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Sample records for alpha-emitters radon lung

  1. High-LET alpha-emitters: Radon, lung cancer and smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Academy of Sciences BEIR IV Report deals with the health effects in human populations exposed to internally-deposited alpha-emitting radionuclides and their decay products. Quantitative risk estimates for cancer induction are derived, mainly from analyses of epidemiological data. The Report addresses the health outcomes of exposure to radon and its daughters, primarily lung cancer risks of worker exposure to radon progeny in underground mines and in the general public in indoor domestic environments. An excess relative risk model of lung cancer mortality and exposure to radon progeny is developed; this models the excess risk per Working Level Month in terms of time intervals prior to an attained age, and is dependent on time-since-exposure and age at risk. Risk projections are presented and cover exposure situations of current public health concern. For example, lifetime exposure to 1 WLM y/sup /minus/1/ is estimated to increase the number of deaths due to lung cancer by a factor of about 1.5 over the current rate for both males and females in a population having the current prevalence of cigarette-smoking. Occupational exposure to 4 WLM y/sup /minus/1/ from ages 20 y to 40 y is projected to increase lung cancer deaths by a factor of 1.6 over the current rate of this age cohort in the general population. In all of these cases, most of the increased risk occurs to smokers for whom the risk is up to ten times greater than for non-smokers. 8 refs., 1 tab

  2. Microscopic dose to lung from inhaled alpha emitters in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the short range of alpha particles in tissue, the degree of uniformity of irradiation of the lung varies greatly depending on the form of the inhaled material. Animal studies have shown that the degree of dose uniformity influences the risk of lung cancer. This study investigates the radiation dose distribution of plutonium in human lung. Numerical maps of tissue configuration and target cell locations are obtained from histological sections of human lung tissue stained to enhance the identification of putative cell types for parenchymal lung cancers, i.e. alveolar type II cells and Clara cells. Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain dose distribution around individual particles, and these distributions are used to compute dose distribution in volumes of lung tissue. Lung dose is characterised both by the degree of non-uniformity of irradiation and the relative degree of irradiation of all tissue versus the special cells of interest. (authors)

  3. Inhalation of natural radiation. Lung cancer from radon; Inhalation natuerlicher Strahlung. Lungenkrebs durch Radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueske-Hohlfeld, I.; Kreienbock, L.; Wichmann, H.E.

    2006-07-01

    Radon is a natural noble gas contained in all soils, rocks, water and air. It is an alpha emitter and decays into other radioactive elements. Through cracks and leaks, it may easily enter in buildings. Inhalation of radon and its radioactive decay products is one of the main causes of lung cancer, second only to tobacco smoke. (orig.)

  4. Radon and radiation biology of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main papers presented at the meeting dealt with the behaviour of radon and the indoor environment, radiation biology of the lung, lung dosis and the possible cancer risk caused by radon in homes, contamination of the room air. A series of special papers treated the radon problem in detail: sources and transport mechanisms of radon, geological aspects of the radon radiation burden in Switzerland, radon in homes, search for radon sources, and the Swiss radon-programme RAPROS. 67 figs., 13 tabs., 75 refs

  5. Lung cancer risk of low-level exposures to alpha emitters: critical reappraisal and experiments based on a new cytodynamic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, Kenneth T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-02-20

    Ecologic U.S. county data suggest negative associations between residential radon exposure and lung cancer mortality (LCM)-inconsistent with clearly positive associations revealed by occupational data on individual miners, but perhaps explained by competing effects of cell killing vs. mutations in alpha-exposed bronchial epithelium. To assess the latter possibility, a biologically based "cytodynamic 2-stage" (CD2) cancer-risk model was fit to combined 1950-54 age- specific person-year data on lung cancer mortality (LCM) in white females of age 40+ y in 2,821 U.S. counties (-90% never-smokers), and in 5 cohorts of underground miners who never smoked. New estimates of household annual average radon exposure in U.S. counties were used, which were found to have a significant negative ecologic association with 1950-54 LCM in U.S. white females, adjusted for age and all subsets of two among 21 socioeconomic, climatic and other factors considered. A good CD2 fit was obtained to the combined residential/miner data, using biologically plausible parameter values. Without further optimization, the fit also predicted independent inverse dose-rate effects shown (for the first time) to occur in nonsmoking miners. Using the same U.S. county-level LCM data, a separate study revealed a positive ecologic association between LCM and bituminous coal use in the U.S., in agreement with epidemiological data on LCM in women in China. The modeling results obtained are consistent with the CD2-based hypothesis that residential radon exposure has a nonlinear U-shaped relation to LCM risk, and that current linear no-threshold extrapolation models substantially overestimate such risk. A U-shaped dose-response corresponds to a CD2-model prediction that alpha radiation kills more premalignant cells than it generates at low exposure levels, but not at higher levels. To test this hypothesis, groups of Japanese medaka (ricefish minnows) were exposed for 10 to 14 weeks to different concentrations of

  6. Models for comparing lung-cancer risks in radon- and plutonium-exposed experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies of radon-exposed underground miners have provided the primary basis for estimating human lung-cancer risks resulting from radon exposure. These studies are sometimes used to estimate lung-cancer risks resulting from exposure to other alpha- emitters as well. The latter use, often referred to as the dosimetric approach, is based on the assumption that a specified dose to the lung produces the same lung-tumor risk regardless of the substance producing the dose. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory, experiments have been conducted in which laboratory rodents have been given inhalation exposures to radon and to plutonium (239PuO2). These experiments offer a unique opportunity to compare risks, and thus to investigate the validity of the dosimetric approach. This comparison is made most effectively by modeling the age-specific risk as a function of dose in a way that is comparable to analyses of human data. Such modeling requires assumptions about whether tumors are the cause of death or whether they are found incidental to death from other causes. Results based on the assumption that tumors are fatal indicate that the radon and plutonium dose-response curves differ, with a linear function providing a good description of the radon data, and a pure quadratic function providing a good description of the plutonium data. However, results based on the assumption that tumors are incidental to death indicate that the dose-response curves for the two exposures are very similar, and thus support the dosimetric approach. 14 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Risk estimates for exposure to alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary scope of this report is to evaluate the risk of lung cancer from occupational exposure to short-lived daughters of radon and thoron. The Subcommittee on Risk Estimates considers that inhalation of radon and thoron daughters is the major radiation hazard from alpha radiation in uranium mining. The secondary scope of this report is the consideration of the applicability of the risk estimates derived from miners to the general public. The risk to members of the public from radium-226 in drinking water is also considered. Some research requirments are suggested

  8. Radon and lung cancer in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that the incidence of lung cancer is related to inhalation of radon and radon daughters. However, the magnitude of the risk and its dependence upon physiological and environmental factors are still not well defined either experimentally or epidemiologically. Occupational studies of underground miners are the only available human epidemiological information to estimate the risk of exposure to radon daughters in the indoor environment. The results are shown of a study carried out to determine whether lung cancer mortality rates in Spain are significantly correlated with the average indoor radon levels. For this purpose, we have used indoor radon data generated from the national survey carried out in 1989. Lung cancer distribution by cities and deaths, by year of death and sex, were retrieved for each of the different provinces of Spain for the period 1960-1985, showing the evolution and changes in the incidence of lung cancer in the population. Data referring to the evolution of lung cancer for males and females from 1940 until 1985 are also shown. Since cigarette smoking has been linked to lung cancer the effect of smoking habits in the Spanish population was also considered in this analysis. The first results of this study establish no clear evidence of any substantial association between lung cancer mortality rates and indoor radon for males. However, a relationship was evident for females. (author)

  9. American Lung Association's radon public information program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Lung Association (ALA), the nation's oldest voluntary health organization, is dedicated to the conquest of lung disease and the promotion of lung health. The objective of the ALA Radon Public Information Program is to reduce public exposure to elevated indoor radon levels through implementing grassroots-based radon public awareness campaigns by 22 local ALA groups. The program, which is funded by a grant from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was initiated in December 1989; the first phase will continue until May, 1991. Activities of local Lung Associations include distribution of free or reduced-cost radon kits; presenting programs in elementary and secondary schools; presenting information on TV news series and talk shows, and on radio Public Service Announcements and talk shows; presenting articles and feature stories in the print media; holding conferences, workshops, and displays at fairs and other exhibitions; distributing radon fact sheets through libraries and utility company mailings; and distributing videos through video chains and libraries. The local Lung Associations also serve as promoters for the EPA/Advertising Council Radon Public Service Announcement Campaign. We will highlight the activities of the groups in communicating radon health risks to the public; we will describe the results obtained and will attempt to evaluate the merits of the various approaches on the basis of the initial results

  10. Relation between indoor radon and lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Low level of exposures to residential radon and dosimetric uncertainties due to mobility have hampered the evaluation of lung cancer risk and the comparison to radon-exposed miners. To address these limitations, the authors conducted a case-control study in a predominantly rural area of China with low mobility and high radon levels. Methods: Cases studied including all lung cancer patients diagnosed between January 1994 and April 1998, aged 30-75 years, and resided in two prefectures of Gansu Province. Controls were randomly selected from census lists and matched on age sex and prefecture. Radon detectors were placed in all houses having been occupied two or more years in the past 5-30 years prior to enrollment. Measurements covered 77% of the possible exposure time. Results: Mean radon concentration were 230.4 Bq/m3 for the cases (n = 768) and 222.2 Bq/m3 for the controls (n = 1659). Lung cancer risk increased along with increasing of the radon level (P 3 was 0.19 (95% CI:0.05, 0.47) for all subjects, and 0.31(95% CI:0.10, 0.81) for subjects with 100% coverage of the exposure interval. Adjusting for exposure uncertainties increased estimates about 70%. Conclusion: The results support increased lung cancer risks with indoor radon exposures, which may equal to or exceed extrapolation-based risks from miner data

  11. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  12. Radon potential, geologic formations, and lung cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Yevgeniya Gokun; William M. Andrews Jr.; Bethany L. Overfield; Heather Robertson; Amanda Wiggins; Mary Kay Rayens

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to radon is associated with approximately 10% of U.S. lung cancer cases. Geologic rock units have varying concentrations of uranium, producing fluctuating amounts of radon. This exploratory study examined the spatial and statistical associations between radon values and geological formations to illustrate potential population-level lung cancer risk from radon exposure. Method: This was a secondary data analysis of observed radon values collected in 1987 from homes (N = ...

  13. Therapeutic use of alpha-emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassmann, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    In recent years there is a growing interest in the therapeutic use of {alpha}-emitters for patient treatment, {alpha}-particles have much higher energy and their range is only a few cell diameters. Their high LET and the limited ability of cells to repair DNA damage from {alpha}-radiation explain their high relative biological effectiveness and cytotoxicity. Potential {alpha}-emitting isotopes for therapeutic applications are {sup 224}Ra, {sup 223}Ra, {sup 213}Bi and {sup 211}At. The treatment with {alpha}-particles is focused upon targeted cancer therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, on palliation of bone metastases or upon pain relief in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Examples for targeted cancer therapy are the treatment of melanoma with {sup 213}Bi and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with {sup 211}At. For metastatic bone pain palliation {sup 223}Ra was applied in a phase I clinical trial. For amelioration of pain in AS-patients {sup 224}Ra-chloride is used. This radiopharmaceutical is licensed for this particular application in Germany. Today there are some potential clinical applications for {alpha}-emitters although most of them are in the state of scientific, non-routine investigations. In-vivo dosimetry for risk assessment associated with this treatment is even more difficult to perform than for therapies using beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. (orig.)

  14. Signatures of reionization on Lyman alpha emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Dayal, Pratika; Gallerani, Simona

    2008-01-01

    We use a semi-analytic model of Lyman alpha emitters (LAEs) to constrain the reionization history. By considering two physically motivated scenarios in which reionization ends either early (ERM, z_i ~ 7) or late (LRM, z_i ~ 6), we fix the global value of the IGM neutral fraction (e.g. chi_{HI}=3 times 10^{-4}, 0.15 at z=6.56 for the ERM and LRM, respectively) leaving only the star formation efficiency and the effective escape fraction of Lya photons as free parameters. The ERM fits the observed LAE luminosity function (LF) at z=5.7 and 6.56 requiring no redshift evolution or mass dependence of the star formation efficiency, and LAE star formation rates (SFR) of 3-103 solar masses/year, contributing approximately 8% of the cosmic SFR density at z=5.7. The LRM requires a physically uncomfortable drop of approximately 4.5 times in the SFR of the emitters from z=6.5 to 5.7. Thus, the data seem to imply that the Universe was already highly ionized at z=6.56. The mass-dependent Lya transmissivity is between 0.36-0....

  15. Lyman Alpha Emitter Evolution Through Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Dayal, P; Saro, A; Salvaterra, R; Borgani, S; Tornatore, L

    2009-01-01

    Combining cosmological SPH simulations with a previously developed Lyman Alpha production/transmission model and the Early Reionization Model (ERM, reionization ends at redshift z~7), we obtain Lyman Alpha and UV Luminosity Functions (LFs) for Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) for redshifts between 5.7 and 7.6. Matching model results to observations at z~5.7 requires escape fractions of Lyman Alpha, f_alpha=0.3, and UV (non-ionizing) continuum photons, f_c=0.22, corresponding to a color excess, E(B-V)=0.15. We find that (i) f_c increases towards higher redshifts, due the decreasing mean dust content of galaxies, (ii) the evolution of f_alpha/f_c hints at the dust content of the ISM becoming progressively inhomogeneous/clumped with decreasing redshift. The clustering photoionization boost is important during the initial reionization phases but has little effect on the Lyman Alpha LF for a highly ionized IGM. With no more free parameters, the Spectral Energy Distributions of three LAE at z~5.7 observed by Lai et al. ...

  16. Modelling high redshift Lyman-alpha Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Garel, Thibault; Guiderdoni, Bruno; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne; Hayes, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We present a new model for high redshift Lyman-Alpha Emitters (LAEs) in the cosmological context which takes into account the resonant scattering of Ly-a photons through expanding gas. The GALICS semi-analytic model provides us with the physical properties of a large sample of high redshift galaxies. We implement a gas outflow model for each galaxy based on simple scaling arguments. The coupling with a library of numerical experiments of Ly-a transfer through expanding or static dusty shells of gas allows us to derive the Ly-a escape fractions and profiles. The predicted distribution of Ly-a photons escape fraction shows that galaxies with a low star formation rate have a f_esc of the order of unity, suggesting that, for those objects, Ly-a may be used to trace the star formation rate assuming a given conversion law. In galaxies forming stars intensely, the escape fraction spans the whole range from 0 to 1. The model is able to get a good match to the UV and Ly-a luminosity function (LF) data at 3 < z <...

  17. Molecular hydrogen in Lyman Alpha Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Vallini, Livia; Ferrara, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We present a physically motivated model to estimate the molecular hydrogen (H2) content of high-redshift (z~5.7,6.6) Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) extracted from a suite of cosmological simulations. We find that the H2 mass fraction, (f_H2), depends on three main LAE physical properties: (a) star formation rate, (b) dust mass, and (c) cold neutral gas mass. At z~5.7, the value of f_H2 peaks and ranges between 0.5-0.9 for intermediate mass LAEs with stellar mass M_* ~ 10^{9-10} solar mass, decreasing for both smaller and larger galaxies. However, the largest value of the H2 mass is found in the most luminous LAEs. These trends also hold at z\\sim6.6, although, due to a lower dust content, f_H2(z=6.6)\\sim0.5 f_H2(z=5.7) when averaged over all LAEs; they arise due to the interplay between the H2 formation/shielding controlled by dust and the intensity of the ultraviolet (UV) Lyman-Werner photo-dissociating radiation produced by stars. We then predict the carbon monoxide (CO) luminosities for such LAEs and check tha...

  18. Sex and smoking sensitive model of radon induced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and radon progeny inhalation exposure are recognized to cause lung cancer. Only strong evidence of radon exposure health effects was results of epidemiological studies among underground miners. Any single epidemiological study among population failed to find reliable lung cancer risk due to indoor radon exposure. Indoor radon induced lung cancer risk models were developed exclusively basing on extrapolation of miners data. Meta analyses of indoor radon and lung cancer case control studies allowed only little improvements in approaches to radon induced lung cancer risk projections. Valuable data on characteristics of indoor radon health effects could be obtained after systematic analysis of pooled data from single residential radon studies. Two such analyses are recently published. Available new and previous data of epidemiological studies of workers and general population exposed to radon and other sources of ionizing radiation allow filling gaps in knowledge of lung cancer association with indoor radon exposure. The model of lung cancer induced by indoor radon exposure is suggested. The key point of this model is the assumption that excess relative risk depends on both sex and smoking habits of individual. This assumption based on data on occupational exposure by radon and plutonium and also on the data on external radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the data on external exposure in Mayak nuclear facility. For non-corrected data of pooled European and North American studies the increased sensitivity of females to radon exposure is observed. The mean value of ks for non-corrected data obtained from independent source is in very good agreement with the L.S.S. study and Mayak plutonium workers data. Analysis of corrected data of pooled studies showed little influence of sex on E.R.R. value. The most probable cause of such effect is the change of men/women and smokers/nonsmokers ratios in corrected data sets in North American study. More correct

  19. Sex and smoking sensitive model of radon induced lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukovsky, M.; Yarmoshenko, I. [Institute of Industrial Ecology of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    Radon and radon progeny inhalation exposure are recognized to cause lung cancer. Only strong evidence of radon exposure health effects was results of epidemiological studies among underground miners. Any single epidemiological study among population failed to find reliable lung cancer risk due to indoor radon exposure. Indoor radon induced lung cancer risk models were developed exclusively basing on extrapolation of miners data. Meta analyses of indoor radon and lung cancer case control studies allowed only little improvements in approaches to radon induced lung cancer risk projections. Valuable data on characteristics of indoor radon health effects could be obtained after systematic analysis of pooled data from single residential radon studies. Two such analyses are recently published. Available new and previous data of epidemiological studies of workers and general population exposed to radon and other sources of ionizing radiation allow filling gaps in knowledge of lung cancer association with indoor radon exposure. The model of lung cancer induced by indoor radon exposure is suggested. The key point of this model is the assumption that excess relative risk depends on both sex and smoking habits of individual. This assumption based on data on occupational exposure by radon and plutonium and also on the data on external radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the data on external exposure in Mayak nuclear facility. For non-corrected data of pooled European and North American studies the increased sensitivity of females to radon exposure is observed. The mean value of ks for non-corrected data obtained from independent source is in very good agreement with the L.S.S. study and Mayak plutonium workers data. Analysis of corrected data of pooled studies showed little influence of sex on E.R.R. value. The most probable cause of such effect is the change of men/women and smokers/nonsmokers ratios in corrected data sets in North American study. More correct

  20. Residential radon exposure and risk of lung cancer in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavanja, M C; Lubin, J H; Mahaffey, J A; Brownson, R C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated residential radon exposure and lung cancer risk, using both standard radon dosimetry and a new radon monitoring technology that, evidence suggests, is a better measure of cumulative radon exposure. METHODS: Missouri women (aged 30 to 84 years) newly diagnosed with primary lung cancer during the period January 1, 1993, to January 31, 1994, were invited to participate in this population-based case-control study. Both indoor air radon detectors and CR-39 alpha-particle detectors (surface monitors) were used. RESULTS: When surface monitors were used, a significant trend in lung cancer odds ratios was observed for 20-year time-weighted-average radon concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: When surface monitors were used, but not when standard radon dosimetry was used, a significant lung cancer risk was found for radon concentrations at and above the action level for mitigation of houses currently used in the United States (148 Bqm-3). The risk was below the action level used in Canada (750 Bqm-3) and many European countries (200-400 Bqm-3). PMID:10394313

  1. Residential Radon Exposure and Risk of Lung Cancer in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    A case-control study of lung cancer and residential radon exposure in which investigators carried out both standard year-long air measurements and CR-39 alpha detector measurements (call surface monitors)

  2. Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993–1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m3. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69–1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m3 higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69–4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

  3. Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeuner, Elvira V., E-mail: ole@cancer.dk [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University (Denmark); Andersen, Claus E. [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Sorensen, Mette [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Gravesen, Peter [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ulbak, Kaare [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark); Hertel, Ole [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Camilla [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Overvad, Kim [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-10-15

    High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

  4. Arsenic, asbestos and radon: emerging players in lung tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubaux Roland

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cause of lung cancer is generally attributed to tobacco smoking. However lung cancer in never smokers accounts for 10 to 25% of all lung cancer cases. Arsenic, asbestos and radon are three prominent non-tobacco carcinogens strongly associated with lung cancer. Exposure to these agents can lead to genetic and epigenetic alterations in tumor genomes, impacting genes and pathways involved in lung cancer development. Moreover, these agents not only exhibit unique mechanisms in causing genomic alterations, but also exert deleterious effects through common mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, commonly associated with carcinogenesis. This article provides a comprehensive review of arsenic, asbestos, and radon induced molecular mechanisms responsible for the generation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in lung cancer. A better understanding of the mode of action of these carcinogens will facilitate the prevention and management of lung cancer related to such environmental hazards.

  5. Does radon plus smoking equal lung cancer?; Radon plus Rauchen gleich Lungenkrebs?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severin, E. [Inst. fuer Strahlenbiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    The author discusses the results obtained using three models designed to investigate into possible links between radon exposure, smoking behaviour and lung cancer. One of the models presumes that the risks from radon and cigarettes are additive, while the other two are based on the assumption of multiplying effects. (MG) [Deutsch] Der Autor diskutiert die Ergebnisse dreier Modelle, in denen moegliche Zusammenhaenge zwischen Radonexposition, Rauchverhalten und Lungenkrebs untersucht werden. Ein Modell betrachtet das Radon-Risiko als Additiv zum Zigarettenkrebsrisiko, die beiden anderen gehen von einer multiplikativen Beziehung aus. (MG)

  6. Radon and lung cancer - history and current issues; Radon und Lungenkrebs - Historie und aktuelle Probleme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobi, W. [Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz, GSF, Neuherberg (Germany)

    1994-02-01

    Its historical roots date back to the late middle ages when silver mining was started in the Schneeberg region. Today the problem of mining-associated exposure to radon persists in uranium mining. In addition there is the problem of radon exposure in building which has been detected some 20 years ago. The author briefly surveys the history and causes of radon exposure and resulting issues of modern radiation protection. Inhalation of indoor-air-borne radon decay products in buildings consitutes the greatest shave of the population`s exposure to natural and artificial radiation sources. Next to tobacco smoking, these natural radionuclides have to be rated as the most important environmental noxions agent for lung cancer induction. (Uhe) [Deutsch] Die Wurzeln der Historie reichen bis in das spaete Mittelalter zurueck, als im Raum Schneeberg mit dem Silberbergbau begonnen wurde. Heute findet das Radon-Problem im Bergbau seine Fortsetzung im Uranbergbau. Hinzu kommt die vor ca. 20 Jahren einsetzende Erkennung des Radon-Problems in Haeusern. Der Artikel gibt einen kurzen Ueberblick ueber die Historie und die Ursachen des Radon-Problems sowie die daraus resultierenden aktuellen Fragen des Strahlenschutzes. Die Inhalation der Radon-Zerfallsprodukte in der Innenraumluft der Haeuser verursacht nicht nur den weitaus groessten Beitrag zur Strahlenbelastung der Bevoelkerung aus natuerlichen und kuenstlichen Strahlenquellen. Nach dem Rauchen sind diese natuerlichen Radionuklide als wichtigste Umweltnoxe fuer die Induktion von Lungenkrebs einzustufen. (Uhe)

  7. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer: a re-assessment based on the recent cross-Canada radon survey

    OpenAIRE

    J. Chen; Moir, D.; Whyte, J.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to indoor radon has been determined to be the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer was assessed in 2005 with the radon distribution characteristics determined from a radon survey carried out in the late 1970s in 19 cities. In that survey, a grab sampling method was used to measure radon levels. The observed radon concentration in 14 000 Canadian homes surveyed followed a log–normal distribution with a geometr...

  8. Lung cancer and radon in dwellings; Lungenkrebs und Radon in Wohnraeumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelkle, H. [Bundesamt fuer Gesundheitswesen (BAG), Fribourg (Switzerland). Sektion Ueberwachung der Radioaktivitaet; Minder, C.E. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Sozial- und Praeventivmedizin

    1993-12-31

    Positive correlations between radon and lung cancer have been found only for mine workers but not for the general population in dwellings. In this study we are looking for a connection between the mean radon values in 41 different regions of Switzerland and the corresponding lung cancer mortalities. For yound woman in general and young men and young women from rural areas a correlation was found. Such calculations, however, do not prove a causal connection, since they use only present day radon levels and can account neither for their temporal variations nor for the mobility and life habits of the population or for the real amount of time spent inside the dwellings. (orig.) [Deutsch] Eine positive Korrelation zwischen Radon und Lungenkrebs wurde bisher nur fuer Minenarbeiter belegt, nicht aber fuer die Bevoelkerung im Wohnbereich. In dieser Arbeit wird geprueft, ob die durchschnittlichen Radonkonzentrationen in Wohnungen von 41 Regionen der Schweiz mit der entsprechenden Lungenkrebssterblichkeit korrelieren. Dabei zeigt sich bei jungen Frauen allgemein, sowie bei jungen Frauen und Maennern vom Land eine gewisser positiver Zusammenhang. Solche Rechnungen sind allerdings noch kein beweis fuer eine kausale Beziehung, da sie von den heutigen Radon-Werten ausgehen und weder deren zeitliche Variationen noch die Mobilitaet oder Lebensgewohnheiten der Bevoelkerung, oder die tatsaechlichen Aufenthaltszeiten im Wohnbereich beruecksichtigen. (orig.)

  9. Modeling Lung Carcinogenesis in Radon-Exposed Miner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, Teun van; Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Brüske, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological miner cohort data used to estimate lung cancer risks related to occupational radon exposure often lack cohort-wide information on exposure to tobacco smoke, a potential confounder and important effect modifier. We have developed a method to project data on smoking habits from a case-

  10. Non-linearity between dose and cancer risk for internally deposited alpha emitters in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of cancer in experimental animals exposed to low doses and dose rates of internally deposited alpha emitting radionuclides was analyzed in 27 animal experiments comprising 78 groups exposed to specific dose levels (dose groups). In these experiments, 3041 animals were exposed to eight different alpha emitters, by injection or by inhalation. Radiation doses ranged from about 60 mGy to more than 7 Gy. There were 1655 control animals. The target organs were the lung and the skeleton. The cancer incidence in exposed groups was compared to that predicted by the Linear No-Threshold Hypothesis (LNTH). In the 3041 exposed animals, 49 cancers were observed, against 83 predicted by the LNTHT. The LNTH appears to be a reliable risk predictor in 11 of the 78 dose groups, but it overestimates the risk in the 67 other dose groups (71 predicted cases, 8 cases observed). No cancer was observed in 53 dose groups, when 23 were predicted by the LNTH. In these 53 dose groups, the probability of not observing a single case of cancer was extremely small. These observations led to the conclusion that, at least in the case of alpha emitters with long physical and biological half-lives, the LNTH is not a good predictor of the risk of cancer. (author)

  11. Radon and lung cancer: an epidemiological study in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives and strategy of an epidemiological study on the effects of exposure to radon in Norwegian dwellings is presented. The study is a cooperation between the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene and the Norwegian Cancer Registry in Norway and the National Radiological Protection Board of the United Kingdom, with funding by the Norwegian Cancer Society. Measurements of radon are being made in 10,000 dwellings representing all Norwegian municipalities. The potential for detecting an effect of radon exposure by such a study in Norway is unique because: (1) Radon concentrations are high and there are large regional variations. (2) Data from the Norwegian Cancer Registry is of high quality: all cancers have been subject to compulsory reporting since 1955. These data can be broken down according to municipality, sex and age. (3) In 1964/1965 a large scale survey of smoking habits was carried out in Norway. These data can also be broken down according to municipality, sex and age, and by types of smoking and smoking rate. It is intended to examine the correlation between lung cancer incidence and geographical variation in radon levels after making allowance for smoking habits. Radon measurements were started in early 1987 and the results of the study are expected to be published in 1989. (author)

  12. Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Andersen, Claus Erik; Sørensen, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    . Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed.Median estimated radon was 35.8Bq/m3. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69–1.56) in association with a 100Bq/m3 higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69–4.04) among...... to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol...... non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification.We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information...

  13. Molecular characterization of radon-induced rat lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radon gas is a well known lung carcinogenic factor in human at high doses but the cancer risk at low doses is not established. Indeed, epidemiological studies at low doses are difficult to conduct because of the human exposure to other lung carcinogenic factors. These data underlined the necessity to conduct experiments on lung tumors developed on animal model. The aim of this work was to characterize rat lung tumors by working on a series of radon-induced tumors that included adenocarcinomas (A.C.), squamous cell carcinomas (S.C.C.) and adeno-squamous carcinomas (A.S.C.), that are mixed tumors with both A.C. and S.C.C. cellular components. A C.G.H. analysis of the three types of tumors allowed us to define chromosomal recurrent unbalances and to target candidate genes potentially implicated in lung carcinogenesis, as p16Ink4a, p19Arf, Rb1, K-Ras or c-Myc. A more precise analysis of the p16Ink4a/Cdk4/Rb1 and p19Arf/Mdm2/Tp53 pathways was performed and indicated that the Rb1 pathway was frequently inactivated through an absence of p16Ink4a protein expression, indicating that it has a major role in rat lung carcinogenesis. Finally, a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the three types of tumors allowed us to show for the first time that the complex tumors A.S.C. have a transcriptomic profile in accordance with their mixed nature but that they also display their own expression profiles specificities. This work allowed us to find molecular characteristics common to murine and human lung tumors, indicating that the model of lung tumors in rat is pertinent to search for radiation-induced lung tumors specificities and to help for a better molecular identification of this type of tumors in human. (author)

  14. The use of track registration detectors to reconstruct contemporary and historical airborne radon ( sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn) and radon progeny concentrations for a radon-lung cancer epidemiologic study

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, D J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies that investigate the relationship between radon and lung cancer require accurate estimates for the long-term average concentrations of radon progeny in dwellings. Year-to-year and home-to-home variations of radon in domestic environments pose serious difficulties for reconstructing an individual's long-term radon-related exposure. The use of contemporary radon gas concentrations as a surrogate for radon-related dose introduces additional uncertainty in dose assessment. Studies of glass exposed in radon chambers and in a home show that radon progeny deposited on, and implanted in, glass hold promise for reconstructing past radon concentrations in a variety of atmospheres. We developed an inexpensive track registration detector for the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study (IRLCS) that simultaneously measures contemporary airborne radon concentrations, surface deposited alpha activity density, and implanted sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po activity density. The implanted activity is used to reconstruct the cum...

  15. Indoor radon exposure and lung cancer: a review of ecological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Lee, Jung-Dong; Joo, So Won; Kang, Dae Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has high mortality and incidence rates. The leading causes of lung cancer are smoking and radon exposure. Indeed, the World Health Organization (WHO) has categorized radon as a carcinogenic substance causing lung cancer. Radon is a natural, radioactive substance; it is an inert gas that mainly exists in soil or rock. The gas decays into radioactive particles called radon progeny that can enter the human body through breathing. Upon entering the body, these radioactive elements release α-rays that affect lung tissue, causing lung cancer upon long-term exposure thereto. Epidemiological studies first outlined a high correlation between the incidence rate of lung cancer and exposure to radon progeny among miners in Europe. Thereafter, data and research on radon exposure and lung cancer incidence in homes have continued to accumulate. Many international studies have reported increases in the risk ratio of lung cancer when indoor radon concentrations inside the home are high. Although research into indoor radon concentrations and lung cancer incidence is actively conducted throughout North America and Europe, similar research is lacking in Korea. Recently, however, studies have begun to accumulate and report important data on indoor radon concentrations across the nation. In this study, we aimed to review domestic and foreign research into indoor radon concentrations and to outline correlations between indoor radon concentrations in homes and lung cancer incidence, as reported in ecological studies thereof. Herein, we noted large differences in radon concentrations between and within individual countries. For Korea, we observed tremendous differences in indoor radon concentrations according to region and year of study, even within the same region. In correlation analysis, lung cancer incidence was not found to be higher in areas with high indoor radon concentrations in Korea. Through our review, we identified a need to implement a greater variety of

  16. Conception and optimisation of a new apparatus for the radioactive aerosols alpha emitters measurement in real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the atmospheric contaminations due to artificial radioelements alpha emitters (239 Pu, 241 Am, 244 Cm,...) is a very difficult problem to resolve because of the three following reasons: the nature of the radiation to detect; very small activities, which correspond to LDCA; existence in the atmosphere of descendants radon and thoron, which are alpha emitters too. To avoid the drawbacks that the present apparatus present, we have conceived, realised and focused a new apparatus based on the following principals: aerosols collection by gas jet technic on solid state support and measurement in real time under a few millibar pression using a solid detector. First of all, we have tried to make the aerosol collection rate better studying the collector nature and dimension influence, the distance between the collector and the gas jet exit and the air flow. Using different supports, we have shown that the energy resolution is not depending on the support nature, but it depends very much on atmospheric conditions. Direct measurements of the radioactive samples are made by the annular detector insered between the nozzle and the collector. The good resolution, the efficacity and the discrimination of natural and artificial contaminations show off the feasibility of this apparatus

  17. Norwegian households' WTP for radon induced lung cancer risk reduction : a contingent valuation

    OpenAIRE

    Myrseth, André Brockstedt

    2014-01-01

    Although indoor air radon concentration cause a number of premature deaths due to increased risk of lung cancer, very few studies have been conducted to document the health damage costs; and thus the social benefits of measures to reduce indoor air radon concentrations. In the absence of any such studies in Norway, a Contingent Valuation (CV) survey of 751 households is conducted in order to elicit Norwegian households’ willingness-to-pay (WTP) for reductions in radon induced lung cancer r...

  18. Shelter and indoor air in the twenty-first century: Radon, smoking and lung cancer risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the relationship between indoor radon exposure, cigarette smoking, and lung cancer. The author explains the sources of radon, the tissues at risk, the human populations most likely to be affected, and the estimates of lung cancer in the population. 6 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer: A re-assessment based on the recent cross-Canada radon survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to indoor radon has been determined to be the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer was assessed in 2005 with the radon distribution characteristics determined from a radon survey carried out in the late 1970's in 19 cities. In that survey, a grab sampling method was used to measure radon levels. The observed radon concentration in 14 000 Canadian homes surveyed followed a log-normal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 11.2 Bq m-3 and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.9. Based on the information from that survey, it was estimated that ∼10 % of lung cancers in Canada resulted from indoor radon exposure. To gain a better understanding of radon concentrations in homes across the country, a national residential radon survey was launched in April 2009. In the recent survey, long-term (3 month or longer) indoor radon measurements were made in roughly 14 000 homes in 121 health regions across Canada. The observed radon concentrations follow, as expected, a log-normal distribution with a GM of 41.9 Bq m-3 and a GSD of 2.8. Based on the more accurate radon distribution characteristics obtained from the recent cross-Canada radon survey, a re-assessment of Canadian population risk for radon induced lung cancer was undertaken. The theoretical estimates show that 16 % of lung cancer deaths among Canadians are attributable to indoor radon exposure. These results strongly suggest the ongoing need for the Canadian National Radon Program. In particular, there is a need for a focus on education and awareness by all levels of government, and in partnership with key stakeholders, to encourage Canadians to take action to reduce the risk from indoor radon exposure. (authors)

  20. Lung Cancer Attributable to Indoor Radon Exposures in Two Radon--Prone Areas, Stei (Romania) and Torrelodones (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and radon progeny are present indoors, in houses and others dwellings, representing the most important contribution to dose from natural sources of radiation. Most studies have demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer at high concentration of radon for both smokers and nonsmokers. For medium and low concentrations which are the typical residential radon levels, recent researches have also demonstrated increased risks of lung cancer for people exposed. The work presents a comparative analysis of the radon exposure data in the two radon--prone areas, Stei, Transylvania, (Romania), in the near of old Romanian uranium mines and in the granitic area of Torrelodones town, Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain). One important difference between the two studied areas is related to the houses built using uranium waste as construction material in Stei area. Measurements of indoor radon were performed in 280 dwellings (Romania) and 91 dwellings (Spain) by using nuclear track detectors, CR 39. The highest value measured in Stei area was 2650 Bq·m-3. and 366 Bq·m-3 in the Spanish region. The results are compute with the BEIR VI report estimates using the age-duration model at an exposure rate below 2650 Bq·m-3. A total of 233 lung cancer deaths were calculated in the Stei area for a period of 13 years (1994-2006), which is 116.82% higher than observed from the national statistics. In comparison, in Torrelodones area, a number of 276 deaths caused by lung cancer were estimated along a period of 13 years, which is 2.09 times higher than the number observed by authorities. This represents a significantly evidence that elevated risk can strongly be associated with cumulated radon exposure.

  1. Lung cancer mortality and indoor radon concentrations in 18 Canadian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor radon and radon daughter concentrations were measured in a survey of 14,000 homes in 18 Canadian cities conducted in the summers of 1978 through 1980. Mortality and population data for the period 1966 through 1979 were retrieved for the geographic areas surveyed in each city. The results of analysis of the relation between lung cancer and radon daughter concentration, smoking habits and socioeconomic indicators for each city showed no detectable association between radon daughter concentrations and lung cancer mortality rates with or without adjustment for differences in smoking habits between cities

  2. Age dependent hit probabilities for lung cancer induction following exhalation of ingested radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous calculations of the risk following ingestion of 222Rn (radon) in drinking water have been concerned primarily with the solubilization of the radon in body tissues, followed by in situ decay. Much less attention has been directed towards the escape of radon from lung tissue and blood into the alveolar air, which should lead to doses to lung tissue as the newly formed progeny deposit in lung passages prior to exhalation. The present report details the calculation of hit probabilities to the basal cells of the bronchial epithelium and alveolar cells in various age groups following ingestion of radon in drinking water. Results are compared with those obtained for the in situ decay of radon within the lung mass. (author)

  3. Lyman alpha emitter evolution in the reionization epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, P.; Ferrara, A.; Saro, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Borgani, S.; Tornatore, L.

    2009-12-01

    Combining cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations with a previously developed Lyα production/transmission model and the Early Reionization Model (ERM; reionization ends at redshift z ~ 7), we obtain Lyα and UV luminosity functions (LFs) for lyman alpha emitters (LAEs) at 5.7 ERM. However, during the initial reionization phases (z >~ 7), the clustering photoionization boost becomes important. We quantify the physical properties of observed LAEs and their redshift evolution, for which we give handy analytical fitting functions. Halo (stellar) masses are in the range 10.0 20 Myr at all redshifts, while the mean stellar metallicity increases from Z = 0.12Zsolar at z ~ 7.6 to Z = 0.22Zsolar at z ~ 5.7; both t* and Z positively correlate with stellar mass. The brightest LAEs are all characterized by large and intermediate ages (~200Myr), while objects in the faint end of the Lyα LF show large age and star formation rate spreads. With no more free parameters, the spectral energy distributions of three LAE at z ~ 5.7 observed by Lai et al. (2007) are well reproduced by an intermediate age (182-220 Myr) stellar population and the above E(B - V) value. The model uncertainties, mostly related to the simplified treatment of dust and to the possible effects related to gas outflow/infall, are discussed along with their impact on the results.

  4. Determination of substraces of alpha emitter elements in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine alpha emitter elements in water by alpha spectrometry, it is necessary to use large volumes of samples, concentration techniq-ues and to separate the elements of interest. In this report a study is presented about two concentration techniques and the process of analysis. Firstly, the stages of concentration method by iron hydroxide coprecipitation were studied in order to improve the results. The combination of liquid-liquid extraction and ion exchange techniques was the best way. Secondly, the technique by adsorption on manganese dioxide was studied. To apply this technique it was necessary to develop analysis methods to separate uranium, thorium, plutonium, americium and radium. These methods were designed combining several techniques of separation: liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-solid extraction, ionic exchange and coprecipitation. After the analysis methods were developped the adsorption on manganese dioxide with artificial samples was studied in the laboratory. Finally, the method of adsorption on manganese dioxide was studied to determine uranium, thorium and radium in the drinking water of Madrid. (Author)

  5. Joint Ly{\\alpha} emitters - quasars reionization constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Baek, S; Semelin, B

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method to investigate cosmic reionization, using joint spectral information on high redshift Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAE) and quasars (QSOs). Although LAEs have been proposed as reionization probes, their use is hampered by the fact their Ly{\\alpha} line is damped not only by intergalactic HI but also internally by dust. Our method allows to overcome such degeneracy. First, we carefully calibrate a reionization simulation with QSO absorption line experiments. Then we identify LAEs in two simulation boxes at z=5.7 and z=6.6 and we build synthetic images/spectra of a prototypical LAE. At redshift 5.7, we find that the Ly{\\alpha} transmissivity (T_LAE) ~ 0.25, almost independent of the halo mass. This constancy arises from the conspiracy of two effects: (i) the intrinsic Ly{\\alpha} line width and (ii) the infall peculiar velocity. At higher redshift, z=6.6, where the transmissivity is instead largely set by the local HI abundance and LAE transmissivity consequently increases with halo mass from ...

  6. Lung cancer and environmental radon exposure: a case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer accounts for approximately 100,000 deaths annually and nearly 30% of these are due to factors other than smoking. The prognosis for lung cancer is very poor and control of this disease depends on the identification and manipulation of etiologic agents. Radon is a demonstrated pulmonary carcinogen among uranium miners and is a ubiquitous environmental agent. This study addresses two principal issues: (a) the assessment of the potential health effects due to radon exposure from radioactive waste disposal in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, and (b) the broader scientific question of the existence of an association between lung cancer and environmental radon exposure. Indoor radon concentrations were taken in the homes of 50 lung cancer cases and 48 ASHD controls as an index of cumulative exposure. The distribution of concentrations was similar among case and control homes. The range of exposures was within background expectations as were lung cancer rates in the area. There was, furthermore, no geographic clustering of cases near the tailings site. Although an association between lung cancer and environmental radon exposure cannot be ruled out, the evidence suggests that radon exposure due to the disposal of tailings did not have a significant impact on the health of the residents living in the area and that indoor radon is not an important lung cancer risk factor at concentrations less than about 4pCi/I

  7. Threshold for Radon-Induced Lung Cancer From Inhaled Plutonium Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry M. Cuttler

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cohen’s lung cancer mortality data, from his test of the LNT theory, do not extend to the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL above which inhaled radon decay products begin to induce excess lung cancer mortality. Since there is concern about the level of radon in homes, it is important to set the radon limit near the NOAEL to avoid the risk of losing a health benefit. Assuming that dogs model humans, data from a study on inhaled plutonium dioxide particulates in dogs were assessed, and the NOAEL for radon-induced lung tumors was estimated to be about 2100 Bq/m3. The US Environmental Protection Agency should consider raising its radon action level from 150 to at least 1000 Bq/m3.

  8. Risk of lung cancer and residental radon in China: pooled results of two studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubin, J.H.; Kleinerman, R.A. [Div. of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Inst., Rockville, ML (United States); Wang, Z.Y. [Lab. of Industrial Hygiene, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); Boice, J.D.; Blot, W.J. [International Epidemiology Inst. (United States); Xu, Z.Y. [Liaoning Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenyang (China); Wang, L.D. [Ministry of Health, Beijing (China)

    2005-07-01

    Studies of radon-exposed underground miners predict that residential radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer mortality; however, case-control studies of residential radon have not provided unambiguous evidence of an association. Owing to small expected risks from residential radon and uncertainties in dosimetry, large studies or pooling of multiple studies are needed to fully evaluate effects. We pooled data from 2 case-control studies of residential radon representing 2 large radon studies conducted in China. The studies included 1,050 lung cancer cases and 1,996 controls. In the pooled data, odds ratios (OR) increased significantly with greater radon concentration. Based on a linear model, the OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI) at 100 Becquerel/cubic-meter (Bq/m{sup 3}) was 1.13 (1.01, 1.36). For subjects resident in the current home for 30 years or more, the OR at 100 Bq/m{sup 3} was 1.32 (1.07, 1.91). Results across studies were consistent with homogeneity. Estimates of ORs were similar to extrapolations from miner data and consistent with published residential radon studies in North American and Europe, suggesting long-term radon exposure at concentrations found in many homes increases lung cancer risk. (orig.)

  9. Bio-mathematical models for radon daughters inhalation. The ModeLung software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its decay daughters are the most important sources for natural irradiation of population. ModeLung software is based on the human respiratory tract compartment model and is computing radiation doses on several internal organs and tissues for subjects inhaling radon daughters attached to aerosols. Radiation doses are presented for several subjects performing different types of activity under specific environmental conditions. (authors)

  10. Measurement of simulated lung deposition of radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonassen, N.; Jensen, B. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Lab. of Applied Physics 3)

    1992-01-01

    A measurement system for the lung deposition of radon daughters based on respiratory models was suggested by Hopke et al. By choosing suitable mesh size and flow velocities it is possible to design a multiple-wire screen sampler simulating deposition in the respiratory tract of aerosols over the size range 0.5-1000 nm. This paper describes a preliminary investigation where simulated deposition in the nasal tract and in the bronchii (for mouth breathing as well as nasal breathing) is determined. The measurements were performed in atmospheres where the normalised exposure rate (equilibrium factor) was varied by changing the aerosol loading of the air as well as by enhanced electrostatic plateout. The general results of the measurements are that the energy deposited in the nose with nasal breathing and in the bronchii with mouth breathing varies as the calculated dose while the energy deposited in the bronchii with nasal breathing follows the exposure. It is also demonstrated that the energy deposited for a fixed value of the radon concentration may vary by a factor of 2-7 depending on the treatment of the air. (author).

  11. Pooled analysis of two German studies on the lung cancer risk by radon in homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffrath Rosario, A.; Heid, I.M.; Kreuzer, M.; Heinrich, J.; Kreienbrock, L.; Wichmann, H.E. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Inst. of Epidemiology, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Studies on underground miners have shown an increased risk of lung cancer after exposure to high doses of radon and radon daughters. However, in the range of typical indoor radon exposures, there are still some uncertainties about the strength of the association between radon exposure and the risk of lung cancer. Since 1990, population-based epidemiological studies have been performed in various countries in North America, Europe, and China. The pooled analysis of two large German case-control studies on the lung cancer risk due to radon in homes is described. The analysis is based on an extended dataset compared to previous publications, including 2,963 lung cancer cases and 4,232 population controls. A linear increase in the relative lung cancer risk of 0.10 (95% CI -0.02 to 0.39) is found. The risk estimates tend to be higher when measurement error in the radon concentrations is reduced. Furthermore, an outlook is given on the activities regarding the pooling of radon studies worldwide. (orig.)

  12. Radon,Lung Cancer Risk and Environmental Geology in Gejiu Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢伟; 王任重; 等

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancer in the Gejiu area of Yunnan Province ranks the first in the world.The radon level(indoor,soil) was measured in the Gejiu area by the SSNTD method from 1990 to 1996,The result indicates an extensive high-level of indoor radon in that area though U and Th are lower in local limestones,The indoor radon level of houses located in the geologic fault zone is 6 times high that 2km far from the fault zone.The reason probably is that the radon level of soil in the fault is 6-8 times high that 1 km far from the faults.our data indicate that a lower range of radon levels,0-100Bq.m-3,exists in healthy families.However,a higher radon level,over 800 Bq.m-3,is often found corresponding to that of cancer patients' homes(the house-owners are suffering from either lung cancer or leukaemia or liver cancer),Obviously,an increase in lung cancer incidence follows an increase in indoor radon level,The risk of cancer induced by indoor radon is no longer an inference,but a fact.

  13. Combined effect of radon exposure and smoking and their interaction in Czech studies of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim is to compare lung cancer risks from radon in smoking categories in Czech residential radon and uranium miners studies and to evaluate interactions between smoking and radon exposure. The residential and occupational studies are based on one hospital based case-control study and three case-control studies nested within cohort studies, two among uranium miners and one in the general population in a radon prone area. Controls in the nested studies are individually matched by sex, age and year of birth. Smoking data were collected in person or from relatives of deceased subjects. In the occupational studies, some smoking data were obtained from medical files. Radon exposures were based on measurements of radon in houses by open track detectors LR115 in the radon prone area and by closed detectors and electrets in the hospital based study. Exposures in uranium mines were based on extensive measurements and personal dosimetry. The analyses are based on conditional logistic regression with linear dependence of the risk on radon exposure adjusted for smoking. The study resulted in 300 cases and 1035 controls in the residential study and 672 cases and 1491 controls in the study of uranium miners. The dependence of lung cancer risk on radon exposure adjusted for smoking was not substantially different from analyses when smoking was ignored and reflected mainly the risk among smokers. However, the excess relative risk per unit exposure among non-smokers was 3-10 fold higher in comparison to that in smokers. The relative risk from radon among non-smokers was consistently higher in the occupational and residential studies, reflecting probably differences in lung morphometry, clearence and unattached fraction of radon progeny in houses of non-smokers. Risks from combined effects are substantially lower than the risk derived from the multiplicative model, but consistent with the additive model. (author)

  14. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of radon-induced lung tumors in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is a natural radioactive gas. This radioelement, which is an α-particle emitter, is omnipresent in the environment. Inhalation of atmospheric radon is the major exposure route in man of natural radioactivity which results in respiratory tract contamination. An increased lung cancer risk associated with radon inhalation has been shown both in humans and animals by epidemiological and experimental studies, respectively. In rats, characterization of dose-effect relationships has led to the construction of statistical models that may help theoretically in the prediction of human health involvements of both occupational and domestic chronic exposure to radon. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radon-induced lung carcinogenesis. In the laboratory, a model of lung cancers induced in rats after radon inhalation is available. This model represents a good tool to identify and characterize the genetic events contributing to the development of radon-induced lung tumors. Carrying out a global approach based on the combined use of classical and molecular cytogenetic methods, the analysis of 17 neoplasms allowed the identification of chromosomal regions frequently altered in these tumors. Numerous similarities have been found between our results and the cytogenetic data for human lung cancers, suggesting common underlying genetic molecular mechanisms for lung cancer development in both species. Moreover, our study has allowed to point to tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes potentially involved in radon-induced lung carcinogenesis. Thus, our results may aid further molecular studies aimed either at confirming the role of these candidate genes or at demonstrating the involvement of yet to be identified genes. (author)

  15. Case-control study of radon and lung cancer in New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is known to cause lung cancer in humans; however, there remain uncertainties about the effects associated with residential exposures. This case-control study of residential radon and lung cancer was conducted in five counties in New Jersey and involved 561 cases and 740 controls. A yearlong α-track detector measurement of radon was completed for ∼93% of all residences lived in at the time of interview (a total of 2063). While the odds ratios (ORs) for whole data were suggestive of an increased risk for exposures >75 Bq m-3, these associations were not statistically significant. The adjusted excess OR (EOR) per 100 Bq m-3 was -0.13 (95% CI: -0.30 to 0.44) for males, 0.29 (95% CI: -0.12 to 1.70) for females and 0.05 (95% CI: -0.14 to 0.56) for all subjects combined. An analysis of radon effects by histological type of lung cancer showed that the OR was strongest for small/oat cell carcinomas in both males and females. There was no statistical heterogeneity of radon effects by demographic factors (age at disease occurrence, education level and type of respondent). Analysis by categories of smoking status, frequency or duration did not modify the risk estimates of radon on lung cancer. The findings of this study are consistent with an earlier population-based study of radon and lung cancer among New Jersey women, and with the North American pooling of case control radon seven studies, including the previous New Jersey study. Several uncertainties regarding radon measurements and assumptions of exposure history may have resulted in underestimation of a true exposure-response relationship. (authors)

  16. Risk of lung cancer by radon, disagreement in international regulation; Riesgo de cancer pulmonar por radon, discordancia en reglamentacion internacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, M.; Pena, P.; Villamares, A.; Avelar, J. R., E-mail: miguel.balcazar@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    Diverse international organizations have evaluated the risk of lung cancer starting from epidemic studies in miners of uranium mines, where the corresponding effective dose was determined relating with the dose received by the population during Hiroshima and Nagasaki events. Alternately, the equivalent dose has been calculated by means of based models on the energy deposited by the breathable radon fractions and its decay products in the breathing ducts. A unique factor agreed by the diverse organizations that allows converting radon concentration to effective dose does not exist. Neither an agreement exists among the different countries on which duty to be the value of the maximum concentration of radon, in interiors starting from which an intervention is required and if this intervention is standardized, recommended or nonexistent. In this work study cases in Mexico are presented and their interpretation alternative based on the international agreements absence. (Author)

  17. Indoor radon and risk of lung cancer: an epidemiological study in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the present study was to establish whether high radon concentrations in dwellings in Finland had increased the risk of lung cancer. Previous studies had shown an association between the α-active radon daughters and elevated lung cancer risk among miners. Convincing evidence of the risk among the general population exposed to radon indoors was, however, lacking. A descriptive analysis was first conducted in an area in southern Finland with high indoor radon exposure. In 18 rural municipalities this analysis yielded no significant correlation between the average radon exposure and incidence of male lung cancer. A case-control study within a cohort of the same rural population was then designed. The data included 238 male cases of lung cancer diagnosed in 1980-85 and 434 controls (390 smokers and 44 nonsmokers) from the male population. Radon exposure was measured, when possible, in all the dwellings occupied by a case or control in 1950-1975. Measurements were available for the total 25-year period, or for a proportion of it, for 164 cases and 334 controls; for the rest only estimates were available. In spite of the fact that the controls were mainly selected among smokers, the amount smoked still appeared to be the most important lung cancer risk factor in the data, the risk increasing linearly with the quantity of cigarettes smoked in a lifetime. The risk of lung cancer was not associated with the radon exposure level when the whole data were studied. In heavy smokers, however, a positive though not significant, effect on the risk from radon exposure was found. In the range of uncertainty the findings do not conflict with most of those observed among miners or the general population so far. (orig.)

  18. The HETDEX Pilot Survey & 3DHST: What Makes a Lyman-alpha Emitter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Alex; Zeimann, Gregory; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Bridge, Joanna; Hetdex

    2015-01-01

    We compare the 3D-HST H-beta emitters at z~2 to Lyman-alpha emitters found in the same redshift range by the HETDEX Pilot Survey to investigate any differences in the physical and morphological parameters that could elucidate how or why Lyman-alpha is escaping. We use one-dimensional and multi-dimensional statistics, as well as machine learning techniques to try to find differences between these datasets. However, we are unable to find statistically significant differences between these populations. This demonstrates that Lyman-alpha emitters are pulled randomly from the distribution of star-forming galaxies, and there are seemly no strong physical or morphological requirements to be a Lyman-alpha emitter. We also use this information to inform a toy model of Lyman-alpha emission that poses all star-forming galaxies are LAEs if view along certain lines of sight.

  19. Radon Control Activities for Lung Cancer Prevention in National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans, 2005–2011

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Neri, MD, MPH; Sherri L. Stewart, PhD; William Angell, MS

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer among smokers and the leading cause among nonsmokers. The US Environmental Protection Agency recommends that every home be tested for radon. Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) programs develop cancer coalitions that coordinate funding and resources to focus on cancer activities that are recorded in cancer plans. Radon tests, remediation, and radon mitigation techniques are relatively inexpensive, but it is unclear whether coalition...

  20. RELATED GENES IN LUNG CANCER TISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH RESIDENTIAL HIGH RADON EXPOSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏英; 杨梅英; 张守志; 叶常青

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the related genes in lung cancer tissues associated with residential high radon exposure. Methods: Differentially expressed gene fragments in lung cancer and normal lung tissues were discovered by differential display and reverse Northern blot hybridization method. The fragments positive in lung cancer and negative in normal lung tissue were determined. Results: Seven differential displayed fragments were sequenced. One of them named NA7 is 95% homologous with AI208667 in EAT of Genbank. Another fragment named NG2 is up to 98% homologous with five fragments. The remained one CA1 may be a new gene fragment. Conclusion: 3 gene fragments were discovered from lung cancer and normal lung tissues of high radon exposure resident.

  1. A device for the remote detection of alpha emitters under field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simakov, AB

    2005-01-01

    The portable DOP device was designed for the ecological monitoring of the radiation of alpha radioactive nuclides, such as plutonium, uranium, radium, etc. Under field conditions, it can detect alpha emitters at distances of up to 0.5 m. The device's performance data are as follows: the lower thresh

  2. Studies on the mechanism of apoptasis by radon in lung tissue of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the mechanism of apoptasis by radon in lung tissue of mice. Methods: Male BALB/c mice were exposed to radon with the cumulative dose of 0.02, 30 or 60 working level month (WLM) respectively, and then were raised for different time (24 h, 30 d or 90 d). Apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidy transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL). The expression of p 53 and Bcl-2/Bax protein was observed by immunohistochemistry. Results: As compared with the control group, the apoptotic index in lung tissue increased along with the increasing of expose dose and the raise time. The protein expression of p 53 increased significantlyin the 30 d and 90 d groups. But Bcl-2/Bax expression decreased. Conclusions: The apoptosis by radon in lung tissue of mice had close relationship with p 53 and.Bcl-2/Bax pathway. (authors)

  3. Residential radon exposure and lung cancer risk in Misasa, Japan. A case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate an association between residential radon exposure and risk of lung cancer, a case-control study was conducted in Misasa Town, Tottori Prefecture, Japan. The case series consisted of 28 people who had died of lung cancer in the years 1976-96 and 36 controls chosen randomly from the residents in 1976, matched by sex and year of birth. Individual residential radon concentrations were measured for 1 year with alpha track detectors. The average radon concentration was 46 Bq/m3 for cases and 51 Bq/m3 for controls. Compared to the level of 24 or less Bq/m3, the adjusted odds ratios of lung cancer associated with radon levels of 25-49, 50-99 and 100 or more Bq/m3, were 1.13 (95% confidence interval; 0.29-4.40), 1.23 (0.16-9.39) and 0.25 (0.03-2.33), respectively. None of the estimates showed statistical significance, due to small sample size. When the subjects were limited to only include residents of more than 30 years, the estimates did not change substantially. This study did not find that the risk pattern of lung cancer, possibly associated with residential radon exposure, in Misasa Town differed from patterns observed in other countries. (author)

  4. Risk of lung cancer in animals following low exposures to Radon-222 progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the facts that a) large uncertainties affect the epidemiology of radon progeny-induced lung cancer in humans (especially at low exposures), and b) the rat is a good model for studying the carcinogenicity of radon progeny in humans, the risk of lung cancer following low exposures to low concentrations of radon progeny can be estimated from data obtained in the laboratory on rats exposed under controlled conditions. From the limited set of laboratory data on the induction of lung cancer in laboratory rats it appears that, at low exposures, the risk of lung cancer decreases with decreasing concentration, and that exposures of the order of 25 WLM, at an exposure rate of 2 WL do not produce any excess lung cancers. Since 20 WLM is a lifetime exposure comparable to those expected in occupational or indoors conditions and 2 WL is an exposure rate about 20 times higher dm current occupational exposures rates and 100 times higher than indoor ones, these observations may be indicative of threshold conditions for the induction of lung cancer by radon progeny. (author)

  5. Factors modifying the risk of lung cancer associated to radon in the french cohort of uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radon is classified lung carcinogen for man, but questions stay about the effects for low doses irradiation.The results of the analysis radon-lung cancer and the factors modifying on this relationship in the French cohort of miners followed until to 1999 is reported. This analysis confirms that the risk lung cancer is different according the period of exposure. A best precision in the measurement of exposure after 1956 could explain this difference. (N.C.)

