of the heavy alkaline earths barium, radium, and element 120. Quantum electrodynamics radiative corrections are included. We have found unprecedented agreement between ab initio theory and experiment for the spectra of barium and radium, and we make accurate predictions for missing and unreliable data for all three atoms.

  11. Difference between potentials of zero charge in the absence of the metal-solvent chemisorption interaction of mercury and metals of the gallium subgroup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modern solution of the Volt problem is introduced. The difference values of the zero-charge potentials between Hg- and Ga-(In-Ga)- and (Tl-Ga)-electrodes in six solvents in the absence of the metal-solvent chemisorption interaction of mercury and the gallium subgroup metals are calculated. The errors of the calculated values and the possibility of their minimization are evaluated. It is shown, that the values obtained are determined by the metal nature alone

  12. An exchange-Coulomb model potential energy surface for the Ne-CO interaction. II. Molecular beam scattering and bulk gas phenomena in Ne-CO mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dham, Ashok K; McBane, George C; McCourt, Frederick R W; Meath, William J

    2010-01-14

    Four potential energy surfaces are of current interest for the Ne-CO interaction. Two are high-level fully ab initio surfaces obtained a decade ago using symmetry-adapted perturbation theory and supermolecule coupled-cluster methods. The other two are very recent exchange-Coulomb (XC) model potential energy surfaces constructed by using ab initio Heitler-London interaction energies and literature long range dispersion and induction energies, followed by the determination of a small number of adjustable parameters to reproduce a selected subset of pure rotational transition frequencies for the (20)Ne-(12)C(16)O van der Waals cluster. Testing of the four potential energy surfaces against a wide range of available experimental microwave, millimeter-wave, and mid-infrared Ne-CO transition frequencies indicated that the XC potential energy surfaces gave results that were generally far superior to the earlier fully ab initio surfaces. In this paper, two XC model surfaces and the two fully ab initio surfaces are tested for their abilities to reproduce experiment for a wide range of nonspectroscopic Ne-CO gas mixture properties. The properties considered here are relative integral cross sections and the angle dependence of rotational state-to-state differential cross sections, rotational relaxation rate constants for CO(v=2) in Ne-CO mixtures at T=296 K, pressure broadening of two pure rotational lines and of the rovibrational lines in the CO fundamental and first overtone transitions at 300 K, and the temperature and, where appropriate, mole fraction dependencies of the interaction second virial coefficient, the binary diffusion coefficient, the interaction viscosity, the mixture shear viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients, and the thermal diffusion factor. The XC model potential energy surfaces give results that lie within or very nearly within the experimental uncertainties for all properties considered, while the coupled-cluster ab initio surface gives

  13. New bases for the evaluation of interaction energies: An ab initio study of the CO-Ne van der Waals complex intermolecular potential and ro-vibrational spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: CO-Ne IPES. Highlights: → From the LPol, MLPol, and aug-pc-2 bases we obtained new bases for the evaluation of CO-Ne interaction energies. → We checked the bases on the evaluation of the rovibrational spectrum. → The results were satisfactory, being the new bases more efficient than those previously available. - Abstract: Recently we have derived new efficient basis sets for the evaluation of interaction energies in the X-Y (X, Y = He, Ne, Ar) van der Waals complexes. Here we extend the study to the CO-Ne complex. For this, we start with a systematic basis set study, where the LPol, MLPol and Jensen's aug-pc-2 basis sets are considered as starting point (for the Ne atom LPol bases are developed). As reference we take interaction energy results obtained with Dunning's augmented correlation consistent polarized valence basis sets. In all cases we test extensions with different sets of midbond functions. With the selected bases we evaluate CCSD(T) interaction potentials, and to check the potentials further, we obtain the ro-vibrational spectrum of the complex. The results are compared to the available experimental data.

  14. Potential role of chitinases and chitin-binding proteins in host-microbial interactions during the development of intestinal inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Hoa T.; Barnich, Nicolas; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2011-01-01

    The small and large intestines contain an abundance of luminal antigens derived from food products and enteric microorganisms. The function of intestinal epithelial cells is tightly regulated by several factors produced by enteric bacteria and the epithelial cells themselves. Epithelial cells actively participate in regulating the homeostasis of intestine, and failure of this function leads to abnormal and host-microbial interactions resulting in the development of intestinal inflammation. Ma...

  15. Older Age and Steroid Use Are Associated with Increasing Polypharmacy and Potential Medication Interactions Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Parian, Alyssa; Ha, Christina Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity and polypharmacy, more prevalent among older persons, may impact the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aims of this study were to assess the frequency of polypharmacy and medication interactions within a cohort of older patients with IBD and describe IBD treatment patterns. Methods: Cohort study of 190 patients with IBD 65 years or older followed at a tertiary IBD referral center from 2006 to 2012. Data collected included demographics, IB...

  16. Interaction of the mu-opioid receptor with GPR177 (Wntless inhibits Wnt secretion: potential implications for opioid dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stagljar Igor

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid agonist drugs produce analgesia. However, long-term exposure to opioid agonists may lead to opioid dependence. The analgesic and addictive properties of opioid agonist drugs are mediated primarily via the mu-opioid receptor (MOR. Opioid agonists appear to alter neuronal morphology in key brain regions implicated in the development of opioid dependence. However, the precise role of the MOR in the development of these neuronal alterations remains elusive. We hypothesize that identifying and characterizing novel MOR interacting proteins (MORIPs may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved in the development of opioid dependence. Results GPR177, the mammalian ortholog of Drosophila Wntless/Evi/Sprinter, was identified as a MORIP in a modified split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen. GPR177 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that plays a critical role in mediating Wnt protein secretion from Wnt producing cells. The MOR/GPR177 interaction was validated in pulldown, coimmunoprecipitation, and colocalization studies using mammalian tissue culture cells. The interaction was also observed in rodent brain, where MOR and GPR177 were coexpressed in close spatial proximity within striatal neurons. At the cellular level, morphine treatment caused a shift in the distribution of GPR177 from cytosol to the cell surface, leading to enhanced MOR/GPR177 complex formation at the cell periphery and the inhibition of Wnt protein secretion. Conclusions It is known that chronic morphine treatment decreases dendritic arborization and hippocampal neurogenesis, and Wnt proteins are essential for these processes. We therefore propose that the morphine-mediated MOR/GPR177 interaction may result in decreased Wnt secretion in the CNS, resulting in atrophy of dendritic arbors and decreased neurogenesis. Our results demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for GPR177 in regulating cellular response to opioid drugs.

  17. Potential Effects of Climate Change on Ecological Interaction Outcomes Between Two Disease-Vector Mosquitoes: A Mesocosm Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonel, B F; Koroiva, R; Hamada, N; Ferreira-Keppler, R L; Roque, F O

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to experimentally assess the effects of different climate change scenarios on the outcomes of interactions between Aedes aegypti (L.) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae. The experimental design maintained a constant density of specimens while the proportion of the species in different experimental climate change scenarios varied. Our results indicate that survival of the two species was not affected, but larval development and pupation times decreased under elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration and high air temperature. In climate change scenarios with both species together, the survival of Ae. aegypti increased and its larval development time decreased with increasing density of Cx. quinquefasciatus. This may be attributed to the effects of intraspecific competition being more significant than interspecific competition in Ae. aegypti. Our study also reveals that climatic changes may affect the patterns of interactions between Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti. Alterations in climatic conditions changed the response of context-dependent competition, indicating the importance of studies on how ecological interactions will be affected by projected future climatic change. PMID:26336208

  18. Potential bioactive Schiff base compounds: Synthesis, characterization, X-ray structures, biological screenings and interaction with Salmon sperm DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Uddin, Noor; Ali, Saqib; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2013-12-01

    Three Schiff base compounds ofN‧-substituted benzohydrazide and sulfonohydrazide derivatives: N‧-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-4-tert-butyl- benzohydrazide (1), N‧-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene)-4-tert-butylbenzohydrazide (2) and N‧-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-4-methylbenzenesulfonohydrazide (3) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal analysis. The title compounds have been screened for their biological activities including, antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant, cytotoxic, enzymatic activities as well as interaction with SS-DNA which showed remarkable activities in each area of research. The DNA binding of the compounds 1-3 with SS-DNA has been carried out with absorption spectroscopy, which reveals the binding propensity towards SS-DNA via intercalation mode of interaction. The intercalative mode of interaction is also supported by viscometric results. The synthesized compounds were also found to be effective against alkaline phosphatase enzyme. They also show significant to good antimicrobial activity against six bacterial and five fungal strains. The MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) for antibacterial activity ranges from 1.95-500 μg/mL. Compounds 1-3 show cytotoxic activity comparable to the control. At higher conc. (100 μg/L) compound 3 shows 100% activity means that it has killed all brine shrimps. They were also found to be effective antioxidant of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and show almost comparable antioxidant activity to that of the standard and known antioxidant, ascorbic acid.

  19. Constraining early and interacting dark energy with gravitational wave standard sirens: the potential of the eLISA mission

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    We perform a forecast analysis of the capability of the eLISA space-based interferometer to constrain models of early and interacting dark energy using gravitational wave standard sirens. We employ simulated catalogues of standard sirens given by merging massive black hole binaries visible by eLISA, with an electromagnetic counterpart detectable by future telescopes. We consider three-arms mission designs with arm length of 1, 2 and 5 million km, 5 years of mission duration and the best-level low frequency noise as recently tested by the LISA Pathfinder. Standard sirens with eLISA give access to an intermediate range of redshift $1\\lesssim z \\lesssim 8$, and can therefore provide competitive constraints on models where the onset of the deviation from $\\Lambda$CDM (i.e.~the epoch when early dark energy starts to be non-negligible, or when the interaction with dark matter begins) occurs relatively late, at $z\\lesssim 6$. If instead early or interacting dark energy is relevant already in the pre-recombination er...

  20. Quarkonia potential

    OpenAIRE

    Durnev, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Using the quark-antiquark interactions obtained in the framework of the bootstrap method we construct a potential model, investigate the possibility of describing of heavy quarkonia and calculate the bottomonium spectrum. The potential of the interaction was obtained as a nonrelativistic limit of the relativistic quark-antiquark amplitudes Q{\\bar Q} -> Q\\bar Q.

  1. Investigating the Conformational Structure and Potential Site Interactions of SOD Inhibitors on Ec-SOD in Marine Mud Crab Scylla serrata: A Molecular Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Sablok, Gaurav; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Chainy, G B N

    2016-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) act as a first line of the enzymatic antioxidant defense system to control cellular superoxide anion toxicity. Previously, several inhibitors have been widely identified and catalogued for inhibition of SOD activity; however, still the information about the mechanism of interaction and points toward the inhibitor interactions in structures of SODs in general and in extracellular (Ec)-SOD in particular is still in naive. In the present research, we present an insight to elucidate the molecular basis of interactions of SOD inhibitors with Ec-SOD in mud crab Scylla serrata using molecular modeling and docking approaches. Different inhibitors of SOD such as hydrogen peroxide [Formula: see text], potassium cyanide, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), [Formula: see text]-mercaptoethanol and dithiocarbamate were screened to understand the potential sites that may act as sites for cleavage or blocking in the protein. SOD-SDS and [Formula: see text] complex interactions indicate residues Pro72 and Asp102 of the predicted crab Ec-SOD as common targets. The GOLD result indicates that Pro72, Asp102 and Thr103 are commonly acting as the site of interaction in Ec-SOD of S. serrata with SOD inhibitors. For the first time, the results of this study provide an insight into the structural properties of Ec-SOD of S. serrata and define the possible involvements between the amino acids present in its active sites, i.e., in the regions from 70 to 84 and from 101 to 103 and different inhibitors.

  2. Bound state solutions of the Dirac equation with the Deng—Fan potential including a Coulomb tensor interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximate analytical solutions of the Dirac equation in the case of pseudospin and spin symmetry limits are investigated under the Deng—Fan potential by applying the asymptotic iteration method for the arbitrary quantum numbers n and κ. Some of the numerical results are also represented in both pseudospin symmetry and spin symmetry limits

  3. Oscillatory interaction between dorsal root excitability and dorsal root potentials in the spinal cord of the turtle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgado-Lezama, R; Perrier, J F; Hounsgaard, J

    1999-01-01

    The response to dorsal root stimulation, at one to two times threshold, was investigated in the isolated cervical enlargement of the turtle spinal cord. At frequencies near 10 Hz the synaptic response in motoneurons and the cord dorsum potential, after an initial lag time, oscillated in amplitude...

  4. Mannose-specific interactions of Lactobacillus plantarum in the intestine : bacterial genes, molecular host responses and potential probiotic effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pretzer, G.

    2008-01-01

    One potential mechanism by which probiotic microorganisms may exert beneficial health effects to the host is the inhibition of intestinal infections by competitive exclusion of pathogenic bacteria. This concept may also be applicable for mannose-specific adhesion to the epithelial surface, which has

  5. Particle resonance in the (1+1)-dimensional Dirac equation with kink-like vector potential and delta interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Eshghi, M; Ikhdair, Sameer M

    2015-01-01

    The relativistic problem of spin- fermions subject to vector hyperbolic (kink-like) potential tanh (kx) is investigated by using the parametric Nikiforov-Uvarov method. The energy eigenvalue equation and the corresponding normalized wave functions are obtained in terms of the Jacobi polynomials for x>0 and x<0 cases.

