WorldWideScience

Sample records for alpha-glucosidases

  1. The Role of alpha-Glucosidase in Germinating Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Duncan; Rejzek, Martin; Næsted, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The importance of alpha-glucosidase in the endosperm starch metabolism of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings is poorly understood. The enzyme converts maltose to glucose (Glc), but in vitro studies indicate that it can also attack starch granules. To discover its role in vivo, we took complementa...

  2. Cloning a cDNA for the lysosomal alpha-glucosidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KONINGS, A.; HUPKES, P.; Versteeg, R.; Grosveld, G.; Reuser, A.; Galjaard, H.

    1984-01-01

    Messenger RNA was isolated from monkey testes and size-fractionated on sucrose gradients. In vitro translation of these mRNA fractions resulted in nascent, labeled alpha-glucosidase that could be precipitated with anti human alpha-glucosidase antiserum. A cDNA library was constructed from the most

  3. Characterization of different crystal forms of the alpha-glucosidase MalA from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Willemoës, Martin; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2005-01-01

    MalA is an alpha-glucosidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. It belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 31, which includes several medically interesting alpha-glucosidases. MalA and its selenomethionine derivative have been overproduced in Escherichia coli...

  4. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitory and antiplasmodial properties of terpenoids from the leaves of Buddleja saligna Willd

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chukwujekwu, J. C.; Rengasamy, K.R.R.; de Kock, C. A.; Smith, P. J.; Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; van Staden, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 1 (2016), s. 63-66 ISSN 1475-6366 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alpha-glucosidase * antidiabetic * antiplasmodial * Buddleja saligna * terpenoids Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.293, year: 2016

  5. Potential antiradical and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors from Ecklonia maxima (Osbeck) Papenfuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Aderogba, Mutalib A; Amoo, Stephen O; Stirk, Wendy A; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-11-15

    Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors play a potential role in the treatment of type 2 diabetes by delaying glucose absorption in the small intestine. Ecklonia maxima, a brown alga which grows abundantly on the west coast of South Africa, is used to produce alginate, animal feed, nutritional supplements and fertilizer. The crude aqueous methanol extract, four solvent fractions and three phlorotannins: 1,3,5-trihydroxybenezene (phloroglucinol) (1), dibenzo [1,4] dioxine-2,4,7,9-tetraol (2) and hexahydroxyphenoxydibenzo [1,4] dioxine (eckol) (3) isolated from E. maxima were evaluated for antiradical and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities. All the phlorotannins tested had strong antioxidant activities on DPPH free radicals with EC50 values ranging from 0.008 to 0.128μM. Compounds 2 and 3 demonstrated stronger antioxidant activity and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitory property than positive controls. These results suggest that E. maxima could be a natural source of potent antioxidants and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. This study could facilitate effective utilization of E. maxima as an oral antidiabetic drug or functional food ingredient with a promising role in the formulation of medicines and nutrition supplements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human acid alpha-glucosidase from rabbit milk has therapeutic effect in mice with glycogen storage disease type II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.A. Bijvoet (Agnes); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); H. van Hirtum (Hans); M.A. Kroos (Marian); E.H. van de Kamp; O. Schoneveld; P. Visser (Pim); J.P. Brakenhoff (Just); M. Weggeman (Miranda); E.J.J.M. van Corven (Emiel); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPompe's disease or glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) belongs to the family of inherited lysosomal storage diseases. The underlying deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase leads in different degrees of severity to glycogen storage in heart, skeletal

  7. An isozyme of acid alpha-glucosidase with reduced catalytic activity for glycogen.

    OpenAIRE

    Beratis, N G; LaBadie, G U; Hirschhorn, K

    1980-01-01

    Both the common and a variant isozyme of acid alpha-glucosidase have been purified from a heterozygous placenta with CM-Sephadex, ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, Amicon filtration, affinity chromatography by Sephadex G-100, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Three and two activity peaks, from the common and variant isozymes, respectively, were obtained by DEAE-cellulose chromatography using a linear NaCl gradient. The three peaks of activity of the common isozyme were eluted with 0....

  8. Screening alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors from natural compounds by molecular docking in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhong, Chien-Hung; Riyaphan, Jirawat; Lin, Shih-Hung; Chia, Yi-Chen; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor is a common oral anti-diabetic drug used for controlling carbohydrates normally converted into simple sugars and absorbed by the intestines. However, some adverse clinical effects have been observed. The present study seeks an alternative drug that can regulate the hyperglycemia by down-regulating alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activity by molecular docking approach to screen the hyperglycemia antagonist against alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activities from the 47 natural compounds. The docking data showed that Curcumin, 16-hydroxy-cleroda-3,13-dine-16,15-olide (16-H), Docosanol, Tetracosanol, Antroquinonol, Berberine, Catechin, Quercetin, Actinodaphnine, and Rutin from 47 natural compounds had binding ability towards alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase as well. Curcumin had a better biding ability of alpha-amylase than the other natural compounds. Analyzed alpha-glucosidase activity reveals natural compound inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) are Curcumin, Actinodaphnine, 16-H, Quercetin, Berberine, and Catechin when compared to the commercial drug Acarbose (3 mM). A natural compound with alpha-amylase inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) includes Curcumin, Berberine, Docosanol, 16-H, Actinodaphnine/Tetracosanol, Catechin, and Quercetin when compared to Acarbose (1 mM). When taken together, the implication is that molecular docking is a fast and effective way to screen alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors as lead compounds of natural sources isolated from medicinal plants. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. alpha-Glucosidase-albumin conjugates: effect of chronic administration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.M.; Murray, L.; Bhardwaj, D.; Poznansky, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Enzyme albumin conjugates have been proposed as a means of increasing the efficacy of enzyme use in vivo and decreasing immune response to the enzyme. Particulate drug carriers, however, have a pronounced tendency to localize in the mononuclear phagocyte (reticuloendothelial) system. The authors have examined in mice the effect on phagocytic index, tissue distribution and organ size of continued administration of conjugates of alpha-glucosidase with either homologous or heterologous albumin. Mice received 10 X 2-mg injections of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or mouse serum albumin (MSA), either free, polymerized or conjugated with alpha-glucosidase. Experiments involving BSA had to be terminated before the end of the experiment because of anaphylaxis, but these reactions were less severe to the polymerized albumin than to free albumin. Free BSA, BSA polymer and BSA-enzyme conjugates all caused a decrease in phagocytic index after six injections. Mice receiving MSA showed no evidence of anaphylaxis, but mice receiving six or more injections of free MSA, MSA polymer or MSA-enzyme conjugate had significantly decreased phagocytic indices as compared to controls. Phagocytic indices had returned to normal by 7 days after the final injection. Tissue distribution of 125 I-labeled albumin preparations was determined in either naive or chronically injected mice

  10. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Hout, Johanna M P; Kamphoven, Joep H J; Winkel, Léon P F; Arts, Willem F M; De Klerk, Johannes B C; Loonen, M Christa B; Vulto, Arnold G; Cromme-Dijkhuis, Adri; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke; Hop, Wim; Van Hirtum, Hans; Van Diggelen, Otto P; Boer, Marijke; Kroos, Marian A; Van Doorn, Pieter A; Van der Voort, Edwin; Sibbles, Barbara; Van Corven, Emiel J J M; Brakenhoff, Just P J; Van Hove, Johan; Smeitink, Jan A M; de Jong, Gerard; Reuser, Arnold J J; Van der Ploeg, Ans T

    2004-05-01

    Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be obtained at relatively low costs, even in small animals such as rabbits. We tested the long-term safety and efficacy of recombinant human -glucosidase (rhAGLU) from rabbit milk for the treatment of the lysosomal storage disorder Pompe disease. The disease occurs with an estimated frequency of 1 in 40,000 and is designated as orphan disease. The classic infantile form leads to death at a median age of 6 to 8 months and is diagnosed by absence of alpha-glucosidase activity and presence of fully deleterious mutations in the alpha-glucosidase gene. Cardiac hypertrophy is characteristically present. Loss of muscle strength prevents infants from achieving developmental milestones such as sitting, standing, and walking. Milder forms of the disease are associated with less severe mutations and partial deficiency of alpha-glucosidase. In the beginning of 1999, 4 critically ill patients with infantile Pompe disease (2.5-8 months of age) were enrolled in a single-center open-label study and treated intravenously with rhAGLU in a dose of 15 to 40 mg/kg/week. Genotypes of patients were consistent with the most severe form of Pompe disease. Additional molecular analysis failed to detect processed forms of alpha-glucosidase (95, 76, and 70 kDa) in 3 of the 4 patients and revealed only a trace amount of the 95-kDa biosynthetic intermediate form in the fourth (patient 1). With the more sensitive detection method, 35S-methionine incorporation, we could detect low-level synthesis of -glucosidase in 3 of the 4 patients (patients 1, 2, and 4) with some posttranslation modification from 110 kDa to 95 kDa in 1 of them (patient 1). One patient (patient 3) remained totally deficient with both detection methods (negative for cross

  11. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors for patients with type 2 diabetes: results from a Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, F.A. van de; Lucassen, P.L.B.J.; Akkermans, R.P.; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Rutten, G.E.H.M.; Weel, C. van

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the effects of monotherapy with alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) for patients with type 2 diabetes, with respect to mortality, morbidity, glycemic control, insulin levels, plasma lipids, body weight, and side effects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We systematically searched

  12. An isozyme of acid alpha-glucosidase with reduced catalytic activity for glycogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beratis, N G; LaBadie, G U; Hirschhorn, K

    1980-03-01

    Both the common and a variant isozyme of acid alpha-glucosidase have been purified from a heterozygous placenta with CM-Sephadex, ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, Amicon filtration, affinity chromatography by Sephadex G-100, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Three and two activity peaks, from the common and variant isozymes, respectively, were obtained by DEAE-cellulose chromatography using a linear NaCl gradient. The three peaks of activity of the common isozyme were eluted with 0.08, 0.12, and 0.17 M NaCl, whereas the two peaks of the variant, with 0.01 and 0.06 M NaCl. The pH optimum and thermal denaturation at 57 degrees C were the same in all enzyme peaks of both isozymes. Rabbit antiacid alpha-glucosidase antibodies produced against the common isozyme were found to cross-react with both peaks of the variant isozyme. The two isozymes shared antigenic identity and had similar Km's with maltose as substrate. Normal substrate saturation kinetics were observed with the common isozyme when glycogen was the substrate, but the variant produced an S-shaped saturation curve indicating a phase of negative and positive cooperativity at low and high glycogen concentrations, respectively. The activity of the variant was only 8.6% and 19.2% of the common isozyme when assayed with nonsaturating and saturating concentrations of glycogen, respectively. A similar rate of hydrolysis of isomaltose by both isozymes was found indicating that the reduced catalytic activity of the variant isozyme toward glycogen is not the result of a reduced ability of this enzyme to cleave the alpha-1,6 linkages of glycogen.

  13. Antioxidant, cytotoxic and alpha-glucosidase inhibition activities from the Mexican berry "Anacahuita" (Cordia boissieri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros-Valdez, Ezequiel; Jaramillo-Mora, Carlos; Oranday-Cardenas, Azucena; Mordn-Martinez, Javier; Carranza-Rosales, Pilar

    2016-09-01

    This study describes the total phenolic and flavonoid content as well as cytotoxic, alpha-glucosidase inhibition and antiradical/antioxidant potential of extracts obtained from the edible fruits of Cordia boissieri, which is widely distributed throughout northeastern Mexico. Phenolic and flavonoid content were evaluated by means of the Folin-Ciocalteu method and aluminum chloride colorimetric assay respectively. The antiradical/antioxidant activity was determined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging and Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC) assays. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by means of human cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and HeLa), alpha-glucosidase inhibition was determined by colorimetric assay using p-Nitrophenyl a-D-glucopyranoside (PNPG) as a substrate. Results indicate that extract of C. boissieri fruit has a good antioxidant potential to show a EC₅₀: 137.76 ± 35 ptg/mL and 65 ±2 ltM/g in the DPPH and TEAC assays respectively, inhibitor of the enzyme alpha-glu- cosidase involved in sugar uptake (ICSO: 215.20 ± 35 μg/ mL), cytotoxic activities against MCF-7 (IC50: 310 ± 42 μg/mL) and HeLa (IC₅₀0: 450.4 ±21μgg/mL) cancer cell lines as well as an important phenolic content with 230 t 23 mg/1OOg and 54±11 mg100g g of phenols and flavonoids totals respectively. These results point towards an interesting potential for the fruits of C. boissieri as chemopreventive properties and expand the possibilities.

  14. Purification, enzymatic characterization, and nucleotide sequence of a high-isoelectric-point alpha-glucosidase from barley malt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, T P; Lok, F; Mirgorodskaya, E

    2000-01-01

    in the transition state complex. Mass spectrometry of tryptic fragments assigned the 92-kD protein to a barley cDNA (GenBank accession no. U22450) that appears to encode an alpha-glucosidase. A corresponding sequence (HvAgl97; GenBank accession no. AF118226) was isolated from a genomic phage library using a c......High-isoelectric-point (pI) alpha-glucosidase was purified 7, 300-fold from an extract of barley (Hordeum vulgare) malt by ammonium sulfate fractionation, ion-exchange, and butyl-Sepharose chromatography. The enzyme had high activity toward maltose (k(cat) = 25 s(-1)), with an optimum at pH 4...

  15. Nutrient Content, Phytonutrient Composition, Alpha Amylase, Alpha Glucosidase Inhibition Activity and Antioxidant Activity of the Stoechospermum Marginatum Collected in Pre Monsoon Season

    OpenAIRE

    Reka Palanivel; Thahira Banu Azeez; Seethalakshmi Muthaya

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the nutrient content, phytonutrient composition, physicochemical properties, alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibition activity and antioxidant activity of the brown algae Stoechospermum marginatum collected from Gulf of Mannar, Tamil Nadu, India in pre monsoon season (June- September, 2015). Six and eight hours of ethanol and aqueous extract of Stoechospermum marginatum were used for phytonutrient screening, alpha amylase, alpha glucosidase...

  16. Cloning and Molecular Characterization of an Alpha-Glucosidase (MalH) from the Halophilic Archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuebas-Irizarry, Mara F; Irizarry-Caro, Ricardo A; López-Morales, Carol; Badillo-Rivera, Keyla M; Rodríguez-Minguela, Carlos M; Montalvo-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2017-11-21

    We report the heterologous expression and molecular characterization of the first extremely halophilic alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.20) from the archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi . A 2349 bp region ( Hqrw_2071 ) from the Hqr. walsbyi C23 annotated genome was PCR-amplified and the resulting amplicon ligated into plasmid pET28b(+), expressed in E. coli Rosetta cells, and the resulting protein purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The recombinant protein showed an estimated molecular mass of 87 kDa, consistent with the expected value of the annotated protein, and an optimal activity for the hydrolysis of α-PNPG was detected at 40 °C, and at pH 6.0. Enzyme activity values were the highest in the presence of 3 M NaCl or 3-4 M KCl. However, specific activity values were two-fold higher in the presence of 3-4 M KCl when compared to NaCl suggesting a cytoplasmic localization. Phylogenetic analyses, with respect to other alpha-glucosidases from members of the class Halobacteria, showed that the Hqr. walsbyi MalH was most similar (up to 41%) to alpha-glucosidases and alpha-xylosidases of Halorubrum . Moreover, computational analyses for the detection of functional domains, active and catalytic sites, as well as 3D structural predictions revealed a close relationship with an E. coli YicI-like alpha-xylosidase of the GH31 family. However, the purified enzyme did not show alpha-xylosidase activity. This narrower substrate range indicates a discrepancy with annotations from different databases and the possibility of specific substrate adaptations of halophilic glucosidases due to high salinity. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the characterization of an alpha-glucosidase from the halophilic Archaea, which could serve as a new model to gain insights into carbon metabolism in this understudied microbial group.

  17. Cloning and Molecular Characterization of an Alpha-Glucosidase (MalH from the Halophilic Archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara F. Cuebas-Irizarry

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the heterologous expression and molecular characterization of the first extremely halophilic alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.20 from the archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi. A 2349 bp region (Hqrw_2071 from the Hqr. walsbyi C23 annotated genome was PCR-amplified and the resulting amplicon ligated into plasmid pET28b(+, expressed in E. coli Rosetta cells, and the resulting protein purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The recombinant protein showed an estimated molecular mass of 87 kDa, consistent with the expected value of the annotated protein, and an optimal activity for the hydrolysis of α-PNPG was detected at 40 °C, and at pH 6.0. Enzyme activity values were the highest in the presence of 3 M NaCl or 3–4 M KCl. However, specific activity values were two-fold higher in the presence of 3–4 M KCl when compared to NaCl suggesting a cytoplasmic localization. Phylogenetic analyses, with respect to other alpha-glucosidases from members of the class Halobacteria, showed that the Hqr. walsbyi MalH was most similar (up to 41% to alpha-glucosidases and alpha-xylosidases of Halorubrum. Moreover, computational analyses for the detection of functional domains, active and catalytic sites, as well as 3D structural predictions revealed a close relationship with an E. coli YicI-like alpha-xylosidase of the GH31 family. However, the purified enzyme did not show alpha-xylosidase activity. This narrower substrate range indicates a discrepancy with annotations from different databases and the possibility of specific substrate adaptations of halophilic glucosidases due to high salinity. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the characterization of an alpha-glucosidase from the halophilic Archaea, which could serve as a new model to gain insights into carbon metabolism in this understudied microbial group.

  18. Treatment with acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, reduces increased albumin excretion in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M P; Vasselli, J R; Neuman, R G; Witt, J

    1995-10-01

    1. We examined the effect of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on urinary albumin excretion (UAE) in streptozotocin diabetic rats. 2. Treatment with acarbose for 8 weeks after induction of diabetes prevented the significant increase in UAE observed in untreated diabetic rats relative to nondiabetic controls. 3. Acarbose significantly reduced integrated glycemia, which correlated with albumin excretion rates, and exerts a salutary effect on diabetic renal dysfunction.

  19. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitory and antiplasmodial properties of terpenoids from the leaves of Buddleja saligna Willd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwujekwu, Jude C; Rengasamy, Kannan R R; de Kock, Carmen A; Smith, Peter J; Slavětínská, Lenka Poštová; van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    In our continuing search for biologically active natural product(s) of plant origin, Buddleja saligna, a South African medicinal plant, was screened in line with its traditional use for antidiabetic (yeast alpha glucosidase inhibitory) and antiplasmodial (against a chloroquine sensitive strain of Plasmodium falciparum (NF54)) activities. The hexane fraction showed the most promising activity with regards to its antidiabetic (IC(50) = 260 ± 0.112 µg/ml) and antiplasmodial (IC(50) = 8.5 ± 1.6 µg/ml) activities. Using activity guided fractionation three known terpenoids (betulonic acid, betulone and spinasterol) were isolated from this species for the first time. The compounds displayed varying levels of biological activities (antidiabetic: 27.31 µg/ml ≥ IC(50) ≥ 5.6 µg/ml; antiplasmodial: 14 µg/ml ≥ IC(50) ≥ 2 µg/ml) with very minimal toxicity.

  20. In vitro alpha glucosidase inhibition and free-radical scavenging activity of propolis from Thai stingless bees in mangosteen orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonyadist Vongsak

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe chemical component and biological activity of propolis depend on flora area of bee collection and bee species. In the study, the propolis from three stingless bee species, Lepidotrigona ventralis Smith, Lepidotrigona terminata Smith, and Tetragonula pagdeni Schwarz, was collected in the same region of mangosteen garden from Thailand. Total phenolic content, alpha glucosidase inhibitory effect, and free-radical scavenging activity using FRAP, ABTS, DPPH assays were determined. The most potent activity of propolis extract was investigated for bioactive compounds and their quantity. The ethanol extract of T. pagdeni propolis had the highest total phenolic content 12.83 ± 0.72 g of gallic acid equivalents in 100 g of the extract, and the strongest alpha glucosidase inhibitory effect with the IC50 of 70.79 ± 6.44 µg/ml. The free-radical scavenging activity evaluated by FRAP, ABTS, DPPH assays showed the FRAP value of 279.70 ± 20.55 µmol FeSO4 equivalent/g extract and the IC50 of 59.52 ± 10.76 and 122.71 ± 11.76 µg/ml, respectively. Gamma- and alpha-mangostin from T. pagdeni propolis extract were isolated and determined for the biological activity. Gamma-mangostin exhibited the strongest activity for both alpha glucosidase inhibitory effect and free-radical scavenging activity. Using HPLC quantitative analysis method, the content of gamma- and alpha-mangostin in the extract was found to be 0.94 ± 0.01 and 2.77 ± 0.08% (w/w, respectively. These findings suggested that T. pagdeni propolis may be used as a more suitable raw material for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical products and these mangostin derivatives as markers.

  1. Synergisms in Alpha-glucosidase Inhibition and Antioxidant Activity of Camellia sinensis L. Kuntze and Eugenia uniflora L. Ethanolic Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinholes, Juliana; Vizzotto, Márcia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Camellia sinensis, the most consumed and popular beverages worldwide, and Eugenia uniflora, a Brazilian native species, have been already confirmed to have beneficial effects in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. However, their potential acting together against an enzyme linked to this pathology has never been exploited. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory properties of individual and combined ethanolic extracts of the leaves of C. sinensis and E. uniflora over alpha-glucosidase, a key digestive enzyme used on the Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) control. In addition, their inhibitory activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH•) and peroxyl radicals was also assayed. Materials and Methods: Enzyme inhibition and antioxidant potential were assessed based on in vitro assays. Total phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and chlorophylls A and B were achieved using spectrophotometric methods. Results: E. uniflora was almost 40 times more active on alpha-glucosidase than C. sinensis and combined extracts showed a significant synergistic effect with an obtained IC50 value almost 5 times lower than the theoretical value. C. sinensis extract was twice more active than E. uniflora concerning DPPH•, in contrast, E. uniflora was almost 10 times more effective than C. sinensis on inhibition of peroxyl radicals with a significant synergistic effect for combined extracts. The extracts activities may be related with their phytochemicals, mainly phenolic compounds, and chlorophylls. Conclusion: Combined C. sinensis and E. uniflora ethanolic extracts showed synergistic effect against alpha-glucosidase and lipid peroxidation. These herbal combinations can be used to control postprandial hyperglycemia and can also provide antioxidant defenses to patients with T2DM. SUMMARY Alfa-glucosidase and antioxidant Interaction between Camellia sinensis L. Kuntze and Eugenia uniflora L. ethanolic extracts was investigated.Extracts showed

  2. Synergisms in Alpha-glucosidase Inhibition and Antioxidant Activity of Camellia sinensis L. Kuntze and Eugenia uniflora L. Ethanolic Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinholes, Juliana; Vizzotto, Márcia

    2017-01-01

    Camellia sinensis , the most consumed and popular beverages worldwide, and Eugenia uniflora , a Brazilian native species, have been already confirmed to have beneficial effects in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. However, their potential acting together against an enzyme linked to this pathology has never been exploited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory properties of individual and combined ethanolic extracts of the leaves of C. sinensis and E. uniflora over alpha-glucosidase, a key digestive enzyme used on the Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) control. In addition, their inhibitory activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH • ) and peroxyl radicals was also assayed. Enzyme inhibition and antioxidant potential were assessed based on in vitro assays. Total phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and chlorophylls A and B were achieved using spectrophotometric methods. E. uniflora was almost 40 times more active on alpha-glucosidase than C. sinensis and combined extracts showed a significant synergistic effect with an obtained IC 50 value almost 5 times lower than the theoretical value. C. sinensis extract was twice more active than E. uniflora concerning DPPH • , in contrast, E. uniflora was almost 10 times more effective than C. sinensis on inhibition of peroxyl radicals with a significant synergistic effect for combined extracts. The extracts activities may be related with their phytochemicals, mainly phenolic compounds, and chlorophylls. Combined C. sinensis and E. uniflora ethanolic extracts showed synergistic effect against alpha-glucosidase and lipid peroxidation. These herbal combinations can be used to control postprandial hyperglycemia and can also provide antioxidant defenses to patients with T2DM. Alfa-glucosidase and antioxidant Interaction between Camellia sinensis L. Kuntze and Eugenia uniflora L. ethanolic extracts was investigated.Extracts showed synergistic effect over alpha-glucosidase and peroxyl radicals

  3. Repetitive postprandial hyperglycemia increases cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury: prevention by the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Stefan; Calvillo, Laura; Tillmanns, Jochen; Elbing, Inka; Dienesch, Charlotte; Bischoff, Hilmar; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann

    2005-04-01

    Protective effects of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose have been reported for various diabetic complications. In the STOP-NIDDM study, even patients without overt diabetes, but with impaired glucose tolerance, had a reduction in cardiovascular events when treated with acarbose. Therefore, we investigated the effect of repetitive postprandial hyperglycemia on the cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury in vivo. Mice were treated daily by single applications of placebo, sucrose (4 g/kg body weight), or sucrose + acarbose (10 mg/kg body weight) by gavage for 7 days. Acarbose treatment significantly reduced the sucrose-induced increase in plasma glucose concentration. Subsequently, animals underwent 30 min of ischemia by coronary artery ligation and 24 h of reperfusion in vivo. In the sucrose group, ischemia/reperfusion damage was significantly increased (infarct/area at risk, placebo vs. sucrose, 38.8+/-7.5% vs. 62.2+/-4.8%, P<0.05). This was prevented by acarbose treatment (infarct/area at risk 30.7+/-7.2%). While myocardial inflammation was similar in all groups, oxidative stress as indicated by a significant increase in lipid peroxides was enhanced in the sucrose, but not in the sucrose + acarbose group. In summary, repetitive postprandial hyperglycemia increases ischemia/reperfusion damage. This effect can be prevented by treatment with the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose.