  6. Remote system for measurement of radon alpha emitter for population safety guards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research project is to study the OSL properties for high doses of dosemeters traditionally applied in thermoluminescent dosimetry (TL), as CaF2: Dy (TLD 200) and CaF2: Mn (TLD 400), and thus verify the applicability of OSL technique in high-dose dosimetry

  7. Small area mapping of domestic radon, smoking prevalence and lung cancer incidence--A case study in Northamptonshire, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Antony R; Rogers, Stephen; Ali, Akeem; Sinclair, John; Phillips, Paul S; Crockett, Robin G M; Groves-Kirkby, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    Smoking and radon both cause lung cancer, and together the risk is significantly higher. UK public health campaigns continue to reduce smoking prevalence, and other initiatives identify houses with raised radon (radon-222) levels and encourage remedial action. Smoking prevalence and radon levels in the UK have been mapped at Primary Care Trust level. This paper extends that work, using a commercial socio-demographic database to estimate smoking prevalence at the postcode sector level, and to predict the population characteristics at postcode sector level for 87 postcode sectors in Northamptonshire. Likely smoking prevalence in each postcode sector is then modelled from estimates of the smoking prevalence in the different socio-economic groups used by the database. Mapping estimated smoking prevalence, radon potential and average lung cancer incidence for each postcode sector suggested that there was little correlation between smoking prevalence and radon levels, as radon potential was generally lower in urban areas in Northamptonshire, where the estimates of smoking prevalence were highest. However, the analysis demonstrated some sectors where both radon potential and smoking prevalence were moderately raised. This study showed the potential of this methodology to map estimated smoking prevalence and radon levels to inform locally targeted public health campaigns to reduce lung cancer incidence.

  8. Lung cancer incidence after exposure of rats to low doses of radon: influence of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect on lung cancer incidence of a long exposure to low levels of radon, 500 male 3-months-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were exposed to a cumulative dose of 25 WLM of radon and its daughters, 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, during 18 months. Exposure conditions were controlled in order to maintain a defined PAEC: 42 x 106 J.m-3 (2 WL), in the range of domestic and environmental exposures. Animals were kept until they died or given euthanasia when moribund. Mean survival times were similar in both irradiated and control groups: 828 days (SD = 169) and 830 days (SD = 137), as well as lung cancer incidence, 0.60% at 25 WLM and 0.63% for controls. The incidence of lung lesions was compared statistically with controls and those previously obtained at cumulative exposures of 25 and 50 WLM delivered over a 4-6 month period, inducing a significant increase of lung cancer, 2.2% and 3.8% respectively. Such a comparison showed a decreased lung cancer incidence related to a decrease in the dose rate for low levels of radon exposure. (author)

  9. Radon and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... low levels outdoors. However, in areas without adequate ventilation, such as underground mines, radon can accumulate to ... radon levels. What have scientists learned about the relationship between radon and lung cancer? Scientists agree that ...

  10. Indoor radon levels and lung cancer risk estimates in seven cities of the Bahawalpur Division, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiullah; Ahad, A; Rehman, S; Mirza, M L

    2003-01-01

    Indoor radon concentration levels were measured in seven major cities of the Bahawalpur Division, Pakistan. These included Fort Abbas, Minchin Abad, Hasilpur, Bahawalpur, Liaqatpur, Rahimyar Khan and Sadiq Abad. In order to select houses for this survey, the inhabitants were approached through their school-registered children. Due to several constraints, only those 100 houses were chosen in each city that were relatively the best representatives of the built-up area. The selected houses were then divided into live categories according to the house locations and building characteristics. CR-39 detectors, placed in polyethylene bags. were installed at head height in bedrooms and sitting rooms of all the selected houses and were exposed to radon and its daughter products for 90 days. Four such measurements were performed over a year in order to average out the seasonal variation in radon levels. After exposure, all the detectors were etched and counted under an optical microscope. The track densities of four measurements were averaged out and related to radon concentration levels. The radon levels were found to be 20, 20, 26, 28, 34, 42, 47 Bq m(-3) in the bedrooms and 24, 26, 27, 26, 37, 40, 43 Bq m(-3) in sitting rooms of Hasilpur, Rahimyar Khan, Minchin Abad, Fort Abbas, Sadiq Abad, Bahawalpur and Liaqatpur respectively. The observed variation in the radon level may be attributed to the geological variation in the area. Based on the observed data, excess lung cancer risk was assessed using the risk factors recommended by the USEPA, UNSCEAR and the ICRP. According to the EPA model, the lifetime excess lung cancer risk due to the lifetime exposure is found to vary from 12-102 per million per year in the houses surveyed. This variation is from 16-114 and 26-62 per million per year if UNSCEAR and ICRP limits are applied respectively.

  11. Radon and Lung Cancer Case-Control Study in Middle Ural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The pilot phase of radon and lung cancer case-control study has been performed in Karpinsk and Pervouralsk towns of Middle Ural region of Russia. The case group consists of 341 persons with lung cancer and living in that towns at least five previous years. The lung cancer diagnoses were carefully verified by instrumental techniques and 70% of its were morphologically validated. The persons for the control group (448) were chosen from the population living in that towns at least five years taking into account the age and sex. The special epidemiological questionnaire was developed which includes the items by the groups of factors as follow: clinical data, social factors, chronic lung diseases, life habit, tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, diet preference etc. The epidemiological questionnaires were fulfilled for each member of case and control groups. Radon gas concentration and thoron equilibrium equivalent concentration measurements had been performed using nuclear track detectors and grab sampling accordingly in the dwellings of case and control groups members. By preliminary estimation the odds ratios are 1, 0.91, 1.2, 1.1 in the ranges of radon and thoron equilibrium equivalent concentration 0-6, 3-13, 13-36 and 36-370 Bq/m3 respectively. The deeper and more rigorous analysis as well as different independent approaches will be discussed in the paper.(author)

  12. DNA damage in lung cells after radon exposure detected by comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comet assay was applied to measure DNA breaks and oxidised bases in isolated alveolar macrophages and epithelial type II cells from the rat lung. The cells were exposed to radon for 60 min. Radon exposure was estimated at (1.25 - 2.45) MBq.h.m-3. Strand breaks were significantly elevated above the background level after irradiation of epithelial type II cells. In contrast, no strand breaks were induced in alveolar macrophages, but a high level of oxidised bases, mostly purines, was found. Alveolar macrophages and epithelial type II cells isolated from the rat lung provide and exceptionally suitable cell model for investigation of potential hazards of air-born environmental contaminants. (authors)

  13. Radiative Transfer Modeling of Lyman Alpha Emitters. I. Statistics of Spectra and Luminosity

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zheng; Cen, Renyue; Trac, Hy; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    We combine a cosmological reionization simulation with box size of 100Mpc/h on a side and a Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha (Lya) radiative transfer code to model Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z~5.7. The model introduces Lya radiative transfer as the single factor for transforming the intrinsic Lya emission properties into the observed ones. Spatial diffusion of Lya photons from radiative transfer results in extended Lya emission and only the central part with high surface brightness can be observed...

  14. Optical imaging of alpha emitters: simulations, phantom, and in vivo results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Federico; Meo, Sergio Lo; Rossi, Pier Luca; Calandrino, Riccardo; Sbarbati, Andrea; Spinelli, Antonello E.

    2011-12-01

    There has been growing interest in investigating both the in vitro and in vivo detection of optical photons from a plethora of beta emitters using optical techniques. In this paper we have investigated an alpha particle induced fluorescence signal by using a commercial CCD-based small animal optical imaging system. The light emission of a 241Am source was simulated using GEANT4 and tested in different experimental conditions including the imaging of in vivo tissue. We believe that the results presented in this work can be useful to describe a possible mechanism for the in vivo detection of alpha emitters used for therapeutic purposes.

  15. New aspects of the etiology of lung carcinomas in respect to radon 222

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is the reason for the high cancer risk of uran miners. It also is present in building materials and therefore in the air inside houses. In the last year the radium content in houses increased because of the use of other row materials for building materials and because of a better isolation of the houses. This may increase the risc of lung cancer. (P.W.)

  16. Lung cancer from radon and smoking: a multistage model for the WISMUT uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the world's third-largest uranium-mining province located in areas of Saxony and Thuringia in the former German Democratic Republic, the WISMUT Company conducted extensive uranium mining starting in 1946. Up to 1990, when mining activities were discontinued, most of the 400,000 employees had been exposed to uranium ore dust and radon and its progeny. It is well established that, besides smoking, such exposures are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. From about 130,000 known miners a huge cohort of 59,000 miners has been formed and in an epidemiological analysis lung cancer risks have been evaluated (Grosche et al., 2006). We will present an alternative approach using a biologically-based multistage carcinogenesis model quantifying the lung-cancer risk related to both the exposure to radon and smoking habits. This mechanistic technique allows for extrapolation to the low exposures that are important for present-day radiation protection purposes and the transfer of risk across populations. The model is applied to a sub-cohort of about 35,000 persons who were employed at WISMUT after 1955, with known annual exposures estimated from the job-exposure matrix (Lehmann et al., 2004). Unfortunately, detailed information on smoking is missing for most miners. However, this information has been retrieved in two case-control studies, one of which was nested in the cohort while the other was not (Brueske-Hohlfeld et al., 2006). For these studies, the relevant smoking parameters are assembled in so-called smoking spectra that are next projected onto the entire cohort using a Monte-Carlo sampling method. Individual smoking habits that are randomly assigned to the cohort members, together with the information on annual exposure to radon, is used as an input for the multistage model. Model parameters related to radon and tobacco exposure are fitted with a maximum-likelihood technique. We will show results of the observed and expected lung

  17. Can galactic outflows explain the properties of Ly-alpha emitters?

    CERN Document Server

    Orsi, Alvaro; Baugh, Carlton M

    2011-01-01

    We study the properties of Ly-alpha emitters in a cosmological framework by computing the escape of Ly-alpha photons through galactic outflows. We combine the GALFORM semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with a Monte Carlo Ly-alpha radiative transfer code. The properties of Ly-alpha emitters at 0

  18. Alpha emitters in nuclear waste. Extension of the procedure for low and medium level activity waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes a separative method for the determination of U, Pu, Am, Np, Th and Cm as alpha emitters and 3H, Sr, and Ni as beta emitters, when present in aqueous samples of nuclear waste, by using chromatographic separations, liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry. The main separation is performed in one step by coprecipitation of the alpha emitters with yttrium hydroxide at pH = 9-10 after distillation of tritium until dryness and dissolution of the residue in 2M HCI. Actinides are precipitated while strontium and nickel remain in supernatant. Nickel is separated by precipitation with dimetyglioxime in the supernatant and measured by LSC. Strontium is separated by chromatography after conditioning the supernatant (which also contained nickel) and measured by LSC. The actinides fraction is re dissolved in nitric acid and percolated through three chromatographic columns (TEVA, U-TEVA and TRU-SPEC) conditioning the different fractions for measuring by alpha spectrometry. The spectra of the different fractions are presented together with the detection limits and the recoveries obtained on spiked samples. (author)

  19. The preformation probability inside Alpha-emitters having different ground state spin-parity than daughters

    CERN Document Server

    Seif, W M; Refaie, A I

    2015-01-01

    The ground-state spin and parity of a formed daughter in the radioactive Alpha-emitter is expected to influence the preformation probability of the Alpha and daughter clusters inside it. We investigate the Alpha and daughter preformation probability inside odd-A and doubly-odd radioactive nuclei when the daughter and parent are of different spin and/or parity. We consider only the ground-state to ground-state unfavored decays. This is to extract precise information about the effect of the difference in the ground states spin-parity of the involved nuclei far away any influences from the excitation energy if the decays are coming from isomeric states. The calculations are done for 161 Alpha-emitters, with Z=65-112 and N=84-173, in the framework of the extended cluster model, with WKB penetrability and assault frequency. We used a Hamiltonian energy density scheme based on Skyrme-SLy4 interaction to compute the interaction potential. The Alpha plus cluster preformation probability is extracted from the calculat...

  20. Studying reionization with the next generation of Ly-alpha emitter surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Hannes; Iliev, Ilian; Laursen, Peter; Mellema, Garrelt; Zackrisson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    We study the prospects for constraining the ionized fraction of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at $z>6$ with the next generation of large Ly$\\alpha$ emitter surveys. We make predictions for the upcoming Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Ly$\\alpha$ survey and a hypothetical spectroscopic survey performed with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Considering various scenarios where the observed evolution of the Ly$\\alpha$ luminosity function of Ly$\\alpha$ emitters at $z>6$ is explained partly by an increasingly neutral IGM and partly by intrinsic galaxy evolution, we show how clustering measurements will be able to distinguish between these scenarios. We find that the HSC survey should be able to detect the additional clustering induced by a neutral IGM if the global IGM neutral fraction is greater than $\\sim$20 per cent at $z=6.5$. If measurements of the Ly$\\alpha$ equivalent widths (EWs) are also available, neutral fractions as small as 10 per cent may be detectable by looking for correlation between the EW an...

  1. The nature of z ~ 2.3 Lyman-alpha emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Kim K; Møller, Palle; Möller-Nilsson, Ole; Tapken, Christian; Freudling, Wolfram; Fynbo, Johan P U

    2010-01-01

    We study the multi-wavelength properties of a set of 171 Ly-alpha emitting candidates at redshift z = 2.25 found in the COSMOS field. The candidates are shown to have different properties from those of Ly-alpha emitters found at higher redshift, by fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using a Monte-Carlo Markov-Chain technique and including nebular emission in the spectra. The dust contents and stellar masses are both higher, with A_V = 0.0 - 2.0 mag and stellar masses in the range log M_* = 9.0 - 11.0 M_sun. Young population ages are well constrained, but older population ages are typically unconstrained. In 40 % of the galaxies only a single, young population of stars is observed. We show that the ages and Ly-alpha fluxes of the best fit galaxies are correlated with their dust properties, with higher dust extinction in younger galaxies. We conclude that the stellar properties of Ly-alpha emitters at z = 2.25 are different from those at higher redshift and that they are very diverse. Ly-alpha sel...

  2. Limits on the luminosity function of Ly-alpha emitters at z = 7.7

    CERN Document Server

    Hibon, P; Willis, J; Clément, B; Lidman, C; Arnouts, S; Kneib, J -P; Willott, C J; Marmo, C; McCracken, H

    2009-01-01

    The Ly-alpha luminosity function (LF) of high-redshift Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) is one of the few observables of the re-ionization epoch accessible to date with 8-10 m class telescopes. The evolution with redshift allows one to constrain the evolution of LAEs and their role in re-ionizing the Universe at the end of the Dark Ages. We have performed a narrow-band imaging program at 1.06 microns at the CFHT, targeting Ly-alpha emitters at redshift z ~ 7.7 in the CFHT-LS D1 field. From these observations we have derived a photometric sample of 7 LAE candidates at z ~ 7.7. We derive luminosity functions for the full sample of seven objects and for sub-samples of four objects. If the brightest objects in our sample are real, we infer a luminosity function which would be difficult to reconcile with previous work at lower redshift. More definitive conclusions will require spectroscopic confirmation.

  3. An assessment of ecological and case-control methods for estimating lung cancer risk due to indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of underground miners indicate that indoor radon is an important cause of lung cancer. This finding has raised concern that exposure to radon also causes lung cancer in the general population. Epidemiological studies, including both case-control and ecological approaches, have directly addressed the risks of indoor residential radon; many more case-control studies are in progress. Ecological studies that associate lung-cancer rates with typical indoor radon levels in various geographic areas have not consistently shown positive associations. The results of purportedly negative ecological studies have been used as a basis for questioning the hazards of indoor radon exposure. Because of potentially serious methodologic flaws for testing hypotheses, we examined the ecological method as a tool for assessing lung-cancer risk from indoor radon exposure. We developed a simulation approach that utilizes the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon survey data to assign exposures to individuals within counties. Using the computer-generated data, we compared risk estimates obtained by ecological regression methods with those obtained from other regression methods and with the open-quotes trueclose quotes risks used to generate the data. For many of these simulations, the ecological models, while fitting the summary data well, gave risk estimates that differed considerably from the true risks. For some models, the risk estimates were negatively correlated with exposure, although the assumed relationship was positive. Attempts to improve the ecological models by adding smoking variables, including interaction terms, did not always improve the estimates of risk, which are easily affected by model misspecification. Because exposure situations used in the simulations are realistic, our results show that ecological methods may not accurately estimate the lung-cancer risk associated with indoor radon exposure

  4. Radon measurement and its risk in the development of lung cancer in indoor spaces at the historical center of Quito, Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Ecuador, as in other countries around the world, the presence of radon is eminent. This study compiles some information about the effects that radon has over human beings, its incidence in lung cancer and the methodologies used to determine radon. High concentrations of radon, superior to international limits have been found in indoor sites in the center of Quito and Cuenca Ecuador. (The author)

  5. Localization of alpha emitters by damage production in a thin film. Application to the study of alpha emitter diffusion in irradiated samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of recording α particles on cellulose nitrate films, called alpha-graphy, is applied to the study of the diffusion of α-emitting elements in irradiated alloys. The existence of diffusion is shown by attacking the film with concentrated caustic soda after exposition. The insensitivity of the recorder to β γ radiation emitted by the sample after passing in the reactor makes it possible to operate with long exposure times and to detect small diffusions. The concentration-penetration curves are drawn up after carrying out a densitometric analysis of the alpha-graphies. - As the cellulose nitrate is affected only by α particles of energies of between 0.5 and 4 MeV, it was first necessary to determine the yield of the recorder for α particles emitted by a thick source, i.e. whose energy varies between 0 and E0, E0 being the energy of the alpha emitter. - The concentration C of the α-emitter, as a function of the optical density D of the alpha-graphy, and of the exposure time t is given by a simple relationship: C = D/at where a is an experimental constant determined by calibration. It depends on the nature of the cellulose nitrate, of the α-emitting element and of the alloy studied. (authors)

  6. Quantitative evaluation of the lung cancer deaths attributable to residential radon: A simple method and results for all the 21 Italian Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooled analyses of epidemiological case-control studies on lung cancer and residential radon have shown that radon exposure in dwellings increases lung cancer risk, and that the increase is statistically significant also for prolonged exposures to low-medium level of radon concentration, i.e. levels commonly found in many dwellings. In this paper, a simple method to evaluate the health burden due to the presence of radon in homes (i.e. the number of lung cancer deaths attributable to radon exposure in dwellings) was presented. This method is based on the following parameters: i) the excess relative risk per unit of exposure evaluated in case-control studies; ii) the average radon concentration that can be considered representative of population exposure in dwellings; iii) the total number of lung cancer deaths occurring each year. Moreover, the interaction between radon and cigarette smoking is needed to be taken into account: in fact, although most of the persons are non-smokers, most of the lung cancer deaths attributed to radon are actually due to the multiplicative effect of radon and cigarette smoking. To show this effect, the number of radon related lung cancer deaths estimated to occur among current, former and never smokers was calculated separately for males and females, taking into account the relative risk of lung cancer for the different smoking categories and the prevalence of smoking habits. The methodology described in this work was applied to all the 21 Italian Regions in order to illustrate it. The overall fraction of lung cancer deaths attributable to radon in Italy is about 10%, with values in individual Regions ranging from 4% to 16%. The greater part of the lung cancers attributable to radon is estimated to occur among current smokers for both males and females (72% and 60%, respectively, at national level). This is due to the synergistic effects of radon and cigarette smoking, which should therefore be taken into account in policies aimed to

  7. Expected lung cancer risk from radon daughter exposure in dwelllings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different concepts and approaches for the assessment of the lung cancer risk of populations from indoor exposure and its decay products are outlined. They proceed from the epidemiological data on the excess lung cancer frequency observed among Rn-exposed uranium miners and γ-exposed atomic bomb survivors, taking into account appropriate correction factors for indoor conditions. Inparticular a proportional hazard model is presented which enables an individual - and population - related risk assessment. The results lead to the conclusion that at the present time probably about 10-20% of the total observed lung cancer frequency in the Swedish population might be associated with the indoor inhalation of 222-Rn daughters. For most other countries these values are about a factor 0.5 lower. The absolute radiation risk for males is probably about a factor 2-3 higher than that for females. (Author)

  8. Radon and lung cancer: The BEIR IV Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Academy of Sciences' BEIR IV Report (1988) deals primarily with lung cancer risks in human populations exposed to internally deposited alpha-emitting Rn and its decay products. Quantitative risk estimates for lung cancer are derived from analyses of epidemiologic data. A modified excess relative risk model of lung cancer mortality of worker exposure to Rn progeny in underground miners is developed. This models the excess risk per WLM (working level month) in terms of time intervals prior to an attained age, and is dependent on time since exposure and age at risk. Risk projections for the general public in indoor domestic environments are presented and cover exposure situations of current public health concern. For example, lifetime exposure to 1 WLM y-1 is estimated to increase the number of deaths due to lung cancer by a factor of about 1.5 over the current rate for both males and females in a population having the current prevalence of cigarette smoking. Occupational exposure to 4 WLM y-1 from ages 20 to 40 y is projected to increase lung cancer deaths in the general population by a factor of 1.6 over the current rate of this age cohort. In all of these cases, most of the increased risk occurs to smokers for whom the risk is up to 10 times greater than for nonsmokers. Discussion includes the extrapolation of estimates of lung cancer mortality risks from the underground miner data to the general population exposed to Rn and its decay products in the indoor domestic environment

  9. Use of various microdosimetric models for the prediction of radon induced damage in human lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, R; Nikodémová, D; Holý, K

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to radon and radon decay products in some residential areas and at workplaces constitutes one of the greatest risks from natural sources of ionising radiation. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the precise estimations of this health risk by numerous models. The compartmental model published in ICRP Publication 66 (HRTM) has been used for calculating alpha activity concentration in human lung. Energy deposition in the tissue was calculated by the Bethe-Bloch equation. The aim of this study was to check the performance and to compare the reliability of the microdosimetric models. In this work different thicknesses of mucus in the cases of non-smokers and smokers has been considered. Transformed cells were considered as the radiation risk parameters. The radiation risk evaluation for different exposure levels was based on homogeneous and heterogeneous distributions of target cells. The results of application of these procedures were compared with the epidemiological study of Czechoslovakian uranium miners. PMID:12918790

  10. Factors modifying the risk of lung cancer associated to radon in the french cohort of uranium miners; Facteurs modifiants du risque de cancer du poumon associe au radon au sein de la cohorte francaise des mineurs d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacquier, B.; Rogel, A.; Laurier, D. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Caer, S.; Acker, A. [Areva NC, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-09-15

    The radon is classified lung carcinogen for man, but questions stay about the effects for low doses irradiation.The results of the analysis radon-lung cancer and the factors modifying on this relationship in the French cohort of miners followed until to 1999 is reported. This analysis confirms that the risk lung cancer is different according the period of exposure. A best precision in the measurement of exposure after 1956 could explain this difference. (N.C.)

  11. An experimental two-stage rat model of lung carcinoma initiated by radon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of a two-stage biological model of lung carcinogenesis in rats. The histogenesis of these tumors was examined, and DNA content of lung cells was measured by flow cytometry during the evolving neoplastic stage. Tumors were induced in rat lungs after radon inhalation (1600 WLM) followed by a promoter treatment; six intramuscular injections of 5,6-benzoflavone (25 mg/kg of body weight/injection) every 2 wk. Less than 3 mo after the first injection of benzoflavone, squamous cell carcinoma was observed in the lungs of all rats exposed to radon. The preneoplastic lesions gradually developed as follows: hyperplastic bronchiolar-type cells migrated to the alveoli from cells that proliferated in bronchioles and alveolar ducts; initial lesions were observed in almost all respiratory bronchioles. From some hyperplasias, epidermoid metaplasias arose distally, forming nodular epidermoid lesions in alveoli, which progressed to form squamous papilloma and, finally, epidermoid carcinomas. The histogenesis of these experimentally induced epidermoid carcinomas showed the bronchioloalveolar origin of the tumor. This factor must be considered when comparing these with human lesions; in humans, lung epidermoid carcinomas are thought to arise mainly in the first bronchial generations. The labeling index of pulmonary tissue after incorporation of 3H-thymidine by the cells was 0.2% in control rats. This index reached a value of 1 to 2% in the hyperplastic area of the bronchioles and 10 to 15% in epidermoid nodules and epidermoid tumors, respectively. DNA cytometric analysis was performed on cell suspensions obtained after enzymatic treatment of paraffin sections of lungs from rats sacrificed during different stags of neoplastic transformations. Data showed the early appearance of a triploid cell population that grew during the evolution of nodular epidermoid lesions to epidermoid carcinomas

  12. Early bone changes after incorporation of low quantities of alpha emitters in male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work shows the early effects of cancergenic doses of alpha emitters in long bones of rats. The investigations were based on radiographic, morphologic, angiographic, histologic and electronmicroscopic methods. A special method for bone angiography in the rat was elaborated and a new method was developed for measurement of the femur neck-head angle. Numerous disturbances in bone growth and bone structure, in the blood supply of bone and also of the bone building cells were observed. There was a correlation between the severity of the damage and the radiation dose, the spacial distribution of the nuclide and partially the age of the rats. The bone injury due to plutonium was markedly reduced by administration of the chelating agent Zn-DTPA. (orig.)

  13. Modeling Lung Carcinogenesis in Radon-Exposed Miner Cohorts: Accounting for Missing Information on Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillen, Teun; Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kreuzer, Michaela; Grosche, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological miner cohort data used to estimate lung cancer risks related to occupational radon exposure often lack cohort-wide information on exposure to tobacco smoke, a potential confounder and important effect modifier. We have developed a method to project data on smoking habits from a case-control study onto an entire cohort by means of a Monte Carlo resampling technique. As a proof of principle, this method is tested on a subcohort of 35,084 former uranium miners employed at the WISMUT company (Germany), with 461 lung cancer deaths in the follow-up period 1955-1998. After applying the proposed imputation technique, a biologically-based carcinogenesis model is employed to analyze the cohort's lung cancer mortality data. A sensitivity analysis based on a set of 200 independent projections with subsequent model analyses yields narrow distributions of the free model parameters, indicating that parameter values are relatively stable and independent of individual projections. This technique thus offers a possibility to account for unknown smoking habits, enabling us to unravel risks related to radon, to smoking, and to the combination of both.

  14. Radon progeny exposure and lung cancer risk: Analyses of a cohort of Newfoundland fluorspar miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cohort study of the mortality experience (1950-1990) of 1744 underground miners and 321 millers or surface workers has been conducted. Excess mortality among underground miners was noted for cancers of the lung, buccal cavity, pharynx and mouth, urinary tract and for silicosis and pneumoconioses. A highly statistically significant relationship was noted between radon daughter exposure and risk of dying of lung cancer; the small numbers of buccal cavity/pharynx cancers (n = 6) precluded meaningful analysis of exposure-response. No statistically significant excess was found for any cause of death among surface workers. The exposure-response data for lung cancer were fitted to various mathematical models. The model selected included terms for attained age, cumulative dose, dose rate and time since last exposure. Because risk varies according to each of these factors, a single summary risk estimate was felt to be misleading. The joint effects of radon and smoking could not be adequately assessed using this cohort. (author). 46 refs., 16 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Modeling Lung Carcinogenesis in Radon-Exposed Miner Cohorts: Accounting for Missing Information on Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillen, Teun; Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kreuzer, Michaela; Grosche, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological miner cohort data used to estimate lung cancer risks related to occupational radon exposure often lack cohort-wide information on exposure to tobacco smoke, a potential confounder and important effect modifier. We have developed a method to project data on smoking habits from a case-control study onto an entire cohort by means of a Monte Carlo resampling technique. As a proof of principle, this method is tested on a subcohort of 35,084 former uranium miners employed at the WISMUT company (Germany), with 461 lung cancer deaths in the follow-up period 1955-1998. After applying the proposed imputation technique, a biologically-based carcinogenesis model is employed to analyze the cohort's lung cancer mortality data. A sensitivity analysis based on a set of 200 independent projections with subsequent model analyses yields narrow distributions of the free model parameters, indicating that parameter values are relatively stable and independent of individual projections. This technique thus offers a possibility to account for unknown smoking habits, enabling us to unravel risks related to radon, to smoking, and to the combination of both. PMID:27198876

  16. Risk of lung cancer from radon exposure: contribution of recently published studies of uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recently estimated the risk of lung cancer associated with radon exposure, and a statement was issued in ICRP Publication 115. This was based on recent epidemiological studies and the results from a joint analysis of cohorts of Czech, French, and German uranium miners, and indicated that the excess relative risk of lung cancer per unit of exposure should be expressed with consideration of chronic exposure over more than 10 years, by modelling time since median exposure, age attained or age at exposure, and taking in account, if possible, interaction between radon and tobacco. The lifetime excess absolute risk (LEAR) calculated from occupational exposure studies is close to 5 × 10−4 per working level month (WLM) (14 × 10−5 per hm J/m3). LEAR values estimated using risk models derived from both miners and domestic exposure studies are in good agreement after accounting for factors such as sex, attained age, and exposure scenario. A sensitivity analysis highlighted the high dependence of background mortality rates on LEAR estimates. Using lung cancer rates among Euro-American males instead of the ICRP reference rates (males and females, and Euro-American and Asian populations), the estimated LEAR is close to 7 × 10−4 per WLM (20 × 10−5 per hm J/m3).

  17. Study of epidemiological risk of lung cancer in Mexico due indoor radon exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles, A.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this work the lifetime relative risks (LRR) of lung cancer due to exposure to indoor 222Rn on the Mexican population is calculated. Cigarette smoking is the number one risk factor for lung cancer (LC), because that, to calculate the number of cases of LC due to exposure to 222Rn is necessary considers the number of cases of LC for smoking cigarette. The lung cancer mortality rates published by the "Secretaría de Salud" (SSA), the mexican population data published by the "Consejo Nacional de Población" (CONAPO), smoking data in the mexican population, published by the "Comisión Nacional Contra las Adicciones" (CONADIC), the "Organización Panamericana de la Salud" (OPS) and indoor 222Rn concentrations in Mexico published in several recent studies are used. To calculate the lifetime relative risks (LRR) for different segments of the Mexican population, firstly the Excess Relative Risk (ERR) is calculated using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee and subsequently modified by the USEPA and published in the report "EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes". The excess relative risks were then used to calculate the corresponding lifetime relative risks, again using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee. The lifetime relative risks for Mexican male and female eversmokers and Mexican male and female never-smokers were calculated for radon concentrations spanning the range found in recent studies of indoor radon concentrations in Mexico. The lifetime relative risks of lung cancer induced by lifetime exposure to the mexican average indoor radon concentration were estimated to be 1.44 and 1.40 for never-smokers mexican females and males respectively, and 1.19 and 1.17 for ever-smokers Mexican females and males respectively. The Mexican population LRR values obtained in relation to the USA and Canada LRR published values in ever-smokers for both gender are similar with differences less than 4%, in case of never-smokers in relation with Canada

  18. Dosimetric concepts for inhaled radon decay products in the human lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of lung dosimetry is to provide a physical basis in terms of radiation doses for establishing the relationship between airborne radon decay products and lung cancer induction as the most important biological endpoint. In order to accomplish this goal, several dosimetric approaches have been developed which are based on reasonable approximations of the anatomical structure of the respiratory tract, of clearance mechanisms for particles deposited, and of energy deposition at the cellular level. Usually lung cancer risk is correlated with the mean radiation dose to the stem cells in the bronchial epithelium. A different approach is presented here through the application of stochastic models which allow for the biological variability inherent in all anatomical and physiological parameters. Thus, the specific energy distribution in cells or cell nuclei and the number of sensitive targets hit are more appropriate quantities for the interpretation of lung cancer incidence. The relevance of dosimetric approaches at the cellular level is, however, intimately connected with models describing the transformation towards malignancy, and further improvements of lung dosimetry can only be achieved by a more profound insight into the basic biological mechanisms involved in radiation-induced carcinogenesis

  19. Dose-rate effects on lung cancers induced by exposure to radon progeny in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological studies in uranium miners and other underground miners showed an association between an excess risk of lung cancer and exposure to radon and its progeny, but the evidence of an excess risk of lung cancer from residential radon indoor exposure is less certain. Animal studies were used in addition to epidemiological studies to investigate the effects of exposure, exposure rate and other factors in predicting risks resulting from human exposures both in the home and in the workplace. The advantage of animal data is that animal experiments are generally conducted under well controlled conditions and that exposure and exposure rate can be estimated more accurately. Radon animal data, obtained primarily in adult rats, were provided mainly by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in USA and our group in France. Despite the fact that significant cumulative exposures at typical residential exposure rates of about 1.810-5 Jhm-3 per week, approximately 0.005 WLM per week, cannot be tested in a short-lived species like the rat, the rat model is valuable for reducing the uncertainties that exist in human data, particularly in regard to the exposure-rate effect. In PNL lifespan animal experiments, a trend towards increasing tumour risk with decreased exposure rate has been reported in Wistar rats exposed at 2.1 mJm-3 (100 WL) and 21 mJm-3 (1,000 WL) and cumulative exposures varying from 2.3 Jhm-3 (640 WLM) up to 18.4 Jhm-3 (5,120 WLM). A trend towards increasing tumour risk with decreased exposure rate was observed in our Sprague-Dawley rats exposed at cumulative exposure varying from about 0.72 Jhm-3 (200 WLM) up to 10.8 Jhm-3 (3,000 WLM) and high exposure rates varying from 0.09 Jhm-3 (25 WLM per week) to 1.8 Jm-3 (500 WLM per week). In contrast, the results obtained at low cumulative exposure, comparable to domestic indoor exposures showed no evidence of an inverse exposure-rate effect. Chronic radon exposure at 0.09 Jhm-3 (25 WLM), protracted over a 18

  20. Radiative Transfer Modeling of Lyman Alpha Emitters: I. Statistics of Spectra and Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Zheng; Trac, Hy; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    We combine a cosmological reionization simulation with box size of 100Mpc/h on a side and a Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha (Lya) radiative transfer code to model Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z~5.7. The model introduces Lya radiative transfer as the single factor for transforming the intrinsic Lya emission properties into the observed ones. Spatial diffusion of Lya photons from radiative transfer results in extended Lya emission and only the central part with high surface brightness can be observed. Because of radiative transfer, the appearance of LAEs depends on density and velocity structures in circumgalactic and intergalactic media as well as the viewing angle, which leads to a broad distribution of apparent (observed) Lya luminosity for a given intrinsic Lya luminosity. Radiative transfer also causes frequency diffusion of Lya photons. The resultant Lya line is asymmetric with a red tail. The peak of the Lya line shifts towards longer wavelength and the shift is anti-correlated with the apparent to intrinsic L...

  1. Exploring the nature of the Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitter CR7

    CERN Document Server

    Hartwig, Tilman; Magg, Mattis; Bromm, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S; Glover, Simon C O; Whalen, Daniel J; Pellegrini, Eric W; Volonteri, Marta

    2015-01-01

    CR7 is the brightest Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitter observed at $z>6$, which shows very strong Lyman-$\\alpha$ and HeII 1640 \\AA\\ line luminosities, but no metal line emission. Previous studies suggest that CR7 hosts either young primordial stars with a total stellar mass of $\\sim 10^7\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ or a black hole of $\\sim 10^6\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$. Here, we explore different formation scenarios for CR7 with a semianalytical model, based on the random sampling of dark matter merger trees. We find that primordial stars cannot account for the observed line luminosities because of their short lifetimes and because of early metal enrichment. Black holes that are the remnants of the first stars are either not massive enough, or reside in metal-polluted haloes, ruling out this possible explanation of CR7. Our models instead suggest that direct collapse black holes, which form in metal-free haloes exposed to large Lyman-Werner fluxes, are more likely the origin of CR7. However, this result is derived under optimistic ass...

  2. The VLT LBG Redshift Survey - V. Characterising the z = 3.1 Lyman Alpha Emitter Population

    CERN Document Server

    Bielby, R M; Shanks, T; Francke, H; Crighton, N H M; Bañados, E; González-López, Jorge; Infante, L; Orsi, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a survey of Ly$\\alpha$ emitting galaxies in the fields of the VLT LBG Redshift Survey, incorporating the analysis of narrow band number counts, the rest frame UV luminosity function and the two-point correlation function of Ly$\\alpha$ emitters at $z\\approx3.1$. Our photometric sample consists of 750 LAE candidates, over an area of 1.07 deg$^2$, with estimated equivalent widths of $\\gtrsim65$ \\AA, from 5 fields based on deep Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging data. Added to this we have obtained spectroscopic follow-up observations, which successfully detected Ly$\\alpha$ emission in 35 galaxies. Based on the spectroscopic results, we refined our photometric selection constraints, with the resulting sample having a success rate of $78\\pm18\\%$. We calculate the narrow band number counts for our photometric sample and find these to be consistent with previous studies of LAEs at this redshift. We find the $R$-band continuum luminosity function to be $\\sim10\\times$ lower than the equivalent luminosity function o...

  3. The Brightest Ly$\\alpha$ Emitter: Pop III or Black Hole?

    CERN Document Server

    Pallottini, A; Pacucci, F; Gallerani, S; Salvadori, S; Schneider, R; Schaerer, D; Sobral, D; Matthee, J

    2015-01-01

    CR7 is the brightest $z=6.6 \\, {\\rm Ly}\\alpha$ emitter (LAE) known to date, and spectroscopic follow-up by Sobral et al. (2015) suggests that CR7 might host Population (Pop) III stars. We examine this interpretation using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Several simulated galaxies show the same "Pop III wave" pattern observed in CR7. However, to reproduce the extreme CR7 ${\\rm Ly}\\alpha$/HeII1640 line luminosities ($L_{\\rm \\alpha/He II}$) a top-heavy IMF and a massive ($>10^{7}{\\rm M}_{\\odot}$) PopIII burst with age $10^{43.3}{\\rm erg}\\,{\\rm s}^{-1}$ should also host Pop III stars producing an observable $L_{\\rm He II}>10^{42.7}{\\rm erg}\\,{\\rm s}^{-1}$. As an alternate explanation, we explore the possibility that CR7 is instead powered by accretion onto a Direct Collapse Black Hole (DCBH). Our model predicts $L_{\\alpha}$, $L_{\\rm He II}$, and X-ray luminosities that are in agreement with the observations. In any case, the observed properties of CR7 indicate that this galaxy is most likely powered by s...

  4. Exploiting 21cm - Ly$\\alpha$ emitter synergies: constraints on reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Hutter, Anne; Müller, Volker; Trott, Cathryn

    2016-01-01

    We couple a $z \\simeq 6.6$ hydrodynamical simulation (GADGET-2) with a radiative transfer code (pCRASH) and a dust model to simultaneously obtain the 21cm emission from the spin-flip transition of neutral hydrogen (HI) as well as the sub-population of galaxies visible as Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs). Cross-correlating 21cm data with the underlying galaxy population, and especially the subset visible as LAEs, our aim is to constrain both the average intergalactic medium (IGM) ionization state ($\\langle \\chi_{HI} \\rangle$) and the reionization topology (outside-in versus inside-out). We find that LAEs occupy the densest and most-ionized regions resulting in a very strong anti-correlation between the LAEs and the 21cm emission. Within errors, a 1000h SKA-LOW1 - Subaru Hyper Suprime Cam experiment can provide exquisite constraints on $\\langle \\chi_{HI} \\rangle$, allowing us to distinguish between IGM ionization levels of 50%, 25%, 10% and fully ionized at scales $\\leq 10$ comoving Mpc. Our results support the insi...

  5. Evolution in the properties of Lyman-alpha emitters from redshifts z ~ 3 to z ~ 2

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Kim K; Moeller, Palle; Freudling, Wolfram; Fynbo, Johan P U; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Laursen, Peter; Oestlin, Goeran

    2008-01-01

    Context: Narrow-band surveys for Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) is a powerful tool in detecting high, and very high, redshift galaxies. Even though samples are growing at redshifts z = 3 - 6, the nature of these galaxies is still poorly known. Aims: To study the properties of z = 2.25 LAEs and compare those with the properties of z > 3 LAEs. Methods: We present narrow-band imaging made with the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope with the WFI detector. We have made a selection for emission-line objects and find 170 candidate typical LAEs and 17 candidates which we regard as high UV-transmission LAEs. We have derived the magnitudes of these objects in 8 bands from u* to Ks, and studied if they have X-ray and/or radio counterparts. Results: We show that there has been significant evolution in the properties of LAEs between redshift z ~ 3 and z = 2.25. The spread in spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at the lower redshift is larger and we detect a significant AGN contribution in the sample. The distribution of the equivalent wid...

  6. A Multiply-Imaged z $\\sim$ 6.3 Lyman Alpha Emitter candidate behind Abell 2261

    CERN Document Server

    Rydberg, Claes-Erik; Zackrisson, Erik; Melinder, Jens; Whalen, Daniel J; Klessen, Ralf S; Gonzalez, Juan; Östlin, Göran; Carollo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    While the Lyman-$\\alpha$ ($\\mathrm{Ly}\\alpha$) emission line serves as an important tool in the study of galaxies at $z\\lesssim 6$, finding Ly$\\alpha$ emitters (LAE) at significantly higher redshifts has been more challenging, probably because of the increasing neutrality of the intergalactic medium above $z\\sim6$. Galaxies with extremely high rest-frame Ly$\\alpha$ equivalent widths, EW(Ly$\\alpha$) $\\gtrsim 150$ \\AA{}, at $z>6$ are good candidates for Ly$\\alpha$ follow-up observations, and can stand out in multiband imaging surveys because of their unusual colors. We have conducted a photometric search for such objects in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH), and report here the identification of three likely gravitationally-lensed images of a single LAE candidate at $z\\sim6.3$, behind the galaxy cluster Abell 2261($z = 0.225$). In the process, we also measured with Keck/MOSFIRE the first spectroscopic redshift of a multiply-imaged galaxy behind Abell 2261, at $z = 3.337$. This allows ...

  7. On the Use of Ly-alpha Emitters as Probes of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Hannes; Mellema, Garrelt; Iliev, Ilian T; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Shapiro, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    We use numerical simulations to study the effects of the patchiness of a partly reionized intergalactic medium (IGM) on the observability of Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) at high redshifts (z ~ 6). We present a new model that divides the Ly-alpha radiative transfer into a (circum-)galactic and an extragalactic (IGM) part, and investigate how the choice of intrinsic line model affects the IGM transmission results. We use our model to study the impact of neutral hydrogen on statistical observables such as the Ly-alpha restframe equivalent width (REW) distribution, the LAE luminosity function and the two-point correlation function. We find that if the observed changes in LAE luminosity functions and equivalent width distributions between z ~ 6 and z ~ 7 are to be explained by an increased IGM neutral fraction alone, we require an extremely late and rapid reionization scenario, where the Universe was ~ 40 % ionized at z = 7, ~ 50 % ionized at z = 6.5 and ~ 100 % ionized at z = 6. This is in conflict with other observa...

  8. Constraining the Lyman Alpha Escape Fraction with Far-Infrared Observations of Lyman Alpha Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Wardlow, Julie L; Zheng, Z; Finkelstein, S; Bock, J; Bridge, C; Calanog, J; Ciardullo, R; Conley, A; Cooray, A; Farrah, D; Gawiser, E; Gronwall, C; Heinis, S; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Marsden, G; Oliver, S J; Rhoads, J; Riechers, D; Schulz, B; Smith, A J; Viero, M; Wang, L; Zemcov, M

    2013-01-01

    We study the far-infrared properties of 498 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, using 250, 350 and 500 micron data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) and 870 micron data from the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (LESS). None of the 126, 280 or 92 LAEs at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5, respectively, are individually detected in the far-infrared data. We use stacking to probe the average emission to deeper flux limits, reaching $1\\sigma$ depths of ~0.1 to 0.4 mJy. The LAEs are also undetected at $\\ge3\\sigma$ in the stacks, although a $2.5\\sigma$ signal is observed at 870 micron for the z=2.8 sources. We consider a wide range of far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), including a M82 and an Sd galaxy template, to determine upper limits on the far-infrared luminosities and far-infrared-derived star-formation rates of the LAEs. These star-formation rates are then combined with those inferred from the Ly$\\alpha$ and UV emission to de...

  9. Clustering and lifetime of Lyman Alpha Emitters in the Epoch of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Hutter, Anne; Müller, Volker

    2015-01-01

    We calculate Lyman Alpha Emitter (LAE) angular correlation functions (ACFs) at $z\\simeq6.6$ and the fraction of lifetime (for the 100 Myrs preceding $z\\simeq6.6$) galaxies spend as Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) with/without Lyman Alpha (Ly\\alpha) emission using a model that combines SPH cosmological simulations (GADGET-2), dust attenuation and a radiative transfer code (pCRASH). The ACFs are a powerful tool that significantly narrows the 3D parameter space allowed by LAE Ly$\\alpha$ and UV luminosity functions (LFs) alone. With this work, we simultaneously constrain the escape fraction of ionizing photons $f_{esc}=0.05-0.5$, the mean fraction of neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) $\\leq 0.01$ and the dust-dependent ratio of the escape fractions of Ly$\\alpha$ and UV continuum photons $f_\\alpha/f_c=0.6-1.2$. Our results show that reionization has the largest impact on the amplitude of the ACFs, and its imprints are clearly distinguishable from those of $f_{esc}$ and $f_\\alpha/f_c$. We also show that...

  10. Lung cancer risk due to indoor radon in the eastern federal states of Germany - Thuringia and Saxonia; Lungenkrebsrisiko durch Radon in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (Ost) - Thueringen und Sachsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichmann, H.E. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Epidemiologie; Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Epidemiologie; Gerken, M.; Wellmann, M.; Heinrich, J. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Epidemiologie; Kreuzer, L. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenhygiene; Kreienbrock, L. [Tieraerztliche Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Biometrie, Epidemiologie und Informationsverarbeitung; Keller, G. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Inst. fuer Biophysik; Woelke, G. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Epidemiologie

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the lung cancer risk due to indoor radon a case-control study was conducted in Thuringia and Saxony (East Germany) from 1990 to 1997. Incident lung cancer patients recruited from cooperating hospitals, as well as a random sample of population controls were personally interviewed according to their complete residential, smoking and occupational history and other risk factors. Radon exposure was quantified based on measurements with two alpha-track detectors, placed for one year in the bedrooms and living-rooms of the current and former residences. The evaluation included 1053 cases and 1667 controls. A further evaluation included only subjects from regions with high and very high radon exposure. In the study are an increase of the lung cancer risk with increasing exposure to radon is observed. The odds ratios (adjusted for smoking and asbestos exposure) referring to the one year measurements in the current residences are 0.97, 1.05 and 1.37 for 50-80, 80-140 and more than 140 Bq/m{sup 3} compared to 0-50 Bq/m{sup 3}, the odds ratio for the highest exposure category being of borderline significance. Other quantifications render comparable risk estimators. An analysis restricted to regions with high and very high radon exposure partly shows statistically significant elevated risks. The results of the study give additional evidence that indoor radon is a risk factor for lung cancer in the general population. The results are in accordance with a Swedish and a British investigation, with the result of a meta analysis including eight important published studies, as well as risk models from the analysis of cohorts of miners. Furthermore they confirm the results of an analysis in radon-prone areas within a case-control study conducted in West Germany. (orig.) [German] Im Zeitraum von 1990 bis 1997 wurde in Thueringen und Sachsen eine Fall-Kontroll-Studie zum Lungenkrebsrisiko durch Radon in Wohnraeumen durchgefuehrt. Hierbei wurden neu diagnostizierte

  11. Mechanisms of radon injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this new project, they conduct molecular, cellular and whole-animal research relevant to understanding the inhalation toxicology of radon and radon-daughter exposures. The work specifically addresses the exposure-rate effect in radon-daughter carcinogenesis; the induction-promotion relationships associated with exposure to radon and cigarette-smoke mixtures; the role of oncogenes in radon-induced cancers; the effects of radon on DNA as well as on DNA repair processes; and the involvement of growth factors and their receptors in radon-induced carcinogenesis. Preliminary experiments showed that oncogenes are activated in radon-induced lung tumors. They have therefore begun further exposures pertinent to the oncogene and growth-factor studies. An in vitro radon cellular-exposure system was designed, and cell exposures were initiated. Initiation-promotion-initiation studies with radon and cigarette-smoke mixtures have also begun; and they are compiling a radon health-effects bibliography

  12. Critical review for the determination of the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of alpha-emitter radionuclides in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different criteria for the calculation of the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of an alpha emitter in environmental levels are reviewed in this report. Practical examples of its application to previously analyzed samples are shown. The authors propose a criteria based on prior calculations that applies to the radiochemical activities performed in the laboratory. The calculation procedure has been discussed with scientist from other laboratories in order to establish a general criteria to calculate the MDA

  13. Studies on the atomic and molecular processes produced by alpha emitters in gaseous media using track detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the studies consists in obtaining new and reliable experimental data on certain atomic and molecular physical processes which take place at low speed or/and very low amounts, such as: diffusion, adherence, fallout, etc. of the alpha emitters in gaseous media. By using the track analysis method, most experimental data can be visualized by optical microscopy, so that reliable qualitative and quantitative investigations can be performed. In the first stage, the alpha track method was used. Two plastic detectors were used: CR - 39 (Page, England) and RL - 115 types 1 and 2 (Kodak, France). For these detectors new etching conditions were developed. In the present stage, a calibration of CR - 39 and RL - 115 track detectors for the alpha particles emitted from gaseous radionuclides, particularly for 222 Rn and its alpha descendants, is performed. For this purpose the track detectors were suspended in tight vessels and the following alpha emitter sources were used: - a diuranate source calibrated in uranium prepared in our laboratory; - a calibrated 226 Ra solution; - sources calibrated in 222 Rn and 226 Ra. The amounts and activities of each alpha decay product of these sources are calculated using a radioactive accumulation computation programme UURASE based on the Bateman general equation. The alpha particle ranges were calculated using the TRIM computation programme. In the future stages of this investigation the following studies will be performed: - the diffusion of gaseous alpha emitters; - the sorption of alpha emitter gases and aerosols on different materials; - 222 Rn monitoring in dwelling houses and working places and the implementation of the alpha track method in the National Networks for surveillance of the environmental alpha radioactivity. (authors)

  14. Epidemiologic approach to determining the REM dose to bronchial epithelium from radon daughter exposures in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetric evaluation of exposures to the bronchial epithelial stem cells from inhalation of alpha emitters is complex and the number of assumptions required leads to substantial uncertainty. Moreover, it is evident that many factors such as variable breathing patterns will modify the results. An empirical approach to determining the rem dose biologically effective in producing bronchial cancer by inhalation of radon daughters is possible by comparison of cumulative exposure in terms of Working Level Months with the dose of penetrating low-LET radiation to produce the same bronchial cancer risk in other groups investigated. This method is possible when the dosimetry of the comparison groups is well known and lung cancer risks are reasonably well-defined. A number of epidemiologic considerations must be taken into account in such comparisons, however. These include age at exposure, length of following, age at expression of or death from cancer, and for underground miners exposed to radon daughters the lung cancer-latent period model applied to long-term exposures. Use of these methods gives results consistent with dosimetry derived from models of bronchial deposition and clearance, as well as reasonable values for the quality factor for alpha radiation. This comparison gives an average equivalent dose for a working population exposed to short-lived isotopes

  15. Assessment of indoor radon exposure and risk of lung cancer in the population of the Sverdlovsk region, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adverse radioecological situation in the Sverdlovsk Region of Russia forms elevated radiation load on the population. To adequately assess the influence of exposure to radon on the development of lung cancer, a cohort study employing a multivariate analysis was conducted in the city of Pervouralsk, Russia. According to the chosen method, 200 lung cancer cases were randomly matched with 237 controls. Each of the 437 cohort members was characterized by a complex of 26 parameters reflecting known risk factors of lung cancer. Analytical tasks were solved based on methods of discriminant analysis. None of the three parameters directly characterizing the indoor level of radiation pollution by radon and thoron was found to be one of the most informative cancer risk factors. Thus, as compared to other analyzed risk factors of lung cancer, the contribution of radon and thoron exposure of population inhabiting multi story residential buildings in the city of Pervouralsk could not be considered as the most important cause of lung cancer. (authors)

  16. Measurements of size distributions of radon progeny for improved quantification of the lung cancer risk emanating from exposure to radon decay products; Messungen der Groessenverteilungen von Radon-Folgeprodukten zur Verbesserung der Quantifizierung des durch Radonexposition verursachten Lungenkrebsrisikos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haninger, T.

    1997-12-31

    A major issue in radiation protection is to protect the population from the harmful effects of exposure to radon and radon progeny. Quantification of the lung cancer risk emanating from exposure to radon decay products in residential and working environments poses problems, as epidemiologic studies yield information deviating from the results obtained by the indirect method of assessment based on dosimetric respiratory tract models. One important task of the publication here was to characterize the various exposure conditions and to quantify uncertainties that may result from application of the ``dose conversion convention``. A special aerosol spectrometer was therefore designed and built in order to measure the size distributions of the short-lived radon decay products in the range between 0.5 nm and 10 000 nm. The aerosol spectrometer consists of a three-step diffusion battery with wire nets, an 11-step BERNER impactor, and a detector system with twelve large-surface proportional detectors. From the measured size distributions, dose conversion coefficients, E/P{sup eq}, were calculated using the PC software RADEP; the RADEP program was developed by BIRCHALL and JAMES and is based on the respiratory tract model of the ICRP. The E/P{sup eq} coefficients indicate the effective dose E per unit exposure P{sup eq} to radon decay products. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Eines der groessten Probleme des Strahlenschutzes ist der Schutz der Bevoelkerung vor einer Strahlenexposition durch Radon und seine Folgeprodukte. Die Quantifizierung des Lungenkrebsrisikos, das durch Radonexpositionen in Wohnungen und an Arbeitsplaetzen verursacht wird, ist ein grosses Problem, weil epidemiologische Studien ein anderes Ergebnis liefern, als die indirekte Methode der Abschaetzung mit dosimetrischen Atemtrakt-Modellen. Eine wichtige Aufgabe der vorliegenden Arbeit war es, unterschiedliche Expositionsbedingungen zu charakterisieren und die Unsicherheiten zu quantifizieren, die sich aus der

  17. Lung Cancer Risk from Occupational and Environmental Radon and Role of Smoking in Two Czech Nested Case-Control Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Tomasek

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the risk of lung cancer from combined exposure to radon and smoking. Methodologically, it is based on case-control studies nested within two Czech cohort studies of nearly 11,000 miners followed-up for mortality in 1952–2010 and nearly 12,000 inhabitants exposed to high levels of radon in homes, with mortality follow-up in 1960–2010. In addition to recorded radon exposure, these studies use information on smoking collected from the subjects or their relatives. A total of 1,029 and 370 cases with smoking information have been observed in the occupational and environmental (residential studies, respectively. Three or four control subjects have been individually matched to cases according to sex, year of birth, and age. The combined effect from radon and smoking is analyzed in terms of geometric mixture models of which the additive and multiplicative models are special cases. The resulting models are relatively close to the additive interaction (mixing parameter 0.2 and 0.3 in the occupational and residential studies, respectively. The impact of the resulting model in the residential radon study is illustrated by estimates of lifetime risk in hypothetical populations of smokers and non-smokers. In comparison to the multiplicative risk model, the lifetime risk from the best geometric mixture model is considerably higher, particularly in the non-smoking population.