  6. Chemical Potential for the Interacting Classical Gas and the Ideal Quantum Gas Obeying a Generalized Exclusion Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, F. J.; Olivares-Quiroz, L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we address the concept of the chemical potential [mu] in classical and quantum gases towards the calculation of the equation of state [mu] = [mu](n, T) where n is the particle density and "T" the absolute temperature using the methods of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two cases seldom discussed in elementary textbooks are…

  7. Web Based Interactive Software in International Business: The Case of the Global Market Potential System Online (GMPSO[C])

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janavaras, Basil J.; Gomes, Emanuel; Young, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to confirm whether students using the Global Market Potential System Online (GMPSO) web based software, (http://globalmarketpotential.com), for their class project enhanced their knowledge and understanding of international business. The challenge most business instructors and practitioners face is to determine how to bring the…

  8. Potential interactions among disease, pesticides, water quality and adjacent land cover in amphibian habitats in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglin, W A; Smalling, K L; Anderson, C; Calhoun, D; Chestnut, T; Muths, E

    2016-10-01

    To investigate interactions among disease, pesticides, water quality, and adjacent land cover, we collected samples of water, sediment, and frog tissue from 21 sites in 7 States in the United States (US) representing a variety of amphibian habitats. All samples were analyzed for >90 pesticides and pesticide degradates, and water and frogs were screened for the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) using molecular methods. Pesticides and pesticide degradates were detected frequently in frog breeding habitats (water and sediment) as well as in frog tissue. Fungicides occurred more frequently in water, sediment, and tissue than was expected based upon their limited use relative to herbicides or insecticides. Pesticide occurrence in water or sediment was not a strong predictor of occurrence in tissue, but pesticide concentrations in tissue were correlated positively to agricultural and urban land, and negatively to forested land in 2-km buffers around the sites. Bd was detected in water at 45% of sites, and on 34% of swabbed frogs. Bd detections in water were not associated with differences in land use around sites, but sites with detections had colder water. Frogs that tested positive for Bd were associated with sites that had higher total fungicide concentrations in water and sediment, but lower insecticide concentrations in sediments relative to frogs that were Bd negative. Bd concentrations on frog swabs were positively correlated to dissolved organic carbon, and total nitrogen and phosphorus, and negatively correlated to pH and water temperature. Data were collected from a range of locations and amphibian habitats and represent some of the first field-collected information aimed at understanding the interactions between pesticides, land use, and amphibian disease. These interactions are of particular interest to conservation efforts as many amphibians live in altered habitats and may depend on wetlands embedded in these landscapes to survive

  9. van der Waals interactions and dipole polarizabilities of lanthanides: Tm(2F)-He and Yb(1S)-He potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, Alexei A.; Szczȩśniak, Małgorzata M.; Chałasiński, Grzegorz

    2006-03-01

    Anisotropic dipole polarizabilities of Tm(F2),Tm+2(F2), and Yb(S1) are calculated using the finite-field multireference averaged quadratic coupled cluster (MR-AQCC) (Tm and Tm+2) and RCCSD(T) (Yb) methods with small-core relativistic pseudopotentials ECP28MWB combined with the augmented ANO basis sets. The lanthanide atoms are strongly polarizable with the scalar part originating from the 6s electrons and the tensorial part from the open 4f shells. The adiabatic interaction potentials Σ+2,Π2,Δ2, and Φ2 of Tm(F2)-He and Tm+2(F2)-He were examined by the multireference approaches, multireference configuration interaction and MR-AQCC, using the basis sets designed in the polarizability calculations. A closed-shell lanthanide system Yb(S1)-He was included for comparison. The Tm-He Σ+2,Π2,Δ2, and Φ2 interaction potentials are very shallow and nearly degenerate (within 0.01cm-1), with the well depths in the range of 2.35-2.36cm-1 at R =6.17Å. The basis-set saturated well depths are expected to be larger by ca. 25%, as estimated using the bond-function augmented basis set. The interactions of lanthanide atoms with He are one order of magnitude less anisotropic than those involving first-row transition metal atoms. The suppression of anisotropy is chiefly attributed to the screening effected by the 6s shell. When these electrons are removed as in the di-cation complex Tm+2(F2)-He, the potentials deepen to a thousand wave number range and their anisotropy is enhanced 500-fold.

  10. Dimensional reduction in Bose-Einstein condensed clouds of atoms confined in tight potentials of any geometry and any interaction strength

    CERN Document Server

    Sandin, P; Gulliksson, M; Smyrnakis, J; Magiropoulos, M; Kavoulakis, G M

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by numerous experiments on Bose-Einstein condensed atoms which have been performed in tight trapping potentials of various geometries (elongated and/or toroidal/annular), we develop a general method which allows us to reduce the corresponding three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the order parameter into an effectively one-dimensional equation, taking into account the interactions (i.e., treating the width of the transverse profile variationally) and the curvature of the trapping potential. As an application of our model we consider atoms which rotate in a toroidal trapping potential. We evaluate the state of lowest energy for a fixed value of the angular momentum within various approximations of the effectively one-dimensional model and compare our results with the full solution of the three-dimensional problem, thus getting evidence for the accuracy of our model.

  11. Quantum dynamical simulation of the scattering of Ar from a frozen LiF(100) surface based on a first principles interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azuri, Asaf; Pollak, Eli, E-mail: eli.pollak@weizmann.ac.il [Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovoth (Israel)

    2015-07-07

    In-plane two and three dimensional diffraction patterns are computed for the vertical scattering of an Ar atom from a frozen LiF(100) surface. Suitable collimation of the incoming wavepacket serves to reveal the quantum mechanical diffraction. The interaction potential is based on a fit to an ab initio potential calculated using density functional theory with dispersion corrections. Due to the potential coupling found between the two horizontal surface directions, there are noticeable differences between the quantum angular distributions computed for two and three dimensional scattering. The quantum results are compared to analogous classical Wigner computations on the same surface and with the same conditions. The classical dynamics largely provides the envelope for the quantum diffractive scattering. The classical results also show that the corrugation along the [110] direction of the surface is smaller than along the [100] direction, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations of unimodal and bimodal scattering for the [110] and [100] directions, respectively.

  12. An improved density functional theory description of the Ge(100)c(4×2) surface using the MBJLDA xc potential and spin-orbit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Phillip V; Radny, Marian W; Shah, G Ali

    2013-02-01

    The MBJLDA xc potential (modified Becke-Johnson exchange potential with local density approximation correlation) proposed by Tran and Blaha has been designed and shown to significantly improve the description of the fundamental energy gaps of a wide range of bulk materials. Recently we reported that combining this MBJLDA xc potential with spin-orbit interactions and local density approximation pseudopotentials within the plane wave density functional method led to results for bulk germanium that were at least as accurate as those obtained from far more sophisticated and computationally expensive methods such as the GW method. Here we demonstrate that the application of this approach to the Ge(100)c(4×2) surface yields results that are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data.

  13. Review of potential interactions between stocked rainbow trout and listed Snake River sockeye salmon in Pettit Lake Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuscher, D.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if hatchery rainbow trout compete with or prey on juvenile Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka in Pettit Lake, Idaho. In 1995, a total of 8,570 age-0 sockeye and 4,000 hatchery rainbow trout were released in Pettit Lake. After releasing the fish, gillnets were set in the pelagic and littoral zones to collected diet and spatial distribution data. Interactions were assessed monthly from June 1995 through March 1996. Competition for food was discounted based on extremely low diet overlap results observed throughout the sample period. Conversely, predation interactions were more significant. A total of 119 rainbow trout stomachs were analyzed, two contained O. nerka. The predation was limited to one sample period, but when extrapolated to the whole rainbow trout populations results in significant losses. Total consumption of O. nerka by rainbow trout ranged from an estimated 10 to 23% of initial stocking numbers. Predation results contradict earlier findings that stocked rainbow trout do not prey on wild kokanee or sockeye in the Sawtooth Lakes. The contradiction may be explained by a combination of poorly adapted hatchery sockeye and a littoral release site that forced spatial overlap that was not occurring in the wild populations. Releasing sockeye in the pelagic zone may have reduced or eliminated predation losses to rainbow trout.

  14. Linear quadratic game and non-cooperative predictive methods for potential application to modelling driver-AFS interactive steering control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Xiaoxiang; Cole, David J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the modelling of strategic interactions between the human driver and the vehicle active front steering (AFS) controller in a path-following task where the two controllers hold different target paths. The work is aimed at extending the use of mathematical models in representing driver steering behaviour in complicated driving situations. Two game theoretic approaches, namely linear quadratic game and non-cooperative model predictive control (non-cooperative MPC), are used for developing the driver-AFS interactive steering control model. For each approach, the open-loop Nash steering control solution is derived; the influences of the path-following weights, preview and control horizons, driver time delay and arm neuromuscular system (NMS) dynamics are investigated, and the CPU time consumed is recorded. It is found that the two approaches give identical time histories as well as control gains, while the non-cooperative MPC method uses much less CPU time. Specifically, it is observed that the introduction of weight on the integral of vehicle lateral displacement error helps to eliminate the steady-state path-following error; the increase in preview horizon and NMS natural frequency and the decline in time delay and NMS damping ratio improve the path-following accuracy.

  15. Review of potential interactions between stocked rainbow trout and listed Snake River sockeye salmon in Pettit Lake Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine if hatchery rainbow trout compete with or prey on juvenile Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka in Pettit Lake, Idaho. In 1995, a total of 8,570 age-0 sockeye and 4,000 hatchery rainbow trout were released in Pettit Lake. After releasing the fish, gillnets were set in the pelagic and littoral zones to collected diet and spatial distribution data. Interactions were assessed monthly from June 1995 through March 1996. Competition for food was discounted based on extremely low diet overlap results observed throughout the sample period. Conversely, predation interactions were more significant. A total of 119 rainbow trout stomachs were analyzed, two contained O. nerka. The predation was limited to one sample period, but when extrapolated to the whole rainbow trout populations results in significant losses. Total consumption of O. nerka by rainbow trout ranged from an estimated 10 to 23% of initial stocking numbers. Predation results contradict earlier findings that stocked rainbow trout do not prey on wild kokanee or sockeye in the Sawtooth Lakes. The contradiction may be explained by a combination of poorly adapted hatchery sockeye and a littoral release site that forced spatial overlap that was not occurring in the wild populations. Releasing sockeye in the pelagic zone may have reduced or eliminated predation losses to rainbow trout

  16. Prediction of dynamic Rankine Cycle waste heat recovery performance and fuel saving potential in passenger car applications considering interactions with vehicles’ energy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Method for evaluating fuel saving potential of vehicle waste heat recovery systems. • Analysis of interactions between waste heat recovery system and vehicle. • Evaluation of fuel saving potential in dynamic motorway driving scenario. • Parameter study for increasing fuel saving potential of integrated system. - Abstract: Waste heat recovery (WHR) by means of a Rankine Cycle is a promising approach for achieving reductions in fuel consumption and, as a result, exhaust emissions of passenger car engines. To find the best compromise between complexity and fuel saving potential, methods for predicting the WHR performance for different system configurations and stationary as well as dynamic driving scenarios are needed. Since WHR systems are usually not included in today’s car concepts, they are mostly designed as add-on systems. As a result their integration may lead to negative interactions due to increased vehicle weight, engine backpressure and cooling demand. These effects have to be considered when evaluating the fuel saving potential. A new approach for predicting WHR performance and fuel saving potential was developed and is presented in this paper. It is based on simple dynamic models of a system for recovering exhaust gas waste heat and its interfaces with the vehicle: the exhaust system for heat input, the on-board electric system for power delivery and the engine cooling system for heat rejection. The models are validated with test bench measurements of the cycle components. A study of fuel saving potential in an exemplary dynamic motorway driving scenario shows the effect of vehicle integration: while the WHR system could improve fuel economy by 3.4%, restrictions in power output due to the architecture of the on-board electric system, package considerations, increased weight, cooling demand and exhaust gas backpressure lead to a reduction of fuel saving potential by 60% to 1.3%. A parameter study reveals that, in addition to weight

  17. A protocol for a randomized clinical trial of interactive video dance: potential for effects on cognitive function

    OpenAIRE

    Jovancevic Jelena; Rosano Caterina; Perera Subashan; Erickson Kirk I; Studenski Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Physical exercise has the potential to affect cognitive function, but most evidence to date focuses on cognitive effects of fitness training. Cognitive exercise also may influence cognitive function, but many cognitive training paradigms have failed to provide carry-over to daily cognitive function. Video games provide a broader, more contextual approach to cognitive training that may induce cognitive gains and have carry over to daily function. Most video games do not inv...

  18. Ab initio interaction potentials for X and B excited states of He-I{sub 2} for studying dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosmiti, Rita; Garcia-Gutierrez, Leonor; Delgado-Tellez, Laura; Valdes, Alvaro; Villarreal, Pablo; Delgado-Barrio, Gerardo, E-mail: rita@imaff.cfmac.csic.e [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-11-01

    Ab initio CCSD(T) and MRCI approaches were employed to construct potential energy surfaces of the ground and the B electronic excited states of He-I{sub 2} complex, while full quantum mechanical methods were applied to study its spectroscopy and dynamics. A description of the approach adopted, together with the results obtained and their comparison with recent experimental data, as well as further improvements are presented.