  4. Recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase: high level production in mouse milk, biochemical characteristics, correction of enzyme deficiency in GSDII KO mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.A. Bijvoet (Agnes); M.A. Kroos (Marian); F.R. Pieper (Frank); M. Van der Vliet (Martin); H.A. de Boer (Herman); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); M.Ph. Verbeet (Martin); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractGlycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is caused by lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency. Patients have a rapidly fatal or slowly progressive impairment of muscle function. Enzyme replacement therapy is under investigation. For large-scale, cost-effective

  5. Nutrient Content, Phytonutrient Composition, Alpha Amylase, Alpha Glucosidase Inhibition Activity and Antioxidant Activity of the Stoechospermum Marginatum Collected in Pre Monsoon Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reka Palanivel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the nutrient content, phytonutrient composition, physicochemical properties, alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibition activity and antioxidant activity of the brown algae Stoechospermum marginatum collected from Gulf of Mannar, Tamil Nadu, India in pre monsoon season (June- September, 2015. Six and eight hours of ethanol and aqueous extract of Stoechospermum marginatum were used for phytonutrient screening, alpha amylase, alpha glucosidase inhibition activity and antioxidant activity. From the results of the study it is understood that Stoechospermum marginatum contain a high amount of carbohydrate, protein, crude fiber and phytonutrients like tannin, flavonoid, saponin, alkaloid, terpenoids, steroid and total phenolic content. The physicochemical properties namely Water absorption and Swelling power were very promising. Alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibition activity was recorded to be high in both aqueous and ethanol extracts of eight hour extraction than in extracts taken from six hours extraction. Antioxidant activity was detected using DPPH, FRAP, beta carotene scavenging and H2O2 assay and found to have a high radical scavenging activity. Stoechospermum marginatum possess a valuable amount of total phenolic content and other phytonutrients and physicochemical properties, it may the reason for the potential inhibition of alpha amylase, alpha glucosidase and antioxidant activity. It is concluded from the study that the brown algae may be incorporated into foods to enhance their nutritional and therapeutic value.

  6. Alpha amylase and Alpha glucosidase inhibitory effects of aqueous stem extract of Salacia oblonga and its GC-MS analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladis Raja Malar Chelladurai

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Our present investigation deals with the phytochemical screening, estimation of total flavonoids, terpenoids and tannin contents to evaluate the anti-diabetic activities of Salacia oblonga stem followed by GC-MS analysis. It explores the natural compounds and the potential α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory actions of stem extracts. The aqueous stem extract was selected from other extracts (ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether and chloroform for the in vitro study of anti-diabetic activity by alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibitory assays. The stem extract was also analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to identify the natural chemical components. Phytochemical analysis of aqueous stem extract showed major classes of secondary metabolites such as phenols, flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, tannins, saponins. The total flavonoid, terpenoid, and tannin contents were quantified as 19.82±0.06 mg QE/g, 96.2±0.20 mg/g and 11.25±0.03 mg TAE/g respectively. The percentage inhibition of assays showed maximum inhibitory effects (59.46±0.04% and 68.51±0.01% at a concentration of 100 mg/mL. The IC50 values of stem extract was found to be 73.56 mg/mL and 80.90 mg/mL for alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibition. Fifteen chemical constituents were found by GC-MS analysis. This study suggest the aqueous stem extract of Salacia oblonga might be considered as potential source of bio active constituents with excellent antidiabetic activity.

  7. Divergent clinical outcomes of alpha-glucosidase enzyme replacement therapy in two siblings with infantile-onset Pompe disease treated in the symptomatic or pre-symptomatic state

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Takashi; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Tajika, Makiko; Sawada, Madoka; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Soga, Takashi; Tomita, Hideshi; Uemura, Shigeru; Nishino, Ichizo; Fukuda, Tokiko; Sugie, Hideo; Kosuga, Motomichi; Okuyama, Torayuki; Umeda, Yoh

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal glycogen storage disease caused by acid ?-glucosidase deficiency. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD) is the most severe form and is characterized by cardiomyopathy, respiratory distress, hepatomegaly, and skeletal muscle weakness. Untreated, IOPD generally results in death within the first year of life. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha glucosidase (rhGAA) has been shown to markedly improve the life expectan...

  8. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A; Byrne, Barry J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Study of the role of epididymal alpha-glucosidase in the fertility of male rats by the administration of the enzyme inhibitor castanospermine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C H; Cooper, T G

    1994-11-01

    The activity of epididymal alpha-glucosidase in adult rats was rapidly suppressed to histochemically undetectable levels within 2 days by the continuous release of the enzyme inhibitor castanospermine via a peritoneal osmotic pump at a rate of 100-200 nmol h-1. It was established that mating activities overnight depleted 72% of the spermatozoa in the distal cauda, which was replenished in 2 days, and that fertility began to decline 3 weeks after efferent duct ligation. Male rats of proven mating proficiency and fertility were treated with castanospermine, or buffered saline as control, for up to 30 days and enzyme inhibition was confirmed at the end of treatment by histochemistry. Fertility was normal at the first mating test on day 7, significantly decreased at the second mating on day 9, but recovered in a stepwise manner at subsequent matings on days 12 and 14. Delaying the third mating until day 25 did not sustain the transient subfertility. However, prolonging sperm storage in the distal cauda epididymides and preventing replenishment with freshly matured spermatozoa, by efferent duct ligation for 14 days performed on day 15 during castanospermine administration, caused a decrease in fertility and a change in the kinematics of epididymal spermatozoa of the castanospermine-treated group. In control rats, binding of epididymal spermatozoa to Vicia faba, a lectin specific for glucose and glucosamine, and mannose and mannosamine residues, decreased from the proximal caput to the distal corpus coincident with the increase in alpha-glucosidase activity on the epithelial brush border. Lectin binding then increased in the cauda where enzyme activity was absent. However, castanospermine treatment did not significantly alter this binding profile. The findings suggest that epididymal alpha-glucosidase does not play a crucial role in the development of sperm fertilizing capacity, but may be involved in the preparation of spermatozoa for storage.

  10. Production of enzymatically active recombinant full-length barley high pI alpha-glucosidase of glycoside family 31 by high cell-density fermentation of Pichia pastoris and affinity purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Kramhøft, Birte; Lok, F.

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant barley high pI alpha-glucosidase was produced by high cell-density fermentation of Pichia pastoris expressing the cloned full-length gene. The gene was amplified from a genomic clone and exons (coding regions) were assembled by overlap PCR. The resulting cDNA was expressed under contr...... nM x s(-1), and 85 s(-1) using maltose as substrate. This work presents the first production of fully active recombinant alpha-glucosidase of glycoside hydrolase family 31 from higher plants. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  11. alpha-Glucosidase inhibition (acarbose) fails to enhance secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (7-36 amide) and to delay gastric emptying in Type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hücking, K; Kostic, Z; Pox, C

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Acarbose is able to enhance GLP-1 release and delay gastric emptying in normal subjects. The effect of alpha-glucosidase inhibition on GLP-1 has been less evident in Type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of acarbose on GLP-1 release and gas...

  12. KAPASITAS ANTIOKSIDAN DAN INHIBITOR ALFA GLUKOSIDASE EKSTRAK UMBI BAWANG DAYAK [Antioxidant and Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitory Properties of Bawang Dayak Bulb Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Early Febrinda*

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bawang dayak (Eleutherine palmifolia is an indigenous plant in Borneo traditionally used by Dayak tribes to treat any kind of degenerative deseases including diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this research was to measure antioxidant and antidiabetic capacities of water and ethanolic extracts of bawang dayak bulb. Parameters evaluated in this research were phytochemical screening, total phenolics, flavonoid content, DPPH free-radical scavenging activity, and alpha glucosidase inhibiting (AGI activity. The result showed that the total phenolics and flavonoid content in bawang dayak ethanolic extract (217.71 mg GAE/g and 65.35 mg QE/g were higher than that of the water extract (139.93 mg GAE/g and 16.95 mg QE/g. The ethanolic extract also had higher antioxidant and AGI activities (IC50 112 and 241 ppm than that of the water extract (IC50 526 and 505 ppm. In addition, the IC50 values for AGI in bawang dayak ethanolic extract was lower than acarbose which is known as a commercial antidiabetic agent.

  13. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose, improves glycamic control and reduces body weight in type 2 diabetes: Findings on indian patients from the pooled data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are widely used especially in Asian countries as a treatment option for type 2 diabetes patients with high postprandial glycemia (PPG. The higher carbohydrate in the Indian diets lead to greater prandial glycemic excursion, increased glucosidase, and incretin activity in the gut and may need special therapeutic strategies to tackle these glucose peaks. This is the subgroup analysis of Indian subjects who participated in the GlucoVIP study that investigated the effectiveness and tolerability of acarbose as add-on or monotherapy in a range of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 1996 Indian patients were included in the effectiveness analysis. After 12.5 weeks (mean, the mean change in 2-hour PPG from baseline was −74.4 mg/dl, mean HbA1c decreased by -1.0%, and mean fasting blood glucose decreased by -37.9 mg/dl. The efficacy of acarbose was rated "very good" or "good" in 91.1% of patients, and tolerability as "very good" or "good" in 88.0% of patients. The results of this observational study suggest that acarbose was effective and well tolerated in the Indian patients with T2DM.

  14. Characteristics of alpha-glucosidase production from recombinant Aspergillus oryzae by membrane-surface liquid culture in comparison with various cultivation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masakazu; Shimamura, Hiroko; Ishida, Natsuko; Imamura, Koreyoshi; Sakiyama, Takaharu; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2004-01-01

    alpha-Glucosidase was produced using recombinant Aspergillus oryzae by membrane-surface liquid culture (MSLC), a method previously developed by the authors and the results compared with other methods, including shaking flask culture (SFC), agar-plate culture (APC), culture on urethane sponge supports (USC), and liquid surface culture (LSC) to determine possible reasons for the advantageous features of MSLC. When yeast extract was used as a nitrogen source, the amount of enzyme produced by MSLC was 5 or more times higher than those for SFC and LSC, but similar to that using APC. Enzyme production in USC was slightly lower than in MSLC and APC. Cell growth was similar irrespective of the cultivation method used. When NaNO3, a typical inorganic nitrogen source was used, enzyme production in all the cultures was lower than that using yeast extract. However, even using NaNO3, the amount of the enzyme produced by MSLC was 8 to 20 times higher than those by SFC, APC, USC, and LSC. Although cell growth using NaNO3 was similar to that for yeast extract in MSLC, it was markedly decreased in SFC, APC, and LSC. The reason for the difference in enzyme productivity for various cultivation methods using yeast extract and NaNO3 as a nitrogen source is discussed, on the basis of the experimental findings. The role of the oxygen transfer effect and gene expression levels in enzyme production were also examined.

  15. Divergent clinical outcomes of alpha-glucosidase enzyme replacement therapy in two siblings with infantile-onset Pompe disease treated in the symptomatic or pre-symptomatic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takashi; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Tajika, Makiko; Sawada, Madoka; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Soga, Takashi; Tomita, Hideshi; Uemura, Shigeru; Nishino, Ichizo; Fukuda, Tokiko; Sugie, Hideo; Kosuga, Motomichi; Okuyama, Torayuki; Umeda, Yoh

    2016-12-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal glycogen storage disease caused by acid α-glucosidase deficiency. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD) is the most severe form and is characterized by cardiomyopathy, respiratory distress, hepatomegaly, and skeletal muscle weakness. Untreated, IOPD generally results in death within the first year of life. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha glucosidase (rhGAA) has been shown to markedly improve the life expectancy of patients with IOPD. However, the efficacy of ERT in patients with IOPD is affected by the presence of symptoms and cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM) status. We have treated two siblings with IOPD with ERT at different ages: the first was symptomatic and the second was asymptomatic. The female proband (Patient 1) was diagnosed with IOPD and initiated ERT at 4 months of age. Her younger sister (Patient 2) was diagnosed with IOPD at 10 days of age and initiated ERT at Day 12. Patient 1, now 6 years old, is alive but bedridden, and requires 24-hour invasive ventilation due to gradually progressive muscle weakness. In Patient 2, typical symptoms of IOPD, including cardiac failure, respiratory distress, progressive muscle weakness, hepatomegaly and myopathic facial features were largely absent during the first 12 months of ERT. Her cardiac function and mobility were well-maintained for the first 3 years, and she had normal motor development. However, she developed progressive hearing impairment and muscle weakness after 3 years of ERT. Both siblings have had low anti-rhGAA immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers during ERT and have tolerated the treatment well. These results suggest that initiation of ERT during the pre-symptomatic period can prevent and/or attenuate the progression of IOPD, including cardiomyopathy, respiratory distress, and muscle weakness for first several years of ERT. However, to improve the long-term efficacy of ERT for IOPD, new strategies

  16. Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitory and Antioxidant Activity of Solvent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    regression analysis. Phytochemical contents and correlation with bioactivities. Total phenolic (TP), total proanthocyanidin. (TPro), and total hydroxycinnamic acid ..... An advantage of competitive inhibitors is that their inhibitory action is reversible, thus allowing undesirable effects to be readily mitigated by decreasing the ...

  17. Role of alpha-glucosidase in the fermentable sugar composition of sorghum malt mashes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taylor, JRN

    1994-11-01

    Full Text Available The cause of the high glucose to maltose ratio in sorghum malt worts was studied. Mashing temperature and pH strongly affected both the amount of glucose and the proportion of glucose relative to total fermentable sugars. The relative proportion...

  18. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, J.M. van den; Kamphoven, J.H.; Winkel, L.P.; Arts, W.F.M.; Klerk, J.B.C. de; Loonen, M.C.B.; Vulto, A.G.; Cromme-Dijkhuis, A.H.; Weisglas-Kuperus, N.; Hop, W.C.J.; Hirtum, H. van; Diggelen, O.P. van; Boer, M. de; Kroos, M.A.; Doorn, P.A. van; Voort, E.I. van der; Sibbles, B.; Corven, E.J. van; Brakenhoff, J.P.; Hove, J.L. van; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Jong, G. de; Reuser, A.J.J.; Ploeg, A.T. van der

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be obtained at relatively low costs,

  19. Phytochemical Screening, Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibition, Antibacterial and Antioxidant Potential of Ajuga bracteosa Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Kokab; Andleeb, Saiqa; Ghousa, Tahseen; Mustafa, Rozina G; Naseer, Anum; Shafique, Irsa; Akhter, Kalsoom

    2017-01-01

    Ajuga bracteosa, a medicinal herb, is used by local community to cure a number of diseases such as inflammation, jaundice bronchial asthma, cancer and diabetes. The aim of present work was to evaluate the antioxidant potential, in vitro antidiabetic and antimicrobial effects of A. bracteosa. n-hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, methanol and aqueous extracts of Ajuga bracteosa roots, were prepared via maceration. Antibacterial activity was carried out by agar well diffusion method. Quantitative and qualitative phytochemical screening was done. The antioxidant activity was determined by iron (II) chelating activity, iron reducing power, DPPH, and ABTS free radical scavenging methods, Antidiabetic activity was evaluated through inhibition of α-glucosidase assay. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of phenols, flavonoids, tannins, saponins, quinines, terpenoids, xanthoproteins, glycosides, carbohydrates, steroids, phytosterols and amino acids. DPPH and ABTS potential values were recorded as 61.92% to 88.84% and 0.11% to 38.82%, respectively. Total phenolic and total flavonoid contents were expressed as gallic acid and rutin equivalents. Total iron content was expressed as FeSO4 equivalents. Chloroform and n-hexane extracts showed significant enzyme inhibition potential with IC50 values of 29.92 μg/ml and 131.7 μg/ml respectively. Aqueous extract showed maximum inhibition of E. coli, S. typhimurium, E. amnigenus, S. pyogenes, and S. aureus, (18.0±1.0 mm, 12.5±0.7 mm, 17.0±0.0 mm, 11.0±0.0 mm and 15.3±2.0 mm mm), respectively. Similarly, n-hexane extract showed maximum inhibition of E. coli, E. amnigenus, S. aureus (11.6±1.5 mm; 11.3±1.5 mm; 13.3±0.5 mm). This study also shows that n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous extracts of A. bracteosa root possess α-glucosidase inhibitory activities and therefore it may be used as hypoglycemic agents in the management of postprandial hyperglycemia. Ajuga bracteosa root extracts may provide a basis for development of antioxidant, antimicrobial and antidiabetic drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.P. van den Hout (Johanna); B. Sibbles (Barbara); J.P. Brakenhoff (Just); A.H. Cromme-Dijkhuis (Adri); N. Weisglas-Kuperus (Nynke); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); M.A. Boer (Marijke); J.A.M. Smeitink (Jan); O.P. van Diggelen (Otto); E. van der Voort (Edwin); E.J.J.M. van Corven (Emiel); H. van Hirtum (Hans); J.H.J. Kamphoven (Joep); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); J. van Hove (Johan); W.F.M. Arts (Willem Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); J.B.C. de Klerk (Johannes); M.C.B. Loonen (Christa); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); M.A. Kroos (Marian); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); L.P.F. Winkel (Léon); G. de Jong (Gerard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be

  1. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitory effect and inorganic constituents of Phyllanthus amarus Schum. & Thonn. ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinee Wongnawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the -glucosidase inhibitory effect and determined the concentration of some inorganic constituents in P. amarus ash. Oral glucose and sucrose tolerance test were performed on normal mice. In vitro -glucosidase inhibitory activity was evaluated by using yeast a-glucosidase. The element concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectroscopy. Single oral administration of P. amarus ash did not show antihyperglycemic effect after glucose administration, but decreased blood glucose level after sucrose administration. The ash showed -glucosidase inhibitory activity in vitro with IC50 of 982 mg/mL. The concentrations of K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni and Co in P. amarus ash were 35049.80±340.64, 3337.24±52.10, 1368.52±13.29, 90.81±1.34, 87.68±1.15, 18.28±0.22, 4.69±0.07, 1.07±0.15, 0.29±0.03, 0.20±0.04 and 0.10±0.02 mg/g, respectively. These results indicate that the antihyperglycemic effect of P. amarus ash might be partly due to the -glucosidase inhibitory activity of the inorganic constituents.

  2. Competitive inhibitor of cellular alpha-glucosidases protects mice from lethal dengue virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jinhong; Schul, Wouter; Yip, Andy; Xu, Xiaodong; Guo, Ju-Tao; Block, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus infection causes diseases in people, ranging from the acute febrile illness Dengue fever, to life-threatening Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome. We previously reported that a host cellular α-glucosidases I and II inhibitor, imino sugar CM-10-18, potently inhibited dengue virus replication in cultured cells, and significantly reduced viremia in dengue virus infected AG129 mice. In this report we show that CM-10-18 also significantly protects mice from death and/or dis...

  3. Impaired performance of skeletal muscle in alpha-glucosidase knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, R.P; Gorselink, M.; Schaart, G.; Wagenmakers, A.J.M.; Kamphoven, G.; Reuser, A.J.J.; Vusse, van der G.J.; Drost, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD II) is an inherited progressive muscle disease in which lack of functional acid -glucosidase (AGLU) results in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen. We report on the impact of a null mutation of the acid -glucosidase gene (AGLU-/-) in mice on the force production

  4. Alpha-Glucosidase Enzyme Biosensor for the Electrochemical Measurement of Antidiabetic Potential of Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, M; Arbain, D; Islam, A K M Shafiqul; Ahmad, M S; Ahmad, M N

    2016-12-01

    A biosensor for measuring the antidiabetic potential of medicinal plants was developed by covalent immobilization of α-glucosidase (AG) enzyme onto amine-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-NH2). The immobilized enzyme was entrapped in freeze-thawed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) together with p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (PNPG) on the screen-printed carbon electrode at low pH to prevent the premature reaction between PNPG and AG enzyme. The enzymatic reaction within the biosensor is inhibited by bioactive compounds in the medicinal plant extracts. The capability of medicinal plants to inhibit the AG enzyme on the electrode correlates to the potential of the medicinal plants to inhibit the production of glucose from the carbohydrate in the human body. Thus, the inhibition indicates the antidiabetic potential of the medicinal plants. The performance of the biosensor was evaluated to measure the antidiabetic potential of three medicinal plants such as Tebengau (Ehretis laevis), Cemumar (Micromelum pubescens), and Kedondong (Spondias dulcis) and acarbose (commercial antidiabetic drug) via cyclic voltammetry, amperometry, and spectrophotometry. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) response for the inhibition of the AG enzyme activity by Tebengau plant extracts showed a linear relation in the range from 0.423-8.29 μA, and the inhibition detection limit was 0.253 μA. The biosensor exhibited good sensitivity (0.422 μA/mg Tebengau plant extracts) and rapid response (22 s). The biosensor retains approximately 82.16 % of its initial activity even after 30 days of storage at 4 °C.

  5. Antioxidant rich grape pomace extract suppresses postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic mice by specifically inhibiting alpha-glucosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogan Shelly

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postprandial hyperglycemia is an early defect of type 2 diabetes and one of primary anti-diabetic targets. Treatment of postprandial hyperglycemia can be achieved by inhibiting intestinal α-glucosidase, the key enzyme for oligosaccharide digestion and further glucose absorption. Grape pomace is winemaking byproduct rich in bioactive food compounds such as phenolic antioxidants. This study evaluated the anti-diabetic potential of two specific grape pomace extracts by determining their antioxidant and anti-postprandial hyperglycemic activities in vitro and in vivo. Methods The extracts of red wine grape pomace (Cabernet Franc and white wine grape pomace (Chardonnay were prepared in 80% ethanol. An extract of red apple pomace was included as a comparison. The radical scavenging activities and phenolic profiles of the pomace extracts were determined through the measurement of oxygen radical absorbance capacity, DPPH radical scavenging activity, total phenolic content and flavonoids. The inhibitory effects of the pomace extracts on yeast and rat intestinal α-glucosidases were determined. Male 6-week old C57BLKS/6NCr mice were treated with streptozocin to induce diabetes. The diabetic mice were then treated with vehicle or the grape pomace extract to determine whether the oral intake of the extract can suppress postprandial hyperglycemia through the inhibition of intestinal α-glucosidases. Results The red grape pomace extract contained significantly higher amounts of flavonoids and phenolic compounds and exerted stronger oxygen radical absorbance capacity than the red apple pomace extract. Both the grape pomace extracts but not the apple pomace extract exerted significant inhibition on intestinal α-glucosidases and the inhibition appears to be specific. In the animal study, the oral intake of the grape pomace extract (400 mg/kg body weight significantly suppressed the postprandial hyperglycemia by 35% in streptozocin-induced diabetic mice following starch challenge. Conclusion This is the first report that the grape pomace extracts selectively and significantly inhibits intestinal α-glucosidase and suppresses postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. The antioxidant and anti-postprandial hyperglycemic activities demonstrated on the tested grape pomace extract therefore suggest a potential for utilizing grape pomace-derived bioactive compounds in management of diabetes.

  6. Antioxidant rich grape pomace extract suppresses postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic mice by specifically inhibiting alpha-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Shelly; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jianrong; Sun, Shi; Canning, Corene; Zhou, Kequan

    2010-08-27

    Postprandial hyperglycemia is an early defect of type 2 diabetes and one of primary anti-diabetic targets. Treatment of postprandial hyperglycemia can be achieved by inhibiting intestinal α-glucosidase, the key enzyme for oligosaccharide digestion and further glucose absorption. Grape pomace is winemaking byproduct rich in bioactive food compounds such as phenolic antioxidants. This study evaluated the anti-diabetic potential of two specific grape pomace extracts by determining their antioxidant and anti-postprandial hyperglycemic activities in vitro and in vivo. The extracts of red wine grape pomace (Cabernet Franc) and white wine grape pomace (Chardonnay) were prepared in 80% ethanol. An extract of red apple pomace was included as a comparison. The radical scavenging activities and phenolic profiles of the pomace extracts were determined through the measurement of oxygen radical absorbance capacity, DPPH radical scavenging activity, total phenolic content and flavonoids. The inhibitory effects of the pomace extracts on yeast and rat intestinal α-glucosidases were determined. Male 6-week old C57BLKS/6NCr mice were treated with streptozocin to induce diabetes. The diabetic mice were then treated with vehicle or the grape pomace extract to determine whether the oral intake of the extract can suppress postprandial hyperglycemia through the inhibition of intestinal α-glucosidases. The red grape pomace extract contained significantly higher amounts of flavonoids and phenolic compounds and exerted stronger oxygen radical absorbance capacity than the red apple pomace extract. Both the grape pomace extracts but not the apple pomace extract exerted significant inhibition on intestinal α-glucosidases and the inhibition appears to be specific. In the animal study, the oral intake of the grape pomace extract (400 mg/kg body weight) significantly suppressed the postprandial hyperglycemia by 35% in streptozocin-induced diabetic mice following starch challenge. This is the first report that the grape pomace extracts selectively and significantly inhibits intestinal α-glucosidase and suppresses postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. The antioxidant and anti-postprandial hyperglycemic activities demonstrated on the tested grape pomace extract therefore suggest a potential for utilizing grape pomace-derived bioactive compounds in management of diabetes.

  7. Lactic Acid Bacteria Producing Inhibitor of Alpha Glucosidase Isolated from Ganyong (Canna Edulis) and Kimpul (Xanthosoma sagittifolium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhayati, Rifa; Miftakhussolikhah; Frediansyah, Andri; Lailatul Rachmah, Desy

    2017-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a disease that caused by the failure of insulin secretion by the beta cells of the pancreas and insulin resistance in peripheral levels. One therapy for diabetics is by inhibiting the activity of α-glucosidase. Lactic acid bacteria have the ability to inhibit of α-glucosidase activity. The aims of this research was to isolation and screening of lactic acid bacteria from ganyong tuber (Canna Edulis) and kimpul tuber (Xanthosoma sagittifolium), which has the ability to inhibit the activity of α-glucosidase. Eightteen isolates were identified as lactic acid bacteria and all of them could inhibit the activity of α-glukosidase. The GN 8 isolate was perform the highest inhibition acivity.