  18. Mechanistic study on lung cancer mortality after radon exposure in the Wismut cohort supports important role of clonal expansion in lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaballa, I; Eidemüller, M

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer mortality after radon exposure in the Wismut cohort was analyzed using the two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model. A total of 2996 lung cancer deaths among the 58,695 male workers were observed during the follow-up period between 1946 and 2003. Adjustment to silica exposure was performed to find a more accurate estimation of the risk of radon exposure. An additional analysis with the descriptive excess relative risk (ERR) model was carried out for comparison. The TSCE model that best describes the data is nonlinear in the clonal expansion with radon exposure and has a saturation level at an exposure rate of [Formula: see text]. The excess relative risk decreases with age and shows an inverse exposure rate effect. In comparison with the ERR model, the TSCE model predicts a considerably larger risk for low exposures rates below [Formula: see text]. Comparison to other mechanistic studies of lung cancer after exposure to alpha particles using the TSCE model reveals an extraordinary consistency in the main features of the exposure response, given the diversity in the characteristics of the cohorts and the exposure across different studies. This suggests that a nonlinear response mechanism in the clonal expansion, with some level of saturation at large exposure rates, may be playing a crucial role in the development of lung cancer after alpha particle irradiation. PMID:27334643

  19. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC EVIDENCE FOR HIGH IONIZATION STATE AND LOW OXYGEN ABUNDANCE IN Ly{alpha} EMITTERS ,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Kimihiko; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Takuya; Ono, Yoshiaki [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Lee, Janice C., E-mail: nakajima@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-05-20

    We present results from Keck/NIRSPEC and Magellan/MMIRS follow-up spectroscopy of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 identified in our Subaru narrowband survey. We successfully detect H{alpha} emission from seven LAEs, and perform a detailed analysis of six LAEs free from active galactic nucleus activity, two out of which, CDFS-3865 and COSMOS-30679, have [O II] and [O III] line detections. They are the first [O II]-detected LAEs at high-z, and their [O III]/[O II] ratios and R23-indices provide the first simultaneous determinations of ionization parameter and oxygen abundance for LAEs. CDFS-3865 has a very high ionization parameter (q{sub ion}=2.5{sup +1.7}{sub -0.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cm s{sup -1}) and a low oxygen abundance (12+ log (O/H)=7.84{sup +0.24}{sub -0.25}) in contrast with moderate values of other high-z galaxies such as Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). COSMOS-30679 also possesses a relatively high ionization parameter (q{sub ion}=8{sup +10}{sub -4} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm s{sup -1}) and a low oxygen abundance (12+ log (O/H)=8.18{sup +0.28}{sub -0.28}). Both LAEs appear to fall below the mass-metallicity relation of z {approx} 2 LBGs. Similarly, a low metallicity of 12 + log (O/H) < 8.4 is independently indicated for typical LAEs from a composite spectrum and the [N II]/H{alpha} index. Such high ionization parameters and low oxygen abundances can be found in local star-forming galaxies, but this extreme local population occupies only {approx}0.06% of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic galaxy sample with a number density {approx}100 times smaller than that of LAEs. With their high ionization parameters and low oxygen abundances, LAEs would represent an early stage of galaxy formation dominated by massive stars in compact star-forming regions. High-q{sub ion} galaxies like LAEs would produce ionizing photons efficiently with a high escape fraction achieved by density-bounded H II regions, which would significantly contribute to

  20. Purification of scintillation cocktails containing the alpha emitters americium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One efficient way of measuring alpha emitters is by the usage of liquid scintillation counting (LSC). A liquid sample is placed in a vial containing a scintillation cocktail. The alpha particles excite electrons in the surrounding liquid, and when they are de-excited photons are emitted. The photons are detected and the activity can be quantified. LSC has a high efficiency for alpha radiation and is therefore a fast and easy way for measuring alpha emitting samples. One drawback is that it does not differentiate very well between alpha energies; measurements of for example curium and plutonium simultaneously are impossible and demand other techniques. Another drawback is the production of a liquid alpha active waste. In Sweden alpha radioactive waste liquids with an activity over some kBq per waste container cannot be sent for final storage. If, however, the activity of the liquids could be reduced by precipitation of the actinides, it would be possible to send away the liquid samples to municipal incineration. In this work a method for a purification of alpha active scintillation cocktails was developed. The method was first tried on a lab scale, and then scaled up. Until today (March, 2013) more than 20 liters of scintillation liquids have successfully been purified from americium and plutonium at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The four scintillation cocktails used were Emulsifier Safe®, Hionic-Fluor®, Ultima Gold AB® and Ultima Gold XR®. The scintillation cocktails could all be purified from americium with higher yield than 95%. The yield was kept when the liquids were mixed. Also plutonium could be precipitated with a yield over 95% in all cocktails except in Hionic-Fluor® (>55%). However, that liquid in particular could be purified (>95%) by mixing it with the three other cocktails. Up-scaling was performed to a batch size of 6-8 L of scintillation cocktail. In neither the americium nor the plutonium system, adverse effects of increasing the

  1. Radon in caves: clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Craven Stephen A.; Smit Berend J.

    2006-01-01

    Historical, experimental and clinical evidence is presented to suggest that radon constitutes a relatively small carcinogenic risk for casual visitors to caves. The risk is dependent on radon levels and the smoking of tobacco. Show cave guides, chronically exposed to radon, may be at increased risk for lung cancer due to the effects of radon, especially if they are smokers of tobacco.

  2. Quantification of lung cancer risk after low radon exposure and low exposure rate: synthesis from epidemiological and experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is a radioactive gas produced during the decay of uranium 238 that is present in soil. It was classified as a human lung carcinogen in 1988, based on evidence both from animal studies and from human studies of miners with high levels of radon exposure. Radon is present everywhere; therefore the quantification of the risk associated with exposure to it is a key public health issue. The project aimed to analyse the risk associated with radon inhalation at low doses and at low rates of exposure. It involved researchers from three different fields: epidemiology, animal experiments and mechanistic modelling and provided a unique opportunity to study the influence of dose rate, mainly in the range of low daily exposures over long periods, by analysing in parallel results from both animal and epidemiological studies. The project comprised 6 work packages (W.P.). Firstly, the partners involved in epidemiology and animal experiments worked on the validation and the analysis of the data. Secondly, the data from W.P.1 and W.P.4 were transferred to the partners involved in W.P.5 for the application of mechanistic models. In the final step a synthesis of the results was prepared. (N.C)

  3. Quantification of lung cancer risk after low radon exposure and low exposure rate: synthesis from epidemiological and experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timarche, M

    2004-03-15

    Radon is a radioactive gas produced during the decay of uranium 238 that is present in soil. It was classified as a human lung carcinogen in 1988, based on evidence both from animal studies and from human studies of miners with high levels of radon exposure. Radon is present everywhere; therefore the quantification of the risk associated with exposure to it is a key public health issue. The project aimed to analyse the risk associated with radon inhalation at low doses and at low rates of exposure. It involved researchers from three different fields: epidemiology, animal experiments and mechanistic modelling and provided a unique opportunity to study the influence of dose rate, mainly in the range of low daily exposures over long periods, by analysing in parallel results from both animal and epidemiological studies. The project comprised 6 work packages (W.P.). Firstly, the partners involved in epidemiology and animal experiments worked on the validation and the analysis of the data. Secondly, the data from W.P.1 and W.P.4 were transferred to the partners involved in W.P.5 for the application of mechanistic models. In the final step a synthesis of the results was prepared. (N.C)

  4. Similarities and uniqueness of Ly$\\alpha$ emitters among star-forming galaxies at z=2.5

    CERN Document Server

    Shimakawa, Rhythm; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Tanaka, Ichi; Matsuda, Yuichi; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Koyama, Yusei; Hayashi, Masao; Suzuki, Tomoko L; Yamamoto, Moegi

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a deep narrow-band imaging survey with the Subaru Prime Focus Camera on the Subaru Telescope and constructed a sample of Ly$\\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) at z=2.53 in the UDS-CANDELS field where a sample of H$\\alpha$ emitters (HAEs) at the same redshift is already obtained from our previous narrow-band observation at NIR. The deep narrow-band and multi broadband data allow us to find LAEs of stellar masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) down to $\\gtrsim$$10^8$ M$_\\odot$ and $\\gtrsim$0.2 M$_\\odot$/yr, respectively. We show that the LAEs are located along the same mass-SFR sequence traced by normal star-forming galaxies such as HAEs, but towards a significantly lower mass regime. Likewise, LAEs seem to share the same mass--size relation with typical star-forming galaxies, except for the massive LAEs, which tend to show significantly compact sizes. We identify a vigorous mass growth in the central part of LAEs: the stellar mass density in the central region of LAEs increases as their total galaxy mass gr...

  5. The BOSS Emission-Line Lens Survey. III. : Strong Lensing of Ly$\\alpha$ Emitters by Individual Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, Yiping; Kochanek, Christopher S; Oguri, Masamune; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Zheng, Zheng; Mao, Shude; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D; Brownstein, Joel R; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Menard, Brice

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the BOSS Emission-Line Lens Survey (BELLS) GALaxy-Ly$\\alpha$ EmitteR sYstems (BELLS GALLERY) Survey, which is a Hubble Space Telescope program to image a sample of galaxy-scale strong gravitational lens candidate systems with high-redshift Ly$\\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) as the background sources. The goal of the BELLS GALLERY Survey is to illuminate dark substructures in galaxy-scale halos by exploiting the small-scale clumpiness of rest-frame far-UV emission in lensed LAEs, and to thereby constrain the slope and normalization of the substructure mass function. In this paper, we describe in detail the spectroscopic strong-lens selection technique, which is based on methods adopted in the previous Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey, BOSS Emission-Line Lens Survey, and SLACS for the Masses Survey. We present the BELLS GALLERY sample of the 21 highest-quality galaxy-LAE candidates selected from $\\approx 1.4 \\times 10^6$ galaxy spectra in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital...

  6. Lung cancer risk, exposure to radon and tobacco consumption in a nested case-control study of French uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: A nested case-control study was conducted among the French uranium miners cohort in order to assess the effect of protract ed radon exposure on lung cancer risk taking into account tobacco consumption. Material and methods: One hundred uranium miners employed by the French company CEA-COGEMA and who died of a lung cancer between 1980 and 1994 were identified as cases among the cohort. For each case, five controls were randomly matched on birth period and attained age at the time of death of the corresponding case. Cumulated radon exposure during employment was reconstructed for each of these 100 cases and 500 controls. Smoking habits were retrospectively determined from three complementary sources: 1) medical files, 2) forms filled in by occupational physicians and 3) questionnaires applied in face-to-face interviews, phone calls or mailings. Analysis was performed by conditional logistic regression using a linear excess relative risk (ERR) model. A multiplicative model was fitted to assess the joint effect of radon exposure and smoking on lung cancer risk. Results: Smoking status was established for 62 cases and 320 controls and two categories ('ever smokers' vs. 'never smokers') were defined. Ninety percent of the cases and 73% of the controls were classified as 'ever smokers'. Mean five-year lagged cumulated radon exposures were 82.0 and 47.6 working level months (WLM) for the cases and the controls, respectively. The excess relative risk per WLM (ERR/WLM) was 1.1% with a 95%-confidence interval (CI) of 0.2-2.0%. When adjusting for smoking, radon exposure effect was little modified (ERR/WLM = 0.8%, 95% -CI = 0.1- 2.8%). The effect of smoking on lung cancer risk was comparable to results reported in previous miners cohorts (OR = 3.04, 95% -CI = 1.20-7.70). Discussion: A consequent effort was carried out to collect smoking status from three sources for the miners included in this nested case-control study. This analysis shows that, when adjusting on

  7. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-06-01

    The quantitative estimation of the carcinogenic risk of low-dose, high-LET radiation in the case of exposure to radon daughters and lung-cancer is subject to numerous uncertainties. The greatest of these concerns the parametric values of the dose-response curve. We lack knowledge and an understanding of the dosimetry and the distribution of aggregates of radioactivity that remain localized as hot spots in specific regions of the lungs and the influence on greater or lesser risk of lung cancer per average lung dose than uniformly deposited radiation (NRC76). We have only a limited understanding of the response to exposure to high-LET radiations, such as alpha particles, for which linear risk estimates for low doses are less likely to overestimate the risk, and may, in fact, underestimate the risk (BEIR80). Other uncertainties include the length of the latency period, the RBE for alpha radiation relative to gamma radiation, the period during which the radiation risk is expressed, the risk projection model used - whether absolute or relative - for projecting risk beyond the period of observation, the effect of dose rate and protraction of dose, and the influence of differences in the natural incidence of lung cancer in different populations. In addition, uncertainties are introduced by the biological and life-style risk characteristics of humans, for example, the effect of sex, the effect of age at the time of irradiation and at the time of appearance of the cancer, the influence of length of observation or follow-up of the study populations, and the influence of perhaps the most important confounding bias, cigarette-smoking. The collective influence of these uncertainties is such as to deny great credibility to any estimate of human lung cancer risk and other cancer risk that can be made for low-dose, high-LET radon daughter radiation exposure.

  8. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitative estimation of the carcinogenic risk of low-dose, high-LET radiation in the case of exposure to radon daughters and lung-cancer is subject to numerous uncertainties. The greatest of these concerns the parametric values of the dose-response curve. We lack knowledge and an understanding of the dosimetry and the distribution of aggregates of radioactivity that remain localized as hot spots in specific regions of the lungs and the influence on greater or lesser risk of lung cancer per average lung dose than uniformly deposited radiation (NRC76). We have only a limited understanding of the response to exposure to high-LET radiations, such as alpha particles, for which linear risk estimates for low doses are less likely to overestimate the risk, and may, in fact, underestimate the risk (BEIR80). Other uncertainties include the length of the latency period, the RBE for alpha radiation relative to gamma radiation, the period during which the radiation risk is expressed, the risk projection model used - whether absolute or relative - for projecting risk beyond the period of observation, the effect of dose rate and protraction of dose, and the influence of differences in the natural incidence of lung cancer in different populations. In addition, uncertainties are introduced by the biological and life-style risk characteristics of humans, for example, the effect of sex, the effect of age at the time of irradiation and at the time of appearance of the cancer, the influence of length of observation or follow-up of the study populations, and the influence of perhaps the most important confounding bias, cigarette-smoking. The collective influence of these uncertainties is such as to deny great credibility to any estimate of human lung cancer risk and other cancer risk that can be made for low-dose, high-LET radon daughter radiation exposure

  9. Estimating the risk of lung cancer from inhalation of radon daughters indoors: review and evaluation. Final report, October 1986-April 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borak, T.B.; Johnson, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    A review of the dosimetric models and epidemiological studies with regard to the relation between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer indicates that the Working Level is an appropriate unit for indoor radon exposure; that the uncertainty in applying risk estimates derived from uranium miner data may be reduced by determining nose vs. mouth breathing ratios, residential aerosol characteristics, and lung cancer risk vs. age at exposure; that there is persuasive evidence of an association between radon exposure indoors and lung cancer; and that epidemiological studies in progress may provide a basis for revision or validation of current models but only is experimental designs are employed that will permit pooling of data to obtain greater statistical power.

  10. Mechanistic model of radon-induced lung cancer risk at low exposure levels based on cellular alpha particle hits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Hofmann; Hatim, Fakir [Salzburg Univ., Div. of Physics and Biophysics, Dept. of Material Science (Austria); Lucia-Adina, Truta-Popa [Babes-Bolyai Univ., Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    To explore the role of the multiplicity of cellular hits by radon progeny alpha particles for lung cancer incidence, the number of single and multiple alpha particle hits were computed for basal and secretory cells in the bronchial epithelium of human airway bifurcations employing Monte Carlo methods. Hot spots of alpha particle hits were observed at the branching points of bronchial airway bifurcations, suggesting that multiple alpha particle hits may occur primarily at carinal ridges. Random alpha particle intersections of bronchial cells during a given exposure period, selected from a Poisson distribution, were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, based on experimentally observed cellular transformation and survival functions. To consider potential bystander effects, which have been observed in cellular in vitro studies, alpha particle interactions were also simulated for larger sensitive target volumes in bronchial epithelium, consisting of a collection of cells. Lung cancer risk simulations indicated that cancer induction for continuous exposures is related to the cycle time of an irradiated cell, thus exhibiting a distinct dose-rate effect. While the dominant role of single hits leads to a linear dose-response relationship at low radon exposure levels, predicted lung cancer risk for a collection of interacting cells exhibits a linear-quadratic response, suggesting that bystander effects, if operating at all under in vivo irradiations, may be restricted to a small number of adjacent cells. (author)

  11. Theory of the induction of bone sarcoma by bone-seeking alpha emitters and its application to risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petojan, I.M.

    1992-06-01

    This work discusses the theory of bone sarcoma induction by bone seeking alpha emitters, which is based strictly on biological considerations relative to the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, identification of cells at risk and their location in bone, bone tissue renewal processes and bone cell kinetics with or without radiation exposure. The model is consistent with the data on bone sarcoma incidence human with incorporated long-lived isotopes Ra-226 + Ra-228. Extrapolation of these data to a low intake region of the basis of the developed theoretical approach suggests that the linear ICRP-UNSCEAR model overestimates carciogenic risk at low doses, possibly by a factor of 2-4. The model suggests a linear response of target cells to the initiation effects of alpha irradiation. The non-linear (linear-quadratic) initial part of dose-response curve for osteosarcoma induction is explained quantitatively by a model based on a promoter effect of regenerative hyperplasia resulting from invitation effects of alpha radiation. The maximum overestimation inherent to the model of the low-level risk due to the the dose-dependent promotion factor is estimated using bo{sup +1}/bo, where bo is a model parameter which is proportional to the normal division rate of osteogenic cells in vivo and which can be estimated within the framework of the model. The model provides confirming evidence that, for radiation protection purposes, endosteal cells may be considered the only group of cells at risk of sarcoma induction by low doses of bone-seeking alpha emitters, whereas the role of marrow stromal (osteogenic) cells as target cells is much more significant with increasing intakes, and can become dominating if intake is high enough.

  12. Theory of the induction of bone sarcoma by bone-seeking alpha emitters and its application to risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work discusses the theory of bone sarcoma induction by bone seeking alpha emitters, which is based strictly on biological considerations relative to the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, identification of cells at risk and their location in bone, bone tissue renewal processes and bone cell kinetics with or without radiation exposure. The model is consistent with the data on bone sarcoma incidence human with incorporated long-lived isotopes Ra-226 + Ra-228. Extrapolation of these data to a low intake region of the basis of the developed theoretical approach suggests that the linear ICRP-UNSCEAR model overestimates carciogenic risk at low doses, possibly by a factor of 2-4. The model suggests a linear response of target cells to the initiation effects of alpha irradiation. The non-linear (linear-quadratic) initial part of dose-response curve for osteosarcoma induction is explained quantitatively by a model based on a promoter effect of regenerative hyperplasia resulting from invitation effects of alpha radiation. The maximum overestimation inherent to the model of the low-level risk due to the the dose-dependent promotion factor is estimated using bo+1/bo, where bo is a model parameter which is proportional to the normal division rate of osteogenic cells in vivo and which can be estimated within the framework of the model. The model provides confirming evidence that, for radiation protection purposes, endosteal cells may be considered the only group of cells at risk of sarcoma induction by low doses of bone-seeking alpha emitters, whereas the role of marrow stromal (osteogenic) cells as target cells is much more significant with increasing intakes, and can become dominating if intake is high enough

  13. The luminosity function of Ly-alpha emitters at 2.3 < z < 4.6 from integral-field spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Van Breukelen, C; Venemans, B P; Breukelen, Caroline van; Jarvis, Matt J.; Venemans, Bram P.

    2005-01-01

    We have used VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph Integral-Field Unit (VIMOS-IFU) observations centred on a radio galaxy at z=2.9 to search for Ly-alpha emitters within a comoving volume of ~ 10^4 Mpc^3. We find 14 Ly-alpha emitters with flux > 1.4 x 10^-20 Wm^-2, yielding a comoving space density of 0.0018 +/- 0.0006 Mpc^-3. We fit a Schechter luminosity function which agrees well with previous studies both at similar redshift (z ~ 3.4) and higher redshift (z ~ 5.7). We therefore find no evidence for evolution in the properties of Ly-alpha emitters between 3 < z < 6, although our sample is small. By summing the star-formation rates of the individual Ly-alpha emitters we find a total cosmic star-formation rate density of rho_SFR = 6.7 +/- 0.5 x 10^-3 M_solar yr^-1 Mpc^-3. Integrating over the luminosity function for the combined Ly-alpha surveys at z ~ 3.4 and accounting for the difference in obscuration between the Ly-alpha line and the UV-continuum yields an estimate of rho_SFR ~ 2.2 x 10^-2 M_solar yr^-1...

  14. Remote system for measurement of radon alpha emitter for population safety guards; Sistema remoto de medicion de radon alfa emisor para la salvaguarda poblacional-3599

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Vasquez, E-mail: jesus.vasguez@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Laboratorio Nazionale di Legnaro; Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Palacios, Daniel; Barros, Haydn, E-mail: sajobohus@gmail.com, E-mail: sanjuro.perdomo@gmail.com, E-mail: lab.nuclear@gmail.com [Universidad Simon Bolivar (USB), Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research project is to study the OSL properties for high doses of dosemeters traditionally applied in thermoluminescent dosimetry (TL), as CaF2: Dy (TLD 200) and CaF2: Mn (TLD 400), and thus verify the applicability of OSL technique in high-dose dosimetry.

  15. Indoor radon: deadliest pollutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon in individual homes may be the greatest source of radiation that people are exposed to during a lifetime. In areas where radon concentrations in homes are high, people may be exposed to more radiation than were the Russian people living in the vicinity of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Studies indicate that the radon exposure contributes to 5000 to 20,000 deaths per year from lung cancer and that smoking may have a lethal interaction with the radon exposure. One study found an average annual concentration of radon in living spaces of 1.5 picocuries per liter. 7% of U.S. homes were found to have a radon concentration above the 4 picocuries per liter level set by the Environmental Protection Agency, and 1 - 3% of the homes have levels above 8 picocuries. Some ways are described for changing the air pressure in a house so that air is not constantly drawn from the permeable soil where the radon originates

  16. Lyman-\\alpha{} Emitters in the context of hierarchical galaxy formation: predictions for VLT/MUSE surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Garel, Thibault; Blaizot, Jérémy

    2015-01-01

    The VLT Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral-field spectrograph can detect Ly\\alpha{} emitters (LAE) in the redshift range $2.8 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 6.7$ in a homogeneous way. Ongoing MUSE surveys will notably probe faint Ly\\alpha{} sources that are usually missed by current narrow-band surveys. We provide quantitative predictions for a typical wedding-cake observing strategy with MUSE based on mock catalogs generated with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation coupled to numerical Ly\\alpha{} radiation transfer models in gas outflows. We expect $\\approx$ 1500 bright LAEs ($F_{Ly\\alpha}$ $\\gtrsim$ $10^{-17}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$) in a typical Shallow Field (SF) survey carried over $\\approx$ 100 arcmin$^2$, and $\\approx$ 2,000 sources as faint as $10^{-18}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ in a Medium-Deep Field (MDF) survey over 10 arcmin$^2$. In a typical Deep Field (DF) survey of 1 arcmin$^2$, we predict that $\\approx$ 500 extremely faint LAEs ($F_{Ly\\alpha}$ $\\gtrsim$ $4 \\times 10^{-19}$ erg s$^{-1}$...

  17. Morphological Properties of Lyman Alpha Emitters at Redshift 4.86 in the COSMOS Field: Clumpy Star Formation or Merger?

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Koekemoer, Anton M; Murayama, Takashi; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Kajisawa, Masaru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Scoville, Nick Z; Nagao, Tohru; Capak, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    We investigate morphological properties of 61 Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at z = 4.86 identified in the COSMOS field, based on Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging data in the F814W-band. Out of the 61 LAEs, we find the ACS counterparts for the 54 LAEs. Eight LAEs show double-component structures with a mean projected separation of 0."63 (~ 4.0 kpc at z = 4.86). Considering the faintness of these ACS sources, we carefully evaluate their morphological properties, that is, size and ellipticity. While some of them are compact and indistinguishable from the PSF half-light radius of 0."07 (~ 0.45 kpc), the others are clearly larger than the PSF size and spatially extended up to 0."3 (~ 1.9 kpc). We find that the ACS sources show a positive correlation between ellipticity and size and that the ACS sources with large size and round shape are absent. Our Monte Carlo simulation suggests that the correlation can be explained by (1) the deformation effects via PSF broadening and shot noise or...

  18. The HETDEX Pilot Survey V: The Physical Origin of Lyman-alpha Emitters Probed by Near-infrared Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Mimi; Gebhardt, Karl; Hill, Gary J; Drory, Niv; Ashby, Matthew L N; Blanc, Guillermo A; Bridge, Joanna; Chonis, Taylor; Ciardullo, Robin; Fabricius, Maximilian; Fazio, Giovanni G; Gawiser, Eric; Gronwall, Caryl; Hagen, Alex; Huang, Jia-Sheng; Jogee, Shardha; Livermore, Rachael; Salmon, Brett; Schneider, Donald P; Willner, S P; Zeimann, Gregory R

    2014-01-01

    We present the results from a VLT/SINFONI and Keck/NIRSPEC near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 16 Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at $z$ = 2.1 - 2.5 in the COSMOS and GOODS-N fields discovered from the HETDEX Pilot Survey. We detect rest-frame optical nebular lines (H$\\alpha$ and/or [OIII]$\\lambda$5007) for 10 of the LAEs and measure physical properties, including the star formation rate (SFR), gas-phase metallicity, gas-mass fraction, and Ly$\\alpha$ velocity offset. We find that LAEs may lie below the mass-metallicity relation for continuum-selected star-forming galaxies at the same redshift. The LAEs all show velocity shifts of Ly$\\alpha$ relative to the systemic redshift ranging between +85 and +296 km s$^{-1}$ with a mean of +180 km s$^{-1}$. This value is smaller than measured for continuum-selected star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. The Ly$\\alpha$ velocity offsets show a moderate correlation with the measured star formation rate (2.5$\\sigma$), but no significant correlations are seen with the SFR...

  19. What Is Radon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn About Cancer » What Causes Cancer? » Other Carcinogens » Pollution » Radon Share this Page Close Push escape to ... Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features ...

  20. Influence of radon-daughter exposure rate and uranium ore dust concentration on occurrence of lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groups of male SPF Wistar rats were exposed concurrently to several levels of radon daughters and uranium ore dust to study the effect of these variables on pulmonary disease states. Clinical pathology data at 1 yr postexposure indicate no significant differences among exposed animals when compared with controls. Preliminary histopathologic data suggest a trend toward increasing lung tumor risk as the exposure rate is decreased (constant total dose), but the differences are not statistically significant at the 0.05 level. A similar trend occurs with decrease in ore dust concentration (except for the 2560-WLM exposure group), but these differences are also not significant at the 0.05 level. The tumor risk is significantly (0.05 level) increased as the exposure level increases from approximately 320 and 640 WLM to 2560 WLM at the high ore dust concentration

  1. Seasonal variation measurements of radon levels in caves using SSNTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.mx; Golzarri, J.I. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Gammage, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6480 (United States); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela); Viccon-Pale, J.; Signoret-Poillon, M. [El Hombre y su Ambiente, UAM-Xochimilco, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-08-15

    The results of radon concentration measurements inside of the Gabriel caves of Mexico, during three consecutive two-month periods covering almost three seasons, are reported in the present work. The radio-ecological importance of this site is related to the radon and its concentration-dynamic behavior in the cave. Further interest in radiation safety motivated this initiative since routine biological field work is done, with people spending long periods of time there. CR-39 passive nuclear track detector was chosen for this survey. Radon concentration levels decrease during the rainy season and show different values depending on the ventilation and geometeorological structure. Measured values range between 956 and 4931Bqm{sup -3}, an indication that radon doses may exceed the allowed values for workers. This project is part of a larger study of indoor radon alpha emitters in Mexican caves.

  2. Simulation of radon short lived decay daughters' inhalation using the lung compartmental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its short-lived decay daughters are the main source of radiation on natural ways for population. The radon gas, released from soil, water or construction materials is producing by radioactive decay the following solid daughters: Po-218, Bi-214, Pb-214, and Po-214, which can attach to aerosols, and consequently penetrate the organism by inhalation. The human respiratory tract can be approximated by aid of a compartment model that takes into account the different anatomical structures exposed to contamination and irradiation, as well as the respective physiological processes. This model is associated to a mathematical equation system that describes the behavior of the radioactive material inside the body. The results represent the dose equivalent on different organs and tissues, as a function of subject and the activity performed in contaminating environment. (author)

  3. Radon and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication proposes an overview on what is known about the carcinogenic effect of radon. It recalls the origin of radon, its presence in the environment, and its radioactivity. It comments data on the relationship between exposure to radon and lung cancer, and with other forms of cancer. It discusses the role of the exposure level, and the cases of professional and domestic exposure with respect to these risks. It indicates the hazardous areas in France which are well identified, outlines that smokers are more likely victims of risks related to radon, that this risk is still underrated and underestimated (notably by the public). It gives an overview of existing regulations regarding exposure to radon, of public health policies and national plans concerning radon, and recalls some WHO recommendations

  4. STUDY ON LUNG DOSE FOR DIFFERENT ANIMALS BY INHALATION OF SHORT—LIVED RADON DAUGHTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李素云; 张升慧; 等

    1994-01-01

    The dose distribution in the lung is inhomogeneous.The dose to the basal cell layer of trachea and main bronchi is much higher than the dose to total lung both for rabbits at different ages and for different animals.A maximum value of the dose to lung tissue for rabbits at ages of 20-40d is observed.The dose decreases with increasing body weight.The relationship between the dose and body weight can be descreibed by a power function.The dose to total lung increases exponentially with the minute breathing volume per unit of lung weight.

  5. Radon progeny distributions inside a diffusion chamber and their contributions to track density in SSNT detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of alpha emitter radon progeny inside a cylindrical diffusion chamber was simulated. In the simulation of atomic movements, we took into account the random nature of the diffusion direction and the decay process. The alpha emitter distributions in volume, lateral wall and top cover of a 6.0cm height diffusion chamber for different diameters were determined. Results show non-uniform distribution of radon progeny. As chamber diameter increases, the tendency of radon progeny is to accumulate in central regions of the chamber volume (218Po) and inner wall (218Po and 214Po). Depending on chamber diameter and detector size, non-uniform distribution of radon progeny deposited on SSNTs surface can be achieved if the detector is horizontally located at the bottom. The fraction of surface where 222Rn progeny are deposited diminishes as chamber diameter increases. Due to the relatively short 218Po half-life, for diameters larger than the assumed height its subsequent atoms decay in air before their deposition on chamber wall. The form in which radon progeny is distributed in volume and walls of chamber can affect the quantity and distribution of tracks in detector

  6. Analysis of the joint effects of radon exposure and smoking on lung cancer risk in three nested case-control studies in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Objectives: Three case-control studies nested in the French (Fr), German (Ge) and Czech (Cz) cohorts of uranium miners were conducted in the frame of a European research Project, named Alpha-Risk, on the quantification of risks associated with multiple radiation exposures. These case-control studies aimed at assessing the effect of protracted radon exposure on lung cancer risk taking into account individual tobacco consumption. Material and methods: In the three case-control studies, cases were miners of the corresponding cohort who died of lung cancer (100, 704, 672 cases for the Fr, Ge and Cz study, respectively). For each case, controls were randomly matched on birth period and attained age at the time of death of the corresponding case (500, 1398 and 1491 controls for the Fr, Ge and Cz study, respectively). Cumulated radon exposure during employment was obtained from ambient and individual measurements for the Fr and Cz studies, and from a job exposure matrix for the Ge study. Smoking habits were retrospectively determined from medical archives and questionnaires applied in face-to-face interviews, phone calls or mailings. Analysis was performed by conditional logistic regression using a linear excess relative risk (ERR) model. A multiplicative model was fitted to assess the joint effect of radon exposure and smoking on lung cancer risk. Results: Smoking status was established for 62, 421, and 672 cases and 320, 620, and 1491 controls for the Fr, Ge, and Cz study, respectively. Two categories ('ever smokers' vs. 'never smokers') were defined. The percentages of 'ever-smokers' were 90%, 95%, and 92% for the cases and 73%, 75%, and 73% for the controls, for the Fr, Ge and Cz study, respectively. Mean five-year lagged cumulated radon exposures were 115, 717 and 174 working level months (WLM) for the cases, and 71, 505 and 118 WLM for the controls, for the Fr, Ge and Cz study, respectively. The excess relative risk per WLM (ERR/WLM) was 0.98% with a 95

  7. Use of threshold-specific energy model for the prediction of effects of smoking and radon exposure on the risk of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, R; Sedlák, A; Bulko, M; Holý, K

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. Smoking causes 80-90% of cases of lung cancer. In this study, an attempt was made to assess the impact of cigarette smoking on the risk of lung cancer by the so-called threshold-specific energy model. This model allows to analyse the biological effects of radon daughter products on the lung tissue, and is based on the assumption that the biological effect (i.e. cell inactivation) will manifest itself after the threshold-specific energy z0 deposited in the sensitive volume of the cell is exceeded. Cigarette smoking causes, among others, an increase in the synthesis of the survivin protein that protects cells from apoptosis and thereby reduces their radiosensitivity. Based on these facts, an attempt was made to estimate the shape of the curves describing the increase in the oncological effect of radiation as a function of daily cigarette consumption. PMID:24711526

  8. Sequence analysis of laci mutations obtained from lung cells of radon-exposed big blue{trademark} transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, A.D.; Cross, F.T.; Steigler, G.L.; Stillwell, L.S.; Jostes, R.F. [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Lutze, L.H. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We have exposed Big Blue{trademark} transgenic mice by inhalation to 320, 640 and 960 Working Level Months (WLM) of radon progeny. Mice were sacrificed after 3, 6 and 9 days; the time periods required to obtain the exposures. Control mice were also sacrificed at each time interval. In each case all tissues were excised, flash frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at -80{degrees}C for further analysis. Twelve lacI mutations have been isolated from the lung tissue of a mouse from the 960-WLM exposure group; the lacI genes from these mutants have been sequenced. Sequence data indicate that three of the mutants have a C;G deletion at BP 978 and are possibly clonal in origin. Two mutants have multiple events within the gene: one has a an A:T to C:G transversion and a C:G insertion separated by 291 BPs; the second has a G:C to A:T transition as well as an A:T deletion followed by 6 base pairs downstream by a T:A insertion. Other mutations include a single G:C to A:T transition, a two base pair deletion, and a C:G to T:A transition. Mutant plaques are being evaluated from individual mice at other dose levels. Time course experiments are also planned. These studies will help define the molecular fine structure of mutations induced by high-LET radiation exposure.

  9. Sequence analysis of laci mutations obtained from lung cells of radon-exposed big blue trademark transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have exposed Big Blue trademark transgenic mice by inhalation to 320, 640 and 960 Working Level Months (WLM) of radon progeny. Mice were sacrificed after 3, 6 and 9 days; the time periods required to obtain the exposures. Control mice were also sacrificed at each time interval. In each case all tissues were excised, flash frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at -80 degrees C for further analysis. Twelve lacI mutations have been isolated from the lung tissue of a mouse from the 960-WLM exposure group; the lacI genes from these mutants have been sequenced. Sequence data indicate that three of the mutants have a C;G deletion at BP 978 and are possibly clonal in origin. Two mutants have multiple events within the gene: one has a an A:T to C:G transversion and a C:G insertion separated by 291 BPs; the second has a G:C to A:T transition as well as an A:T deletion followed by 6 base pairs downstream by a T:A insertion. Other mutations include a single G:C to A:T transition, a two base pair deletion, and a C:G to T:A transition. Mutant plaques are being evaluated from individual mice at other dose levels. Time course experiments are also planned. These studies will help define the molecular fine structure of mutations induced by high-LET radiation exposure

  10. Radon - The management of the risk related to radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This leaflet briefly explains what radon is, where it comes from, and what it becomes. It indicates and briefly comments its concentrations in French departments, describes how radon can affect our health (lung cancer), describes how the risk can be reduced in buildings, and indicates the existing regulatory provisions

  11. Identification of the brightest Ly\\alpha\\ emitters at z=6.6: implications for the evolution of the luminosity function in the re-ionisation era

    CERN Document Server

    Matthee, Jorryt; Santos, Sérgio; Röttgering, Huub; Darvish, Behnam; Mobasher, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Using wide field narrow-band surveys, we provide a new measurement of the $z=6.6$ Lyman-$\\alpha$ Emitter (LAE) luminosity function (LF), which constraints the bright end for the first time. We use a combination of archival narrow-band NB921 data in UDS and new NB921 measurements in SA22 and COSMOS/UltraVISTA, all observed with the Subaru telescope, with a total area of $\\sim 5$ deg$^2$. We exclude lower redshift interlopers by using broad-band optical and near-infrared photometry and also exclude three supernovae with data split over multiple epochs. We spectroscopically confirm the two most luminous Ly$\\alpha$ emitters ever found at $z=6.604$ and $6.541$ in the COSMOS field using Keck/DEIMOS and VLT/FORS2. Combining the UDS and COSMOS samples we find no evolution of the bright end of the Ly$\\alpha$ LF between $z=5.7$ and $6.6$, which is supported by spectroscopic follow-up, and conclude that \\emph{Himiko}-like sources are not as rare as previously thought, with number densities of $\\sim 1.5\\times10^{-5}$ Mpc...

  12. Radon Research Program, FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research (DOE/OHER) is the principal federal agency conducting basic research related to indoor radon. The scientific information being sought in this program encompasses research designed to determine radon availability and transport outdoors, modeling transport into and within buildings, physics and chemistry of radon and radon progeny, dose response relationships, lung cancer risk, and mechanisms of radon carcinogenesis. There still remains a significant number of uncertainties in the currently available knowledge that is used to estimate lung cancer risk from exposure to environmental levels of radon and its progeny. The main goal of the DOE/OHER Radon Research Program is to develop information to reduce these uncertainties and thereby provide an improved health risk estimate of exposure to radon and its progeny and to identify and understand biological mechanisms of lung cancer development and required copollutants at low levels of exposure. Information useful in radon control strategies is also provided by the basic science undertaken in this program

  13. Radon - The management of the risk related to radon; Le radon la gestion du risque lie au radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This leaflet briefly explains what radon is, where it comes from, and what it becomes. It indicates and briefly comments its concentrations in French departments, describes how radon can affect our health (lung cancer), describes how the risk can be reduced in buildings, and indicates the existing regulatory provisions

  14. Radon Research Program, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific information being sought in this program encompasses research designed to determine radon availability and transport outdoors, modeling transport into and within buildings, physics and chemistry of radon and radon progeny, dose response relationships, lung cancer risk, and mechanisms of radon carcinogenesis. The main goal of the DOE/OHER Radon Research Program is to develop information to reduce these uncertainties and thereby provide an improved health risk estimate of exposure to radon and its progeny as well as to provide information useful in radon control strategies. Results generated under the Program were highlighted in a National Research Council report on radon dosimetry. The study concluded that the risk of radon exposure is 30% less in homes than in mines. This program summary of book describes the OHER FY-1991 Radon Research Program. It is the fifth in an annual series of program books designed to provide scientific and research information to the public and to other government agencies on the DOE Radon Research Program

  15. Constitution of a group of Czech and French uranium miners in order to estimate lung cancer risk linked to low chronic exposure to radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West Bohemian and French uranium miners are characterized by a long duration of exposure to radon and its decay products, in comparison to most of the other groups of miners, studied in the recent international joint analysis by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in USA. This analysis has confirmed the linearly increasing risk of lung cancer by cumulative radon exposure, describing the different factors that may influence this dose-response relationship. One of the main factors presently discussed is the influence of the exposure-rate effect: in other words, has the same cumulated exposure spread over 10 years the same risk of lung cancer as if it is cumulated in 2 years? The implication of an inverse exposure-rate effect for low chronic exposures as well as some methodological approaches will be discussed and tested by using the data of the Czech and French cohorts. These two cohorts present annual exposures varying by a factor of 5 to 10, French exposure rates being close or even less than 0.1 Working Level during the last 20 years. The project is integrated in a larger European project on uranium miners, co-ordinated by IPSN. (author)

  16. Alpha-risk or quantification of risks associated with chronic exposure to Alpha emitters; Alpha-risk ou la quantification du risque associe a une exposition chronique aux emeteurs ALPHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timarche, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, DS, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2010-07-15

    This article discusses the results obtained by a European research program on long term health risks associated with a chronic internal contamination by alpha radiation emitters. The researchers outlined that, in the case of an exposure to radon, the lung cancer risk, with respect to the cumulative dose, progressively reduces once the exposure has stopped. They also notice that this risk is present for smokers as well as for not smokers

  17. Radon in homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon 222 and its radioactive decay products can enter buildings and, through inhalation, expose the inhabitants' pulmonary tissues to ionizing radiation. Studies of radon levels in the US indicate that variations of 100-fold or greater exist among private dwellings. In one region, 55% of homes had levels exceeding 4 pCi/L (0.15 Bq/L), which is the guidance level recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Ventilation and tightness of construction are important determinants of radon levels. In some instances, fans or heat exchangers can reduce excessive concentrations, but in others more elaborate remedial measures may be required. Physicians may obtain information about radon through Environmental Protection Agency regional offices and state radiation control programs. The risk of radiogenic cancer is believed to increase with exposure to ionizing radiation. According to some estimates, concentrations of radon decay products in US homes could be responsible for several thousand cases of lung cancer per year. Studies of radon levels in representative buildings and guidelines are needed to ensure safe, effective, and cost-effective counter-measures. Architects, contractors, designers, building code administrators, health physicists, and biomedical investigators can help with solutions

  18. Radon campaigns. Status report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon campaigns aim at activating citizens to make indoor radon measurements and remediation as well as increasing the common awareness of indoor radon questions. Indoor radon increases the risk of lung cancer. Through radon campaigns Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) also promotes the attainment of those goals that the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health has set for municipal authorities in Finland for prevention of the harmful effects of radon. The Ministry of Social Affairs and Health supports this campaign. Radon campaigns were started in autumn 2003. By autumn 2008 the campaigns have been organised already in 64 regions altogether in 160 municipalities. In some municipalities they have already arranged two campaigns. Altogether 14 100 houses have been measured and in 2 100 of these the action limit of radon remediation 400 Bq / m3 has been exceeded. When participating in radon campaigns the house owners receive a special offer on radon detectors with a reduced price. In 2008 a new practice was introduced where the campaign advertisements were distributed by mail to low-rise residential houses in a certain region. The advertisement includes an order / deposit slip with postage paid that the house owner can send directly to STUK to easily make an order for radon measurement. In the previous radon campaigns in 2003 - 2007 the municipal authorities collected the orders from house owners and distributed later the radon detectors. The radon concentrations measured in the campaign regions have exceeded the action limit of 400 Bq / m3 in 0 - 39% of houses, depending on the region. The total of 15% of all measurements made exceeded this limit. The remediation activities have been followed by sending a special questionnaire on remedies performed to the house owners. In 2006 - 2007 a questionnaire was sent to those households where the radon concentration of 400 Bq / m3 was exceeded during the two first campaign seasons. Among the households that replied

  19. Radon - To mobilise civil society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As radon is one of the two main sources of exposure of population to ionizing radiations in France, is notably said to be responsible of 1.000 to 3.000 deaths for lung cancer per year, and could be at the origin of other cancers like child leukaemia, this set of articles evokes the different factors which promote radon transfer from soils to buildings, studies performed to better identify geological sources of radon, actions implemented to assess radon presence in dwellings (distribution of 'radon kits' in Brittany), the performance of radiological expertise by the IRSN on the request of public authorities, the project of dwelling inventory and population information. A second article reports examples of intervention by the IRSN to inform local authorities, inhabitants, academics, public utilities, building professions, and even children. Technical solutions adopted in the United Kingdom are briefly evoked

  20. Results of simultaneous radon and thoron measurements in 33 metropolitan areas of Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jing; Bergman, Lauren; Falcomer, Renato; Whyte, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. 222Rn (radon gas) and 220Rn (thoron gas) are the most common isotopes of radon. In order to assess thoron contribution to indoor radon and thoron exposure, a survey of residential radon and thoron concentrations was initiated in 2012 with ∼4000 homes in the 33 census metropolitan areas of Canada. The survey confirmed that indoor radon and thoron concentrations are not correlated and that thoron concent...

  1. Dosimetric and health consequences of radon ingestion via drinking water; Consequences dosimetriques et sanitaires de l'ingestion de radon via l'eau de boisson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, O.; Guseva canu, I. [IRSN, Laboratoire d' epidemiologie, DRPH/SRBE/LEPID, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Blanchardon, E. [IRSN, Laboratoire d' evaluation de la dose interne, DRPH/SDI/LEDI, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2010-10-15

    Lung cancer risk following radon inhalation is strongly established. On the contrary, much less is known about the possible health effects of radon ingestion via drinking water. This article summarizes the current knowledge of dosimetry following radon ingestion. Results from epidemiological studies of radon in drinking water are also presented and discussed. (author)

  2. Cases study of lung cancer deaths and analysis of radon levels in house-room of Mexicali, B. C; Estudio de casos de muertes de cancer pulmonar y analisis de niveles de radon en casas-habitacion de Mexicali, B. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez B, G.; Reyna C, M. A. [Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Facultad de Ingenieria, Blvd. Benito Juarez y Calle de la Normal s/n, Col. Insurgentes Este, 21280 Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico)], e-mail: glopezbadilla@yahoo.com

    2009-10-15

    The lung cancer is a case of health of more importance as much in women as in men, with more frequency that the cancer of mamma, colon and prostate on the whole. A factor that influences in the cancer generation originating serious complications it is the exposition to radioactive substances in closed places, as house-room. In the investigation study, levels of radon concentration were measured in interiors of Mexicali homes, to study the relationship that this gas could have with the death cases by lung cancer into population. The gas radon is radioactive and it adheres easily to particles that remain suspended in air; when inhaling them small explosions take place inside the alveoli, changing the DNA of cells and lung cancer is generated. The meteorological, geographical and urban characteristics of Mexicali, favor conditions so that certain areas of the city present high indexes of suspended particles in atmosphere. One sample of gas radon inside 100 house-rooms, the analysis was made by paved and not paved colonies and for sex, to establish if the death cases by lung cancer had relationship with the genus and/or with some of two groups of colonies. The study found that the major number of deaths it was presented in colonies in which lacked the paving service and always happened with more frequency in women; and that in homes of having died by lung cancer the radon concentrations were more high that the homes where there was not death cases, with significant differences that go from 9.2% to 70%. This investigation project is presented as a cases study in the Mexicali City. (Author)

  3. Large-scale environment of $z\\sim 5.7$ CIV absorption systems -II. Spectroscopy of Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz, C Gonzalo; Cooke, Jeff; Koyama, Yusei; Ouchi, Masami

    2014-01-01

    The flow of baryons to and from a galaxy, which is fundamental for galaxy formation and evolution, can be studied with galaxy-metal absorption system pairs. Our search for galaxies around CIV absorption systems at $z\\sim5.7$ showed an excess of photometric Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitter (LAE) candidates in the fields J1030+0524 and J1137+3549. Here we present spectroscopic follow-up of 33 LAEs in both fields. In the first field, three out of the five LAEs within 10$h^{{-}1}$ projected comoving Mpc from the CIV system are within $\\pm500$ km s$^{{-}1}$ from the absorption at $z_{\\text{CIV}}=5.7242\\pm0.0001$. The closest candidate (LAE 103027+052419) is robustly confirmed at $212.8^{+14}_{-0.4}h^{-1}$ physical kpc from the CIV system. In the second field, the LAE sample is selected at a lower redshift ($\\Delta z\\sim0.04$) than the CIV absorption system as a result of the filter transmission and, thus, do not trace its environment. The observed properties of LAE 103027+052419 indicate that it is near the high-mass end of...

  4. A Dual Narrowband Survey for H\\alpha\\ Emitters at z=2.2: Demonstration of the Technique and Constraints on the H\\alpha\\ Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Janice C; Spitler, L; Labbe, I; Salim, S; Persson, S E; Ouchi, M; Dale, D; Monson, A; Murphy, D

    2012-01-01

    We present first results from a narrowband imaging program for intermediate redshift emission-line galaxies using the newly commissioned FourStar infrared camera at the 6.5m Magellan telescope. To enable prompt identification of H\\alpha\\ emitters, a pair of custom 1% filters, which sample low-airglow atmospheric windows at 1.19 \\mu m and 2.10 \\mu m, is used to detect both H\\alpha\\ and [OII]\\lambda 3727 emission from the same redshift volume at z=2.2. Initial observations are taken over a 130 arcmin^2 area in the CANDELS-COSMOS field. The exquisite image quality resulting from the combination of the instrument, telescope, and standard site conditions (~0.55" FWHM) allows the 1.19 \\mu m and 2.10 \\mu m data to probe 3\\sigma\\ emission-line depths down to 1.0e-17 erg/s/cm^2 and 1.2e-17 erg/s/cm^2 respectively, in less than 10 hours of integration time in each narrowband. For H\\alpha\\ at z=0.8 and z=2.2, these fluxes correspond to observed star formation rates of ~0.3 and ~4 Msun/yr respectively. We find 122 source...

  5. First direct implications for the dust extinction and star formation of typical Ly{\\alpha} emitters from their faint infrared luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Kusakabe, Haruka; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Ouchi, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the IR luminosity of galaxies is crucial for reliably deriving their dust extinction and stellar population. By stacking publicly available deep Spitzer/MIPS 24um and Herschel PACS images for 213 z~2.18 Ly alpha Emitters (LAEs) in the GOODS-South, we obtain a strong upper limit to the IR luminosity of typical high-redshift LAEs and constrain the extinction law for the first time. Our 3sigma upper limit L_{TIR} = 1.1 * 10^{10} L_{sun} gives IRX = L_{TIR}/L_{UV} 44%, are both significantly higher than the cosmic averages at the same epoch. We find that the SMC extinction law is consistent with the IRX and the UV slope beta = -1.4^{+0.2}_{-0.2} of our stacked LAE, while the Calzetti law predicts a 3.8 times higher IRX at this beta. SED fitting using the Calzetti law also gives a ~10 times higher SFR than that calculated from the IR and UV luminosities, SFR_{tot}=1.5-3.3 M_{sun}/yr. With the stellar mass 6.3^{+0.8}_{-2.0} *10^8 M_{sun}, our LAEs lie on a lower-mass extrapolation of the star formation ma...

  6. A hard ionizing spectrum in z=3-4 Ly-alpha emitters with intense [OIII] emission: Analogs of galaxies in the reionization era?

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, Kimihiko; Iwata, Ikuru; Inoue, Akio; Kusakabe, Haruka; Ouchi, Masami; Robertson, Brant

    2016-01-01

    We present Keck/MOSFIRE spectra of the diagnostic nebular emission lines [OIII]5007,4959, [OII]3727, and H-beta for a sample of 15 redshift z=3.1-3.7 Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) and Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). In conjunction with spectra from other surveys, we confirm earlier indications that LAEs have a much higher [OIII]/[OII] line ratio than is seen in similar redshift LBGs. By comparing their distributions on a [OIII]/[OII] versus R23 diagram, we demonstrate that this difference cannot arise solely because of their lower metallicities but most likely is due to a harder ionizing spectrum. Using measures of H-beta and recombination theory, we demonstrate, for a subset of our LAEs, that xi_ion - the number of Lyman continuum photons per UV luminosity - is indeed 0.2-0.5 dex larger than for typical LBGs at similar redshifts. Using photoionization models we estimate the effect this would have on both [OIII]/[OII] and R23 and conclude such a hard spectrum can only partially explain such intense line emission. The...

  7. Kiloparsec Mass/Light Offsets in the Galaxy Pair-Lyman-alpha Emitter Lens System SDSS\\,J1011$+$0143

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, Yiping; Moustakas, Leonidas A; Stern, Daniel; Dey, Arjun; Brownstein, Joel R; Burles, Scott; Spinrad, Hyron

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of significant mass/light offsets in the strong gravitational lensing system SDSS\\,J1011$+$0143. We use the high-resolution \\textsl{Hubble Space Telescope} (\\textsl{HST}) F555W- and F814W-band imaging and SDSS spectroscopy of this system, which consists of a close galaxy pair with a projected separation of $\\approx 4.2$ kpc at $z_{\\rm lens} \\sim 0.331$ lensing a Lyman-alpha emitter (LAE) at $z_{\\rm source} = 2.701$. Comparisons between the mass peaks inferred from lens models and light peaks from \\textsl{HST} imaging data reveal significant spatial mass/light offsets as large as $(1.72 \\pm 0.24 \\pm 0.34)$ kpc in both filter bands. Such large mass/light offsets, not seen in isolated field lens galaxies and relaxed galaxy groups, may be related to the interactions between the two lens galaxies. The detected mass/light offsets can potentially serve as an important test for the self-interacting dark matter model. However, other mechanisms such as dynamical friction on spatially differently...

  8. No evidence for Population III stars or a Direct Collapse Black Hole in the z = 6.6 Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitter 'CR7'

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, R A A; Dunlop, J S; McLeod, D J; Stanway, E R; Eldridge, J J; Jarvis, M J

    2016-01-01

    The z = 6.6 Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitter 'CR7' has been claimed to have a Population III-like stellar population, or alternatively, be a candidate Direct Collapse Black Hole (DCBH). In this paper we investigate the evidence for these exotic scenarios using recently available, deeper, optical, near-infrared and mid-infrared imaging. We find strong Spitzer/IRAC detections for the main component of CR7 at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, and show that it has a blue colour ([3.6] - [4.5] $= -1.2\\pm 0.3$). This colour cannot be reproduced by current Pop. III or pristine DCBH models. Instead, the results suggest that the [3.6] band is contaminated by the [OIII]4959,5007 emission line with an implied rest-frame equivalent width of EW_0 (H$\\beta$ + [OIII]) $\\gtrsim 2000$\\AA. Furthermore, we find that new near-infrared data from the UltraVISTA survey supports a weaker He II 1640 emission line than previously measured, with EW_0 $= 40 \\pm 30$\\AA. For the fainter components of CR7 visible in Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we find no evi...

  9. Radon monitoring and hazard prediction in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elio, Javier; Crowley, Quentin; Scanlon, Ray; Hodgson, Jim; Cooper, Mark; Long, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas which forms as a decay product from uranium. It is the largest source of natural ionizing radiation affecting the global population. When radon is inhaled, its short-lived decay products can interact with lung tissue leading to DNA damage and development of lung cancer. Ireland has among the highest levels of radon in Europe and eighth highest of an OECD survey of 29 countries. Every year some two hundred and fifty cases of lung cancer in Ireland are linked to radon exposure. This new research project will build upon previous efforts of radon monitoring in Ireland to construct a high-resolution radon hazard map. This will be achieved using recently available high-resolution airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (radiometric) and soil geochemistry data (http://www.tellus.ie/), indoor radon concentrations (http://www.epa.ie/radiation), and new direct measurement of soil radon. In this regard, legacy indoor radon concentrations will be correlated with soil U and Th concentrations and other geogenic data. This is a new approach since the vast majority of countries with a national radon monitoring programme rely on indoor radon measurements, or have a spatially limited dataset of soil radon measurements. Careful attention will be given to areas where an indicative high radon hazard based on geogenic factors does not match high indoor radon concentrations. Where such areas exist, it may imply that some parameter(s) in the predictive model does not match that of the environment. These areas will be subjected to measurement of radon soil gas using a combination of time averaged (passive) and time dependant (active) measurements in order to better understand factors affecting production, transport and accumulation of radon in the natural environment. Such mapping of radon-prone areas will ultimately help to inform when prevention and remediation measures are necessary, reducing the radon exposure of the population. Therefore, given

  10. Status of radon monitoring in Haryana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is present in trace amounts almost everywhere (indoor and outdoor) on the earth, being distributed in the soil, the ground water and in the lower atmosphere. Radon migrates and appears mainly by diffusion processes from the point of origin following α- decay of 226Ra in underground soil and building materials used in the construction of floors, walls, and ceilings. The influx of radon is a function of (1) Permeability of the underlying soil (2) Geological, meteorological and structural factor and (3) Permeability of the medium. The concentration of radon in the atmosphere varies depending on the place, time, and height above the ground and meteorological conditions. When radon decays it forms its progeny 218Po and 214Po, which are electrically charged and can attach themselves to tiny dust particles, water vapours, oxygen, trace gases in indoor air and other solid surfaces. These daughter products (aerosols) remain air-borne for a long time and can easily be inhaled into the lung and can adhere to the epithelial lining of the lung, thereby irradiating the tissue. Bronchial stem cells and secretion cells in airways are considered to be the main target cells for the induction of lung cancer resulting from radon exposure. The exposure of population to high concentrations of radon and its daughters for a long period may lead to pathological effects like the respiratory functional changes and the occurrence of lung cancer. Some studies have been carried out by different researchers for radon monitoring in Haryana state of India using alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors. The following studies have been carried out: 1. Indoor radon in different dwellings like cemented, soil bricks, mud and fly ash bricks. 2. Radon in industrial units like thermal power plants, gas power plants, LPG bottling plants and refineries 3. Radon exhalation rates measurements in building materials viz; soil, fly ash, cement, sand and stones. 4. Radon diffusion studies

  11. A review of radon pollution in buildings in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor radon concentrations, radon emanation rates from building surfaces, radioactivity contents of building materials and the indoor gamma dose rates for Hong Kong are all in general higher than values obtained elsewhere. An interesting phenomenon has been noted that the values of indoor radon concentrations and radon emanation rates from building surfaces in Hong Kong tend to decrease with the age of the buildings, while the absorbed gamma dose remains about the same. The total average annual effective dose equivalent, and contribution from radon, thoron and their daughters, and that related to building materials will be shown. The number of radon-induced lung cancer deaths will also be discussed. (Author)

  12. Radon Measurements in Schools: An Interim Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation Programs.

    Radon-222 is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally in soil, rocks, underground water, and air. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other scientific organizations have identified an increased risk of lung cancer associated with exposure to elevated levels of radon in homes. Schools in many…

  13. A study on the thoron sensitivity of radon detectors available to Canadians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its decay products have been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Thoron is an isotope of radon. With increased awareness of radon, questions related to thoron are arising from the public. Currently, only radon detectors are commonly available to Canadian homeowners. A study on the thoron sensitivities of those radon detectors was undertaken. The average thoron sensitivity relative to radon varied from a factor of 0.012 to 0.74 for the five commonly available types of alpha track radon detectors. The potential impact of thoron sensitivity on radon test results is discussed. (paper)

  14. A perspective on risks from radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higson, D. J., E-mail: higsond@bigpond.net.a [Australasian Radiation Protection Society, PO Box 7108, Upper Ferntree Gully, Victoria 3156 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    In its Statement on Radon (November 2009), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has reduced the upper reference level for radon gas in dwellings to 300 Bq m{sup -3}. The recommended level for workplaces is 1000 Bq m{sup -3}. A risk coefficient of 8 x 10{sup -10} per Bq h m{sup -3} is recommended without reference to smoking habits. On the basis of these figures: 1) The estimated risk of fatal cancer from exposure to radon at home and at work could be greater than the observed risk of accidental death from travelling by car, which would be surprising if true. 2) The estimated risk of lung cancer from radon could be greater than the observed risk of lung cancer from all causes, which is actually known to be dominated by smoking. The author is not aware of any direct evidence of risks from inhaling radon in Australian dwellings, 99% of which have radon levels below 50 Bq m{sup -3}. Evidence available from other countries shows that: 1) The effects of radon in the incidences of lung cancer are uncertain at levels less then about 50-100 Bq m{sup -3}. 2) The estimation of risks at levels below 200 Bq m{sup -3} depends on extrapolation from risks observed at higher levels. 3) Risks to non-smokers from radon are 25 times less than risks to smokers. Its concluded that the ICRP Statement on Radon and radon policies in the US and UK have the potential to cause unwarranted concern. Some people may be made to feel they need to spend money modifying their homes and workplaces to protect occupants from exposure to radon when there is no compelling reason to show that this is necessary. The vast majority of non-smokers do not need to be protected from radon. (Author)

  15. Scopingsreport Radon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer RO; Vaas LH; Hesse JM; Slooff W

    1989-01-01

    Dit scopingsrapport vormt een onderdeel van de voorbereiding tot het opstellen van het basisdocument radon. Het doel van dit rapport is het algemene kennisniveau van de deelnemers aan de scopingsbijeenkomst aangaande radon op eenzelfde peil te brengen en discussie- en beslispunten inzake de inho

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE Ly{alpha} EMITTERS IN THE 53W002 FIELD AT z = 2.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mawatari, K.; Yamada, T.; Nakamura, Y. [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Hayashino, T. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Matsuda, Y., E-mail: mawatari@astr.tohoku.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-11-10

    We present the results of our wide-field narrowband imaging of the field around the radio galaxy 53W002 at z = 2.390 with Subaru/Suprime-Cam. A custom-made filter, NB413, centered at 4140 A with a width of 83 A is used to observe the 31' Multiplication-Sign 24' area around the radio galaxy. We detected 204 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.4 with a rest-frame equivalent width larger than 25 A to the depth of 26 AB mag (in NB413). The entire LAE population in the 53W002 field has an average number density and distributions of equivalent width and size that are similar to those of other fields at z {approx} 2. We identify a significant high-density region (53W002F-HDR) that spreads over Almost-Equal-To 5' Multiplication-Sign 4' near 53W002, where the LAE number density is nearly four times as large as the average of the entire field. Using the probability distribution function of density fluctuation, we evaluate the rareness probability of 53W002F-HDR to be 0.9{sup +2.4} {sub -0.62}%, which corresponds to a moderately rich structure. No notable environmental dependency at the comoving scale of 10 Mpc is found for the distributions of the Ly{alpha} equivalent width and luminosity in the field. We also detected four Ly{alpha} blobs, one of which is newly discovered. They are all located in the rims of high-density regions. The biased location and unique morphologies in Ly{alpha} suggest that galaxy interaction plays a key role in their formation.