  19. Iron overload causes osteoporosis in thalassemia major patients through interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Perrotta, Silverio; Bellini, Giulia; Luongo, Livio; Tortora, Chiara; Siniscalco, Dario; Francese, Matteo; Torella, Marco; Nobili, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Maione, Sabatino

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bone resorption in β-thalassemia major is multifactorial and our understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remains incomplete. Considering the emerging importance of the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system in bone metabolism, it may be instructive to examine a potential role for this system in the development of osteoporosis in patients with β-thalassemia major and its relationship with iron overload and iron chelation therapy. This study demonstrates that, in thalassemic-derived osteoclasts, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression inversely correlates with femoral and lumbar bone mineral density, and directly correlates with ferritin levels and liver iron concentration. The vanilloid agonist resiniferatoxin dramatically reduces cathepsin K levels and osteoclast numbers in vitro, without affecting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. The iron chelators deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox decrease both tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K expression, as well as osteoclast activity. Taken together, these data show that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 activation/desensitization influences tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression and activity, and this effect is dependent on iron, suggesting a pivotal role for iron overload in the dysregulation of bone metabolism in patients with thalassemia major. Our applied pharmacology provides evidence for the potential of iron chelators to abrogate these effects by reducing osteoclast activity. Whether iron chelation therapy is capable of restoring bone health in humans requires further study, but the potential to provide dual benefits for patients with β-thalassemia major –preventing iron-overload and alleviating associated osteoporotic changes – is exciting. PMID:25216685

  20. Potential energy curves for the interaction of a low-energy positron with matter: The case He+e{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohallem, Jose R. [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O. Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: rachid@fisica.ufmg.br; Rolim, Flavia [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade de Coimbra, FCT, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2007-02-15

    In this introductory exploration of the title theme, we treat a positron as a light nucleus and work within the quasi-molecule approximation to obtain, for the first time, adiabatic potential energy curves for its scattering by the He atom. We then show that different elastic and inelastic processes that contribute to the total scattering cross section can be rationalized in molecular terms as dissociation and non-adiabatic couplings. Particularly, some new insights on positronium yielding are presented.

  1. Electron Flow in Multiheme Bacterial Cytochromes is a Balancing Act Between Heme Electronic Interaction and Redox Potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen

    2014-01-14

    The naturally widespread process of electron transfer from metal reducing bacteria to extracellular solid metal oxides entails unique biomolecular machinery optimized for long-range electron transport. To perform this function efficiently microorganisms have adapted multi-heme c-type cytochromes to arrange heme cofactors into wires that cooperatively span the cellular envelope, transmitting electrons along distances greater than 100 Angstroms. Implications and opportunities for bionanotechnological device design are self-evident. However, at the molecular level how these proteins shuttle electrons along their heme wires, navigating intraprotein intersections and interprotein interfaces effciently, remains a mystery so far inaccessible to experiment. To shed light on this critical topic, we carried out extensive computer simulations to calculate Marcus theory quantities for electron transfer along the ten heme cofactors in the recently crystallized outer membrane cytochrome MtrF. The combination of electronic coupling matrix elements with free energy calculations of heme redox potentials and reorganization energies for heme-to-heme electron transfer allows the step-wise and overall electron transfer rate to be estimated and understood in terms of structural and dynamical characteristics of the protein. By solving a master equation for electron hopping, we estimate an intrinsic, maximum possible electron flux through solvated MtrF of 104-105 s-1, consistent with recently measured rates for the related MtrCAB protein complex. Intriguingly, this flux must navigate thermodynamically uphill steps past low potential hemes. Our calculations show that the rapid electron transport through MtrF is the result of a clear correlation between heme redox potential and the strength of electronic coupling along the wire: Thermodynamically uphill steps occur only between electronically well connected stacked heme pairs. This suggests that the protein evolved to harbor low potential

  2. Mannose-specific interactions of Lactobacillus plantarum in the intestine : bacterial genes, molecular host responses and potential probiotic effects

    OpenAIRE

    Pretzer, G.

    2008-01-01

    One potential mechanism by which probiotic microorganisms may exert beneficial health effects to the host is the inhibition of intestinal infections by competitive exclusion of pathogenic bacteria. This concept may also be applicable for mannose-specific adhesion to the epithelial surface, which has been demonstrated for several pathogens as well as for the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum. In this thesis, a complementary approach was performed to focus on mannose-specific host-microbe inter...

  3. It's a dark, dark world: background evolution of interacting phiCDM models beyond simple exponential potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suprit; Singh, Parminder

    2016-05-01

    We study the background cosmological dynamics with a three component source content: a radiation fluid, a barotropic fluid to mimic the matter sector and a single scalar field which can act as dark energy giving rise to the late-time accelerated phase. Using the well-known dimensionless variables, we cast the dynamical equations into an autonomous system of ordinary differential equations (ASODE), which are studied by computing the fixed points and the conditions for their stability. The matter fluid and the scalar field are taken to be uncoupled at first and later, we consider a coupling between the two of the form Q = √(2/3)κβρṁphi where ρm is the barotropic fluid density. The key point of our analysis is that for the closure of ASODE, we only demand that the jerk, Γ = V V''/V'2 is a function of acceleration, z = -MpV'/V, that is, Γ = 1+f(z). In this way, we are able to accommodate a large class of potentials that goes beyond the simple exponential potentials. The analysis is completely generic and independent of the form of the potential for the scalar field. As an illustration and confirmation of the analysis, we consider f(z) of the forms μ/z2, μ/z, (μ-z)/z2 and (μ-z) to numerically compute the evolution of cosmological parameters with and without coupling. Implications of the approach and the results are discussed.

  4. In Vitro Interaction of 5-Hydroxytrptamine with Cytosolic Molybdenum Hydroxylases as a Potential Inhibitor for Initial Rates Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Al-Mohizea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The role of 5-HT has been investigated in many behavioral activities. Thus, studies using raphe lesion showed that 5-HT is involved in sleep, general activity levels, habituation, aggression, pain sensitivity and morphine analgesia, avoidance behavior, self-stimulation and water consumption. Approach: The metabolic interaction between serotonin (5- hydroxytrptamine and indole-3-aldehyde and xanthine via aldehyde oxidase (EC 1.2.3.1 and xanthine oxidase (EC 1.1.3.22, respectively, were studied in liver tissue homogenate of Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs by following the decrease in substrate concentration using spectrophotometer. Homogenates of liver were incubated with indole-3-aldehyde in the presence and absence of serotonin or (chlorpromazine and allopurinol a potent and selective inhibitors for aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase, respectively. Oxidation of indole-3-aldehyde to indole-3-acetic acid was reduced up to 63.2% in the presence of serotonin (100 µM, while oxidation of xanthine to uric acid was reduced up to 51.6% under the same conditions. Results: In comparison, incubation of the substrates with their specific inhibitors (100 µM of chlorpromazine and 100 µM allopurinol give almost complete inhibition. These results demonstrate that in the guinea pig liver a metabolic interaction between serotonin and indole-3-aldehyde or xanthine via molybdenum hydroxylases system may take place in liver, which is the main tissue for xenobiotics detoxification. Conclusion: The overall conclusion from this research is that serotonin could be a protector for neurons and other tissue from the insult of oxidation of aldehydes and xanthines by molybdenum hydroxylases.

  5. Characterization of Long-Lasting Oatp Inhibition by Typical Inhibitor Cyclosporine A and In Vitro-In Vivo Discrepancy in Its Drug Interaction Potential in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Takayuki; Masuo, Yusuke; Kogi, Tatsuya; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Kato, Yukio

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative assessment of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is one of the major focuses in drug development. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate in vitro-in vivo discrepancy of DDI potential for prototypical organic anion transporting polypeptide (Oatp) inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) using rats. Plasma concentration of pravastatin, prototypical Oatp substrate, after oral administration was increased by CsA intravenously administered at 1 d before the pravastatin administration. The ratio of the area under the curve of pravastatin to the control was much higher than the R-values calculated using the plasma unbound concentrations of CsA and the inhibition constant (Ki) assessed in isolated hepatocytes, indicating in vitro-in vivo discrepancy. This interaction with pravastatin persisted for 3 d after CsA administration, demonstrating long-lasting inhibition in vivo. The Ki value for unbound CsA in the presence of serum was comparable with that in its absence. M1, the major metabolite of CsA inhibited pravastatin uptake at much higher concentration compared with its plasma unbound concentration. Thus, the DDI potential of CsA-mediated hepatic Oatp inhibition cannot be extrapolated from in vitro data, and this could be due to the long-lasting Oatp inhibition by CsA, but not the effect of plasma protein or metabolites.

  6. Characterization of Long-Lasting Oatp Inhibition by Typical Inhibitor Cyclosporine A and In Vitro-In Vivo Discrepancy in Its Drug Interaction Potential in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Takayuki; Masuo, Yusuke; Kogi, Tatsuya; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Kato, Yukio

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative assessment of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is one of the major focuses in drug development. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate in vitro-in vivo discrepancy of DDI potential for prototypical organic anion transporting polypeptide (Oatp) inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) using rats. Plasma concentration of pravastatin, prototypical Oatp substrate, after oral administration was increased by CsA intravenously administered at 1 d before the pravastatin administration. The ratio of the area under the curve of pravastatin to the control was much higher than the R-values calculated using the plasma unbound concentrations of CsA and the inhibition constant (Ki) assessed in isolated hepatocytes, indicating in vitro-in vivo discrepancy. This interaction with pravastatin persisted for 3 d after CsA administration, demonstrating long-lasting inhibition in vivo. The Ki value for unbound CsA in the presence of serum was comparable with that in its absence. M1, the major metabolite of CsA inhibited pravastatin uptake at much higher concentration compared with its plasma unbound concentration. Thus, the DDI potential of CsA-mediated hepatic Oatp inhibition cannot be extrapolated from in vitro data, and this could be due to the long-lasting Oatp inhibition by CsA, but not the effect of plasma protein or metabolites. PMID:27290622

  7. Interaction between ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with human serum albumin as binary and ternary systems by multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahaki, Hanie, E-mail: hanieh.mahaki@gmail.com [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina; Chamani, Jamshidkhan [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reza Saberi, Mohammad [Medical Chemistry Department, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to describe the competition of ropinirole hydrochloride (RP) and aspirin (ASA) in binding to human serum albumin (HSA) in physiological buffer (pH=7.4) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta-potential measurements. Fluorescence analysis was used to define the binding and quenching properties of drug-HSA complexes in binary and ternary systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that in the presence of RP, the binding constant of HSA-ASA was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to result in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The effect of drugs on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD). The RLS method determined the critical aggregation concentration of drugs on HSA in binary and ternary systems that confirmed the zeta potential results. Structural modeling showed that the affinity of each of the drugs to HSA in binary and ternary systems confirms the spectroscopic results. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the interaction of ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined the critical induced aggregation concentration of both drugs on HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding mechanism of drugs as separate and simultaneous to HSA has been compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding site of both drugs as simultaneous effects on HSA has been determined.

  8. Self-spin-controlled rotation of spatial states of a Dirac electron in a cylindrical potential via spin-orbit interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, C C; Reeb, D; Raymer, M G [Oregon Center for Optics and Department of Physics, 1274 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-1274 (United States)], E-mail: cleary@uoregon.edu

    2008-10-15

    Solution of the Dirac equation predicts that when an electron with nonzero orbital angular momentum (OAM) propagates in a cylindrically symmetric potential, its spin and orbital degrees of freedom interact, causing the electron's phase velocity to depend on whether its spin angular momentum (SAM) and OAM vectors are oriented parallel or anti-parallel with respect to each other. This spin-orbit splitting of the electronic dispersion curves can result in a rotation of the electron's spatial state in a manner controlled by the electron's own spin z-component value. These effects persist at non-relativistic velocities. To clarify the physical origin of this effect, we compare solutions of the Dirac equation to perturbative predictions of the Schroedinger-Pauli equation with a spin-orbit term, using the standard Foldy-Wouthuysen Hamiltonian. This clearly shows that the origin of the effect is the familiar relativistic spin-orbit interaction.

  9. Self-spin-controlled rotation of spatial states of a Dirac electron in a cylindrical potential via spin-orbit interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solution of the Dirac equation predicts that when an electron with nonzero orbital angular momentum (OAM) propagates in a cylindrically symmetric potential, its spin and orbital degrees of freedom interact, causing the electron's phase velocity to depend on whether its spin angular momentum (SAM) and OAM vectors are oriented parallel or anti-parallel with respect to each other. This spin-orbit splitting of the electronic dispersion curves can result in a rotation of the electron's spatial state in a manner controlled by the electron's own spin z-component value. These effects persist at non-relativistic velocities. To clarify the physical origin of this effect, we compare solutions of the Dirac equation to perturbative predictions of the Schroedinger-Pauli equation with a spin-orbit term, using the standard Foldy-Wouthuysen Hamiltonian. This clearly shows that the origin of the effect is the familiar relativistic spin-orbit interaction.

  10. Toward Chemical Accuracy in the Description of Ion-Water Interactions through Many-Body Representations. I. Halide-Water Dimer Potential Energy Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Pushp; Götz, Andreas W; Paesani, Francesco

    2016-06-14

    Despite recent progress, a unified understanding of how ions affect the structure and dynamics of water across different phases remains elusive. Here, we report the development of full-dimensional many-body potential energy functions, called MB-nrg (Many-Body-energy), for molecular simulations of halide ion-water systems from the gas phase to the condensed phase. The MB-nrg potentials are derived entirely from "first-principles" calculations carried out at the F12 explicitly correlated coupled-cluster level including single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, CCSD(T)-F12, in the complete basis set limit. Building upon the functional form of the MB-pol water potential, the MB-nrg potentials are expressed through the many-body expansion of the total energy in terms of explicit contributions representing one-body, two-body, and three-body interactions, with all higher-order contributions being described by classical induction. The specific focus of this study is on the MB-nrg two-body terms representing the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the corresponding H2O-X(-) dimers, with X(-)= F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-). The accuracy of the MB-nrg PESs is systematically assessed through extensive comparisons with results obtained using both ab initio models and polarizable force fields for energies, structures, and harmonic frequencies of the H2O-X(-) dimers. PMID:27145081

  11. The interaction of HAb18G/CD147 with integrin α6β1 and its implications for the invasion potential of human hepatoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Juan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HAb18G/CD147 plays pivotal roles in invasion by hepatoma cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Our previous study demonstrated that overexpression of HAb18G/CD147 promotes invasion by interacting with integrin α3β1. However, it has never been investigated whether α3β1 is solely responsible for this process or if other integrin family members also interact with HAb18G/CD147 in human hepatoma cells. Methods Human SMMC-7721 and FHCC98 cells were cultured and transfected with siRNA fragments against HAb18G/CD147. The expression levels of HAb18G/CD147 and integrin α6β1 were determined by immunofluorescent double-staining and confocal imaging analysis. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses were performed to examine the native conformations of HAb18G/CD147 and integrin α6β1. Invasion potential was evaluated with an invasion assay and gelatin zymography. Results We found that integrin α6β1 co-localizes and interacts with HAb18G/CD147 in human hepatoma cells. The enhancing effects of HAb18G/CD147 on invasion capacity and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs were partially blocked by integrin α6β1 antibodies (P 2+ mobilization, significantly reduced cell invasion potential and secretion of MMPs in human hepatoma cells (P Conclusion These results suggest that α6β1 interacts with HAb18G/CD147 to mediate tumor invasion and metastatic processes through the PI3K pathway.