  8. Combination of alpha-glucosidase inhibitor and ribavirin for the treatment of Dengue virus infection in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinhong; Schul, Wouter; Butters, Terry D.; Yip, Andy; Liu, Boping; Goh, Anne; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Alonzi, Dominic; Reinkensmeier, Gabriele; Pan, Xiaoben; Qu, Xiaowang; Weidner, Jessica M.; Wang, Lijuan; Yu, Wenquan; Borune, Nigel; Kinch, Mark A.; Rayahin, Jamie E.; Moriarty, Robert; Xu, Xiaodong; Shi, Pei-Yong; Guo, Ju-Tao; Block, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular α-glucosidases I and II are enzymes that sequentially trim the three terminal glucoses in the N-linked oligosaccharides of viral envelope glycoproteins. This process is essential for the proper folding of viral glycoproteins and subsequent assembly of many enveloped viruses, including dengue virus (DENV). Imino sugars are substrate mimics of α-glucosidases I and II. In this report, we show that two oxygenated alkyl imino sugar derivatives, CM-9-78 and CM-10-18, are potent inhibitors of both α-glucosidases I and II in vitro and in treated animals, and efficiently inhibit DENV infection of cultured human cells. Pharmacokinetic studies reveal that both compounds are well tolerated at doses up to 100mg/kg in rats and have favorable pharmacokinetic properties and bioavailability in mice. Moreover, we showed that oral administration of either CM-9-78 or CM-10-18 reduces the peak viremia of DENV in mice. Interestingly, while treatment of DENV infected mice with ribavirin alone did not reduce the viremia, combination therapy of ribavirin with sub-effective dose of CM-10-18 demonstrated a significantly enhanced antiviral activity, as indicated by a profound reduction of the viremia. Our findings thus suggest that combination therapy of two broad-spectrum antiviral agents may provide a practically useful approach for the treatment of DENV infection. PMID:21073903

  9. Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitory and Antioxidant Potential of Antidiabetic Herb Alternanthera sessilis: Comparative Analyses of Leaf and Callus Solvent Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tsun-Thai; Khoo, Chee-Siong; Tee, Chong-Siang; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Alternanthera sessilis is a medicinal herb which is consumed as vegetable and used as traditional remedies of various ailments in Asia and Africa. This study aimed to investigate the antiglucosidase and antioxidant activity of solvent fractions of A. sessilis leaf and callus. Leaf and callus methanol extracts were fractionated to produce hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol, and water fractions. Antiglucosidase and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activities as well as total phenolic (TP), total flavonoid (TF), and total coumarin (TC) contents were evaluated. Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis was performed on leaf and callus fractions with the strongest antiglucosidase activity. Leaf ethyl acetate fraction (LEF) had the strongest antiglucosidase (EC 50 0.55 mg/mL) and radical scavenging (EC 50 10.81 μg/mL) activity among leaf fractions. Callus ethyl acetate fraction (CEF) and chloroform fraction had the highest antiglucosidase (EC 50 0.25 mg/mL) and radical scavenging (EC 50 34.12 μg/mL) activity, respectively, among callus fractions. LEF and CEF were identified as noncompetitive and competitive α-glucosidase inhibitors, respectively. LEF and CEF had greater antiglucosidase activity than acarbose. Leaf fractions had higher phytochemical contents than callus fractions. LEF had the highest TP, TF, and TC contents. Antiglucosidase and antioxidant activities of leaf fractions correlated with phytochemical contents. LEF had potent antiglucosidase activity and concurrent antioxidant activity. CEF had the highest antiglucosidase activity among all fractions. Callus culture is a promising tool for enhancing production of potent α-glucosidase inhibitors. Leaf ethyl acetate fraction (LEF) had the strongest antiglucosidase (EC 50 0.55 mg/mL) and radical scavenging (EC 50 10.81 μg/mL) activity among leaf fractionsCallus ethyl acetate fraction (CEF) and chloroform fraction had the highest antiglucosidase (EC 50 0.25 mg/mL) and radical scavenging (EC 50 34.12 μg/mL) activity, respectively, among callus fractionsLEF and CEF were identified as noncompetitive and competitive á-glucosidase inhibitors, respectivelyAntiglucosidase and antioxidant activities of leaf fractions correlated with phytochemical contents. Abbreviations used: LHF: Leaf hexane fraction, LCF: Leaf chloroform fraction, LEF: Leaf ethyl acetate fraction, LBF: Leaf butanol fraction, LWF: Leaf water fraction, CHF: Callus hexane fraction, CCF: Callus chloroform fraction, CEF: Callus ethyl acetate fraction, CBF: Callus butanol fraction, CWF: Callus water fraction, TP: Total phenolic, TF: Total flavonoid, TC: Total coumarin.

  10. Structure of the Sulfolobus solfataricus alpha-glucosidase: Implications for domain conservation and substrate recognition in GH31

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila; Willemoes, M.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of a-glucosidase MalA from Sulfolobus solfataricus has been determined at 2.5 Å resolution. It provides a structural model for enzymes representing the major specificity in glycoside hydrolase family 31 (GH31), including a-glucosidases from higher organisms, involved...

  11. Cuparane sesquiterpenes from Laurencia natalensis Kylin as inhibitors of alpha-glucosidase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV and xanthine oxidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rengasamy, K.R.R.; Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Kulkarni, M. G.; Stirk, W. A.; Van Staden, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, Jul (2017), s. 178-183 ISSN 2211-9264 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 1-deoxyalgoane * dipeptidyl peptidase IV * diabetes * gout * Laurencia natalensis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 3.994, year: 2016

  12. Increased glucose metabolism and alpha-glucosidase inhibition in Cordyceps militaris water extract-treated HepG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Jung; Kang, Yun Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Kon; Kim, Tae Woo; Park, Jae Bong

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Recent living condition improvements, changes in dietary habits, and reductions in physical activity are contributing to an increase in metabolic syndrome symptoms including diabetes and obesity. Through such societal developments, humankind is continuously exposed to metabolic diseases such as diabetes, and the number of the victims is increasing. This study investigated Cordyceps militaris water extract (CMW)-induced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells and the effect of CMW treatment on glucose metabolism. MATERIALS/METHODS Colorimetric assay kits were used to determine the glucokinase (GK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities, glucose uptake, and glycogen content. Either RT-PCR or western blot analysis was performed for quantitation of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF-1α), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k), protein kinase B (Akt), phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, GK, PDH, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) expression levels. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of acarbose and CMW were evaluated by absorbance measurement. RESULTS CMW induced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells by increasing GLUT2 through HNF-1α expression stimulation. Glucose in the cells increased the CMW-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. In turn, glycolysis was stimulated, and glyconeogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, by studying the mechanism of action of PI3k, Akt, and GSK-3β, and measuring glycogen content, the study confirmed that the glucose was stored in the liver as glycogen. Finally, CMW resulted in a higher level of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity than that from acarbose. CONCLUSION CMW induced the uptake of glucose into HepG2 cells, as well, it induced metabolism of the absorbed glucose. It is concluded that CMW is a candidate or potential use in diabetes prevention and treatment. PMID:28584574

  13. In vitro anti-diabetic activity of flavonoids and pheophytins from Allophylus cominia Sw . on PTP1B, DPPIV, alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, D G; Igoli, J O; Young, L; Marrero, E; Gray, A I; Rowan, E G

    2017-05-05

    Ethno-botanical information from diabetic patients in Cuba led to the identification of Allophylus cominia as a possible source of new drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2-DM). Chemical characterization of the extracts from A. cominia was carried out using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The extracts were tested for their activity on PTP1B, DPPIV, α-glucosidase enzymes and α-amylase. The flavonoid rich fractions from A. cominia inhibited DPPIV enzyme (75.3±2.33%) at 30µg/ml and produced a concentration-dependent inhibition against DPPIV with a Ki value of 2.6µg/ml. At 30µg/ml, flavonoids and pheophytins extracts significantly inhibited PTP1B enzyme (100±2.6% and 68±1% respectively). The flavonoids, pheophytin A and pheophytin B fractions showed significant concentration-dependent inhibition against PTP1B with Ki values of 3µg/ml, 0.64µg/ml and 0.88µg/ml respectively. At 30µg/ml, the flavonoid fraction significantly inhibited α-glucosidase enzyme (86±0.3%) in a concentration-dependent pattern with a Ki value of 2µg/ml. None of the fractions showed significant effects on α-amylase. Fatty acids, tannins, pheophytins A and B, and a mixture of flavonoids were detected in the methanolic extract from A. cominia. The identified flavonoids were mearnsitrin, quercitrin, quercetin-3-alloside, and naringenin-7-glucoside. The pharmacological effects of the extracts from A. cominia earlier observed in experimental diabetic models was confirmed in this study. Thus a new drug or formulation for the treatment of T2-DM could be developed from A. cominia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis of (E)-N'-[1-(2,4-Dihydroxyphenyl)ethylidene]substituted hydrazides as possible alpha-glucosidase and butyrylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, M.A.; Shah, S.A.H.; Siddiqui, S.Z.; Khan, K.M.

    2017-01-01

    In the current research work, (E)-N'-[1-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethylidene]substituted hydrazides were synthesized in a couple of steps and their enzyme inhibition potential was analyzed. Firstly 2,4-hydroxyacetophenone (1) was reacted with hydrated hydrazine (2) under stirring to yield (E)-4-(1-hydrazonoethyl)benzene-1,3-diol (3) which was further reacted with different acid halides, (4a-i) to afford (E)-[1-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethylidene]substituted hydrazides (5a-i). These synthesized compounds were characterized by EI-MS, 1H-NMR spectral techniques and were also evaluated against a-glucosidase and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes. The synthesized compounds were found to be acceptable inhibitors of a-glucosidase and decent inhibition against butyrylcholinesterase. (author)

  15. Preliminary phytochemical screening and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of Philippine taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott var. PSB-VG #9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebosada, Richemae Grace R.; Librando, Ivy L.

    2017-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the anti-hyperglycemic property in terms of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the various parts (corm, leaf and petiole) of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott var. PSB-VG #9. Each of the plant parts were extracted with 95% ethanol and concentrated using a rotary evaporator at 40 °C. The crude extracts were screened for the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides and saponins using Thin Layer Chromatography. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the crude extracts (50 mg/L) were assayed spectrophotometrically using a microplate reader. The results of the phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, and saponins in the leaf part while flavonoids and saponins were detected in the petiole and only saponins were present in the corm. The assay showed that the percentage α-glucosidase inhibition of the 50 mg/L ethanolic crude extract of the corm, leaves and petiole of C. esculenta are 68.03, 71.64 and 71.39%, respectively. Statistical analysis shows significant differences in the α-glucosidase inhibition among the various plant parts. It can be concluded that the ethanolic crude extracts of the different parts of C. esculenta (L.) Schott var. PSB-VG #9 exhibited inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase and the presence of phytochemicals like alkaloids, flavonoids and saponins may have contributed greatly to the inhibitory activity of the plant extract and can be further subjected for isolation of the therapeutically active compounds with antidiabetes potency.

  16. Differential effects of sugars and the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose (Bay g 5421) on satiety in the Zucker obese rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, C A; Decarr, L B; Vasselli, J R

    1987-01-01

    To examine the satiety responses of Zucker obese and lean rats to simple sugars, adult male rats were given equicaloric intragastric infusions of fructose, glucose, and sucrose. All three sugars reduced the short-term intakes of both genotypes, although no reliable between-genotype differences in the satiety effects of the sugars were observed. Within each genotype, fructose had a larger satiety effect than sucrose. To examine a potential basis for the observed effects, rats were given sucrose infusions containing the intestinal glucosidase inhibitor acarbose (Bay g 5421). In obese rats, addition of a low dose of acarbose increased the satiety effect of sucrose infusion. Delaying carbohydrate absorption via acarbose administration may alter gastrointestinal and/or postabsorptive satiety processes, and may prove useful as a probe for investigating the nature of satiety signals.

  17. Synthèses enzymatiques de néoglucoconjugués catalysées par l'alpha-glucosidase purifiée de la blatte Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamenan A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic synthesis of neoglucoconjugates by purified α-glucosidase from cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus. Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus contains in his digestive tract an acid (pH 5,0 and mesophile (50°C α-glucosidase. This enzyme, purified to homogeneity, hydrolyses highly maltose, sucrose and p-nitrophenyl-α-Dglucopyranoside. The ability of α-glucosidase from cockroach purified to homogeneity to catalyse transglucosylation reactions was tested using maltose and saccharose as glucosyl donors and 2-phenylethanol and phenol as acceptors. The experimental conditions were optimized in relation to the time course of the reaction, pH and concentrations of glucosyl donors and acceptors. The yields in transglucosylation reactions at 37 °C were very high and could attain 67% and 48% with 2-phenylethanol and phenol respectively as glucosyl acceptors. This α-glucosidase hydrolyzed the products formed. It seems that the products formed were the phenylethyl-α-D-glucoside and phenyl-α-D-glucoside. These results suggest that α- glucosidase from cockroach is an exoglucosidase which catalyse the splitting of the α-glucosyl residue from the non reducing terminal of the substrate to liberate α-glucose. This comportment indicates that this enzyme operated by a mechanism involving the retention of the anomeric configuration. On the basis of this work, α-glucosidase from P. americana appears to be a valuable tool for the preparation of α-neoglucoconjugates.

  18. Serviceberry [Amerlanchier alnifolia (Nutt.) Nutt. ex. M. Roem(Rosaceae)] leaf exhibits mammalian alpha glucosidase activity and suppresses postprandial glycemic response in a mouse model of diet induced obesity/hyperglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several plant-based remedies offer cost-effective management of diabetes, but few plant species adapted to North America have been validated for their antidiabetic properties. One such species is serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia), found in Browning, MT, which has been traditionally used by the Am...

  19. Drug: D00625 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00625 Drug Miglitol (JP17/USAN/INN); Glyset (TN) ... C8H17NO5 D00625.gif ... Antidiabetic... agent ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Unclas...sified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Same as: C07708 Therapeu

  20. Drug: D01665 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01665 Drug Voglibose (JP17/USAN/INN); Basen (TN) ... C10H21NO7 D01665.gif ... Antidiabetic... agent ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Uncla...ssified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Therapeutic category: 3

  1. SwissProt search result: AK066051 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066051 J013051B02 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (A...cid maltase) (Aglucosidase alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 1e-89 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK243062 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243062 J100014O03 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (A...cid maltase) (Aglucosidase alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 3e-72 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK121014 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121014 J023048A03 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (A...cid maltase) (Aglucosidase alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 6e-81 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK121588 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121588 J033037N10 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (A...cid maltase) (Aglucosidase alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 1e-126 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK063966 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063966 001-124-A04 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (...Acid maltase) (Aglucosidase alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 1e-145 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK105449 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105449 001-125-B12 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (...Acid maltase) (Aglucosidase alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 1e-142 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK102309 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102309 J033090B18 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (A...cid maltase) (Aglucosidase alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 1e-145 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK110088 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110088 002-160-G07 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (...Acid maltase) (Aglucosidase alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 1e-62 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK121428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121428 J023136H14 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (A...cid maltase) (Aglucosidase alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 6e-54 ...

  10. Drug: D03342 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03342 Drug Camiglibose (USAN) ... (C13H25NO9)2. 3H2O D03342.gif ... Antidiabetic agen...t ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Unclassified ... D...G02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor ... CAS: 132438-21-2 PubChem: 17397492 LigandBox: D03342 ...

  11. Dgroup: DG01803 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DG01803 DGroup Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor -bose ... D00216 ... Acarbose (...e (USAN) D09779 ... Emiglitate (JAN/INN) Antidiabetic agent ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ATC code: A10BF Antidiabetics GAA [HSA:2548] [KO:K12316] GANC [HSA:2595] [KO:K12317] MGAM [HSA:8972] [KO:K12047] ...

  12. Dgroup: DG01663 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DG01663 DGroup alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor -bose, -glustat ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic,...at ... D09605 ... Duvoglustat (USAN/INN) ... D09606 ... Duvoglustat hydrochloride (USAN) Antidiabetic agent ... alpha-glucosidase [KO:K12316 K12317 K12047] ...

  13. Drug: D00216 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available etic agent ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glu...cosidase inhibitor Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor... D00216 Drug Acarbose (JAN/USAN/INN); Precose (TN) ... C25H43NO18 D00216.gif ... Actinoplanes [TAX:1865] Antidiab

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1573 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1573 ref|ZP_01446186.1| probable alpha-glucosidase protein [Roseovariu...s sp. HTCC2601] gb|EAU43606.1| probable alpha-glucosidase protein [Roseovarius sp. HTCC2601] ZP_01446186.1 0.59 38% ...

  15. In vitro inhibition activity of polyphenol-rich extracts from Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & Perry (Clove) buds against carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes and Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen Adeniyi; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2012-10-01

    To investigate and compare the inhibitory properties of free and bound phenolic extracts of clove bud against carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes (alpha-amylase & alpha-glucosidase) and Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas in vitro. The free phenolics were extracted with 80% (v/v) acetone, while bound phenolics were extracted from the alkaline and acid hydrolyzed residue with ethyl acetate. Then, the interaction of the extracts with alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase was subsequently assessed. Thereafter, the total phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of the extracts were determined. The result revealed that both extracts inhibited alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase in a dose-dependent manner. However, the alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the extracts were significantly (Ppancreas in vitro. This study provides a biochemical rationale by which clove elicits therapeutic effect on type 2 diabetes.

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004307 gi|23465117 >1g5aA 80 628 2 589 5e-59 ... gb|AAL05573.1| alpha-glucosidase [Bifidobacterium adolesce...ntis] ... Length = 588 ... Query: 1 ... MTANNLNDDWWKQAVVYQIYPRSFKDVNGDGLGDIAGVTEK

  17. Drug treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients for whom metformin is contraindicated [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irons BK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Irons BK, Minze MG. Drug treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients for whom metformin is contraindicated. Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes. 2014;7:15–24.There is an error in the text on page 19:“Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are infrequently used in the treatment of T2DM.3 These agents competitively inhibit the absorption of alpha-glucosidase along the brush border of the small intestine, which slows gut absorption of carbohydrates and ultimately reduces post-prandial blood glucose.34–36” should read as “Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are infrequently used in the treatment of T2DM.3 These agents competitively inhibit the degradation of complex carbohydrates along the brush border of the small intestine, which slows gut absorption of metabolized carbohydrates and ultimately reduces post-prandial blood glucose.34–36”Read the original article

  18. Antidiabetic potential of Conocarpus lancifolius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Saadullah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic activity of Conocarpus lancifolius extract was investigated in vitro, as alpha glucosidase inhibition and in vivo as alloxan induced diabetic rabbits with other biochemical parameters (LDL, HDL, SGPT, SGOT, cretinine, urea and triglyceride. Alpha-glucosidase inhibition activity was performed by using acorbose as standred. Methanolic extract show alpha-glucosidase inhibition activity. The dose of 200 mg/kg body weight significantly (p<0.05 decreases the blood glucose level, plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL in treated rabbits as compared to diabetic rabbits. This dose significantly increased the level of HDL in treated group. The activity of SGOT and SGPT also significantly (p<0.05 decreased in treated diabetic rabbits. Phytochemical studies show the presence of glycosides, tannins, saponins and terpenoids. The antidiabetic potential is may be due to its saponin contents.

  19. Effect of miglitol (BAY m-1099) on fasting blood glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sels, J P; Kingma, P J; Wolffenbuttel, B H; Menheere, P P; Branolte, J H; Nieuwenhuijzen Kruseman, A C

    BACKGROUND: In type 2 diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose values are increased due to increased glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. As miglitol (BAY m-1099), an absorbable alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, can inhibit glycogenolysis, we investigated whether 200 mg miglitol ingested at bedtime could

  20. Generalized glycogen storage and cardiomegaly in a knockout mouse model of Pompe disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.A. Bijvoet (Agnes); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); E.H. van de Kamp; M.A. Kroos (Marian); J.-H. Ding (Jia-Huan); B.Z. Yang (Bing); P. Visser (Pim); C.E. Bakker (Cathy); M.Ph. Verbeet (Martin); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractGlycogen storage disease type II (GSDII; Pompe disease), caused by inherited deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase, is a lysosomal disorder affecting heart and skeletal muscles. A mouse model of this disease was obtained by targeted disruption of the

  1. Lysosomal storage disease 2 - Pompe's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also

  2. Ionic liquids as cosolvents for glycosylation by sucrose phosphorylase: balancing acceptor solubility and enzyme stability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Winter, K.; Verlinden, K.; Křen, Vladimír; Weignerová, Lenka; Soetaert, W.; Desmet, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2013), s. 1949-1955 ISSN 1463-9262 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11011 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : DISACCHARIDE PHOSPHORYLASES * THERMAL-STABILITY * ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASE Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.852, year: 2013

  3. Screening for late-onset Pompe disease in western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Julie Schjødtz; Pedersen, E G; Gaist, D

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD) is a rare autosomal recessively inherited metabolic myopathy caused by reduced activity of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-glucosidase. In a previous screening study at two large neuromuscular university clinics in Denmark, three patients with LOPD were...

  4. Testudinibacter aquarius gen. nov., sp nov., a member of the family Pasteurellaceae isolated from the oral cavity of freshwater turtles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Johanne; Pennanen, Elin Anna Erica; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2016-01-01

    Pasteurellaceae. However, they could be separated from existing genera of the Pasteurellaceae by the following test results: indole, ornithine decarboxylase and Voges-Proskauer positive; and methyl red, urease and PNPG (alpha-glucosidase) negative. No X- or V-factor requirement was observed. A zone of beta...

  5. Recent advances in the Management of Diabetes Mellitus | Sanusi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Life style modi cation, oral hypoglycaemic agents, insulin therapy and islet cell transplantation are some of the approaches in the management of diabetes mellitus. Several classes of oral hypoglycemic agents like sulfonylureas, biguanides and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are available for the treatment of type II diabetes ...

  6. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of aqueous extract of Allium cepa (red onion) on ovalbumininduced allergic asthma in wistar rats. Abstract PDF · Vol 10, No 1 (2017) - Articles HPLC profile, in vitro alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Gymnema sylvestre ethyl acetate leaf extract. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2006-6996.

  7. GenBank blastx search result: AK107397 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK107397 002-127-D06 AB052295.1 Brevibacterium fuscum var. dextranlyticum genes for... ABC membrane transporter homologues, putative alpha-glucosidase, isomaltotrio-dextranase precursor, partial and complete cds.|BCT BCT 1e-122 +2 ...

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_004350 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004350 gi|24379337 >1g5aA 90 627 3 535 7e-83 ... gb|AAN58598.1| dextran glucosidas...e DexB [Streptococcus mutans UA159] ... ref|NP_721292.1| dextran glucosidase DexB [Streptococcus ... ... ... (Exo-1,6-alpha-glucosidase) (Glucodextranase) ... Length = 533 ... Que

  9. Phytochemical Screening, Polyphenolic Content and Alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    traditionally in the management of diabetes mellitus and in the treatment of wounds and stomach ache. In this study, phytochemical screening, total phenolic contents and alpha-glucosidase ... Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases (Di Matteo and Esposito, 2003) as well as inflammation and problems caused by cell and ...

  10. Comparison of semen parameters in samples collected by masturbation at a clinic and at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzanaty, Saad; Malm, Johan

    2008-06-01

    To investigate differences in semen quality between samples collected by masturbation at a clinic and at home. Cross-sectional study. Fertility center. Three hundred seventy-nine men assessed for infertility. None. Semen was analyzed according to World Health Organization guidelines. Seminal markers of epididymal (neutral alpha-glucosidase), prostatic (prostate-specific antigen and zinc), and seminal vesicle (fructose) function were measured. Two patient groups were defined according to sample collection location: at a clinic (n = 273) or at home (n = 106). Compared with clinic-collected semen, home-collected samples had statistically significantly higher values for sperm concentration, total sperm count, rapid progressive motility, and total count of progressive motility. Semen volume, proportion of normal sperm morphology, neutral alpha-glucosidase, prostate-specific antigen, zinc, and fructose did not differ significantly between groups. An abnormal sperm concentration (masturbation at home compared with at a clinic. This should be taken into consideration in infertility investigations.

  11. Polyhydroxylated alkaloids isolated from mulberry trees (Morusalba L.) and silkworms (Bombyx mori L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, N; Yamashita, T; Yasuda, K; Ikeda, K; Kizu, H; Kameda, Y; Kato, A; Nash, R J; Lee, H S; Ryu, K S

    2001-09-01

    New polyhydroxylated alkaloids, (2R,3R,4R)-2-hydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine-N-propionamide from the root bark of Morus alba L., and 4-O-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-calystegine B(2) and 3 beta,6 beta-dihydroxynortropane from the fruits, were isolated by column chromatography using a variety of ion-exchange resins. Fifteen other polyhydroxylated alkaloids were also isolated. 1-Deoxynojirimycin, a potent alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, was concentrated 2.7-fold by silkworms feeding on mulberry leaves. Some alkaloids contained in mulberry leaves were potent inhibitors of mammalian digestive glycosidases but not inhibitors of silkworm midgut glycosidases, suggesting that the silkworm has enzymes specially adapted to enable it to feed on mulberry leaves. The possibility of preventing the onset of diabetes and obesity using natural dietary supplements containing 1-deoxynojirimycin and other alpha-glucosidase inhibitors in high concentration is of great potential interest.

  12. Uji Penghambatan Aktivitas Alfa-glukosidase Ekstrak Dan Fraksi Daun Antidesma Montanum Blume

    OpenAIRE

    Nofiantini,; Elya, Berna; Azizahwati,

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor has known to be a therapeutic agent for diabetes mellitus (DM) treatment, especially type 2 DM. Based on previous studies. There are various plants that have the effect of inhibiting the activity of a-glucosidase, one of which is garu leaves (Antidesma montanum Blume). This research aimed to get the fraction which had the highest Il-glucosidase inhibiting activity from ethanol extract of garu leaves and identify the chemical compounds from the most active fraction....