  17. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published...

  18. Asbestos and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the effects of inhaled agents on the lung, a characterization of both the lung and the inhaled agent is essential. Since deposition of the agent is the result of a dynamic process involving the particles as they move through the tracheobronchial tree, the authors' goal is to understand this interaction. To lay the groundwork for this they present basic tracheobronchial anatomy and physiology. Then they examine information on deposition and clearance of asbestos and radon and discuss how this relates to the resultant pathology

  19. Radon risk management. Construction solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Frutos Vázquez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Radon gas is a radioactive element that appears in nature by the decay of radium found in terrestrial soils. This gas is able to travel between the pores of the ground and enter into the buildings where the concentration can increase and becoming a health risk to occupants from inhaling. The World Health Organization rate the radon gas as a level 1 carcinogen agent. According to this organization, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer contraction after tobacco. Based on the perception of risk derived from epidemiological medical studies, some countries have established radon concentration values as safety limits, above which is recommended or required an architectural intervention to reduce levels. From an architectural perspective, there have been studies of several radon protection techniques to reduce radon immission in buildings or to evacuate it, in order to reduce the radon levels below the safety limits. This article develops some protection strategies that have been being used for these purposes, some of which have been tested in Spain thanks to a research project funded by the Nuclear Safety Council, and developed by the Eduardo Torroja Institute and the University of Cantabria.

  20. Workshop on dosimetry for radon and radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.E.; Holoway, C.F.; Loebl, A.S. (eds.)

    1978-05-01

    Emphasis is placed on the dosimetry for radon and daughters, rather than on monitoring and instrumentation. The objectives of the meeting were to exchange scientific information, to identify problem areas in radon-daughter dosimetry, and to make any observations or recommendations by the participants through issuance of this report. The discussion topics included the history of dosimetry for radon and daughters, human data, aerosols, deposition and movement in the respiratory tract, dose calculations, dose-to-working-level-month (WLM) conversion factors, animal experiments, and the development of regulations and remedial criteria for reducing population exposures to radon daughters. This report contains a summary of Workshop discussions plus individual statements contributed by several of the participants. The outstanding problem areas from the standpoint of dosimetry appear to involve the appropriate lung organ mass to be used (average lung-tissue dose vs. high-level local dose); recognition of the discrete, rather than continuous, structure of the mucus; lack of knowledge about lung clearance; the variability of dose with the degree of disequilibrium and the unattached fraction of radon daughters for a given WLM; and questions about the character of uranium mine atmospheres actually breathed in the older mines from which much of the epidemiological information originates. The development of criteria for taking remedial action to reduce exposures involves additional concerns of basing long-term risk assessment on short-term sampling and applying WLM data for miners to general populations.

  1. Radon in British mines: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the occupational hazards experienced by non-coal miners in British mines is presented, with emphasis on the radiation hazards of radon. Topics reviewed include legislation and radiation standards, radiation monitoring methods in Britain, the geology of the Pennine range wherein the tin and fluorspar mines are located, and survey and workplace monitoring results. Lung cancer risk coefficients are derived from radon decay product data and from British epidemiology on lung cancer

  2. EPA's approach to assessment of radon risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Protection Agency has assessed the potential lung cancer risk to the general population due to radon based on the Agency's general principles of risk assessment. This is the same approach that has been used to assess the impact on public health of other carcinogenic environmental pollutants. This paper describes the application of this approach to radon. This paper includes a description of the method used by the Agency to estimate that 20,000 lung cancer deaths per year may be related to radon exposure. Also presented are the weight-of-evidence for classifying radon as a known human carcinogen and the uncertainties associated with estimating risks from radon exposure. These reflect the extent of the underlying support and context for these estimates

  3. Radon: implications for the health professional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is a colorless, odorless gas formed by radioactive decay of radium and uranium, which are naturally present in the earth's crust. When concentrated indoors, this invisible gas becomes a potential health hazard. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that up to 20,000 lung cancer deaths annually can be attributed to prolonged radon exposure. Radon is an important health issue that should be understood by all health care professionals. This paper discusses some of the important issues regarding radon, such as the incidences of lung cancer believed to be attributable to radon, the high-risk areas in the United States, federal safety guidelines, and public apathy. These issues and their impact on the health care required by professionals, especially nurse practitioners, are discussed

  4. Targeted therapy using alpha emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1996-10-01

    Radionuclides such as and which decay by the emission of -particles are attractive for certain applications of targeted radiotherapy. The tissue penetration of and -particles is equivalent to only a few cell diameters, offering the possibility of combining cell-specific targeting with radiation of similar range. Unlike the -particles emitted by radionuclides such as and , -particles are radiation of high linear energy transfer and thus greater biological effectiveness. Several approaches have been explored for targeted radiotherapy with - and -labelled substances including colloids, monoclonal antibodies, metabolic precursors, receptor-avid ligands and other lower molecular weight molecules. An additional agent which exemplifies the promise of -emitting radiopharmaceuticals is meta-[]astatobenzylguanidine. The toxicity of this compound under single-cell conditions, determined both by []thymidine incorporation and by limiting dilution clonogenic assays, for human neuroblastoma cells is of the order of 1000 times higher than that of meta-[]iodobenzylguanidine. For meta-[]astatobenzylguanidine, the value was equivalent to only atoms bound per cell. These results suggest that meta-[]astatobenzylguanidine might be valuable for the targeted radiotherapy of micrometastatic neuroblastomas.

  5. Radon reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a radon gas screening program, elevated levels of radon gas were detected in homes on Mackinac Island, Mich. Six homes on foundations with crawl spaces were selected for a research project aimed at reducing radon gas concentrations, which ranged from 12.9 to 82.3 pCi/l. Using isolation and ventilation techniques, and variations thereof, radon concentrations were reduced to less than 1 pCi/l. This paper reports that these reductions were achieved using 3.5 mil cross laminated or 10 mil high density polyethylene plastic as a barrier without sealing to the foundation or support piers, solid and/or perforated plastic pipe and mechanical fans. Wind turbines were found to be ineffective at reducing concentrations to acceptable levels. Homeowners themselves installed all materials

  6. Problems in the radon versus lung cancer test of the linear no-threshold theory and a procedure for resolving them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that lung cancer rates in U.S. counties, with or without correction for smoking, decrease with increasing radon exposure, in sharp contrast to the increase predicted by the linear-no-threshold (LNT) theory. The discrepancy is by 20 standard deviations, and very extensive efforts to explain it were not successful. Unless a plausible explanation for this discrepancy (or conflicting evidence) can be found, continued use of the LNT theory is a violation of open-quotes the scientific method.close quotes Nevertheless, LNT continues to be accepted and used by all official and governmental organizations, such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the National Academy of Sciences - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Board of Radiation Effects Research, Environmental Protection Agency etc., and there has been no move by any of these bodies to discontinue or limit its use. Assuming that they rely on the scientific method, this clearly implies that they have a plausible explanation for the discrepancy. The author has made great efforts to discover these 'plausible explanations' by inquiries through various channels, and the purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss them

  7. Assessment of radon levels in some water resources in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is produced by the radioactive decay of radium. Breathing high concentrations of radon can cause lung cancer. When radon gas migrates through the atmosphere, the solid radon progeny are deposited on the soil and water below, entering into the food chain. Radon generated from rocks containing its parents may escape to the underground or surface running water, which ultimately used as drinking water or for irrigation. In this work radon level was determined in different water resources in Egypt. Water from spring, tap water Nile and some commercially available drinking water were subjected to radon measurements using CR-39 detectors. Radon concentration in different water resources was found the range from 8.94 to 10.00 Bq/m3 while in trapped air above water was 9.3 to 10.38 Bq/m3

  8. How to Ensure Low Radon Concentrations in Indoor Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn; Wraber, Ida Kristina

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on methods for measuring radon levels in the indoor air in buildings as well as on concrete solutions that can be carried out in the building to prevent radon leakage and to lower the radon concentration in the indoor air of new buildings. The radon provision in the new Danish...... Building Regulations from 2010 has been tightened as a result of new recommendations from the World Health Organization. Radon can cause lung cancer and it is not known whether there is a lower limit for its harmfulness. It is therefore important to reduce the radon concentration as much as possible in new...... buildings. The airtightness is a major factor when dealing with radon in buildings. Above the ground it is important to build airtight in compliance with energy requirements and against the ground it is important to prevent radon from seeping into the building. There is a direct connection between...

  9. Assessment of risks associated to ionizing radiations: lung cancers after domestic radon exposure and thyroid cancers after accidental exposure to radioactive iodines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to develop a critical analysis of quantitative risk assessment in the field of ionizing radiation and to provide new estimates of attributable risks for particular situations of environmental exposure to ionizing radiation. This work is based on knowledge about dose-response relationships and ionizing radiation exposure of the general population. The work focuses on two different situations that both present an important interest for public health: lung cancer associated with domestic radon exposures (natural situation) and thyroid cancer associated with the Chernobyl accident fallout (accidental situation). The assessment of lung cancer risk associated with domestic radon exposure considers 10 dose-response relationships resulting from miner cohorts and case-control studies in the general population. A critical review of available data on smoking habits has been performed and allowed to consider the interactions between radon and tobacco. The exposure data come from measurements campaigns carried out since the beginning of the 1980 by the Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety and the Health General Directory in France. The French lung cancer mortality data are provided by the I.N.S.E.R.M.. Estimates of the number of attributable cancers are carried out for the whole country, stratified by 8 large regions (Z.E.A.T.) and by 96 departments for the year 1999 allowing to perform a sensibility analysis according to the geographical level of calculation. Uncertainties associated to risk coefficients and exposures have been quantified and it's impact on risk estimates is calculated. The estimated number of deaths attributable to domestic radon exposure ranges from 543 (90% uncertainty interval (U.I.): 75-1,097) to 3,108 (90% U.I.: 2,996-3,221). The corresponding risk fractions range from 2.2% (90% U.I.: 0.3%-4.4%) to 12.4% (90% U.I.: 11.9%-12.8%). The assessment of thyroid cancer risk in the most exposed area of France due to the

  10. Short and long term indoor radon survey in Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Marina, F.; Segovia, N. E-mail: msa@nuclear.inin.mx; Ruiz, W.; Godinez, L.; Tavera, L.; Lopez, A.; Chavez, A.; Pena, P.; Ponciano, G

    2001-06-01

    An indoor radon survey was performed in Mexico City in the scope of a lung cancer epidemiological study. The radon survey was performed in 416 houses using LR 115 track detectors in a cup array. The exposure time in the dwellings was around three months. A few dwellings were monitored with short term Honeywell and Alphaguard automatic radon monitors. The results indicate a radon concentration arithmetic mean of 145 Bq m{sup -3}, and the higher data frequency correspond to values lower than 30 Bq m{sup -3}. The distribution of the radon concentration is discussed as a function of several local parameters.

  11. Radon in the Environment: Friend or Foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is part of the Uranium decay series. Its Presence in the environment is associated mainly with trace amounts of uranium and its immediate parent, radium226, in rocks, soil and groundwater. About one-half of the effective doses from natural sources is estimated to be delivered by inhalation of the short lived radon progeny. Owing to this fact, radon is the most popular subject of studies on environmental radioactivity. The presence of high level of radon in indoor environment constitutes a major health hazard for man. The radon progeny is well established as causative agents of lung cancer and other types of caners. Radon unique properties as a naturally radioactive gas have led to its use as a geophysical tracer for locating buried faults and geological structures, in exploring for uranium, and for predicting earthquakes. Radon has been used as a tracer in the study of atmospheric transport process. There have been several other applications of radon in meteorology, water research and medicine. This paper summarizes the health effects and the potential benefits of radon and its progeny.

  12. Preliminary studies for the determination of alpha emitters using the gross alpha coprecipitation methods; Estudios preliminara para la determinacion de emisores alfa mediante el metodo de coprecipitationd e alfa total

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Navarro, J. A.; Pujol, L.; Suarez, J. A.; Pablo, M. A. de

    2003-07-01

    The radiological quality of drinking water in Spain is regulated by Nuclear Security Guideline No, 7.7 (Rev.1) of the Nuclear Security Council (NSC). this guideline establishes the protocol to follow when the radiological level exceeds 0,1 Bq.l''1. When this level is passed, the responsible alpha emitter must be identified; ''210 Po, ''226Ra, ''230Th, ''239Pu, ''224Ra, ''234 U and ''138 U. Activity due to these isotopes is usually determined using alpha spectrometry with semiconductor detectors. This method allows the activity of the alpha emitters to be determined with a good sensitivity. however, it requires long radiochemical isolations and long counting times, so the method is not suitable for rough estimate radiological analysis. In this preliminary work, we present the conditioning of the sample-precipitate that is essential for further radiochemical isolations. (Author) 9 refs.

  13. Radon exposure and oropharyngeal cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Espinosa, Tania; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a multifactorial disease. Alcohol and tobacco are the main risk factors. Radon is a human carcinogen linked to lung cancer risk, but its influence in other cancers is not well known. We aim to assess the effect of radon exposure on the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer through a systematic review of the scientific literature. This review performs a qualitative analysis of the available studies. 13 cohort studies were included, most of them mortality studies, which analysed the relationship between occupational or residential radon exposure with oropharyngeal cancer mortality or incidence. Most of the included studies found no association between radon exposure and oral and pharyngeal cancer. This lack of effect was observed in miners studies and in general population studies. Further research is necessary to quantify if this association really exists and its magnitude, specially performing studies in general population, preferably living in areas with high radon levels.

  14. Radon in coal power plant areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon, the radioactive colourless and inodorous noble gas, represents more than 55% of the natural average radioactivity. It is permanently released from the soil and majority of building materials, it builds up in the mine galleries, in dwelling houses and in other closed rooms. Radon gained increasingly in importance, particularly after 1990 when was doubtless identified as the second cause of lung cancer if a given concentration threshold is surpassed. This threshold is established differentially by each country as a function of the particular site and generally ranges between 150 Bq.m-3 and 600 Bq.m-3. The telluric radon consists of two isotopes, 222Rn, a daughter of radium descending from uranium, which induces 90% of the effects, and 220Rn from thorium series which have too short a lifetime to count in the risk assessments of radon inhalation. The interest of the authorities and population for diminishing the radon effects was illustrated by specific studies which in USA were managed by the National Counsel of Research, the BEIR VI committee of which has issued a report concerning the lung cancer produced by radon and its descendants. Coal mining, the transport, processing, burning, slag and ash disposal are activities entailing radon release. The miners' dwellings are placed in areas with the high radon potential. The local building materials have a high content of radioactive elements from the uranium or thorium series so that radon can build up in the closed rooms of these buildings. Hence the social responsible authorities in the coal power industry zones should consider this aspect long time ignored in the Balkans macro zone so far. The radon issue must be differentially approached in different areas hence a zonal mapping of the radon emission should be first done. It is worth to underline that the gaseous radioactive emission from operational nuclear power plants amounts up to a few percents of the radon natural emissions what entails a corresponding

  15. Factors Afrecting Passive Monitoring of Radon

    OpenAIRE

    浅野 智宏; Kahn, B.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, increasing cancer has been expressed as a possible health hazards associated with long-term exposures to a large population at a low level of radon in the environment. Because radon is ubiquitous nuclide, nation-wide monitoring is necessary to determine lung cancer risk. For such purpose, passive sampling methods with track etch detector or charcoal adsorption collector may have the advantage in lower cost and convenience. The charcoal adsorption collector is considered in th...

  16. Radon concentrations in coal mines of Baluchistan, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prolonged exposure to radon, the largest source (69%) of natural radioactivity, may cause lung cancer and bronchial tissue damage. So monitoring of radon at places of high radioactivity and in underground mines is important to assess the radiological hazards to occupational workers. For these reasons radon measurements were carried out in some coal mines of Baluchistan, Pakistan. The measurements were based upon passive detection of radon using CN-85 track detectors in Box Type Dosimeters. The radon concentration varied from 121 to 408 Bq m-3 in the mines under study. The computed radon dose varied from 1.38 to 4.67 mSv yr-1 with an average of 2.19±0.5 mSv yr-1. These coal mines have been found to be safe from radon-related health hazards

  17. Dealing with radon emissions in respect of new development : evaluation of mapping and site investigation methods for targeting areas where new development may require radon protective measures

    OpenAIRE

    Appleton, J. D.; Miles, J.C.H.; Talbot, D.K.

    2000-01-01

    Radon gas comes from uranium that occurs naturally in the ground. The variation in radon levels between different parts of the country is mainly controlled by the underlying geology. Radon decays to form radioactive particles that can enter the body by inhalation. Inhalation of the short-lived decay products of radon has been linked to an increase in the risk of developing cancers of the respiratory tract, especially of the lungs, and is considered to cause approximately 5% of dea...

  18. Characterization of radon levels in indoor air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose is to describe the different types of monitoring and sampling techniques that can determine the radiation burden of the general public from radon and its decay products. This is accomplished by measuring the range and distribution of radon and radon decay products through broad surveys using simple and convenient integrating monitoring instruments. For in-depth studies of the behavior of radon decay products and calculation of the radiation dose to the lung, fewer and more intensive and complex measurements of the particle size distribution and respiratory deposition of the radon decay products are required. For diagnostic purposes, the paper describes measurement techniques of the sources and exhalation rate of radon and the air exchange inside buildings. Measurement results form several studies conducted in ordinary buildings in different geographical areas of the United States, using the described monitoring techniques, indicate that the occupants of these buildings are exposed to radon and radon decay product concentrations, varying by as much as a factor of 20.

  19. Quantitative framework for assessing indoor radon policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon gas in the indoor environment is recognized as a problem of considerable magnitude; likely responsible for 5,000 to 20,000 lung cancer deaths per year in the United States (Cohen, 1978; Nero, 1986). Radon is an inert, radioactive element in the decay chain or uranium-238 which occurs ubiquitously in soil and rock. Radon emanating from the ground enters houses through cracks and porous building materials in the substructure. Depending on characteristics of the housing design, construction and ventilation practices, dangerously high concentrations can result. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has taken a lead role in addressing the indoor radon problem. Their strategy is to work with the States and the private sector to characterize the extent of exposure in problem areas and identify alternative actions to reduce health risks. Since radon poses a risk that occurs in private homes, the responsibility for testing and remediation lies largely with the homeowner. This paper presents a quantitative framework to analyze indoor radon policy on a regional scale. A model is developed which describes regional radon risk reduction in terms of the percentage of homeowners in the region who decide to monitor their homes, the likelihood of homeowners taking alternative remedial actions, and the effectiveness of remediation methods in lowering radon concentrations. Different government policies are analyzed in terms of their potential effect on model parameters and resulting risk reductions

  20. Mineral dusts and radon in uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to assert that radon is a major cause of lung cancer in this country. EPA is fostering a radon program that could entail huge financial and emotional costs while yielding negligible benefits to public health. Justification for the program was the occurrence of lung cancer in men exposed to huge amounts of radon, mineral dusts, and other lung irritants in uranium mines on the Colorado Plateau. Lung cancer has been reported in about 356 cigarette smokers and in about 25 nonsmokers. During the era of high radon levels, monitoring was sporadic. Conditions in only a small fraction of the mines were measured, and that on a few separate occasions. Later, cumulative exposure to radon was calculated on the basis of measurements involving only a tiny fraction of the miners. Some were exposed to more than 15,000 pCi/liter of radon and its products. The level in the average home is about 1.5 pCi/liter. In making extrapolations from mine to home, the assumption is made that residents are in their dwellings most of the time and that miners spend only 170 hours a month in the mine. Two major questionable assumptions are involved in extrapolations from high doses of radon in the mines to low doses in homes. One is that no threshold is involved; that is, that humans have no remediation mechanism for α particle damages. There is evidence to the contrary. The most unrealistic assumption is that heavy exposure to silica has no effect on inducing lung cancer. Many studies have shown that silica dust causes lung cancer in animals. Exposure of human culture cells to silica has resulted in formation of neoplastic tissue. EPA has no solid evidence that exposures to 4 pCi/liter of radon causes lung cancer in either smokers or nonsmokers. Indeed, there is abundant evidence to the contrary in the fact that in states with high levels of radon, inhabitants have less lung cancer than those in states with low levels

  1. Strategy for the reduction of radon exposure in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    Elevated indoor radon concentrations are a more extensive problem in Norway than in many other countries. It has been estimated that indoor radon causes approximately 300 deaths from lung cancer each year in Norway. On average, avoiding lung cancer increases life expectancy by 14 to 18 years. Radon is a radioactive noble gas formed continually is a decay product from uranium. Uranium is a natural constituent existing in varying concentrations in bedrock, minerals and soils. For this reason, both the soil air and groundwater contain radon. Radon in buildings normally originates from the soil air in the underlying ground. Indoor air pressure is often low, so that radon-containing air from the surrounding ground gets sucked in through cracks in the building foundations. Elevated indoor radon concentrations can be due to household water drawn from groundwater wells, and radon gas can also be emitted from building materials such as certain types of stone or concrete containing high levels of natural radioactivity. Norway, Sweden and Finland are among the the countries in the world with the highest average indoor radon concentrations. Geological conditions and the cool climate pose a big challenge, but the radon problem can be solved in a cost-effective way. Radon is the most common cause of lung cancer after active smoking. At a radon concentration of 100 Bq/m3, which is not far from the estimated average for Norwegian housing, the risks of dying of radon-induced lung cancer before the age of 75 are 0.1 % for non-smokers and 2 % for smokers, respectively. Many buildings in Norway have radon levels that exceed this. The most important health impact of radon exposure is the increased risk of lung cancer. This increase in risk is assumed to be linear in relation to radon concentration (i.e., the risk is 10 times higher at 1000 Bq/m3 compared to 100 Bq/m3). The risk also increases linearly with exposure time, i.e. there is a tenfold greater risk of contracting lung cancer

  2. Health Risks due to Exposure to Radon in Homes in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarises the evidence that links exposure to radon in homes with an increase in lung cancer. Using the most recent risk estimates derived from epidemiological studies carried out abroad, the risk associated with radon exposure in homes in Ireland is derived. The relationship between exposure to radon and cigarette smoking is also discussed

  3. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-04-01

    Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

  4. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation

  5. Radon gas, bronchogenic carcinoma - Ontario experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the procedures followed by the Ontario Worker's Compensation Board in paying insurance benefits to injured workers is presented. Topics include initial methods of handling lung cancer claims, the first guidelines for adjudication of lung cancer, the present guidelines, and a perspective on occupational lung cancers. The Ontario Board has accepted the cause-effect relationship between radon gas decay products and the development of certain bronchogenic carcinomas in those persons so exposed

  6. The radon in the environment of Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper presents the main aspects related to the problem of radon, a concern approached with great interest in the last 10-15 years by the scientific community. Though one of the first radioactive elements discovered and despite its implication in the irradiation of exposed population (especially the proof that most cases of lung cancer among workers in uranium mines are caused by radon), only lately have radon been studied intensively. As an element with great mobility, impossibly to be fixed through chemical reactions, and, on the other hand, being perpetually generated by radium sources in soil and building materials, radon is ubiquitous, therefore it is desirable to know more about one of the elements inextricably linked to our life. Radon in dwellings requires special attention because both individual and collective doses owing to radon and its descendants are higher than those deriving from any other sources. People spend more than eighty per cent of their time indoors, and more than fifty per cent of their irradiation from different sources is caused by radon. In many countries there are individual doses much higher than those accepted in professional exposure, as it is the case for certain regions in ex - Eastern Germany, where uranium mining led up to an extreme high level of radon in dwellings. Besides its major contribution to exposure to radiation, very important is the fact than its target is very precise - the lungs, especially the bronchial epithelium. There is therefore an increased risk of lung cancer occurrence, assumed to be proportional with the exposure to higher concentrations in dwellings. A number of on-going studies try to estimate the risk factors. It was shown that radon is the second risk factor after smoking. The exposure to radon in such cases should be amended through interventions and modifications of the dwellings and inhabitants' behavior. The International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICPR) recommended certain

  7. Assessment of soil radon potential in Hong Kong, China, using a 10-point evaluation system

    OpenAIRE

    Tung, S.; Wiegand, J; Wartenberg, W; Leung, JKC; Jiao, JJ

    2012-01-01

    Radon and its progenies have been ranked second of being responsible for lung cancer in humans. Hong Kong has four major groups of uranium-rich plutonic and volcanic rocks and is suffering from radon emanated therefrom. However, there is a lack of radon potential maps in Hong Kong to resolve the spatial distribution of radon-prone areas. A ten-point radon potential system was developed in Germany (2005) to predict radon potential using both the in situ geogenic and geographic parameters under...

  8. BGS Radon Protective Measures GIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The British Geological Survey Radon Protective Measures Geographical Information System is described. The following issues are highlighted: Identification of development sites where radon protection is required in new dwellings; Mapping radon potential on the basis of house radon and geology; Radon Protective Measures GIS; Radon site reports; and Follow-up radon protective measures sire reports

  9. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published values оf total population carcinogenic risk from chemical carcinogens.Results: it is shown that the 304 cases of lung cancer per year (1. 85 10-3 on average from 2006 to 2011 (21280diseases for 70 years in addition to background level induced by radon; the differences in average trends of all lungcancer incidence in the districts can exceed 25%.Conclusion. The potential of risk reduction by measures of mitigation radon concentration exceeds 5 times the cost efficiency to reduce emissions from vehicles and can reduce cancer incidence, on average 236 cases per year; population risk 16520 cases over 70 years or save not less than 2832 person-years of life per year. The annual effect of reducing losses from not-survival of 12 years as a result of radon-induced lung cancer deaths exceeds 14160000 dollars. The evaluating of the carcinogenic risk from radon in accordance with the definition of population risk increases the predictive evaluation of the effectiveness of preventive measures more than twice.

  10. Contamination of individuals by radon daughters: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Body radon daughter contamination reflects relative individual respiratory exposures to radon daughters; counts can be related both to household radon levels and to lung cancer risk factors such as sex and tobacco smoking. Radon daughters were counted by gamma spectroscopy from 180 adult residents of eastern Pennsylvania. A seven-position, 35-min scan was conducted in a mobile body counter, generally during afternoon or evening hours. Track-etch detectors for household radon were distributed, and were recovered from 80% of the subjects. Over 75% of the population had environmentally enhanced radon daughter contamination. House radon levels were strongly related, as anticipated, to radon daughter contamination in the 112 subjects for whom both sets of measurements were available (p less than .001); basement measurements were as strongly related to personal contamination as were living area measurements; bedroom measurements were slightly more strongly correlated. Both sex (p less than .02) and cigarette smoking (p less than .01) significantly modified the relationships, after nonlinear adjustment for travel times. Using a logarithmic model, a given house living-area radon level was associated in females with body contamination by radon daughters 2-3 times that in males. Nonsmokers had 2-4 times higher levels of contamination than smokers. Results are for the total of internal and external contamination, these being highly correlated in preliminary experiments. Time usage and activity patterns of the subjects are believed to be important in explaining these findings, and may become important variables in radon risk assessment

  11. Compilation of geogenic radon potential map of Pest County, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, K. Zs.; Pásztor, L.; Horváth, Á.; Bakacsi, Zs.; Szabó, J.; Szabó, Cs.

    2010-05-01

    222Rn and its effect on the human health have recently received major importance in environmental studies. This natural radioactive gas accounts for about 9% of lung cancer death and about 2% of all deaths from cancer in Europe due to indoor radon concentrations. It moves into the buildings from the natural decay chain of uranium in soils, rocks and building materials. Radon mapping regionalizes the average hazard from radon in a selected area as a radon risk map. Two major methods (concerning the applied radon data) have been used for mapping. One uses indoor radon data whereas the other is based on soil gas radon data. The outputs of the second approach are the geogenic radon potential maps. The principal objective of our work is to take the first step in geogenic radon mapping in Hungary. Soil samples collected in Pest County (Central Region of Hungary) in the frame of a countrywide soil survey (Soil Information and Monitoring System) were studied to have empirical information of the potential radon risk. As the first two steps radium concentration of soil samples, collected at 43 locations sampling soil profiles by genetic horizons from the surface level down to 60-150 cm, were determined using HPGe gamma-spectroscopy technique, as well as measurement of radon exhalation on the soil samples were carried out applying closed radon accumulation chamber coupled with RAD7 radon monitor detector. From these data the exhalation coefficient was calculated, which shows how many percent of the produced radon can come out from the sample. This rate strongly depends on the depth: at circa 100 cm a drastic decrease have been noticed, which is explained by the change in soil texture. The major source of indoor radon is the soil gas radon concentration (Barnet et al., 2005). We estimated this value from the measured radon exhalation and calculated soil porosity and density. The soil gas radon concentration values were categorized after Kemski et al. (2001) and then the

  12. An historical overview of radon and its progeny: Applications and health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its discovery by Dorn in 1900, studies of radon and its progeny have contributed to such diverse scientific fields as meteorology, geophysics, mineral exploration and radiation health effects. In addition to terrestrial scientific studies of radon, NASA missions in recent decades have yielded data on the behaviour of radon and its progeny on the Moon and on Mars. Radon has been used therapeutically for ∼100 y in the form of radon seeds for the irradiation of malignant tumours. It is, however, for its negative health effects that radon is better and more justifiably known. The causal role of radon and, in particular, its progeny in the elevated incidence of lung cancer in underground uranium miners was established in the 1950's. It is of historical interest to note that the fatal lung disease of silver miners in Saxony and Bohemia in the 16. century, was undoubtedly lung cancer caused by the high levels of radon in the mines. In recent decades there has been an ever-growing interest in the public health effects of exposure to radon in homes. Extensive radon epidemiological studies both of underground miners and of the general public in recent decades have quantified the lung cancer risks from radon exposure. Radon was classified in 1988 by International Agency for Research on Cancer as a human carcinogen and in 2009 the World Health Organization identified radon as the second cause of lung cancer globally after smoking. Radon control strategies are used by many governments to control and reduce the risk to public health from radon. (authors)

  13. 氡及其子体对肺以外的组织器官是否有危险%Radon and Decay Products-is There a Risk Outside the Lung?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杰拉尔德·M·肯德尔; TracyJSmith

    2002-01-01

    吸入氡子体有致肺癌的危险是辐射防护界公认健康效应之一.文章总结了氡子体致肺癌的流行病调查结果.本文还给出了氡及其子体对其他组织器官所致剂量的计算结果,这些结果可用于评价氡及其子体对身体其他部分的可能危险.跟致肺癌的情况不一样,缺乏其他组织器官假设危害的流行病学调查结果.沉积到皮肤上的氡子体致皮癌的危险和溶于饮水中氡所致胃癌的危险没有过估,但其他危害好象不大.%The risk of lung cancer from inhaled radon decay products is now one of the most firmly established health effect in radiological protection. This paper summarizes the epidemiological evidence for the lung cancer hazard. It also presents the results of calculations of doses to other body organs and tissues. These allow possible risks to other parts of the body to be assessed. Unlike the situation with lung cancer,epidemiological evidence for these other putative hazards is lacking. It is concluded that the risks of skin cancer from deposited decay products and of stomach cancer from radon gas ingested in water should not be overlooked, but that other hazards appear to be minor.

  14. Estimation of radon concentration in dwellings in and around Guwahati

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Kumar Dey; Projit Kumar Das

    2012-02-01

    It has been established that radon and its airborne decay products can present serious radiation hazards. A long term exposure to high concentration of radon causes lung cancer. Besides, it is also known that out of the total radiation dose received from natural and man-made sources, 60% of the dose is due to radon and its progeny. Taking this into account, an attempt has been made to estimate radon concentration in dwellings in and around Guwahati using aluminium dosimeter cups with CR-39 plastic detectors. Results of preliminary investigation presented in this paper show that the mean concentration is 21.31 Bq m−3.

  15. Hazards of radon daughters to the general public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk estimates of lung cancer resulting from the inhalation by the general public of radon daughters which accumulate inside buildings are discussed. The cost-benefit relationship for decreasing radon daughter exposures in Canadian homes by increasing ventilation rates is also quantified. The main components in this relationship are identified together with the uncertainties associated with some of these components. The uncertainties in the calculated values appeared to be related primarily to the most appropriate risk estimates for inhalation of radon daughters and to actual radon daughter concentrations inside buildings at various ventilation rates. (UK)

  16. Estimation of radon concentration in dwellings in and around Guwahati

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Gautam Kumar; Das, Projit Kumar

    2012-02-01

    It has been established that radon and its airborne decay products can present serious radiation hazards. A long term exposure to high concentration of radon causes lung cancer. Besides, it is also known that out of the total radiation dose received from natural and man-made sources, 60% of the dose is due to radon and its progeny. Taking this into account, an attempt has been made to estimate radon concentration in dwellings in and around Guwahati using aluminium dosimeter cups with CR-39 plastic detectors. Results of preliminary investigation presented in this paper show that the mean concentration is 21.31 Bq m - 3.

  17. The radon gas. An air pollutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Santiago Quindós Poncela

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work different aspects about the problem of the radon in dwellings are approached. This gas of natural origin is virtually present in all the soils in the earth’s crust due to the presence of uranium and radium in the composition of them. Depending on architectural factors and of occupancy habits of the house, high concentrations of this gas can be reached indoors. In these situations, there is a quantifiable increment of the risk of developing lung cancer in the inhabitants of the housing. In the last years the methodological improvements in the realization of epidemiologic studies have led to the obtaining of scientific evidences about the relationship between the presence of indoor radon and the risk of lung cancer. This relationship, found years ago in workers of uranium mines, has been corroborated in the case of the residential radon by the light of several recent meta-analysis performed on groups of epidemiologic studies. More than 6.000 radon measurements have been carried out in Spain during the last 25 years. A summary of the results obtained from the main national radon surveys are also presented, as well as the criteria recently established by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council concerning radon action levels in dwellings and workplaces.

  18. What do we know about the effects of radon?; Was wissen wir ueber die Wirkung des Radon?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkart, W. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenhygiene; Wichmann, H.E. [GSF-Forschungszentrum, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Epidemiologie

    1996-12-31

    Radon and radon decay products pose by far the higher lung cancer risk as compared to chemical substances capable of inducing lung cancer. However, there is presently only one study, performed in Sweden, giving evidence of a direct link between indoor radon exposure and the incidence of lung cancer. Epidemiologic studies on this issue are currently being performed across the world, with the German study covering more than 4000 lung cancer cases and the same number of control persons representing one of the most extensive projects. (orig.) [Deutsch] Radon und Radonfolgeprodukte stellen im Vergleich zu chemischen Konzerogenen das mit Abstand groesste umweltbedingte Lungenkrebsrisiko dar. Bisher ist der direkte epidemiologische Nachweis des Zusammenhangs zwischen der Radonexposition in Wohnungen und dem Auftreten von Lungenkrebs jedoch erst in einer schwedischen Studie gelungen. Derzeit wird weltweit eine groessere Zahl epidemiologischer Studien durchgefuehrt, wobei die Untersuchungen in Deutschland mit mehr als 4.000 Lungenkrebserkrankungsfaellen und der gleichen Zahl von Kontrollpersonen zu den groessten zaehlen. (orig.)

  19. Factors affecting passive monitoring of radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, increasing cancer has been expressed as a possible health hazards associated with long-term exposures to a large population at a low level of radon in the environment. Because radon is ubiquitous nuclide, nation-wide monitoring is necessary to determine lung cancer risk. For such purpose, passive sampling methods with track etch detector or charcoal adsorption collector may have the advantage in lower cost and convenience. The charcoal adsorption collector is considered in this study. Various factors may significantly affect the charcoal adsorption mechanism on its practical application. Moisture effects are discussed here as having major impact on radon collection by charcoal. Set of equations are presented in this report to describe adsorption of radon including moisture effects. (author) 61 refs

  20. Doses and affects of radon and its daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its short-lived daughters are one of the main contributors to the natural exposures of ionizing radiation to man. Their sources, levels and characteristics are described. By inhalation of radon and its daughters tissues in the lung are irritated by α-particles leading to an increased risk of lung cancer. Methods of calculation of doses and risks using the dosimetric approach and the epidemiological approach are described and discussed. (Author)

  1. Radon gas: detection techniques, health impacts and reduction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon-222, a decay product of Uranium, is found to be radioactively contaminating homes throughout the US and causing hazardous working conditions for uranium miners. Radon gas decays to various heavy metal isotopes of polonium, bismuth and lead which in turn emit alpha particles. Despite an alpha particle's shallow penetration distance of approximately 20 microns, biological damage can be extensive if ingested, possibly resulting in lung cancer. The toll of lung cancer fatalities due to Radon exposure is estimated at 20,000 per year in the US. Statistical surveys approximate that 7% of homes in the US, or roughly four million, exceed the 4 picocurie per liter limit set by the EPA at which remedial action is recommended. In the Uranium mining industry, the common unit of measurement for radon radiation, the working level (WL), is set at a maximum of 4 WL per month per year. The instruments presently available to measure and monitor radon levels are: Working Level Meters, Charcoal Filters, and Track Etch Detectors. Construction Technology to reduce radon levels can be as easy as installing ventilation system and sealing off entry routes of radon gas. The paper will provide an overview of radon sources, detection techniques, the health impact on the public and construction technology in the reduction of radon levels

  2. Assessment of Radon level in dwellings of Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhassan Haddadi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Indoor radon gas (222Rn has been recognized as one of the causes of lung cancer. The presence of radioactive radium in the construction & materials in the buildings its changes in contact with radon gas may lead to increase level of radon gas in the residential houses. In this regards, indoor radon measurement is important. This study was conducted to determine radon concentration in Tabriz houses. Materials & Methods: In this study, 196 radon diffusion dosimeters were left in different floors of houses constructed with different materials such as cement (betony, heated brick & clay with raw brick at every floor for 6 months. The “electrochemical etching” method was applied to detect “alpha tracks” on the polymers of dosimeters and based on number of these tracks, radon concentration was determined. Results: This study showed that average radon concentration were 39Bqm-3 in the houses. At different floors & different construction material the average effective dose equivalent of lung tissue was 0.97msvy-1. Conclusion: Based on these results, it can be concluded that, the indoor radon levels in the Tabriz houses are within acceptable range.

  3. Lung tumors and radon inhalation in over 2000 rats: Approximate linearity across a wide range of doses and potentiation by tobacco smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 2000 rats were exposed to cumulative doses of up to 28,000 WLMs of radon gas. More than 300 pulmonary tumors were induced by this exposure, most being nonfatal lesions detected only at autopsy of animals that had died of unrelated causes. Above 6000 WLMs rats suffered increasingly from life shortening due to radiation-induced nonneoplastic causes and so had less time in which to develop tumors. When adjusted for these competing causes of death, the hazard function for the excess risk of developing pulmonary tumors was approximately linearly related to dose throughout the range of doses studied. This suggests that some previously reported high-dose ''reductions'' in radiogenic tumor-induction rates may chiefly have involved the killing of rats rather than the killing of precursor cells. Rats exposed to radon and then to six months of inhalation of tobacco smoke had a four times greater age-specific prevalence of pulmonary tumors than rats exposed to an identical radon dose either alone or preceded by tobacco smoke inhalation. This suggests that tobacco smoke may accelerate the carcinogenic process by acting as a promoter of radiation-induced somatic damage. These data suggest that, for assessing human risk from exposure to radon, the linear model should be assumed, but that the WLM is not on its own an adequate index of carcinogenic insult. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Modeling the potential impacts of different radon policies for the U.S. housing stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other public health agencies in the United States, radon may be the leading cause (along with passive smoking) of lung cancer deaths among nonsmokers. Radon is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer death in smokers behind smoking-related lung cancer. EPA estimates that 7,000 to 30,000 lung cancer deaths each year are due to radon exposure. (It is implied that radon-related lung cancer deaths can be prevented by reducing radon levels below EPA's guideline levels). Current EPA radon policy is based on a strategy of education, the transfer of testing and remediation technologies to the public and private sectors, and recently proposed radon-resistant construction standards for new homes. This paper models the effectiveness of current proposed, and alternative policies for reducing radon risks in U.S. residential construction. The results of our analysis suggest that EPS's projections of 2,200 'lives saved annually' as a result of its current action level of 4 pCi/l will not be achieved with its current policy in the near future. Overall, the response of radon-related mortality to most policy options is delayed and flat due in part to the large number of houses with low radon levels and the long latency period between radon exposure and the development of cancer. The modeling results suggest that more aggressive smoking reduction programs may yield greater benefits in overall lung cancer mortality (but not reduced radon exposure) than most radon-related policies. (au)

  5. Detection of 210Po on filter papers 16 years after use for the collection of short-lived radon progeny in a room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Jarad, F; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2003-01-01

    Radon gas was allowed to accumulate in its radium source and then injected into a 36 m(3) test room, resulting in an initial radon concentration of 15 kBq m(-3). Filter papers were used to collect the short-lived radon progeny and thus to measure the Potential Alpha Energy Concentration (PAEC) in-situ in the year 1984 at different times and conditions according to the experimental design. The radon progeny collected on the filter papers were studied as a function of aerosol particle concentration ranging from 10(2)-10(5) particles cm(-3) in three different experiments. The highest aerosol particle concentration was generated by indoor cigarette smoking. Those filters were stored after the experiment, and were used after 16 years to study the activity of the radon long-lived alpha emitter progeny, (210)Po (T(1/2)=138 days). This isotope is separated from the short-lived progeny by (210)Pb beta emitter with 22.3 years half-life. After 16 years' storage of these filters, each filter paper was sandwiched and wrapped between two CR-39 nuclear track detectors, to put the detectors in contact with the surfaces of different filters, for 337 days. Correlation between the PAEC measured using filter papers in the year 1984 and the activity of long-lived alpha emitter (210)Po on the same filter papers measured in the year 2000 were studied. The results of the (210)Po activity showed a very good correlation of 0.92 with the PAEC 16 years ago. The results also depict that the PAEC and (210)Po activity in indoor air increased with the increase of aerosol particle concentration, which shows the attachment of short-lived radon progeny with the aerosol particles. The experiment proves that indoor cigarette smoking is a major source of aerosol particles carrying radon progeny and, thus, indoor cigarette smoking is an additional source of internal radiation hazard to the occupants whether smoker or non-smoker.

  6. Determination of Radon Concentration in Some Types of the Smoking Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon concentrations were measured with long- term alpha-track radon detectors along with radon scout. Radon gas emanates from the radium content of terrestrial products, like tobacco leaves. Smoking materials contain, beside tobacco, many other additives that may also contain radium traces. These additives aim at exciting smoker’s feeling via chemical reactions, which may be disrupted by alpha particle simultaneous ionizing effect leading to mutation. This study may provide evidence of intimate relation between smoke’s radon and risk of lung cancer. Radon was measured by tracking its emitted alpha particles in solid state CR - 39 plastic detector and also by counting ionization pulses in silicon surface barrier detector (radon-scout). The results indicate that some of the cigarette staffs raise radon concentration in air to 270 bq/m3, corresponding to an annual effective dose of about 5500 μ Sv

  7. Radon in homes. Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon 222 and its radioactive decay products can enter buildings and, through inhalation, expose the inhabitants' pulmonary tissues to ionizing radiation. Studies of radon levels in the United States indicate that variations of 100-fold or greater exist among private dwellings. In one region, 55% of homes had levels exceeding 4 pCi/L (0.15 Bq/L), which is the guidance level recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Ventilation and tightness of construction are important determinants of radon levels. In some instances, fans or heat exchangers can reduce excessive concentrations, but in others more elaborate remedial measures may be required. Physicians may obtain information about radon through Environmental Protection Agency regional offices and state radiation control programs. The risk of radiogenic cancer is believed to increase with exposure to ionizing radiation. According to some estimates, concentrations of radon decay products in US homes could be responsible for several thousand cases of lung cancer per year. Studies of radon levels in representative buildings and guidelines are needed to ensure safe, effective, and cost-effective countermeasures. Architects, contractors, designers, building code administrators, health physicists, and biomedical investigators can help with solutions

  8. Environmental Radon Gas and Degenerative Conditions An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas, has variable distribution in the environment as a decay product of uranium occurring in a wide range of rocks, soils and building materials. Although radon dissipates rapidly in outdoor air, it concentrates in the built environment, and inhalation of 222Rn and its progeny 218Po and 214Po is believed to provide the majority of the radioactive dose to the respiratory system. While the connection between radon and lung cancer has long been recognised and investigated, recent studies have highlighted potential links between radon and other conditions, among them Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases, and Paget Disease of Bone. A strong case exists for clarifying the relationship between radon and these other conditions, not least since radon remediation to reduce lung cancer may conceivably have additional benefits hitherto unrecognized. The present status of the postulated links between environmental radon gas and degenerative conditions is reviewed, and recommendations for further research into levering current anti-radon campaigns are made. (authors)

  9. Environmental Radon Gas and Degenerative Conditions An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves-Kirkby, C.J. [Medical Physics Department, Northampton General Hospital, Northampton NN1 5BD (United Kingdom)]|[School of Health, University of Northampton, Northampton NN2 7AL (United Kingdom); Denman, A.R. [Medical Physics Department, Northampton General Hospital, Northampton NN1 5BD (United Kingdom); Woolridge, A.C. [School of Health, University of Northampton, Northampton NN2 7AL (United Kingdom)]|[School of Applied Sciences, University of Northampton, Northampton NN2 7AL (United Kingdom); Phillips, P.S. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Northampton, Northampton NN2 7AL (United Kingdom); Phillips, C. [School of Health, University of Northampton, Northampton NN2 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas, has variable distribution in the environment as a decay product of uranium occurring in a wide range of rocks, soils and building materials. Although radon dissipates rapidly in outdoor air, it concentrates in the built environment, and inhalation of {sup 222}Rn and its progeny {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po is believed to provide the majority of the radioactive dose to the respiratory system. While the connection between radon and lung cancer has long been recognised and investigated, recent studies have highlighted potential links between radon and other conditions, among them Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases, and Paget Disease of Bone. A strong case exists for clarifying the relationship between radon and these other conditions, not least since radon remediation to reduce lung cancer may conceivably have additional benefits hitherto unrecognized. The present status of the postulated links between environmental radon gas and degenerative conditions is reviewed, and recommendations for further research into levering current anti-radon campaigns are made. (authors)

  10. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range ∼66 μm) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range ∼44 μm). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 μm. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is restricted to the epidermis does not

  11. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M W [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range {approx}66 {mu}m) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range {approx}44 {mu}m). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 {mu}m. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is restricted to the

  12. Lyman-Alpha Emitter Galaxies at z ~ 2.8 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South: I. Tracing the Large-Scale Structure via Lyman-Alpha Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Rhoads, James E; Finkelstein, Steven L; Wang, Jun-Xian; Jiang, Chun-Yan; Cai, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    We present a narrowband survey with three adjacent filters for z=2.8--2.9 Lyman Alpha Emitter (LAE) galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), along with spectroscopic followup. With a complete sample of 96 LAEs in the narrowband NB466, we confirm a large-scale structure at z~ 2.8. Compared to the blank field in NB470 and NB475, the LAE density excess in the NB466 field is ~6.0+/-0.8 times the standard deviation expected at z~2.8, assuming a linear bias of 2. The overdense large scale structure in NB466 can be decomposed into 4 protoclusters, whose overdensities are 4.6 - 6.6. These 4 protoclusters are expected to evolve into a Coma-like cluster at z~ 0. In the meanwhile, we investigate the average star-formation rates derived from Ly{\\alpha}, rest-frame UV and X-ray, the Ly{\\alpha} luminosity functions, the Ly{\\alpha} photon densities and their dependence on the environment. We find that the Ly{\\alpha} photon density in the overdense field (NB466) is ~50\\% higher than that in the blank field ...

  13. A remarkably high fraction of strong Ly_alpha emitters amongst luminous redshift 6.0

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis-Lake, E; Pearce, H J; Dunlop, J S; Cirasuolo, M; Stark, D P; Almaini, O; Bradshaw, E J; Chuter, R; Foucaud, S; Hartley, W G

    2011-01-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of ten highly luminous (L >= 2L*) Lyman alpha emitters in the redshift range 6.01= 6 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) selected from an area of 0.25 square degrees within the UKIDSS Ultra-deep Survey (UDS). Overall, our high rate of spectroscopic confirmation (>= 71%) and low rate of contamination provides a strong vindication of the photometric redshift analysis used to define the original sample. By considering star-formation rate estimates based on the Ly_alpha and UV continuum luminosity we conclude that our sample is consistent with a Ly_alpha escape fraction of ~25%. Moreover, after careful consideration of the potential uncertainties and biases, we find that 40%-50% of our sample of L >= 2L* galaxies at 6.0= 25 Angs), a fraction which is a factor of ~2 higher than previously reported for L =2 L*) LBGs shows a similarly sharp increase to that observed in their lower-luminosity (L <= L*) counterparts.

  14. Ly$\\alpha$ Emitters with Very Large Ly$\\alpha$ Equivalent Widths, EW$_{\\rm 0}$(Ly$\\alpha$) $\\simeq 200-400$ \\AA, at $z\\sim 2$

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Schaerer, Daniel; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ono, Yoshiaki; Rauch, Michael; Goto, Ryosuke

    2016-01-01

    We present physical properties of spectroscopically confirmed Ly$\\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) with very large rest-frame Ly$\\alpha$ equivalent widths EW$_{\\rm 0}$(Ly$\\alpha$). Although the definition of large EW$_{\\rm 0}$(Ly$\\alpha$) LAEs is usually difficult due to limited statistical and systematic uncertainties, we identify six LAEs selected from $\\sim 3000$ LAEs at $z\\sim 2$ with reliable measurements of EW$_{\\rm 0}$ (Ly$\\alpha$) $\\simeq 200-400$ \\AA\\ given by careful continuum determinations with our deep photometric and spectroscopic data. These large EW$_{\\rm 0}$(Ly$\\alpha$) LAEs do not have signatures of AGN, but notably small stellar masses of $M_{\\rm *} = 10^{7-8}$ $M_{\\rm \\odot}$ and high specific star-formation rates (star formation rate per unit galaxy stellar mass) of $\\sim 100$ Gyr$^{-1}$. These LAEs are characterized by the median values of $L({\\rm Ly\\alpha})=3.7\\times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$ and $M_{\\rm UV}=-18.0$ as well as the blue UV continuum slope of $\\beta = -2.5\\pm0.2$ and the low dust extinc...

  15. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of radon gas (222Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the 226Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m-3 to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m-3, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m-3 to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m-3, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m-3 to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m-3, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m-3 to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m-3 and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m-3 to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m-3, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m-3, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m-3, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m-3 and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m-3, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m-3 proposed by EPA except monazite 0.15 kg, struverite 0.15 kg and 0.25 kg. Whereas

  16. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Measurements of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the {sup 226}Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m{sup −3} to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m{sup −3}, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m{sup −3} to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m{sup −3}, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m{sup −3} to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m{sup −3}, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m{sup −3} to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m{sup −3} and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m{sup −3} to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m{sup −3}, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m{sup −3}, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m{sup −3} and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the

  17. Influence of aerosol upon radon concentration of radon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of theoretical analysis, the influence on the radon concentration of radon chamber by the experiment of filling the radon chamber with aerosol, and the absorption of radon daughter on aerosol under the condition of different radon concentration and aerosol concentration was described. The results of experiment showed that: Aerosol did not affect the stability of the radon concentration of the radon chamber, but different aerosol concentration will change the combination state of radon daughter, thus it will affect the diffusion coefficient of radon daughter, so it will affect the results of the measure of the gross measuring instrument. (authors)

  18. [The radon exposure in mine: risk evaluation, risk assessment and health effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggiola, M; Scielzo, G; Baracco, A; Perrelli, F; Pribytkova, Z

    2011-01-01

    In mining sector, the natural presence of radon determines an exposition which deserves substantive consideration. The results of radon measure from '90 years in a talc mining show levels of radon below to the threshold limit of 400 Bq/m3, values influenced from air forced systems. The epidemiologic studies updated in a cohort of talc workers between 1946 and 1995 showed no excess for lung cancer mortality. No excess was found for lung cancer mortality in miners exposed to low dose of radon. PMID:23393887

  19. Soil radon as a possible earthquake precursor: Preliminary results from Ileia (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraki, Ermioni; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Louizi, Anna; Zisos, Athanasios

    2010-05-01

    Radon (222Rn) is a naturally occurring radioactive gas which is directly produced by the decay of the 238U series. It is significant for the studies of Earth, in hydrogeology and atmosphere. Radon is used as a trace gas due to the long half-life (3.82-days) which allows migration at long distances. In addition, it is an alpha emitter, fact which enables detection of low levels of radon. Anomalies of radon impending earthquakes of a variety of magnitudes have been observed in soil gas, ground- and thermal-waters and in underground tunnels. Increasing is the scientific interest in this field during the last two years. However, the majority of the published papers refer to data of rather long time intervals between sequential measurements (~2-4 weeks).On the other hand, it is justified, both on laboratory and geophysical scale, that when a heterogeneous material is strained acoustic and electromagnetic (EM) emissions occur in a wide frequency spectrum, ranging from very low to very high frequencies. These emissions are considered as precursors of general fracture. In the search of soil radon as a possible earthquake precursor, a station for quick and continuous monitoring of soil radon has been installed in a very active tectonic site in Greece (Ileia, Peloponnese, SW Greece). The monitoring site is Kardamas Ileias, located 3 km south from Amaliada which is the second highly populated city. The instrumental and felt seismicity of Ileia is dominated by extensional active seismicity structures (e.g. Alfeios, Neda, Melpeia, Kiparissia-Aetos) and has shown more than 600 earthquakes of magnitude greater than 4.0 R in the last 100 years. Two earthquakes were very destructive (5.8 R on 26/3/93 and 6.8 R on 8/6/08 respectively). The station consists of a high precision active instrument (Alpha Guard-AG, Genitron Ltd.), equipped with an appropriate unit designed for pumping and measurement of radon in soil gas (Soil gas Unit, Genitron Ltd.). Soil radon is continuously pumped

  20. Radon concentrations in some Egyptian dwellings using LR 115 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon, a well-established risk factor for human lung cancer, is present at low concentrations in most homes. Consequently, many countries have established national guidelines for residential radon concentrations. This survey provides additional information about indoor radon concentrations in Egypt. Indoor radon survey of a total of 15 randomly selected houses in Qena city, Upper Egypt was carried out. LR 115 detectors were exposed for one year, covering all the seasons. The estimated indoor radon levels varied from 19 to 59 Bq m3 with an average of 40 Bq m3. Using the bare and filtered LR 115 detectors, the average equilibrium factor F was assessed as 0.30 indoors. An average annual effective dose of 0.40 mSv has been estimated and was found to be lower than the ICRP-65

  1. A review of experimental animal radon health effects data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abundant epidemiological data from underground miners confirm that radon decay products (progeny) are carcinogenic, although the evidence is less conclusive on the quantitative risks of these exposures, especially for indoor air. The imprecision results principally from differences between exposures in mining and domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between smoking and exposure to radon progeny. Experimental animal studies of radon-induced lung cancer are particularly valuable for understanding the carcinogenicity of human radon exposures in the home and in the workplace. Animals can be exposed to a variety of agents under carefully controlled conditions and then sacrificed for the study of developing lesions or held for their life span for tumor development. The doses to critical cells in the respiratory tract can be determined, and these in turn can be related to doses to critical cells in the respiratory tract of humans exposed to similar aerosols. The study of radon-induced mutations and changes in expression of oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes as well as growth factors and growth factor receptors during tumor progression in animals also provides valuable evidence on the underlying mechanisms of radon carcinogenesis. This evidence, particularly that of the efficiency for oncogenic transformation at low dose rates, is crucial to the determination of the risk of lung cancer from exposure to indoor levels of radon. This review of animal health effects data emphasizes the carcinogenicity of radon exposures in rats; mechanistic data on radon-induced lung tumors in rats are currently sparse and are not reviewed here. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. Atmosphere purification of radon and radon daughter elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L.