  12. Synthesis and bioactive evaluations of novel benzotriazole compounds as potential antimicrobial agents and the interaction with calf thymus DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu Ren; Hui Zhen Zhang; Shao Lin Zhang; Yun Lei Luo; Ling Zhang; Cheng He Zhou; Rong Xia Geng

    2015-12-01

    A novel series of benzotriazole derivatives were synthesized and characterized by NMR, IR and MS spectra. The bioactive assay manifested that most of the new compounds exhibited moderate to good antibacterial and antifungal activities against the tested strains in comparison to reference drugs chloromycin, norfloxacin and fluconazole. Especially, 2,4-dichlorophenyl substituted benzotriazole derivative 6f displayed good antibacterial activity against MRSA with MIC value of 4 g/mL, which was 2-fold more potent than Chloromycin, and it also displayed 3-fold stronger antifungal activity (MIC = 4 g/mL) than fluconazole (MIC = 16 g/mL) against Beer yeast. The preliminary interactive investigations of compound 6f with calf thymus DNA revealed that compound 6f could effectively intercalate into DNA to form compound 6f–DNA complex which might block DNA replication to exert antimicrobial activities. Molecular docking experiments suggested that compound 6f projected into base-pairs of DNA hexamer duplex forming two hydrogen bonds with guanine of DNA. The theoretical calculations were in accordance with the experimental results.

  13. Inferring coarse-grain histone-DNA interaction potentials from high-resolution structures of the nucleosome

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The histone-DNA interaction in the nucleosome is a fundamental mechanism of genomic compaction and regulation, which remains largely unkown despite a growing structural knowledge of the complex. Here, we propose a framework for the extraction of a nanoscale histone-DNA force-field from a collection of high-resolution structures, which may be adapted to a larger class of protein-DNA complexes. We apply the procedure on a large crystallographic database extended by snapshots from molecular dynamics simulations. The comparison of the structural models first shows that, at the sites of histone-DNA contact, the DNA base-pairs are locally shifted outwards, consistent with locally repulsive forces exerted by the histones. In a second step, we show that the various force profiles of the analyzed structures derive locally from a unique, sequence-independent, quadratic repulsive force field, while the sequence preferences are entirely due to the internal DNA mechanics. We thus obtain the first knowledge-derived nanosca...

  14. Phage-Host Interactions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the Potential for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb

    temperatures below 15°C and typically with fry mortality rates of 50-60%. Several attempts of vaccine development against RTFS have been made, but according to my knowledge no commercial vaccine is yet available. Bacterial chemotherapy is still the most effective and used treatment of RTFS today. However......, the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance has led to increased attention to the use of phages for controlling F. psychrophilum infections in aquaculture. In a synopsis and four scientific papers, this PhD project studies the potential and optimizes the use of phage therapy for treatment and prevention...... to be phage receptors. The observed links between phage resistance and the genetic modifications were supported by direct measurements of bacteriophage adsorption rates, biofilm formation and secretion of extracellular enzymes, which were all impaired in the resistant strains. In the fourth paper...

  15. A stable and adaptive semi-Lagrangian potential model for unsteady and nonlinear ship-wave interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mola, Andrea; DeSimone, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We present an innovative numerical discretization of the equations of inviscid potential flow for the simulation of three dimensional unsteady and nonlinear water waves generated by a ship hull advancing in water. The equations of motion are written in a semi-Lagrangian framework, and the resulting integro-differential equations are discretized in space via an adaptive iso-parametric collocation Boundary Element Method, and in time via adaptive implicit Backward Differentiation Formulas (BDF) with variable step and variable order. When the velocity of the advancing ship hull is non-negligible, the semi-Lagrangian formulation (also known as Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation, or ALE) of the free surface equations contains dominant transport terms which are stabilized with a Streamwise Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) method. The SUPG stabilization allows automatic and robust adaptation of the spatial discretization with unstructured quadrilateral grids. Preliminary results are presented where we compare ou...

  16. Comparative Leaves Transcriptome Analysis Emphasizing on Accumulation of Anthocyanins in Brassica: Molecular Regulation and Potential Interaction with Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad A; Pan, Qi; Chen, Daozong; Zhang, Qinghua; Ge, Xianhong; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    The purple leaf pigmentation mainly associated with anthocyanins accumulation is common in Brassica but the mechanisms of its production and its potential physiological functions are poorly understood. Here, we performed the phenotypic, cytological, physiological, and comparative leaves transcriptome analyses of 11 different varieties belonging to five Brassica species with purple or green leaves. We observed that the anthocyanin was accumulated in most of vegetative tissues in all species and also in reproduction organs of B. carinata. Anthocyanin accumulated in different part of purple leaves including adaxial and abaxial epidermal cells as well as palisade and spongy mesophyll cells. Leave transcriptome analysis showed that almost all late biosynthetic genes (LBGs) of anthocyanin, especially Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase (DFR), Anthocyanidin Synthase (ANS) and Transparent Testa 19 (TT19), were highly up-regulated in all purple leaves. However, only one of transcript factors in anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway, Transparent Testa 8 (TT8), was up regulated along with those genes in all purple leaves, indicating its pivotal role for anthocyanin production in Brassica. Interestingly, with the up-regulation of genes for anthocyanin synthesis, Cytosolic 6-phosphogluconolactonase (PLG5) which involved in the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway was up-regulated in all purple leaves and three genes FTSH PROTEASE 8 (FTS8), GLYCOLATE OXIDASE 1 (GOX1), and GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE 1;4 (GLN1;4) related to degradation of photo-damaged proteins in photosystem II and light respiration were down-regulated. These results highlighted the potential physiological functions of anthocyanin accumulation related to photosynthesis which might be of great worth in future.

  17. Comparative Leave Transcriptome Analysis Emphasizing on Accumulation of Anthocyanins in Brassica: Molecular Regulation and Potential Interaction with Photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Adnan Mushtaq

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purple leaf pigmentation mainly associated with anthocyanins accumulation is common in Brassica but the mechanisms of its production and its potential physiological functions are poorly understood. Here, we performed the phenotypic, cytological, physiological and comparative leaves transcriptome analyses of 11 different varieties belonging to five Brassica species with purple or green leaves. We observed that the anthocyanin was accumulated in most of vegetative tissues in all Brassica species and also in reproduction organs of B. carinata. Anthocyanin accumulated in different part of purple leaves including adaxial and abaxial epidermal cells as well as palisade and spongy mesophyll cells. Leave transcriptome analysis showed that almost all late biosynthetic genes of anthocyanin especially Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase (DFR, Anthocyanidin Synthase (ANS and Transparent Testa 19 (TT19, were highly up-regulated in all purple leaves. However, only one of transcript factors in anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway, Transparent Testa 8 (TT8, was co-up regulated along with those genes in all purple leaves, indicating its pivotal role for anthocyanin production in Brassica. Interestingly, with the up-regulation of genes for anthocyanin synthesis, Cytosolic 6-phosphogluconolactonase (PLG5 which involved in the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway was up-regulated in all purple leaves and three genes FTSH PROTEASE 8 (FTS8, GLYCOLATE OXIDASE 1 (GOX1 and GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE 1;4 (GLN1;4 related to degradation of photo-damaged proteins in photosystem II and light respiration were down-regulated. These results highlighted the potential physiological functions of anthocyanin accumulation related to photosynthesis which might be of great worth in future.

  18. Comparative Leaves Transcriptome Analysis Emphasizing on Accumulation of Anthocyanins in Brassica: Molecular Regulation and Potential Interaction with Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad A; Pan, Qi; Chen, Daozong; Zhang, Qinghua; Ge, Xianhong; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    The purple leaf pigmentation mainly associated with anthocyanins accumulation is common in Brassica but the mechanisms of its production and its potential physiological functions are poorly understood. Here, we performed the phenotypic, cytological, physiological, and comparative leaves transcriptome analyses of 11 different varieties belonging to five Brassica species with purple or green leaves. We observed that the anthocyanin was accumulated in most of vegetative tissues in all species and also in reproduction organs of B. carinata. Anthocyanin accumulated in different part of purple leaves including adaxial and abaxial epidermal cells as well as palisade and spongy mesophyll cells. Leave transcriptome analysis showed that almost all late biosynthetic genes (LBGs) of anthocyanin, especially Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase (DFR), Anthocyanidin Synthase (ANS) and Transparent Testa 19 (TT19), were highly up-regulated in all purple leaves. However, only one of transcript factors in anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway, Transparent Testa 8 (TT8), was up regulated along with those genes in all purple leaves, indicating its pivotal role for anthocyanin production in Brassica. Interestingly, with the up-regulation of genes for anthocyanin synthesis, Cytosolic 6-phosphogluconolactonase (PLG5) which involved in the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway was up-regulated in all purple leaves and three genes FTSH PROTEASE 8 (FTS8), GLYCOLATE OXIDASE 1 (GOX1), and GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE 1;4 (GLN1;4) related to degradation of photo-damaged proteins in photosystem II and light respiration were down-regulated. These results highlighted the potential physiological functions of anthocyanin accumulation related to photosynthesis which might be of great worth in future. PMID:27047501

  19. Modeling of human prokineticin receptors: interactions with novel small-molecule binders and potential off-target drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Levit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION: The Prokineticin receptor (PKR 1 and 2 subtypes are novel members of family A GPCRs, which exhibit an unusually high degree of sequence similarity. Prokineticins (PKs, their cognate ligands, are small secreted proteins of ∼80 amino acids; however, non-peptidic low-molecular weight antagonists have also been identified. PKs and their receptors play important roles under various physiological conditions such as maintaining circadian rhythm and pain perception, as well as regulating angiogenesis and modulating immunity. Identifying binding sites for known antagonists and for additional potential binders will facilitate studying and regulating these novel receptors. Blocking PKRs may serve as a therapeutic tool for various diseases, including acute pain, inflammation and cancer. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ligand-based pharmacophore models were derived from known antagonists, and virtual screening performed on the DrugBank dataset identified potential human PKR (hPKR ligands with novel scaffolds. Interestingly, these included several HIV protease inhibitors for which endothelial cell dysfunction is a documented side effect. Our results suggest that the side effects might be due to inhibition of the PKR signaling pathway. Docking of known binders to a 3D homology model of hPKR1 is in agreement with the well-established canonical TM-bundle binding site of family A GPCRs. Furthermore, the docking results highlight residues that may form specific contacts with the ligands. These contacts provide structural explanation for the importance of several chemical features that were obtained from the structure-activity analysis of known binders. With the exception of a single loop residue that might be perused in the future for obtaining subtype-specific regulation, the results suggest an identical TM-bundle binding site for hPKR1 and hPKR2. In addition, analysis of the intracellular regions highlights variable regions that may provide

  20. Distance to high-voltage power lines and risk of childhood leukaemia – an analysis of confounding by and interaction with other potential risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Camilla; Bräuner, Elvira V.; Rod, Naja H.;

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an interaction between distance from residence at birth to nearest power line and domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution, respectively, in relation to childhood leukemia risk. Further, we investigated whether adjusting for potential confounders alters...... the association between distance to nearest power line and childhood leukemia. We included 1024 cases aged .... We used geographical information systems to determine the distance between residence at birth and the nearest 132-400 kV overhead power line. Concentrations of domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution (NOx at the front door) were estimated using validated models. We found a statistically...

  1. Novel secreted isoform of adhesion molecule ICAM-4: Potential regulator of membrane-associated ICAM-4 interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gloria; Spring, Frances A.; Parons, Stephen F.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Peters, Luanne L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2003-02-18

    ICAM-4, a newly characterized adhesion molecule, is expressed early in human erythropoiesis and functions as a ligand for binding a4b1 and aV integrin-expressing cells. Within the bone marrow, erythroblasts surround central macrophages forming erythroblastic islands. Evidence suggests that these islands are highly specialized subcompartments where cell adhesion events, in concert with cytokines, play critical roles in regulating erythropoiesis and apoptosis. Since erythroblasts express a4b1 and ICAM-4 and macrophages exhibit aV, ICAM-4 is an attractive candidate for mediating cellular interactions within erythroblastic islands. To determine whether ICAM-4 binding properties are conserved across species, we first cloned and sequenced the murine homologue. The translated amino acid sequence showed 68 percent overall identity with human ICAM-4. Using recombinant murine ICAM-4 extracellular domains, we discovered that hematopoietic a4b1-expressing HEL cells and non-hematopoietic aV-expressing FLY cells adhered to mouse ICAM-4. Cell adhesion studies showed that FLY and HEL cells bound to mouse and human proteins with similar avidity. These data strongly suggest conservation of integrin-binding properties across species. Importantly, we characterized a novel second splice cDNA that would be predicted to encode an ICAM-4 isoform, lacking the membrane-spanning domain. Erythroblasts express both isoforms of ICAM-4. COS-7 cells transfected with GFP constructs of prototypic or novel ICAM-4 cDNA showed different cellular localization patterns. Moreover, analysis of tissue culture medium revealed that the novel ICAM-4 cDNA encodes a secreted protein. We postulate that secretion of this newly described isoform, ICAM-4S, may modulate binding of membrane-associated ICAM-4 and could thus play a critical regulatory role in erythroblast molecular attachments.