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_001263 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001263 gi|15805432 >1bplA 2 169 309 525 3e-10 ... gb|AAF09983.1| alpha-dextran end...o-1,6-alpha-glucosidase [Deinococcus radiodurans] ... pir||D75524 alpha-dextran endo-1,6-alpha-glucos...idase - ... Deinococcus radiodurans (strain R1) ref|NP_294128.1| ... alpha-dextran endo-1,6-al

  14. Dataset on the kinetics of the inhibition of PTP1B by the flavonoids and pheophytin A from Allophylus cominia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, D G; Igoli, J O; Young, L; Marrero, E; Gray, A I; Rowan, E G

    2018-04-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article under the title "in vitro anti-diabetic activity of flavonoids and pheophytins from Allophylus cominia Sw. on PTP1B, DPPIV, alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase enzymes" (Semaan et al., 2017) [3]. This article defines the kinetics of inhibition of flavonoids and pheophytin A extracts from A. cominia which showed an inhibition of the PTP1B enzyme activity. The main reason to make these results public is to confirm that this study was followed up and no more experiments are needed, also to confirm that these compounds can be reported as PTP1B inhibitors.

  15. Adult onset glycogen storage disease type II (adult onset Pompe disease): report and magnetic resonance images of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Gaizo, Andrew; Banerjee, Sima; Terk, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII), also referred to as Pompe disease or acid maltase deficiency, is a rare inherited condition caused by a deficiency in acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme activity. The condition is often classified by age of presentation, with infantile and late onset variants (Laforet et al. J Neurology 55:1122-8, 2000). Late onset tends to present with progressive proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency (Winkel et al. J Neurology 252:875-84, 2005). We report two cases of biopsy confirmed adult onset GSDII, along with key Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. (orig.)

  16. Pompe disease: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Çim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, and is usually observed in the children of asymptomatic carriers. Pompe disease, known as Glycogen Storage Disorder type II, is caused by pathogenic mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA. There are three types of Pompe disease: classical infantile form, non-classical infantile form and late-onset Pompe disease. Age of onset and severity of the disease determine the type of Pompe disease. We aimed to identify a mutation in GAA gene in parents who were first cousins and their baby girl was passed away due to the Pompe disease. The baby girl had reduced acid alpha-glucosidase activity, but genetic analysis had not been performed. Mutation analysis of parents was performed using high-throughput DNA sequencing method. Heterozygous mutation of c.896 T>C in exon 5 was found in parents, and prenatal diagnosis was performed for their next pregnancy. In conclusion, c.896 T>C substitution in GAA gene may lead to the severe type of Pompe disease. Using a relatively fast and reliable molecular genetic analysis method to confirm the early diagnosis of the Pompe disease is important for the management of the disease.

  17. Quantitative iTRAQ secretome analysis of Aspergillus niger reveals novel hydrolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adav, Sunil S; Li, An A; Manavalan, Arulmani; Punt, Peter; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2010-08-06

    The natural lifestyle of Aspergillus niger made them more effective secretors of hydrolytic proteins and becomes critical when this species were exploited as hosts for the commercial secretion of heterologous proteins. The protein secretion profile of A. niger and its mutant at different pH was explored using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics approach coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This study characterized 102 highly confident unique proteins in the secretome with zero false discovery rate based on decoy strategy. The iTRAQ technique identified and relatively quantified many hydrolyzing enzymes such as cellulases, hemicellulases, glycoside hydrolases, proteases, peroxidases, and protein translocating transporter proteins during fermentation. The enzymes have potential application in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysis for biofuel production, for example, the cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes glucan 1,4-alpha-glucosidase, alpha-glucosidase C, endoglucanase, alpha l-arabinofuranosidase, beta-mannosidase, glycosyl hydrolase; proteases such as tripeptidyl-peptidase, aspergillopepsin, and other enzymes including cytochrome c oxidase, cytochrome c oxidase, glucose oxidase were highly expressed in A. niger and its mutant secretion. In addition, specific enzyme production can be stimulated by controlling pH of the culture medium. Our results showed comprehensive unique secretory protein profile of A. niger, its regulation at different pH, and the potential application of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics for the microbial secretome analysis.

  18. Cloning and characterization of a Candida albicans maltase gene involved in sucrose utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, A; Williamson, P R; Rex, J H; Sweeney, E C; Bennett, J E

    1992-01-01

    In order to isolate the structural gene involved in sucrose utilization, we screened a sucrose-induced Candida albicans cDNA library for clones expressing alpha-glucosidase activity. The C. albicans maltase structural gene (CAMAL2) was isolated. No other clones expressing alpha-glucosidase activity. were detected. A genomic CAMAL2 clone was obtained by screening a size-selected genomic library with the cDNA clone. DNA sequence analysis reveals that CAMAL2 encodes a 570-amino-acid protein which shares 50% identity with the maltase structural gene (MAL62) of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. The substrate specificity of the recombinant protein purified from Escherichia coli identifies the enzyme as a maltase. Northern (RNA) analysis reveals that transcription of CAMAL2 is induced by maltose and sucrose and repressed by glucose. These results suggest that assimilation of sucrose in C. albicans relies on an inducible maltase enzyme. The family of genes controlling sucrose utilization in C. albicans shares similarities with the MAL gene family of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and provides a model system for studying gene regulation in this pathogenic yeast. Images PMID:1400249

  19. A complex craniovertebral junction malformation in a patient with late onset glycogenosis 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariasofia Cotelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogenosis II (GSDII is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase and subsequent lysosomal accumulation of glycogen in skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles. The late-onset form is characterized by wide variability of the phenotypical spectrum. Clinical findings may include muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, vascular abnormalities, low bone mineral density and higher risk of developing osteoporosis. Craniovertebral junction (CVJ malformations have never been described so far. We here report on a GSDII 43-year-old woman who harbored the mutations IVS1-13T>G and c.2237G>A in the acid alpha-glucosidase gene. She recurrently suffered from headache, neck pain and dizziness. Brain MRI and CT scan showed the presence of a very rare complex CVJ malformation composed of basilar invagination, basiocciput hypoplasia, partial C1 assimilation, C1 posterior arch aplasia and C1 lateral mass hypoplasia and offset. Although we cannot rule out their coincidental occurrence, the rarity of multiple CVJ malformations in the general population as well as the well-known GSDII multisystem involvement should suggest to study the CVJ in the diagnostic process of GSDII patients in order to assess the CVJ malformation frequency in GSDII population and verify a possible relationship between these two conditions.

  20. Evaluation of antihyperglycemia and antihypertension potential of native Peruvian fruits using in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Marcia Da Silva; Ranilla, Lena Galvez; Apostolidis, Emmanouil; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Genovese, Maria Inés; Shetty, Kalidas

    2009-04-01

    Local food diversity and traditional crops are essential for cost-effective management of the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes and associated complications of hypertension. Water and 12% ethanol extracts of native Peruvian fruits such as Lucuma (Pouteria lucuma), Pacae (Inga feuille), Papayita arequipeña (Carica pubescens), Capuli (Prunus capuli), Aguaymanto (Physalis peruviana), and Algarrobo (Prosopis pallida) were evaluated for total phenolics, antioxidant activity based on 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay, and functionality such as in vitro inhibition of alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) relevant for potential management of hyperglycemia and hypertension linked to type 2 diabetes. The total phenolic content ranged from 3.2 (Aguaymanto) to 11.4 (Lucuma fruit) mg/g of sample dry weight. A significant positive correlation was found between total phenolic content and antioxidant activity for the ethanolic extracts. No phenolic compound was detected in Lucuma (fruit and powder) and Pacae. Aqueous extracts from Lucuma and Algarrobo had the highest alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Papayita arequipeña and Algarrobo had significant ACE inhibitory activities reflecting antihypertensive potential. These in vitro results point to the excellent potential of Peruvian fruits for food-based strategies for complementing effective antidiabetes and antihypertension solutions based on further animal and clinical studies.

  1. Skeletal muscle metabolism during prolonged exercise in Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pompe disease (glycogenosis type II) is caused by lysosomal alpha-glucosidase deficiency, which leads to a block in intra-lysosomal glycogen breakdown. In spite of enzyme replacement therapy, Pompe disease continues to be a progressive metabolic myopathy. Considering the health benefits...... of exercise, it is important in Pompe disease to acquire more information about muscle substrate use during exercise. METHODS: Seven adults with Pompe disease were matched to a healthy control group (1:1). We determined (1) peak oxidative capacity (VO2peak) and (2) carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism...... during submaximal exercise (33 W) for 1 h, using cycle-ergometer exercise, indirect calorimetry and stable isotopes. RESULTS: In the patients, VO2peak was less than half of average control values; mean difference -1659 mL/min (CI: -2450 to -867, P = 0.001). However, the respiratory exchange ratio...

  2. Differentiation of Staphylococcus aureus from freshly slaughtered poultry and strains 'endemic' to processing plants by biochemical and physiological tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, G C; Norris, A P; Bratchell, N

    1989-02-01

    A comparison was made of 27 'endemic' strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 35 strains from freshly slaughtered birds, isolated at five commercial slaughterhouses processing chickens or turkeys. Of 112 biochemical and physiological tests used, 74 gave results which differed among the strains. Cluster analysis revealed several distinct groupings which were influenced by strain type, processing plant and bird origin; these included a single group at the 72% level of similarity containing most of the 'endemic' strains. In comparison with strains from freshly slaughtered birds, a higher proportion of 'endemic' strains produced fibrinolysin, alpha-glucosidase and urease and were beta-haemolytic on sheep-blood agar. The 'endemic' type also showed a greater tendency to coagulate human but not bovine plasma, and to produce mucoid growth and clumping. The last two properties, relevant to colonization of processing equipment, were less evident in heart infusion broth than in richer media or process water collected during defeathering of the birds.

  3. An exopolysaccharide (EPS) from a Lactobacillus plantarum BR2 with potential benefits for making functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Keerthi; Kozhummal Vaikkath, Deepti; Devendra, Leena; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2017-10-01

    A high molecular weight EPS of glucomannan nature was recovered and purified to get an yield of 2.8±0.5g/L from Lb. plantarum BR2 and it displayed potent antioxidant activity with 29.8% radical scavenging activity and 19% total antioxidant capacity. At 100µg/ml concentration, it is capable of inhibiting the alpha amylase activity by 10% and at 300µg/ml, it drastically inhibited the alpha-glucosidase activity by 67% which indicates its antidiabetic potential. More interestingly, at a concentration level of 0.1%, it reduced the cholesterol level by a margin of 45% in an in vitro assay. The sample didn't reveal any cytotoxicity against H9C2 normal cells indicating its potential for safe use as a food additive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dataset on the kinetics of the inhibition of PTP1B by the flavonoids and pheophytin A from Allophylus cominia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.G. Semaan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article under the title “in vitro anti-diabetic activity of flavonoids and pheophytins from Allophylus cominia Sw. on PTP1B, DPPIV, alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase enzymes” (Semaan et al., 2017 [3]. This article defines the kinetics of inhibition of flavonoids and pheophytin A extracts from A. cominia which showed an inhibition of the PTP1B enzyme activity. The main reason to make these results public is to confirm that this study was followed up and no more experiments are needed, also to confirm that these compounds can be reported as PTP1B inhibitors. Keywords: Flavonoids, Pheophytin, Inhibition, Kinetics, PTP1B enzyme

  5. Improved health-relevant functionality in dark germinated Mucuna pruriens sprouts by elicitation with peptide and phytochemical elicitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhir, Reena; Kwon, Young-In; Shetty, Kalidas

    2009-10-01

    The health-relevant functionality of Mucuna pruriens was improved by priming the seeds with elicitors of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) such as fish protein hydrolysates (FPHs), lactoferrin (LF) and oregano extract (OE) followed by dark germination. FPH elicited the highest phenolic content of 19 mg/g FW on day 1, which was 38% higher than control sprouts. OE enhanced Parkinson's disease-relevant L-DOPA content by 33% on day 1 compared to control sprouts. Anti-diabetes-relevant alpha-amylase inhibition percent (AIP) and alpha-glucosidase inhibition percent (GIP) were high in the cotyledons and decreased following elicitation and sprouting. For potential anti-diabetic applications, low AIP and high GIP with moderate L-DOPA content on day 4 of dark germination could be optimal. Improved L-DOPA concentrations in a soluble phenolic and antioxidant-rich M. pruriens background on day 1 sprouts have potential for Parkinson's disease management.

  6. Balanced trafficking between the ER and the Golgi apparatus increases protein secretion in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Jichen; Huang, Mingtao; Petranovic, Dina

    2018-01-01

    of ADP-ribosylation factor GTP activating proteins, Gcs1p and Glo3p, which are involved in the process of COPI-coated vesicle formation. Engineering the retrograde trafficking increased the secretion of alpha-amylase but did not induce production of reactive oxygen species. An expanded ER membrane......The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used as a cell factory to produce recombinant proteins. However, S. cerevisiae naturally secretes only a few proteins, such as invertase and the mating alpha factor, and its secretory capacity is limited. It has been reported that engineering protein...... recombinant proteins, endoglucanase I from Trichoderma reesei and glucan-1,4-alpha-glucosidase from Rhizopus oryzae, indicating overexpression of GLO3 in a SEC16 moderate overexpression strain might be a general strategy for improving production of secreted proteins by yeast....

  7. Drug treatment in elderly diabetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, A O

    2007-12-01

    Diabetes causes greater decline in physical and functional status in elderly diabetic than in a younger one. Also the rise of MI, stroke and hypertension is also higher. In elderly diabetics management is always on challenging task due to atypical disease presentation, classical symptoms often absent, presence of other coexisting conditions delays the diagnosis, dietary advice not followed properly and due to non-compliance of drug therapy. The antidiabetic drugs which are often used are: sulfonylureas, metformin, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, insulin. Advantages and disadvantages of these drugs are discussed in a nutshell. Moreover control of hypertension, CAD risk reduction and practice pearls eg, lifestyle changes and goals setting for HbA(1c) are important.

  8. Identification of phenolic antioxidants and bioactives of pomegranate seeds following juice extraction using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MSn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambigaipalan, Priyatharini; de Camargo, Adriano Costa; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2017-04-15

    Phenolics from free and hydrolyzed fractions of pomegranate juice (PJ) and seeds (PS) were evaluated. In general, total phenolic contents and scavenging of ABTS + , DPPH and hydroxyl radicals, as well as metal chelation of the soluble fraction from PS, were higher than those for PJ. Insoluble-bound phenolics from PS accounted for up to 27% of total scavenging capacity (free+esterified+insoluble-bound). Phenolic acids (13), monomeric flavonoids (8), hydrolysable tannins (12), proanthocyanidin (1) and anthocyanins (12) were tentatively characterized using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS n . Several compounds were identified for the first time in PJ or PS. The inhibition of DNA damage (induced by hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals), copper-induced LDL-cholesterol peroxidation, as well as alpha-glucosidase and lipase activities were demonstrated, therefore supporting the potential exploitation of PJ and PS as sources of bioactive compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Change of Oral to Topical Corticosteroid Therapy Exacerbated Glucose Tolerance in a Patient with Plaque Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yui; Ashida, Kenji; Ohe, Kenji; Enjoji, Munechika; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Kurata, Tsuyoshi; Emoto, Akiko; Yamanouchi, Hiroko; Takagi, Satoko; Mori, Hitoe; Kawata, Nozomi; Hisata, Yoshio; Sakanishi, Yuta; Izumi, Kenichi; Sugioka, Takashi; Anzai, Keizo

    2017-11-13

    BACKGROUND Psoriasis is known as the most frequent disease treated by long-term topical steroids. It is also known that patients with thick, chronic plaques require the highest potency topical steroids. However, the treatment is limited to up to four weeks due to risk of systemic absorption. CASE REPORT An 80-year-old man was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 16 years before, and was being administered insulin combined with alpha glucosidase inhibitor. He was diagnosed with plaque psoriasis and his oral steroid treatment was switched to topical steroid treatment due to lack of improvement and poorly controlled blood glucose level. The hypoglycemic events improved after the psoriatic lesions improved. CONCLUSIONS Control of blood glucose level is difficult at the very beginning of topical steroid treatment for psoriasis especially if a patient is receiving insulin treatment. Intense monitoring of blood glucose level during initiation of topical steroid treatment is necessary to prevent unfavorable complications.

  10. Diet and the Role of Altered Carbohydrate Absorption in the Treatment of Noninsulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas MS Wolever

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract has no clear role in the pathophysiology of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM, but it may be an appropriate site for therapeutic intervention, specifically changes in diet, meal frequency and medications. Studies suggest that for patients with NIDDM, a calorie-restricted, high carbohydrate diet low in fat and rich in fibre may improve glycemic control, mitigate the risk of atherosclerosis and retard such diabetic complications as nephropathy and retinopathy. Increased meal frequency slows the rate of carbohydrate absorption, flattens blood insulin responses and reduces serum cholesterol. New therapeutic interventions, such as soluble fibre, low glycemic index foods or alpha glucosidase inhibitors, can further slow carbohydrate absorption and thus reduce secondary risks from hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia.

  11. Red Maple (Acer rubrum) Aerial Parts as a Source of Bioactive Phenolics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Seeram, Navindra P

    2015-08-01

    The bark and stems of red maple (Acer rubrum) are reported to contain bioactive phenolics but its aerial parts, namely, flowers and leaves, remain largely unexplored. This is unfortunate considering that various parts of the red maple were used for traditional medicinal purposes by the indigenous peoples of eastern North America, where this species is found. Herein, we report the identification of twenty-five (1-25) phenolics, including two new galloyl derivatives (1 and 2), from red maple flowers and leaves. Of these, ten compounds (1-10), including the new compounds, were isolated and identified by NMR and HRESIMS data while the remaining fifteen compounds (11-25) were identified by HPLC-DAD analyses (by comparison with chemical standards). The isolates (1-10), along with the clinical drug, acarbose, were evaluated for their alpha-glucosidase enzyme inhibitory activities.

  12. Potential ability of hot water adzuki (Vigna angularis) extracts to inhibit the adhesion, invasion, and metastasis of murine B16 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Umekawa, Hayato; Furuichi, Yukio

    2005-03-01

    The 40% ethanol eluent of the fraction of hot-water extract from adzuki beans (EtEx.40) adsorbed onto DIAION HP-20 resin has many biological activities, for example, antioxidant, antitumorigenesis, and intestinal alpha-glucosidase suppressing activities. This study examined the inhibitory effect of EtEx.40 on experimental lung metastasis and the invasion of B16-BL6 melanoma cells. EtEx.40 was found significantly to reduce the number of tumor colonies. It also inhibited the adhesion and migration of B16-BL6 melanoma cells into extracellular matrix components and their invasion into reconstituted basement membrane (matrigel) without affecting cell proliferation in vitro. These in vivo data suggest that EtEx.40 possesses a strong antimetastatic ability, which might be a lead compound in functional food development.

  13. Disruption of Brewers' yeast by hydrodynamic cavitation: Process variables and their influence on selective release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasundaram, B; Harrison, S T L

    2006-06-05

    Intracellular products, not secreted from the microbial cell, are released by breaking the cell envelope consisting of cytoplasmic membrane and an outer cell wall. Hydrodynamic cavitation has been reported to cause microbial cell disruption. By manipulating the operating variables involved, a wide range of intensity of cavitation can be achieved resulting in a varying extent of disruption. The effect of the process variables including cavitation number, initial cell concentration of the suspension and the number of passes across the cavitation zone on the release of enzymes from various locations of the Brewers' yeast was studied. The release profile of the enzymes studied include alpha-glucosidase (periplasmic), invertase (cell wall bound), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; cytoplasmic) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; cytoplasmic). An optimum cavitation number Cv of 0.13 for maximum disruption was observed across the range Cv 0.09-0.99. The optimum cell concentration was found to be 0.5% (w/v, wet wt) when varying over the range 0.1%-5%. The sustained effect of cavitation on the yeast cell wall when re-circulating the suspension across the cavitation zone was found to release the cell wall bound enzyme invertase (86%) to a greater extent than the enzymes from other locations of the cell (e.g. periplasmic alpha-glucosidase at 17%). Localised damage to the cell wall could be observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of cells subjected to less intense cavitation conditions. Absence of the release of cytoplasmic enzymes to a significant extent, absence of micronisation as observed by TEM and presence of a lower number of proteins bands in the culture supernatant on SDS-PAGE analysis following hydrodynamic cavitation compared to disruption by high-pressure homogenisation confirmed the selective release offered by hydrodynamic cavitation. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Computational and Pharmacological Evaluation of Ferrocene-Based Acyl Ureas and Homoleptic Cadmium Carboxylate Derivatives for Anti-diabetic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Bano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated possible anti-diabetic effect of ferrocene-based acyl ureas: 4-ferrocenyl aniline (PFA, 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl-3-(4-ferrocenylphenyl urea (DPC1, 1-(3-chlorobenzoyl-3-(4-ferrocenylphenyl urea (DMC1, 1-(2-chlorobenzoyl-3-(4-ferrocenylphenyl urea (DOC1 and homoleptic cadmium carboxylates: bis (diphenylacetato cadmium (II (DPAA, bis (4-chlorophenylacetato cadmium (II (CPAA, using in silico and in vivo techniques. PFA, DPC1, DMC1, DOC1, DPAA and CPAA exhibited high binding affinities (ACE ≥ −350 Kcal/mol against targets: aldose reductase, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1, C-alpha glucosidase and glucokinase, while showed moderate affinities (ACE ≥ −250 Kcal/mol against N-alpha glucosidase, dipeptidyl peptidase-IV, phosphorylated-Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, whereas revealed lower affinities (ACE < −250 Kcal/mol vs. alpha amylase, protein tyrosine phosphatases 1B, glycogen phosphorylase and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase. In alloxan (300 mg/Kg-induced diabetic mice, DPAA and DPC1 (1–10 mg/Kg at day 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20th decreased blood glucose levels, compared to diabetic control group and improved the treated animals body weight. DPAA (10 mg/Kg and DPC1 (5 mg/Kg in time-dependent manner (30–120 min. enhanced tolerance of oral glucose overload in mice. DPAA and DPCI dose-dependently at 1, 5, and 10 mg/Kg decreased glycosylated hemoglobin levels in diabetic animals, as caused by metformin. These results indicate that aforementioned derivatives of ferrocene and cadmium possess anti-diabetic potential.

  15. Effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake: a multi-mode study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the possible mechanism(s) behind the effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, muscle glucose uptake and intestinal glucose absorption using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. The effects of increasing concentrations of xylitol (2.5%-40% or 164.31 mM-2628.99 mM) on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase activity in vitro and intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake were investigated under ex vivo conditions. Additionally, the effects of an oral bolus dose of xylitol (1 g per kg BW) on gastric emptying and intestinal glucose absorption and digesta transit in the different segments of the intestinal tract were investigated in normal and type 2 diabetic rats at 1 hour after dose administration, when phenol red was used as a recovery marker. Xylitol exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of alpha amylase (IC₅₀ = 1364.04 mM) and alpha glucosidase (IC₅₀ = 1127.52 mM) activity in vitro and small intestinal glucose absorption under ex vivo condition. Xylitol also increased dose dependent muscle glucose uptake with and without insulin, although the uptake was not significantly affected by the addition of insulin. Oral single bolus dose of xylitol significantly delayed gastric emptying, inhibited intestinal glucose absorption but increased the intestinal digesta transit rate in both normal and diabetic rats compared to their respective controls. The data of this study suggest that xylitol reduces intestinal glucose absorption via inhibiting major carbohydrate digesting enzymes, slowing gastric emptying and fastening the intestinal transit rate, but increases muscle glucose uptake in normal and type 2 diabetic rats.

  16. [Adult form of Pompe disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska-Graca, Bozena; Kania, Aleksander; Zwolińska, Grazyna; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, Ewa

    2008-01-01

    Pompe disease (glycogen-storage disease type II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA), leading to the accumulation of glycogen in the lysosomes primarily in muscle cells. In the adult form of the disease, proximal muscle weakness is noted and muscle volume is decreased. The infantile form is usually fatal. In the adult form of the disease the prognosis is relatively good. Muscle weakness may, however, interfere with normal daily activities, and respiratory insufficiency may be associated with obstructive sleep apnea. Death usually results from respiratory failure. Effective specific treatment is not available. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GAA (rh-GAA) still remains a research area. We report the case of a 24-year-old student admitted to the Department of Pulmonary Diseases because of severe respiratory insufficiency. Clinical symptoms such as dyspnea, muscular weakness and increased daytime sleepiness had been progressing for 2 years. Clinical examination and increased blood levels of CK suggested muscle pathology. Histopathological analysis of muscle biopsy, performed under electron microscope, confirmed the presence of vacuoles containing glycogen. Specific enzymatic activity of alpha-glucosidase was analyzed confirming Pompe disease. The only effective method to treat respiratory insufficiency was bi-level positive pressure ventilation. Respiratory rehabilitation was instituted and is still continued by the patient at home. A high-protein, low-sugar diet was proposed for the patient. Because of poliglobulia low molecular weight heparin was prescribed. The patient is eligible for experimental replacement therapy with rh-GAA.