    1974-01-01

    A method of removing radon and radon daughter elements from an atmosphere containing these elements by passing the atmosphere through a bed of fluorinating compound whereby the radon and radon daughters are oxidized to their respective fluorides is discussed. These fluorides adhere to the fluorinating compound and are thus removed from the atmosphere which may then be recirculated. A method for recovering radon and separating radon from its daughter elements is also described. (Official Gazette)

  3. Relationship among cancer,indoor radon and geology from Gejiu area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢伟; 王任重; 等

    1996-01-01

    The mortality of lung cancer in Gejiu has reached the peak in the world.The indoor radon levels in Gejiu are measured by SSNTD.The results indicate that a higher indoor radon level widely exists in Gejiu area;the radon level in houses situated in geologic fault zone is 6 times as high as 2km from fault zone;the radon level in soil in faults is 6-8 times as high as 1km from faults;the radon level of the cancer patients' houses is 1.45 times as high as healths'.The relationship between indoor radon level and incidence of lung cancer is given for the firest time.

  4. Environmental radon dosimetry in Indian dwellings and workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of radon and its progeny in the dwellings and environment of workplaces are important because the radiation dose to human population due to inhalation of radon and its progeny contribute more than 50% of the total dose from natural sources and is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Recent experimental and epidemiological studies suggest that inhalation of radon progeny, which are the most important source of irradiation of the human respiratory track in workplace and domestic environment could be a cause of lung cancer. The quantification of individual radon exposure over a long time period is one of the main issues. In the present study, we will report the results of radon monitoring carried out in the environment of workplaces of an oil refinery, LPG bottling plant, thermal power plant and gas power plant, besides the typical and modern Indian dwellings using alpha sensitive L.R.-115 type II solid-state nuclear track detectors in order to quantify the dose to the workers and the inhabitants. For comparison, the radon and its progeny levels were also measured in dwellings far away from the plants. Radon and its progeny levels were found higher in the environment of workplaces and dwellings in the vicinity of the plants. The details of the results obtained will be reported in the full paper. (authors)

  5. Internal Exposure of a Seoul Subway Passenger due to Radon Inhalation: Before and After PSD Installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is the major source of public exposure to natural radiation and is also known to cause lung cancer. Platform screen doors (PSD) were installed primarily for passenger's safety purposes. Radon concentration and aerosol distribution have been changed since PSD installation. In this study, we have assessed the annual effective dose of regular subway passengers, before and after PSD installation, by employing current available data on air concentration of radon in Seoul subways with aerosol size distributions taken into account. ICRP recommends that the reference value for internal dose from radon be between 1.0 and 20.0 mSv. Korean Ministry of Environment enacted the indoor radon regulation, which requires the indoor radon level should not exceed 148 Bq/m3. Radon concentrations in Seoul subways and annual dose estimates meet the requirements

  6. An overview of PNL radon experiments with reference to epidemiological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological effects observed in dogs and rodents after the inhalation of radon and radon daughters have included, primarily, respiratory carcinoma, pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and life-span shortening. Extrapulmonary lesions observed are not considered significant except for certain hematological effects. In this paper we present biological effects data resulting from chronic exposures of hamsters, rats, and beagle dogs. Emphasis is placed on the carcinogenic effects of radon and radon daughters, including the influences of radon-daughter exposure rate, unattachment fraction, and disequilibrium and of concomitant exposure to other pollutants. These data are correlated with results from human epidemiological studies. Plausible values for the radon (radon-daughter) lifetime lung-cancer risk coefficient are provided. 30 refs., 3 tabs

  7. Measurement of concentration and size distribution of radon decay products in homes using air cleaners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By removing particles, air cleaners can also eliminate radon decay products. However, by removing the particles, the open-quotes unattachedclose quotes fraction of the radon progeny is increased leading to a higher dose per unit exposure. Thus, both the concentration and size distributions of the radon decay products are needed to evaluate air cleaners. Three types of room air cleaners, NO-RAD Radon Removal System, Electronic Air Cleaner and PUREFLOW Air Treatment System were tested in a single family home in Arnprior, Ontario (Canada). Semi-continuous measurements of radon gas concentration and radon decay product activity weighted size distribution were performed in the kitchen/dining room under real living conditions. The effects of air cleaners on both the concentration and size distribution of the radon decay products were measured, and their impact on the dose of radiation given to the lung tissue were examined

  8. Radon Measurements in Egypt using passive etched track detectors. A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its progeny may cause serious radiation harm to human health such as lung cancer and other types. Radon measurements based on alpha particles etched track detectors (LR-115, CR-39) are very attractive for assessment of radon exposure. This is due to their high sensitivity, low cost, easy to handle and retain a permanent record of data. Also these detectors can incorporate the effects of seasonal and diurnal fluctuation of radon activity concentrations due to physical, geological and meteorological factors. The present review is based mainly on the topic of passive etched track detectors for the measurements of radon in Egypt in the recent years. Published papers includes the measurements of radon in dwellings, working places, Cairo Metro stations, ancient Pharaonic places and uranium exploration galleries as well as assessment of radon in drinking water

  9. Radon health hazard calls for redevelopment; Radon-Gesundheitsrisiko erfordert Sanierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffrath, G. [Sicherheits-/Umwelt-/Nukleartechnik, TH Darmstadt (Germany); Kraft, G. [Sicherheits-/Umwelt-/Nukleartechnik, TH Darmstadt (Germany)

    1994-11-01

    Radon orginates from alpha decay of radium and occurs is the ground and in mineral construction materials. According to current knowledge, radon is the second most frequent cause of lung cancer after smoking and thus an important environmental health hazard. In about 1.5 to 1.8 per cent of buildings in Germany, radon radiation exceeds the redevelopment recommendation of the commission on radiation protection of 250 Bq/m{sup 3}, with clusters of excessive radiation in the southern Black Forest and Fichtelgebirge because of the geological conditions. In the new federal states, even, the situation is extreme: Three to five per cent of buildings, and in some areas more than twenty per cent, emanate excessive amounts of radon. Redevelopment measures seem indispensable. (orig.) [Deutsch] Radon entsteht beim Alpha-Zerfall von Radium und kommt im Erdreich und in mineralischen Baustoffen vor. Nach heutigen Erkenntnissen ist Radon nach dem Rauchen die zweithaeufigste Ursache fuer Lungenkrebs und damit ein bedeutender Einflussfaktor der Umwelt auf die menschliche Gesundheit. In etwa 1,5 bis 1,8 Prozent der Gebaeude in Deutschland wird der Sanierungsrichtwert der Strahlenschutzkommission von 250 Bq/m{sup 3} ueberschritten, wobei aufgrund der geologischen Verhaeltnisse Schwerpunkte im Suedschwarzwald und im Fichtelgebirge liegen. Eine Extremsituation gibt es in den neuen Bundeslaendern, wo 3 bis 5% der Haeuser, in begrenzten Gebieten mehr als 20% der Gebaeude zu hohe Radonkonzentrationen aufweisen. Sanierungsmassnahmen erscheinen unumgaenglich. (orig.)

  10. Study on the risk of late damage in humans after incorporation of the short-lived alpha emitter Ra-224; Studie zum Risiko von Spaetschaeden beim Menschen nach Inkorporation des kurzlebigen {alpha}-Strahlers Radium-224

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, R.R.; Nekolla, E.A.; Kellerer, A.M. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Strahlenbiologisches Inst.; Goessner, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie

    2003-07-01

    An epidemiological study has been carried out at the GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health - between 1948 and 1975, on 1460 ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. The aim of the study was to ascertain the late health effects suffered by these patients who had received repeated intravenous injections of the short lived {alpha}-emitter {sup 224}Ra. These patients have been followed together with a control group of 1323 ankylosing spondylitis patients not treated with radioactive drugs and/or X-rays. Causes of death have been ascertained for 842 exposed patients and 861 controls by the end of 2002. In the exposed group there has been a total of 219 malignant diseases and 206 cases among the controls. In particular, we observed 15 cases of leukaemia in the exposure group and 8 cases of leukaemia in the control group. Further subclassification of the leukaemias demonstrated a high increase of myeloid leukaemia in the exposure group (9 cases obs. vs. 2.5 cases exp.), and out of these especially the acute myeloid leukaemias (6 cases observed vs. 1.6 expected), whereas in the control group the observed cases are within the expected range (3 myeloid leukaemias vs. 2.6 cases). Out of these 6 cases of myeloid leukaemia, 3 cases have been observed at doses comparable to those of the currently applied {sup 224}Ra treatment with the preparation SpondylAT {sup registered}, in one case the {sup 224}Ra-dose was the 0.6fold, in another case 1.6fold, whereas in one case the total dose could not be verified exactly. The enhanced leukaemia incidence in our exposed group is in line with results from animal experiments in mice having been injected with bone seeking {alpha}-emitters given at low dose rates. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen einer epidemiologischen Studie werden im GSF-Forschungszentrum 1460 Bechterew-Patienten beobachtet, die in den Jahren 1948 bis 1975 zur Behandlung ihrer Krankheit wiederholte intravenoese Injektionen von {sup 224}Ra erhalten haben. Daneben

  11. Cornerstones of the Austrian radon risk communication strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On behalf of the Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management (BMLFUW), the National Radon Centre of Austria developed the National Radon Risk Communication Strategy. The superior goal is the reduction of the radon exposure of Austrian citizens as well as the reduction of radon-related lung cancer deaths. Austria, like many other countries, follows the approach to raise awareness and to inform the public to achieve this goal. The presented strategy deals with the question of how radon protection issues can be communicated to the public, existing fears can be reduced and affected people can be motivated to take action (perform a radon test, if necessary, mitigate or install preventive measures in new buildings). The cornerstones of the National Radon Risk Communication Strategy can be summarized as follows: - Definition of communication goals - Identification and categorization of target groups - Development of specific key messages for each of the target groups - Determination of communication channels and assessment of their efficiency - Integration of the radon issue in education and training - Cooperation with relevant organizations and platforms. The communication objectives, target groups and communication paths (and their evaluation) will be discussed during the presentation in detail.

  12. Radon exhalation rates from some building construction materials using SSNTDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon appears mainly by diffusion processes from the point of origin following α- decay of 226Ra in underground soil and building materials used. in the construction of floors, walls, and ceilings. In dwellings main source of radon are soil or rock underneath, building materials and portable water supplies. The major release of radon indoors is from building construction materials used. The radon measurements on the ground can give a clue about the hidden uranium. The exposure of population to high concentrations of radon and its daughters for a long period leads to pathological effects like the respiratory functional changes and the occurrence of lung cancer. In the present investigations radon exhalation rates from some soil and other building materials like fly ash, cement and sand collected from Panchkula, Ambala, Yamunanagar, Kurukshetra, Karnal and Panipat districts of Haryana have been estimated. For the measurement of radon concentration in these samples we used α-sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors. The mass and the surface exhalation rates of radon emanated from these samples have also been calculated. The aim of study is the possible health risk assessment due to emission of radiation from building construction materials. (author)

  13. Environmental radon monitoring in Khartoum dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is released into the surrounding environment. Existence of this gas indoors ( house and dwelling ) mainly depends on its source in the building materials, the soil beneath the buildings and the ventilation of the rooms. In this study the technique of ground activated charcoal and gamma spectrometry system are used for Radon measurement. This technique has been calibrated and optimized. The main reason for radon determination in house comes from the fact that Radon and its daughters are directly responsible of lung cancer and some kidney diseases. The measurements, in this study, have been performed for Khartoum indoors. 644 rooms have been measured. These rooms were sorted out into groups according to their building material as well as the ventilation of each room. The measurements covered the whole year ( the three main seasons ) to see the variation of Radon level, since its emanation is affected by the temperature. Also monthly outdoor measurements have been performed in different locations in Khartoum. On the basis of the results obtained, the radiation dose received by the public due to the inhalation of this gas has been calculated. The average annual effective dose was found to be 1.2 m Sv. (author). 33 refs., 17 tabs., 24 figs

  14. Risks from Radon: Reconciling Miner and Residential Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Douglas B.; Harley, Naomi H.

    2008-08-01

    Everyone is exposed to radon, an inert radioactive gas that occurs naturally and is present everywhere in the atmosphere. The annual dose from radon and its (short-lived) decay products is typically about one-half of the dose received by members of the public from all natural sources of ionizing radiation. Data on exposures and consequent effects have recently been reviewed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Studies of underground miners provides a well-established basis for estimating risks from occupational exposures to radon and for studying factors that may affect the dose response relationship such as the reduction of risk (coefficients) with increasing time since exposure. Miners' studies previously formed the basis for estimating risks to people exposed to radon at home, with downward extrapolation from exposures in mines to residential levels of radon. Presently, the risk estimates from residential studies are adequate to estimate radon risks in homes. Although there are major uncertainties in extrapolating the risks of exposure to radon from the miner studies to assessing risks in the home, there is remarkably good agreement between the average of risk factors derived from miner studies and those from pooled residential case-control studies. There are now over 20 analytical studies of residential radon and lung cancer. These studies typically assess the relative risk from exposure to radon based on estimates of residential exposure over a period of 25 to 30 years prior to diagnosis of lung cancer. Recent pooled analyses of residential case-control studies support a small but detectable lung cancer risk from residential exposure, and this risk increases with increasing concentrations. The excess relative risk of lung cancer from long-term residential exposure is about the same for both smokers and non-smokers; however, because the

  15. A study of indoor radon levels and radon effective dose in dwellings of some cities of Gezira State in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzain Abd-Elmoniem Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to natural sources of radiation, especially 222Rn and its short-lived daughter products has become an important issue throughout the world because sustained exposure of humans to indoor radon may cause lung cancer. The indoor radon concentration level and radon effective dose rate were carried out in the dwellings of Medani, El Hosh, Elmanagil, Haj Abd Allah, and Wad Almahi cities, Gezira State - Central Sudan, in 393 measurements, using passive integrated solid-state nuclear track devices containing allyl diglycol carbonate plastic detectors. The radon concentration in the corresponding dwellings was found to vary from (57 ± 8 Bq/m3 in Medani to 41 ± 9 Bq/m3 in Wad Almahi, with an average of 49 ± 10 Bq/m3. Assuming an indoor occupancy factor of 0.8 and 0.4 for the equilibrium factor of radon indoors, we found that the annual effective dose rate from 222Rn in the studied dwellings ranges from 1.05 to 1.43 mSv per year and the relative lung cancer risk for radon exposure was 1.044%. In this research, we also correlated the relationship of radon concentration and building age. From our study, it is clear that the annual effective dose rate is larger than the “normal” background level as quoted by UNSCEAR, lower than the recommended action level of ICRP, and less than the maximum permissible dose defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  16. Effective dose from outdoor radon in children in dependence on their age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since radon concentration in outdoor air tends to decrease with increasing distance from the ground, tall people will inhale less radon than small people. Conversely, this implies that the radon-related radiation burden will be higher in children than in adults. This effect is enhanced by the fact that children's lung tissue is more sensitive to radiation damage. The aim of this paper is to quantify the radiation burden in children in the outdoor environment. (orig.)

  17. Conference on provisions against radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Proceedings contain 20 contributions dealing with diverse aspects of the radon problem. Information is presented on the occurrence of radon on the territory of Czechoslovakia, and on natural radioactivity of rocks. The majority of contributions concentrate on ways of radon measurement, on determination of the radon content of building materials and on radon propagation through buildings. Various technologies for removing radon from homes and for preventing radon leaks are described and assessed. The effect of radon on human health is also dealt with. (M.D.). 16 tabs., 34 figs., 39 refs

  18. Radon-Instrumentation; Radon-Instrumentacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno y Moreno, A. [Departamento de Apoyo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 4 Sur 104, Centro Historico 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The presentation of the active and passive methods for radon, their identification and measure, instrumentation and characteristics are the objectives of this work. Active detectors: Active Alpha Cam Continuous Air Monitor, Model 758 of Victoreen, Model CMR-510 Continuous Radon Monitor of the Signature Femto-Tech. Passive detectors: SSNTD track detectors in solids Measurement Using Charcoal Canisters, disk of activated coal deposited in a metallic box Electrets Methodology. (Author)

  19. Radon in Caves.

    OpenAIRE

    Cigna Arrigo A.

    2005-01-01

    The physical characteristics of radon are reported as well as its sources,the transport in rock and its behaviour in caves. Then,the instruments,both active and passive, used for the measurement of radon concentration are discussed by taking into accounttheir respective advantages and disadvantages for the use in the cave environment. Since in many countries radon is the objectof regulations that were adopted for radiation protection purposes, this aspect is examined and the recommendations i...

  20. Radon diffusion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, P; Dimbylow, P J

    1985-10-01

    A mathematical model has been developed that examines the ingress of radon into houses, through a vertical crack in an otherwise impervious concrete floor. Initially, the model considered the diffusive flow of radon from its soil source and this simulation has highlighted the dependency of the flux of radon into the house on the magnitude of various parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of radon in soil. A preliminary investigation of the modelling of pressure-driven flow into a building is presented, and the potential of this type of analysis is discussed. PMID:4081719

  1. YAPILARDA RADON FENOMENY

    OpenAIRE

    OZAN, Sadik Sezgin; EKİNCİ, Cevdet Emin

    2011-01-01

    Bu çaly?mada, yapylarda Radon konusu irdelenmi?tir. Radon, günlük hayatta sürekli maruz kaldy?ymyz radyasyonun yakla?yk %50'sini olu?turan ve topraktaki Uranyum'un bozunma zincirinin bir halkasy olan renksiz, kokusuz ve duyu organlaryyla algylanamayan radyoaktif bir gazdyr. Kayaçlardaki Uranyumun bozunmasy sonucu ortaya çykan Radon gazy, difüzyon yoluyla topra?a, oradan da atmosfere veya ortama yayylmaktadyr. Gazyn birikmesiyle, Radon yo?unlu?u kapaly mekânlarda veya iyi havalandyrylmayan yer...

  2. Radon doses in mines and homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risks of exposure to radon and its decay products under modern mining conditions and also in the home are discussed. A brief review of the background epidemiology is given. The lung tissues most at risk are the bronchial epithelium and particularly the basal stem cells. Doses to bronchial basal cells and alveoli from exposure to 1 Working Level Month (WLM) radon-222 daughters in a uranium mine atmosphere are calculated. The risk of lung cancer in relation to dose is then discussed. An effective dose equivalent of 5-8 mSv/WLM exposure for domestic exposure relative to 10 mSv/WLM in uranium mines is indicated. (U.K.)

  3. Development of a data base on radon in US homes and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This research led to the development of the compilation of data on radon in homes which is included in this document. This research also contributed to the development of two papers analyzing the results. These are a case control study test and tests of the liner no-threshold theory for lung cancer induced by exposure to radon in residential buildings.

  4. Development of a data base on radon in US homes and applications. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1991-12-31

    This research led to the development of the compilation of data on radon in homes which is included in this document. This research also contributed to the development of two papers analyzing the results. These are a case control study test and tests of the liner no-threshold theory for lung cancer induced by exposure to radon in residential buildings.

  5. Assessment of risks associated to ionizing radiations: lung cancers after domestic radon exposure and thyroid cancers after accidental exposure to radioactive iodines; Evaluation des risques associes aux rayonnements ionisants: cancers du poumon apres exposition domestique au radon et cancers de la thyroide apres exposition accidentelle aux iodes radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catelinois, O

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this work is to develop a critical analysis of quantitative risk assessment in the field of ionizing radiation and to provide new estimates of attributable risks for particular situations of environmental exposure to ionizing radiation. This work is based on knowledge about dose-response relationships and ionizing radiation exposure of the general population. The work focuses on two different situations that both present an important interest for public health: lung cancer associated with domestic radon exposures (natural situation) and thyroid cancer associated with the Chernobyl accident fallout (accidental situation). The assessment of lung cancer risk associated with domestic radon exposure considers 10 dose-response relationships resulting from miner cohorts and case-control studies in the general population. A critical review of available data on smoking habits has been performed and allowed to consider the interactions between radon and tobacco. The exposure data come from measurements campaigns carried out since the beginning of the 1980 by the Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety and the Health General Directory in France. The French lung cancer mortality data are provided by the I.N.S.E.R.M.. Estimates of the number of attributable cancers are carried out for the whole country, stratified by 8 large regions (Z.E.A.T.) and by 96 departments for the year 1999 allowing to perform a sensibility analysis according to the geographical level of calculation. Uncertainties associated to risk coefficients and exposures have been quantified and it's impact on risk estimates is calculated. The estimated number of deaths attributable to domestic radon exposure ranges from 543 (90% uncertainty interval (U.I.): 75-1,097) to 3,108 (90% U.I.: 2,996-3,221). The corresponding risk fractions range from 2.2% (90% U.I.: 0.3%-4.4%) to 12.4% (90% U.I.: 11.9%-12.8%). The assessment of thyroid cancer risk in the most exposed area of France due to

  6. Development of calibration facility for radon and its progenies at NIM (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J C; Zheng, P H; Yang, Z J; Liu, H R; Zhang, M; Li, Z S; Zhang, L; Guo, Q J

    2015-11-01

    Accurate measurement of radon and its progenies is the basis to control the radon dose and reduce the risk of lung cancer caused. The precise calibration of measuring instrument is an important part of the quality control of measurements of the concentration of radon and radon progenies. To establish Chinese national standards and realise reliable calibrations of measuring instrument for radon and its progenies, a radon chamber with regulation capability of environmental parameters, aerosol and radon concentrations was designed and constructed at National Institute of Metrology (NIM). The chamber has a total volume of ∼20 m(3) including an exposure volume of 12.44 m(3). The radon concentration can be controlled from 12 Bq m(-3) to the maximum of 232 kBq m(-3). The regulation range of temperature, relative humidity and aerosol are 0.66 -44.39°C, 16.4 -95 %RH and 10(2) -10(6) cm(-3), respectively. The main advantages of the NIM radon chamber with respect to maintaining a stable concentration and equilibrium factor of radon progenies in a wide range through automatic regulation and control of radon and aerosol are described.

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Pre and Post Radon Inhalation on Carbon Tetrachloride-induced Oxidative Damage in Mouse Organs

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiyama, Yuichi; Kataoka, Takahiro; Teraoka, Junichi; Sakoda, Akihiro; Ishimori, Yuu; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2012-01-01

    Radon inhalation activates antioxidative functions in some organs of mice. We examined the prevention effects of pre radon inhalation and the alleviation effects of post radon inhalation on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced oxidative damage in the brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidney of mice. In addition, we compared the effect of pre and post radon inhalation on oxidative damage. Mice inhaled radon at a concentration of 18000Bq/m3 for 6hrs before or after CCl4 administration. As a result,...

  8. Quantum Estimates of Alpha Emitter Life Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Santoso

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum estimates of several alpha radioactive life time have been made using the probability of quantum tunneling through the nuclear potential barrier. It is assumed that for a given nucleus with mass number A and isotopic number Z, there exists an alpha particle moving freely back and forth in the nucleus with mass and isotopic numbers A -4 and Z-2. If the probability of penetrating the nuclear potential barrier is Τ, then after N times (N=1/Τ hitting the barrier an alpha particle is emitted. To obtain the elapsed time for emitting an alpha particle requires N times τ0, where τ0 is the time travel for alpha across the nuclear diameter, which is dependent on alpha energy. It is assumed here that this kinetic energy is the same as the emitted energy. The emitting alpha kinetic energies here are calculated by the difference of the masses of the parent and daughter nuclei and the alpha particles. They are in closed agreement with the experimental observations. While the alpha radioactive life time are not the same order of magnitudes but give the same linearity on the logarithmic scale as function of the inverse square root of energy.

  9. Effects of internally deposited alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study seeks to identify and quantify the human health effects of occupational exposures to radium, use the health effects data from the radium study to predict responses to other alpha-emitting and/or bone-seeking radionuclides at occupational exposure levels and above, and predict the effects of these radionuclides, specifically environmental radium and its daughters, at nonoccupational exposure levels. 14 refs

  10. Radon and its measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work reviews the topics concerning the problem of the indoor radon and its measurement. The initial stage deals with the general features of radon, from the historical remarks about its discovery to the formation mechanisms in the soil, then passing to describe the transport processes that lead the radon to enter into the buildings. The mean radon concentration distribution among the Italian regions is reported and compared with the situation in the other countries of the world. A particular importance is given to present the national law concerning the radioprotection from the natural sources of ionizing radiations; a paragraph is completely devoted to this argument and to discuss the differences between the Italian approach and the regulations applied in the Test of Europe for both workplaces and dwellings. Chapter 3 describes the different detectors and methods to measure the radon and its short mean live decay products concentrations, together with the operative procedures and guides provided by the Italian law and by the international bodies. As an example of typical radon passive measurement device. the new ENEA detector developed at the Institute of Radioprotection is presented and discussed. Appendix 1 is entirely devoted to discuss the main remedial actions for decreasing the radon indoor concentration both for old and new buildings; appendix 2 reports the main quantities related to radon and radioprotection

  11. LARGE BUILDING RADON MANUAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes information on how bilding systems -- especially the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system -- inclurence radon entry into large buildings and can be used to mitigate radon problems. It addresses the fundamentals of large building HVAC syst...

  12. Radon in indoor environments - a cost-benefit analysis of adoption of the new recommendations of WHO for radon limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report's goal is to investigate the consequences of the authorities to adopt the new WHO recommended limit and guideline for radon in homes of 100 Bq/m3. The report's purpose is to provide a basis for decision if the radon and radon guideline limit should be lowered. 400,000 houses and 230,000 apartments in Sweden have a radon concentration of 100-200 Bq/m3, and thus must be decontaminated of radon if the guideline value would be raised. This corresponds to about 1.3 million residents. The cost of such a radon mitigation is estimated at 14-19 billion SEK (2-3 billion USD). The increase in operating costs is estimated at 500 million SEK per year. Remediation measures are not economically reasonable. For the cost to be reasonable, 65-85 lung cancer cases should be prevented per year. Reduction in lung cancer cases, with a reduction in guideline value is estimated at 40 cases. Remediation costs for individual buildings with blue concrete can be very high. Close to 5000 people each year move into newly built homes with radon levels higher than 100 Bq/m3 under the 2010 construction forecast. The cost of mitigation measures necessary to bring down radon below 100 Bq/m3 for new constructions is estimated at 130 million SEK for 2010. These measures are not economically reasonable. For the cost to be reasonable 0.45 lung cancer cases should be prevented per year. The decrease in the number of lung cancers, with a reduction in the limit is estimated at 0.15 cases or new buildings. The Radon Coordinating Group recommends retaining the current target and limit for radon in dwellings of 200 Bq/m3. It is not economically reasonable to implement a tightening of the guide and limit values. The benchmark and the limit for radon should be remain unaltered. To have different guidelines and limits for old and new dwellings will create confusion in the industry and can lead to decreased respect for the limits. It is unclear whether there are ways to get down radon concentrations

  13. Indoor radon mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action limit for indoor radon concentration in Finnish dwellings is 400 Bq/m3 which is exceeded in 50.000 dwellings. In these dwellings indoor radon mitigation is needed. The most important reason for high concentration is the soil air with high radon concentrations that flows into living spaces through openings and gaps in the building foundation. Slab on ground is the most prevalent type of foundation in Finnish single family houses. Without preventive measures, this type of foundation promotes the flow of radon-bearing soil air into living spaces. In the second popular foundation type, semi-basement houses, the flow of soil air through the walls in contact with soil still increases radon leakages. The key aim of indoor radon mitigation is to prevent or decrease the harmful flows of radon-bearing soil air into dwellings. This guide gives the basic information on Finnish regulations on indoor radon, leakage routes, effect of air exchange and under-pressure as well as pre-mitigation studies of houses. The results on the efficiency of various mitigation methods are based on a questionnaire study in 400 Finnish dwellings and on-site studies in numerous houses. In the case of sub slab suction, the Finnish guide published by the Ministry of Environment has also been utilized. Best mitigation efficiency has been achieved using sub slab suction and radon well. Typical indoor radon reduction factors for both methods are 70 - 90%, and the best results are above 95%. Sub slab suction can be implemented through both floor slab and foundation wall. An exhaust fan coupled to suction pit and exhaust piping creates underpressure and ventilation beneath the slab. In case of a radon well an exhaust fan sucks air from the soil and ventilates the soil air volume through a well construction placed outside the house. The depth of a radon well is 4 - 5 metres. A single radon well can reduce radon concentration in many dwellings at the distance up to 20 - 30 metres. Mitigation work

  14. Indoor radon mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action limit for indoor radon concentration in Finnish dwellings is 400 Bq/m3 which is exceeded in 50.000 dwellings. In these dwellings indoor radon mitigation is needed. The most important reason for high concentration is the soil air with high radon concentrations that flows into living spaces through openings and gaps in the building foundation. Slab on-ground is the most prevalent type of foundation in Finnish single family houses. Without preventive measures, this type of foundation promotes the flow of radon-bearing soil air into living spaces. In the second popular foundation type, hill-side houses, the flow of soil air through the walls backing soil still increases radon leakages. The key aim of indoor radon mitigation is to prevent or decrease the harmful flows of radon-bearing soil air into dwellings. This guide gives the basic information on Finnish regulations on indoor radon, leakage routes, effect of air exchange and underpressure as well as pre-mitigation studies of houses. The results on the efficiency of various mitigation methods are based on a questionnaire study in 400 Finnish dwellings and on-site studies in numerous houses. In the case of sub-slab-suction the Finnish guide published by the Ministry of Environment has also been utilized. Best mitigation efficiency has been achieved using sub-slab-suction and radon well. Typical reduction factors for both methods are 70-90%, and the best results are above 95%. Sub-slab-suction can be implemented through both floor slab and foundation wall. An exhaust fan coupled to suction pit and exhaust piping creates underpressure and ventilation beneath the slab. In case of a radon well an exhaust fan sucks air from the soil and ventilates the soil air volume through a well construction placed outside the house. The depth of a radon well is 3-5 metres. A single radon well can reduce radon concentration in many dwellings at the distance up to 20-30 metres. Mitigation work based on ventilation aims at

  15. Some aspects of radon and its daughter-products in man and his environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major but short-lived postprandial increase in the exhalation rate of radon by persons containing no radium was observed. The concentrations of radon and its short-lived daughter-products in houses was unusually high (> 5 to 10 pCi l-1, > 185 to 370 Bq m-3) in some houses with unpaved crawl spaces, and with concrete basements. External counting of radon daughter-products in the residents of one of the radon-contaminated houses indicated that there may be interference with the assay of plutonium in the lungs of persons who live in those houses

  16. Radon concentration values in the field: Correlation with underlying geology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, S.A

    1999-06-01

    In epidemiological and ecological studies of radon as a health hazard in a given area or region, it is becoming widely recognized that it is necessary to establish the significance of correlations, if any, between the incidence of diseases (e.g. lung cancer or leukaemias) and local radon concentration values. Measurements of soil-radon concentration levels in the field, especially under geostatistically controlled conditions, have underscored the highly erratic nature of radon emission on a scale often of only a few metres. It would appear that, while underlying geology does determine the longer scale of variation in soil-radon, many localized parameters, e.g. fissures, moisture content, thickness of overburden, etc., make it imperative that detailed in-situ measurements of radon emission are made before a reliable correlation can be established between, say, leukaemia clusters and radon concentration levels. A broad survey of measurement methods and reported results, examined in the above context, is presented and conclusions drawn in this paper.

  17. Daily variations of indoor air-ion and radon concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarz, P M; Filipović, D M; Marinković, B P

    2009-11-01

    Air-ions and radon are two atmospheric trace constituents which have two opposite effects on human health: the ions are beneficial, and radon gas is potentially lethal as it increases the risk of lung cancer. In the lower troposphere, radon is the most important generator of the air-ions. Ionization by cosmic rays and radioactive minerals is almost constant in daily cycles, and variation of air-ion concentrations is attributed to changes of the radon activity. Air-ion and radon concentrations in outdoor and indoor space and their vertical gradients in residential buildings were measured. Gerdien type air-ion detector "CDI-06" made in our laboratory and radon monitor "RAD7" were utilized for these measurements. Correlation coefficient between positive air-ion and Rn indoor concentrations was approximately 0.7. Outdoor and indoor peak values were simultaneous while vertical gradient of concentrations in indoor measurements was evident. The indoor experiments showed that positive air-ion concentration could be an alternative method of radon activity concentration evaluation. PMID:19700332

  18. Where's the radon? The geographic information system in Washington State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As Washington's lead agency for radon issues, the Department of Health (DOH) is developing the analytical basis for establishing a public health policy regarding radon. The Geographic Information System (GIS) is a fundamental step in this analytical process to develop a map of the potential for indoor radon occurrence. The GIS analysis will take into account geology, geography, topography, soil permeability, indoor test results, population density and distribution, and housing. In addition, DOH is working to aid policy makers and residents by comparing residential exposures to the lowest exposure range at which miners evidenced excess lung cancers. This approach is a departure from the commonly used risk assessments that extrapolate from high to low exposure, and will help determine how many Washington residents are at risk. In conclusion there is an examination of Washington's radon prescriptive construction standards for residences. (author)

  19. Air radon concentration decrease in a waste water treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    222Rn is a naturally occurring gas created from the decay of 226Ra. The long-term health risk of breathing radon is lung cancer. One particular place where indoor radon concentrations can exceed national guidelines is in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) where treatment processes may contribute to ambient airborne concentrations. The aim of this paper was to study the radon concentration decrease after the application of corrective measures in a Spanish WWTP. According to first measures, air radon concentration exceeded International Commission Radiological Protection (ICRP) normative (recommends intervention between 400 and 1000 Bq m-3). Therefore, the WWTP improved mechanical forced ventilation to lower occupational exposure. This measure allowed to increase the administrative controls, since the limitation of workers access to the plant changed from 2hd-1 (considering a maximum permissible dose of 20 mSv y-1 averaged over 5 y) to 7 h d-1 (authors)

  20. Another bogus radiation scare - radon in homes. Letter to the editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses Health Canada's research that radon in homes is causing unnecessary lung cancer deaths. Health Canada has carried out a cross-Canada survey of radon-concentrations in homes (Health Canada 2012). The aims of their study were to obtain an estimate of the proportion of the Canadian population living in homes, with radon gas levels above the guideline of 200 Bq/m to identify new areas of this health risk. Their results indicate that 6.9% of Canadians are in 3 such homes (similar to their 1970 results). The authors state that their results can be used by governments and health professionals to help prioritize radon outreach and education efforts, and testing and remediation. Their next step is to correlate radon level and home characteristics, and also develop radon mapping methods. Several sentences in the introduction link radon with lung cancer, based on early studies of uranium miners and later studies in homes. It is estimated that about 10% of all lung cancers worldwide are related to radon exposure.

  1. Radon levels in Cyprus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon levels in atmospheric and aquatic systems in Cyprus have recently been measured using the radon monitor Alpha Guard. Indoor and outdoor radon levels were obtained in situ, whereas analysis of radon concentrations in water was performed using tap and ground water samples collected from several areas of the island. The average value for outdoor and indoor radon concentration is 11±10 and 7±6 Bq m-3, respectively, and for tap and ground water 0.4 Bq l-1 and 1.4 Bq l-1, respectively. From these data the annual dose equivalent of airborne radon to the Cypriot population is about 0.19 mSv y-1, which is quite low compared to the total dose equivalent of natural and man-made ionising radiation in Cyprus. Radon levels in aquatic systems are relatively low due to an exhaustive utilisation of ground water resources and also to the increased input of desalinated sea water in the water distribution network and eventually into the ground water reservoirs

  2. [sup 210] Po as a long-term integrating radon indicator in the indoor environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to radon (Rn-222) decay products in the indoor environment is suspected of being a significant lung cancer agent in many countries. But quantification of the contemporary lung cancer risk (i.e. probability) on an individual basis is not an easy task. Only past exposures are relevant and assessing individual exposures in retrospect is associated with large uncertainties, if possible at all. One way to extend the validity of contemporary measurements to past decades is to measure long-lived decay products of radon, the long-lived radon daughters. After our laboratory had exemplified the correlation between implanted Po-210 and the estimated radon exposures in six different dwellings, the US Department of Energy and the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute granted funds for a one-year study, [sup 210]Po as a Long-Term Integrating Radon Indicator in the Indoor Environment.'' In this report the work performed under these two contracts is reported.

  3. Methods of radon measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forkapić S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several important international scientific organizations have designated radon as a carcinogenic and serious health problem. As a chemically inert gas, it is easily released from soil, building materials, and water, to emanate to the atmosphere. Since 1992, Laboratory for Nuclear Physics of the Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences in Novi Sad has been involved in measurements of radon concentration in air, using several different techniques. Last year, systematic radon measurements in drinking waters began, too. The work presented here gives a survey and discussion of the results of the both series of measurements.

  4. Intercomparison of passive radon dosimeters developed by NIRS (Japan) and SSI (Sweden)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) are widely applied for the assessment of mean radon concentration over long periods in human environment, because of their simple, reliable specifications. In Japan, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) developed the passive radon-thoron discriminative dosimeter for the nationwide indoor radon and thoron survey project since 1992. The dosimeter contains two polycarbonate disks as SSNTD, which is ready for the low level indoor radon concentration (-3). In Sweden, Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (Statens straalskyddsinstitut, SSI) developed the passive radon dosimeter for the nationwide survey, which showed the Swedish indoor radon level to be 100 Bq m-3 in 1982. As well, the SSI passive radon dosimeter is adopted for the Swedish epidemiological (case control) study on residential radon and lung cancer in 1993. To compare technical features of above two types of passive radon dosimeters, intercomparison was performed at 24 Swedish houses in Stockholm. Two types of dosimeters were placed side by side in both living room and bed room from March to May (about 90 days). Gradient of the linear regression may reflect systematic difference between radon standards in Japan and Sweden. Intercept might be caused by the background uncertainty in either or both dosimeters. This is a first trial for the future cooperative studies between NIRS and SSI. (J.P.N.)

  5. Description of the behavior of an aquifer by using continuous radon monitoring in a thermal spa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, Carlos; Rábago, Daniel; Fuente, Ismael; Celaya, Santiago; Quindós, Luis Santiago

    2016-02-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) levels in air and water have been analyzed continuously for almost a year in Las Caldas de Besaya thermal spa, north Spain. Radon is a naturally occurring noble gas from the decay of radium ((226)Ra) both constituents of radioactive uranium 238 series. It has been recognized as a lung carcinogen by the World Health Organization (WHO) and International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Furthermore the Royal Decree R.D 1439/2010 of November, 2010 establishes the obligation to study occupational activities where workers and, where appropriate, members of the public are exposed to inhalation of radon in workplaces such as spas. Together with radon measures several physico-chemical parameters were obtained such as pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity and air and water temperature. The devices used for the study of the temporal evolution of radon concentration have been the RTM 2100, the Radon Scout and gamma spectrometry was complementarily used to determine the transfer factor of the silicone tubes in the experimental device. Radon concentrations obtained in water and air of the spa are high, with an average of 660 Bq/l and 2900 Bq/m(3) respectively, where water is the main source of radon in the air. Radiation dose for workers and public was estimated from these levels of radon. The data showed that the thermal processes can control the behavior of radon which can be also influenced by various physical and chemical parameters such as pH and redox potential.

  6. Radon in Dwellings in the Republic of Kalmykia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakerblom, Gustav (Aakerblom och Aakerblom HP, Skaerholmen (Sweden)); German, Olga; Soederman, Ann-Louise (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)); Stamat, Ivan; Venkov, Vladimir (Research Inst. of Radiation Hygiene, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation))

    2009-02-15

    The National Radon Survey in the Republic of Kalmykia, Russian Federation during 2006-2007 was carried out in a cooperation project between the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) and the Russian Institute of Radiation Hygiene (RIRH). In August 2006 SSI, RIRH, federal and local authorities carried out a field study in Kalmykia when radon daughter measurements (equilibrium equivalent radon concentrations in the air) and gamma radiation measurements were made in 103 buildings. Gamma spectrometry measurements were made at several sites. During the visit the cooperating parties devoted some time to the education of local authorities on radon related issues. During three months in the winter season 2006-2007, long term radon trace measurements were made in 525 randomly chosen dwellings in the Republic of Kalmykia. The radon gas activity varied between 3 and 973 Bq/m3, with a mean value of 122 Bq/m3. In 19 of a total of 835 measurement points, the radon activity exceeded the maximum permitted value in Russia of 200 Bq/m3 of EERC. The year-round radon trace measurement were made in 20 houses in Elista, the capital of the Republic of Kalmykia, for comparison with the three-month measurements. The year-round measurements showed some higher values for the radon activity, and a correction factor of 0.85 was applied. Using data on the number of people living in detached houses and apartments, and applying the radon activities measured, the number of new lung cancer cases caused by radon was calculated to be 20 to 40 of the 100 new cases reported annually. The methods of construction of the dwellings in Kalmykia is greatly influenced by the history and culture. Most of them were built after World War II and there are only a few that are newly built because of the poor economic situation and the low population growth rate in the Republic. Most people live in detached houses, one-storied with 3-5 rooms, built directly on the ground or on coquina blocks or on a cast

  7. ROE Radon Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The polygon dataset represents predicted indoor radon screening levels in counties across the United States. These data were provided by EPA’s Office of Radiation...

  8. Radon in residences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses the geographic variation in the presence of radon at relatively high levels. Its focus is the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania but it considers the incidence of residential radon in adjoining counties in contiguous states, and by state throughout the nation. Cartographic analysis provides a robust assessment of the broad impact of physiography, the local effects of housing and lifestyle, and the quality of the best available spatial data. By promoting a fuller understanding of the pattern and magnitude of the risk, radon maps constitute a basis for a more effective and efficient prophylaxis. Further, county-unit maps of age-adjusted mortality rates for successive decades demonstrate inconsistent and puzzling linkages between the geographics of radon and cancer

  9. Radon i danske lejeboliger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn; Skytte Clausen, Louise

    I denne undersøgelse kortlægges radonindholdet i indeluften og det undersøges, hvordan indholdet af radon i indeluften er fordelt og spredes i en ejendom, og om det er muligt at pege på en bygningsdel eller en bygningskomponent som en spredningsvej for radon i boliger. Boligerne er lejeboliger og...... ligger i etageejendomme, kæde- og rækkehuse tilhørende bygningstyper opført fra 1850 og frem. De udvalgte ejendomme ligger i områder af landet, hvor der ved tidligere undersøgelser har vist sig at være en stor andel af huse med et højt indhold af radon i indeluften. Koncentrationen af radon er målt over...

  10. Indoor Radon Measurement in Van

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, E.; Osmanlioglu, A. E.; Dogan, I.; Celebi, N.

    2007-04-01

    In this study, indoor radon concentrations obtained from the radon surveys conducted in the Van. Radon monitoring was performed by applying a passive, time-integrating measuring technique. For this purpose, CR-39 nuclear track detectors were installed in dwellings for 2 months. After the monitoring period, detectors were collected. In order to make the alpha tracks visible, chemical etching was applied to the exposed detectors. Nuclear track numbers and the corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. Annual effective dose equivalents and the risk probabilities caused by indoor radon inhalation were calculated, and the found results compared with the indoor radon concentrations' data measured in different provinces of Turkey.

  11. A Cohort Study on Risk Factors of Lung Cancer in Yunnan Tin Miners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong JIANG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Smoking is a major cause of lung cancer. Studies of lung cancer among miners have shown that occupational exposure also played an important role. The aim of this study is to investigate radon, cigarette use and other risk factors of lung cancer in Yunnan tin miners and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and control of occupational lung cancer. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted among Yunnan tin miners, the associations between potential risk factors for lung cancer were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression model. Effects of age at first radon exposure and radon exposure rate on lung cancer risk were analyzed. The relationship between cumulative working level month and lung cancer was analyzed according to smoking status. The joint effect of tobacco use and cumulative radon exposure was analyzed based on additive and multiplicative models. Results Increased risk of lung cancer was associated with age at enrollment, tobacco use, prior bronchitis, and cumulative arsenic and radon exposure, while higher education level was associated with decreased lung cancer risk. An inverse effect of radon exposure rate was observed. There was no significant association between lung cancer risk and first radon exposure age. There was a significant additive interaction between tobacco use and radon exposure on lung cancer risk. Conclusion Several risk factors may contribute to the high incidence of lung cancer in Yunnan tin miners. Further studies are warranted to evaluate joint effect of different risk factors.

  12. Surveys of radon levels in homes in the United States: A test of the linear-no-threshold dose-response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Pittsburgh Radon Project for large scale measurements of radon concentrations in homes is described. Its principal research is to test the linear-no threshold dose-response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis by determining average radon levels in the 25 U.S. counties (within certain population ranges) with highest and lowest lung cancer rates. The theory predicts that the former should have about 3 times higher average radon levels than the latter, under the assumption that any correlation between exposure to radon and exposure to other causes of lung cancer is weak. The validity of this assumption is tested with data on average radon level vs replies to items on questionnaires; there is little correlation between radon levels in houses and smoking habits, educational attainment, or economic status of the occupants, or with urban vs rural environs which is an indicator of exposure to air pollution

  13. Personal radon daughter dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional means of radon daughter exposure estimatikn for uranium miners in Canada is by grab sampling and time weighting. Personal dosimetry is a possible alternative method with its own advantages and limitations. The author poses basic questions with regard to two methods of radon daughter detection, thermoluminescent chips and track-etch film. An historical review of previous and current research and development programs in Canada and in other countries is presented, as are brief results and conclusions of each dosimeter evaluation

  14. Radon-Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation of the active and passive methods for radon, their identification and measure, instrumentation and characteristics are the objectives of this work. Active detectors: Active Alpha Cam Continuous Air Monitor, Model 758 of Victoreen, Model CMR-510 Continuous Radon Monitor of the Signature Femto-Tech. Passive detectors: SSNTD track detectors in solids Measurement Using Charcoal Canisters, disk of activated coal deposited in a metallic box Electrets Methodology. (Author)

  15. Radon og boligen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    Radon er en radioaktiv og sundhedsskadelig luftart, som ved indånding øger risikoen for lungekræft. Der er ingen dokumenteret nedre grænse for, hvornår radon er ufarligt. Derfor anbefales det, at man tilstræber et så lavt radonindhold i indeluften som muligt. Man kan hverken lugte, se, høre eller...... smage radon, så vil du vide, om du har radon i din bolig, må du måle radonindholdet i indeluften. Radon forekommer naturligt i jorden og kan suges ind sammen med jordluft, hvis der inde er et undertryk, og hvis konstruktionerne mod jord er utætte. Jordluft trænger ind gennem revner og utætte samlinger......, fx omkring rør til kloak, vand og varmeforsyning. Koncentrationen af radon i jorden varierer meget fra sted til sted, også lokalt og gennem året. Tidligere undersøgelser har vist, at der kan forekomme høje koncentrationer i Sydgrønland, specielt i området syd for Narsalik ved Paamiut, 61°30’N....

  16. Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present no simple statement can be made relative to the role of radionuclidic lung studies in the pediatric population. It is safe to assume that they will be used with increasing frequency for research and clinical applications because of their sensitivity and ready applicability to the pediatric patient. Methods comparable to those used in adults can be used in children older than 4 years. In younger children, however, a single injection of 133Xe in solution provides an index of both regional perfusion and ventilation which is easier to accomplish. This method is particularly valuable in infants and neonates because it is rapid, requires no patient cooperation, results in a very low radiation dose, and can be repeated in serial studies. Radionuclidic studies of ventilation and perfusion can be performed in almost all children if the pediatrician and the nuclear medicine specialist have motivation and ingenuity. S

  17. Acute Exposure from RADON-222 and Aerosols in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, George Paul, IV

    Radon-222 in water is released when the water is aerated, such as during showering. As a result, a temporary burst of radon-222 can appear as a short term, or acute, exposure. This study looked at homes with radon-222 concentrations in water from 800 picocuries per liter (pCi/l) to 53,000 pCi/l to determine the buildup of radon gas in a bathroom during showering. Samples from the tap and drain, compared to determine the percentage of radon-222 released, showed that between 58% and 88% of radon-222 in the water was released. The resultant radon-222 increase in air, measured with a flow-through detector, ranged from 2 pCi/l to 114 pCi/l in bathrooms due to a 10 to 15 minute shower with water flow rates ranging from 3 l/min to 6 l/min. Significantly, these rates did not fall rapidly but stayed approximately the same for up to 15 minutes after the water flow ceased. In examining exposures, the true danger is in the radon-222 progeny rather than the radon itself. The progeny can be inhaled and deposited in the tracheobronchial passages in the lung. Filter samples of bathroom air measured in a portable alpha spectrometer showed an increase in radon-222 progeny, notably polonium-218 and -214, in the air after showering. These increases were gradual and were on the order of 0.5 pCi/l at the highest level. Tap samples measured in a portable liquid scintillator showed that the progeny are present in the water but are not in true secular equilibrium with the radon-222 in the water. Therefore, the radon-222 does not have to decay to produce progeny since the progeny are already present in the water. A two stage sampler was used to examine the percentage of radiation available in aerosols smaller than 7 microns. Repeated trials showed that up to 85% of the radiation available in the aerosols is contained in the smaller, more respirable particles.

  18. Radon and tritium in human life. The real threat aspects and social responsibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radon is the heaviest radioactive colorless, odorless, undetectable by human feelings and noble atomic gas, contributing by around 54% to the world average total radiation exposure and by more than 58% of the average natural radioactivity. Radon is released from all kind of soils and from building materials and can built up within dwellings and other closed spaces. Established until 1990 as the second cause of lung cancer, the scientists paid more attention to the radon and his daughters effects. The radon maximum permissible level was accepted between 150 Bq/m3 and 600 Bq/m3, being different for different countries. The telluric radon is represented by three abundant isotopes: Rn-222 as successor of U-238 via Ra-226 from uranium chain having more than 90% of effects, Rn-220 from thorium chain and Rn-219 from U-235, both last isotopes having a too short half time to be important in radiological risk by inhalation. The risk by direct body irradiation or by radon ingestion is 104 less than by radon inhalation risk. The interest of different countries in order to reduce the radon effects was sustained by appropriate studies. In USA the radon studies were monitored by National Research Center and as a consequence its Committee for Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VI issued a special report regarding radon. The activities regarding the mining, transport and processing are accompanied by radon release. The miner dwellings are located generally into areas of high potential radon release from all kind of natural sources as mountains, faults line or cracks. The existing type of dwellings is very permissive for gaseous elements, especially for radon. The building can accumulate the radon into the airtight or unventilated rooms like gap, cellar, and basement and so on. By the other side many antinuclear NGOs are very active and belligerent against Nuclear Power Plants, especially regarding tritium from CANDU reactor. It must be maintained that all

  19. Control of indoor radon and radon progeny concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are three general categories of techniques for the control of radon and radon progeny concentrations in indoor air - restriction of radon entry, reduction of indoor radon concentrations by ventilation or air cleaning, and removal of airborne radon progeny. The predominant radon entry process in most residences appears to be pressure driven flow of soil gas through cracks or other openings in the basement, slab, or subfloor. Sealing these openings or ventilation of the subslab or subfloor space are methods of reducing radon entry rates. Indoor radon concentrations may be reduced by increased ventilation. The use of charcoal filters for removal of radon gas in the indoor air by adsorption has also been proposed. Concentrations of radon progeny, which are responsible for most of the health risks associated with radon exposures, can be controlled by use of electrostatic or mechanical filtration. Air circulation can also reduce radon progeny concentrations in certain cases. This paper reviews the application and limitations of each of these control measures and discusses recent experimental results

  20. The radon in Corsica: evaluation of exposure and associated risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The average level found in Corsica is superior to that one found in France. On the basis of the results of it campaign I.R.S.N.-D.G.S., the French average is of 90 Bq.m3 against 197 Bq.m3 for Corsica. The risk of dying from a lung cancer attributable to the radon was estimated at 13 % in France. The evaluation of risk led on Corsica shows a risk attributable to the radon included between 21.5 and 28 %.This evaluation of risk is only a stage. It is important to arrest better the exposure to the radon of the Corsican population. For a good estimation of the levels of radon and thus the impact of this one, additional measures are necessary. The results of the data analysis of exposure allow to guide the choice of the new measures: a campaign on the season effect in Corsica and a completion of the measures in housing are two main axes.Seen the importance of the interaction between the tobacco and the radon, a good estimation of the tobacco customs in Corsica and its evolution in the time seems essential to estimate indeed the impact of the radon in this region. (N.C.)

  1. Preliminary integrated indoor radon measurements in Transylvania (Romania).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosma, Constantin; Szacsvai, Kinga; Dinu, Alexandra; Ciorba, Daniela; Dicu, Tiberius; Suciu, Liviu

    2009-09-01

    Measurements of indoor radon concentrations were performed in 406 residential houses in five counties (Cluj, Bihor, Alba, Bistrita, and Sibiu) using Makrofol and CR-39 alpha-track detectors. From our measurements, an average indoor radon concentration of 82.5 Bq m(-3) for the Transylvanian population was calculated, i.e. an annual effective dose of 2.4 mSv for the whole body. The calculated dose is 62% higher than that previously reported but yet below the recommended action level of ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). A log-normal distribution of the radon concentration was obtained for the studied counties, excluding some higher values from the Stei region--a radon-prone area in Transylvania. For the Stei region, the data show a dual log-normal distribution of the radon concentration with the second maximum being related to the houses built using uranium waste as a construction material. Assuming a cancer risk coefficient of 10(-4)/100 Bq m(-3) year(-1), one can estimate that about 600 lung cancer per year, for about 7,000,000 inhabitants of the Transylvania region, are due to radon inhalation.

  2. Radon as a hydrological indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komae, Takami [National Research Inst. of Agricultural Engineering, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    The radon concentration in water is measured by a liquid scintillation method. After the radioactive equilibrium between radon and the daughter nuclides was attained, the radon concentration was determined by the liquid scintillation analyzer. {alpha}-ray from radon, then two {beta}- and two {alpha}-ray from the daughter nuclei group were released, so that 500% of the apparent counting efficiency was obtained. The detector limit is about 0.03 Bq/l, the low value, which corresponds to about 5.4x10{sup -15} ppm. By determining the radon concentration in groundwater, behavior of radon in hydrological process, the groundwater exchange caused by pumping and exchange between river water and groundwater were investigated. The water circulation analysis by means of radon indicator in the environment was shown. By using the large difference of radon concentration between in river water and in groundwater, arrival of injected water to the sampling point of groundwater was detected. (S.Y.)

  3. Assessment of indoor radon-thoron levels in dwellings of north Indian states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to ICRP publication radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer for individuals who have never smoked. Radon and its progeny are radioactive and is the major contributor to environmental radioactivity. Being a gas radon has the advantage to spread like gases and its progeny has the advantage to attach to aerosols or dust particles and can be inhaled by the human beings leading to the exposure of lung tissues to the radiation. The accumulation of radon indoor is a big source of exposure of human beings to natural radiation. Radon can enter the home through cracks in the foundation floor and walls and other openings. It is also liberated by the building materials. Thus there is need of continuous monitoring for the radon levels in dwellings. Keeping this in mind the environmental monitoring of radon, thoron and their progeny in some dwellings of northern Haryana and southern Himachal Pradesh has been carried out using twin cup dosimeters. Out of different types of dwellings under study the levels are found to be higher in some dwellings in Shivalik foot hills of India as compare to other dwellings. The annual dose received due to radon-thoron and their progeny by the inhabitants in the dwellings under study have also been calculated. (author)

  4. Radon epidemiology and nuclear track detectors: Methods, results and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochicchio, F. [Unit of Radioactivity and Related Health Effects, Technology and Health Department, Italian National Institute of Health, Viale Regina Elena 299, I-00161 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: francesco.bochicchio@iss.it

    2005-11-15

    An important achievement of nuclear track detectors is that they render it possible to measure a large number of radon concentrations. These are necessary for epidemiological studies aimed to estimate the lung cancer risk due to exposure to radon and its decay products in dwellings. Many case-control studies were conducted in the last 15 years in Europe, North America and China, in order to avoid the uncertainties associated with the risk extrapolation from epidemiological studies on miners exposed in underground mines. In this review paper, the main methodological issues of these studies are introduced: confounding factors, the impact of radon exposure uncertainties on the estimated risk, the retrospective assessment of radon exposure through the measurement of Po210 surface concentration on glass objects, the interaction between radon and smoking, statistical methods to analyze data and combine studies, etc. As regards the estimated risk of lung cancer, the main characteristics and results of each study are reported and discussed, together with the results of meta-analyses and, most importantly, of the three recently published analyses that pool 2 Chinese, 7 North American, and 13 European studies. Finally, some conclusions are given and a brief reference is made to ongoing studies.