  2. Two grams of sarcosine in schizophrenia – is it too much? A potential role of glutamate- serotonin interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strzelecki D

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dominik Strzelecki, Justyna Szyburska, Jolanta Rabe-JabłońskaDepartment of Affective and Psychotic Disorders, Central Clinical Hospital, Medical University of Lódz, Lódz, PolandAbstract: Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Dysfunction of the glutamatergic system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Therefore, glutamatergic agents such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor co-agonists (ie, glycine, D-cycloserine and glycine transporter type 1 inhibitors (eg, sarcosine are studied for their efficacy in ameliorating negative and cognitive symptomatology in patients with schizophrenia. We report the case of a 23-year-old schizophrenic patient treated with quetiapine and citalopram, who was offered concomitant sarcosine treatment. After obtaining an informed consent, we started administration of 2 g of sarcosine per day to treat persistent negative and cognitive symptoms. The patient's activity and mood improved within 2 weeks, but in the following 2 weeks the patient reported increased drive, activity, libido, unpleasant inner tension, and irritability. We ruled out hypomania and decided to decrease the daily dose of sarcosine to 1 g, which resulted in reduction of drive and irritability. Activity and mood improved compared with his state before adding sarcosine. We suggest a sarcosine dose between 1 g and 2 g per day with an initial dose of 2 g, but if side effects occur, the dose should be decreased to 1 g per day. We would like to emphasize the clinically important glutamate-serotonin interaction during concomitant use of sarcosine, citalopram, and quetiapine in our patient, which may lead to serious discomfort.Keywords: schizophrenia, glutamatergic system, serotoninergic system, sarcosine, NMDA receptor, dose finding

  3. Granule and Symmetrical Double Potential Barrier Interaction Tunneling Phenomenon%粒子与对称双势垒相互作用的隧穿现象

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任青; 杨文平

    2009-01-01

    在非相对论条件下,计算了粒子与对称双势垒相互作用的反射系数和透射系数,并与一维对称方势垒的相位和隧穿时间相比较,通过计算和比较,对隧穿现象有了更深地理解.%This article, under the non-theory of relativity condition, has calculated the granule and the symmetrical double potential barrier interaction reflection coefficient and the transmission coefficient, and compares with the univariate symmetrical square potential harrier's phase and tunneling time, through the computation and the comparison, had a deeper understanding to the tunneling phenomenon.

  4. Interactions between nematophagous fungi and consequences for their potential as biological agents for the control of potato cyst nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Helen; Gray, Simon N; Crump, David H

    2003-01-01

    The efficacies of three nematophagous fungi, Paecilomyces lilacinus, Plectosphaerella cucumerina and Pochonia chlamydosporia, for controlling potato cyst nematodes (PCN) as part of an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) regime were studied. The compatibility of the nematophagous fungi with commonly used chemical pesticides and their ability to compete with the soil fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Chaetomium globosum, Fusarium oxysporum, Penicillium bilaii and Trichoderma harzianum were tested in vitro. Paecilomyces lilacinus was the most successful competitor when the ability to grow and inhibit growth of an opposing colony at both 10 and 20 degrees C was considered. P. lilacinus also showed potential for control of the soil-borne fungal pathogen R. solani, releasing a diffusable substance in vitro which inhibited its growth and caused morphological abnormalities in its hyphae. Pochonia chlamydosporia was least susceptible to growth inhibition by other fungi at 20 degrees in vitro, but the isolate tested did not grow at 10 degrees. Plectosphaerella cucumerina was a poor saprophytic competitor. Radial growth of Paecilomyces lilacinus and Plectosphaerella cucumerina was slowed, but not prevented, when grown on potato dextrose agar incorporating the fungicides fenpiclonil and tolclofos-methyl, and was not inhibited by the addition of pencycuron or the nematicide oxamyl. Radial growth of Pochonia chlamydosporia was partially inhibited by all the chemical pesticides tested. The efficacy of Paecilomyces lilacinus as a control agent for R. solani was further investigated in situ. Treatment with P. lilacinus significantly reduced the symptoms of Rhizoctonia disease on potato stems in a pot trial. The effectiveness of P. lilacinus and P. cucumerina against PCN was also tested in situ. Three application methods were compared; incorporating the fungi into alginate pellets, Terra-Green inoculated with the fungi and applying conidia directly to the tubers. Both formulations containing P

  5. It's a dark, dark world: Background evolution of interacting $\\phi$CDM models beyond simple exponential potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Suprit

    2015-01-01

    We study the background cosmological dynamics with a three component source content: radiation fluid, a barotropic fluid to mimic the matter sector and a single scalar field which can act as dark energy giving rise to the late-time accelerated phase. Using the well-known dimensionless variables, we cast the dynamical equations into an autonomous system of ordinary differential equations (ASODE), which are studied by computing the fixed points and the conditions for their stability. The matter fluid and the scalar field are taken to be uncoupled at first and later, we consider a coupling between the two of the form $Q = \\sqrt{2/3}\\kappa\\beta\\rho_m\\dot{\\phi}$ where $\\rho_m$ is the barotropic fluid density. The key point of our analysis is that for the closure of ASODE, we only demand that the jerk, $\\Gamma = V V"/V'^2$ is a function of acceleration, $z = - M_p V'/ V$, that is, $\\Gamma = 1+ f(z)$. In this way, we are able to accommodate a large class of potentials that goes beyond the simple exponential potentia...

  6. Artemether-Lumefantrine Combination Therapy for Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria: The Potential for Complex Interactions with Antiretroviral Drugs in HIV-Infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Byakika-Kibwika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of malaria in HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART poses significant challenges. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL is one of the artemisisnin-based combination therapies recommended for treatment of malaria. The drug combination is highly efficacious against sensitive and multidrug resistant falciparum malaria. Both artemether and lumefantrine are metabolized by hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450 enzymes which metabolize the protease inhibitors (PIs and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs used for HIV treatment. Coadministration of NNRTIs and PIs with AL could potentially cause complex pharmacokinetic drug interactions. NNRTI by inducing CYP450 3A4 enzyme and PIs by inhibiting CYP450 3A4 enzymes could influence both artemether and lumefantrine concentrations and their active metabolites dihydroartemisinin and desbutyl-lumefantrine, predisposing patients to poor treatment response, toxicity, and risk for development of resistance. There are scanty data on these interactions and their consequences. Pharmacokinetic studies to evaluate these interactions in the target populations are urgently needed.

  7. The conductance of the asymmetric Aharonov-Bohm ring with a delta-potential barrier in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Letter deals with the effect of a delta-potential barrier on the one-dimensional and asymmetric Aharonov-Bohm ring with Rashba spin-orbit interaction. The analytic expressions of the transmission amplitude and conductance are derived by applying the transfer matrix method in the one-electron scattering formalism. Resorting to an adequate tuning of the Aharonov-Bohm magnetic flux and Rashba coupling strength, a control of the conductance can be done by varying the strength and the location of the barrier. This may be useful in the design of further mesoscopic spin filters by using suitable asymmetry configurations. -- Highlights: → An asymmetric Aharonov-Bohm ring with Rashba spin-orbit interaction is considered. → The effect of a delta-potential barrier on this ring is examined. → The analytic expression of the transmission amplitude is derived. → The conductance can be controlled by varying the barrier parameters. → The asymmetric ring can acts like a spin filter device.

  8. Potential for Drug-Drug Interactions between Antiretrovirals and HCV Direct Acting Antivirals in a Large Cohort of HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Poizot-Martin

    Full Text Available Development of direct acting antivirals (DAA offers new benefits for patients with chronic hepatitis C. The combination of these drugs with antiretroviral treatment (cART is a real challenge in HIV/HCV coinfected patients. The aim of this study was to describe potential drug-drug interactions between DAAs and antiretroviral drugs in a cohort of HIV/HCV coinfected patients.Cross-sectional study of all HIV/HCV coinfected patients attending at least one visit in 2012 in the multicenter French Dat'AIDS cohort. A simulation of drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral treatment and DAAs available in 2015 was performed.Of 16,634 HIV-infected patients, 2,511 had detectable anti-HCV antibodies, of whom 1,196 had a detectable HCV-RNA and were not receiving HCV treatment at the time of analysis. 97.1% of these patients were receiving cART and 81.2% had a plasma HIV RNA <50 copies/mL. cART included combinations of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with a boosted protease inhibitor in 43.6%, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in 17.3%, an integrase inhibitor in 15.4% and various combinations or antiretroviral drugs in 23.7% of patients. A previous treatment against HCV had been administered in 64.4% of patients. Contraindicated associations/potential interactions were expected between cART and respectively sofosbuvir (0.2%/0%, sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (0.2%/67.6%, daclatasvir (0%/49.4%, ombitasvir/boosted paritaprevir (with or without dasabuvir (34.4%/52.2% and simeprevir (78.8%/0%.Significant potential drug-drug interactions are expected between cART and the currently available DAAs in the majority of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and sofosbuvir/daclatasvir with or without ribavirin appeared the most suitable combinations in our population. A close collaboration between hepatologists and HIV/AIDS specialists appears necessary for the management of HCV treatment concomitantly to cART.

  9. Fe3O4 nanoparticles and nanocomposites with potential application in biomedicine and in communication technologies: Nanoparticle aggregation, interaction, and effective magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allia, P.; Barrera, G.; Tiberto, P.; Nardi, T.; Leterrier, Y.; Sangermano, M.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles with a size of 5-6 nm with potential impact on biomedicine and information/communication technologies were synthesized by thermal decomposition of Fe(acac)3 and subsequently coated with a silica shell exploiting a water-in-oil synthetic procedure. The as-produced powders (comprised of either Fe3O4 or Fe3O4@silica nanoparticles) were mixed with a photocurable resin obtaining two magnetic nanocomposites with the same nominal amount of magnetic material. The static magnetic properties of the two nanopowders and the corresponding nanocomposites were measured in the 10 K-300 K temperature range. Magnetic measurements are shown here to be able to give unambiguous information on single-particle properties such as particle size and magnetic anisotropy as well as on nanoparticle aggregation and interparticle interaction. A comparison between the size distribution functions obtained from magnetic measurements and from TEM images shows that figures estimated from properly analyzed magnetic measurements are very close to the actual values. In addition, the present analysis allows us to determine the value of the effective magnetic anisotropy and to estimate the anisotropy contribution from the surface. The Field-cooled/zero field cooled curves reveal a high degree of particle aggregation in the Fe3O4 nanopowder, which is partially reduced by silica coating and strongly decreased by dissolution in the host polymer. In all considered materials, the nanoparticles are magnetically interacting, the interaction strength being a function of nanoparticle environment and being the lowest in the nanocomposite containing bare, well-separate Fe3O4 particles. All samples behave as interacting superparamagnetic materials instead of ideal superparamagnets and follow the corresponding scaling law.

  10. Oxazoloisoindolinones with in vitro antitumor activity selectively activate a p53-pathway through potential inhibition of the p53-MDM2 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joana; Pereira, Nuno A L; Monteiro, Ângelo; Leão, Mariana; Bessa, Cláudia; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A; Raimundo, Liliana; Queiroz, Glória; Bisio, Alessandra; Inga, Alberto; Pereira, Clara; Santos, Maria M M; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-23

    One of the most appealing targets for anticancer treatment is the p53 tumor suppressor protein. In half of human cancers, this protein is inactivated due to endogenous negative regulators such as MDM2. Actually, restoring the p53 activity, particularly through the inhibition of its interaction with MDM2, is considered a valuable therapeutic strategy against cancers with a wild-type p53 status. In this work, we report the synthesis of nine enantiopure phenylalaninol-derived oxazolopyrrolidone lactams and the evaluation of their biological effects as p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. Using a yeast-based screening assay, two oxazoloisoindolinones, compounds 1b and 3a, were identified as potential p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. The molecular mechanism of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further validated in human colon adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells with wild-type p53 (HCT116 p53(+/+)) and in its isogenic derivative without p53 (HCT116 p53(-/-)). Indeed, using these cells, we demonstrated that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a exhibited a p53-dependent in vitro antitumor activity through induction of G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The selective activation of a p53-apoptotic pathway by oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further supported by the occurrence of PARP cleavage only in p53-expressing HCT116 cells. Moreover, oxazoloisoindolinone 3a led to p53 protein stabilization and to the up-regulation of p53 transcriptional activity with increased expression levels of several p53 target genes, as p21(WAF1/CIP1), MDM2, BAX and PUMA, in p53(+/+) but not in p53(-/-) HCT116 cells. Additionally, the ability of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a to block the p53-MDM2 interaction in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Finally, the molecular docking analysis of the interactions between the synthesized compounds and MDM2 revealed that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a binds to MDM2. Altogether, this work adds, for the first time, the oxazoloisoindolinone scaffold to the list of

  11. An Assessment of Density Functional Methods for Potential Energy Curves of Nonbonded Interactions: The XYG3 and B97-D Approximations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Sherrill, C David; Aprà, Edoardo; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2010-03-01

    A recently proposed double-hybrid functional called XYG3 and a semilocal GGA functional (B97-D) with a semiempirical correction for van der Waals interactions have been applied to study the potential energy curves along the dissociation coordinates of weakly bound pairs of molecules governed by London dispersion and induced dipole forces. Molecules treated in this work were the parallel sandwich, T-shaped, and parallel-displaced benzene dimer, (C6H6)2; hydrogen sulfide and benzene, H2S·C6H6; methane and benzene, CH4·C6H6; the methane dimer, (CH4)2; and the pyridine dimer, (C5H5N)2. We compared the potential energy curves of these functionals with previously published benchmarks at the coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triplets [CCSD(T)] complete-basis-set limit. Both functionals, XYG3 and B97-D, exhibited very good performance, reproducing accurate energies for equilibrium distances and a smooth behavior along the dissociation coordinate. Overall, we found an agreement within a few tenths of one kcal mol(-1) with the CCSD(T) results across the potential energy curves.