  17. Acarbose improved severe postprandial hypotension in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, E; Goda, K; Nagata, K; Kitaoka, H; Ohsawa, N; Hanafusa, T

    2001-01-01

    Postprandial hypotension (PPH) is defined as a decrease of systolic blood pressure by more than 20 mmHg after meals. Severe PPH is a troublesome diabetic complication, which has no established means of treatment. We encountered a patient who had diabetes mellitus complicated by severe PPH and attempted to treat this problem using several medications (octreotide, midodrine hydrochloride, and acarbose). A 58-year-old male with diabetic triopathy complained of orthostatic dizziness and vertigo after meals. The blood pressure was monitored for 24 h with an ambulatory blood pressure monitor, revealing that the systolic blood pressure decreased markedly after breakfast and dinner by 45 and 50 mmHg, respectively. PPH was not improved by a subcutaneous injection of octreotide. Administration of midodrine hydrochloride reduced the frequency of hypotensive episodes from twice to once daily, but the magnitude of the postprandial fall in blood pressure was still around 30 mmHg. After the patient started to receive acarbose therapy, the postprandial fall in blood pressure was diminished to 18 mmHg and his symptoms largely disappeared. For the treatment of PPH in diabetic patients, our experience suggests that it may be appropriate to try first on alpha-glucosidase inhibitor like acarbose.

  18. The amyR-deletion strain of Aspergillus niger CICC2462 is a suitable host strain to express secreted protein with a low background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Xiang Xiang; Ji, Wei; Song, Fuping; Zhao, Yue; Li, Jie

    2016-04-28

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is widely exploited as an important expression host for industrial production. The glucoamylase high-producing strain A. niger CICC2462 has been used as a host strain for the establishment of a secretion expression system. It expresses recombinant xylanase, mannase and asparaginase at a high level, but some high secretory background proteins in these recombinant strains still remain, such as alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase; lead to a low-purity of fermentation products. The aim was to construct an A. niger host strain with a low background of protein secretion. The transcription factor amyR was deleted in A. niger CICC2462, and the results from enzyme activity assays and SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the glucoamylase and amylase activities of the ∆amyR strains were significantly lower than those of the wild-type strain. High-throughput RNA-sequencing and shotgun LC-MS/MS proteomic technology analysis demonstrated that the expression of amylolytic enzymes was decreased at both the transcriptional and translational levels in the ∆amyR strain. Interestingly, the ∆amyR strain growth rate better than the wild-type strain. Our findings clearly indicated that the ∆amyR strain of A. niger CICC2462 can be used as a host strain with a low background of protein secretion.

  19. Inhibitory activities of Moringa oleifera leaf extract against α-glucosidase enzyme in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsir, H.; Wahab, A. W.; Laga, A.; Arif, A. R.

    2018-03-01

    Alpha-glucosidase is a key enzyme in the final process of breaking carbohydrates into glucose. Inhibition of α-glucosidase affected more absorption of glucose, so it can reduce hyperglycemia condition. The aims of this study is to determine the effectiveness of inhibition wet and dried Moringa oleifera leaf extract through α-glucosidase activity in vitro. The effectiveness study of inhibition on the activity of α-glucosidase enzyme obtained from white glutinous rice (Oryza sativa glutinosa) was carried out using wet and dried kelor leaf extract of 13% (w/v) with 10 mM α-D-glucopyranoside (PNPG) substrate. A positive control used 1% acarbose and substrate without addition of extract was a negative control. Inhibitory activity was measured using spectrophotometers at a wavelength of 400 nm. The result showed that the inhibition activity against α-glucosidase enzyme of dried leaf extract, wet leaf extract and acarbose was 81,39%, 83,94%, and 95,4%, respectively on pH 7,0. The effectiveness inhibition of the wet Moringa leaf extract was greater than the dried leaf extract. The findings suggest that M. oleifera leaf has the potential to be developed as an alternative food therapy for diabetics.

  20. Recent Trends in Therapeutic Approaches for Diabetes Management: A Comprehensive Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Tiwari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes highlights a growing epidemic imposing serious social economic crisis to the countries around the globe. Despite scientific breakthroughs, better healthcare facilities, and improved literacy rate, the disease continues to burden several sections, especially middle and low income countries. The present trends indicate the rise in premature death, posing a major threat to global development. Scientific and technological advances have witnessed the development of newer generation of drugs like sulphonylureas, biguanides, alpha glucosidase inhibitors, and thiazolidinediones with significant efficacy in reducing hyperglycemia. Recent approaches in drug discovery have contributed to the development of new class of therapeutics like Incretin mimetics, Amylin analogues, GIP analogs, Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor as targets for potential drugs in diabetes treatment. Subsequently, the identification and clinical investigation of bioactive substances from plants have revolutionized the research on drug discovery and lead identification for diabetes management. With a focus on the emerging trends, the review article explores the current statistical prevalence of the disease, discussing the benefits and limitations of the commercially available drugs. Additionally, the critical areas in clinical diabetology are discussed, with respect to prospects of statins, nanotechnology, and stem cell technology as next generation therapeutics and why the herbal formulations are consistently popular choice for diabetes medication and management.

  1. Diabetes Management and Hypoglycemia in Safety Sensitive Jobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    See-Muah Lee

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus are in the working age group in developing countries. The interrelationship of diabetes and work, that is, diabetes affecting work and work affecting diabetes, becomes an important issue for these people. Therapeutic options for the diabetic worker have been developed, and currently include various insulins, insulin sensitizers and secretagogues, incretin mimetics and enhancers, and alpha glucosidase inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and hypoglycaemic unawareness are important and unwanted treatment side effects. The risk they pose with respect to cognitive impairment can have safety implications. The understanding of the therapeutic options in the management of diabetic workers, blood glucose awareness training, and self-monitoring blood glucose will help to mitigate this risk. Employment decisions must also take into account the extent to which the jobs performed by the worker are safety sensitive. A risk assessment matrix, based on the extent to which a job is considered safety sensitive and based on the severity of the hypoglycaemia, may assist in determining one's fitness to work. Support at the workplace, such as a provision of healthy food options and arrangements for affected workers will be helpful for such workers. Arrangements include permission to carry and consume emergency sugar, flexible meal times, self-monitoring blood glucose when required, storage/disposal facilities for medicine such as insulin and needles, time off for medical appointments, and structured self-help rogams.

  2. Diabetes management and hypoglycemia in safety sensitive jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, See-Muah; Koh, David; Chui, Winnie Kl; Sum, Chee-Fang

    2011-03-01

    The majority of people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus are in the working age group in developing countries. The interrelationship of diabetes and work, that is, diabetes affecting work and work affecting diabetes, becomes an important issue for these people. Therapeutic options for the diabetic worker have been developed, and currently include various insulins, insulin sensitizers and secretagogues, incretin mimetics and enhancers, and alpha glucosidase inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and hypoglycaemic unawareness are important and unwanted treatment side effects. The risk they pose with respect to cognitive impairment can have safety implications. The understanding of the therapeutic options in the management of diabetic workers, blood glucose awareness training, and self-monitoring blood glucose will help to mitigate this risk. Employment decisions must also take into account the extent to which the jobs performed by the worker are safety sensitive. A risk assessment matrix, based on the extent to which a job is considered safety sensitive and based on the severity of the hypoglycaemia, may assist in determining one's fitness to work. Support at the workplace, such as a provision of healthy food options and arrangements for affected workers will be helpful for such workers. Arrangements include permission to carry and consume emergency sugar, flexible meal times, self-monitoring blood glucose when required, storage/disposal facilities for medicine such as insulin and needles, time off for medical appointments, and structured self-help programs.

  3. Late-onset Pompe disease with complicated intracranial aneurysm: a Chinese case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang B

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bin Zhang,1,2,* Yuying Zhao,1,3,* Junling Liu,1,4 Ling Li,1 Jingli Shan,1 Dandan Zhao,1 Chuanzhu Yan1,3 1Laboratory of Neuromuscular Disorders and Department of Neurology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 2Department of Neurology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng, Shandong, 3Department of Neurology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of the Ministry of Education, Brain Science Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 4Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Pompe disease is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease caused by genetic defects of acid maltase. This disease could be divided into two forms: infantile and late-onset, which mainly affect cardiac, respiratory, and skeletal muscle systems. Late-onset patients mainly show symptoms of skeletal muscle involvement, but recent reports have found that the central nervous system was also affected in some patients. Herein, we report a case of a female, adolescent-onset Pompe patient, who was diagnosed with complicated intracranial aneurysm in adulthood. Keywords: Pompe disease, glycogen storage disease II, acid maltase, acid alpha-glucosidase, cerebrovascular disorders

  4. Retrospective, Single Center Study of Clinical, Paraclinical and Natural Course of Infantile-Onset Pompe Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noormohammad Noori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infantile-onset Pompe disease is a rare genetic and lethal disorder which is caused by the lack of acid alpha-glucosidase activity (GAA. The aim of our study was to identify the demographic and clinical characteristics, and natural history of these patients. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, clinical file of 15 patients diagnosed with infantile-onset Pompe disease whose symptoms started before the age of 12 months were studied. Diagnosis was based on clinical history, physical examination and diagnostic parameters in chest X-ray, echocardiogram, electrocardiogram and biochemical tests after rule out the other metabolic and neuromuscular disorders. Results: Sixty percent of the patients were male and 40% were female. The mean age at the onset of symptoms was 78 days (range: 3-150 days. Most frequent clinical and paraclinical symptoms were cardiomegaly, hypotonia, hyporeflexia, macroglossia, failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and feeding problems, respectively. The mean age at the time of death was 5.96 months (range: 4-8 months, and all patients died before one year of age. Muscle enzymes including AST, ALT, LDH, and CPK were elevated in all patients. Due to the lack of availability, enzyme replacement therapy was not possible for any patient. Conclusion: The study showed that despite the supportive measures and no specific treatment, the clinical course is not significantly different with similar studies and the overall prognosis of this form of disease is very poor and disappointing.

  5. Glycosidases in Brachionus plicatilis (Rotifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühle, K; Kleinow, W

    1990-01-01

    1. Tests for glycosidases were performed in homogenates of Brachionus plicatilis. 2. Hydrolytic activity was detected with the following substrates: (a) with synthetic substrates (NP = 4-nitrophenyl): NP-alpha- and NP-beta-D-glucopyranoside, NP-alpha- and NP-beta-D-galactopyranoside, NP-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide, NP-N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide, NP-alpha- and NP-beta-D-mannopyranoside and NP-alpha-L-fucopyranoside; (b) with disaccharides: sucrose, maltose, trehalose, isomaltose, cellobiose, gentiobiose and lactose; (c) with polysaccharides: laminarine, carboxymethyl-cellulose, avicel, Micrococcus luteus (for lysozyme) and 4-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-maltoheptaoside (for amylase). 3. The pH dependence of the glycosidase activities was determined. 4. The distribution of enzyme activities within fractions from the homogenate was studied in order to localize them within the cell. 5. Proteins from Brachionus homogenate were separated by SDS-gel electrophoresis and the positions of the following glycosidase activities were detected by assays performed on the gels (estimated molecular weights in parentheses): alpha-glucosidase (250,000); beta-glucosidase (200,000); beta-galactosidase (70,000); N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (60,000).

  6. In vitro antidiabetic activity of various crude extracts of Boletus variipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniandy, Sutha; Fazry, Shazrul; Daud, Fauzi; Senafi, Sahidan

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease that progressively spread worldwide and difficult to treat due to various physical and metabolic complications. Current treatment using synthetic drugs has lead to various undesirable side effects. Here we determined the effect of Boletus variipes extracts on diabetes related enzymes. In this study, hot water, cold water and methanol extracts of B. variipes were utilized in order to assess their in vitro antidiabetic activity by measuring the effect on α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzyme. Hot water extract possessed the highest inhibition activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase in a concentration dependent manner with the IC50 value 87 mg/mL and 89 mg/mL respectively. The methanol extract also showed inhibition activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase but significantly lower than the hot water extract. Whereas cold water extract did not show any inhibition activity towards both the enzymes. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the hot water extract of Boletus variipes contains bioactive compound that can inhibit alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase enzyme activity. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 11 May 2016. The original version identified the species of mushroom as Boletus variipes, but new findings have proved the species of mushroom to be Boletus qriseipurpureus. The species name has been updated throughout the revised version of this paper.

  7. Oral anti-diabetics in Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Najmul

    2015-05-01

    A large proportion of Muslim patients with type 2 diabetes fast during the month of Ramadan worldwide. Hypoglycaemia is one of the major complications associated with long periods without food during the fasting hours. There is also a risk of hyperglycaemia due to over indulgence in food during the two main meals of Suhur and Iftar. Healthcare providers need to be cognizant of the risk of fasting and be competent to provide Ramadan adjusted diabetes care particularly adjustment of oral anti diabetics. This review article has taken into consideration observational studies, randomized trial data, pathophysiology and practical experience in recommending adjustment in oral anti-diabetics during fasting in type-2 diabetics. Metformin and Thiazolidinediones (TZD'S) being insulin sensitizers need minimum adjustment with low risk of hypoglycaemia. Older generation Sulphonylureas (SU) pose a high risk of hypoglycaemia but the newer generations of Sulphonylureas have a reasonable safety profile. Alpha- Glucosidase inhibitors are safe during fasting but their use is limited due to the side effects.

  8. Evaluation of the toxic effects of arsenite, chromate, cadmium, and copper using a battery of four bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Lee, Pyeong-Koo [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Geologic Environment Div.; Kong, In Chul [Yeungnam Univ., Kyungbuk (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2012-09-15

    The sensitivities of four different kinds of bioassays to the toxicities of arsenite, chromate, cadmium, and copper were compared. The different bioassays exhibited different sensitivities, i.e., they responded to different levels of toxicity of each of the different metals. However, with the exception of the {alpha}-glucosidase enzyme activity, arsenite was the most toxic compound towards all the tested organisms, exhibiting the highest toxic effect on the seeds of Lactuca, with an EC{sub 50} value of 0.63 mg/L. The sensitivities of Lactuca and Raphanus were greater than the sensitivities of two other kinds of seeds tested. Therefore, these were the seeds appropriate for use in a seed germination assay. A high revertant mutagenic ratio (5:1) of Salmonella typhimurium was observed with an arsenite concentration of 0.1 {mu}g/plate, indicative of a high possibility of mutagenicity. These different results suggested that a battery of bioassays, rather than one bioassay alone, is needed as a more accurate and better tool for the bioassessment of environmental pollutants. (orig.)

  9. Enzymatic Activity of Candida spp. from Oral Cavity and Urine in Children with Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Dąbkowska, Maria; Swoboda-Kopeć, Ewa; Gozdowski, Dariusz; Mizerska-Wasiak, Małgorzata; Demkow, Urszula; Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Oral colonization with Candida spp. is not synonymous with a systemic active infection. The aim of the study was to evaluate enzymatic activity of Candida strains isolated from the oral cavity in patients with nephrotic syndrome (NS) and to compare it with the activity determined in urine. We studied 32 children with NS and 26 control healthy children. Children with NS were treated with glucocorticosteroids, cyclosporin A, mycophenolate mofetil or azathioprine. In all children, API-ZYM enzymatic tests were performed to evaluate hydrolytic enzymes of Candida isolated from the oral cavity and in urine. Candida spp. were isolated from the oral cavity in 11 patients with NS (34.4%), all receiving immunosuppressive treatment. All strains produced valine arylamidase, 9 alpha-glucosidase (E16), and 9 N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (E18). A positive correlation between the presence of Candida in the oral cavity and E16 and E18 enzymatic activity in both oral cavity and urine was found. A dose of cyclosporin A had an effect on the enzymatic activity (p Candida invasion. The results of this study suggest that oral candida infection should be monitored in children with nephrotic syndrome, particularly those treated with immunosuppressive agents.

  10. New α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Triterpenic Acid from Marine Macro Green Alga Codium dwarkense Boergs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liaqat Ali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The marine ecosystem has been a key resource for secondary metabolites with promising biological roles. In the current study, bioassay-guided phytochemical investigations were carried out to assess the presence of enzyme inhibitory chemical constituents from the methanolic extract of marine green alga—Codium dwarkense. The bioactive fractions were further subjected to chromatographic separations, which resulted in the isolation of a new triterpenic acid; dwarkenoic acid (1 and the known sterols; androst-5-en-3β-ol (2, stigmasta-5,25-dien-3β,7α-diol (3, ergosta-5,25-dien-3β-ol (4, 7-hydroxystigmasta-4,25-dien-3-one-7-O-β-d-fucopyranoside (5, 7-hydroxystigmasta-4,25-dien-3-one (6, and stigmasta-5,25-dien-3β-ol (7. The structure elucidation of the new compound was carried out by combined mass spectrometry and 1D (1H and 13C and 2D (HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY NMR spectroscopic data. The sub-fractions and pure constituents were assayed for enzymatic inhibition of alpha-glucosidase. Compound 1 showed significant inhibition at all concentrations. Compounds 2, 3, 5, and 7 exhibited a dose-dependent response, whereas compounds 4–6 showed moderate inhibition. Utilizing such marine-derived biological resources could lead to drug discoveries related to anti-diabetics.

  11. Alkaptonuria and Pompe disease in one patient: metabolic and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouheir Habbal, Mohammad; Bou Assi, Tarek; Mansour, Hicham

    2013-04-29

    Pompe disease is characterised by deficiency of acid α-glucosidase that results in abnormal glycogen deposition in the muscles. Alkaptonuria is caused by a defect in the enzyme homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase with subsequent accumulation of homogentisic acid. We report the case of a 6-year-old boy diagnosed with Pompe disease and alkaptonuria. Urine organic acids and α-glucosidase were measured. Homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGO) and acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) genes were sequenced by Sanger DNA sequencing. The level of α-glucosidase in white blood cells was markedly decreased (4 nm/mg) while the level of homogentisic acid was markedly increased (15 027 mmol/mol creatine). GAA sequencing detected two heterozygous GAA mutations (C.670C>T and C.1064T>C) while HGO sequencing revealed three polymorphisms in exons 4, 5 and 6, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported instance of Pompe disease and alkaptonuria occurring in the same individual.

  12. cld and lec23 are disparate mutations that affect maturation of lipoprotein lipase in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquet-Laugier, V; Ben-Zeev, O; White, A; Doolittle, M H

    1999-11-01

    The mutations cld (combined lipase deficiency) and lec23 disrupt in a similar manner the expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Whereas cld affects an unknown gene, lec23 abolishes the activity of alpha-glucosidase I, an enzyme essential for proper folding and assembly of nascent glycoproteins. The hypothesis that cld, like lec23, affects the folding/assembly of nascent LPL was confirmed by showing that in cell lines homozygous for these mutations (Cld and Lec23, respectively), the majority of LPL was inactive, displayed heterogeneous aggregation, and had a decreased affinity for heparin. While inactive LPL was retained in the ER, a small amount of LPL that had attained a native conformation was transported through the Golgi and secreted. Thus, Cld and Lec23 cells recognized and retained the majority of LPL as misfolded, maintaining the standard of quality control. Examination of candidate factors affecting protein maturation, such as glucose addition and trimming, proteins involved in lectin chaperone cycling, and other abundant ER chaperones, revealed that calnexin levels were dramatically reduced in livers from cld/cld mice; this finding was also confirmed in Cld cells. We conclude that cld may affect components in the ER, such as calnexin, that play a role in protein maturation. Whether the reduced calnexin levels per se contribute to the LPL deficiency awaits confirmation.

  13. Gut metagenomes of type 2 diabetic patients have characteristic single-nucleotide polymorphism distribution in Bacteroides coprocola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaowen; Li, Zongcheng; Hu, Shuofeng; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Jiaqi; Shao, Ningsheng; Bo, Xiaochen; Ni, Ming; Ying, Xiaomin

    2017-02-01

    Gut microbes play a critical role in human health and disease, and researchers have begun to characterize their genomes, the so-called gut metagenome. Thus far, metagenomics studies have focused on genus- or species-level composition and microbial gene sets, while strain-level composition and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been overlooked. The gut metagenomes of type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients have been found to be enriched with butyrate-producing bacteria and sulfate reduction functions. However, it is not known whether the gut metagenomes of T2D patients have characteristic strain patterns or SNP distributions. We downloaded public gut metagenome datasets from 170 T2D patients and 174 healthy controls and performed a systematic comparative analysis of their metagenome SNPs. We found that Bacteroides coprocola, whose relative abundance did not differ between the groups, had a characteristic distribution of SNPs in the T2D patient group. We identified 65 genes, all in B. coprocola, that had remarkably different enrichment of SNPs. The first and sixth ranked genes encode glycosyl hydrolases (GenBank accession EDU99824.1 and EDV02301.1). Interestingly, alpha-glucosidase, which is also a glycosyl hydrolase located in the intestine, is an important drug target of T2D. These results suggest that different strains of B. coprocola may have different roles in human gut and a specific set of B. coprocola strains are correlated with T2D.

  14. Acarviosine-simmondsin, a novel compound obtained from acarviosine-glucose and simmondsin by Thermus maltogenic amylase and its in vivo effect on food intake and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin-Sook; Kim, Hye-Young; Abbott, Thomas P; Moon, Tae-Wha; Lee, Soo-Bok; Park, Cheon-Seok; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2003-03-01

    Simmondsin was modified with acarviosine-glucose using the transglycosylation activity of Thermus maltogenic amylase to synthesize a novel compound with both antiobesity and hypoglycemic activity. The LC/MS and 13C NMR analyses confirmed that the structure of the major transglycosylation product was acarviosine-simmondsin (Acv-simmondsin), in which acarviosine was attached to the glucose moiety of simmondsin by an alpha-(1,6)-glycosidic linkage. It was found that Acv-simmondsin was a potent competitive inhibitor of alpha-glucosidase with the Ki value of 0.69 microM and a mixed type inhibitor of alpha-amylase with the Ki and KI of 20.78 microM and 26.31 microM, respectively. The administration of Acv-simmondsin (0.1 g/100 g diet/day) to mice for 5 days significantly reduced food intake by 35%, compared to 25% with simmondsin in control obese mice. Acv-simmondsin (50 mg/kg BW) suppressed the postprandial blood glucose response to sucrose (1 g/kg BW) by 74%, compared to 71% with acarbose, in normal rats.

  15. A quick overview on some aspects of endocrinological and therapeutic effects of Berberis vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zarei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Many herbaceous plants contain compounds that have biological effects in addition to their medicinal properties. They have compounds with numerous properties, including hypo lipidemic, hypoglycemic, antioxidant, and hepato protective ones, which have been analyzed at different levels. One of these plants, with the scientific name of Berberis vulgaris, is barberry. The most important compounds identified in this plant are berberine, oxycontin, palmatine, bervulcine, berbamine, columbamine, jatrorrhizine, coptisine, and berbamine. In addition to alkaloids, organic acids such as chelidonic acid, citric acid, malic acid, resin, tannin, pectinic, and mucilagic substances are among the ingredients of barberry. In this paper, it was attempted to determine the role and effect of the extract of barberry on various body organs. The results showed that berberine actually increases insulin sensitivity and is capable of inhibiting alpha glucosidase, adipogenesis, and thus acts as an anti-obesity and hypoglycemic agent. Berberine reduces the density of serum cholesterol and triglycerides and can improve the function of liver enzymes, therefore, it can be suggested as a hypo lipidemic and hepato protective plant extract. The hepato protective effects of this extract are probably due to its antioxidant properties. Studies showed that barberry have numerous health benefits, including anti-inflammatory ones. Moreover, it can be used as a medicinal herb to treat a variety of disorders, such as diabetes, liver disease, gallbladder pain, digestive, urinary tract diseases, and gallstones. However, more studies on this issue and doing more focused and intensive researches in this field are recommended.

  16. Changing Patterns of Glucose-Lowering Medication Use in VA Nursing Home Residents With Diabetes, 2005 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sei J; Stijacic-Cenzer, Irena; Barnhart, Caroline; McClymont, Keelan; Steinman, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Although nursing home (NH) residents make up a large and growing proportion of Americans with diabetes mellitus, little is known about how glucose-lowering medications are used in this population. We sought to examine glucose-lowering medication use in Veterans Affairs (VA) NH residents with diabetes between 2005 and 2011. Retrospective cohort study, using linked laboratory, pharmacy, administrative, and NH Minimum Dataset (MDS) 2.0 databases in 123 VA NHs. A total of 9431 long-stay (>90 days) VA NH residents older than 65 followed for 52,313 person-quarters. We identified receipt of glucose-lowering medications, including insulin, metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, and others (alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, meglitinides, glucagonlike peptide-1 analogs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and amylin analogs) per quarter. The rates of sulfonylurea use in long-stay NH residents dropped dramatically from 24% in 2005 to 12% in 2011 (P use (10% to 2%, P use in 2007 (4% to Metformin use was stable, ranging between 7% and 9% (P = .24). Insulin use increased slightly from 30% to 32% (P Use of other classes of glucose-lowering medications was stable (P = .22) and low, remaining below 1.3%. Between 2005 and 2011, there were dramatic declines in use of sulfonylureas and thiazolidinediones in VA NH residents, suggesting that prescribing practices can be quickly changed in this setting. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. [Diagnosis and treatment of Pompe disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; de la Fuente-Cortez, Beatriz; Molina-García, Avril; Romero-Díaz, Víktor; Rodríguez-Leyva, Ildefonso; Esmer-Sánchez, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is a rare, progressive and often fatal neuromuscular disorder. It is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal alpha-glucosidase. Among glycogen storage disorders, it is one of the most common. Its clinical manifestations can start at any moment of life, with a very variable symptomatology. In this article, we show an extended revision of the literature in regards to the main medical aspects of Pompe disease: etiology, psychopathology, epidemiology, clinical variants, pathological diagnosis, and enzyme replacement therapy. With this information, we created a diagnostic and therapeutic guide, which is addressed to specialists and to first-level physicians, in order to let them identify both the classic and the late forms of this disease. We describe as well the best, timely, multidisciplinary treatment in use. Also, we show some suggestions to the proper functioning of health institutions, and routes to diagnosis. We conclude that Pompe disease may be properly diagnosed and treated if health care professionals follow the internationally approved recommendations.