  5. House in Bessine-sur-Gartempe (87) built on uranium ore waste rocks and residues. Assessment of radon contents of the indoor air and induced health risks for dwellers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled the origin of radon and how characterization measurements of exposure pathways are performed, this document reports an expertise investigation of the exposure to radon of dwellers of a house. It presents the main results of environmental radiological measurements: exposure to beta/gamma radiation and to radon, assessment of average radon concentrations in the house (measurement strategy, interpretation of average values). It reports the assessment of annual exposures to radon. It discusses the assessment of risks: status of knowledge of impacts of radon on health (radon and risk of lung cancer, other potential health effects of radon), risk assessment based on the efficient dose, method and results of assessment of the risk of lung cancer, impact of tobacco on this assessment, assessment of the risk of leukaemia

  6. Indoor radon measurements in dwellings and other buildings in the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Talita de Oliveira [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: talitaolsantos@yahoo.com.br; Rocha, Zildete [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Quimica e Radioquimica]. E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Radon is a radioactive noble gas derived from the natural decay series of {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 232}Th, which are present in rocks and soils. By diffusion and convection, radon migrates from the rocks and soils to the surface and through fissures, pipes and holes it may enter the dwellings and other buildings. Another important indoor radon source is the building material construction. Therefore, it may accumulate indoor environments with reduced ventilation rates. Radon progeny attach to the aerosol particle in the air. The attached and unattached radon progeny may deposit in the lungs and irradiate to the lung tissue as they decay. Radon has been recognized as a radiation hazard, that causes excess of lung cancer among underground miners and there is an evidence that radon is also a heath hazard in dwellings and other indoor environments. Radon accounts for about half of all human exposure to natural radiation. Radon concentration measurements were carried out in dwellings, schools and shopping centers in the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte - RMBH. Most part of the inhabitants of the RMBH lives over the granitic gneissic complex, which has a variable depth out coming in some areas. For the radon concentration measurement continuous detectors, AlphaGUARD PQ2000PRO, RAD7 and Pylon Lucas Cells were used and, for Potential Alpha Energy Concentration-PAEC measurement a solid state alpha spectroscope, the DOSEman PRO was used. The experiments showed that most results are below 50 Bqm{sup -3} (mean+3{sigma}). This value is bellowing the action levels of the USEPA, ICRP and others, which varies in the range from 148 to 200 Bqm{sup -3}. The values are in the low range, as it was expected for a tropical climate. (author)

  7. Radon in the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guide has been prepared for the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) by the Building Research Establishment (BRE). Following the guidance is not compulsory and you are free to take other action. However if you do follow the guidance you will normally be doing enough to comply with the law. Health and Safety Inspectors seek to secure compliance with the law and may refer to this guidance as illustrating good practice. In the past, concern about exposure of employees to radon has largely centred on the mining environment. In recent times, with increased knowledge and mapping of radon levels in homes, attention has increasingly turned to radon exposure in buildings used for work purposes. Now there is a considerable fund of information to show that employees in some buildings can receive very significant radiation doses from radon. Surveys show that levels of radon tend to be higher in buildings with small rooms, such as offices rather than larger factory and warehouse constructions. The particular problem is that the nature of the work process gives no clue as to the radon hazard that may exist, and the employer may be unaware of its presence and how to deal with it. This Guide is aimed principally at employers and those who control buildings used for work purposes, or their representatives. It offers guidance on practical measures for reducing radon levels in workplaces. The guidance should also be of interest and assistance to those, such as surveyors and builders, concerned with specifying and carrying out the necessary remedial measures. Advice is provided for the majority of building types and construction situations likely to be encountered in larger non-domestic buildings. For buildings where construction is similar to that found in dwellings the guidance published by BRE on remedial measures for dwellings should be used. BRE prepared this Guide with assistance from the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) and Cornwall County Council under contract

  8. Bavarian radon network und education of radon experts; Bayerisches Radon-Netzwerk und Ausbildung zur Radon-Fachperson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerner, S.; Kunte, A. [Bayerisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt, Augsburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The Bavarian Environment Agency (LfU) initiated 2012 the Bavarian Radon Network and the training initiative to become a 'Radon-Fachperson' (radon specialist) to further the awareness concerning radon. The Bavarian Radon Network was established in summer 2012 by the LfU in cooperation with the 'Bauzentrum Muenchen' (Munich Building Center). The Bavarian Radon Network is meant to link radon specialists, specialists from the building and real estate sector, municipal and private building owners, stakeholders, government agencies and science. Meetings are held biannually. The four day course to become a Radon-Fachperson is primarily aimed at building specialists, e.g. architects, construction engineers, ventilation engineers and staff of private and public construction offices. The course imparts specialised knowledge of radon prevention for new buildings, realisation of radon mitigation, measurement instrumentation and methods as well as fundamentals of radiation protection. With the Radon-Fachperson there are henceforth qualified specialists in the field of radon in buildings available in Bavaria. (orig.)

  9. Surface-deposition and Distribution of the Radon (222Rn and 220Rn) Decay Products Indoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, G.; Tommasino, Luigi

    The exposure to radon (222Rn and 220Rn) decay products is of great concern both in dwellings and workplaces. The model to estimate the lung dose refers to the deposition mechanisms and particle sizes. Unfortunately, most of the dose data available are based on the measurement of radon concentration and the concentration of radon decay products. These combined measurements are widely used in spite of the fact that accurate dose assessments require information on the particle deposition mechanisms and the spatial distribution of radon decay products indoors. Most of the airborne particles and/or radon decay products are deposited onto indoor surfaces, which deposition makes the radon decay products unavailable for inhalation. These deposition processes, if properly known, could be successfully exploited to reduce the exposure to radon decay products. In spite of the importance of the surface deposition of the radon decay products, both for the correct evaluation of the dose and for reducing the exposure, little or no efforts have been made to investigate these deposition processes. Recently, two parallel investigations have been carried out in Rome and at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City respectively, which address the issue of the surface-deposited radon decay products. Even though these investigations have been carried independently, they complement one another. It is with these considerations in mind that it was decided to report both investigations in the same paper.

  10. Chemical properties of radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, L.

    1986-01-01

    Radon is frequently regarded as a totally inert element. It is, however, a ''metalloid'' - an element which lies on the diagonal of the Periodic Table between the true metals and nonmetals and which exhibits some of the characteristics of both. It reacts with fluorine, halogen fluorides, dioxygenyl salts, fluoro-nitrogen salts, and halogen fluoride-metal fluoride complexes to form ionic compounds. Several of the solid reagents can be used to collect radon from air but must be protected from moisture, since they hydrolyze readily. Recently, solutions of nonvolatile, cationic radon have been produced in nonaqueous solvents. Ion-exchange studies have shown that the radon can be quantitatively collected on columns packed with either Nafion resins or complex salts. In its ionic state, radon is able to displace H/sup +/, Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, Cs/sup +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and Ba/sup 2 +/ ions from a number of solid materials. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Comparison of radon levels in building basements and above- ground floors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazula, C.; Campos, M.; Mazzilli, B. [IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Radon-222, a decay product of Ra-226, is a natural radioactive noble gas that can be found in soil, water and air. Radon and its short-lived decay products in the atmosphere are the most important contributors to human exposure from natural sources. Radon is recognized as the second most significant risk for lung cancer after tobacco smoking. The World Health Organization established a concentration of 100 Bq m{sup -3} for radon in air, in order to limit its hazards. The main source of radon exposition indoors comes from Ra-226, a decay product of the U-238 natural series, present in rocks and soils underneath the building and, to a lesser extent, in the building materials. The dynamics of radon production in rocks and soil and its subsequent indoors emanation is quite complex. It is controlled by factors such as soil permeability and water content, meteorological variability, building foundation characteristics and the usual positive differential pressure between the soil and the indoor environment. This is normally sufficient to bring soil gas from the ground into the building. Radon gas can enter a building by several mechanisms, but the most significant ones are diffusion and pressure-driven flow from the ground. Usually, cracks and holes in the floor and walls and gaps around service pipes are the main entrance for the radon gas. Studies indicated that indoor radon concentration present significant variation on the basement, ground floor and upper floors. The aim of this study is to determine the radon levels in building basements and above- ground floors in the city of Sao Paulo. Radon measurements were carried out through the passive method with solid-state nuclear- track detectors (CR-39), because of their simplicity and long-term integrated read-out. The exposure period was, at least, three months, covering one year minimum, in order to determine the seasonal variation of indoor radon concentration. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  12. Towards a Brazilian radon map: consortium radon Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the idea of generating radon map of Brazil has emerged. First attempts of coordinating radon surveys-carried out by different groups across the country-and initial discussions on how to proceed on a larger scale were made at the First Brazilian Radon Seminary, Natal, September 2012. Conventionally, it is believed that indoor radon is no major problem in Brazil, because the overall benign climate usually allows high ventilation rates. Nevertheless, scattered measurements have shown that moderately high indoor radon concentrations (up to a few hundred Bq m-3) do occur regionally. Brazilian geology is very diverse and there are regions where an elevated geo-genic radon potential exists or is expected to exist. Therefore, a Brazilian Radon Survey is expected to be a challenge, although it appears an important issue, given the rising concern of the public about the quality of its environment. (authors)

  13. Study on migration of radon in geologic environment by SSNTD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢伟

    1996-01-01

    There is a high incidence of lung cancer in Gejiu area of Yunnan Province.Using method of SSNTD(solid state nuclear track detector),469 data of radon in the indoor or soil have been obtained.There is 471.9Bq.m-3 on an average in houses situated in geologic fault zone.None of ore of uranium or thorium has been found here.The migration of radon seems not"diffusion” bot“suction effect”。

  14. The householders' guide to radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide is a follow-up to the leaflet Radon in Houses which was issued previously by the Department of the Environment. It is intended for people who live in areas with high levels of radon. It is written particularly for householders whose homes have already been tested and found to have an appreciable level of radon. It explains what radon is, how it gets into houses and what the effects on health may be. It also outlines some of the ways of reducing the level of radon and gives guidance both on how to get the work done and likely costs. (author)

  15. Radon: a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepman, S.R.; Boegel, M.L.; Hollowell, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with the support of the Department of Energy, has developed a computerized database to manage research information in the area of building ventilation and indoor air quality. This literature survey contains references pertaining to the physical properties of radon and its daughters, instrumentation for their measurement, health effects, surveys and measurements, and regulatory information. The references in the bibliography are sequenced in alphabetical order and abstracts are included when supplied by the author. The objective of this report is to disseminate the bibliographic references compiled at the laboratory relating to radon research portion of the program. Interested database users are encouraged to contact the laboratory to receive instructions for direct database acess. A flyer describing the database is supplied at the end of the bibliography and a brief overview of the Radon Research porgram is given.

  16. Radon: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with the support of the Department of Energy, has developed a computerized database to manage research information in the area of building ventilation and indoor air quality. This literature survey contains references pertaining to the physical properties of radon and its daughters, instrumentation for their measurement, health effects, surveys and measurements, and regulatory information. The references in the bibliography are sequenced in alphabetical order and abstracts are included when supplied by the author. The objective of this report is to disseminate the bibliographic references compiled at the laboratory relating to radon research portion of the program. Interested database users are encouraged to contact the laboratory to receive instructions for direct database acess. A flyer describing the database is supplied at the end of the bibliography and a brief overview of the Radon Research porgram is given

  17. World History Of Radon Research And Measurement From The Early 1900's To Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, A. C.

    2008-08-01

    In 1900, Dorn discovered the emanation in the uranium series that eventually became the well-known gas 222Rn. From 1900 through 1908, it was demonstrated that 222Rn is a radioactive gas found in tap water, highly condensable at low temperatures with a half-life of approximately 3.7 days and can be collected on charcoal by adsorption. Although, radon was discovered in 1900, the effects of prolonged exposure had been suspected and noted 300 years earlier among underground miners who developed lung cancer. During the period from 1924-1932, it was suggested that radon was the cause of high lung cancer incidence. In 1951, researchers at the university of Rochester N.Y. pointed out that the lung cancer health hazard was from the alpha radiation dose delivered by the radon decay products that deposited in the respiratory tract. The findings of the BEIR Committee Report VI, which was based on epidemiological studies in different groups of mines in the 1950's and 1960's and on laboratory studies, showed that from 60,000 miners over 2,600 developed lung cancer where only 750 were expected. Since 1998, the epidemiological study conducted in Iowa US, showed beyond any reasonable doubt that radon decay products cause lung cancer among women who lived at least twenty years in their homes. This paper will cover early radon measurements in soil, building material, ground water and in different air environments such as in the atmosphere, caves spas, underground mines and in residential indoor air environment. Radon measurements were conducted in many areas for diagnostic purposes. Radon was used as natural tracer to study air masses, vertical diffusion, and atmospheric studies, in earthquake prediction, and as a geological indicator for radium and uranium. In the early radon measurements, electroscopes, electrometers and primitive ionization chambers were used for many years. In the 1940's fast pulse ionization chambers replaced total ionization chambers. From the mid 1950's

  18. World History Of Radon Research And Measurement From The Early 1900's To Today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1900, Dorn discovered the emanation in the uranium series that eventually became the well-known gas 222Rn. From 1900 through 1908, it was demonstrated that 222Rn is a radioactive gas found in tap water, highly condensable at low temperatures with a half-life of approximately 3.7 days and can be collected on charcoal by adsorption. Although, radon was discovered in 1900, the effects of prolonged exposure had been suspected and noted 300 years earlier among underground miners who developed lung cancer. During the period from 1924-1932, it was suggested that radon was the cause of high lung cancer incidence. In 1951, researchers at the university of Rochester N.Y. pointed out that the lung cancer health hazard was from the alpha radiation dose delivered by the radon decay products that deposited in the respiratory tract. The findings of the BEIR Committee Report VI, which was based on epidemiological studies in different groups of mines in the 1950's and 1960's and on laboratory studies, showed that from 60,000 miners over 2,600 developed lung cancer where only 750 were expected.Since 1998, the epidemiological study conducted in Iowa US, showed beyond any reasonable doubt that radon decay products cause lung cancer among women who lived at least twenty years in their homes. This paper will cover early radon measurements in soil, building material, ground water and in different air environments such as in the atmosphere, caves spas, underground mines and in residential indoor air environment. Radon measurements were conducted in many areas for diagnostic purposes. Radon was used as natural tracer to study air masses, vertical diffusion, and atmospheric studies, in earthquake prediction, and as a geological indicator for radium and uranium. In the early radon measurements, electroscopes, electrometers and primitive ionization chambers were used for many years. In the 1940's fast pulse ionization chambers replaced total ionization chambers. From the mid 1950's onwards

  19. Radon programmes and health marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtikova, Ivana; Rovenska, Katerina

    2011-05-01

    Being aware of negative health effects of radon exposure, many countries aim for the reduction of the radon exposure of their population. The Czech radon programme was commenced >20 y ago. Since then experts have gathered a lot of knowledge, necessary legislation has been enacted, tens of thousands of inhabitants have been offered free measurement and subsidy for the mitigation. Despite the effort, the effectiveness of the radon programme seems to be poor. Newly built houses still exhibit elevated radon concentrations and the number of houses mitigated is very low. Is it possible to enhance the effectivity of radon programme while keeping it on a voluntary basis? One possible way is to employ health marketing that draws together traditional marketing theories and science-based strategies to prevention. The potential of using marketing principles in communication and delivery of radon information will be discussed. PMID:21498864

  20. ERRICCA radon model intercomparison exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.; Albarracín, D.; Csige, I.;

    1999-01-01

    Numerical models based on finite-difference or finite-element methods are used by various research groups in studies of radon-222 transport through soil and building materials. Applications range from design of radon remediation systems to morefundamental studies of radon transport. To ascertain...... that results obtained with these models are of good quality, it is necessary that such models are tested. This document reports on a benchmark test organized by the EU project ERRICCA: European Researchinto Radon in Construction Concerted Action. The test comprises the following cases: (1) Steady......-state diffusive radon profiles in dry and wet soils, (2) steady-state entry of soil gas and radon into a house, (3) time-dependent radon exhalation from abuilding-material sample. These cases cover features such as: soil heterogeneity, anisotropy, 3D-effects, time dependency, combined advective and diffusive...

  1. Radon assay for SNO+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+

  2. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  3. Sampling and analysis for radon-222 dissolved in ground water and surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWayne, Cecil L.; Gesell, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    Radon-222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas in the uranium-238 decay series that has traditionally been called, simply, radon. The lung cancer risks associated with the inhalation of radon decay products have been well documented by epidemiological studies on populations of uranium miners. The realization that radon is a public health hazard has raised the need for sampling and analytical guidelines for field personnel. Several sampling and analytical methods are being used to document radon concentrations in ground water and surface water worldwide but no convenient, single set of guidelines is available. Three different sampling and analytical methods - bubbler, liquid scintillation, and field screening - are discussed in this paper. The bubbler and liquid scintillation methods have high accuracy and precision, and small analytical method detection limits of 0.2 and 10 pCi/l (picocuries per liter), respectively. The field screening method generally is used as a qualitative reconnaissance tool.

  4. Radon applied for physical therapy - a review of the current situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is no clear evidence at date that radon alone may have specific therapeutic effects, but there are results indicating specific remedial success in certain cases (Bechterev's diesease, e.g.). A major uncertainty factor in establishing a causal relationship, particularly for treatment in radon underground spas, is the presence of various therapeutic factors such as the radon, heat, and hummidity,and their probable synergistic effects. The inhalation of air free of daughter products, as is applied in the radon spas in Russia, may strongly reduce the lung cancer risk, at a comparable achievable therapeutic effect. It is the medical and the technical personnel in these spas that profit most from this reduction. The radiation dose to the patient resulting from radon treatment remains within the limits of natural background radiation. The medical and technical personel is to be (and is) protected by the radiological protection regime provided by the law. (orig./HP)

  5. Synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite on DNA damage in HBE cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Sun, Bin; Wang, Xiaojuan; Nie, Jihua; Chen, Zhihai; An, Yan; Tong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Human epidemiological studies showed that radon and arsenic exposures are major risk factors for lung cancer in Yunnan tin miners. However, biological evidence for this phenomenon is absent. In this study, HBE cells were exposed to different concentrations of sodium arsenite, different radon exposure times, or a combination of these two factors. The results showed a synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite in cell cytotoxicity as determined by cell viability. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and increased DNA damage indexed by comet assay and γ-H2AX were detected. Moreover, DNA HR repair in terms of Rad51 declined when the cells were exposed to both radon and sodium arsenite. The synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite in HBE cells may be attributed to the enhanced DSBs and inhibited HR pathway upon co-exposure.

  6. Radon thematic days - Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the Radon thematic days organized by the French society of radiation protection (SFRP). Twenty five presentations (slides) are compiled in the document and deal with: 1 - General introduction about radon (Sebastien Baechler, IRA); 2 - Survey of epidemiological studies (Dominique Laurier, IRSN); 3 - Dosimetric model (Eric Blanchardon, Estelle Davesne, IRSN); 4 - Radon issue in Franche-Comte: measurement of the domestic exposure and evaluation of the associated health impact (Francois Clinard, InVS); 5 - WHO's (World Health Organization) viewpoint in limiting radon exposure in homes (Ferid Shannoun, OMS); 6 - Radon measurement techniques (Roselyne Ameon, IRSN); 7 - Quality of radon measurements (Francois Bochud, IRA); 8 - International recommendations (Jean-Francois Lecomte, IRSN); 9 - Radon management strategy in Switzerland - 1994-2014 (Christophe Murith, OFSP); 10 - 2011-2015 action plan for radon risk management (Jean-Luc Godet, Eric Dechaux, ASN); 11 - Radon at work place in Switzerland (Lisa Pedrazzi, SUVA); 12 - Strategies of radiation protection optimization in radon exposure situations (Cynthia Reaud, CEPN); 13 - Mapping of the radon potential of geologic formations in France (Geraldine Ielsch, IRSN); 14 - Radon database in Switzerland (Martha Gruson, OFSP); 15 - Radon 222 in taps water (Jeanne Loyen, IRSN); 16 - Buildings protection methods (Bernard Collignan, CSTB, Roselyne Ameon, IRSN); 17 - Preventive and sanitation measures in Switzerland (Claudio Valsangiacomo, SUPSI); 18 - Training and support approach for building specialists (Joelle Goyette-Pernot, Fribourg engineers and architects' school); 19 - Status of radon bulk activity measurements performed between 2005-2010 in public areas (Cyril Pineau, ASN); 20 - Neuchatel Canton experiments (Didier Racine, SENE); 21 - Montbeliard region experience in the radon risk management (Isabelle Netillard, Pays de Montbeliard Agglomeration); 22

  7. {sup 210}Po as a long-term integrating radon indicator in the indoor environment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Exposure to radon (Rn-222) decay products in the indoor environment is suspected of being a significant lung cancer agent in many countries. But quantification of the contemporary lung cancer risk (i.e. probability) on an individual basis is not an easy task. Only past exposures are relevant and assessing individual exposures in retrospect is associated with large uncertainties, if possible at all. One way to extend the validity of contemporary measurements to past decades is to measure long-lived decay products of radon, the long-lived radon daughters. After our laboratory had exemplified the correlation between implanted Po-210 and the estimated radon exposures in six different dwellings, the US Department of Energy and the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute granted funds for a one-year study, ``{sup 210}Po as a Long-Term Integrating Radon Indicator in the Indoor Environment.`` In this report the work performed under these two contracts is reported.

  8. Ammonia concentration in an animal radon exposure facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental and dosimetric study on lung tumour induction by inhalation of radon daughters under indoor conditions has been started with the aim of analysing the various factors which determine the risk due to this inhalation. In the experimental part of the study, WAG/Rij rats will be exposed daily for a period of about 18 months in an exposure chamber to a relatively low concentration of radon daughter products. In chronic exposure chambers, ammonia is produced by the action of urease-positive bacteria in urine and faeces. There are reports showing that, in such exposure chambers, the ammonia concentrations will rise beyond acceptable levels. The ammonia concentration as a function of time has therefore been studied, as has means of reducing this concentration. The results demonstrate that, with the addition of Aqualloy granules the ammonia concentration can be reduced over a long period of time to a level for which no cooperative action with the radon exposure is expected. (Auth.)

  9. Map showing radon potential of rocks and soils in Montgomery County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, L.C.; Reimer, G.M.; Wiggs, C.R.; Rice, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the radon potential of Montgomery County in the context of its geology. Radon is a naturally occurring gas produced by the radioactive decay of uranium. Radon produced by uraniferous rocks and soils may enter a house through porous building materials and through openings in walls and floors. Radon gases has a tendency to move from the higher pressure commonly existing in the soil to the lower pressure commonly existing in the house. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA, 1986a) estimates that elevated levels of indoor radon may be associated with 5,000 to 20,000 of the 130,000 lung cancer deaths per year. They also estimate that 8 to 12 percent of the homes in the United States will have annual average indoor radon levels exceeding 4 picoCuries per liter of air (pCi/L). Above this level, the U.S. EPA recommends homeowners take remedial action. May factors control the amount of radon which may enter a home from the geologic environment. Soil drainage, permeability, and moisture content effect the amount of radon that can be released from rocks and soils (known as the emmanation) and may limit or increase how far it can migrate. Well drained, highly permeable soils facilitate the movement of radon. Soils with water content in the 8 to 15 percent range enhance the emmanation of radon (Lindmark, 1985). Daily and seasonal variations in soil and indoor radon can be caused by meteorologic factors such as barometric pressure, temperature, and wind (Clements and Wilkening, 1974; Schery and other, 1984). Construction practices also inhibit or promote entry of radon into the home (U.S. EPA, 1986b). In general, however, geology controls the source and distribution of radon (Akerblom and Wilson, 1982; Gundersen and others, 1987, 1988; Sextro and others, 1987; U.S. EPA, 1983; Peake, 1988; Peake and Hess, 1988). The following sections describe: 1) the methods used to measure radon and equivalent uranium (eU) in soil; 2) the radon potential

  10. A method for determining an indicator of effective dose calculation due to inhalation of Radon and its progeny from in vivo measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, J

    1994-01-01

    Direct measurement of the absolved dose to lung tissue from inhalation of radon and its progeny is not possible and must be calculated using dosimetric models, taking into consideration the several parameters upon which the dose calculation depends. To asses the dose due to inhalation of radon and its progeny, it is necessary to estimate the cumulative exposure. Historically, this has been done using WLM values estimated with measurements of radon concentration in air. The radon concentration in air varies significantly, however, in space with time, and the exposed individual is also constantly moving around. This makes it almost impossible to obtain a precise estimate of an individual's inhalation exposure. This work describes a pilot study to calculate lung dose from the deposition of radon progeny, via estimates of cumulative exposure derived from in vivo measurements of sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Pb, in subjects exposed to above-average radon and its progeny concentrations in their home environments. The measureme...

  11. EML indoor radon workshop, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop on indoor radon, held at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) on November 30 and December 1, 1982, covered recent developments in radon daughter research and development. Thirty papers were presented dealing with standardization and quality assurance measurement methods, surveys, measurements strategy, physical mechanisms of radon and radon daughter transport and development of guidance standards for indoor exposures. The workshop concluded with a planning session that identified the following needs: (1) national and international intercomparisons of techniques for measuring radon and radon daughter concentrations, working level and radon exhalation flux density; (2) development and refinement of practical measurement techniques for thoron and its daughter products; (3) quantitative definition of the sources of indoor radon and the mechanisms of transport into structures; (4) better knowledge of the physical properties of radon daughters; (5) more complete and accurate data on the population exposure to radon, which can only be met by broadly based surveys; and (6) more international cooperation and information exchange among countries with major research programs

  12. Radon Quantification and epidemiological assessment in room environments, according to construction material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the quantification of radon concentrations en the Ecuadorian region called 'Sierra', the contribution of building materials to the radioactive contamination and the rooms with greatest contents of radon and his daughters. The most representative zones are: Cuenca, Riobamba, San Gabriel and Puyango, this means that per m3 of air 429.14 radon atoms decay in a second to Po-218, the analyzed materials were: cement, black stone, bricks the rooms: bedroom, hall, dining room and bethroom. Knowing the biological damage that occurs by interaction of a particles with lung tissues. We suggest the follow research in order to get the average concentration for every province

  13. Concentration variation of radon in the room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was carried out to determine the variation of radon concentration in the room. Radon detector used was solid nuclear tracks detector (SSNTD) LR-115. From this result, suitable points to make radon measurement was determined

  14. Radon in Norwegian dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of radon in indoor air have been made in a total of about 7500 randomly selected dwellings in Norway from all parts of the country. The number of selected dwellings in each municipality is about proportional to its population, except for the two largest municipalities, Oslo and Bergen, where somewhat smaller samples were taken due to the higher population density. The measurements were performed by nuclear track detectors from the National Radiological Protection Boards in United Kingdom, and the integration time for the measurements was 6 months. The detectors were spread evenly over all seasons of the year to eliminate influence from seasonal variation in the radon level. One single measurement was performed in each dwelling: in the main bedroom. The results shows that the distribution of radon concentrations in Norwegian bedrooms is log-normal. The aritmetic mean of the measurements, including all categories of dwellings, is calculated to be 51 Bq/m3 and the corresponding geometric mean to be 26 Bq/m3. In a large proportion of single-family houses the living room and the kitchen are located on the ground floor while the bedrooms are located one floor higher. The results of the study shows that the radon level is somewhat higher at the ground floor than on the first floor, and higher in the basement than on the first floor. Taking this into account, and assuming that measurements in bedrooms on the first floor is a representative average for living room and kitchen, the average radon concentration for Norwegian dwellings is estimated to be between 55-65 Bq/m3. In this estimate, possible influences of the fact that the winters 87/88 and 88/89 were much warmer than normal and may therefor have lowered the results, has been taken into account. 15 refs., 9 figs., 15 tabs

  15. Determination of Geogenic Radon Potential (GEORP) in Pocos de Caldas - Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcelo T.; Silva, Nivaldo C.; Guerrero, Eder T.Z., E-mail: apoc@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Navarro, Fabiano C.; Oliveira, Rodrigo J., E-mail: campus.pcaldas@unifal-mg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencia e Tecnologia

    2015-07-01

    The noble gas {sup 222}Rn is a radioactive isotope of the element radon that can be found in atmospheric air, among others gases, at broad range of concentration. This isotope decays from {sup 238}U series, which is normally found in soil and rocks, especially in fault zones and fractures, where uranium presents greater mobility. The atmospheric high concentration of this gas is frequently related to confined environments including dwellings and other buildings with low air ventilation rate. Inhalation of this gas is acknowledged by international agencies such as WHO, as the second leading cause of lung cancer, being the first among the non-smoker population. That is the reason why, some countries have defined their regions with high radon potential where it is justified the implementation of construction techniques to reduce indoor radon concentration. This paper uses the Geogenic Radon Potential (GEORP) approach aiming to identify radon prone areas in the urban zone of Pocos de Caldas - Brazil. GEORP encompasses simultaneous measurements of the soil gas permeability and radon soil gas concentration. This investigation was accomplished using RADON-JOK permeameter, a device specially developed for in situ soil gas permeability, and ALPHAGUARD, a professional radon monitor. A large variability was observed in both radon soil concentration and soil gas permeability. Some areas have presented low gas permeability due to clayey soil characteristics thus medium GEORP. The majority of the points in this paper have been identified with high radon soil gas concentration showing values that reached 1,000 kBq.m{sup -3} and presenting high radon index. (author)

  16. A Risk Management Strategy for Radon: The US Experience (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States (US) the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) has played a leading role on radon policy. EPA estimates that indoor radon in the US causes approximately 14,000 lung cancer deaths per year with an uncertainty range of 7,000 to 30,000. In 1988, EPA and the Center for Disease Control issued an advisory urging that most houses in the US be tested for radon. The risk assessments have indicated a problem of substantial magnitude. Nonetheless, risk of radon has been assumed to follow a non-threshold model and risk management strategies have been based on the concept that exposures at levels ≥148 Bq.m-3 (4 pCi.1-1). EPA's approach has been to call for voluntary testing, since the Agency does not have direct regulatory authority, and to follow an action guideline of 148 Bq.m-3. This paper provides an overview of EPA's risk management strategy to control exposure to indoor radon. The first part reviews EPA's approach to radon testing and radon measurement protocols while introducing the option of encouraging homes to be tested and, if necessary, mitigated at the time of any real estate transaction. The second part introduces EPA's voluntary guidelines for construction techniques on how to minimise radon in new homes and addresses how these guidelines could be adopted by the States, local governments, and private sector homebuilders. The third part presents EPA's programme to educate the public on indoor radon risk. The paper concludes by outlining a Congressional directed approach to radon protection based on a multi-media risk management model for radon in air and water. (author)

  17. Indoor radon distribution in metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Talita O.; Oliveira, Arno H. de, E-mail: talitaolsantos@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: arnoheeren@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete; Barreto, Alberto A.; Souza, Leticia A.C. de; Miguel, Ronaldo A., E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.b, E-mail: aab@cdtn.b, E-mail: lets.coutinho@gmail.co, E-mail: ram@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Human beings are exposed to ionizing radiation from many natural sources. Radon and its progeny have been recognized as the most important contributors to the natural radioactivity dose, accounting for about half of all human exposure to ionizing radiation. Radon ({sup 222}Rn) is a alpha-radioactive noble gas derived from the natural series of uranium (2{sup 38}U), which occurs in a wide concentration range in all geological materials, especially, in rocks, soils and waters. By diffusion and convection, radon migrates from the rocks and soils to atmosphere and through fissures, pipes and holes it may enter the dwellings and other buildings. Another important radon source in dwellings is its emanation from the construction material. The radon progeny concentration in dwellings has been receiving considerable global attention due to its potential effect in causing lung cancer if it deposited in upper respiratory tract when inhaled. This paper presents radon concentration distribution in dwellings in Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte - RMBH. The effective dose estimate is also presented for the RMBH inhabitants. The geological settings of the area are Archean rocks of Granitic Gnaissic Complex and of metasediments sequences of the great Precambrian unit of the Iron Quadrangle of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Radon concentration measurements were carried out with continuous detector AlphaGUARD PQ200PRO (Genitron), in passive mode and with passive detectors E-PERM{sup R} Eletret Ion Chamber-EIC. The radon progeny concentration was carried out with a solid state alpha spectroscope, the DOSEman PRO (Sarad). It was found an indoor radon concentration varying in a large range from 18.5 to 2671.4 Bq/m{sup -3}, with an average value of 148.0 Bqm{sup -3} and geometric mean equal to 128.2 Bqm{sup -3}. The variable results are due mainly to region geological factors and building material composition of dwellings. The equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny were determined

  18. Men and radon - a noble gas of many disguise - Part I and Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon-induced lung cancer can be traced back to the 16th century miners in Europe, but recently there has been a world wide concern that elevated radon progeny levels in dwellings may also be implicated in lung cancer. Historical and experimental evidence is presented to document how inhaled radon is distributed throughout the body and stored in fats and lipids. Background counts in a steel room using a human whole-body counter (HWBC) progressively decreased throughout the day, which is attributed to a lowering of radon as subjects entered the steel room. The observed increases in potassium-40 (40K) counts in marathon runners was attributed to inhalation of environmental radon, and radon progeny was verified by measuring contributions to the 40K photopeak by 214Bi in cyclists and an untrained subject who exercised in a room with radon-laden air. Effective half-lives and regional 214Bi emissions were found to be the highest in the areas of the head (brain) and stomach (omentum) when filtered radon-laden air was inhaled. These observations prompted analyses for radon progeny (210Bi and 210Po) from brain tissues of persons who suffered from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases (AD and PD). Protein in AD and lipids in PD were high in these progeny relative to the control tissues. Whole body counts (214Bi emissions) of subjects over a period of 24 years were analysed for radon body content (Rn-conc). Statistically significant correlations were found between total body fat and Rn-conc in women and between seasonal home radon concentrations and seasonal Rn-conc in subjects participating in community-based studies. It is concluded that environmental radon is indeed stored in the body, that body concentration correlates with body fat in women, and that these reflect seasonal concentrations in their dwellings. Radon decay products include a number of alpha and beta particle emitters. These emissions produce a radiation risk and may play a role in multiple sclerosis and

  19. Cornerstones of the Austrian radon risk communication strategy; Eckpfeiler der oesterreichischen Radonrisikokommunikationsstrategie (OeRRKS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunte, A.; Ringer, W. [AGES, Linz (Austria). Oesterreichische Fachstelle fuer Radon

    2015-07-01

    On behalf of the Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management (BMLFUW), the National Radon Centre of Austria developed the National Radon Risk Communication Strategy. The superior goal is the reduction of the radon exposure of Austrian citizens as well as the reduction of radon-related lung cancer deaths. Austria, like many other countries, follows the approach to raise awareness and to inform the public to achieve this goal. The presented strategy deals with the question of how radon protection issues can be communicated to the public, existing fears can be reduced and affected people can be motivated to take action (perform a radon test, if necessary, mitigate or install preventive measures in new buildings). The cornerstones of the National Radon Risk Communication Strategy can be summarized as follows: - Definition of communication goals - Identification and categorization of target groups - Development of specific key messages for each of the target groups - Determination of communication channels and assessment of their efficiency - Integration of the radon issue in education and training - Cooperation with relevant organizations and platforms. The communication objectives, target groups and communication paths (and their evaluation) will be discussed during the presentation in detail.

  20. Radon dose assessment in underground mines in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T O; Rocha, Z; Cruz, P; Gouvea, V A; Siqueira, J B; Oliveira, A H

    2014-07-01

    Underground miners are internally exposed to radon, thoron and their short-lived decay products during the mineral processing. There is also an external exposure due to the gamma emitters present in the rock and dust of the mine. However, the short-lived radon decay products are recognised as the main radiation health risk. When inhaled, they are deposited in the respiratory system and may cause lung cancer. To address this concern, concentration measurements of radon and its progeny were performed, the equilibrium factor was determined and the effective dose received was estimated in six Brazilian underground mines. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM, AlphaGUARD and CR-39 detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman. The annual effective dose for the miners was estimated according to United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation methodologies. The mean value of the equilibrium factor was 0.4. The workers' estimated effective dose ranged from 1 to 21 mSv a(-1) (mean 9 mSv a(-1)). PMID:24723186

  1. Radon dose assessment in underground mines in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T O; Rocha, Z; Cruz, P; Gouvea, V A; Siqueira, J B; Oliveira, A H

    2014-07-01

    Underground miners are internally exposed to radon, thoron and their short-lived decay products during the mineral processing. There is also an external exposure due to the gamma emitters present in the rock and dust of the mine. However, the short-lived radon decay products are recognised as the main radiation health risk. When inhaled, they are deposited in the respiratory system and may cause lung cancer. To address this concern, concentration measurements of radon and its progeny were performed, the equilibrium factor was determined and the effective dose received was estimated in six Brazilian underground mines. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM, AlphaGUARD and CR-39 detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman. The annual effective dose for the miners was estimated according to United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation methodologies. The mean value of the equilibrium factor was 0.4. The workers' estimated effective dose ranged from 1 to 21 mSv a(-1) (mean 9 mSv a(-1)).

  2. Epidemiological study on the cancer mortality in an area with elevated radon daughter exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many countries water containing considerable amounts of Radon-222 is used in so-called ''Radon Spas'' for therapeutical purposes. In the Austrian radon spas Badgastein and Bad Hofgastein many detailed studies of the environmental natural radioactivity have been carried out for about 20 years. The accumulated annual doses to the basal cells of the segmental and subsegmental bronchiols (receiving the highest dose at inhalation of radon and daughters, and target for lung cancer) were calculated for several population groups in this area. The researcher calculated the exposure to radon and daughter accumulated over a lifetime for each single person who lived in Badgastein for at least 10 years and died between 1947 and 1980. The lifetime bronchial doses of 1366 residents who died between 1947 and 1980 from several causes of death were calculated. Altogether 56 lung cancer cases occurred. From that the annual lung cancer incidence rate for Badgastein (30 and 108 per 105 living people of all ages and for persons over 40 years respectively) is not statistically different from the mean observed lung cancer cases in the whole Federal Province of Salzburg (32 and 98 respectively). A case-control study has also been carried out to compare the mean annual lifetime exposure of lung cancer deaths with those of other. It can be seen that for the higher exposed population groups and even more so for the miners, the persons who died of lung cancer received a higher dose than those who died of other cancer and other causes. Therefore radon daughter inhalation may be responsible for lung cancer induction even in a non-mining environment

  3. Legal issues in radon affairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massuelle, M.H. [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    1999-12-01

    In France, it was only recently that cases related to high radon concentrations in dwellings received substantial publicity. This irruption of radon as a public health issue came with the general progress of scientific knowledge and the availability of a research capacity in France able to develop expertise. We are interested here in the legal implications of issues that arise from the lag between the activity of expertsand the regulatory activity in the domain of radon. We use the term expertise very broadly, to cover the practical application of research findings, the relation of the researchers with the community, and finally the acts by which experts provide their knowledge to the community. We first examine the course by which science developed the radon issue and the way they organized to move from research to expertise; here we try to characterize the various needs for radon expertise. We then discuss the legal difficulties associated with radon expertise.

  4. Radon mapping strategies in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Wurm, G; Friedmann, H

    2015-11-01

    According to current European and international recommendations (e.g. by IAEA, WHO and European Union), countries shall identify high radon areas. In Austria, this task was initiated already in the early 1990s, which yielded the first Austrian Radon Potential Map. This map is still in use, updated with recent indoor radon data in 2012. The map is based on radon gas measurements in randomly selected dwellings, normalised to a standard situation. To meet the current (legal) requirements, uncertainties in the existing Austrian radon map should be reduced. A new indoor radon survey with a different sampling strategy was started, and possible mapping methods are studied and tested. In this paper, the methodology for the existing map as well as the planned strategies to improve this map is discussed.

  5. Radon and the environment - 222Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having presented some physical and chemical characteristics of radon 222, this report describes the presence of radon in the environment (in the atmosphere and in soft waters), discusses the radio-toxic effect of radon on human health (exposure, epidemiology, dose calculation, share of radon in population exposure to ionizing radiations), comments the presence of radon in buildings, briefly describes actions aimed at reducing radon concentration within buildings, briefly addresses the issue of professional exposure to radon, evokes regulatory aspects (at the international level, in France, in Switzerland), and comments principles and practices of radon measurement in buildings, water, and underground cavities

  6. Radon and risk of cancer: epidemiological studies after occupational and domestic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of cancer risk after exposure to radon is mainly based on the results of uranium miners follow-up. A cohort study on the French uranium miners has demonstrated an excess of lung cancer and of larynx cancer mortality. A linear dose-response relationship has been described between the excess relative risk of lung cancer and the cumulative exposure to radon (Poisson regression). This study has contributed to a joint analysis of 11 cohorts of miners, the aim being a more precise evaluation of the different factors able to influence the dose-response relationship between radon and lung cancer mortality. These factors are: age at first exposure, attained age, time since exposure, the pattern of exposure over time and tobacco consumption. The extrapolation of the risk for the general public from the risk estimated after occupational exposure, has to be considered by taking in account several remarks: uranium miners are exposed, beside radon, to two other radiological components, gamma rays and long lived uranium dust, and to other substances specific of the mines, which are absent in the domestic environment but may with radon have an effect on the lung cancer risk. It was impossible to estimate directly, from these uranium miners data, the risk linked to radon for non-smokers and for female population. A case control-study is currently be carrying out in the French hospitals, in order to estimate the risk of lung cancer linked to the last 30 years of radon exposure in the dwellings. (author). 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Development of a low-level radon reference chamber; Entwicklung einer Low-Level-Radon-Referenzkammer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linzmaier, Diana

    2013-01-04

    The naturally occurring, radioactive noble gas radon-222 exists worldwide in different activity concentrations in the air. During the decay of radon-222, decay products are generated which are electrically charged and attach to aerosols in the air. Together with the aerosols, the radon is inhaled and exhaled by humans. While the radon is nearly completely exhaled, ca. 20 % of the inhaled aerosols remain in the lungs in one breath cycle. Due to ionizing radiation, in a chain of events, lung cancer might occur. Consequently, radon and its decay products are according to the current findings the second leading cause of lung cancer. At the workplace and in the home measurements of radon activity concentration are performed to determine the radiation exposition of humans. All measurement devices for the determination of radon activity concentration are calibrated above 1000 Bq/m{sup 3}, even though the mean value of the present investigation in Germany shows only 50 Bq/m{sup 3}. For the calibration of measurement devices in the range below 1000 Bq/m{sup 3} over a long time period, the generation of a stable reference atmosphere is presented in this work. Due to a long term calibration (t>5 days) of the measurement devices, smaller uncertainties result for the calibration factor. For the calibration procedure, a so-called low-level radon reference chamber was set up and started operation. The generation of a stable reference atmosphere is effected by means of emanation sources which consist of a radium-226 activity standard. On the basis of {gamma}-spectrometry, the effective emanation coefficient ofthe emanation sources is determined. The traceability of the activity concentration in the reference volume is realized via the activity ofthe radium-226, the emanation coefficient and the volume. With the emanation sources produced, stable reference atmospheres within the range of 150 Bq/m{sup 3} to 1900 Bq/m{sup 3} are achieved. For the realization, maintenance and

  8. Radon Research Program, FY-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has established a Radon Research Program with the primary objectives of acquiring knowledge necessary to improve estimates of health risks associated with radon exposure and also to improve radon control. Through the Radon Research Program, OHER supports and coordinates the research activities of investigators at facilities all across the nation. From this research, significant advances are being made in our understanding of the health effects of radon. OHER publishes this annual report to provide information to interested researchers and the public about its research activities. This edition of the report summarizes the activities of program researchers during FY90. Chapter 2 of this report describes how risks associated with radon exposure are estimated, what assumptions are made in estimating radon risks for the general public, and how the uncertainties in these assumptions affect the risk estimates. Chapter 3 examines how OHER, through the Radon Research Program, is working to gather information for reducing the uncertainties and improving the risk estimates. Chapter 4 highlights some of the major findings of investigators participating in the Radon Research Program in the past year. And, finally, Chapter 5 discusses the direction in which the program is headed in the future. 20 figs

  9. Survey: Knowledge level of the population about radon in Switzerland; Enquete: niveau de connaissance de la population au sujet du radon en Suisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruson, M.; Murith, C. [Office Federal de la Sante Publique, Section Risques Radiologiques, Berne (Switzerland); Rumo, S. [CBC Marketing Research, Berne (Switzerland)

    2010-01-15

    In 1995, a survey was conducted in order to investigate levels of knowledge about radon among the Swiss population. In 2008, a second survey, using a similar methodology, was carried out by the F.O.P.H.. The new study showed that about 40% of the Swiss population has heard of radon, which represents an increase of 8% over the 1995 survey. Most of the respondents knew that radon causes lung cancer, but believed that the gas also produces other health effects (in particular, migraine and skin conditions). In addition, older people, those with a high level of education and property owners tended to be more familiar with the radon issue than the public at large. The inhabitants of high-risk regions achieved markedly better results, which demonstrate that information campaigns in these regions have been successful. At the same time, additional communication efforts are required in low- and medium-risk municipalities, where the majority of the population lives. (authors)

  10. Computer code for general analysis of radon risks (GARR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a computer model for general analysis of radon risks that allow the user to specify a large number of possible models with a small number of simple commands. The model is written in a version of BASIC which conforms closely to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) definition for minimal BASIC and thus is readily modified for use on a wide variety of computers and, in particular, microcomputers. Model capabilities include generation of single-year life tables from 5-year abridged data, calculation of multiple-decrement life tables for lung cancer for the general population, smokers, and nonsmokers, and a cohort lung cancer risk calculation that allows specification of level and duration of radon exposure, the form of the risk model, and the specific population assumed at risk. 36 references, 8 figures, 7 tables

  11. Morphology of respiratory tract lesions in rats exposed to radon progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, G.E.; Cross, F.T.; Gies, R.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    We will discuss the morphologic features of lesions in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to radon and radon progeny. Groups of male Wister rats were exposed to from 10 to 1000 working levels (WL) of radon progeny in the presence of less than 1 to about 15 mg m{sup {minus}3} uranium ore dust. Cumulative exposures ranged from 20 to approximately 10,000 working level months (WLM). Higher exposure levels produced radiation pneumonitis characterized by interstitial fibrosis, associated with alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia and accumulations of alveolar macrophages containing phagocytosed uranium ore dust. Nodular fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis were correlated with deposits of uranium ore dust. Vesicular emphysema also occurred at higher exposure levels. Pulmonary adenomatosis appeared to be a preneoplastic lesion; it was composed of nodular proliferation of bronchioloalveolar epithelium without disruption of the general architecture of the parenchyma. At exposure levels where rats lived longer than 1 y, lung tumors and a few tumors of the nasal cavity developed. The principal lung tumors were pulmonary adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and adenosquamous carcinomas. Occasionally, malignant mesotheliomas and sarcomas were also present. The malignant lung tumors were characterized by invasion and occasionally metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Lower exposure rates produced more tumors, generally of different histologic types, and more fatal tumors than higher exposure rates. The similarity to relationships of human radon progeny exposure as far as incidence and types of lung tumors establish the validity of this animal model for studying radon carcinogenesis in humans.

  12. Morphology of respiratory tract lesions in rats exposed to radon progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We will discuss the morphologic features of lesions in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to radon and radon progeny. Groups of male Wister rats were exposed to from 10 to 1000 working levels (WL) of radon progeny in the presence of less than 1 to about 15 mg m-3 uranium ore dust. Cumulative exposures ranged from 20 to approximately 10,000 working level months (WLM). Higher exposure levels produced radiation pneumonitis characterized by interstitial fibrosis, associated with alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia and accumulations of alveolar macrophages containing phagocytosed uranium ore dust. Nodular fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis were correlated with deposits of uranium ore dust. Vesicular emphysema also occurred at higher exposure levels. Pulmonary adenomatosis appeared to be a preneoplastic lesion; it was composed of nodular proliferation of bronchioloalveolar epithelium without disruption of the general architecture of the parenchyma. At exposure levels where rats lived longer than 1 y, lung tumors and a few tumors of the nasal cavity developed. The principal lung tumors were pulmonary adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and adenosquamous carcinomas. Occasionally, malignant mesotheliomas and sarcomas were also present. The malignant lung tumors were characterized by invasion and occasionally metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Lower exposure rates produced more tumors, generally of different histologic types, and more fatal tumors than higher exposure rates. The similarity to relationships of human radon progeny exposure as far as incidence and types of lung tumors establish the validity of this animal model for studying radon carcinogenesis in humans

  13. Assessment of radiological effect of the indoor radon and its progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of all the sources of environmental radiation, radon and its progeny are considered to be responsible for a significant dose to man, especially when they are in enclosed areas like underground mines, caves, cellars, poorly designed and badly ventilated houses. Linear extrapolation from the dose response value of the uranium miners exposed to higher levels of radon and its daughters also suggest that the majority of the lung cancer incidence could be due to radon. Higher indoor radon levels and shift in the disequilibrium of the progeny concentration in dwellings caused by the lower ventilation rate leads to severalfold increase of lung cancer incidence from radon. The large risk which is anticipated calls for further studies in this field and may also lead to the conclusion that the slight, but much feared, burden due to man-made radioactivity could be more than compensated by controlling critical segments of the environmental radioactivity. In this report the study of risk due to breathing of indoor radon is briefly reviewed. Dose equivalent to the exposed tissue of the respiratory tract of the people living in dwellings are evaluated. Like most of the risk assessment of low level radiation, the effort to quantify the effect of radon in terms of death rate dose due to lung cancer attributable to radon levels indoors, has to rely on the extrapolation from the effects of the higher exposure rate. In situations where soil or building materials contain elevated radium levels, living in energy efficient houses may be as dangerous as heavy smoking. (author). 8 tabs., 5 figs., 41 refs

  14. Exposure to radon and radon progeny in the indoor environment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socolow, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    This report discusses the work done by the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies at Princeton University as part of the radon research program. It involves radon measurements in various buildings, as well as the use of natural ventilation to mitigate radon levels. The report is divided into four chapters: The use of radon entry rate measurements to understand radon concentration in buildings; Use of natural basement ventilation to control radon in single family dwellings; The effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses; and Comparison of natural and forced ventilation for radon mitigation in houses.

  15. Chemical methods for removing radon and radon daughters from air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L

    1972-03-31

    Liquid bromine trifluoride and the solid complexes ClF(2)SbF(6), BrF(2)SbF(6), BrF(4)Sb(2)F(11), IF(4)(SbF(6))(3) and BrF(2)BiF(6) react spontaneously with radon and radon daughters at 25 degrees C, converting the radioelements to nonvolatile ions and compounds. The reagents can be used in gas-scrubbing units to remove radon and radon daughters from air. The halogen fluoride-antimony pentafluoride complexes may be suitable for purifying air in uranium mines and analyzing radon in air, since they have low dissociation pressures at 25 degrees C and are less hazardous to handle than liquid halogen fluorides. PMID:5013675

  16. Description of the behavior of an aquifer by using continuous radon monitoring in a thermal spa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, Carlos; Rábago, Daniel; Fuente, Ismael; Celaya, Santiago; Quindós, Luis Santiago

    2016-02-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) levels in air and water have been analyzed continuously for almost a year in Las Caldas de Besaya thermal spa, north Spain. Radon is a naturally occurring noble gas from the decay of radium ((226)Ra) both constituents of radioactive uranium 238 series. It has been recognized as a lung carcinogen by the World Health Organization (WHO) and International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Furthermore the Royal Decree R.D 1439/2010 of November, 2010 establishes the obligation to study occupational activities where workers and, where appropriate, members of the public are exposed to inhalation of radon in workplaces such as spas. Together with radon measures several physico-chemical parameters were obtained such as pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity and air and water temperature. The devices used for the study of the temporal evolution of radon concentration have been the RTM 2100, the Radon Scout and gamma spectrometry was complementarily used to determine the transfer factor of the silicone tubes in the experimental device. Radon concentrations obtained in water and air of the spa are high, with an average of 660 Bq/l and 2900 Bq/m(3) respectively, where water is the main source of radon in the air. Radiation dose for workers and public was estimated from these levels of radon. The data showed that the thermal processes can control the behavior of radon which can be also influenced by various physical and chemical parameters such as pH and redox potential. PMID:26599146

  17. Radon awareness survey in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant progress has been made in reducing the risk from exposure to radon and its progeny all over the world as a result of efforts made by different organisations which are working together to educate public about the harmful effects of radon. During the past several surveys, it was found that uneducated people were totally ignorant of radon in Pakistan. Even a large number of science graduates knew very little about radon and its hazards. Therefore, a nationwide survey was conducted to measure general awareness and factual knowledge about radon and its health hazards. In this regard, a questionnaire was prepared and distributed among different classes of the society including students, government employees and general public throughout the country. A total of 7000 people with different educational backgrounds participated in this survey, which includes uneducated people (1000), science and humanities graduates (2000 each) and under graduate (2000). Statistical analysis, excluding uneducated people, revealed that 30.4% of the total respondents were aware of radon and 69.6% had even not heard of radon. Only ∼8.4% of the total respondents were knowledgeably aware of radon. (authors)

  18. Indoor radon concentration in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary survey of Rn concentration indoors by means of track detectors and y-ray dose rate with the use of TLD in almost 500 homes in selected areas of Poland was performed in the late 1980s. It was concluded that radon contributes 1.16 mSv i.e. about 46 per cent of the total natural environment ionizing radiation dose to the Polish population. Comparison of the average radon concentrations in 4 seasons of a year and in 3 groups of buildings: masonry, concrete and wood, revealed that the ground beneath the building structure is likely the dominant source of radon indoors. Since the National Atomic Energy Agency in its regulations of 1988-03-31 set up the permissible limit of the equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon in new buildings (equal 100 Bq/m3), the nation-scale survey project for radon in buildings has been undertaken. These regulations were supposed to take effect in 1995-01-01. The project has 3 objectives: to estimate the radiation exposure due to radon daughters received by Polish population to identify radon-prone areas in Poland to investigate dependence of the indoor radon concentrations on such parameters as: type of construction material, presence (or absence) of cellar under the building, number of floor

  19. APPLICATION OF RADON REDUCTION METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The document is intended to aid homeowners and contractors in diagnosing and solving indoor radon problems. It will also be useful to State and Federal regulatory officials and many other persons who provide advice on the selection, design and operation of radon reduction methods...

  20. The history, development and the present status of the radon measurement programme in the United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, A C

    2015-11-01

    The US radon measurement programme began in the late 1950s by the US Public Health Service in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah during the uranium frenzy. After the 1967 Congressional Hearings on the working conditions in uranium mines, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was asked to conduct studies in active uranium mines to assess the exposure of the miners on the Colorado Plateau and in New Mexico. From 1967 to 1972, the Health and Safety Laboratory of the US AEC in New York investigated more than 20 uranium mines for radon and radon decay product concentrations and particle size in 4 large uranium mines in New Mexico. In 1970, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established and took over some of the AEC radon measurement activities. Between 1975 and 1978, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory of the US Department of Energy conducted the first detailed indoor radon survey in the USA. Later in 1984, the very high concentrations of radon found in Pennsylvania homes set the wheels in motion and gave birth to the US Radon Industry. The US EPA expanded its involvement in radon issues and assumed an active role by establishing the National Radon Proficiency Program to evaluate the effectiveness of radon measurement and mitigation methods. In 1998, due to limited resources EPA privatised the radon programme. This paper presents a personal perspective of past events and current status of the US radon programme. It will present an update on radon health effects, the incidence rate of lung cancer in the USA and the number of radon measurements made from 1988 to 2013 using short-term test methods. More than 23 million measurements were made in the last 25 y and as a result more than 1.24 million homes were mitigated successfully. It is estimated that radon measurements performed in the USA are made using long-term testing devices. The number of homes above the US action level of 148 Bq m(-3) (4 pCi l(-1)) may be ∼8.5 million because ∼50 million homes

  1. Environmental radon and cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, A.K.M.M.; Kirk, A.E. (South Bank Polytechnic, London (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    Data collected from the office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) statistics and those published by the Leukaemia Research Fund (LRF) have been analysed with a view to examining whether radon is a possible causative agent in the induction of leukaemias. Radon concentration values have been taken from a NRPB survey. Positive correlation has been observed between radon concentration and incidence of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and chronic lymphoid leukaemia (CLL). Employing the method of BEIR IV, the lifetime probability of leukaemia incidence, R[sub o], of a non-exposed person (zero radon concentration) has been calculated for AML, CML, ALL and CLL, which agree well with those values obtained from extrapolation of linear graphs of leukaemia deaths versus radon concentration. (author).

  2. Radon availability in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources (NMBMMR) in cooperation with the Radiation Licensing and Registration Section of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been evaluating geologic and soil conditions that may contribute to elevated levels of indoor radon throughout New Mexico. Various data have been integrated and interpreted in order to determine areas of high radon availability. The purpose of this paper is to summarize some of these data for New Mexico and to discuss geologic controls on the distribution of radon. Areas in New Mexico have been identified from these data as having a high radon availability. It is not the intent of this report to alarm the public, but to provide data on the distribution of radon throughout New Mexico

  3. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  4. Radon levels in drinking water and soil samples of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts of Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sudhir; Rani, Asha; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-07-01

    Radon causes lung cancer when it is trapped inside the lungs. Therefore it is very important to analyze the radon concentration in water and soil samples. In the present investigation, water and soil samples collected from 20 different locations of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts of Northern Rajasthan, India have been studied by using RAD7. The measured radon concentration in water samples varies from 0.5 to 15Bql(-1). The observed values lie within the safe limit as set by UNSCEAR, 2008. The total annual effective dose due to radon in water corresponding to all studied locations has been found to be well within the safe limit of 0.1mSvy(-1) as recommended by World Health Organization (WHO, 2004) and European Council (EU, 1998). The measurements carried out on radon concentration in soil samples reveal a variation from 1750 to 9850Bqm(-3). These results explore that the water of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts is suitable for drinking purpose without posing any health hazard but soil hazards depend upon its permeability and radon concentration. PMID:27135605

  5. Indoor concentrations of radon 222 and its daughters: sources, range, and environmental influences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author here reviews what is presently known about factors affecting indoor concentrations of radon 222 and its daughters. In US single-family homes, radon concentrations are found to average about 1.5 pCi/1, but substantially higher concentrations occur frequently: perhaps a million US homes have concentrations exceeding 8 pCi/1 (from which occupants receive radiation doses comparable to those now experienced by uranium miners). The major contributor to indoor radon is ordinary soil underlying homes, with this radon being transported indoors primarily by the slight depressurization that occurs toward the bottom of a house interior (due to indoor-outdoor temperature differences and winds). Water from underground sources contributes significantly in a minority of cases, primarily residences with private wells, with public water supplies contributing only a few percent of indoor radon, even when drawn from wells. The strong variability in indoor concentrations is associated primarily with variability in the amount of radon entering homes from these various sources, and secondarily with differences in ventilation rates. However, for a given entry rate, the ventilation rate is the key determinant of indoor concentrations. Human doses are also influenced strongly by the chemical behavior of the daughters (i.e., decay products of radon), and considerable progress has been made recently in investigating a major aspect of this behavior, i.e., the manner in which daughters attach to airborne particles, to walls, and - indeed - to the lining of the lung itself, where the key radiation dose occurs

  6. Human exposure to indoor radon: a survey in the region of Guarda, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louro, Alina; Peralta, Luís; Soares, Sandra; Pereira, Alcides; Cunha, Gilda; Belchior, Ana; Ferreira, Luís; Monteiro Gil, Octávia; Louro, Henriqueta; Pinto, Paulo; Rodrigues, António Sebastião; Silva, Maria João; Teles, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as the city of Guarda at the northeast of Portugal. This gas is recognised as a carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoke. Therefore, the knowledge of radon concentrations inside the houses (where people stay longer) is important from the point of view of radiological protection. The main goal of this study was to assess the radon concentration in an area previously identified with a potentially high level of residential radon. The radon concentration was measured using CR-39 detectors, exposed for a period of 2 months in 185 dwellings in the Guarda region. The radon concentration in studied dwellings, ranged between 75 and 7640 Bq m(-3), with a geometric mean of 640 Bq m(-3) and an arithmetic mean of 1078 Bq m(-3). Based on a local winter-summer radon concentration variation model, these values would correspond to an annual average concentration of 860 Bq m(-3). Several factors contribute to this large dispersion, the main one being the exact location of housing construction in relation to the geochemical nature of the soil and others the predominant building material and ventilation. Based on the obtained results an average annual effective dose of 15 mSv y(-1) is estimated, well above the average previously estimated for Portugal.

