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Sample records for alpha-chlorohydrin-induced infertile rats

  1. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MALE INFERTILITY Male infertility may be due to: Decreased number of sperm Blockage that prevents the sperm ... from woman to woman. Infertility problems and miscarriage rates increase ... a successful pregnancy if childbearing is delayed until after age 35. ...

  2. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility means not being able to become pregnant after a year of trying. If a woman can ... keeps having miscarriages or stillbirths, that's also called infertility. Infertility is fairly common. After one year of ...

  3. The Effect of Mirtazapine on Cisplatin-Induced Oxidative Damage and Infertility in Rat Ovaries

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    Durdu Altuner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin causes infertility due to ovarian toxicity. The toxicity mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests oxidative stress. In this study, the effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced infertility and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. 64 female rats were divided into 4 groups of 16. Except for the controls that received physiologic saline only, all were administered with cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p. and mirtazapine (15 mg/kg p.o. or mirtazapine (30 mg/kg p.o. for 10 days. After this period, six rats from each group were randomly selected, and malondialdehyde (MDA, myeloperoxidase (MPO, nitric oxide (NO, total gluthatione (tGSH, gluthatione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanine (8-OH Gua levels were measured in their ovarian tissues. Reproductive functions of the remaining rats were examined for 6 months. The MDA, MPO, NO groups and 8-OH Gua levels were higher in the cisplatin-treated groups than the controls, which was not observed in the mirtazapine and cisplatin groups. GSH, GPx, and SOD levels were reduced by cisplatin, which was prevented by mirtazapine. Cisplatin caused infertility by 70%. The infertility rates were, respectively, 40% and 10% for the 15 and 30 mg/kg mirtazapine administered groups. In conclusion, oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in the rat ovary tissue causes infertility in the female rats. Mirtazapine reverses this in a dose-dependent manner.

  4. The effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced oxidative damage and infertility in rat ovaries.

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    Altuner, Durdu; Gulaboglu, Mine; Yapca, Omer Erkan; Cetin, Nihal

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin causes infertility due to ovarian toxicity. The toxicity mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests oxidative stress. In this study, the effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced infertility and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. 64 female rats were divided into 4 groups of 16. Except for the controls that received physiologic saline only, all were administered with cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and mirtazapine (15 mg/kg p.o.) or mirtazapine (30 mg/kg p.o.) for 10 days. After this period, six rats from each group were randomly selected, and malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitric oxide (NO), total gluthatione (tGSH), gluthatione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanine (8-OH Gua) levels were measured in their ovarian tissues. Reproductive functions of the remaining rats were examined for 6 months. The MDA, MPO, NO groups and 8-OH Gua levels were higher in the cisplatin-treated groups than the controls, which was not observed in the mirtazapine and cisplatin groups. GSH, GPx, and SOD levels were reduced by cisplatin, which was prevented by mirtazapine. Cisplatin caused infertility by 70%. The infertility rates were, respectively, 40% and 10% for the 15 and 30 mg/kg mirtazapine administered groups. In conclusion, oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in the rat ovary tissue causes infertility in the female rats. Mirtazapine reverses this in a dose-dependent manner.

  5. The Effect of Mirtazapine on Cisplatin-Induced Oxidative Damage and Infertility in Rat Ovaries

    OpenAIRE

    Durdu Altuner; Mine Gulaboglu; Omer Erkan Yapca; Nihal Cetin

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin causes infertility due to ovarian toxicity. The toxicity mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests oxidative stress. In this study, the effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced infertility and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. 64 female rats were divided into 4 groups of 16. Except for the controls that received physiologic saline only, all were administered with cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and mirtazapine (15 mg/kg p.o.) or mirtazapine (30 mg/kg p.o.) for 10 days. After t...

  6. A diet containing the soy phytoestrogen genistein causes infertility in female rats partially deficient in UDP glucuronyltransferase

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    Seppen, Jurgen, E-mail: j.seppen@amc.uva.nl