  18. Glycogen Reduction in Myotubes of Late-Onset Pompe Disease Patients Using Antisense Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goina, Elisa; Peruzzo, Paolo; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea; Buratti, Emanuele

    2017-09-06

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is a lysosomal disorder caused by the deficient activity of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme, leading to the accumulation of glycogen within the lysosomes. The disease has been classified in infantile and late-onset forms. Most late-onset patients share a splicing mutation c.-32-13T > G in intron 1 of the GAA gene that prevents efficient recognition of exon 2 by the spliceosome. In this study, we have mapped the splicing silencers of GAA exon 2 and developed antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (AMOs) to inhibit those regions and rescue normal splicing in the presence of the c.-32-13T > G mutation. Using a minigene approach and patient fibroblasts, we successfully increased inclusion of exon 2 in the mRNA and GAA enzyme production by targeting a specific silencer with a combination of AMOs. Most importantly, the use of these AMOs in patient myotubes results in a decreased accumulation of glycogen. To our knowledge, this is the only therapeutic approach resulting in a decrease of glycogen accumulation in patient tissues beside enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and TFEB overexpression. As a result, it may represent a highly novel and promising therapeutic line for GSDII. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Australine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that inhibits amyloglucosidase and glycoprotein processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tropea, J.E.; Molyneux, R.J.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pan, Y.T.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (USA))

    1989-03-07

    Australine is a polyhydroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid that was isolated from the seeds of the Australian tree Castanospermum australe and characterized by NMR and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since swainsonine and catanospermine are polyhydroxylated indolizidine alkaloids that inhibit specific glycosidases, the authors tested australine against a variety of exoglycosidases to determine whether it would inhibit any of these enzymes. This alkaloid proved to be a good inhibitor of the {alpha}-glucosidase amyloglucosidase (50% inhibition at 5.8 {mu}M), but it did not inhibit {beta}-glucosidase, {alpha}- or {beta}-mannosidase, or {alpha}- or {beta}-galactosidase. The inhibition of amyloglucosidase was of a competitive nature. Australine also inhibited the glycoprotein processing enzyme glucosidase I, but had only slight activity toward glucosidase II. When incubated with cultured cells, this alkaloid inhibited glycoprotein processing at the glucosidase I step and caused the accumulation of glycoproteins with Glc{sub 3}Man{sub 7-9}(GlcNAc){sub 2}-oligosaccharides.

  20. Effect to the Glycolit which the absorption to the solution of sacarose marked with a 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleitas Estevez, Andres; Simon Carballo, Rafael; Perez Perez, Luisa; Derivet Zarzabal, Milagros

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies conducted in vitro and in experimental animals have served as the basis for a working hypothesis about the antihyperglycemic effect of a product derived from a natural zeolite (Fz), called glicolit. The objective of this paper was to demonstrate by the use of a radioisotopic method the effect of the joint administration of this product and a source of glucose (sacarose) on the blood levels of this monosaccharide. The study group was composed of 10 rats; 5 were administered glicolit and the other 5 were used as controls. Measurements of glucose in plasma were made at different times by a radioisotopic method after the oral administration of a solution of sacarose marked with a 14 C. The results showed a decrease of the levels of blood glucose in those rats that received glicolit. A graphic of absorption kinetics was made (specific activities against time) and it was obtained an area under the curve that was 16,2% lower in the group of animals that received glicolit. The radioisotopic method proved to be useful for studying the absorption kinetics of glucose when it is administered in the form of sacarose together with glicolit, which showed that it is effective in the reduction of the postprandial glycemic peaks in the studied rats. It seems that glicolit catches the glucose released by the intestinal alpha glucosidases enzymes. The radioisotopic method was also used to verify the hypothesis on the usefulness of glicolit to reduce the levels of glycemic after the ingestion of carbohydrates

  1. CONSENSUS STATEMENT BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY ON THE COMPREHENSIVE TYPE 2 DIABETES MANAGEMENT ALGORITHM - 2018 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Alan J; Abrahamson, Martin J; Barzilay, Joshua I; Blonde, Lawrence; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Bush, Michael A; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Einhorn, Daniel; Fonseca, Vivian A; Garber, Jeffrey R; Garvey, W Timothy; Grunberger, George; Handelsman, Yehuda; Hirsch, Irl B; Jellinger, Paul S; McGill, Janet B; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Rosenblit, Paul D; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2018-01-01

    A1C = hemoglobin A1C; AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; ACCORD = Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes; ACCORD BP = Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Blood Pressure; ACEI = angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor; ADVANCE = Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron MR Controlled Evaluation; AGI = alpha-glucosidase inhibitor; apo B = apolipoprotein B; ASCVD = atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease; BAS = bile acid sequestrant; BCR-QR = bromocriptine quick release; BMI = body mass index; BP = blood pressure; CCB = calcium channel blocker; CHD = coronary heart disease; CKD = chronic kidney disease; CVD = cardiovascular disease; DASH = Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension; DPP4 = dipeptidyl peptidase 4; eGFR = estimated glomerular filtration rate; ER = extended release; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; GLP1 = glucagon-like peptide 1; HDL-C = high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; IMPROVE-IT = Improved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial; LDL-C = low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-P = low-density lipoprotein particle; Look AHEAD = Look Action for Health in Diabetes; NPH = neutral protamine Hagedorn; OSA = obstructive sleep apnea; RCT = randomized controlled trial; SU = sulfonylurea; SGLT2 = sodium glucose cotransporter-2; SMBG = self-monitoring of blood glucose; T2D = type 2 diabetes; TZD = thiazolidinedione; VADT = Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial.

  2. Autophagy and Mis-targeting of Therapeutic Enzyme in Skeletal Muscle in Pompe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tokiko; Ahearn, Meghan; Roberts, Ashley; Mattaliano, Robert J.; Zaal, Kristien; Ralston, Evelyn; Plotz, Paul H.; Raben, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) became a reality for patients with Pompe disease, a fatal cardiomyopathy and skeletal muscle myopathy caused by a deficiency of glycogen-degrading lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). The therapy, which relies on receptor-mediated endocytosis of recombinant human GAA (rhGAA), appears to be effective in cardiac muscle, but less so in skeletal muscle. We have previously shown a profound disturbance of the lysosomal degradative pathway (autophagy) in therapy-resistant muscle of GAA knockout mice (KO). Our findings here demonstrate a progressive age-dependent autophagic build-up in addition to enlargement of glycogen-filled lysosomes in multiple muscle groups in the KO. Trafficking and processing of the therapeutic enzyme along the endocytic pathway appear to be affected by the autophagy. Confocal microscopy of live single muscle fibers exposed to fluorescently labeled rhGAA indicates that a significant portion of the endocytosed enzyme in the KO was trapped as a partially processed form in the autophagic areas instead of reaching its target – the lysosomes. A fluid-phase endocytic marker was similarly mis-targeted and accumulated in vesicular structures within the autophagic areas. These findings may explain why ERT often falls short of reversing the disease process, and point to new avenues for the development of pharmacological intervention. PMID:17008131

  3. Impact of infection on the secretory capacity of the male accessory glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marconi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Studies that compare the impact of different infectious entities of the male reproductive tract (MRT on the male accessory gland function are controversial. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Semen analyses of 71 patients with proven infections of the MRT were compared with the results of 40 healthy non-infected volunteers. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to their diagnosis: chronic prostatitis NIH type II (n = 38, chronic epididymitis (n = 12, and chronic urethritis (n = 21. RESULTS: The bacteriological analysis revealed 9 different types of microorganisms, considered to be the etiological agents, isolated in different secretions, including: urine, expressed prostatic secretions, semen and urethral smears: E. Coli (n = 20, Klebsiella (n = 2, Proteus spp. (n = 1, Enterococcus (n = 20, Staphylococcus spp. (n = 1, M. tuberculosis (n = 2, N. gonorrhea (n = 8, Chlamydia tr. (n = 16 and, Ureaplasma urealyticum (n = 1. The infection group had significantly (p < 0.05 lower: semen volume, alpha-glucosidase, fructose, and zinc in seminal plasma and, higher pH than the control group. None of these parameters was sufficiently accurate in the ROC analysis to discriminate between infected and non-infected men. CONCLUSION: Proven bacterial infections of the MRT impact negatively on all the accessory gland function parameters evaluated in semen, suggesting impairment of the secretory capacity of the epididymis, seminal vesicles and prostate. These findings were associated with an infectious related significant increase of semen pH. None of the semen parameters evaluated can be suggested as a diagnostic tool for infection.

  4. Improved glycemic control in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus taking Urtica dioica leaf extract: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianbakht, Saeed; Khalighi-Sigaroodi, Farahnaz; Dabaghian, Fataneh Hashem

    2013-01-01

    Advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) needing insulin therapy is common. Most conventional anti-hyperglycemic drugs have limited efficacies and significant side effects, so that better anti-hyperglycemic agents are needed. Urtica dioica L. (nettle) leaves have insulin secretagogue, PPARgamma agonistic, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory effects. Moreover, nettle leaves are used in traditional medicine as an anti-hyperglycemic agent to treat diabetes mellitus. Thus, efficacy and safety of nettle in the treatment of patients with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus needing insulin were studied. In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of taking nettle leaf extract (one 500 mg capsule every 8 hours for 3 months) combined with the conventional oral anti-hyperglycemic drugs on the blood levels of fasting glucose, postprandial glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), creatinine and liver enzymes SGOT and SGPT, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures in 46 patients and compared with the placebo group (n = 46). At the endpoint, the extract lowered the blood levels of fasting glucose, 2 hours postprandial glucose, and HbA1c significantly (p 0.05) compared with placebo. Nettle may safely improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients needing insulin therapy.

  5. Prevalence of adult Pompe disease in patients with proximal myopathic syndrome and undiagnosed muscle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsari, Amir; Nasimzadah, Arzoo; Thomalla, Götz; Keller, Sarah; Gerloff, Christian; Magnus, Tim

    2018-03-01

    We examined patients with limb-girdle muscle weakness and/or hyper-CKaemia and undiagnosed muscle biopsy for late onset Pompe disease (LOPD). Patients with an inconclusive limb-girdle muscle weakness who presented at our neuromuscular centre between 2005 and 2015 with undiagnosed muscle biopsies were examined by dry blood spot testing (DBS) including determination of the enzyme activity of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). In the case of depressed enzyme activity, additional gene testing of the GAA gene was carried out. Of the 340 evaluated muscle biopsies, 69 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were examined with DBS. Among those patients, 76% showed a limb-girdle muscle weakness and 14% showed a hyper-CKaemia. A diagnosis of LOPD could be established in the case of two patients (2.9%) with reduced GAA enzyme activity and proof of mutations in the GAA gene. One of the two patients presents in the muscle biopsy suggestive features of Pompe disease including vacuoles with positive acid phosphatase reaction. In summary, our results show that a muscle biopsy can be helpful in identifying LOPD patients, but vacuolation with glycogen storage can also be absent. An inconspicuous muscle biopsy does not rule out Pompe disease. Consequently, all patients with limb-girdle muscle weakness should be examined by DBS before conducting a muscle biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effervescent Granules Prepared Using Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. and Moso Bamboo Leaves: Hypoglycemic Activity in HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Zhou Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. (E. ulmoides Oliv. and moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens leaves are used as folk medicines in central-western China to treat diabetes. To investigate the hypoglycemic activity of the effervescent granules prepared using E. ulmoides Oliv. and moso bamboo leaves (EBEG in HepG2 cells, EBEG were prepared with 5% of each of polysaccharides and chlorogenic acids from moso bamboo and E. ulmoides Oliv. leaves, respectively. HepG2 cells cultured in a high-glucose medium were classified into different groups. The results displayed EBEG-treated cells showed better glucose utilization than the negative controls; thus, the hypoglycemic effect of EBEG was much greater than that of granules prepared using either component alone, thereby indicating that this effect was due to a synergistic action of the components. Further, glucose consumption levels in the cells treated with EBEG (156.35% at 200 μg/mL and the positive controls (metformin, 162.29%; insulin, 161.52% were similar. Thus, EBEG exhibited good potential for use as a natural antidiabetic agent. The hypoglycemic effect of EBEG could be due to the synergistic action of polysaccharides from the moso bamboo leaves and chlorogenic acids from E. ulmoides Oliv. leaves via the inhibition of alpha-glucosidase and glucose-6-phosphate displacement enzyme.

  7. Differential protein modulation in midguts of Aedes aegypti infected with chikungunya and dengue 2 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Tchankouo-Nguetcheu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod borne virus infections cause several emerging and resurgent infectious diseases. Among the diseases caused by arboviruses, dengue and chikungunya are responsible for a high rate of severe human diseases worldwide. The midgut of mosquitoes is the first barrier for pathogen transmission and is a target organ where arboviruses must replicate prior to infecting other organs. A proteomic approach was undertaken to characterize the key virus/vector interactions and host protein modifications that happen in the midgut for viral transmission to eventually take place. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a proteomics differential approach with two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE, we defined the protein modulations in the midgut of Aedes aegypti that were triggered seven days after an oral infection (7 DPI with dengue 2 (DENV-2 and chikungunya (CHIKV viruses. Gel profile comparisons showed that the level of 18 proteins was modulated by DENV-2 only and 12 proteins were modulated by CHIKV only. Twenty proteins were regulated by both viruses in either similar or different ways. Both viruses caused an increase of proteins involved in the generation of reactive oxygen species, energy production, and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Midgut infection by DENV-2 and CHIKV triggered an antioxidant response. CHIKV infection produced an increase of proteins involved in detoxification. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study constitutes the first analysis of the protein response of Aedes aegypti's midgut infected with viruses belonging to different families. It shows that the differentially regulated proteins in response to viral infection include structural, redox, regulatory proteins, and enzymes for several metabolic pathways. Some of these proteins like antioxidant are probably involved in cell protection. On the other hand, we propose that the modulation of other proteins like transferrin, hsp60 and alpha

  8. Differential protein modulation in midguts of Aedes aegypti infected with chikungunya and dengue 2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchankouo-Nguetcheu, Stéphane; Khun, Huot; Pincet, Laurence; Roux, Pascal; Bahut, Muriel; Huerre, Michel; Guette, Catherine; Choumet, Valérie

    2010-10-05

    Arthropod borne virus infections cause several emerging and resurgent infectious diseases. Among the diseases caused by arboviruses, dengue and chikungunya are responsible for a high rate of severe human diseases worldwide. The midgut of mosquitoes is the first barrier for pathogen transmission and is a target organ where arboviruses must replicate prior to infecting other organs. A proteomic approach was undertaken to characterize the key virus/vector interactions and host protein modifications that happen in the midgut for viral transmission to eventually take place. Using a proteomics differential approach with two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we defined the protein modulations in the midgut of Aedes aegypti that were triggered seven days after an oral infection (7 DPI) with dengue 2 (DENV-2) and chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses. Gel profile comparisons showed that the level of 18 proteins was modulated by DENV-2 only and 12 proteins were modulated by CHIKV only. Twenty proteins were regulated by both viruses in either similar or different ways. Both viruses caused an increase of proteins involved in the generation of reactive oxygen species, energy production, and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Midgut infection by DENV-2 and CHIKV triggered an antioxidant response. CHIKV infection produced an increase of proteins involved in detoxification. Our study constitutes the first analysis of the protein response of Aedes aegypti's midgut infected with viruses belonging to different families. It shows that the differentially regulated proteins in response to viral infection include structural, redox, regulatory proteins, and enzymes for several metabolic pathways. Some of these proteins like antioxidant are probably involved in cell protection. On the other hand, we propose that the modulation of other proteins like transferrin, hsp60 and alpha glucosidase, may favour virus survival, replication and transmission, suggesting a subversion of

  9. Effect of Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter 2 Inhibitor, Dapagliflozin, on Renal Renin-Angiotensin System in an Animal Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seok Joon; Chung, Sungjin; Kim, Soo Jung; Lee, Eun-Mi; Yoo, Young-Hye; Kim, Ji-Won; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Kim, Eun-Sook; Moon, Sung-Dae; Kim, Myung-Jun; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation is one of the important pathogenic mechanisms in the development of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor, dapagliflozin, on renal RAS in an animal model with type 2 diabetes. Dapagliflozin (1.0 mg/kg, OL-DA) or voglibose (0.6 mg/kg, OL-VO, diabetic control) (n = 10 each) was administered to Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats for 12 weeks. We used voglibose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, as a comparable counterpart to SGLT2 inhibitor because of its postprandial glucose-lowering effect without proven renoprotective effects. Control Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LT) and OLETF (OL-C) rats received saline (n = 10, each). Changes in blood glucose, urine albumin, creatinine clearance, and oxidative stress were measured. Inflammatory cell infiltration, mesangial widening, and interstitial fibrosis in the kidney were evaluated by histological analysis. The effects of dapagliflozin on renal expression of the RAS components were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR in renal tissue. After treatment, hyperglycemia and urine microalbumin levels were attenuated in both OL-DA and OL-VO rather than in the OL-C group (P renal RAS component expression, oxidative stress and interstitial fibrosis in OLETF rats. We suggest that, in addition to control of hyperglycemia, partial suppression of renal RAS with an SGLT2 inhibitor would be a promising strategy for the prevention of treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Review of Current Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulfatai B. Olokoba

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic metabolic disorder in which prevalence has been increasing steadily all over the world. As a result of this trend, it is fast becoming an epidemic in some countries of the world with the number of people affected expected to double in the next decade due to increase in ageing population, thereby adding to the already existing burden for healthcare providers, especially in poorly developed countries. This review is based on a search of Medline, the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, and citation lists of relevant publications. Subject heading and key words used include type 2 diabetes mellitus, prevalence, current diagnosis, and current treatment. Only articles in English were included. Screening and diagnosis is still based on World Health Organization (WHO and American Diabetes Association (ADA criteria which include both clinical and laboratory parameters. No cure has yet been found for the disease; however, treatment modalities include lifestyle modifications, treatment of obesity, oral hypoglycemic agents, and insulin sensitizers like metformin, a biguanide that reduces insulin resistance, is still the recommended first line medication especially for obese patients. Other effective medications include non-sulfonylurea secretagogues, thiazolidinediones, alpha glucosidase inhibitors, and insulin. Recent research into the pathophysiology of type 2 DM has led to the introduction of new medications like glucagon-like peptide 1 analogoues: dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors, inhibitors of the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 and 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, insulin-releasing glucokinase activators and pancreatic-G-protein-coupled fatty-acid-receptor agonists, glucagon-receptor antagonists, metabolic inhibitors of hepatic glucose output and quick-release bromocriptine. Inhaled insulin was licensed for use in 2006 but has been withdrawn from the market because of low patronage.

  11. Glycemic control: a combination of lifestyle management and the use of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standl, Eberhard; Erbach, Michael; Schnell, Oliver

    2013-06-01

    Some 30% of contemporary cardiology patients have coexisting known diabetes, and another 40% have either undiagnosed diabetes or prediabetes. There is still no final conclusive evidence of cardiovascular benefit by good glycemic control in type 2 diabetes, although studies like the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) and the Prospective Pioglitazone Clinical Trial in Macrovascular Events, and meta-analyses based on these and other randomized controlled trials of blood glucose-lowering therapies have been encouraging. On the other hand, microvascular disease is clearly reduced by good glycemic control. Structured education has remained a mandatory prerequisite of any successful treatment. Not only is appropriate weight management by diet and exercise able to revert new onset diabetes to normal, but it is also the foundation of any successful pharmacotherapy of diabetes. Aiming at normal fasting plasma glucose concentrations of 5.3 mmol/L or 95 mg/dL appears to be safe since publication of the long-term outcome results of the Outcome Reduction with an Initial Glargine INtervention trial. Individualized target glycosylated hemoglobin levels as near to normal as safely possible (i.e., type 2 diabetes, also in terms of preventing cardiovascular complications. An alternate first-line option in some parts of the world, especially Asian countries, is the class of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. In most patients, combination therapies with two or three classes of drugs are warranted. Early combination are the golden strategy as type 2 diabetes is a multi-causal disease; the various classes of drugs have distinct and synergistic modes of action, and the blood glucose-lowering efficacy of these drugs is more or less fully maintained in combination. The recent joint American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes position statement mentions five options as step two of the treatment algorithm for combination with metformin

  12. Time-to-ejaculation and the quality of semen produced by masturbation at a clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzanaty, Saad

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the association between the length of time-to-ejaculation and semen parameters. Ejaculates from 142 men under infertility assessment were analyzed according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Seminal neutral alpha-glucosidase (NAG), prostate-specific antigen (PSA), zinc, and fructose were also measured. Three groups according to the length of the time-to-ejaculation were defined: G(15) (greater than 15 minutes). Time to ejaculation showed negative significant correlation with sperm concentration (rho = -0.20, P = 0.02), total sperm count (rho = -0.20, P = 0.04), NAG (rho = -0.20, P = 0.01), and fructose (rho = -0.30, P = 0.02), respectively. No significant correlations existed among the time-to-ejaculation and age, sexual abstinence, semen volume, sperm motility, PSA, and zinc. There were negative significant associations among time-to-ejaculation and sperm concentration (beta = -3.0; P = 0.004), total sperm count (beta = -10; P = 0.02), total count of progressive motility (beta = -7.0; P = 0.02), and fructose (beta = -0.30; P = 0.02), respectively. No significant associations existed among the time-to-ejaculation and semen volume, motility grades, NAG, PSA, and zinc. G(15) (mean difference = 50 x 10(6)/mL; P = 0.01), (mean difference = 176 x 10(6)/ejaculate; P = 0.02), (mean difference = 110 x 10(6)/ejaculate; P = 0.03), respectively. Fructose was significantly higher in G(15) (mean difference = 5.0 mmol/L; P = 0.03). The time-to-ejaculation length was associated with semen parameters. These results might reflect the negative effect of acute stress during semen collection via masturbation at a clinic on semen parameters.

  13. Pharmaceutical significance of Leuconostoc mesenteroides KS-TN11 isolated from Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Ahmad Paray

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic animals are known for their myriad of beneficial bacteria with diverse biologically active compounds. The current study was aimed to isolate and characterize potentially beneficial lactic acid bacteria from Nile Tilapia and evaluate their pharmaceutical applications. The fish samples were dissected and stomach, intestine, and gills were collected and serially diluted for the isolation of lactic acid bacteria (LAB on BCP agar media. Identification of isolate was carried by biochemical and molecular characterization using API kit and 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis, respectively. Further, KS-TN11 was assessed for α-glucosidase inhibitory potential using the chromogenic method. A lactic acid bacterium KS-TN11 was isolated from the stomach of Nile Tilapia and identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides. Effect of KS-TN11 on lipid accumulation in adipocytes was done by using Oil Red O staining. The isolate showed strong antibacterial activity against a number of pathogenic bacteria in vitro. In addition, L. mesenteroides KS-TN11 KS-TN11 (50 mg/ml and 100 mg/ml tends to inhibit adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and thus may have possible anti-obesity effects. Moreover, L. mesenteroides KS-TN11 exhibited substantial α–glucosidase inhibitory activities by 41.33% at 50 mg/ml and 64% at 100 mg/ml, respectively. The bacterium showed potent antibacterial activity against a number of pathogenic bacteria; in addition to alpha-glucosidase activity, and inhibition of lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 cell line. These results reinforce KS-TN11 as a novel bacterium with an impending pharmaceutical application. Keywords: Lactic acid bacteria, Antimicrobial, Fish microflora, Anti-diabetic

  14. DIPEPTIDYL PEPTIDASE 4 (DPP-4 INHIBITORS FOR THE TREATMENT OF TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Kristin

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM merupakan penyakit kronis yang menyebabkan sekitar 1,5 juta kematian pada tahun 2012 menurut Organisasi Kesehatan Dunia (WHO. DM tipe 2 (DMT2 banyaknya 90% dari keseluruhan DM di seluruh dunia. Prevalensi DMT2 meningkat karena obesitas. Pedoman klinis merekomendasikan penggunaan metformin sebagai pengobatan lini pertama kecuali ada kontraindikasi, maka bisa diikuti dengan penambahan 1 atau 2 OADs, seperti sulfonilurea (SU, inhibitor alpha-glucosidase, atau thiazolidinediones (TZD. Baru-baru ini, obat baru golongan dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4 inhibitor telah ditambahkan ke algoritma pengobatan. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4 inhibitor inhibitor adalah kelas obat antidiabetes oral yang menghambat DPP-4 enzim. Sitagliptin, saxagliptin, vildagliptin dan linagliptin yang merupakan golongan dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor tersedia untuk pengobatan diabetes tipe 2 di Indonesia dan banyak negara lainnya. DPP-4 inhibitor memiliki khasiat glikemik yang setara. DPP-4 inhibitor menghasilkan peningkatan moderat hemoglobin terglikasi (A1C. Namun uji coba head-to-head jumlahnya terbatas, dan tidak ada data tentang penggunaan penggunaan jangka panjang (lebih dari dua tahun keamanan, kematian, komplikasi diabetes, atau kualitas-hidup pasien. Meskipun DPP-inhibitor tidak digunakan sebagai terapi awal untuk mayoritas pasien dengan diabetes tipe 2, DPP-4 inhibitor dapat digunakan sebagai terapi tambahan di tipe 2 pasien diabetes yang tidak toleran, ada kontraindikasi, atau tidak terkontrol dengan penggunaan metformin, sulfonilurea, atau thiazolidinediones. Peran sebenarnya dari DPP-4 inhibitor di antara beberapa obat lainnya untuk DMT2 tidak begitu jelas. Hanya ada sejumlah kecil studi jangka panjang pada DPP-4 inhibitor menilai penurunan glikemik, kemanjuran, kejadian kardiovaskular, kematian, atau keamanan. Pada pasien dengan gagal ginjal (perkiraan laju filtrasi glomerulus [eGFR] <30 mL / menit kronis dapat menggunakan DPP-4 inhibitor, linagliptin

  15. Effects of vildagliptin as add-on treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: insights from long-term clinical studies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odawara, Masato; Sagara, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, is wildly used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with mono- or combination-therapy. We review two previously published open-label studies to extract insights on the long-term efficacy and safety of vildagliptin. Two studies were conducted in Japan to assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin as an add-on to other oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) for 52 weeks. These studies were performed under the similar protocol in Japanese patients with T2DM who were inadequately controlled with OAD monotherapy [excluding other dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors]. Addition of vildagliptin (50 mg twice daily) to other OAD monotherapy [sulfonylurea (SU), metformin, thiazolidinedione, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor and glinide] reduced glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels by -0.64 %,-0.75 %,-0.92 %,-0.94 % and - 0.64 %, respectively, over 52 weeks of treatment. Overall, the incidence of hypoglycemia was low and was slightly higher in the add-on to SU treatment group compared with the other groups. The incidences of adverse events were comparable among the treatment groups, and vildagliptin was well-tolerated as add-on therapy to other OADs. The evidence from the two studies indicates that vildagliptin as an add-on therapy to other OADs is a clinically reasonable option for Japanese patients with T2DM who respond inadequately to other OAD monotherapy.