  7. CONTRIBUTION OF RADON FLOWS AND RADON SOURCES TO THE RADON CONCENTRATION IN A DWELLING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEIJER, RJ; STOOP, P; PUT, LW

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a model is presented for analysis of the radon concentrations in a compartment in terms of contributions from transport by flows of air between compartments and from radon sources in the compartment. Measurements were made to study the effect of increased natural ventilation of the cra

  8. Citizen's Guide to Radon: The Guide to Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... US EPA US Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radon Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us You ... Your Family from Radon A Citizen's Guide to Radon: The Guide to Protecting Yourself and Your Family ...

  9. Environmental radon and cancer correlations in Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, C T; Weiffenbach, C V; Norton, S A

    1983-08-01

    The distribution of 222Rn has been measured in the sixteen counties of Maine, U.S.A. by liquid scintillation counting of water samples from more than two thousand public and private wells. Three hundred and fifty of these wells have been characterized for geology and hydrology. Airborne radon has been measured in seventy houses with grab samples and in eighteen houses for 5-7 days each with continuously recording diffusion-electrostatic radon detectors. Concentrations of radon in water ranged from 20 to 180,000 pCi/l. Granite areas yielded the highest average levels (mean = 22,100 pCi/l.; n = 136), with considerable intra-granite variation. Metasedimentary rocks yielded levels characteristic of the lithology for metamorphic grades ranging from chlorite to andalusite. Sillimanite and higher-grade rocks yielded higher 222Rn levels, probably due to the intrusion of uranium-bearing pegmatites in these terranes. Airborne 222Rn in homes ranged from 0.05 to 210 pCi/l. At the high end of this range, doses will exceed recommended industrial limits. In some homes only a small fraction of the airborne 222Rn was due to the water supply. Average 222Rn levels in domestic water supplies for each of the 16 counties, calculated by areally averaging rock types and their associated 222Rn levels, were found to be significantly correlated with rates for all cancers combined and rates for lung and reproductive cancers in the counties. Although numerous factors other than cancer induction by indoor daughter exposures may be responsible for the observed correlations, these have not been investigated in detail. PMID:6885433

  10. Radon in the workplace: Implications of studies of post-remediation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon gas has been shown to cause an increased incidence of lung cancer. In affected areas, levels in the overground workplace can be sufficiently high to be a health risk and remediation is required. In the UK, the workplace Action Level is 400 Bq m-3. The variation of radon levels in the workplace was studied both before and after remediation. In most rooms, remediation resulted in a greater reduction at night than during the working day. The dose reduction, and therefore the health benefit, to workers is less than that predicted by the drop in radon averaged over 24 h. In order to obtain a health benefit to 75% of workers in our series, the 24 h average radon level in each room must be reduced to -3. It is recommended that UK Regulatory Agencies adopt a post-remediation workplace Action Level of 225 Bq m-3. (authors)

  11. Radon-222 content in the internal atmosphere of Hungarian residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use in home buildings in Hungary of some substitute materials, e.g., coal-ash, fly-ash, etc., caused greater background radiation than the traditional building materials because of their higher content of natural radioactivity. The radon-222 concentration was measured in 1182 flats (apartments) along with the concentrations of its short-lived daughter elements and radon-220 in room air and the radiation dose to the epithelium of the bronchial tubes of the lung was estimated. The average annual radon-222 concentration in open air was estimated as being 0.2 pCi/l. To confirm this estimate the radon-222 concentration in the atmosphere near the surface of the earth and its annual fluctuation was measured. (U.S.)

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis of radon remediation in schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor radon is an important source of radiation dosage in the general population and has been recognised as a world-wide environmental and public health challenge. Governments in many Western and Eastern European and North American countries are undertaking active radon-risk reduction policies, including the remediation of existing residential and work place building stocks (1). These endeavours include a priority of remediating school buildings. Epidemiological and technical radon research has produced information which has enabled attention to be turned to specific effectiveness and optimisation questions regarding radon identification and remediation programmes in buildings, including schools. Decision making about policy implementation has been an integral part of these programmes and questions have been raised about the economic implications of the regulations and optimisation strategies for workplace action level policy (2,3). (the action level applied to schools is 400 Bq m-3). No previous study has estimated the cost-effectiveness of a radon remediation programme for schools using the methodological framework now considered appropriate in the economic evaluation of health interventions. It is imperative that this should be done, in order that the resources required to obtain health gain from radon remediation in schools can be systematically compared with equivalent data for other health interventions and radon remediation programmes. In this study a cost-effectiveness analysis of radon remediation in schools was undertaken, using the best available national data and information from Northamptonshire on the costs and effectiveness of radon identification and remediation in schools, and the costs and health impact of lung cancer cases. A model based on data from Northamptonshire is presented (where 6.3% of residential stock is over 200 Bq m-3). The resultant cost-effectiveness ratio was pound 7,550 per life year gained in pound 1997. Results from the

  13. An assessment of individual health benefits from a domestic Radon remediation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon gas occurs naturally in the environment and has been shown to cause increased numbers of lung cancers in miners when present at high levels in underground workings. Reviews of the miners' studies suggest that levels found in some homes can give rise to increased lung cancer incidence, and this has been confirmed by recent case control studies in South West England, and Germany. The current scientific consensus, expressed in the BEIR 6. report is that the risk of lung cancer has a linear relation with increasing radon exposure, and that there is no threshold of risk. The distribution of such excessive levels is geographically varied, and many countries have established programmes to identify the homes at risk, and encourage homeowners to remediate to reduce levels. Northamptonshire, in the centre of England, has been declared a radon Affected Area by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), and has an average of 6.3 % of homes above the UK domestic Action Level of 200 Bq m-3. Several studies have suggested that theoretically such programmes can be justified on the basis of health benefits and cost effectiveness. Our group was the first to study actual radon remediation programmes - in Northamptonshire, studying first National Health Service properties, schools, and homes. These studies demonstrated that remediation programmes in Northamptonshire could be justified. The domestic radon remediation programme in Northamptonshire, once complete, could be favourably compared to other health initiatives such as the UK mammography screening programme for women aged 50 to 65

  14. Problems in estimating risks due to exposure to radon and its decay products in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems in estimating risks due to exposure to radon and its decay products exsist along the process of making these estimations. To obtain representative value of the radon concentration in Japanese indoor location, an appropriate sampling plan and statistically large enough number of measurements are necessary. Suitable method for measurement should be carefully selected for the purpose of a study. Comparative studies on the methods for measurement are also necessary at domestic or international levels. Natural and artificial parameters influencing the levels of radon should be analyzed in respect of Japanese specificities. The significant factors in estimating doses from radon and its decay products such as the equilibrium factor F for indoor radon, ventilation rate, aerosol concentration, size distribution of aerosols, occupancy factor, breathing rate and lung model must be also studied in respect of Japanese specificities. Problems in calculating the effective dose equivalent for the lung may exist in the target tissue, histological and physiological parameters and the risk factor in inducing lung cancer in the Japanese population. (author)

  15. The radon in Corsica: evaluation of exposure and associated risks; Le radon en Corse: evaluation de l'exposition et des risques associes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    The average level found in Corsica is superior to that one found in France. On the basis of the results of it campaign I.R.S.N.-D.G.S., the French average is of 90 Bq.m{sup 3} against 197 Bq.m{sup 3} for Corsica. The risk of dying from a lung cancer attributable to the radon was estimated at 13 % in France. The evaluation of risk led on Corsica shows a risk attributable to the radon included between 21.5 and 28 %.This evaluation of risk is only a stage. It is important to arrest better the exposure to the radon of the Corsican population. For a good estimation of the levels of radon and thus the impact of this one, additional measures are necessary. The results of the data analysis of exposure allow to guide the choice of the new measures: a campaign on the season effect in Corsica and a completion of the measures in housing are two main axes.Seen the importance of the interaction between the tobacco and the radon, a good estimation of the tobacco customs in Corsica and its evolution in the time seems essential to estimate indeed the impact of the radon in this region. (N.C.)

  16. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the United States may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100

  17. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100

  18. Models for retrospective quantification of indoor radon exposure in case-control studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In epidemiologic studies on lung cancer risk due to indoor radon the quantification of individual radon exposure over a long time period is one of the main issues. Therefore, radon measurements in one or more dwellings, which in total have been inhabited by the participants for a sufficient time-period, are necessary as well as consideration of changes of building characteristics and ventilation habits, which influence radon concentration. Given data on 1-y alpha-track measurements and personal information from 6,000 participants of case-control studies in West and East Germany, and improved method is developed to assess individual radon exposure histories. Times spent in different rooms of the dwelling, which are known from a personal questionnaire, are taken into account. The time spent outside the house varies substantially among the participants. Therefore, assuming a substantially lower radon exposure outside the dwelling, the residence time constitutes an important aspect of total radon exposure. By means of an analysis of variance, important determinants of indoor radon are identified, namely constant conditions such as type of house, type of construction, year of construction, floor and type of basement, and changeable conditions such as heating system, window insulation, and airing habits. A correction of measurements in former dwellings by factors derived from the analysis is applied if current living conditions differ from those of the participants at the time when they were living in the particular dwellings. In rare cases the adjustment for changes leads to a correction of the measurements with a factor of about 1.4, but a reduction of 5% on average only. Exposure assessment can be improved by considering time at home and changes of building and ventilation conditions that affect radon concentration. The major concern that changes in ventilation habits and building conditions lead to substantial errors in exposure assessment cannot be confirmed in the

  19. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. (New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine); Stark, A.; Ju, C. (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology)

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to above-average'' radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject's presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

  20. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to ''above-average'' radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject's presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210

  1. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    CERN Document Server

    Guiseppe, V E; Hime, A; Rielage, K; Westerdale, S

    2011-01-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly Rn-222) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of Pb-210 on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to depos...

  2. Evolution of radon dose evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical change of radon dose evaluation is reviewed based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR reports. Since 1955, radon has been recognized as one of the important sources of exposure of the general public. However, it was not really understood that radon is the largest dose contributor until 1977 when a new concept of effective dose equivalent was introduced by International Commission on Radiological Protection. In 1982, the dose concept was also adapted by UNSCEAR and evaluated per caput dose from natural radiation. Many researches have been carried out since then. However, lots of questions have remained open in radon problems, such as the radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha rays and the large discrepancy of risk estimation among dosimetric and epidemiological approaches.

  3. VENTILATION INFLUENCE UPON INDOOR AIR RADON LEVEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田德源

    1995-01-01

    Levels of indoor radon in air are studied by a continuous electrostatic radon monitor under normal living conditions to evaluate the influence of air conditioned ventilation on indoor air radon level.Results show that the indoor air radon concentrations are not much more than those without household conditioner living condition.although using household conditioner requires a sealed room which should lead to a higher radon level.Turning on air conditioner helps lower indoor radon level.Therefore.the total indoor air Rn levels are normal>ventilation>exhaust or indraft> exhaust plus indraft.

  4. RADON PROGENY AS AN EXPERIMENTAL TOOL FOR DOSIMETRY OF NANOAEROSOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzer, Lev; Ruzer, Lev S.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-02-25

    The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry ?-- nanotechnology. Nanoproduct commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nanoaerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nanoscale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nanoaerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction.

  5. Radon progeny as an experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry — nano technology. Nano product commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nano aerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nano scale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nano aerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction. (author)

  6. Radon legislation and national guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and The Council of the European Union have recommended the Member States to take action against radon in homes and at workplaces. Within the EU project European Research into Radon in Construction Concerted Action, ERRICCA, the Topic Group on Legal and Building Code Impact was designated to study the current radon legislation and give advice regarding future enactment of laws and recommendations. On behalf of the Group, a questionnaire on radon legislation was sent out to nearly all European states and a selection of non-European states. Questions were asked regarding reference levels for dwellings, workplaces and drinking water, and about regulations or recommendations for building materials and city planning. All 15 EU Member States, 17 non-EU European countries and 10 non-European countries responded to the questionnaire. Their answers are considered current as of the end of 1998. Most European States and many non-European countries have recommended reference levels for dwellings and workplaces, and some have guidelines for measures against radon incorporated in their building codes and guidelines for construction techniques. However, only a few countries have enforced reference levels or regulations for planning and construction. The reference levels for indoor radon concentration in existing and new dwellings or workplaces are within the range 150-1000 Bq/m3. Sweden is the only country (Out of 15 EU member states) which has enforced limits for existing dwellings. Sweden and the UK have both enforced levels for new dwellings. 7 non-European countries (Out of 17 responding countries) have enforced levels for existing dwellings and 9 have them for new dwellings. At the end of 1998, only Finland, Sweden, the Czech Republic, Romania, Russia and the Slovak Republic had limits for radon in water, although 8 countries were planning to introduce such limits. The present limits are within the range for 50

  7. Radon integral measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radon Integral Measurement System (SMIR) is a device designed specially to detect, to count and to store the data of the acquisition of alpha particles emitted by Radon-222 coming from the underground. The system includes a detection chamber, a radiation detector, a digital system with bateries backup and an auxiliary photovoltaic cell. A personal computer fixes the mode in which the system works, transmitting the commands to the system by the serial port. The heart of the system is a microprocesor working with interrupts by hardware. Every external device to the microprocessor sends his own interrupt request and the microprocessor handles the interrupts with a defined priority. The system uses a real time clock, compatible with the microprocessor, to take care of the real timing and date of the acquisition. A non volatile RAM is used to store data of two bytes every 15 minutes along 41 days as a maximum. After the setting up to the system by the computer, it can operate in stand alone way for up 41 days in the working place without the lose of any data. If the memory is full the next data will be written in the first locations of the memory. The memory is divided in pages corresponding every one of this to a different day of the acquisition. The counting time for every acquisition can be programmed by the user from 15 minutes to 65535 minutes but it is recommended to use a small time not to reach the limit of 65535 counts in every acquisition period. We can take information of the system without affecting the acquisition process in the field by using a lap top computer, then the information can be stored in a file. There is a program in the computer that can show the information in a table of values or in a bar graph. (Author)

  8. Radon as geological tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, T.; Anjos, R.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Valladares, D.L.; Rizzotto, M.; Velasco, H.; Ayub, J. Juri [Universidad Nacional de San Luis (Argentina). Inst. de Matematica Aplicada San Luis (IMASL); Silva, A.A.R. da; Yoshimura, E.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: This work presents measurements of {sup 222}Rn levels performed in La Carolina gold mine and Los Condores tungsten mine at the province of San Luis, Argentina, today used for tourist visitation, and can evaluate the potential use of such radioactive noble gas as tracer or marker for geological processes in underground environments. By concentrations of {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 23}'8U were also measured in the walls of tunnels were determined the rocks mineral composition, what indicated that the mines have the same composition. In this sense, we used nuclear trace plastic detectors CR-39, gamma spectrometry of rock samples and Geiger-Muller (GM) monitors The patterns of radon gas transportation processes revealed that La Carolina could be interpreted through a model based on a radioactive gas confined into a single entrance tube, with constant cross section and air velocity. Los Condores, which has a second main entrance, could be interpreted through a model based on a radioactive gas confined into a two entrance tube, allowing a chimney effect for air circulation. The results showed the high potential of using {sup 222}Rn as a geological tracer. In what concerns the occupational hazard, in summer (time of more intense tourist activity in the mine) La Carolina presented a mean concentration of the radioactive noble gas that exceeds in four times the action level of 1,5 kBq m{sup -3} recommended by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). The chimney effect shows the low mean concentration of radon in Los Condores. (author)

  9. Indoor radon and radon daughters survey at Campinas-Brazil using CR-39: First results

    CERN Document Server

    Guedes, S; Iunes, P J; Navia, L M S; Neman, R S; Paulo, S R; Rodrigues, V C; Souza, W F; Tello, C A S; Zúñiga, A G

    1999-01-01

    The first results of a radon and radon daughters (RD) survey performed at Campinas-SP, Brazil, are presented. We employed a technique that, potentially, makes possible to measure the radon and RD activity in the air and to separate from this result the activity of radon, alone. In this preliminary paper only the former activity is studied.

  10. Dose repartition in alveoli, alveolar ducts and bronchi of rats exposed to radon and its progeny, preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Bisson, Michèle; Fritsch, P; Morlier, J.P.; Sabattie, P.; Tredaniel, J.; Richard-Le Naour, H.; Monchaux, G.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, micronuclei scoring has been performed to estimate doses delivered to the lungs after heterogenous irradiation induced after inhalation of radon and its progeny. These studies were limited to the deep lung after either extraction of alveolar macrophages (AM) by lavage (Taya et al., 1994, Johnson and Newton, 1994) or enzymatic dissociation of lung cells to initiate fibroblast cultures (Khan et al., 1994). Dose estimates were performed after comparison with micronuclei formation induc...

  11. Current status of radon and radium monitoring at the Federal University of Technology (UTFPR), PR, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous and systematic studies performed in different countries for many decades resulted in the explicit conclusion that radon exposure, as well as its progeny, is the main cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. All three natural radon isotopes (222Rn, 220Rn and 219Rn) are produced in the three principal natural radioactive decay chains. Specifically, the 222Rn is produced by the decay series of 238U and proceeded from α-decay of 226Ra. Current work describes the present status and obtained results concerning indoor radon survey in dwellings, radon in water supply and soil gas tests performed by the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of the Federal University of Technology (UTFPR) within Curitiba urban area. For radon in air activity measurements, it was used polycarbonate etched track detectors such as LEXAN (GE) and CR-39, mounted in diffusion chambers. For soil gas measurements, the experimental setup was based on the Professional Radon Monitor (AlphaGUARD, Genitron/SAPHYMO) connected to the air pump with filter vessels and to specially developed in our Laboratory the Soil Gas Probe. In the case of radon tests in drinking water, the experimental setup was based on the AlphaGUARD Radon monitor and Electronic radon detector RAD7 (Durridge Company, Inc.) connected to special kit of glass vessels through the air pump. Obtained results permitted to identify few dwellings where radon concentration in air was found bigger than 600 Bq/m3 which is considered as the action level by most of the European Community and the World Health Organization (WHO). In the case of studied artesian wells, collected samples of water presented the average 222Rn activity about 60 Bq/L which is 6 times bigger than maximum level recommended by USEPA. Some artesian wells presented the radon activity of almost 200 Bq/L. More over, it was identified the radioactivity of radium (226Ra) salts which are soluble in water and almost all water samples presented results bigger than tolerated

  12. A critical look at the development of radon legislation in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear and high-frequency electromagnetic radiation can harm health. The effect is usually seen with a delay of years or tens of years. The likelihood of late effects, mostly cancer, is directly proportional to the dose. The highest radiation exposure of people is caused by radon inside buildings. Health damage from exposure to radon is expressed selectively by increased likelihood of lung cancer. Probability of disease is directly proportional to income inhaled aerosols of radon daughter products transformation. In the last 40 years, all international bodies which regulate effects of nuclear radiation on human population deal also with the issue of protecting people from harmful effects of radon. We can mention the International Commission on Radiological Protection - ICRP, the International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, the World Health Organization - Who, the leading European competent authority on radiological protection - HERA, International Radiation Protection Association - IRPA. No wonder that the protection of people from exposure to radon in buildings is expressed in the legislation of the European Atomic Energy Community - EURATOM. 22 years ago the designated national authorities of the Slovak Republic started with the issue of protecting people from exposure to radon. Product of theirs activity was the Ministry of Health regulation No. 406/92 . Unfortunately, the radon commission after 1996 stopped its activity. The post of the Chief Hygienist was restored and the Regional Public Health Authority was entitled by the radon risk regulation. This authority issued the Ministry of Health regulation No. 12/2001 which was characterized by discriminatory elements, because the protection of buildings against radon penetration from the ground was ordered only to business entities. The Ministry of Health regulation No. 528/2007 on protection against the effects of natural radioactivity is a real shame of the Slovak radiation protection and demonstrates

  13. Current status of radon and radium monitoring at the Federal University of Technology (UTFPR), PR, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Schelin, Hugo R.; Denyak, Valeriy; Barbosa, Laercio; Perna, Allan F.N. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Numerous and systematic studies performed in different countries for many decades resulted in the explicit conclusion that radon exposure, as well as its progeny, is the main cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. All three natural radon isotopes ({sup 222}Rn, {sup 220}Rn and {sup 219}Rn) are produced in the three principal natural radioactive decay chains. Specifically, the {sup 222}Rn is produced by the decay series of {sup 238}U and proceeded from {alpha}-decay of {sup 226}Ra. Current work describes the present status and obtained results concerning indoor radon survey in dwellings, radon in water supply and soil gas tests performed by the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of the Federal University of Technology (UTFPR) within Curitiba urban area. For radon in air activity measurements, it was used polycarbonate etched track detectors such as LEXAN (GE) and CR-39, mounted in diffusion chambers. For soil gas measurements, the experimental setup was based on the Professional Radon Monitor (AlphaGUARD, Genitron/SAPHYMO) connected to the air pump with filter vessels and to specially developed in our Laboratory the Soil Gas Probe. In the case of radon tests in drinking water, the experimental setup was based on the AlphaGUARD Radon monitor and Electronic radon detector RAD7 (Durridge Company, Inc.) connected to special kit of glass vessels through the air pump. Obtained results permitted to identify few dwellings where radon concentration in air was found bigger than 600 Bq/m{sup 3} which is considered as the action level by most of the European Community and the World Health Organization (WHO). In the case of studied artesian wells, collected samples of water presented the average {sup 222}Rn activity about 60 Bq/L which is 6 times bigger than maximum level recommended by USEPA. Some artesian wells presented the radon activity of almost 200 Bq/L. More over, it was identified the radioactivity of radium ({sup 226}Ra) salts which are soluble in water and almost

  14. Risk assessment of exposure to radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this project was to assess the risk due to inhalation of radon and its decay products using an horizontal approach across a large scale research programme. The central objective was the assessment of human risk which requires combination of several topics involving a multidisciplinary approach. In the Aerosol Studies Group, progress was achieved in improvement, calibration and automation of experimental techniques for continuous and integrated measurements of the unattached fraction fp- and equilibrium factor F- values. Measurements were performed to determine the variation of size distributions of unattached and aerosol-associated radon decay products under typical living conditions. All aerosol groups performed controlled chamber studies to understand the basic behaviour of airborne activity concentrations. Measurements were performed to determine neutralisation rates of 218Po, to understand the cluster growth with residence time and to understand the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles. In the Modelling Group, the programme RADEP has been developed to calculate the weighted committed equivalent lung dose per unit exposure of radon progeny (Hw/Pp) which implements the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM). The stochastic deposition model (IDEAL) has been compared with the deposition model used by the HRTM, and the agreement between the two deposition models was excellent. A deterministic radon progeny dosimetry model (RADOS) has been developed. This model includes all bronchial airway generations compared with the HRTM that groups the 16 airway generations into three regions. Initial calculations with RADOS show that the basal and secretory cell doses are slightly smaller compared with that of the HRTM. A sensitivity analysis has been performed that has identified those HRTM model parameters that most affect the Hw/Pp. A stochastic rat deposition model (RALMO) and a clearance model for the rat based on the HRTM have been

  15. Risk assessment of exposure to radon decay products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monchaux, G

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this project was to assess the risk due to inhalation of radon and its decay products using an horizontal approach across a large scale research programme. The central objective was the assessment of human risk which requires combination of several topics involving a multidisciplinary approach. In the Aerosol Studies Group, progress was achieved in improvement, calibration and automation of experimental techniques for continuous and integrated measurements of the unattached fraction f{sub p}- and equilibrium factor F- values. Measurements were performed to determine the variation of size distributions of unattached and aerosol-associated radon decay products under typical living conditions. All aerosol groups performed controlled chamber studies to understand the basic behaviour of airborne activity concentrations. Measurements were performed to determine neutralisation rates of {sup 218}Po, to understand the cluster growth with residence time and to understand the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles. In the Modelling Group, the programme RADEP has been developed to calculate the weighted committed equivalent lung dose per unit exposure of radon progeny (H{sub w}/P{sub p}) which implements the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM). The stochastic deposition model (IDEAL) has been compared with the deposition model used by the HRTM, and the agreement between the two deposition models was excellent. A deterministic radon progeny dosimetry model (RADOS) has been developed. This model includes all bronchial airway generations compared with the HRTM that groups the 16 airway generations into three regions. Initial calculations with RADOS show that the basal and secretory cell doses are slightly smaller compared with that of the HRTM. A sensitivity analysis has been performed that has identified those HRTM model parameters that most affect the Hw/Pp. A stochastic rat deposition model (RALMO) and a clearance model for the rat based on the

  16. Etiology of lung cancer at the Gejiu tin mine, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, S.Q.

    1987-01-01

    There were 1,724 lung cancer cases registered at the Yunnan Tin Corporation in the period 1954-1986, of which 90% had a history of working underground. Previous exposure to radon, and radon daughters and arsenic is considered to be responsible for the high incidence of lung cancer in these miners. Arsenic may come from inhalation of arsenic-containing ore dust or other environmental arsenic pollution. It appears that radon exposure accounts to a greater extent than arsenic for the increase of lung cancer in these miners. Pathological study was made of 100 surgically resected lung cancer specimens. In this way the distribution and composition of dust retention was determined in relation to peripheral lung cancer.

  17. The Austrian radon activities on the way to the national radon action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Wurm, G; Haider, W

    2014-07-01

    Based on the new Euratom Basic Safety Standards (BSS), all EU member states will be obliged to design a strategy to address long-term risks from radon exposure, which is laid down in the 'national radon action plan'. In Austria, the National Radon Centre is responsible for the development of the action plan. This paper presents the current and planned radon protection activities on the way to establish the radon action plan--like the national radon database, the definition of radon risk areas by improving the existing radon map, as well as strategies and activities to increase the radon awareness of the public and decision-makers and to involve the building sector. The impact of and the need for actions caused by the BSS requirements on the Austrian radon legislation, strategy and programme are discussed.

  18. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337

  19. Radon Sources and Associated Risk in terms of Exposure and Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratios Gregory Vogiannis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon concern the international scientific community from early 20th century. Initially as radium emanation, almost the second half of the century as severe harmful to human health. Initial brilliant period of use as medicine, followed by a period of intense concern for its health effects. Primary target groups surveyed were miners early in Europe later in U.S. There is now compelling evidence that radon and its progeny can cause lung cancer. Human activities may create or modify pathways increasing indoor radon concentration compared to outdoor background. These pathways can be controlled by preventive and corrective actions. Indoor Radon and its short-lived progeny attached on aerosol particles or free compose an air mixture that carry a significant energy amount (PAEC. Exposure on PAEC and dose delivered reviewed in detail. Special attention was paid to the case of water workers because lack of adequate data. Radon risk assessment and current legislation regulates dose from radon and its progeny, also were reviewed.

  20. Thermo-diffusional radon waves in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S

    2016-09-15

    A new theoretical framework for diurnal and seasonal oscillations of the concentration of radon in soil and open air is proposed. The theory is based on the existing temperature waves in soils and thermo-diffusional gas flux in porous media. As soil is a non-isothermal porous medium, usually possessing a large fraction of microscopic pores belonging to Knudsen's free molecular field, a thermo-diffusional gas flow in soil has to arise. The radon mass transfer equation in soil for sinusoidal temperature oscillations at the soil-atmosphere boundary is solved, which reveals that radon concentration behaves as a damped harmonic wave. The amplitude of radon concentration oscillations and phase shift between radon concentration oscillations and soil temperature depend on the radon diffusion coefficient in soil, rate of radon production, soil thermal conductivity, average soil temperature, decay constant, and heat of radon transfer. Primarily numerical calculations are presented and comparisons with experimental data are shown. PMID:27155259

  1. Radon as a health hazard at home: what are the facts?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, S.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1993-12-31

    The dangers of inhaling radon and other noxious gases in the dusty confines of mines have been recognized for a long time. Over the last few decades a number of more or less systematic studies have been carried out on correlations between radon concentration levels inside mines and the incidence of lung cancer among the miners. The paper examines the methods and the justification of extrapolating such risks from the high {sup 222} Rn levels in mines to the very much lower domestic levels, and summarizes the findings of some recent Swedish studies on domestic radon levels and their correlation with the risk of lung cancer. The case for suggesting that significant positive correlations exist between radon levels in given regions of a country and the onset of leukaemias and other cancers is also critically examined. It is concluded that, on present evidence, the case for such correlation is not proven. The paper also suggests that some conventional units of measurement of radon concentration and exposure, and their generally adopted numerical values, are confusing or questionable, and are in need of revision and clarification. (Author).

  2. Assessment and prevention of radioactive risk due to 222Radon on University Premises in Genoa, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, D; Gasparini, R; Benatti, U; Gallelli, G

    2006-12-01

    From October 2004 to September 2005, Radon222 activity in high-risk indoor spaces used by employees and students at the University of Genoa was measured with CR-39 nuclear track detectors. The mean concentration in winter (78.9 Bq/m3 +/- 74.92 S.D.) was low in relation to the microenvironment considered. When data were broken down by type and location of the spaces, no significant differences were found, despite the fact that the Genoa conurbation lies on soil of variable geological composition. The dose absorbed by employees was 0.42 mSv/year, with a relative risk of 4.2/1000 cases of Radon-related lung cancer. The dose absorbed by students was 0.28 mSv/year, with a relative risk of 2.5/1000 cases of Radon-related lung cancer. The level of radon activity detected never exceeded the limit of 500 Bq/m3 established by Italian law. Nevertheless, the value of the compound uncertainty index suggested that the real level of Radon contamination could have exceeded 400 Bq/m3 in selected spaces, a value requiring annual concentration tests.

  3. Comparative survey of outdoor, residential and workplace radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated radon concentrations in above-ground (i.e. first floor) workplace in Missouri and compared them with above-ground radon concentrations in nearby homes and outdoor locations. This study also examined the potential utility of using home and outdoor radon concentrations to predict the radon concentration at a nearby workplace (e.g. county agencies and schools). Even though workplace radon concentrations were not statistically different from home radon concentrations, the radon concentration at a particular home, or outdoor location, was a poor predictor of the radon concentration at a nearby workplace. Overall, 9.6 and 9.9 % of homes and workplace, respectively, exhibited radon concentrations of ≥148 Bq m-3. Because of the percentage of workplace with elevated radon concentrations, the results suggest that additional surveys of workplace radon concentrations are needed, especially in areas of high radon potential, to assess the contribution of workplace radon exposure to an individual's overall radon exposure. (authors)

  4. The distribution of Radon concentration in caves.

    OpenAIRE

    Cigna Arrigo A.

    2003-01-01

    Radon concentration in caves is known to vary within an extremely wide range. Here the distribution of the average values of radon concentration is examined and a power law describing is identified, i.e. radon concentration has a fractal dimension D=1.26. This fact means that concentrations are not grouped around a mean value, a characteristic common to many other phenomena.

  5. Modelling of radon transport in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E.R.; de Meijer, R.J.; Katase, A; Shimo, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the state of the art of modelling radon transport in soil on basis of multiphase radon transport equations. Emphasis is given to methods to obtain a consistent set of input parameters needed For such models. Model-measurement comparisons with the KVI radon transport Facil

  6. Reducing Radon in Schools: A Team Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligman, Bryan K.; Fisher, Eugene J.

    This document presents the process of radon diagnostics and mitigation in schools to help educators determine the best way to reduce elevated radon levels found in a school. The guidebook is designed to guide school leaders through the process of measuring radon levels, selecting the best mitigation strategy, and directing the efforts of a…

  7. Assessment of indoor radon doses received by the students in the Azad Kashmir schools, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Rahman, S U; Rahman, Said; Matiullah; Shahzad, M Ikram; Ahmed, Navid; Iqbal, Javid; Ahmed, Basharat; Ahmed, Tanveer; Akhtar, Nadeem

    2010-12-01

    Several epidemiological studies conducted on thousands of underground miners suggest that long- term exposure to high radon concentration can increase the risk of lung cancer. Keeping in view the importance of the subject, numerous studies throughout the world have been carried out to measure indoor radon concentration and its resulting doses at occupational and non-occupational sites. The purpose of the current study was to measure indoor radon concentration and its resulting doses received by the students of Azad Kashmir government schools. For this purpose, CR-39 radon detectors were installed in 80 carefully selected schools. The detectors were placed at a height of 3-5 ft. (depending upon average height of students in particular class) from the ground. After exposure of 90 d detectors were etched for 9 h in 6 M NaOH at 70°C and the observed track densities were related to radon concentrations. The measured indoor radon concentration ranged from 22 ± 9 to 228 ± 3 Bq m(-3) with a mean value of 78 ± 5 Bq m(-3). Based on the measured indoor radon data, the annual effective doses were found to vary from 0.55 ± 0.04 to 0.71 ± 0.03 mSv y(-1). The overall mean effective dose for the studied area was found to be 0.63 ± 0.04 mSv y(-1). Reported values for radon concentrations and corresponding doses are lower than ICRP recommended limits for workplaces.

  8. Successes and Challenges in Implementation of Radon Control Activities in Iowa, 2010–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Anne L.; Miller, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radon gas has recently become more prominent in discussions of lung cancer prevention nationally and in Iowa. A review in 2013 of cancer plans in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program found that 42% of cancer plans, including Iowa’s, had terminology on radon. Plans included awareness activities, home testing, remediation, policy, and policy evaluation. Community Context Iowa has the highest average radon concentrations in the United States; 70% of homes have radon concentrations above the Environmental Protection Agency’s action levels. Radon control activities in Iowa are led by the Iowa Cancer Consortium, the Iowa Department of Public Health, and the Iowa Radon Coalition. Methods A collaborative approach was used to increase levels of awareness, testing, and (if necessary) mitigation, and to introduce a comprehensive radon control policy in Iowa by engaging partners and stakeholders across the state. Outcome The multipronged approach and collaborative work in Iowa appears to have been successful in increasing awareness: the number of radon tests completed in Iowa increased by 20% from 19,600 in 2009 to 23,500 in 2014, and the number of mitigations completed by certified mitigators increased by 108% from 2,600 to more than 5,400. Interpretation Through collaboration, Iowa communities are engaged in activities that led to increases in awareness, testing, mitigation, and policy. States interested in establishing a similar program should consider a multipronged approach involving multiple entities and stakeholders with different interests and abilities. Improvements in data collection and analysis are necessary to assess impact. PMID:27079648

  9. Estimation of past radon exposure to indoor radon from embedded 210Po in house hold glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present investigation, the surface-deposited polonium activities were measured in houses of Garhwal Himalaya, India. The surface-deposited 210Po activity concentrations were found to vary from 0.7 to 15.40 Bq/m2 with an average of 5.95 Bq m2. The radon concentration estimated on the basis of 210Po activity was found to vary from 0.29 to 700 Bq/m3 with an average value 242 Bq/m3. The contemporary radon concentration in the area was found to vary from 13 to 181 Bq/m3 with an average of 46 Bq/m3. The annual effective dose due to 210Po activity in houses in the Garhwal Himalaya region was found to vary from 0.61 to 13.33 mSv with an average of 5.15 mSv. Some worldwide studies have shown the relation between the increased risk of lung cancer and smoking habits. Data on smoking have also been collected from the same dwellings. The significance of this work is also discussed in detail from a radiation protection point of view. (author)

  10. Regional deposition of radon decay products in human airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, R.; Moere, H.; Nyblom, L.; Oestergren, I. (Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden))

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of the uptake and deposition pattern in the human airways of inhaled radon decay products have been carried out using two different techniques. The deposition in the nasal, bronchial and lung regions was assessed by external gamma measurements on the subject. The exposure of the subject was performed in a 'walk-in' radon chamber with controlled conditions. Results from exposure with high and low aerosol concentrations show that no rapid clearance occurred for the deposited decay products. About 20% of the attached inhaled decay products are retained and deposited in the lungs when mouth breathing during resting conditions, while nasal breathing gave about 26% retention, of which 5% was deposited in the nasal region and about 21% in the lungs. Exposure at low aerosol concentration with unattached fraction of about 80% shows a total retention of about 90% indicating a 100% retention of the unattached fraction. Only about 20% of the unattached fraction is found to penetrate the nasal cavity and it seems to be deposited in the bronchial region. (author).

  11. Application of studies of miners to radon problem in homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lung cancer risk from exposure in homes to short-lived daughters of radon-222 can be estimated from results for underground miners, if differences in epidemiologic and exposure variables between mining populations and the general public can be assessed. Our study of Swedish iron miners exposed at low dose rates and with long follow-up time has enabled us to determine smoking-specific risk coefficients, and to rule out other factors in the mine atmosphere as contributing to lung cancer risk. Miners differ from the population at large in the following characteristics: sex, age at exposure, dose rate, dust conditions in mines and homes, smoking, volume breathed per unit time and proportion of the year exposed. The last two factors affect the conversion of air concentrations to cumulative yearly doses, and from present evidence dose rate, sex and age should not alter risk factors to a great extent. For persons aged 60 about 30% of lung cancers in non-smokers may be attributed to radon daughters, and about 6% in smokers. The percentage may be higher at older ages if the relative risk is found to be constant at these ages. (Author)

  12. Radon Sources and Associated Risk in Terms of Exposure and Dose

    OpenAIRE

    Vogiannis, Efstratios G.; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Radon concerns the international scientific community from the early twentieth century, initially as radium emanation and nearly the second half of the century as a significant hazard to human health. The initial brilliant period of its use as medicine was followed by a period of intense concern for its health effects. Miners in Europe and later in the U.S were the primary target groups surveyed. Nowadays, there is a concrete evidence that radon and its progeny can cause lung cancer (1). Huma...

  13. Concentration and distribution of 210Po in rats exposed to radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the concentration and distribution of 210Po in rats exposed to radon and its daughters. Methods: Fifteen male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups, including one control group and two radon exposed groups with the cumulative doses of 100 WLM (low dose) and 200 WLM (high dose), respectively. Tissue samples containing 210Po were spontaneously deposited onto silvery discs with the diameter of 20 mm by means of wet ashing and electrodeposition. The concentration of 210Po in tissues were measured by α spectroscopy, and tissue burden were calculated. Results: The concentrations of 210Po were significantly different among the three dose groups in femur, liver, sex gland and hair (P210Po were different between the exposed groups and the control group in lung and soleus muscle (P210Po in lung, spleen and hair were higher than that in liver, bone and sex gland, the lowest was in intestine. The tissue burdens of liver, bone and sex gland were significantly different from those in other organs or tissues. Conclusions: 210Po was mainly distributed in lung, liver, spleen, femur and sex gland. The concentrations of 210Po in organs or tissues and the tissue burdens were correspondingly increased with the exposure dose of radon and its daughters. The results of this experiment provide a dosimetric basis for further studies on the carcinogenic effect of radon and its daughters. (authors)

  14. Radon in indoor air of primary schools: determinant factors, their variability and effective dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João; Moreira, André; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Pereira, Alcides

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as in the city of Porto at the north-east of Portugal. This gas is a recognized carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The aim of this preliminary survey was to determine indoor radon concentrations in public primary schools, to analyse the main factors influencing their indoor concentration levels and to estimate the effective dose in students and teachers in primary schools. Radon concentrations were measured in 45 classrooms from 13 public primary schools located in Porto, using CR-39 passive radon detectors for about 2-month period. In all schools, radon concentrations ranged from 56 to 889 Bq/m(3) (mean = 197 Bq/m(3)). The results showed that the limit of 100 Bq/m(3) established by WHO IAQ guidelines was exceeded in 92 % of the measurements, as well as 8 % of the measurements exceeded the limit of 400 Bq/m(3) established by the national legislation. Moreover, the mean annual effective dose was calculated as 1.25 mSv/y (ranging between 0.58 and 3.07 mSv/y), which is below the action level (3-10 mSv). The considerable variability of radon concentration observed between and within floors indicates a need to monitor concentrations in several rooms for each floor. A single radon detector for each room can be used, provided that the measurement error is considerably lower than variability of radon concentration between rooms. The results of the present survey will provide useful baseline data for adopting safety measures and dealing effectively with radiation emergencies. In particular, radon remediation techniques should be used in buildings located in the highest radon risk areas of Portugal. The results obtained in the current study concerning radon levels and their variations will be useful to optimize the design of future research surveys.

  15. Radon reduction in house crawl space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas, is drawn from the soil into a house when low air pressure exists in the house. This is a commonplace environmental hazard in the United States, Canada, and northern Europe. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing and demonstrating procedures to use in reducing the radon concentrations in a variety of house types. Until recently, research has focused on basement houses because of their great potential for radon entry; however, other housing substructures also present unique radon problems. Several radon reduction alternatives for crawl space houses are noted, and the successful demonstration of one of these alternatives, subplastic suction, is described in detail

  16. Simulation of Radon Transport in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

    1983-12-15

    Numerical simulation of radon transport is a useful adjunct in the study of radon as an in situ tracer of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic numerical model has been developed to assist in the interpretation of field experiments. The model simulates transient response of radon concentration in wellhead geofluid as a function of prevailing reservoir conditions. The radon simulation model has been used to simulate radon concentration response during production drawdown and two flowrate transient tests in vapor-dominated systems. Comparison of model simulation with experimental data from field tests provides insight in the analysis of reservoir phenomena such as propagation of boiling fronts, and estimates of reservoir properties of porosity and permeability thickness.

  17. Indoor radon measurements in Turkey dwellings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, N; Ataksor, B; Taskın, H; Bingoldag, N Albayrak

    2015-12-01

    In this work, indoor radon radioactivity concentration levels have been measured in dwellings of Turkey within the frame of the National Radon Monitoring Programme. The (222)Rn concentrations were measured with time-integrating passive nuclear etched track detectors in 7293 dwellings in 153 residential units of 81 provinces, and the radon map of Turkey was prepared. Indoor radon concentrations were distributed in the range of 1-1400 Bq m(-3). The arithmetic mean of the radon gas concentration was found to be 81 Bq m(-3); the geometric mean was 57 Bq m(-3) with a geometric standard deviation of 2.3.

  18. Radon exchange dynamics in a karst system investigated by radon continuous measurements in water: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peano, G; Vigna, B; Villavecchia, E; Agnesod, G

    2011-05-01

    In 2008 the underground Karst Laboratory of Bossea Cave started research on radon exchange dynamics between bedrock, cave waters (main collector and percolations) and indoor underground atmosphere. Radon air concentrations, normally high, increase more and more during the collector's floods. An explanation of this is a radon-water solubilisation process more effective in flood events, because of a greater rock-water contact surface. Radon is then carried by water into the cave and released into the air. To verify this, continuous measurements of radon concentration are needed not only in the air, but also in the waters of the cave. So a new device for continuous radon monitoring in water was tested, connected to the AlphaGuard radon monitor. For the first 6 months of 2010, for different sections of the cave, the correlations between radon in the air, radon in the waters and the collector's stream flow fluctuations were presented and discussed. PMID:21586541

  19. Radon exchange dynamics in a Karst system investigated by radon continuous measurements in water: First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2008 the underground Karst Laboratory of Bossea Cave started research on radon exchange dynamics between bedrock, cave waters (main collector and percolations) and indoor underground atmosphere. Radon air concentrations, normally high, increase more and more during the collector's floods. An explanation of this is a radon-water solubilisation process more effective in flood events, because of a greater rock-water contact surface. Radon is then carried by water into the cave and released into the air. To verify this, continuous measurements of radon concentration are needed not only in the air, but also in the waters of the cave. So a new device for continuous radon monitoring in water was tested, connected to the AlphaGuard radon monitor. For the first 6 months of 2010, for different sections of the cave, the correlations between radon in the air, radon in the waters and the collector's stream flow fluctuations were presented and discussed. (authors)

  20. Variation of the unattached fraction of radon progeny and its contribution to radon exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Qiuju

    2016-06-01

    The unattached fraction of radon progeny is one of the most important factors for radon exposure evaluation through the dosimetric approach. To better understand its level and variation in the real environment, a series of field measurements were carried out indoors and outdoors, and radon equilibrium equivalent concentration was also measured. The dose contribution of unattached radon progeny was evaluated in addition. The results show that no clear variation trend of the unattached fraction of radon progeny is observed in an indoor or outdoor environment. The average unattached fraction of radon progeny for the indoors and outdoors are (8.7  ±  1.6)% and (9.7  ±  2.1)%, respectively. The dose contribution of unattached radon progeny to total radon exposure is some 38.8% in an indoor environment, suggesting the importance of the evaluation on unattached radon progeny. PMID:27171653

  1. A retrospective study of radon daughter concentrations in the workplace in the fluorspar mines of St. Lawrence, Newfoundland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorspar mining began in St. Lawrence, Newfoundland in the early thirties. In the early years the existing economic and social conditions resulted in poor health and safety practices in the mines. A high incidence of many types of pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, among the miners was investigated by the Department of National Health and Welfare, and by 1960 radiation in the mines was recognized as the major cause. The original epidemiological study used radon daughter exposure estimates determined from a limited number of radon daughter measurements in one of the mines. Insufficient experience existed at that time to allow a proper technical assessment of the mines and to modify the estimated radon daughter concentrations accordingly. A review of the environmental conditions in the early years of mining and a revision of the estimates of radon daughter concentrations in those mines is presented. Environmental working conditions were determined based on a review of maps, inspectors' reports, Commission hearings, recollections of former workers and of the authors. Comparison to the conditions in the mines in later years, when radiation samples were taken more frequently allowed estimations of the probable radon daughter concentrations that would have existed in the mines earlier. Ranges of estimated average concentrations were made by mines for each year and wherever possible for broad types of job classes. Rather than attempting to propose single numbers for radon daughter concentrations, which in turn might have implied an accuracy that did not exist, ranges of average radon daughter concentrations were estimated

  2. Seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air and resulting radiation dose to human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.A. Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of radiation hazard of indoor radon is largely due to the radon progenies, which are inhaled and deposited in the human respiratory tract. It is essential to evaluate aerodynamic characteristics of the radon progenies, which are either attached or unattached to aerosol particles, because the dose is strongly dependent on the location of deposition in respiratory tract and hence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the aerosol particles. This paper presents the seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air under domestic conditions at Nagoya University, Japan. A low pressure cascade impactor as an instrument for classifying aerosol sizes and imaging plate as a radiation detector have been employed to characterize the activity size distribution of short-lived radon decay products. In parallel, radon and its progenies concentrations were measured. Taking into account the progeny characteristics, the inhalation dose in the different seasons was also estimated based on a lung dose model with the structure that is related to the ICRP66 respiratory tract model. The result evident that, the highest dose 0.22 mSvy−1 was observed during the winter where the highest value of equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon (EEC and lowest value of the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD were found in this season; whereas, the dose in spring appeared to be lowest 0.02 mSvy−1.

  3. Radon programme in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The framework of the Radon programme in the Czech republic includes both precautionary measures and interventions. The programme informally started in early eighties has been now incorporated in national legislation (Atomic Act, Radiation Protection Decree, etc.). Aim of precautionary measures is to avert construction of building above natural radiation guidance levels (200 Bq/m3 for indoor radon concentration and 0.5 Sv/h for gamma dose rate) by protection of new buildings against soil radon ingress, by regulation of natural radioactivity in building materials and supplied water. Aim of interventions is to identify buildings affected by enhanced natural radioactivity and help owners to put into effect reasonable remedial measures. Two sets of intervention levels for indoor natural exposure were established: guidance intervention levels 400 Bq/m3 (indoor radon), 1.0 Sv/h (indoor gamma dose rate) and limit values 4000 Bq/m3 and 10 Sv/h. The radon programme is based both on governmental and private activities. The governmental activities include representative and targeted indoor radon survey, subsidy for radon mitigation, mitigation test measurements and public information on radon issue. The private activities include radon measurement (radon index of building site, indoor measurements, radon diagnosis) and remedial measures. More than 100 commercial companies were authorised by Radiation Protection Authority (SUJB) to provide these measurements

  4. Characterizing the source of radon indoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Average indoor radon concentrations range over more than two orders of magnitude, largely because of variability in the rate at which radon enters from building materials, soil, and water supplies. Determining the indoor source magnitude requires knowledge of the generation of radon in source materials, its movement within materials by diffusion and convection, and the means of its entry into buildings. This paper reviews the state of understanding of indoor radon sources and transport. Our understanding of generation rates in and movement through building materials is relatively complete and indicates that, except for materials with unusually high radionuclide contents, these sources can account for observed indoor radon concentrations only at the low end of the range observed. Our understanding of how radon enters buildings from surrounding soil is poorer, however recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that soil may be the predominant source in many cases where the indoor radon concentration is high. 73 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  5. Membrane barriers for radon gas flow restrictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research was performed to assess the feasibility of barrier membrane substances, for use within mining or associated high risk environments, in restricting the diffusion transport of radon gas quantities. Specific tests were conducted to determine permeability parameters of a variety of membrane materials with reference to radon flow capabilities. Tests were conducted both within laboratory and in-situ emanation environments where concentrations and diffusion flows of radon gas were known to exist. Equilibrium radon gas concentrations were monitored in initially radon-free chambers adjacent to gas sources, but separated by specified membrane substances. Membrane barrier effectiveness was demonstrated to result in reduced emanation concentrations of radon gas within the sampling chamber atmosphere. Minimum gas concentrations were evidenced where the barrier membrane material was shown to exhibit lowest radon permeability characteristics

  6. Radon removal from the water resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concerning the presence of radioactive substances in groundwater used for public supply, particular attention is paid to radon removal in water treatment process. The processes based on water aeration are the most common methods for the reduction of radon concentrations in water. Simple spraying, bubble aeration in the deeper layers of water and various modifications of water aeration in a horizontal arrangement - Inka system and aeration towers - are used for radon removal from water. Vacuum de-aeration is another possibility of reducing the concentration of radon in water. However, this procedure is not widely used in practice as compared to the above methods. The article presents the results obtained from the pilot tests for radon removal by using the aeration tower and Inka aeration system in the water resource supplying the city of Istebné with drinking water. Key words: radon, radon removal , aeration tower , Inka aerator , water quality

  7. Investigation of radon level in Chongqing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contents of radon in air in the urban district, building fields,diggings and hotel in Chongqing were investigated. Result shows that the mean concentration of radon is 10.8 Bq/m3 in air in the urban district, and the mean concentration of radon is 1193 Bq/m3 in soils on building fields. Radon level is obviously different in each of diggings, with the highest being in fluorite mine and the second in plumbum and zinc mine. The statistical mean value of radon concentration of 10 typles of diggings investigated is 65.2 Bq/m3, while the mean concentration of radon in fluorite mine is 369 Bq/m3, which is 35 times higher than in the urban area. The mean concentration of radon is 32.9 Bq/m3 in eight hotels. (authors)

  8. Survey of Gamma Dose and Radon Exhalation Rate from Soil Surface of High Background Natural Radiation Areas in Ramsar, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhollah Dehghani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radon is a radioactive gas and the second leading cause of death due to lung cancer after smoking. Ramsar is known for having the highest levels of natural background radiation on earth. Materials and Methods: In this research study, 50 stations of high radioactivity areas of Ramsar were selected in warm season of the year. Then gamma dose and radon exhalation rate were measured.Results: Results showed that gamma dose and radon exhalation rate were in the range of 51-7100 nSv/hr and 9-15370 mBq/m2s, respectively.Conclusion: Compare to the worldwide average 16 mBq/m2s, estimated average annual effective of Radon exhalation rate in the study area is too high.

  9. Radon in ground water - Hydrogeologic impact and indoor air contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book focuses on: geologic and hydrogeologic controls that influence radon occurrence; monitoring radon, radium and other radioactivity from geologic sources; mining impacts on occurrence of radon, radium, and other radioactivity in ground water; sampling and analysis; radon and radium in water supply wells; predictive models for occurrence of radon and other radioactivity; and remedial action

  10. 30 CFR 57.5046 - Protection against radon gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection against radon gas. 57.5046 Section... Protection against radon gas. Where radon daughter concentrations exceed 10 WL, respirator protection against radon gas shall be provided in addition to protection against radon daughters. Protection against...

  11. Geographical associations between radon and cancer: is domestic radon level a marker of socioeconomic status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, S.P. (University College, London (United Kingdom). Toxicology Lab. Middlesex School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)); Stern, G.

    1991-12-01

    Previous studies showing a geographical association between radon and various cancers, particularly the leukaemias and lymphomas, appear to be confounded by the role of radon levels as a surrogate for socioeconomic status. Higher socioeconomic status (at least at the UK county level) is correlated with higher levels of domestic radon. Controlling for the relationship between socioeconomic status and radon removes the correlation between radon exposure and lymphoproliferative disease. Reported associations between radon and lymphoproliferative disease (and possibly other cancers) may be secondary to socioeconomic variables. (author).

  12. Indoor radon levels and their relationship with radon exhalation rates from building surface in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The indoor radon concentrations of more than 60 sites in Hong Kong is measured using activated charcoal canisters to identify the underlying distribution pattern. The strong relationship between the indoor radon concentrations and the radon exhalation rate from building surface has been investigated. It has been found that the indoor radon comes mainly from radium in building materials, and that the radon concentration depends on the radon exhalation rate from indoor building surface and on the ventilation. It is also asserted that the radioactivity level of building materials used in Hong Kong is increasing

  13. Effects of home ventilation systems on indoor radon--radon daughter levels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted in a house in Polk County, Florida, to determine the effects of normal home ventilation methods on radon, radon progeny, and working levels. Three ventilation conditions were studied which approximate those found during normal occupancy. The effects of the central air conditioner, the central blower without air conditioning, and outside air ventilation were studied, with radon, radon progeny, and working level measurements made sequentially until significant changes ceased to be observed. In all three experiments, radon, radon progeny, and working levels decreased, with the decreases corresponding to estimated increases in house ventilation rate

  14. Population vulnerability due to the exposure to radon and airborne particulate matter (PM{sub 10}), in Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G., E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Golzarri, J.I. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ponciano-Rodriguez, G. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Gaso, M.I. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Mena, M.; Segovia, N. [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vazquez-Lopez, C. [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV (Mexico); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to indoor radon and suspended particulate matter (SPM) is considered a high risk in lung cancer aetiology. In this paper indoor radon and SPM concentration measurements and their correlations, associated with lung cancer cases are given. Mexico City suffers high concentration of SPM as well as other photochemical pollutants such as ozone. During the last decade in Mexico City, radon and SPM have been monitored. The indoor radon measurements were done using the Nuclear Track Methodology, basically the close-end-cup device with polyallyldiglycol carbonate as detector material, followed of an established chemical etching protocol, and automatic digital image analyzer system for counting. SPM size and concentration were obtained from monitoring stations located along the city. The results show that the central-north part of Mexico City has a large concentration of SPM and the vulnerable population (older than 65 years and younger than 14 years) is located essentially in the same region. In this area, a large number of lung cancer cases were found, even if indoor radon levels were below the recommended limits.

  15. 76 FR 72006 - Draft Interim Staff Guidance: Evaluations of Uranium Recovery Facility Surveys of Radon and Radon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... COMMISSION Draft Interim Staff Guidance: Evaluations of Uranium Recovery Facility Surveys of Radon and Radon... Recovery Facility Surveys of Radon and Radon Progeny in Air and Demonstrations of Compliance with 10 CFR 20... that existing guidance does not sufficiently detail how the NRC staff reviews surveys of radon...

  16. Geostatistical simulations for radon indoor with a nested model including the housing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafaro, C; Giovani, C; Garavaglia, M

    2016-01-01

    The radon prone areas definition is matter of many researches in radioecology, since radon is considered a leading cause of lung tumours, therefore the authorities ask for support to develop an appropriate sanitary prevention strategy. In this paper, we use geostatistical tools to elaborate a definition accounting for some of the available information about the dwellings. Co-kriging is the proper interpolator used in geostatistics to refine the predictions by using external covariates. In advance, co-kriging is not guaranteed to improve significantly the results obtained by applying the common lognormal kriging. Here, instead, such multivariate approach leads to reduce the cross-validation residual variance to an extent which is deemed as satisfying. Furthermore, with the application of Monte Carlo simulations, the paradigm provides a more conservative radon prone areas definition than the one previously made by lognormal kriging.

  17. On the interaction between radon progeny and particles generated by electronic and traditional cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Trassierra, C.; Cardellini, F.; Buonanno, G.; De Felice, P.