  12. Studying wind energy/bird interactions: a guidance document. Metrics and methods for determining or monitoring potential impacts on birds at existing and proposed wind energy sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R.; Morrison, M.; Sinclair, K.; Strickland, D.; Davis, H.; Kendall, W.

    1999-01-01

    In the 1980s little was known about the potential environmental effects associated with large scale wind energy development. Although wind turbines have been used in farming and remote location applications throughout this country for centuries, impacts on birds resulting from these dispersed turbines had not been reported. Thus early wind energy developments were planned, permitted, constructed, and operated with little consideration for the potential effects on birds. In the ensuing years wind plant impacts on birds became a source of concern among a number of stakeholder groups. Based on the studies that have been done to date, significant levels of bird fatalities have been identified at only one major commercial wind energy development in the United States. Research on wind energy/bird interactions has spanned such a wide variety of protocols and vastly different levels of study effort that it is difficult to make comparisons among study findings. As a result there continues to be interest, confusion, and concern over wind energy development's potential impacts on birds. Some hypothesize that technology changes, such as less dense wind farms with larger, slower-moving turbines, will decrease the number of bird fatalities from wind turbines. Others hypothesize that, because the tip speed may be the same or faster, new turbines will not result in decreased bird fatalities but may actually increase bird impacts. Statistically significant data sets from scientifically rigorous studies will be required before either hypothesis can be tested.

  13. The Repellent DEET Potentiates Carbamate Effects via Insect Muscarinic Receptor Interactions: An Alternative Strategy to Control Insect Vector-Borne Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Ella, Aly; Stankiewicz, Maria; Mikulska, Karolina; Nowak, Wieslaw; Pennetier, Cédric; Goulu, Mathilde; Fruchart-Gaillard, Carole; Licznar, Patricia; Apaire-Marchais, Véronique; List, Olivier; Corbel, Vincent; Servent, Denis; Lapied, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Insect vector-borne diseases remain one of the principal causes of human mortality. In addition to conventional measures of insect control, repellents continue to be the mainstay for personal protection. Because of the increasing pyrethroid-resistant mosquito populations, alternative strategies to reconstitute pyrethroid repellency and knock-down effects have been proposed by mixing the repellent DEET (N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) with non-pyrethroid insecticide to better control resistant insect vector-borne diseases. By using electrophysiological, biochemichal, in vivo toxicological techniques together with calcium imaging, binding studies and in silico docking, we have shown that DEET, at low concentrations, interacts with high affinity with insect M1/M3 mAChR allosteric site potentiating agonist effects on mAChRs coupled to phospholipase C second messenger pathway. This increases the anticholinesterase activity of the carbamate propoxur through calcium-dependent regulation of acetylcholinesterase. At high concentrations, DEET interacts with low affinity on distinct M1/M3 mAChR site, counteracting the potentiation. Similar dose-dependent dual effects of DEET have also been observed at synaptic mAChR level. Additionally, binding and in silico docking studies performed on human M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes indicate that DEET only displays a low affinity antagonist profile on these M1/M3 mAChRs. These results reveal a selective high affinity positive allosteric site for DEET in insect mAChRs. Finally, bioassays conducted on Aedes aegypti confirm the synergistic interaction between DEET and propoxur observed in vitro, resulting in a higher mortality of mosquitoes. Our findings reveal an unusual allosterically potentiating action of the repellent DEET, which involves a selective site in insect. These results open exciting research areas in public health particularly in the control of the pyrethroid-resistant insect-vector borne diseases. Mixing low doses of DEET and a

  14. The Repellent DEET Potentiates Carbamate Effects via Insect Muscarinic Receptor Interactions: An Alternative Strategy to Control Insect Vector-Borne Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Abd-Ella

    Full Text Available Insect vector-borne diseases remain one of the principal causes of human mortality. In addition to conventional measures of insect control, repellents continue to be the mainstay for personal protection. Because of the increasing pyrethroid-resistant mosquito populations, alternative strategies to reconstitute pyrethroid repellency and knock-down effects have been proposed by mixing the repellent DEET (N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide with non-pyrethroid insecticide to better control resistant insect vector-borne diseases. By using electrophysiological, biochemichal, in vivo toxicological techniques together with calcium imaging, binding studies and in silico docking, we have shown that DEET, at low concentrations, interacts with high affinity with insect M1/M3 mAChR allosteric site potentiating agonist effects on mAChRs coupled to phospholipase C second messenger pathway. This increases the anticholinesterase activity of the carbamate propoxur through calcium-dependent regulation of acetylcholinesterase. At high concentrations, DEET interacts with low affinity on distinct M1/M3 mAChR site, counteracting the potentiation. Similar dose-dependent dual effects of DEET have also been observed at synaptic mAChR level. Additionally, binding and in silico docking studies performed on human M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes indicate that DEET only displays a low affinity antagonist profile on these M1/M3 mAChRs. These results reveal a selective high affinity positive allosteric site for DEET in insect mAChRs. Finally, bioassays conducted on Aedes aegypti confirm the synergistic interaction between DEET and propoxur observed in vitro, resulting in a higher mortality of mosquitoes. Our findings reveal an unusual allosterically potentiating action of the repellent DEET, which involves a selective site in insect. These results open exciting research areas in public health particularly in the control of the pyrethroid-resistant insect-vector borne diseases. Mixing low

  15. 胶体微粒间相互作用势测量系统%Measurement System of Interaction Potential between Colloidal Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任洪亮; 周金华; 丁攀峰; 李银妹

    2011-01-01

    A mechanical chopper is designed based on the programmable logic controller, servo motor amplifier, servo motor and encoder. The interaction potential measurement system is constructed by the mechanical chopper and dual optical tweezers. The characteristic of the system such as the design of the chopper, the switching time of the blinking optical tweezers, the tuning range, the origin position return feature, the compatibility and the usability of the system are discussed. The system is used to measure the interaction potential of a pair polystyrene spheres. The result is consistent with the Darjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory, which demonstrates the reliability of the apparatus. In addition, the apparatus provides an effective technique for measuring the interaction potential between two micro colloidal particles.%设计出以可编程控制器、伺服电机放大器、伺服电机和编码器为主要部件的可编程机械斩光器,并将其与多光镊系统相耦合,构建了胶体微粒间相互作用势测量系统.利用该系统测量聚苯乙烯球悬浮液中两个小球之间的静电相互作用势,其结果与胶体稳定理论符合,验证了系统的可靠性.该斩光器具有良好的易用性、兼容性和可移植性.并且该系统能在可控的物理化学条件下从粒子层次直接测量胶体粒子间不同类型的相互作用势,为深入研究胶体的微观机制提供了一种有效的测量手段和技术平台.

  16. {\\it Ab initio} study of correlation and Gaunt interaction in ionization potentials and hyperfine constants of ground and first excited states of boron isoelectronic sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Narendra Nath

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied correlation and Gaunt interaction effects in the ionization potentials (I.P.) and magnetic dipole hyperfine (A) constants of 2p$^2P_{1/2}$ and 2p$^2P_{3/2}$ states along with the fine structure separations between them for boron isoelectronic sequence by relativistic coupled-cluster (RCC) method. The range of Z has been taken from 8 to 21. Gaunt operator is reformulated explicitly both in Dirac-Fock (DF) and CC level. The I.P.'s and the fine structure splittings are compared with the results of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Important correlation contributions like core correlation, core polarisation, pair correlation etc. are studied for hyperfine A constants. Many distinct features of correlation and relativistic effects are observed in these studies. With best of our knowledge, except O IV, hyperfine A constants of all the other elements are reported for the first time in the literature.

  17. A self-interaction-free local hybrid functional: Accurate binding energies vis-\\`a-vis accurate ionization potentials from Kohn-Sham eigenvalues

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Tobias; Makmal, Adi; Kronik, Leeor; Kümmel, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    We present and test a new approximation for the exchange-correlation (xc) energy of Kohn-Sham density functional theory. It combines exact exchange with a compatible non-local correlation functional. The functional is by construction free of one-electron self-interaction, respects constraints derived from uniform coordinate scaling, and has the correct asymptotic behavior of the xc energy density. It contains one parameter that is not determined ab initio. We investigate whether it is possible to construct a functional that yields accurate binding energies and affords other advantages, specifically Kohn-Sham eigenvalues that reliably reflect ionization potentials. Tests for a set of atoms and small molecules show that within our local-hybrid form accurate binding energies can be achieved by proper optimization of the free parameter in our functional, along with an improvement in dissociation energy curves and in Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. However, the correspondence of the latter to experimental ionization potent...

  18. Highly interactive nature of flower-specific enhancers and promoters, and its potential impact on tissue-specific expression and engineering of multiple genes or agronomic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yang, Yazhou; Zhang, Jinjin; Wang, Xiping; Singer, Stacy; Liu, Zhongchi; Yang, Yingjun; Yan, Guohua; Liu, Zongrang

    2014-09-01

    Molecular stacking enables multiple traits to be effectively engineered in crops using a single vector. However, the co-existence of distinct plant promoters in the same transgenic unit might, like their mammalian counterparts, interfere with one another. In this study, we devised a novel approach to investigate enhancer-promoter and promoter-promoter interactions in transgenic plants and demonstrated that three of four flower-specific enhancer/promoters were capable of distantly activating a pollen- and stigma-specific Pps promoter (fused to the cytotoxic DT-A gene) in other tissues, as revealed by novel tissue ablation phenotypes in transgenic plants. The NtAGI1 enhancer exclusively activated stamen- and carpel-specific DT-A expression, thus resulting in tissue ablation in an orientation-independent manner; this activation was completely abolished by the insertion of an enhancer-blocking insulator (EXOB) between the NtAGI1 enhancer and Pps promoter. Similarly, AGL8 and AP1Lb1, but not AP1La, promoters also activated distinct tissue-specific DT-A expression and ablation, with the former causing global growth retardation and the latter ablating apical inflorescences. While the tissue specificity of the enhancer/promoters generally defined their activation specificities, the strength of their activity in particular tissues or developmental stages appeared to determine whether activation actually occurred. Our findings provide the first evidence that plant-derived enhancer/promoters can distantly interact/interfere with one another, which could pose potential problems for the tissue-specific engineering of multiple traits using a single-vector stacking approach. Therefore, our work highlights the importance of adopting enhancer-blocking insulators in transformation vectors to minimize promoter-promoter interactions. The practical and fundamental significance of these findings will be discussed.

  19. Incidence rate and pattern of clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions in a large outpatient population of a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabovati, Ehsan; Vakili-Arki, Hasan; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine incidence rate, type, and pattern of clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in a large outpatient population of a developing country. A retrospective, descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on outpatients' prescriptions in Khorasan Razavi province, Iran, over 12 months. A list of 25 clinically relevant DDIs, which are likely to occur in the outpatient setting, was used as the reference. Most frequent clinically relevant pDDIs, most common drugs contributing to the pDDIs, and the pattern of pDDIs for each medical specialty were determined. Descriptive statistics were used to report the results. In total, out of 8,169,142 prescriptions, 6,096 clinically relevant pDDIs were identified. The most common identified pDDIs were theophyllines-quinolones, warfarin-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, benzodiazepines-azole antifungal agents, and anticoagulants-thyroid hormones. The most common drugs contributing to the identified pDDIs were ciprofloxacin, theophylline, warfarin, aminophylline, alprazolam, levothyroxine, and selegiline. While the incidence rate of clinically relevant pDDIs in prescriptions of general practitioners, internists, and cardiologists was the highest, the average pDDI incidence per 10,000 prescriptions of pulmonologists, infectious disease specialists, and cardiologists was highest. Although a small proportion of the analyzed prescriptions contained drug pairs with potential for clinically relevant DDIs, a significant number of outpatients have been exposed to the adverse effects associated with these interactions. It is recommended that in addition to training physicians and pharmacists, other effective interventions such as computerized alerting systems and electronic prescribing systems be designed and implemented. PMID:27499793

  20. Endogenous 17ß-estradiol is required for activity-dependent long-term potentiation in the striatum: interaction with the dopaminergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eTozzi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 17β-estradiol (E2, a neurosteroid synthesized by P450-aromatase (ARO, modulates various brain functions. We characterized the role of the locally synthesized E2 on striatal long-term synaptic plasticity and explored possible interactions between E2 receptors (ERs and dopamine (DA receptors in the dorsal striatum of adult male rats. Inhibition of E2 synthesis or antagonism of ERs prevented the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP in both medium spiny neurons (MSNs and cholinergic interneurons (ChIs. Activation of a D1-like DA receptor/cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway restored LTP. In MSNs exogenous E2 reversed the effect of ARO inhibition. Also antagonism of M1 muscarinic receptors prevented the D1-like receptor-mediated restoration of LTP confirming a role for ChIs in controlling the E2-mediated LTP of MSNs. A novel striatal interaction, occurring between ERs and D1-like receptors in both MSNs and ChIs, might be critical to regulate basal ganglia physiology and to compensate synaptic alterations in Parkinson's disease.