  16. Effect of Acarbose on Control of Metabolic Parameters in Patients with Diabetes Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziaee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Acarbose is an intestinal alpha-glucosidase inhibitor that delays absorption of carbohydrates. Findings of some studies show that it has been effective in better control of blood glucose in patients with diabetes type 1. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of administration of acarbose on glycemic & lipid parameters and daily insulin requirements and tolerability in type 1 diabetic patient.Materials & Methods: This was a clinical trial randomized double blind placebo controlled study. Performed on patients with history of at least 1 year diabetes type 1 and had HbA1c≥7.5%. Patients with Cr≥2, partial GI obstruction or IBD were excluded from the study. 45 patients were randomized to be administered acarbose or placebo for 12 weeks. Initial dose of acarbose was 25 mg T.D.S for 2 weeks, and then it was increased to 50 mg T.D.S for 10 weeks. BMI, FBS, 2hpp, HbA1c, Total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, TG and Insulin dosage were investigated monthly.Results: The values of BMI, FBS, 2hpp, HbA1c, Total cholesterol, and TG & Insulin requirements decreased significantly in the case group compared to the controls (P=0.003, P=0.005, P<0.001, P=0.001, P=0.003, P<0.001, P<0.001, respectively; but no significant changes were observed in HDL &LDL levels. Conclusion: Administration of acarbose together with insulin to type 1 diabetic patient can be valuable in improving metabolic control (BMI, FBS, 2hpp, HbA1c, Total cholesterol and TG.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:5-10

  17. Phytochemicals Content, Antioxidant and α-Glucosidase Inhibition Activity of Bouea Macrophylla Griff Seed Extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainah Adam; Hazlina Ahmad Hassali; Rosniza Razali

    2016-01-01

    Bouea macrophylla Griff or locally known as kundang is one of the common fruit plant available in Malaysia. This plant from Anacardiaceae family is native to Southeast Asia particularly in Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia. Medicinal values of this plant is not yet been explored. The present study was done to evaluate phytochemicals constituents in B. macrophylla seed extract qualitatively and quantitatively. Biological evaluations focusing on antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibition were also performed. Qualitative phytochemicals screening revealed the presence of anthraquinones, terpenoids, flavanoids, tannins, alkaloids, glycosides, reducing sugar, steroids, triterpenes, phenolic, coumarine and proteins in B. macrophylla seed extract. Quantitative determination showed that B. macrophylla seed extract contains high amount of phenolic compounds (689.17±37.50 mg GAE/ g extract), but low amount of flavonoids (2.78±0.01 mg QE/ g extract), suggesting that most of the phenolics in B. macrophylla seed extract were non-flavonoids. Antioxidant assays showed that the extract possesses strong reducing power and DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC_5_0: 4.73±0.51 μg/ ml). These activities were almost comparable to that of vitamin C. α-Glucosidase inhibition study showed that the extract inhibited alpha-glucosidase activity potently with the IC_5_0 value of 0.55±0.04 mg/ ml, suggesting the ability of the plant to delay glucose absorption in small intestine, hence reduces hyperglycemia in diabetic condition. Potent antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the extract might be attributed to the presence of high amount of phenolic compounds. In conclusion, this study showed that B. macrophylla seed extract contains various phytochemicals, possess strong antioxidant property and showed promising antidiabetic activity. These results indicate that B. macrophylla might have the potential to be developed as new pharmacological agent targeting on oxidative stress

  18. The Role of α-Glucosidase in Germinating Barley Grains1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Duncan; Rejzek, Martin; Naested, Henrik; Smedley, Mark; Otero, Sofía; Fahy, Brendan; Thorpe, Frazer; Nash, Robert J.; Harwood, Wendy; Svensson, Birte; Denyer, Kay; Field, Robert A.; Smith, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of α-glucosidase in the endosperm starch metabolism of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings is poorly understood. The enzyme converts maltose to glucose (Glc), but in vitro studies indicate that it can also attack starch granules. To discover its role in vivo, we took complementary chemical-genetic and reverse-genetic approaches. We identified iminosugar inhibitors of a recombinant form of an α-glucosidase previously discovered in barley endosperm (ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASE97 [HvAGL97]), and applied four of them to germinating grains. All four decreased the Glc-to-maltose ratio in the endosperm 10 d after imbibition, implying inhibition of maltase activity. Three of the four inhibitors also reduced starch degradation and seedling growth, but the fourth did not affect these parameters. Inhibition of starch degradation was apparently not due to inhibition of amylases. Inhibition of seedling growth was primarily a direct effect of the inhibitors on roots and coleoptiles rather than an indirect effect of the inhibition of endosperm metabolism. It may reflect inhibition of glycoprotein-processing glucosidases in these organs. In transgenic seedlings carrying an RNA interference silencing cassette for HvAgl97, α-glucosidase activity was reduced by up to 50%. There was a large decrease in the Glc-to-maltose ratio in these lines but no effect on starch degradation or seedling growth. Our results suggest that the α-glucosidase HvAGL97 is the major endosperm enzyme catalyzing the conversion of maltose to Glc but is not required for starch degradation. However, the effects of three glucosidase inhibitors on starch degradation in the endosperm indicate the existence of unidentified glucosidase(s) required for this process. PMID:21098673

  19. Role of maltase in the utilization of sucrose by Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, P R; Huber, M A; Bennett, J E

    1993-01-01

    Two isoenzymes of maltase (EC 3.2.1.20) were purified to homogeneity from Candida albicans. Isoenzymes I and II were found to have apparent molecular masses of 63 and 66 kDa on SDS/PAGE with isoelectric points of 5.0 and 4.6 respectively. Both isoenzymes resembled each other in similar N-terminal sequence, specificity for the alpha(1-->4) glycosidic linkage and immune cross-reactivity on Western blots using a maltase II antigen-purified rabbit antibody. Maltase was induced by growth on sucrose whereas beta-fructofuranosidase activity could not be detected under similar conditions. Maltase I and II were shown to be unglycosylated enzymes by neutral sugar assay, and more than 90% of alpha-glucosidase activity was recoverable from spheroplasts. These data, in combination with other results from this laboratory [Geber, Williamson, Rex, Sweeney and Bennett (1992) J. Bacteriol. 174, 6992-6996] showing lack of a plausible leader sequence in genomic or mRNA transcripts, suggest an intracellular localization of the enzyme. To establish further the mechanism of sucrose assimilation by maltase, the existence of a sucrose-inducible H+/sucrose syn-transporter was demonstrated by (1) the kinetics of sucrose-induced [14C]sucrose uptake, (2) recovery of intact [14C]sucrose from ground cells by t.l.c. and (3) transport of 0.83 mol of H+/mol of [14C]sucrose. In total, the above is consistent with a mechanism whereby sucrose is transported into C. albicans to be hydrolysed by an intracellular maltase. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8489504

  20. Inhibitory activity of Iranian plant extracts on growth and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansouri, S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a drug resistance opportunistic bacterium. Biofilm formation is key factor for survivalof P. aeruginosa in various environments. Polysaccharides may be involved in biofilm formation. The purpose of thisstudy was to evaluate antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities of seven plant extracts with known alpha-glucosidaseinhibitory activities on different strains of P. aeruginosa.Methodology and results: Plants were extracted with methanol by the maceration method. Antimicrobial activities weredetermined by agar dilution and by growth yield as measured by OD560nm of the Luria Bertani broth (LB culture with orwithout extracts. In agar dilution method, extracts of Quercus infectoria inhibited the growth of all, while Myrtuscommunis extract inhibited the growth of 3 out of 8 bacterial strains with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 1000μg/mL. All extracts significantly (p≤0.003 reduced growth rate of the bacteria in comparison with the control withoutextracts in LB broth at sub-MIC concentrations (500 μg/mL. All plant extracts significantly (p≤0.003 reduced biofilmformation compared to the controls. Glycyrrhiza glabra and Q. infectoria had the highest anti-biofilm activities. Nocorrelation between the alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity with growth or the intensity of biofilm formation was found.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: Extracts of Q. infectoria and M. communis had the most antimicrobial,while Q. infectoria and G. glabra had the highest anti-biofilm activities. All plant extracts had anti-biofilm activities withmarginal effect on growth, suggesting that the mechanisms of these activities are unrelated to static or cidal effects.Further work to understand the relation between antimicrobial and biofilm formation is needed for development of newmeans to fight the infectious caused by this bacterium in future.

  1. AB073. Classic infantile-onset Pompe disease: phenotypes and outcomes of 5 Vietnamese patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc; Do, Mai Thi Thanh; Can, Ngoc Thi Bich; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Vu, Dung Chi

    2017-01-01

    Background Pompe disease (PD) or glycogen storage disease type II is a lysosomal storage disorder, caused by mutations of GAA gene which results in deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme that involves in metabolism of glycogen in the lysosomes. Its incidence is 1/14,000–1/100,000. PD is divided into three types: classic infantile onset, non-classic infantile onset, and late onset. Early enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) before developing respiratory distress may lead to good outcome. Since 2013, we have identified 16 cases with classic infantile-onset and 5 cases were treated with ERT. Herein, we describe phenotypes and outcomes of five infantile-onset PD patients who received ERT. Methods GAA enzyme assay was done at National Taiwan University Hospital. Results Ages of diagnosis were 12, 38 and 70 days, 5 and 9 months of age. Clinical presentations included macroglossia (5/5), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (5/5), failure to thrive (5/5), facial weakness and hypotonia (3 patients diagnosed after 70 days of age), respiratory failure (1 patient diagnosed at 9 months of age). All patients had mildly elevated plasma CK (270–380 UI/L) and transaminase (60–260 UI/l). Ages at starting ERT were 28 and 58 days, 3, 6 and 10 months. The time intervals from diagnosis to starting ERT were between 14 days and 1 month. The durations of ERT were 4–22 months. The outcomes were good. All patients had improvement of cardiac functions shown on echocardiography, respiratory status, and motor development. The patient who first received ERT at 10 months of age was reportedly dead at home due to food obstruction at 18 months of age. Current ages of the survivors were 5–24 months. Conclusions Patients with classic infantile-onset PD will have good outcomes if ERT is started early. Newborn screening for this disease is necessary to yield an early diagnosis.

  2. Cecal parameters of rats fed diets containing grapefruit polyphenols and inulin as single supplements or in a combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zduńczyk, Zenon; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy; Estrella, Isabel

    2006-09-01

    We compared the effects of grapefruit flavonoids and inulin, as single dietary components or in a combination, on cecal fermentation in rats adapted to a semipurified diet. The experimental diets contained 0.3% flavonoid extract and 5% or 10% inulin and a combination of both supplements. The large bowel metabolism assessment was based on cecal parameters: bulk effect, pH, microbial enzymes activity, and short-chain fatty acid production. Both supplements induced significant enlargement of the cecal digesta weight. Acidification of cecal digesta was more pronounced, with a higher inulin addition to the diet. Cecal pH was the highest with the flavonoid-rich diets and lowest in the case of a simultaneous addition of flavonoids and a high content of inulin. The flavonoid extract applied as a single dietary supplement was observed to decrease the activity of bacterial beta-glucosidase and beta- and alpha-galactosidases in the cecal digesta. In contrast, addition of the grapefruit extract to inulin-containing diets increased the activity of alpha-glucosidase, alpha-galactosidase, and beta-galactosidase. Great accumulation of cecal digesta in rats consuming the flavonoid-diet caused a considerable increase in the short-chain fatty acid pool, mainly acetic acid. Inulin added to the diet decreased the excessive enlargement of digesta caused by dietary flavonoids. Dietary addition of inulin to the flavonoid-diet also normalized hydration of cecal digesta and significantly decreased the pH of digesta. The presence of polyphenols in the inulin-containing diets did not change total short-chain fatty acid production in the cecum of rats. Our results suggested that simultaneous intake of inulin and polyphenols can decrease the detrimental effects of the latter on cecal fermentation.

  3. Hydrolytic and ligninolytic enzyme activities in the Pb contaminated soil inoculated with litter-decomposing fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähkönen, Mika A; Lankinen, Pauliina; Hatakka, Annele

    2008-06-01

    The impact of Pb contamination was tested to five hydrolytic (beta-glucosidase, beta-xylosidase, beta-cellobiosidase, alpha-glucosidase and sulphatase) and two ligninolytic (manganese peroxidase, MnP and laccase) enzyme activities in the humus layer in the forest soil. The ability of eight selected litter-degrading fungi to grow and produce extracellular enzymes in the heavily Pb (40 g Pb of kg ww soil(-1)) contaminated and non-contaminated soil in the non-sterile conditions was also studied. The Pb content in the test soil was close to that of the shooting range at Hälvälä (37 g Pb of kg ww soil(-1)) in Southern Finland. The fungi were Agaricus bisporus, Agrocybe praecox, Gymnopus peronatus, Gymnopilus sapineus, Mycena galericulata, Gymnopilus luteofolius, Stropharia aeruginosa and Stropharia rugosoannulata. The Pb contamination (40 g Pb of kg ww soil(-1)) was deleterious to all five studied hydrolytic enzyme activities after five weeks of incubation. All five hydrolytic enzyme activities were significantly higher in the soil than in the extract of the soil indicating that a considerable part of enzymes were particle bound in the soils. Hydrolytic enzyme activities were higher in the non-contaminated soil than in the Pb contaminated soil. Fungal inocula increased the hydrolytic enzyme activities beta-cellobiosidase and beta-glucosidase in non-contaminated soils. All five hydrolytic enzyme activities were similar with fungi and without fungi in the Pb contaminated soil. This was in line that Pb contamination (40 g Pb of kg ww soil(-1)) depressed the growth of all fungi compared to those grown without Pb in the soil. Laccase and MnP activities were low in both Pb contaminated and non-contaminated soil cultures. MnP activities were higher in soil cultures containing Pb than without Pb. Our results showed that Pb in the shooting ranges decreased fungal growth and microbial functioning in the soil.

  4. Reguladores prandiales de la glucemia Prandial glycemia regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Mesa Pérez

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Se hizo una revisión actualizada sobre un nuevo grupo de drogas que actúan por vías diferentes y por distintos mecanismos de acción regulan la hiperglucemia posprandial en los pacientes con diabetes mellitus. Se destacó la repaglinida, agente secretagogo insulínico independiente de las sulfonilureas, que ayuda a restaurar la fisiología del fallo en el pico secretor insulínico inicial, en pacientes con diabetes tipo 2 y de la acarbosa, agente inhibidor de las alfas glucosidadas intestinales. La hiperglucemia posprandial es determinante en la aparición de las complicaciones vasculares, por lo cual se concluyó que estos grupos de medicamentos ayudarían a alcanzar un mejor control metabólico y representan nuevas opciones medicamentosas en el arsenal terapéutico para la diabetes mellitus tipo 2.An updated review on a new group of drugs that act by different ways and that regulate postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic patiens by different mechanisms of action was made. The roles played by repaglinide, an insulin secretagogue agent independent of sulphonilureas that helps to restore the physiology of the failure in the initial insulin secreting peak in type 2 diabetics, and by acarbose, an intestinal alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, were stressed. As postprandial hyperglycemia is determinant in the appearance of vascular complications, it was concluded that these groups of drugs may help to attain a better metabolic control and that they represent new drug options to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Differential genomic arrangements in Caryophyllales through deep transcriptome sequencing of A. hypochondriacus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeta Sunil

    Full Text Available Genome duplication event in edible dicots under the orders Rosid and Asterid, common during the oligocene period, is missing for species under the order Caryophyllales. Despite this, grain amaranths not only survived this period but display many desirable traits missing in species under rosids and asterids. For example, grain amaranths display traits like C4 photosynthesis, high-lysine seeds, high-yield, drought resistance, tolerance to infection and resilience to stress. It is, therefore, of interest to look for minor genome rearrangements with potential functional implications that are unique to grain amaranths. Here, by deep sequencing and assembly of 16 transcriptomes (86.8 billion bases we have interrogated differential genome rearrangement unique to Amaranthus hypochondriacus with potential links to these phenotypes. We have predicted 125,581 non-redundant transcripts including 44,529 protein coding transcripts identified based on homology to known proteins and 13,529 predicted as novel/amaranth specific coding transcripts. Of the protein coding de novo assembled transcripts, we have identified 1810 chimeric transcripts. More than 30% and 19% of the gene pairs within the chimeric transcripts are found within the same loci in the genomes of A. hypochondriacus and Beta vulgaris respectively and are considered real positives. Interestingly, one of the chimeric transcripts comprises two important genes, namely DHDPS1, a key enzyme implicated in the biosynthesis of lysine, and alpha-glucosidase, an enzyme involved in sucrose catabolism, in close proximity to each other separated by a distance of 612 bases in the genome of A. hypochondriacus in a convergent configuration. We have experimentally validated that transcripts of these two genes are also overlapping in the 3' UTR with their expression negatively correlated from bud to mature seed, suggesting a potential link between the high seed lysine trait and unique genome organization.

  6. Pompe disease: from pathophysiology to therapy and back again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-A eLim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder in which acid alpha-glucosidase is deficient or absent. Deficiency of this lysosomal enzyme results in progressive expansion of glycogen-filled lysosomes in multiple tissues, with cardiac and skeletal muscle being the most severely affected. The clinical spectrum ranges from fatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and skeletal muscle myopathy in infants to relatively attenuated forms, which manifest as a progressive myopathy without cardiac involvement. The currently available enzyme replacement therapy proved to be successful in reversing cardiac but not skeletal muscle abnormalities. Although the overall understanding of the disease has progressed, the pathophysiology of muscle damage remains poorly understood. Lysosomal enlargement/rupture has long been considered a mechanism of relentless muscle damage in Pompe disease. In past years, it became clear that this simple view of the pathology is inadequate; the pathological cascade involves dysfunctional autophagy, a major lysosome-dependent intracellular degradative pathway. The autophagic process in Pompe skeletal muscle is affected at the termination stage - impaired autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion. Yet another abnormality in the diseased muscle is the accelerated production of large, unrelated to ageing, lipofuscin deposits - a marker of cellular oxidative damage and a sign of mitochondrial dysfunction. The massive autophagic buildup and lipofuscin inclusions appear to cause a greater effect on muscle architecture than the enlarged lysosomes outside the autophagic regions. Furthermore, the dysfunctional autophagy affects the trafficking of the replacement enzyme and interferes with its delivery to the lysosomes. Several new therapeutic approaches have been tested in Pompe mouse models: substrate reduction therapy, lysosomal exocytosis following the overexpression of transcription factor EB and a closely related but distinct factor E3, and genetic

  7. Impact of glucose-lowering agents on the risk of cancer in type 2 diabetic patients. The Barcelona case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Simó

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the impact of glucose-lowering agents in the risk of cancer in a large type 2 diabetic population. METHODS: A nested case-control study was conducted within a defined cohort (275,164 type 2 diabetic patients attending 16 Primary Health Care Centers of Barcelona. Cases (n = 1,040 comprised those subjects with any cancer diagnosed between 2008 and 2010, registered at the Cancer Registry of Hospital Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona. Three control subjects for each case (n = 3,120 were matched by age, sex, diabetes duration, and geographical area. The treatments analyzed (within 3 years prior to cancer diagnosis were: insulin glargine, insulin detemir, human insulin, fast-acting insulin and analogues, metformin, sulfonylureas, repaglinide, thiazolidinediones, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and alpha glucosidase inhibitors. Conditional logistic regressions were used to calculate the risk of cancer associated with the use of each drug adjusted by age, BMI, dose and duration of treatment, alcohol use, smoking habit, and diabetes duration. RESULTS: No differences were observed between case and control subjects for the proportion, dose or duration of exposure to each treatment. None of the types of insulin and oral agents analyzed showed a significant increase in the risk of cancer. Moreover, no cancer risk was observed when glargine was used alone or in combination with metformin. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that diabetes treatment does not influence the risk of cancer associated with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, an eventual increase of cancer should not be a reason for biasing the selection of any glucose-lowering treatment in type 2 diabetic population.

  8. Longitudinal follow-up to evaluate speech disorders in early-treated patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yin-Ting; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Torng, Pao-Chuan; Lee, Ni-Chung; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Lu, Lu; Chien, Yin-Hsiu

    2017-05-01

    Patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD) can be treated by recombinant human acid alpha glucosidase (rhGAA) replacement beginning at birth with excellent survival rates, but they still commonly present with speech disorders. This study investigated the progress of speech disorders in these early-treated patients and ascertained the relationship with treatments. Speech disorders, including hypernasal resonance, articulation disorders, and speech intelligibility, were scored by speech-language pathologists using auditory perception in seven early-treated patients over a period of 6 years. Statistical analysis of the first and last evaluations of the patients was performed with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. A total of 29 speech samples were analyzed. All the patients suffered from hypernasality, articulation disorder, and impairment in speech intelligibility at the age of 3 years. The conditions were stable, and 2 patients developed normal or near normal speech during follow-up. Speech therapy and a high dose of rhGAA appeared to improve articulation in 6 of the 7 patients (86%, p = 0.028) by decreasing the omission of consonants, which consequently increased speech intelligibility (p = 0.041). Severity of hypernasality greatly reduced only in 2 patients (29%, p = 0.131). Speech disorders were common even in early and successfully treated patients with IOPD; however, aggressive speech therapy and high-dose rhGAA could improve their speech disorders. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fiber type conversion by PGC-1α activates lysosomal and autophagosomal biogenesis in both unaffected and Pompe skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Takikita

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PGC-1α is a transcriptional co-activator that plays a central role in the regulation of energy metabolism. Our interest in this protein was driven by its ability to promote muscle remodeling. Conversion from fast glycolytic to slow oxidative fibers seemed a promising therapeutic approach in Pompe disease, a severe myopathy caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA which is responsible for the degradation of glycogen. The recently approved enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has only a partial effect in skeletal muscle. In our Pompe mouse model (KO, the poor muscle response is seen in fast but not in slow muscle and is associated with massive accumulation of autophagic debris and ineffective autophagy. In an attempt to turn the therapy-resistant fibers into fibers amenable to therapy, we made transgenic KO mice expressing PGC-1α in muscle (tgKO. The successful switch from fast to slow fibers prevented the formation of autophagic buildup in the converted fibers, but PGC-1α failed to improve the clearance of glycogen by ERT. This outcome is likely explained by an unexpected dramatic increase in muscle glycogen load to levels much closer to those observed in patients, in particular infants, with the disease. We have also found a remarkable rise in the number of lysosomes and autophagosomes in the tgKO compared to the KO. These data point to the role of PGC-1α in muscle glucose metabolism and its possible role as a master regulator for organelle biogenesis - not only for mitochondria but also for lysosomes and autophagosomes. These findings may have implications for therapy of lysosomal diseases and other disorders with altered autophagy.