    2015-04-01

    During their entire lives, people are exposed to the pollutants present in indoor air. Recently, Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems, mainly known as electronic cigarettes, have been widely commercialized: they deliver particles into the lungs of the users but a "second-hand smoke" has yet to be associated to this indoor source. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring radioactive gas, i.e. radon, represents a significant risk for lung cancer, and the cumulative action of these two agents could be worse than the agents separately would. In order to deepen the interaction between radon progeny and second-hand aerosol from different types of cigarettes, a designed experimental study was carried out by generating aerosol from e-cigarette vaping as well as from second-hand traditional smoke inside a walk-in radon chamber at the National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (INMRI) of Italy. In this chamber, the radon present in air comes naturally from the floor and ambient conditions are controlled. To characterize the sidestream smoke emitted by cigarettes, condensation particle counters and scanning mobility particle sizer were used. Radon concentration in the air was measured through an Alphaguard ionization chamber, whereas the measurement of radon decay product in the air was performed with the Tracelab BWLM Plus-2S Radon daughter Monitor. It was found an increase of the Potential Alpha-Energy Concentration (PAEC) due to the radon decay products attached to aerosol for higher particle number concentrations. This varied from 7.47 ± 0.34 MeV L-1 to 12.6 ± 0.26 MeV L-1 (69%) for the e-cigarette. In the case of traditional cigarette and at the same radon concentration, the increase was from 14.1 ± 0.43 MeV L-1 to 18.6 ± 0.19 MeV L-1 (31%). The equilibrium factor increases, varying from 23.4% ± 1.11% to 29.5% ± 0.26% and from 30.9% ± 1.0% to 38.1 ± 0.88 for the e-cigarette and traditional cigarette, respectively. These growths still continue for long

  18. Gaseous alpha emitter diffusion studies using alpha track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a very accurate and sensitive analysis method such as alpha track method, the SSNTD group was able to undertake studies on the atomic and molecular processes taking place at low speed and/or very low concentrations, such as diffusion of gaseous alpha radionuclides in gaseous media. For practical application reasons, we began to study the diffusion in air for gaseous alpha radionuclides and aerosols carrying solid alpha radionuclides. The used alpha radionuclides were: Rn-222, as gaseous radionuclide and its solid descendants genetically related, attached to different particles from air, as radioactive aerosols. The source was included into an air tight device with a very well known volume. After 40 days, the radioactive equilibrium was established for all descendants, so that in the device there were the Rn-222 and its descendants, each of them having the same activity. The relative amount/activity ratio of each decay product, at any duration, for any initial mass of Ra-226 parent radionuclide, were calculated using the code UURASE, based on the Bateman general equations, for computing the U-238 radioactive series gamma accumulation. This was adapted for alpha accumulation as ALFAURASE programme. The device which contains the Ra-226 source can be coupled to the calibration system or to the diffusion system, without destroying the radioactive equilibrium. At this coupling, only the radioactive concentration is changed due to the variation of the volume. First of all the device was used for calibrating the CR-39 track detectors for both Rn-222 gaseous radionuclide and aerosol concentration measurements using, in the coupled calibration system, a special 'detector-container' equipped/or not with a filter used for radioactive aerosol stopping. The track detectors CR-39 were etched in NaOH 30%, for 7 hours at 70 deg. C and their studies were performed by optical microscopy using a stereo-microscope Wild M7S and a binocular Zeiss Jena microscope. (authors)

  19. Rapid determination of alpha emitters using Actinide resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, N; Rodriguez, L; Alvarez, A; Sancho, C

    2004-01-01

    The European Commission has recently published the recommended radiological protection criteria for the clearance of building and building rubble from the dismantling of nuclear installations. Radionuclide specific clearance levels for actinides are very low (between 0.1 and 1 Bq g(-1)). The prevalence of natural radionuclides in rubble materials makes the verification of these levels by direct alpha counting impossible. The capability of Actinide resin (Eichrom Industries, Inc.) for extracting plutonium and americium from rubble samples has been tested in this work. Besides a strong affinity for actinides in the tri, tetra and hexavalent oxidation states, this extraction chromatographic resin presents an easy recovery of absorbed radionuclides. The retention capability was evaluated on rubble samples spiked with certified radionuclide standards (239Pu and 241Am). Samples were leached with nitric acid, passed through a chromatographic column containing the resin and the elution fraction was measured by LSC. Actinide retention varies from 60% to 80%. Based on these results, a rapid method for the verification of clearance levels for actinides in rubble samples is proposed. PMID:15177360

  20. Indoor radon monitoring near an in situ leach mining site in D G Khan, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiullah; Malik, Fariha; Rafique, Muhammad

    2012-12-01

    Indoor radon and its decay products are considered to be the second leading cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking. This is why extensive radon surveys have been carried out in many countries of the world, including Pakistan. In this context, 25 spots were selected at workplaces in the vicinity of the uranium mining site in Dera Ghazi Khan District for indoor radon measurement. For this purpose, CR-39 based radon detectors were installed at head height and were exposed to indoor radon for 60 days. After retrieval, these detectors were etched in a 6 M solution of NaOH at the temperature of 80 °C for 16 h in order to make the alpha particle tracks visible. The observed track densities were related to the indoor radon concentration using a calibration factor of 2.7 tracks cm(-2) h(-1)/kBq m(-3). The measured indoor radon concentration ranged from ∼386 ±161 to 3028 ± 57 Bq m(-3) with an average value of 1508 ± 81 Bq m(-3) in the studied areas of Dera Ghazi Khan District. The mean annual effective dose ranged from 2.22 ± 0.93 to 17.44 ± 0.33 mSv yr(-1), with an average of 8.68 ± 0.47 mSv yr(-1). The effect of the seasonal correction factor (SCF) on the annual average radon concentration has also been considered. Results of the current study show that, for the majority of the workplaces studied, indoor radon levels exceed the action levels proposed by many world organisations.

  1. Indoor radon remediation : effect of ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its progeny are the major contributors to the natural radiation dose received by human beings. As per the ICRP recommendations, it becomes necessary to take remedial steps for the reduction of radon daughters in a dwelling place if the level is found to be more than 200 Bqm-3. Ventilation process can simulate the conditions generated through advection or diffusion, therefore it may be major factors that control the indoor radon concentration is the room. In the present investigations, the effects of natural ventilation in a room having an external source of radon have been studied. The variation in radon concentration with operative time of exhaust fan has also been studied. For radon concentration measurement the LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) were use. The radon reduction factor, which is the ratio of radon concentrations before and after remediation has been calculated. The radon reduction factor was found to vary 1.08 to 1.17 due to natural ventilation where as 1.17 to 3.01 due to forced ventilation. The results indicate that optimized ventilation (natural or forced) can be simple mean of radon remediation in dwellings. (author)

  2. Radon and hydrotherapy: application to French spas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the use of thermal water for treatments, the dissolved radon ends up, through degassing, in the atmosphere of the various spa premises. According to the type of treatments, the radon activity concentration in the air is very variable; it depends on two factors, the supply of thermal water, and therefore of radon, and the ventilation of the various premises. In unfavourable, even non-existent, ventilation conditions, it is not uncommon to measure radon concentration reaching several thousands of becquerels per air cubic meter. These high values of radon activity concentration, with or without its short-lived daughters, may lead to a staff exposure of approximately ten or several tens of mSv per year. A French spa was subject to a radon 'expertise' during which the radon source terms, 'ground in contact with the buildings' and 'thermal water' were characterized. The radon mapping in the internal atmosphere of the various spa premises and the workstations' analysis resulted in an assessment of the exposure due to radon inhalation. This study showed that on workstations, notably linked to hydrotherapy, the staff exposure to radon is in the same range as the dose assessments from foreign studies. The implementation of an appropriate ventilation of the treatment rooms and a better management of the thermal water in the spa resulted in a significant reduction of staff exposure

  3. Instrumentation for a radon research house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly automated monitoring and control system for studying radon and radon-daughter behavior in residences has been designed and built. The system has been installed in a research house, a test space contained in a two-story wood-framed building, which allows us to conduct controlled studies of (1) pollutant transport within and between rooms, (2) the dynamics of radon daughter behavior, and (3) techniques for controlling radon and radon daughters. The system's instrumentation is capable of measuring air-exchange rate, four-point radon concentration, individual radon daughter concentrations, indoor temerature and humidity, and outdoor weather parameters (temperature, humidity, modules, wind speed, and wind direction). It is also equipped with modules that control the injection of radon and tracer gas into the test space, the operation of the forced-air furnace, the mechanical ventilation system, and the mixing fans located in each room. A microcomputer controls the experiments and records the data on magnetic tape and on a printing terminal. The data on tape is transferred to a larger computer system for reduction and analysis. In this paper we describe the essential design and function of the instrumentation system, as a whole, singling out those components that measure ventilation rate, radon concentration, and radon daughter concentrations

  4. Low Radon Cleanroom at the University of Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Darren; Hallin, Aksel; Hanchurak, Stephen; Krauss, Carsten; Liu, Shengli; Soluk, Richard

    2011-04-01

    A cleanroom laboratory designed to create and maintain a low concentration of radon in the air has been designed and is now under construction. We describe the clean room, the radon stripping system, and various radon monitoring tools.

  5. Smoking produced mucus and clearance of particulates in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some studies of miners have shown a lesser relative lung-cancer risk for smokers than for nonsmokers. For example, experiments by Cross and associates with dogs have shown an apparent protective effect of cigarette smoke against radon-daughter and dust exposure. One reason for these changes may be the thickened mucus layer in the tracheobronchial region of smokers. Physiological changes in the lung due to smoking may decrease the effects of radioactive particles in cancers in the bronchial region by apparently promoting faster clearance, in that region, of radioactive particles and by decreasing the radiation dose through reduced penetration to the sensitive basal epithelial cells. Because of the short half-life of radon daughters, even if there is possible tobacco-related delay of particle clearance from the alveolar region it cannot affect radon clearance. Therefore, the possible mitigating effect of tobacco on radon-produced cancer appears to be limited to the tracheobronchial region. It would be of value to a number of occupations if the same changes in the lungs due to smoking could be produced in exposed workers in the absence of cigarette-smoking. Beta-carotene and vitamin A, which affect maintenance and secretion of the mucosal lining, appear to thicken mucus, thereby providing protection against radon-induced lung cancers that is similar to smoking-related changes in the lung

  6. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study. Final report, 1 March, 1990--May 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. [New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine; Stark, A.; Ju, C. [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to ``above-average`` radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject`s presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

  7. Children’s Exposure to Radon in Nursery and Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Pedro T. B. S.; Nunes, Rafael A. O.; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria C. M.; Martins, Fernando G.; Sousa, Sofia I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The literature proves an evident association between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer, even at low doses. This study brings a new approach to the study of children’s exposure to radon by aiming to evaluate exposure to indoor radon concentrations in nursery and primary schools from two districts in Portugal (Porto and Bragança), considering different influencing factors (occupation patterns, classroom floor level, year of the buildings’ construction and soil composition of the building site), as well as the comparison with IAQ standard values for health protection. Fifteen nursery and primary schools in the Porto and Bragança districts were considered: five nursery schools for infants and twelve for pre-schoolers (seven different buildings), as well as eight primary schools. Radon measurements were performed continuously. The measured concentrations depended on the building occupation, classroom floor level and year of the buildings’ construction. Although they were in general within the Portuguese legislation for IAQ, exceedances to international standards were found. These results point out the need of assessing indoor radon concentrations not only in primary schools, but also in nursery schools, never performed in Portugal before this study. It is important to extend the study to other microenvironments like homes, and in time to estimate the annual effective dose and to assess lifetime health risks. PMID:27043596

  8. Radon measurement works in Dhaka city and central part of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major source of natural radiation that irradiates the human body is primarily due to inhalation of Radon and its short-lived progeny nuclides. It is well known that exposure of population to high concentration of Radon and its daughters for a long period leads to pathological effects like the respiratory functional changes and the occurrence of lung cancer. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (CR-39) are being used for detection and measurement works of radon and its progeny in Bangladesh. Dhaka the capital of Bangladesh and some areas of the central region of Bangladesh are chosen for the present study to measure the Radon concentration level of the country. Dhaka is one of the most populous cities in Bangladesh as well as in the world. High working levels (WL) were found in some locations of Dhaka city specially in the old part of the city where so many ancient building are established and in some villages of the central part of the country. The aim of the study is to prepare a Radon Map of Bangladesh and the results so far obtained have been presented in the paper. (author)

  9. Health effects of exposure to indoor radon and its decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of possible incidence of lung cancer associated with present exposure to natural indoor radon are assessed for Kuwait. Several dosimetric models were used and their results are compared. Some models took into consideration individual differences in sex, life-style and age. The UNSCEAR model gives life-time risk values of 2-4.5 x 10-4 per WLM for miners. Taking into account a factor of 0.6 between the mean breathing rate of workers in the model and non-miners, and the population of Kuwait as 1.7 million, the model gives 46-105 lung cancer cases per year induced by radon and its decay products. Since these models are developed for smokers they tend to overestimate the actual incidence rates. Assuming that 20% of the population in Kuwait are smokers, the incidence rates range will be reduced to 30-63 cases per year which is about 9-20% of the observed lung cancer incidence in 1982. The energy conservation programme is expected to increase average indoor radon concentrations, and consequently bring about higher lung cancer incidence. (author)

  10. Comparative survey of outdoor, residential and workplace radon concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Nirmalla; Field, Dan W.; Steck, Daniel J.; Field, R. William

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated radon concentrations in above-ground (i.e. first floor) workplace in Missouri and compared them with above-ground radon concentrations in nearby homes and outdoor locations. This study also examined the potential utility of using home and outdoor radon concentrations to predict the radon concentration at a nearby workplace (e.g. county agencies and schools). Even though workplace radon concentrations were not statistically different from home radon concentrations, the ...

  11. Indoor - soil gas radon relationshipin the Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex

    OpenAIRE

    I. Fojtíková; J. Miksová; I. Barnet

    2005-01-01

    The relationship of indoor radon measurements and radon in bedrock was studied in the granitoid Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex (CBPC). The indoor data were linked to vectorised geological and radon risk maps using the coordinates of particular dwellings. For each geological unit and rock type it was possible to calculate the statistical characteristics of indoor radon measurements. A clear relationship between indoor radon values and radon in bedrock was confirmed in al...

  12. Second workshop on radon and radon daughters in urban communities associated with uranium mining and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A second meeting of Atomic Energy Control Board staff, federal and provincial government representatives, and consultants was held to discuss progress in reducing the concentrations of radon and its daughter products in houses in communities like Bancroft, Elliot Lake, Port Hope, and Uranium City. Participants discussed successful and unsuccessful remedial techniques, possible sources of radon, and methods of measuring radon and radon daughters in buildings

  13. Study on the solubility of radon in tissues; Untersuchung der Loeslichkeit von Radon in Gewebe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Claudia; Kraft, Gerhard; Maier, Andreas; Beek, Patrick van [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    At the GSI Helmholtz Center in Darmstadt a radon chamber with conditions similar to the radon galleries was built for studies on the solubility of radon in tissues using cell cultures and animals. The samples are investigated using gamma spectroscopy following the radon exposure measuring Pb-214 and Bi-214. The original concentration of Rn-222 in the sample is determined by the time dependence of the decay rates of Rn-222. The experimental conditions and preliminary measurements are described.

  14. Local Control of Lung Derived Tumors by Diffusing Alpha-Emitting Atoms Released From Intratumoral Wires Loaded With Radium-224

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy (DART) is a new form of brachytherapy enabling the treatment of solid tumors with alpha radiation. The present study examines the antitumoral effects resulting from the release of alpha emitting radioisotopes into solid lung carcinoma (LL2, A427, and NCI-H520). Methods and Materials: An in vitro setup tested the dose-dependent killing of tumor cells exposed to alpha particles. In in vivo studies, radioactive wires (0.3 mm diameter, 5 mm long) with 224Ra activities in the range of 21-38 kBq were inserted into LL/2 tumors in C57BL/6 mice and into human-derived A427 or NCI-H520 tumors in athymic mice. The efficacy of the short-lived daughters of 224Ra to produce tumor growth retardation and prolong life was assessed, and the spread of radioisotopes inside tumors was measured using autoradiography. Results: The insertion of a single DART wire into the center of 6- to 7-mm tumors had a pronounced retardation effect on tumor growth, leading to a significant inhibition of 49% (LL2) and 93% (A427) in tumor development and prolongations of 48% (LL2) in life expectancy. In the human model, more than 80% of the treated tumors disappeared or shrunk. Autoradiographic analysis of the treated sectioned tissue revealed the intratumoral distribution of the radioisotopes, and histological analysis showed corresponding areas of necrosis. In vitro experiments demonstrated a dose-dependent killing of tumors cells exposed to alpha particles. Conclusions: Short-lived diffusing alpha-emitters produced tumor growth retardation and increased survival in mice bearing lung tumor implants. These results justify further investigations with improved dose distributions.

  15. Radon and its daughters in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of the behavior of radon and its short-lived daughters in vivo are described and a relationship between the radon exhalation rate and time after a meal is demonstrated. A major but short-lived postprandial increase in the exhalation rate of radon produced from skeletally-deposited radium was observed and a similar effect in exhalation rate of environmental radon by persons containing no radium was noted. Persons living in houses with elevated concentrations of radon may contain sufficient activity for its detection by external gamma-ray counting. Some of the activity observed is due to inhaled daughter-products in the chest, and some to daughter-products associated with and produced by the decay of radon throughout the body. 3 references, 8 figures. (MF)

  16. Radon concentration measurements in bituminous coal mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon measurements were carried out in Kozlu, Karadon and Uezuelmez underground coal mines of Zonguldak bituminous coal basin in Turkey. Passive-time integrating method, which is the most widely used technique for the measurement of radon concentration in air, was applied by using nuclear etched track detectors (CR-39) in the study area. The radon concentration measurements were performed on a total of 42 points in those three mines. The annual exposure, the annual effective dose and lifetime fatality risk, which are the important parameters for the health of workers, were estimated based on chronic occupational exposure to the radon gas, which is calculated using UNCEAR-2000 and ICRP-65 models. The radon concentrations at several coal production faces are higher than the action level of 1000 Bq m-3. It is suggested that the ventilation rates should be rearranged to reduce the radon concentration. (authors)

  17. Radon concentration measurements in bituminous coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisne, Abdullah; Okten, Gündüz; Celebi, Nilgün

    2005-01-01

    Radon measurements were carried out in Kozlu, Karadon and Uzülmez underground coal mines of Zonguldak bituminous coal basin in Turkey. Passive-time integrating method, which is the most widely used technique for the measurement of radon concentration in air, was applied by using nuclear etched track detectors (CR-39) in the study area. The radon concentration measurements were performed on a total of 42 points in those three mines. The annual exposure, the annual effective dose and lifetime fatality risk, which are the important parameters for the health of workers, were estimated based on chronic occupational exposure to the radon gas, which is calculated using UNCEAR-2000 and ICRP-65 models. The radon concentrations at several coal production faces are higher than the action level of 1000 Bq m(-3). It is suggested that the ventilation rates should be rearranged to reduce the radon concentration.

  18. The radon: evaluation and risk management; Le radon: evaluation et gestion du risque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacoste, A.C. [Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France); Masse, R. [Academie des Technologies, 75 - Paris (France); Aurengo, A. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France); Erich Wichmann, H. [Neuberberg Munich Univ. (Germany); Timarche, M.; Laurier, D.; Robe, M.Ch. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Clamart (France); Baubron, J.C.; Bonijoly, D. [BRGM, 75 - Paris (France); Collignan, B. [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Batiment, (CSTB), 75 - Paris (France); Berrier, H. [Direction Gle de l' Urbanisme de l' Habitat et de la Construction, 75 - Paris (France); Jaouen, J. [Direction Departementale des Affaires Sanitaires et Sociales de la Haute-Vienne (France); Caamano, D. [Direction Departementale des Affaires Sanitaires et Sociales de l' Essonne, 91 (France); Guiot, F. [Direction Departementale des Affaires Sanitaires et Sociales de la Haute-Marne (France); Grall, B. [Direction Departementale des Affaires Sanitaires et Sociales de Bretagne (France); Frutos Vasquez, B.; Olaya Adan, M. [Istituto de Ciencias de la Construction (Italy); Garcia Cadierno, J.P.; Martin Matarranz, J.L.; Serrano Renedo, J.; Suarez Mahou, E. [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, J.A. [ENUSA Industrias Avanzadas (Spain); Mjones, L.; Pirard, P. [Institut de veille sanitaire, 94415 - Saint-Maurice (France); Godet, J.L.; Rougy, Ch. [Direction Gle de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-06-15

    The radon exposure constitutes for the French population the first cause of natural irradiation among the different natural sources of irradiation. It is possible to have a significant action on it, either by making draught proof in order to avoid to radon to get inside houses, either by ventilating in order to dispel the radon and improve air quality. (N.C.)

  19. Workshop on radon and radon daughters in urban communities associated with uranium mining and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting of Atomic Energy Control Board staff, representatives of other government departments, and consultants was called to exchange information on steps taken to lower radiation levels in houses in communities such as Elliot Lake, Uranium City, and Port Hope. Discussions covered the sources of radon and radon daughters in these houses, radon measurement techniques, and remedial methods that worked or were not successful

  20. Assessment of the exposure to and dose from radon decay products in normally occupied homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.; Jensen, B.; Li, C.S.; Montassier, N.; Wasiolek, P. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States); Cavallo, A.J.; Gatsby, K.; Socolow, R.H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); James, A.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The exposure to radon decay products has been assessed in seven homes in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. In two of the houses, there was a single individual who smoked cigarettes. There were a variety of heating and cooking appliances among these homes. These studies have provide 565 measurements of the activity-weighted size distributions in these houses. The median value for the equilibrium factor was 0.408 as compared with the previously employed value of 0.50. Using the recently adopted ICRP lung deposition and dosimetry model, the hourly equivalent lung dose rate per unit, radon exposure was estimated for each measured size distribution. Differences between houses with smokers present and absent were noted in the exposure conditions, but the resulting dose rate per unit of radon gas concentration was essentially the same for the two groups. Expressed in terms of ICRP`s unit of effective dose for members of the public, the mean dose rate conversion coefficient with respect to radon gas concentration found in this study was 3.8 nSv h{sup -} Bq{sup -} m{sup -3}. 26 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Contribution of radon in tap water to indoor radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of radon (222Rn) in domestic water supplies to the concentration of 222Rn in indoor atmospheres has been investigated and found to be significant for concentrations over a few thousand picocuries per liter in the water supply. A model predicting average indoor increments due to this source is presented and supported by a series of measurements made in the laboratory and in private homes in the vicinity of Houston, Texas. The efficiency with which radon is transferred from water to air was experimentally determined, and these efficiencies were combined with estimates of average indoor water use to produce a source term proportional to the concentration of 222Rn in the tap water. The importance of the dwelling volume and the air change rate is discussed

  2. Radon in the Hotels in Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor radon concentrations in the 16 hotels in Montenegro, well known by tourists, were measured in winter period by an integral method, with etch-track detectors. Radon concentrations obtained at the 30 measuring sites are in a range (22 - 90) Bq/m3, with an arithmetic mean of 43 Bq/m3. This means that the radon levels in the all surveyed hotels in Montenegro are much bellow the most stringent reference level internationally recommended. (author)

  3. Radon concentrations in Taipei metropolitan railway station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For routine airborne radon monitoring, including use in field conditions, the technique based on electret ion chamber technology seems to be the most suitable choice in many applications. However, this simple and relatively inexpensive method has some specific drawbacks: poorer reproducibility at lower radon concentrations, some uncertainty in the use of manufacturer suggested gamma correction factors, and limited reusability. A modified electret ion chamber method has been proposed, but it is mainly for water borne radon measurement. Therefore, we still applied the simple method recommended by the manufacturer to survey radon concentrations in Taipei Railway Station. (author)

  4. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, William B. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States); Francisco, Paul W. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States); Merrin, Zachary [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  5. Collection of radon with solid oxidizing reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although it is generally considered to be inert, radon reacts spontaneously at ambient temperature with a number of fluorine-containing compounds, including dioxygenyl salts, fluoronitrogen salts, and halogen fluoride-metal fluoride complexes. A method for the collection of radon from air, using either dioxygenyl hexafluoroantimonate (O2+SbF6-) or hexafluoroiodine hexafluoroantimonate (IF6+SbF6-) reagent, is described. The air is passed though a drying tube and then through a bed of the reagent, which captures radon as a nonvolatile product. In tests with radon-air mixtures containing 45-210000 pCi/L of radon-222, more than 99% of the radon was retained by beds of powders (2.3-3.0 g of compound/cm2) and pellets (7.5-10.9 g of compound/cm2). The gas mixtures were designed to simulate radon-contaminated atmospheres in underground uranium mines. No dependence of collection efficiency upon radon concentration was observed. The method can be used for the analysis of radon-222 (by measurement of the γ emissions of the short-lived daughters, lead-214 and bismuth-214) and the purification of small volumes of air

  6. Radon epidemiology: A guide to the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was written as a comprehensive overview of the voluminous literature on both uranium miner and residential radon epidemiology studies. This document provides the reader with a fairly complete list of radon epidemiology publications and key features of each, so that readers may further pursue only those publications of interest in the vast body of radon literature. A companion document, exploring all on-going residential radon epidemiology studies will be published by the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Department of Energy (DOE) in the spring of 1989

  7. Radon transfer and intracorporal deposition of radon decay products under balneotherapeutic conditions; Radon-Transfer und intrakorporale Deposition von Radon-Folgeprodukten unter balneotherapeutischen Bedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, Wolfgang A. [Kurmittelhaus Sibyllenbad, Neualbenreuth (Germany); Just, Guenther [Forschungsbuero Radon, Grosspoesna (Germany); Petzold, Juergen [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum, Leipzig (Germany); Philipsborn, Henning von [Radiometrisches Seminar, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The intracorporal deposition of radon decay products was determined on four persons after 40 and 30 min respectively in radon water with about 1500 Bq/L by whole-body gamma spectrometry. The measurements started about 2 1/2h after exposure. In addition, the radon activity concentration of inspiratory and expiratory air was measured on one person during and after exposure and the deposition of radon decay products on the skin was measured on another person. The radon activity leaving the body with the expiratory air during exposure in the water (called ''radon transfer'') amounts to about 800 Bq. An intracorporal radon activity immediately after therapeutic exposure of about 3000 Bq was obtained as a result of first measurements by extrapolation from measurements starting about 2 1/2 hours later. Additional studies are necessary. There are indications that both the radon transfer and the intracorporal deposition can be increased by exposure in mixed radon-CO{sub 2} water. (orig.)

  8. Radon in Austria: metrology and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of radon mitigation and precaution standards needs continuously scientific attendance and research networking on international level. Otherwise the radon issue could degrade easily to a simplified techno-economical exercise without sustainable results in public health. In this paper the radon investigations in Austria which have been carried out in the last 20 years and the applied methods and derived standards for mitigation and precaution at home and workplaces are discussed. Future strategies, scientific and social necessities to solve the radon problem are outlined comprehensively. Strategies future research in Austria are discussed in consideration of the medium-term perspective of the European radiation protection. (orig.)

  9. Dosimetric lung models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anatomical and physiological factors that vary with age and influence the deposition of airborne radionuclides in the lung are reviewed. The efficiency with which aerosols deposit in the lung for a given exposure at various ages from birth to adulthood is evaluated. Deposition within the lung is considered in relation to the clearance mechanisms acting in different regions or compartments. The procedure for evaluating dose to sensitive tissues in lung and transfer to other organs that is being considered by the Task Group established by ICRP to review the Lung Model is outlined. Examples of the application of this modelling procedure to evaluate lung dose as a function of age are given, for exposure to radon daughters in dwellings, and for exposure to an insoluble 239Pu aerosol. The former represents exposure to short-lived radionuclides that deliver relatively high doses to bronchial tissue. In this case, dose rates are marginally higher in children than in adults. Plutonium exposure represents the case where dose is predominantly delivered to respiratory tissue and lymph nodes. In this case, the life-time doses tend to be lower for exposure in childhood. Some of the uncertainties in this modelling procedure are noted

  10. Instruments to measure radon-222 activity concentration or exposure to radon-222. Intercomparison 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the Directive 96/29/EURATOM the monitoring of occupational radiation exposures shall base on individual measurements carried out by an approved dosimetric service. Pursuant to the European Directive an approved dosimetric service is a body responsible for the calibration, reading or interpretation of individual monitoring devices.., whose capacity to act in this respect is recognized by the competent authorities. This concept will also be applied to radon services issuing passive radon measurement devices. Passive radon measurement devices1 using solid state nuclear track detectors or electrets are recommended for individual monitoring of exposures to radon. German regulations lay down that radon measuring devices are appropriate for purposes of occupational radiation monitoring if the devices are issued by recognized radon measurement services, and the measurement service submits devices of the same type issued for radon monitoring to regular intercomparisons conducted by the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS). A radon measuring service is recognized by the competent authority if it proves its organisational and technical competence, e. g. by accreditation. These regulations have been introduced in the area of occupational radiation exposures. Nevertheless, it is recommended that radon measuring services which carry out radon measurements in other areas (e.g. dwellings) should subject themselves to these measures voluntarily. The interlaboratory comparisons comprise the organization, exposure, and evaluation of measurements of radon activity concentration or exposure to radon. The comparisons only concern radon-222; radon-220 is not in the scope. Radon services being interested can get further information from the European Information System on Proficiency Testing Schemes (EPTIS) and from the BfS websites.

  11. On Academician Behounek's paper ''Lung cancer induced by ionizing radiation''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance and scientific contribution are discussed of the paper ''Lung Cancer Induced by Ionizing Radiation'' submitted by Academician Frantisek Behounek to the nation-wide workshop of the Czechoslovak Society of Pneumology and Oncology in Prague, October 3 and 4, 1952 and published in the Proceedings in 1953. The paper discussed the problem which still remains topical, ie., lung exposure to radon daughters, which Academician Behounek considered to be the true cause of lung cancer in Jachymov miners. (B.S.)

  12. Integral measurement system for radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integral measurement system for Radon is an equipment to detect, counting and storage data of alpha particles produced by Radon 222 which is emanated through the terrestrial peel surface. This equipment was designed in the Special Designs Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research. It supplies information about the behavior at long time (41 days) on each type of alpha radiation that is present into the environment as well as into the terrestrial peel. The program is formed by an User program, where it is possible to determine the operation parameters of a portable probe that contains, a semiconductor detector, a microprocessor as a control central unit, a real time clock and calendar to determine the occurred events chronology, a non-volatile memory device for storage the acquired data and an interface to establish the serial communications with other personal computers. (Author)

  13. Radon in the drinking water in Bavaria; Radon in Trinkwasser in Bayern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerner, Simone; Reifenhaeuser, Christiane [Bayerisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt, Augsburg (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    The EU guideline on the requirements for the protection of the public concerning radioactive matter in water was approved in October 2013, including mandatory regulations for radon in drinking water. The guideline has to be implemented into national laws within two years. The contribution includes an overview on the radon situation in the Bavarian drinking and ground water. Increased radon concentrations are observed only in the north-eastern basement rocks. The contribution also describes facts that can influence the radon concentration in drinking and ground water. Recommendations and measures in case of increased radon concentrations are summarized for decision making support in public health departments and water treatment plants.

  14. Radon and radon daughter measurements at and near the former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the radon and radon daughter measurements made to date (1978) at the Middlesex Sampling Plant in Middlesex, New Jersey, are presented in this report. These measurements were one portion of a more comprehensive radiological survey conducted at this site and the surrounding area from 1976 to 1978. The surveyed property served as a uranium ore sampling plant during the 1940's and early 1950's and as a result contains elevated levels of surface an subsurface contamination. On-site indoor radon daughter and radon concentrations exceeded both the US Surgeon General Guidelines and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's maximum permissible concentration limits for radon (10 CFR Part 20) in all structures surveyed. Off-site structures showed concentrations of radon and radon daughters at or only slightly above background levels, except for one site where the radon levels were found to be above the 10 CFR Part 20 guidelines. Outdoor radon ad radon daughter concentrations, measured both on and off the site, were well below the guidelines, and the data give no indication of significant radon transport from the site

  15. Radon as an Anthropogenic Indoor Air Pollutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Crockett, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Radon is generally regarded as a naturally occurring radiological hazard but we report here measurements of significant, hazardous radon concentrations that arise from man-made sources, including granite ornaments/artefacts, uranium glass and glazed objects as well radium dial watches. This presentation concerns an examination and assessment of health risks from radium and uranium found in historical artefacts, many of which were once viewed as everyday items, and the radon that emanates from them. Such objects were very popular in industrialised countries such as the USA, UK and European countries) particularly between and including the two World Wars but are still readily available. A watch collection examined gave rise to a hazardous radon concentration of 13.24 kBq•m-3 approximately 67 times the Domestic Action Level of 200 Bq•m-3.The results for an aircraft altimeter are comparable to those of the watches, indicating radon activity equivalent to several watches, and also indicate an equilibrium concentration in the 16.3 m3 room ca. 33 times the UK domestic Action Level. Results from a granite block indicate a radon emanation of 19.7 Bq•kg-1, but the indicated equilibrium concentration in the 16.3 m3 room is only ca. 1.7% of the UK domestic Action Level. Uranium-glazed crockery and green uranium glass were scoped for radon activity. The former yielded a radon concentration of ca. 44 Bq•m-3 in a small (7 L) sealed container. The latter yielded a lower radon concentration in a larger (125 L) sealed container of ca. 6 Bq•m-3. This is barely above the background radon concentration in the laboratory, which was typically ca. 1-2 Bq•m-3. Individual items then are capable of giving rise to radon concentrations in excess of the UK Domestic Action Level in rooms in houses, particularly if poorly ventilated. We highlight the gap in the remediation protocols, which are focused on preventing radon entering buildings from outside, with regard to internally

  16. Assessment of dose due to exposure to indoor radon and thoron progeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Ganesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The components of the effective dose through inhalation from radon and its progeny are important for human health since they contribute to more than 50% of the total radiation dose from natural sources. As a consequence, radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Radon and its short lived decay products (218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi, 214Po present in dwellings are a radiation hazard, particularly if such sources are concentrated in the enclosed areas like poorly ventilated houses and underground mines. The indoor radon, thoron, and progeny concentrations were measured in a small hilly town of Budhakedar and the surrounding area of Tehri Garhwal, India, by using LR-115 Type II plastic track detector in a twin cup radon dosimeter. The concentrations of radon progeny were measured as the highest in winter and the lowest in summer while the thoron progeny concentration was found maximum in rainy season and minimum in autumn. The annual exposure to the potential alpha energy of radon and thoron were found to vary from 0.04 WLM to 0.69 WLM with an average value of 0.29 WLM, and 0.03 WLM to 0.37 WLM with an aver- age value of 0.16 WLM, respectively. The annual effective dose due to the exposure to indoor radon and progeny in Budhakedar homes was found to vary from 0.16 mSv to 2.72 mSv with an average value of 1.14 mSv and the effective dose due to the exposure to thoron and progeny was found to vary from 0.18 mSv to 2.49 mSv with an average value of 1.05 mSv. The results of systematic study have been obtained by considering the room as a space in which the radon and thoron levels are directly related to the dynamic and static parameters.

  17. Radon monitoring in groundwater samples from some areas of northern Rajasthan, India, using a RAD7 detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Asha; Mehra, Rohit; Duggal, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    Radon monitoring has been increasingly conducted worldwide because of the hazardous effects of radon on the health of human beings. In the present research, groundwater samples were taken from hand pumps at different areas of the districts of SriGanganagar, Hanumangarh, Sikar and Churu in northern Rajasthan. RAD7, an electronic radon detector (Durridge co., USA), was used to estimate the radon concentration in groundwater used for drinking. Radon concentration in the groundwater ranged from 0.5 ± 0.3 Bq l(-1) (Chimanpura) to 85.7±4.9 Bq l(-1)(Khandela) with an average value of 9.03±1.03 Bq l(-1). In 89 % of the samples, radon concentration is well below the allowed maximum contamination level (MCL) of radon concentration in water of 11 Bq l(-1), proposed by US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Only in 11 % of the samples, the recorded values were found to be higher than MCL proposed by USEPA and only in 5 % of the samples, the recorded values were found to be higher than the values between 4 and 40 Bq l(-1) suggested for radon concentration in water for human consumption by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the effect of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). The annual effective dose in stomach and lungs per person was also evaluated in this research. The estimated total annual effective dose of adults ranged from 1.34 to 229.68 µSv y(-1). The total annual effective dose from three locations of the studied area was found to be greater than the safe limit (0.1 mSv y(-1)) recommended by World Health Organization and EU Council. PMID:22826356

  18. Study on variation of indoor radon concentration and its concentration in ground water in granite regions of Karnataka State, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J, D.S.; DR, R. [Kuvempu University (India); Nagaraj, S. [Department of Physics, Govt. First grade college, Malleswaram, Bangalore (India); C, D.N. [Department of Physics, Vidya Vikas Institute of Engineering and Technology Mysore (India); E, S. [I D S G Govt. College Chickmagalore (India)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental pollution and management of water is a national and international priority today. Our environment is continuously irradiated by naturally occurring radioactive elements and their decay products found in the earth's crust. {sup 222}Rn, a noble radioactive gas produced by decay of {sup 226}Ra, is a member of the {sup 238}U series. Radon concentration measurements in water and atmosphere are necessary to understand the effect of {sup 222}Rn on human health. Epidemiological studies reveal that the exposure to radon and its progeny is the one of the main causes of lung cancer after smoking. The high concentration of radon in ground water poses a potential health risks in two ways by inhalation and ingestion. In the present study, the radon concentration in indoor air atmosphere and in drinking water have been determined by collecting various drinking water samples from bore well, tank, tap and river water from different locations in granite regions of Karnataka state and were estimated by using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) technique and Emanometry technique. The radon concentration in indoor atmosphere is depends mainly on radon emanation from ground water used for domestic purposes, ventilation condition, type of building materials used for construction. The present study highlights the variation of indoor radon concentration with water used for different purposes and estimates the dose to the publics of this study area. The estimated total equivalent effective dose is higher than the global average. According to US EPA and WHO report majority of the drinking water samples and their radon concentration exceeds the reference levels. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  19. Study on variation of indoor radon concentration and its concentration in ground water in granite regions of Karnataka State, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental pollution and management of water is a national and international priority today. Our environment is continuously irradiated by naturally occurring radioactive elements and their decay products found in the earth's crust. 222Rn, a noble radioactive gas produced by decay of 226Ra, is a member of the 238U series. Radon concentration measurements in water and atmosphere are necessary to understand the effect of 222Rn on human health. Epidemiological studies reveal that the exposure to radon and its progeny is the one of the main causes of lung cancer after smoking. The high concentration of radon in ground water poses a potential health risks in two ways by inhalation and ingestion. In the present study, the radon concentration in indoor air atmosphere and in drinking water have been determined by collecting various drinking water samples from bore well, tank, tap and river water from different locations in granite regions of Karnataka state and were estimated by using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) technique and Emanometry technique. The radon concentration in indoor atmosphere is depends mainly on radon emanation from ground water used for domestic purposes, ventilation condition, type of building materials used for construction. The present study highlights the variation of indoor radon concentration with water used for different purposes and estimates the dose to the publics of this study area. The estimated total equivalent effective dose is higher than the global average. According to US EPA and WHO report majority of the drinking water samples and their radon concentration exceeds the reference levels. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  20. Radon awareness in Ireland: a assessment of the effectiveness of radon road shows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In late 2004 the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (R.P.I.I.) initiated a series of radon road shows in areas designated as High Radon Areas 1 in the R.P.I.I. s national radon survey of homes. The main objective of these road shows was to provide information to a local audience on the risks of exposure to radon. These road shows target both employers and householders. Each road show has the same general format. A presentation and/or meeting with a major employer representative group within the area. The purpose is to make employers aware of the risks associated with exposure to radon in the workplace and to highlight their obligations under current Irish health and safety legislation regarding radon in the workplace. An information stand on radon manned by R.P.I.I. staff members in a local shopping centre or other similar area. This provides those concerned about radon with accessible information on radon exposure risks, how to measure radon and the steps a home owner could take to reduce radon concentrations where necessary. Where possible R.P.I.I. staff members visit one or more schools in the general area. A short presentation on radon was given to students and students were given an opportunity to asks questions Maximizing media exposure to publicize our visits is vital to the success of these visits. Each visit is preceded by a Press Release whose main aim is to brief local and national media on the radon issue so as to achieve maximum publicity mainly through radio and television coverage. In general the media are very interested in the whole radon area and R.P.I.I. staff members have given 57 radio and 10 television interviews to date since the commencement of this initiative. The four road shows carried out to date have been successful in encouraging householders to carry out radon measurements. Since the start of the road shows to the present, the R.P.I.I. has seen a 44% increase in the number of householders requesting radon

  1. Radon thematic days - Conference proceedings; Journees thematiques sur le radon - Recueil des presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-03-15

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the Radon thematic days organized by the French society of radiation protection (SFRP). Twenty five presentations (slides) are compiled in the document and deal with: 1 - General introduction about radon (Sebastien Baechler, IRA); 2 - Survey of epidemiological studies (Dominique Laurier, IRSN); 3 - Dosimetric model (Eric Blanchardon, Estelle Davesne, IRSN); 4 - Radon issue in Franche-Comte: measurement of the domestic exposure and evaluation of the associated health impact (Francois Clinard, InVS); 5 - WHO's (World Health Organization) viewpoint in limiting radon exposure in homes (Ferid Shannoun, OMS); 6 - Radon measurement techniques (Roselyne Ameon, IRSN); 7 - Quality of radon measurements (Francois Bochud, IRA); 8 - International recommendations (Jean-Francois Lecomte, IRSN); 9 - Radon management strategy in Switzerland - 1994-2014 (Christophe Murith, OFSP); 10 - 2011-2015 action plan for radon risk management (Jean-Luc Godet, Eric Dechaux, ASN); 11 - Radon at work place in Switzerland (Lisa Pedrazzi, SUVA); 12 - Strategies of radiation protection optimization in radon exposure situations (Cynthia Reaud, CEPN); 13 - Mapping of the radon potential of geologic formations in France (Geraldine Ielsch, IRSN); 14 - Radon database in Switzerland (Martha Gruson, OFSP); 15 - Radon 222 in taps water (Jeanne Loyen, IRSN); 16 - Buildings protection methods (Bernard Collignan, CSTB, Roselyne Ameon, IRSN); 17 - Preventive and sanitation measures in Switzerland (Claudio Valsangiacomo, SUPSI); 18 - Training and support approach for building specialists (Joelle Goyette-Pernot, Fribourg engineers and architects' school); 19 - Status of radon bulk activity measurements performed between 2005-2010 in public areas (Cyril Pineau, ASN); 20 - Neuchatel Canton experiments (Didier Racine, SENE); 21 - Montbeliard region experience in the radon risk management (Isabelle Netillard, Pays de Montbeliard

  2. Solar eruptions - soil radon - earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time a new natural phenomenon was established: a contrasting increase in the soil radon level under the influence of solar flares. Such an increase is one of geochemical indicators of earthquakes. Most researchers consider this a phenomenon of exclusively terrestrial processes. Investigations regarding the link of earthquakes to solar activity carried out during the last decade in different countries are based on the analysis of statistical data ΣΕ (t) and W (t). As established, the overall seismicity of the Earth and its separate regions depends of an 11-year long cycle of solar activity. Data provided in the paper based on experimental studies serve the first step on the way of experimental data on revealing cause-and-reason solar-terrestrials bonds in a series solar eruption-lithosphere radon-earthquakes. They need further collection of experimental data. For the first time, through radon constituent of terrestrial radiation objectification has been made of elementary lattice of the Hartmann's network contoured out by bio location method. As found out, radon concentration variations in Hartmann's network nodes determine the dynamics of solar-terrestrial relationships. Of the three types of rapidly running processes conditioned by solar-terrestrial bonds earthquakes are attributed to rapidly running destructive processes that occur in the most intense way at the juncture of tectonic massifs, along transformed and deep failures. The basic factors provoking the earthquakes are both magnetic-structural effects and a long-term (over 5 months) bombing of the surface of lithosphere by highly energetic particles of corpuscular solar flows, this being approved by photometry. As a result of solar flares that occurred from 29 October to 4 November 2003, a sharply contrasting increase in soil radon was established which is an earthquake indicator on the territory of Yerevan City. A month and a half later, earthquakes occurred in San-Francisco, Iran, Turkey

  3. Methods of radon remediation in Finnish dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of remedial measures taken in dwellings with high indoor radon concentrations and the results obtained. The data regarding the remedial measures taken in 400 dwellings was obtained from a questionnaire study. The mean annual average indoor radon concentration before the remedies was 1.500 Bq/m3, the concentration exceeding in nearly every house the action level of 400 Bq/m3. After the measures were taken the mean indoor radon concentration was 500 Bq/m3. The resulting indoor radon concentration was less than 400 Bq/m3 in 60 percent of the dwellings. The best results were achieved using sub-slab-suction and radon well. These methods effectively decrease both the flow of radon bearing air from soil into dwellings and the radon concentration of leakage air. Typical reduction rates in radon concentration were 70-95 percent. The action level was achieved in more than 70 percent of the houses. Sealing the entry routes and improvement of the ventilation resulted typically in reduction rates of 10-50 percent. The goal of the report is to give useful information for the house owners, the do-it-yourself-mitigators, the mitigation firms and the local authorities. The report includes practical guidance, price information and examples of remedial measures. (13 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.)

  4. Radon diagnostics and tracer gas measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An outline is presented of the tracer gas technique, which is used for continuous measurements of air ventilation rate (generally time-varying) and for simultaneous estimation of air ventilation rate and radon entry rate, and some of its limitations are discussed. The performance of this technique in the calculation of the air ventilation rate is demonstrated on real data from routine measurements. The potential for air ventilation rate estimation based on radon measurements only is discussed. A practical application is described of the tracer gas technique to a simultaneous estimation of the air ventilation rate and radon entry rate in a real house where the effectiveness of radon remedy was tested. The following main advantages of the CO tracer gas techniques are stressed: (i) The averaging method continuous determination of the ventilation rate with good accuracy (≤ 20 %). (ii) The newly presented and verified method based on simultaneous measurements of radon concentration and CO gas concentration enables separate continuous measurements of the radon entry rate and ventilation rate. The results of comparative measurements performed with the aim to estimate the inaccuracy in determination of radon entry rate showed acceptable and good agreement up to approximately 10 %. The results of comparative measurements performed with the aim to estimate the mutual commensuration of the method to the determination of the ventilation rate confirmed the expected unreliability the two parametric non-linear regression method, which is the most frequently used method in radon diagnostic in the Czech Republic

  5. Radon Risk Communication Strategies: A Regional Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Winnie

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication on the health effects of radon encounters many challenges and requires a variety of risk communication strategies and approaches. The concern over radon exposure and its health effects may vary according to people's level of knowledge and receptivity. Homeowners in radon-prone areas are usually more informed and have greater concern over those not living in radon-prone areas. The latter group is often found to be resistant to testing. In British Columbia as well as many other parts of the country, some homes have been lying outside of the radon-prone areas have radon levels above the Canadian guideline, which is the reason Health Canada recommends that all homes should be tested. Over the last five years, the Environment Health Program (EHP) of Health Canada in the British Columbia region has been using a variety of different approaches in their radon risk communications through social media, workshops, webinars, public forums, poster contests, radon distribution maps, public inquiries, tradeshows and conference events, and partnership with different jurisdictions and nongovernmental organizations. The valuable lessons learned from these approaches are discussed in this special report. PMID:26867298

  6. Atmospheric radon families and environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Committee on Investigation and Research Regarding the Effect of Radon in the Atmosphere Exerted on Environmental Radioactivity was organized, in 1982, in order to carry out the research and discussion on radon and joint observation. As the results, the following facts were revealed: (1) the effectiveness of various methods of measuring environmental radon and its daughters, for example, Track Etch Detectors for the deposition rate of airborne radon daughters, (2) the analysis of radon family concentration from the viewpoint of geophysical phenomena, for instance, the relationships among the concentration, wind speed, solar radiation, net radiation, atmospheric stability, precipitation snow cover, and diffusion equation. And it was also reveleaed that the exhalation rate of radon at Siberia in winter is not low in spite of low temperature, and that the scavenging effect of snowfall to radon daughters is large, from the comparison between the atmospheric radon daughters concentrations at the Japan Sea and at Fukui located at north part of Central Japan. (J.P.N.)

  7. Radon measurements in mines and dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon measurements using a time integrating passive radon dosemeter (MAKROFOL track etch detector) have been performed in Brazilian and German mines and dwellings. The present state of the measurement technique is summarized. The results are presented together with exposure calculations and dose estimations for occupational exposure in open pit and underground mines and for the general public in houses. (orig./HP)

  8. Radon concentration in thermal waters of Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radon content in thermal waters of Venezuela has been measured, and a method for carrying out serial measurements has been developed. Besides radon, the thorium and radium content has also been measured. Drinking water sources in the area of Caracas has also been measured. (K.A.)

  9. Radon makes trouble between expert committees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article highlights the disagreement between 2 scientific commissions about the maximal acceptable concentration of radon. 1000 or 400 becquerels for each cubic-meter of air (Bq/m3). Information about the average concentration of radon in the different French departments is given by means of a map. (A.C.)

  10. Systematic radon survey over active volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M.; Garcia Vindas, J.R. [Centre National de la Recherche Cientifique, Montpellier (France). Lab. GBE; Ricard, L.P.; Staudacher, T. [Observatoire Volcanologique Du Pitou de la Fournaise, La Plaine des Cafres (France)

    1999-08-01

    Data obtained since 1993 on Costa Rica volcanos are presented and radon anomalies recorded before the eruption of the Irazu volcano (December 8, 1994) are discussed. The Piton de la Fournaise volcano is inactive since mid 1992. The influence of the external parameters on the radon behaviour is studied and the type of perturbations induced on short-term measurements are individuate.

  11. Removal of Radon from Household Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Research and Development.

    By far, the greatest risk to health from radon occurs when the gas enters the house from underlying soil and is inhaled. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is studying ways to reduce radon in houses, including methods to remove the gas from water to prevent its release in houses when the water is used. While this research has not…

  12. Radon Risk Communication Strategies: A Regional Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Winnie

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication on the health effects of radon encounters many challenges and requires a variety of risk communication strategies and approaches. The concern over radon exposure and its health effects may vary according to people's level of knowledge and receptivity. Homeowners in radon-prone areas are usually more informed and have greater concern over those not living in radon-prone areas. The latter group is often found to be resistant to testing. In British Columbia as well as many other parts of the country, some homes have been lying outside of the radon-prone areas have radon levels above the Canadian guideline, which is the reason Health Canada recommends that all homes should be tested. Over the last five years, the Environment Health Program (EHP) of Health Canada in the British Columbia region has been using a variety of different approaches in their radon risk communications through social media, workshops, webinars, public forums, poster contests, radon distribution maps, public inquiries, tradeshows and conference events, and partnership with different jurisdictions and nongovernmental organizations. The valuable lessons learned from these approaches are discussed in this special report.

  13. Radon Measurement in Schools. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other major national and international scientific organizations have concluded that radon is a human carcinogen and a serious environmental health problem. The EPA has conducted extensive research on the presence and measurement of radon in schools. This report provides school administrators and…

  14. Radon Reduction Methods: A Homeowner's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is studying the effectiveness of various ways to reduce high concentrations of radon in houses. This booklet was produced to share what has been learned with those whose radon problems demand immediate action. The booklet describes nine methods that have been tested successfully--by EPA and/or other…

  15. A retrospective mortality study of workers exposed to radon in a Brazilian coal mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High levels of radon concentration were found in the underground workplace of an underground coal mine in Parana state, which has been in activity since 1942. Many of these workers were exposed for a long period of time to a work atmosphere with high radon, and radon decay products concentration. Taking this into account, it was decided to carry on a historical cohort, study with the workers' of this mining universe (underground and surface) in. order to evaluate the possible health effects related to this exposure, by means of a retrospective study of mortality. Through multiple strategies, it was possible to trace the vital status of 90% of the cohort. The causes of the deaths were identified by active search, of Death Declarations in the Health Office of Parana state and also in and other states. The success rate of cause of death identification was 100%. The final, cohort included 1946 underground workers and 910 surface workers. Standard mortality ratio (SMR) analysis showed lower mortality from all causes for both underground (SMR-88, 95%CI=78-98) and surface workers (SMR=96, 95%CI=81- 113). A highly significant SMR was observed for pneumonia cause of death among surface ((SMR=284, 95%CI=118-684) and underground miners (SMR-254, 95%CI=140-459), while a highly significant lung cancer mortality risk was observed only for underground miners (SMR=177, 95%CI=105-299) with a significant trend in relation to years of underground work (duration of exposure). Taking into account that mortality from smoking-related cancers other than lung cancer is not elevated in underground workers and diesel equipment were not used at this mine, the results suggest that the exposure to radon daughters may have been responsible for the lung cancer excess among underground workers. This work consists of the first historical Brazilian cohort involving miners exposed to radon and one of the few historical cohorts built in Brazil. It should be considered the fact that many workers of

  16. Mortality and cancer incidence in Misasa, Japan, a spa area with elevated radon levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Weimin; Sobue, Tomotaka; Lee, V.S.; Tanooka, Hiroshi [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Research Inst.; Mifune, Masaaki; Suyama, Akihiko; Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Kondo, Sohei

    1998-08-01

    A historical cohort study was conducted in Misasa town, Tottori prefecture, Japan, where radon spas have been operating for a long time. Misasa town was divided into an elevated radon level area and a control area, with mean indoor radon levels of about 60 and 20 Bq/m{sup 3}, respectively. In total, 3,083 subjects in the elevated radon level area and 1,248 in the control area, all aged 40 or older on January 1, 1976, were followed up until December 31, 1993, for a mean period of 14 years. The mortality rates from all causes exhibited no difference between the elevated radon level area and the control area for both sexes. No difference was observed in the incidence of all-site cancers (age, period-adjusted rate ratios by Poisson regression, RR=1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79-1.42 for males, RR=0.90, 95%CI 0.65-1.24 for females), while stomach cancer incidence seemed to decrease for both sexes (RR=0.70, 95%CI 0.44-1.11 for male, RR=0.58, 95%CI 0.34-1.00 for female) and lung cancer incidence for males only seemed to increase (RR=1.65, 95%CI 0.83-3.30 for male, RR=1.07, 95%CI 0.28-4.14 for female) in the elevated radon level area. Caution is needed in the interpretation of these findings, however, since the individual exposure level was not measured and major confounding factors, such as smoking and diet, could not be controlled in this study. (author)

  17. Mortality and cancer incidence in Misasa, Japan, a spa area with elevated radon levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A historical cohort study was conducted in Misasa town, Tottori prefecture, Japan, where radon spas have been operating for a long time. Misasa town was divided into an elevated radon level area and a control area, with mean indoor radon levels of about 60 and 20 Bq/m3, respectively. In total, 3,083 subjects in the elevated radon level area and 1,248 in the control area, all aged 40 or older on January 1, 1976, were followed up until December 31, 1993, for a mean period of 14 years. The mortality rates from all causes exhibited no difference between the elevated radon level area and the control area for both sexes. No difference was observed in the incidence of all-site cancers (age, period-adjusted rate ratios by Poisson regression, RR=1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79-1.42 for males, RR=0.90, 95%CI 0.65-1.24 for females), while stomach cancer incidence seemed to decrease for both sexes (RR=0.70, 95%CI 0.44-1.11 for male, RR=0.58, 95%CI 0.34-1.00 for female) and lung cancer incidence for males only seemed to increase (RR=1.65, 95%CI 0.83-3.30 for male, RR=1.07, 95%CI 0.28-4.14 for female) in the elevated radon level area. Caution is needed in the interpretation of these findings, however, since the individual exposure level was not measured and major confounding factors, such as smoking and diet, could not be controlled in this study. (author)

  18. Measurements of radon around closed uranium mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Sadaaki E-mail: furuta@ningyo.jnc.go.jp; Ito, Kimio; Ishimori, Yuu

    2002-07-01

    There are several waste rock yards at closed uranium mines around Ningyo-toge, in the Western Honshu Island of Japan, and measurements of radon were carried out by both the passive method and the sampling method around these yards. As comparatively high radon concentrations were observed in two districts through routine measurements, more detailed measurements were made by the passive method in these districts. The impact of radon emanation from the waste rock yards was small for both residential districts and around these yards when considering the natural background level of radon. In addition, by simultaneous continuous measurements of radon and its progeny at two locations, it was estimated that the effective dose caused by the representative uranium waste rock yards was less than the public effective dose limit of 1 mSv year{sup -1} at the fenced boundary of the waste rock site.

  19. Radon in houses and soil of Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radolic, V.; Vukovic, B.; Stanic, D.; Miklavcic, I.; Planinic, J. [Osijek Univ., Dept. of Physics (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Long-term indoor radon measurements in thousand Croatian homes, randomly selected, were performed by the LR-115 track etch detectors during a year 2003/2004. The obtained values of arithmetic means of radon concentrations in 20 Croatian counties were in range from 33 to 198 Bq/m{sup 3}, while the arithmetic and geometric means for Croatia were 68 and 50 Bq/m{sup 3}, respectively. Indoor radon concentrations follow log-normal distribution and the percentage of dwellings with concentrations above 400 Bq/m{sup 3} was 1.8 %. Radon concentrations in soil gas, at depth of 0.8 m, were measured by 'Alphaguard' measuring system. Association between levels of indoor and soil radon was investigated. (authors)

  20. Indoor radon survey in the Vojvodina region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forkapic, S.; Todorovic, N.; Bikit, I.; Mrda, D.; Slivka, J.; Veskovic, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2010-07-01

    The results of an indoor radon survey in the Vojvodina region (Serbia) are presented. Long-term average radon measurements in an existing building can be measured relatively simply and inexpensively using a passive device, such as an alpha track detector. Houses in the suburbs were chosen as the target locations of the present investigations. Indoor radon concentrations were measured with CR-39 alpha track detectors at {approx}1000 locations in Vojvodina during the winter period. Effect of floor level, space under the rooms, boarding and the heating system on radon accumulation are discussed in this paper. For the dwellings typical of such regions, we measure a mean annual radon activity concentration of 112 Bq/m{sup 3} (747 measurements using the alpha track detector CR-39). (authors)