  1. Endogenous 17β-estradiol is required for activity-dependent long-term potentiation in the striatum: interaction with the dopaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Tantucci, Michela; Durante, Valentina; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Giampà, Carmela; Di Mauro, Michela; Mazzocchetti, Petra; Costa, Cinzia; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Grassi, Silvarosa; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico; Calabresi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2), a neurosteroid synthesized by P450-aromatase (ARO), modulates various brain functions. We characterized the role of the locally synthesized E2 on striatal long-term synaptic plasticity and explored possible interactions between E2 receptors (ERs) and dopamine (DA) receptors in the dorsal striatum of adult male rats. Inhibition of E2 synthesis or antagonism of ERs prevented the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in both medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and cholinergic interneurons (ChIs). Activation of a D1-like DA receptor/cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway restored LTP. In MSNs exogenous E2 reversed the effect of ARO inhibition. Also antagonism of M1 muscarinic receptors prevented the D1-like receptor-mediated restoration of LTP confirming a role for ChIs in controlling the E2-mediated LTP of MSNs. A novel striatal interaction, occurring between ERs and D1-like receptors in both MSNs and ChIs, might be critical to regulate basal ganglia physiology and to compensate synaptic alterations in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26074768

  2. Extension of the B3LYP - Dispersion-Correcting Potential Approach to the Accurate Treatment of both Inter- and Intramolecular Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DiLabio, Gino A; Torres, Edmanuel

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed that dispersion-correcting potentials (DCPs), atom-centered Gaussian-type functions developed for use with B3LYP (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2012, 3, 1738-1744) greatly improved the ability of the underlying functional to predict non-covalent interactions. However, the application of B3LYP-DCP for the {\\beta}-scission of the cumyloxyl radical led a calculated barrier height that was over-estimated by ca. 8 kcal/mol. We show in the present work that the source of this error arises from the previously developed carbon atom DCPs, which erroneously alters the electron density in the C-C covalent-bonding region. In this work, we present a new C-DCP with a form that was expected to influence the electron density farther from the nucleus. Tests of the new C-DCP, with previously published H-, N- and O-DCPs, with B3LYP-DCP/6-31+G(2d,2p) on the S66, S22B, HSG-A, and HC12 databases of non-covalently interacting dimers showed that it is one of the most accurate methods available for treating intermolecular i...

  3. Characterizing alpha helical properties of Ebola viral proteins as potential targets for inhibition of alpha-helix mediated protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rao, Basuthkar J; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya

    2014-01-01

    Ebola, considered till recently as a rare and endemic disease, has dramatically transformed into a potentially global humanitarian crisis. The genome of Ebola, a member of the Filoviridae family, encodes seven proteins. Based on the recently implemented software (PAGAL) for analyzing the hydrophobicity and amphipathicity properties of alpha helices (AH) in proteins, we characterize the helices in the Ebola proteome. We demonstrate that AHs with characteristically unique features are involved in critical interactions with the host proteins. For example, the Ebola virus membrane fusion subunit, GP2, from the envelope glycoprotein ectodomain has an AH with a large hydrophobic moment. The neutralizing antibody (KZ52) derived from a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit outbreak recognizes a protein epitope on this AH, emphasizing the critical nature of this secondary structure in the virulence of the Ebola virus. Our method ensures a comprehensive list of such `hotspots'. These helices probably are or can be the target of molecules designed to inhibit AH mediated protein-protein interactions. Further, by comparing the AHs in proteins of the related Marburg viruses, we are able to elicit subtle changes in the proteins that might render them ineffective to previously successful drugs. Such differences are difficult to identify by a simple sequence or structural alignment. Thus, analyzing AHs in the small Ebola proteome can aid rational design aimed at countering the `largest Ebola epidemic, affecting multiple countries in West Africa' ( http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/2014-west-africa/index.html). PMID:25717367

  4. LandCaRe DSS--an interactive decision support system for climate change impact assessment and the analysis of potential agricultural land use adaptation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenkel, Karl-Otto; Berg, Michael; Mirschel, Wilfried; Wieland, Ralf; Nendel, Claas; Köstner, Barbara

    2013-09-01

    Decision support to develop viable climate change adaptation strategies for agriculture and regional land use management encompasses a wide range of options and issues. Up to now, only a few suitable tools and methods have existed for farmers and regional stakeholders that support the process of decision-making in this field. The interactive model-based spatial information and decision support system LandCaRe DSS attempts to close the existing methodical gap. This system supports interactive spatial scenario simulations, multi-ensemble and multi-model simulations at the regional scale, as well as the complex impact assessment of potential land use adaptation strategies at the local scale. The system is connected to a local geo-database and via the internet to a climate data server. LandCaRe DSS uses a multitude of scale-specific ecological impact models, which are linked in various ways. At the local scale (farm scale), biophysical models are directly coupled with a farm economy calculator. New or alternative simulation models can easily be added, thanks to the innovative architecture and design of the DSS. Scenario simulations can be conducted with a reasonable amount of effort. The interactive LandCaRe DSS prototype also offers a variety of data analysis and visualisation tools, a help system for users and a farmer information system for climate adaptation in agriculture. This paper presents the theoretical background, the conceptual framework, and the structure and methodology behind LandCaRe DSS. Scenario studies at the regional and local scale for the two Eastern German regions of Uckermark (dry lowlands, 2600 km(2)) and Weißeritz (humid mountain area, 400 km(2)) were conducted in close cooperation with stakeholders to test the functionality of the DSS prototype. The system is gradually being transformed into a web version (http://www.landcare-dss.de) to ensure the broadest possible distribution of LandCaRe DSS to the public. The system will be continuously

  5. Heavy Cluster Knockout Reaction O16(C12,2C12)He4 and the Nature of the C12-C12 Interaction Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, B. N.; Jain, Arun K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Biswas, D. C.; Saxena, A.; John, B. V.; Danu, L. S.; Vind, R. P.; Choudhury, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    The heavy cluster knockout reaction O16(C12,2C12)He4 performed for the first time, reveals the true nature of the C12-C12 interaction. The observed cross section is enhanced by almost 2 orders of magnitude over the conventional zero range distorted wave impulse approximation (DWIA) predictions. An attractive C12-C12 optical potential, as obtained in the folding model, does not explain the enhanced cross section in the finite range (FR) DWIA framework. The inclusion of a hard core of fairly long range ˜3.65fm explains the data. The present investigation of O16(C12,2C12)He4 along with the C12-C12 elastic scattering also proves beyond doubt that the folding model’s deep attractive heavy ion potentials are unsuitable to describe the highly overlapping heavy ions. The application of FR-DWIA opens up new avenues to use the heavy core knockout for the detailed investigation of heavy as well as Borromean halo nuclei.

  6. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY ON THE POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTION BETWEEN ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITOR OR ANGIOTENSIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND OTHER DRUGS IN END-STAGE CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honey Iskandar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing number of chronic renal failure (CRF patients had reflected an increase in the number of patients with diabetes and hypertension. Therefore, health practitioners would be faced with management of complicated medical problems for the patients of chronic renal disease. In this way, various complications of chronic renal failure would lead to polypharmacy, where the patients receive three to five drugs in a dose. Development of polypharmacy had made the potential of drug interaction greater. The objective was to determine whether CRF patients admitted to hospital with specific adverse drug reactions were likely to have been prescribed with interacting drugs. Retrospective study was designed. The study was conducted at the General Practice Rooms Floor 1 – Floor VI of Central Army Hospital Gatot Soebroto Jakarta. The study was conducted from December 2011 – February 2012. The data were collected in a retrospective way for a year (January – December 2011. End-stage CRF patients who were having hemodialysis therapy and receiving ACE Inhibitor drugs or Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonist (AIIRA and receiving treatment at the General Practice Rooms at Central Army Hospital Gatot Soebroto Jakarta. During the period of January – December 2011, 84 patients were treated with end-stage CRF at the Central Army Hospital and having routine hemodialysis and 44 patients were receiving therapy with ACE Inhibitor and AIIRA. Other drugs simultaneously given with ACE Inhibitor and AIIRA were captopril-spironolactone, captopril-aspirin, captopril-allopurinol, captopril-KSR, captopril-furosemide, lisinopril-furosemide and valsartan-mefenemic acid. An increase in adverse effects of the drugs was found based on the clinical evaluation and laboratory examination. The adverse effects included hyperkalemia (9,09%, decrease in anti-hypertension effect (6,8%, acute hypotension (40%, and declining renal function (11,36%. The study identifies drug interaction

  7. Potential sodium–CO2 interaction of a supercritical CO2 power conversion option coupled with an SFR: Basic nature and design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► For the supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle option for SFR power conversion. ► A boundary failure and consequent sodium–CO2 interaction was studied. ► The kinetics depends heavily on temperatures, but is not sensitive to gas velocities. ► Two-zone reaction model was proposed with a threshold temperature of 460 °C. ► Practical design and safety issues relevant to plant safety were discussed as well. -- Abstract: The supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle option for energy conversion in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) has recently received a great deal of attention due to highly reliable system design features that make it essentially free from risk of a sodium–water reaction in a traditional Rankine cycle power conversion. Although this novel approach will yield significant improvements in overall plant safety and energy utilization, it raises the risk of pressure boundary failure and consequent sodium–CO2 interaction. Since an understanding of the interaction mechanism is directly relevant to safety issues for the advanced SFR design, the kinetic behavior of sodium–CO2 interaction and its basic nature were investigated in this study. Experiments were performed for sodium temperatures ranging from 200 to 600 °C. The results indicated that the reaction kinetics over the sodium temperature range of 300–550 °C depends heavily on the temperature but is not sensitive to the velocity of CO2 flowing over the gas–liquid reacting interface explored in this study. The rate of the chemical reaction was determined by measuring the gas concentration of the CO/CO2 mixture, and a two-zone reaction model was proposed with a threshold temperature of 460 °C. The kinetic parameters, i.e., the activation energies according to reaction zones, were obtained experimentally and the corresponding model parameters were identified. Finally, practical design and safety issues regarding a wastage scenario and the potential plugging of faulty heat exchanger

  8. Effect of Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions on the energy spectrum, chemical potential, addition energy and spin-splitting in a many-electron parabolic GaAs quantum dot in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-11-01

    The effect of electron-electron interaction and the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions on the electronic properties of a many-electron system in a parabolically confined quantum dot placed in an external magnetic field is studied. With a simple and physically reasonable model potential for electron-electron interaction term, the problem is solved exactly to second-order in the spin-orbit coupling constants to obtain the energy spectrum, the chemical potential, addition energy and the spin-splitting energy.

  9. Oral treatments of Echinococcus multilocularis-infected mice with the antimalarial drug mefloquine that potentially interacts with parasite ferritin and cystatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küster, Tatiana; Stadelmann, Britta; Rufener, Reto; Risch, Corina; Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of oral treatments of Echinococcus multilocularis-infected mice with the antimalarial drug mefloquine (MEF) and identified proteins that bind to MEF in parasite extracts and human cells by affinity chromatography. In a pilot experiment, MEF treatment was applied 5 days per week and was intensified by increasing the dosage stepwise from 12.5 mg/kg to 200 mg/kg during 4 weeks followed by treatments of 100 mg/kg during the last 7 weeks. This resulted in a highly significant reduction of parasite weight in MEF-treated mice compared with mock-treated mice, but the reduction was significantly less efficacious compared with the standard treatment regimen of albendazole (ABZ). In a second experiment, MEF was applied orally in three different treatment groups at dosages of 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg, but only twice a week, for a period of 12 weeks. Treatment at 100 mg/kg had a profound impact on the parasite, similar to ABZ treatment at 200 mg/kg/day (5 days/week for 12 weeks). No adverse side effects were noted. To identify proteins in E. multilocularis metacestodes that physically interact with MEF, affinity chromatography of metacestode extracts was performed on MEF coupled to epoxy-activated Sepharose(®), followed by SDS-PAGE and in-gel digestion LC-MS/MS. This resulted in the identification of E. multilocularis ferritin and cystatin as MEF-binding proteins. In contrast, when human cells were exposed to MEF affinity chromatography, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase was identified as a MEF-binding protein. This indicates that MEF could potentially interact with different proteins in parasites and human cells. PMID:26395219

  10. Menthol-induced action potentials in Conocephalum conicum as a result of unspecific interactions between menthol and the lipid phase of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupisz, Kamila; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2015-07-01

    Our previous study has shown that the liverwort Conocephalum conicum generates action potentials (APs) in response to both temperature drop and menthol, which are also activators of the TRPM8 (transient receptor potential melastatin 8) receptor in animals. Not only similarities but also differences between electrical reactions to menthol and cooling observed in the liverwort aroused our interest in the action of menthol at the molecular level. Patch-clamp investigations have shown that menthol causes a reduction of current flowing through slow vacuolar (SV) channels to 29 ± 10% of the initial value (n = 9); simultaneously, it does not influence magnitudes of currents passing through a single SV channel. This may point to an unspecific interaction between menthol and the lipid phase of the membrane. An influence of menthol on lipid organization in membranes was investigated in two-component monomolecular layers formed with menthol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) at the argon-water interface. Analyses of the mean molecular area parameters vs the molar fraction of the menthol component have shown over-additivity (approximately 20 Å(2) ) in the region of high molar fractions of menthol. Infrared absorption spectroscopy studies have shown that menthol, most probably, induces breaking of a hydrogen bond network formed by ester carbonyl groups and water bridges in the lipid membrane and binds to the polar head group region of DPPC. We conclude that the disruption in the lipid phase of the membrane influences ion channels and/or pumps and subsequently causes generation of APs in excitable plants such as C. conicum.