  10. Novel method for detection of glycogen in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurat, Alexander V; Segvich, Dyann M; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    Glycogen, a branched polymer of glucose, functions as an energy reserve in many living organisms. Abnormalities in glycogen metabolism, usually excessive accumulation, can be caused genetically, most often through mutation of the enzymes directly involved in synthesis and degradation of the polymer leading to a variety of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs). Microscopic visualization of glycogen deposits in cells and tissues is important for the study of normal glycogen metabolism as well as diagnosis of GSDs. Here, we describe a method for the detection of glycogen using a renewable, recombinant protein which contains the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) from starch-binding domain containing protein 1 (Stbd1). We generated a fusion protein containing g lutathione S-transferase, a cM c eptitope and the tbd1 BM (GYSC) for use as a glycogen-binding probe, which can be detected with secondary antibodies against glutathione S-transferase or cMyc. By enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we demonstrate that GYSC binds glycogen and two other polymers of glucose, amylopectin and amylose. Immunofluorescence staining of cultured cells indicate a GYSC-specific signal that is co-localized with signals obtained with anti-glycogen or anti-glycogen synthase antibodies. GYSC-positive staining inside of lysosomes is observed in individual muscle fibers isolated from mice deficient in lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase, a well-characterized model of GSD II (Pompe disease). Co-localized GYSC and glycogen signals are also found in muscle fibers isolated from mice deficient in malin, a model for Lafora disease. These data indicate that GYSC is a novel probe that can be used to study glycogen metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. The association of yogurt starters with Lactobacillus casei DN 114.001 in fermented milk alters the composition and metabolism of intestinal microflora in germ-free rats and in human flora-associated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouzi, Z; Andrieux, C; Degivry, M C; Bouley, C; Szylit, O

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of milk and of various fermented milks on the composition and metabolic activities of the intestinal microflora. Groups of eight rats were fed for 6 wk a diet containing 30% nonfermented milk (M), yogurt (Y), milk fermented with Lactobacillus casei (LcFM) or milk fermented with the association of L. casei DN 114.001 and yogurt starters (LcYFM). In the first study, the survival of the lactic acid bacteria from the fermented milks was assessed by bacterial enumeration in feces of germ-free rats (GF rats) fed milk or fermented milks. The metabolic activities of the lactic acid bacteria were studied in these rats by the measurement of glycolytic activities and products of bacterial fermentation, i.e., acetate and lactate (isoforms L and D). In a second study, the effects of fermented milks on the composition and metabolism [gas, glycolytic activities, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), alcohol and ammonia] of human flora were studied using human flora-associated rats (HF rats). In GF rats, the survival of L. casei in the feces did not differ between those fed the LcFM and LcYFM diets. L. bulgaricus was detected in the feces of the rats fed Y, whereas Streptoccus thermophilus was found in the feces of the LcYFM group. In HF rats, fecal concentration of Bifidobacteria was greater in the LcFM group than in the others. beta-Glucuronidase (EC 3.2.1.31) activity was lower in rats fed LcFM and Y than in those fed M and LcYFM, whereas beta-galactosidase (3.2.1.23), alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1 20) and beta-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) activities were higher in the LcYFM group compared with the others. Methane excretion was higher in rats fed Y than in other groups. Cecal SCFA concentrations did not differ in LcFM, Y and M groups, but total SCFA, acetate, propionate and butyrate were significantly greater in the LcYFM group. These results suggest that milk fermented with the combination of L. casei and yogurt starters leads to specific

  12. Dietary supplementation of different doses of NUTRIOSE FB, a fermentable dextrin, alters the activity of faecal enzymes in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Ellen G H M; Wils, Daniel; Pasman, Wilrike J; Saniez, Marie-Hélène; Kardinaal, Alwine F M

    2005-10-01

    It is well documented that fermentation of carbohydrates that escape digestion exert several effects supposed to be beneficial for (colonic) health, including an increase in stool volume, a shorter intestinal transit time, production of short chain fatty acids and a decrease of colonic pH (Kritchevsky 1988). NUTRIOSE FB is a dextrin that is not completely hydrolysed and absorbed in the small intestine, due to many alpha-1.6 linkages and the presence of non-digestible glucoside linkages (e. g. alpha-1.2 and alpha-1.3). To be beneficial for 'colonic' health effective NUTRIOSE FB must reach the cecum in some form. To estimate how much non digested NUTRIOSE FB is fermented and to determine the fibre-like effect of the wheat dextrin NUTRIOSE((R))FB by analysing enzymatic activity in faeces. In a randomized, double-blind,multiple dose, placebo-controlled, combined cross-over and parallel trial, 20 healthy men (age 31.7 +/- 9.1 yrs; BMI 24.5 +/- 2.9 kg.m(-2) received different treatments. One group of ten subjects consumed on top of their diet 10, 30 and 60 g daily of NUTRIOSE FB or maltodextrin (placebo). The other group of 10 subjects consumed 15, 45 and 80 g daily. Each dose was consumed for 7 days. On the last two days of each of the 7-day period, faeces were collected in which the enzymatic activity and NUTRIOSE FB residue were analysed. As expected, the faecal residue of NUTRIOSE FB non-linearly increased with the dose of NUTRIOSE FB to approximately 13% of 80 g/d. Compared with the placebo, 30, 45, 60 and 80 g/d of NUTRIOSE FB increased the concentration of alpha-glucosidase significantly. All daily doses of NUTRIOSE FB (10 g/d to 80 g/d) led to significant changes in concentration of beta-glucosidase. The small amount of the residue of NUTRIOSE FB in the faeces suggests that approximately 87% or more of NUTRIOSE FB is digested or fermented in the gastrointestinal tract. Fermentation of NUTRIOSE FB led to an increased faecal concentration of alpha- and beta-glucosidase.

  13. Aislamiento y caracterización bioquímica de la α-glucosidasa II del hongo patógeno Candida albicans Aislamiento y caracterización bioquímica de la α-glucosidasa II del hongo patógeno Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Flores Carreón

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-glucosidase II participates in N-linked glycosylation of proteins. A soluble 47 kDa α-glucosidase II has been previously isolated from C. albicans; however, bioinformatics analysis indicate that native enzyme has a molecular mass of 100 kDa. In this study we assessed the effect of protease inhibitors on intracellular distribution of α-glucosidase II. Despite there was not a significant change in the enzyme distribution, α-glucosidase II activity was associated to a 83 or 47 kDa polypeptide in absence or presence of inhibitors, respectively. Soluble 83-kDa protein was purified by conventional methodology and its biochemical characteristics were similar to those reported for the 47 kDa enzyme. Thus, these results indicated the 83 kDa protein is an α-glucosidase II and also suggested it is a precursor of the 47 kDa enzyme previously reported. La α-glucosidasa II participa en la ruta de la N-glicosilación de proteínas. En Candida albi­cans se ha aislado un polipéptido soluble de 47 kDa con actividad de α-glucosidasa II; sin embargo, análisis bioinformáticos indican que la enzima nativa pudiera tener un peso mo­lecular de 100 kDa. En este trabajo se estudió el efecto de inhibidores de proteasas sobre la distribución intracelular de la α-glucosidasa II. Se demostró que la distribución intracelular no fue afectada significativamente, pero la actividad de la α-glucosidasa II estuvo asociada a una proteína de 83 ó 47 kDa en ausencia o presencia de inhibidores de proteasas, res­pectivamente. La enzima soluble de 83 kDa se purificó por métodos convencionales y se demostró que presenta características bioquímicas similares a la enzima de 47 kDa. Estos datos confirmaron que la proteína de 83 kDa es una α-glucosidasa II y sugieren que es precursora de la enzima de 47 kDa previamente descrita.

  14. Impact of Voglibose on of Metabolic Control Indicators in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Pankiv

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available New therapeutic options to control diabetes mellitus (DM emerged with the discovery of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors which slow the absorption of carbohydrates in the small intestine. The objective of the study — to investigate the effect of voglibose administration on parameters of glycemic control, lipid metabolism and tolerability in patients with DM type 1. Materials and Methods. Criteria for inclusion in the study: DM type 1, age from 26 to 48 years, the level of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c from 8 to 9 %. 19 patients were examined (7 men and 12 women, mean age 37.2 ± ± 3.9 years, DM duration 8.5 ± 1.4 years. Results. During the follow-up period (12 weeks, the level of HbA1c significantly decreased from 9.4 ± 0.6 % to 7.8 ± 0.4 % (p < 0.05. On the background of additional administration of voglibose, we observed a significant reduction in fasting glucose level from 10.37 ± 0.36 mmol/l to 7.39 ± 0.28 mmol/l (p < 0.01 and postprandial — from 12.29 ± 1.42 mmol/l to 8.46 ± 0.64 mmol/l (p < 0.01. At that, we have noted a significant reduction of total cholesterol (from 5.83 ± 0.11 mmol/l to 5.38 ± 0.08 mmol/l, p < 0.05, triglycerides (from 1.82 ± 0.03 mmol/l to 1.46 ± 0.03 mmol/l, p < 0.05 and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (from 3.41 ± 0.05 mmol/l to 3.37 ± ± 0.04 mmol/l, p < 0.05. There were no significant changes in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol parameters. In two surveyed persons, we have detected adverse effects (bloating, which did not require discontinuation of therapy. Conclusion. Additional administration of voglibose at a dose of 0.9 mg/day on a background of insulin therapy helps to improve glycemic control and lipid metabolism, to reduce the daily dose of exogenous insulin and hypoglycemic reactions incidence in patients with DM type 1.

  15. Effects on Diabetes Medications, Weight and Glycated Hemoglobin Among Adult Patients With Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: 6-Month Observations From a Full Meal Replacement, Low-Calorie Diet Weight Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Judy Y; So, Derek Y F; Dent, Robert R

    2018-02-01

    A 6-month weight-management program with full meal replacement, low-calorie diet (full MR-LCD) (900 kcal/day for 6 to 12 weeks) follows a protocol for patients with diabetes for decreasing or discontinuing weight-gaining diabetes medications first (Group WG) and then titrating weight-neutral medications (Group WN). This is a retrospective cohort study (1992 to 2009) of weight, glycemic control and diabetes medications changes in 317 patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes who were taking medications. Group WG and Group WN were similar at baseline, except that glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels were significantly lower in Group WN (7.5% vs. 6.6%; p<0.001). At 6 months, both groups had lost 16% of their weight, and the decreases or discontinuations of medications were 92.1% sulfonureas, 86.5% insulins, 78.8% thiazolidinediones, 77.8% alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, 50% meglitinides, 33.3% dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and 32.8% metformin. At 6 months, compared with baseline, A1C levels improved in Group WG and Group WN (6-month A1C levels 6.7% and 5.8%, respectively; p<0.0001), and Group WN had significantly better A1C levels than Group WG. At 6 months, 30% of patients were no longer taking diabetes medications and had significantly better percentages of weight loss compared with those taking medications (18.6% vs. 16%; p=0.002); both groups had improved glycemic control at 6 months (A1C 6.0% vs. A1C 6.6%; NS). In patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes taking medications, a full MR-LCD program appears to be safe and includes improvement in A1C levels. At 6 months, the percentage of weight loss can be significantly better in patients who no longer require diabetes medications, and A1C levels are best controlled in patients who are on WN medications. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mitiglinide: KAD 1229, S 21403.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Mitiglinide [KAD 1229, S 21403], a derivative of benzylsuccinic acid, is a potassium channel antagonist undergoing development with Kissei for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has potent oral hypoglycaemic activity and is structurally different from the sulphonylureas, although it stimulates calcium influx by binding to the suphonylurea receptor on pancreatic beta-cells and closing K+ATP channels. Mitiglinide belongs to a family of meglitinide analogues that also includes repaglinide and nateglinide. Mitiglinide is licensed to Servier for Europe, where it is undergoing phase III development, and for Russia, the Commonwealth of Independent States, the Baltic Republics, the Middle East, Oceania, China (including Hong Kong) and Taiwan. Kissei exclusively licensed mitiglinide to Choongwae Pharma for South Korea in March 2003. In August 2002, Kissei and Takeda entered into a co-marketing agreement for mitiglinide in Japan. The companies will co-market the agent under a single brand name. Mitiglinide was licensed to Purdue Pharma for the US, Canada, Mexico and Central and South America. However, Kissei and Purdue Pharma terminated their agreement in February 2001 following Purdue Pharma's decision to concentrate on core areas such as oncology and analgesics. Kissei's US subsidiary, Kissei Pharma US, is currently carrying on the ongoing phase II clinical development in the US. However, in its Annual Report 2003, Kissei announced that it is considering outlicensing mitiglinide for development in marketing in North America. Mitiglinide has been recommended for approval in Japan for the management of postprandial hyperglycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Kissei is also conducting phase II/III clinical trials with a combination of mitiglinide and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor (additional indication) in patients with type 2 diabetes in Japan. In the US, the agent is being evaluated in phase II clinical trials with Kissei Pharma USA. Mitiglinide is also

  17. Baseline Body Mass Index and the Efficacy of Hypoglycemic Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaoling; Yang, Wenjia; Gao, Xueying; Zhou, Lingli; Han, Xueyao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to compare the effects of hypoglycemic treatments in groups of patients categorized according to the mean baseline body mass indexes (BMIs). Methods Studies were identified by a literature search and all the studies were double blind, placebo-controlled randomized trials in type 2 diabetes patients; study length of ≥12 weeks with the efficacy evaluated by changes in HbA1c from baseline in groups. The electronic search was first conducted in January 2015 and repeated in June 2015. Results 227 studies were included. Treatment with sulfonylureas was compared with placebo in overweight patients and resulted in a significantly greater change in the HbA1c levels (weighted mean difference (WMD), −1.39%) compared to obese patients (WMD, −0.77%)(p0.05). Treatment with alpha glucosidase inhibitors in normal weight patients was associated with a HbA1c change (WMD, −0.94%) that was comparable that in overweight (WMD, −0.72%) and obese patients (WMD, −0.56%)(p>0.05). Treatment with thiazolidinediones in normal weight patients was associated with a HbA1c change (WMD, −1.04%) that was comparable with that in overweight (WMD, −1.02%) and obese patients (WMD, −0.88%)(p>0.05). Treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors in normal weight patients was associated with a HbA1c change (WMD, −0.93%) that was comparable with that in overweight (WMD, −0.66%) and obese patients (WMD, −0.61%)(p>0.05). In total, of the seven hypoglycemic agents, regression analysis indicated that the mean baseline BMI was not associated with the mean HbA1c changes from baseline. Conclusion In each kind of hypoglycemic therapy in type 2 diabetes, the baseline BMI was not associated with the efficacy of HbA1c changes from baseline. PMID:27935975

  18. Positive effects of acarbose in the diabetic rat are not altered by feeding schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, B E; Vasselli, J R; Katovich, M J

    1998-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that chronic dietary treatment with acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, improves glucose homeostasis in the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat. In this study we evaluated the effects of 4 weeks of acarbose treatment on glucose homeostasis in STZ-diabetic rats for both meal-fed (three times daily) and ad libitum feeding conditions. Sprague Dawley male rats (n = 58) were started on a daily meal-feeding paradigm consisting of three 2-h feeding periods: 0700 to 0900 hours, 1300 to 1500 hours, and 1900 to 2100 hours. Following 2 weeks of adaptation, half of the animals were switched to ad libitum feeding. The feeding paradigm itself (meal fed versus ad lib.) affected neither body weight nor daily food intake. Twenty animals from each feeding group then received STZ (60 mg/kg i.v.), whereas control animals received vehicle injections only. Two days later, the diet of 10 STZ-treated animals from each paradigm was supplemented with acarbose (40 mg of BAY G 5421/100-g diet), and the groups were treated for 4 weeks. Untreated diabetic rats had lower body weight than vehicle-injected control rats at all time points after STZ treatment. Acarbose treatment delayed this effect on body weight. STZ treatment induced hyperphagia regardless of feeding paradigm, which was significantly attenuated by acarbose only for the first week of treatment. Untreated diabetic rats had fasting blood glucose values 4 times those of vehicle-injected controls in both the meal-fed and ad libitum-fed conditions. Acarbose significantly lowered fasting blood glucose in the treated STZ groups. Blood glucose was also assessed 0, 90, and 180 min following the start of a meal. The postprandial rise in blood glucose was significantly reduced in acarbose-treated meal-fed diabetic rats, to values not significantly different from those of vehicle-injected control rats. During the fourth week of treatment glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly higher in untreated

  19. Patrones de prescripción de antidiabéticos en un grupo de pacientes colombianos Antidiabetic drugs prescription patterns among a group of patients in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Machado Alba

    2007-08-01

    prescribed from two to four. The medications prescribed were: biguanides (67.5%, sulphonylureas (64.9%, insulin (23.5%, and thiazolidinediones (0.1%. The most common oral combination-therapies were: glibenclamide and metformin (n = 2 847, metformin and insulin (n = 510, glibenclamide and insulin (n = 148, and metformin, insulin, and glibenclamide (n = 288. Of the total, 94.3% had comorbid conditions for which they had been prescribed medication: antihypertensive drugs (in 74.4% of the cases, anti-inflammatories (61.5%, hypolipemiants (45.5%, antiulcer medications (21.0%, psychoactive drugs (16.8%, antimicrobials (14.4%, asthma medication (5.3%, and salicylic acid (2.8%. Prescriptions for comorbid conditions were more common among women than men (95.6% vs. 92.7%, P < 0.001. Undertreatment with certain medications (metformin, thiazolidinediones, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and salicylic acid, and overtreatment with others (antiulcer drugs, probably exist. CONCLUSIONS: There are significant differences in oral therapies prescribed for diabetes across the 19 cities studied, but overall, prescription patterns are appropriate. Educational strategies should be developed to address those prescribing practices that are not appropriate, and the clinical results of the medications studied should be explored.

  20. NEW IN THE TREATMENT OF TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kadzharyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a major medical and social problem almost in all countries of the world. Currently, there are more and more various pharmacological agents that make management of the glycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes extremely difficult. Therefore, when the physician is faced with the choice of glucose-lowering therapy, he should be clearly aware of all the options in contemporary treatment. 11 groups of hypoglycemic agents are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes The biguanides. According to modern concepts, biguanides inhibit the oxidation of glucose by stimulating anaerobic glycolysis. Both in the consensus of ADA / EASD, and in the IDF recommendations metformin may be the drug of the choice for hypoglycemic therapy of diabetes type 2. Sulfonylurea derivatives: glibenclamide, glimepiride, gliquidone, Glipizide. They belong to a group of secretagogues, as their action is based on the ability to stimulate the secretion of insulin by ß-cells of the pancreas. Prandial glucose regulators. Meglitinides (repaglinide and nateglinide stimulate insulin secretion by ß-cells. Due to the rapid normalization of stimulated insulin level after taking the drugs the risk of hypoglycaemia between meals is minimized. Insulin sensitayzers. Thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone, pioglitazone reduce insulin resistance of peripheral tissues by binding to receptors, activating peroxisome proliferation (PPARg in the nuclear membrane. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose, miglitol, voglibose competitively inhibits intestinal enzymes (α-glucosidase. It consequently slows carbohydrate absorption from foods and supply of glucose into the blood. Incretin mimetics. Analogues of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 stimulate the biosynthesis and secretion of insulin, regulate food consumption, support ß-cells in a healthy state, suppress glucagon secretion, depending on the glucose levels, affect the rate of gastric emptying, stimulat proliferation of

  1. Salivary gland proteins of the human malaria vector, Anopheles dirus B (Diptera: Culicidae Proteínas das glândulas salivares do Anopheles dirus B (Diptera: Culicidae, vetor da malária humana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narissara Jariyapan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Salivary gland proteins of the human malaria vector, Anopheles dirus B were determined and analyzed. The amount of salivary gland proteins in mosquitoes aged between 3 - 10 days was approximately 1.08 ± 0.04 µg/female and 0.1 ± 0.05 µg/male. The salivary glands of both sexes displayed the same morphological organization as that of other anopheline mosquitoes. In females, apyrase accumulated in the distal regions, whereas alpha-glucosidase was found in the proximal region of the lateral lobes. This differential distribution of the analyzed enzymes reflects specialization of different regions for sugar and blood feeding. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that at least seven major proteins were found in the female salivary glands, of which each morphological region contained different major proteins. Similar electrophoretic protein profiles were detected comparing unfed and blood-fed mosquitoes, suggesting that there is no specific protein induced by blood. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analysis showed the most abundant salivary gland protein, with a molecular mass of approximately 35 kilodaltons and an isoelectric point of approximately 4.0. These results provide basic information that would lead to further study on the role of salivary proteins of An. dirus B in disease transmission and hematophagy.Proteínas das glândulas salivares do Anopheles dirus B (Diptera: Culicidae, vetor da malária humana foram determinadas e analisadas. A quantidade de proteínas das glândulas salivares em mosquitos com três a 10 dias de idade foi de aproximadamente 1,08 ± 0,04 µg/ fêmea e de 0,1 ± 0,05 µg/macho. As glândulas salivares de ambos os sexos mostraram organização morfológica semelhante à de outros mosquitos anofelinos. Em fêmeas, apirase acumula-se nas regiões distais, enquanto alfa-glucosidase foi encontrada na região proximal dos lóbulos laterais. Esta distribuição diferencial das enzimas analisadas reflete a especialização de

  2. Hydroethanolic extract of the inner stem bark of Cedrela odorata has low toxicity and reduces hyperglycemia induced by an overload of sucrose and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Morenna Alana; Collicchio, Thiago Carvalho Mamede; Ascêncio, Sergio Donizeti; Martins, Domingos Tabajara de Oliveira; Balogun, Sikiru Olaitan; Bieski, Isanete Geraldini Costa; da Silva, Leilane Aparecida; Colodel, Edson Moleta; de Souza, Roberto Lopes; de Souza, Damiana Luiza Pereira; de França, Suélem Aparecida; Andrade, Claudia Marlise Balbinotti; Kawashita, Nair Honda

    2015-03-13

    animals that received glucose overload by 36.7% and 24.1% in the area under the glucose curve (AUC). When the overload was sucrose, HeECo reduced the blood glucose level by 44.4% without affecting AUC. Treatment with HeECo of the blood glucose of the diabetic animals for 21 days did not lead to improvement in weight gain and regularization of the blood glucose level, but reduced the triacylglycerol and malondialdehyde levels by 36.6% and 48.1%, respectively. The activity of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were significantly increased when compared to diabetic control rats. HPLC analysis showed the presence of polyphenols, such as gallic acid, (-)- gallocatechin and (+)- catechin, the latter is present in higher quantity. Collectively, these data showed that HeECo could blunt the postprandial glycemic surge in rats; possibly through inhibition of alpha-glucosidase and positive modulation of antioxidant enzymes. Our findings confirmed the anti-hiperglycemic activity of HeECo in STZ- diabetic rats. Cedrela odorata is effective in diminishing glucose levels in vitro and in vivo and in ameliorating oxidative damage that occurs in diabetes and/or due to hyperglycemia in rats. According to our results, the efficacy of Cedrela odorata preparation could be due to the presence of active principles with different mode of actions at the molecular level, including α-glycosidases and glucose transporter inhibitors and antioxidant property. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. IMPACT OF HONEY DRESSING IN CHRONIC ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Kumar S. S

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This was an open label study. Although, honey has been used for centuries in wound care, now only it is being integrated into modern medical practice. The resurgence of interest in honey as a medicine for modern wound dressing offers opportunities for both patients and clinicians. The aim of this study is to show the advantage of honey dressing over conventional saline dressing in the management of chronic non-healing ulcer. This property of honey is mentioned in papyruses traced to 3500 years ago among ancient Egyptians and the Hebrews 3000 years ago. Honey naturally contains small amounts of enzymes. The predominant enzymes in honey are diastase (amylase, invertase (alpha-glucosidase and glucose oxidase. Honey has been proven to have significant antibacterial properties and is a useful constituent in wound and burn care. The stimulation of cell growth seen with honey is probably also responsible for ‘kick-starting’ the healing process in chronic wounds that have remained non-healing for long periods. Honey has a broad spectrum of activity against bacteria and fungi. Many randomised and non-randomised study has shown the efficacy of honey as a healing agent and excellent dressing material. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study was conducted in medical college, Trivandrum, which is a tertiary care centre. Patients are selected from orthopaedic and general surgical wards. The study period was one year extending from July 2014 to June 2015. Saline dressing was given for the patients admitted in the first 6 months of study. Honey dressing was given for the next 6 months of study. Outcome was assessed on duration of hospital stay, difference of outcome in different distribution of grades of ulcer, difference of outcome in patients with vascular compromise, which is found out by Doppler ultrasound and difference of outcome in patients with diabetes mellitus. RESULTS Most significant observations made were in regard to duration of hospital stay

  4. Enzyme replacement therapy for infantile-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Zhang, Lingli; Quan, Shuyan

    2017-11-20

    Infantile-onset Pompe disease is a rare and progressive autosomal-recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Current treatment involves enzyme replacement therapy (with recombinant human alglucosidase alfa) and symptomatic therapies (e.g. to control secretions). Children who are cross-reactive immunological material (CRIM)-negative require immunomodulation prior to commencing enzyme replacement therapy.Enzyme replacement therapy was developed as the most promising therapeutic approach for Pompe disease; however, the evidence is lacking, especially regarding the optimal dose and dose frequency. To assess the effectiveness, safety and appropriate dose regimen of enzyme replacement therapy for treating infantile-onset Pompe disease. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register, which is compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Embase (Ovid), PubMed and LILACS, and CBM, CNKI, VIP, and WANFANG for literature published in Chinese. In addition, we searched three online registers: WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ClinicalTrials.gov, and www.genzymeclinicalresearch.com. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search of the Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register: 24 November 2016. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of enzyme replacement therapy in children with infantile-onset Pompe disease. Two authors independently selected relevant trials, assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted investigators to obtain important missing information. We found no trials comparing the effectiveness and safety of enzyme replacement therapy to another intervention, no intervention or placebo.We found one trial (18 participants

  5. Chemometrics Optimized Extraction Procedures, Phytosynergistic Blending and in vitro Screening of Natural Enzyme Inhibitors Amongst Leaves of Tulsi, Banyan and Jamun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Baishakhi; Bhandari, Koushik; Singla, Rajeev K; Katakam, Prakash; Samanta, Tanmoy; Kushwaha, Dilip Kumar; Gundamaraju, Rohit; Mitra, Analava

    2015-10-01

    targeted enzymes expressed in terms of IC50 values have shown that hydro-ethanolic extracts in all cases whether individual species or composites in varying ratios gave higher IC50 values thus showing greater effectivity. Current research provides the state-of-the-art of search of NEIs amongst three species by in-vitro assays which can be further utilized for bioactivity-guided isolations of such enzyme inhibitors. Further, it reports the optimized phyto-blend ratios so as to achieve synergistic anti-oxidative actions. The current research work focuses on the optimization of the extraction process parameters and the ratios of phyto-synergistic blends of the leaves of three common medicinal plants viz. banyan, jamun and tulsi by chemometrics. Qualitative and quantitative chemo profiling of the extracts were done by different phytochemical tests and UV spectrophotometric methods. Enzymes like alpha amylase, alpha glucosidase, aldose reductase, dipeptidyl peptidase 4, angiotensin converting enzymes are found to be pathogenic in type 2 diabetes. In vitro screening of natural enzyme inhibitors amongst individual extracts and composite blends were carried out by different assay procedures and the potency expressed in terms of IC50 values. Antioxidant potentials were estimated by DPPH radical scavenging, ABTS, FRAP and Dot Blot assay. Hydroalcoholic solvent (50:50) gave maximal yield of bio-actives with minimal chlorophyll leaching. Hydroethanolic extract of tulsi showed maximal antioxidant effect. Though all composites showed synergism, maximal effects were shown by the composite (1:1:2) in terms of polyphenol yield, antioxidant effect and inhibitory actions against the targeted enzymes. Abbreviations used: DPP4- dipeptidyl peptidase 4; AR- aldose reductase; ACE- angiotensin converting enzyme; PPAR-γ- peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ; NEIs- natural enzyme inhibitors; BE- binding energy; GLP-1- Glucagon like peptide -1; ROS- Reactive oxygen species; CAT- catalase