  11. Extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence and associated factors of drug-drug interaction and potential adverse drug reactions in Gondar Teaching Referral Hospital, North West Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endalkachew Admassie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence, and associated factors for the occurrence of drug-drug interaction (DDI and potential adverse drug reaction (ADR in Gondar University Teaching Referral Hospital. Institutional-based retrospective cross-sectional study. This study was conducted on prescriptions of both in and out-patients for a period of 3 months at Gondar University Hospital. Both bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and possible ADRs. All the statistical calculations were performed using SPSS; software. A total of 12,334 prescriptions were dispensed during the study period of which, 2,180 prescriptions were containing two or more drugs per prescription. A total of 21,210 drugs were prescribed and the average number of drugs per prescription was 1.72. Occurrences of DDI of all categories (Major, Moderate, and Minor were analyzed and DDI were detected in 711 (32.6% prescriptions. Sex was not found to be a risk factor for the occurrence of DDI and ADR, while age and number of medications per prescription were found to be significant risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and ADR. The mean number of drugs per prescription was 1.72 and hence with regard to the WHO limit of drugs per prescription, Gondar hospital was able to maintain the limit and prescriptions containing multiple drugs supposed to be taken systemically. Numbers of drugs per prescription as well as older age were found to be predisposing factors for the occurrence of DDI and potential ADRs while sex was not a risk factor.

  12. Interactions between dyspnea and the brain processing of nociceptive stimuli:experimental air hunger attenuates laser-evoked brain potentials in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence eDANGERS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dyspnea and pain share several characteristics and certain neural networks and interact with each other. Dyspnea-pain counter-irritation consists of attenuation of preexisting pain by intercurrent dyspnea and has been shown to have neurophysiological correlates in the form of inhibition of the nociceptive spinal reflex RIII and laser-evoked potentials (LEPs. Experimentally induced exertional dyspnea inhibits RIII and LEPs, while air hunger dyspnea does not inhibit RIII despite its documented analgesic effects. We hypothesized that air hunger may act centrally and inhibit LEPs. LEPs were obtained in 12 healthy volunteers (age: 21-29 during spontaneous breathing (FB, ventilator-controlled breathing (VC tailored to FB, after inducing air hunger by increasing the inspired fraction of carbon dioxide -FiCO2- (VCCO2, and during ventilator-controlled breathing recovery (VCR. VCCO2 induced intense dyspnea (visual analogue scale = 63% ± 6% of full scale, p<0.001 vs. VC, predominantly of the air hunger type. VC alone reduced the amplitude of the N2-P2 component of LEPs (∆ = 24.0% ± 21.1%, p<0.05, effect-size = 0.74 predominantly through a reduction in P2, and the amplitude of this inhibition was further reduced by inducting air hunger (∆ = 22.6% ± 17.9%, p<0.05, effect-size = 0.53, predominantly through a reduction in N2. Somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs were not affected by VC or VCCO2, suggesting that the observed effects are specific to pain transmission. We conclude that air hunger interferes with the cortical mechanisms responsible for the cortical response to painful laser skin stimulation, which provides a neurophysiological substrate to the central nature of its otherwise documented analgesic effects.

  13. Gla-Rich Protein Is a Potential New Vitamin K Target in Cancer: Evidences for a Direct GRP-Mineral Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla S. B. Viegas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gla-rich protein (GRP was described in sturgeon as a new vitamin-K-dependent protein (VKDP with a high density of Gla residues and associated with ectopic calcifications in humans. Although VKDPs function has been related with γ-carboxylation, the Gla status of GRP in humans is still unknown. Here, we investigated the expression of recently identified GRP spliced transcripts, the γ-carboxylation status, and its association with ectopic calcifications, in skin basal cell and breast carcinomas. GRP-F1 was identified as the predominant splice variant expressed in healthy and cancer tissues. Patterns of γ-carboxylated GRP (cGRP/undercarboxylated GRP (ucGRP accumulation in healthy and cancer tissues were determined by immunohistochemistry, using newly developed conformation-specific antibodies. Both GRP protein forms were found colocalized in healthy tissues, while ucGRP was the predominant form associated with tumor cells. Both cGRP and ucGRP found at sites of microcalcifications were shown to have in vitro calcium mineral-binding capacity. The decreased levels of cGRP and predominance of ucGRP in tumor cells suggest that GRP may represent a new target for the anticancer potential of vitamin K. Also, the direct interaction of cGRP and ucGRP with BCP crystals provides a possible mechanism explaining GRP association with pathological mineralization.

  14. Analytic determination of the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian self-force contributions to the two-body gravitational interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2014-01-01

    We {\\it analytically} compute, to the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian order, and to linear order in the mass ratio, the radial potential describing (within the effective one-body formalism) the gravitational interaction of two bodies, thereby extending previous analytic results. These results are obtained by applying analytical gravitational self-force theory (for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole) to Detweiler's gauge-invariant redshift variable. We emphasize the increase in \\lq\\lq transcendentality" of the numbers entering the post-Newtonian expansion coefficients as the order increases, in particular we note the appearance of $\\zeta(3)$ (as well as the square of Euler's constant $\\gamma$) starting at the seventh post-Newtonian order. We study the convergence of the post-Newtonian expansion as the expansion parameter $u=GM/(c^2r)$ leaves the weak-field domain $u\\ll 1$ to enter the strong field domain $u=O(1)$.

  15. Pharmacokinetic Herb-Drug Interaction between Essential Oil of Aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae) and Acetaminophen and Caffeine: A Potential Risk for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samojlik, Isidora; Petković, Stojan; Stilinović, Nebojša; Vukmirović, Saša; Mijatović, Vesna; Božin, Biljana

    2016-02-01

    Aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae) and its essential oil (EO) have been widely used. Because there are some data about the impact of aniseed EO on drug effects, this survey aimed to assess the potential of pharmacokinetic herb-drug interaction between aniseed EO and acetaminophen and caffeine in mice. The chemical analysis (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) of aniseed EO has confirmed trans-anethole (87.96%) as the main component. The pharmacokinetic studies of intraperitoneally (i.p.) and orally applied acetaminophen (200 mg/kg) and caffeine (20 mg/kg) were performed in mice after 5 days of oral treatment with human equivalent dose of aniseed EO (0.3 mg/kg/day). The analysis of pharmacokinetic data showed that in the group treated by aniseed EO, the significant decrease in the peak plasma concentration of acetaminophen after oral application (p = 0.024) was revealed when compared with control group and the reduction of systemic exposure to the drug after oral application (74 ± 32% vs. 85 ± 35% in the control) was noted. The bioavailability of orally applied caffeine was also significantly decreased (p = 0.022) after the EO treatment in comparison with the control (57 ± 24% vs. 101 ± 29%). Therefore, the compromised therapeutic efficacy of acetaminophen and caffeine during the usage of aniseed EO preparations should be considered.

  16. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is...

  17. Potenciais interações entre fármacos e produtos à base de valeriana ou alho Potential interactions between drugs and valerian or garlic herbal medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo F. Alexandre

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Atualmente, as potenciais interações entre fármacos e plantas medicinais e/ou medicamentos fitoterápicos são objetos de inúmeros estudos. Tais estudos são motivados pelo fato de que a fitoterapia é amplamente utilizada em associação com diversos fármacos. Nesta revisão, as informações sobre as principais interações entre produtos elaborados com valeriana ou alho foram localizadas, avaliadas e sistematizadas. Verificou-se que tais plantas podem alterar os perfis farmacocinéticos e/ou farmacodinâmicos de diversos fármacos, podendo provocar conseqüências graves aos pacientes. A valeriana pode aumentar os efeitos adversos dos benzodiazepínicos, reduzir a biodisponibilidade dos fármacos metabolizados pelo sistema P450-CYP3A4 e provocar hemorragias graves quando utilizada juntamente com anticoagulantes orais e antiplaquetários. O alho pode aumentar a biodisponibilidade dos relaxantes musculares, potencializar os efeitos terapêuticos e adversos dos hipoglicemiantes, provocar hemorragias quando administrado juntamente com anticoagulantes orais e antiplaquetários e reduzir a biodisponibilidade dos anti-retrovirais inibidores de protease. Porém, tais potenciais interações não são consensos na literatura, visto que há limitações metodológicas e diferenças significativas entre os estudos localizados. Mesmo assim, o uso de produtos à base de valeriana ou alho, associado com determinados fármacos, deve ser adequadamente monitorado por um profissional da área da saúde.At present, potential herbal-drug interactions are subject of great interest, because herbal medicines are often administered in combination with synthetic drugs. The aim of this paper was to review the literature in order to identify reported interactions between valerian or garlic herbal medicines and drugs, as well as to evaluate and summarize this information. Valerian or garlic herbal medicines could modify pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamic

  18. A high-resolution gene expression atlas of epistasis between gene-specific transcription factors exposes potential mechanisms for genetic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sameith, Katrin; Amini, Saman; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J. A.; van Leenen, Dik; Brok, Mariel; Brabers, Nathalie; Lijnzaad, Philip; van Hooff, Sander R; Joris J Benschop; Lenstra, Tineke L.; Apweiler, Eva; van Wageningen, Sake; Snel, Berend; Holstege, Frank C. P.; Kemmeren, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic interactions, or non-additive effects between genes, play a crucial role in many cellular processes and disease. Which mechanisms underlie these genetic interactions has hardly been characterized. Understanding the molecular basis of genetic interactions is crucial in deciphering pathway organization and understanding the relationship between genotype, phenotype and disease. Results To investigate the nature of genetic interactions between gene-specific transcription factor...

  19. Proteolytic degradation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) from head to toe: Identification of novel NPY-cleaving peptidases and potential drug interactions in CNS and Periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Leona; Wolf, Raik; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Rossner, Steffen; Petersén, Åsa; Leavitt, Blair R; Kästner, Florian; Rothermundt, Matthias; Gärtner, Ulf-Torsten; Gündel, Daniel; Schlenzig, Dagmar; Frerker, Nadine; Schade, Jutta; Manhart, Susanne; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; von Hörsten, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    The bioactivity of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is either N-terminally modulated with respect to receptor selectivity by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DP4)-like enzymes or proteolytic degraded by neprilysin or meprins, thereby abrogating signal transduction. However, neither the subcellular nor the compartmental differentiation of these regulatory mechanisms is fully understood. Using mass spectrometry, selective inhibitors and histochemistry, studies across various cell types, body fluids, and tissues revealed that most frequently DP4-like enzymes, aminopeptidases P, secreted meprin-A (Mep-A), and cathepsin D (CTSD) rapidly hydrolyze NPY, depending on the cell type and tissue under study. Novel degradation of NPY by cathepsins B, D, L, G, S, and tissue kallikrein could also be identified. The expression of DP4, CTSD, and Mep-A at the median eminence indicates that the bioactivity of NPY is regulated by peptidases at the interphase between the periphery and the CNS. Detailed ex vivo studies on human sera and CSF samples recognized CTSD as the major NPY-cleaving enzyme in the CSF, whereas an additional C-terminal truncation by angiotensin-converting enzyme could be detected in serum. The latter finding hints to potential drug interaction between antidiabetic DP4 inhibitors and anti-hypertensive angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, while it ablates suspected hypertensive side effects of only antidiabetic DP4-inhibitors application. The bioactivity of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is either N-terminally modulated with respect to receptor selectivity by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DP4)-like enzymes or proteolytic degraded by neprilysin or meprins, thereby abrogating signal transduction. However, neither the subcellular nor the compartmental differentiation of these regulatory mechanisms is fully understood. Using mass spectrometry, selective inhibitors and histochemistry, studies across various cell types, body fluids, and tissues revealed that most frequently DP4-like enzymes

  20. Evacetrapib: in vitro and clinical disposition, metabolism, excretion, and assessment of drug interaction potential with strong CYP3A and CYP2C8 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannady, Ellen A; Wang, Ming-Dauh; Friedrich, Stuart; Rehmel, Jessica L F; Yi, Ping; Small, David S; Zhang, Wei; Suico, Jeffrey G

    2015-10-01

    Evacetrapib is an investigational cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor (CETPi) for reduction of risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with high-risk vascular disease. Understanding evacetrapib disposition, metabolism, and the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDI) may help guide prescribing recommendations. In vitro, evacetrapib metabolism was investigated with a panel of human recombinant cytochromes P450 (CYP). The disposition, metabolism, and excretion of evacetrapib following a single 100-mg oral dose of (14)C-evacetrapib were determined in healthy subjects, and the pharmacokinetics of evacetrapib were evaluated in the presence of strong CYP3A or CYP2C8 inhibitors. In vitro, CYP3A was responsible for about 90% of evacetrapib's CYP-associated clearance, while CYP2C8 accounted for about 10%. In the clinical disposition study, only evacetrapib and two minor metabolites circulated in plasma. Evacetrapib metabolism was extensive. A mean of 93.1% and 2.30% of the dose was excreted in feces and urine, respectively. In clinical DDI studies, the ratios of geometric least squares means for evacetrapib with/without the CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole were 2.37 for area under the curve (AUC)(0-∞) and 1.94 for C max. There was no significant difference in evacetrapib AUC(0-τ) or C max with/without the CYP2C8 inhibitor gemfibrozil, with ratios of 0.996 and 1.02, respectively. Although in vitro results indicated that both CYP3A and CYP2C8 metabolized evacetrapib, clinical studies confirmed that evacetrapib is primarily metabolized by CYP3A. However, given the modest increase in evacetrapib exposure and robust clinical safety profile to date, there is a low likelihood of clinically relevant DDI with concomitant use of strong CYP3A or CYP2C8 inhibitors. PMID:26516590