    2012-11-01

    Soy beans contain genistein, a natural compound that has estrogenic effects because it binds the estrogen receptor with relatively high affinity. Genistein is therefore the most important environmental estrogen in the human diet. Detoxification of genistein is mediated through conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1 and 2 (UGT1 and UGT2) isoenzymes. Gunn rats have a genetic deficiency in UGT1 activity, UGT2 activities are not affected. Because our Gunn rats stopped breeding after the animal chow was changed to a type with much higher soy content, we examined the mechanism behind this soy diet induced infertility. Gunn and control rats were fed diets with and without genistein. In these rats, plasma levels of genistein and metabolites, fertility and reproductive parameters were determined. Enzyme assays showed reduced genistein UGT activity in Gunn rats, as compared to wild type rats. Female Gunn rats were completely infertile on a genistein diet, wild type rats were fertile. Genistein diet caused a persistent estrus, lowered serum progesterone and inhibited development of corpora lutea in Gunn rats. Concentrations of total genistein in Gunn and control rat plasma were identical and within the range observed in humans after soy consumption. However, Gunn rat plasma contained 25% unconjugated genistein, compared to 3.6% in control rats. This study shows that, under conditions of reduced glucuronidation, dietary genistein exhibits a strongly increased estrogenic effect. Because polymorphisms that reduce UGT1 expression are prevalent in the human population, these results suggest a cautionary attitude towards the consumption of large amounts of soy or soy supplements. -- Highlights: ► Gunn rats are partially deficient in detoxification by UDP glucuronyltransferases. ► Female Gunn rats are infertile on a soy containing diet. ► Soy contains genistein, a potent phytoestrogen. ► Inefficient glucuronidation of genistein causes female infertility.

  7. Follicular atresia and infertility in rats treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, K L; Bertero, M C; Lyon, B P; Muse, K N; Vernon, M W

    1990-07-01

    Adverse effects of the GnRH antagonist Antide on folliculogenesis and fertility were noted when we were evaluating the therapeutic value of Antide on endometriosis in a rat model. Cyclic rats with (n = 56) and without (n = 18) surgically induced endometriosis received Antide (2 mg/kg) or vehicle at noon on days 0 (proestrus), 3, 6, and 9. Rats were killed at noon on days 0, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 42, and 165. The number of antral follicles and the number of atretic antral follicles evaluated did not differ (P greater than 0.05) between endometriosis and control rats. Antide-treated rats had more (P less than 0.05 ) atretic antral follicles (64.7%) than vehicle-treated rats (15.3%). Antide-treated rat ovaries contained fewer corpora lutea than those of vehicle-treated rats on days 6, 12, and 18. No corpora lutea were found in Antide-treated rat ovaries after day 18. The abnormal ovarian morphology of the Antide-treated rats persisted for the duration of the project (165 days). Fertility (rats without endometriosis) was assessed by mating vehicle-and Antide-treated rats at spontaneous proestrus (n = 8) for eight posttreatment cycles as well as after follicular stimulation (n = 2). All vehicle-treated and no Antide-treated rats became pregnant. No oocytes were found in the oviducts of Antide-treated rats after eight cycles, indicating that ovulation had not occurred. The serum FSH and estradiol concentrations in the rats treated with Antide were lower (P less than 0.05) on days 6, 12, and 18, but rose to values equal to (days 24 and 30) or greater than (day 42) those in vehicle-treated rats. Serum progesterone levels in rats treated with Antide were lower (P less than 0.05) than those in vehicle-treated rats on all days tested. In conclusion, at a dosage sufficient to suppress reproductive cyclicity (and elicit the regression of endometriosis), Antide also caused long term follicular atresia and infertility.

  8. Evaluating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Evaluating Infertility Home For Patients Search FAQs Evaluating Infertility Page ... Evaluating Infertility FAQ136, June 2012 PDF Format Evaluating Infertility Gynecologic Problems What is an infertility evaluation? When ...

  9. Treating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Treating Infertility Home For Patients Search FAQs Treating Infertility Page ... Treating Infertility FAQ137, March 2015 PDF Format Treating Infertility Gynecologic Problems What is infertility? What treatment options ...

  10. Defining Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  11. Female Infertility

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    Infertility means not being able to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or 6 ... woman keeps having miscarriages, it is also called infertility. Female infertility can result from age, physical problems, ...

  12. Infertility FAQ's

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    ... 3286 After hours (404) 639-2888 Contact Media Infertility FAQs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Frequently Asked Questions What is infertility? In general, infertility is defined as not being ...

  13. The ter mutation in the rat Dnd1 gene initiates gonadal teratomas and infertility in both genders.

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    Emily Northrup

    Full Text Available A spontaneous mutation leading to the formation of congenital ovarian and testicular tumors was detected in the WKY/Ztm rat strain. The histological evaluation revealed derivatives from all three germ layers, thereby identifying these tumors as teratomas. Teratocarcinogenesis was accompanied by infertility and the underlying mutation was termed ter. Linkage analysis of 58 (WKY-ter×SPRD-Cu3 F2 rats associated the ter mutation with RNO18 (LOD = 3.25. Sequencing of candidate genes detected a point mutation in exon 4 of the dead-end homolog 1 gene (Dnd1, which introduces a premature stop codon assumed to cause a truncation of the Dnd1 protein. Genotyping of the recessive ter mutation revealed a complete penetrance of teratocarcinogenesis and infertility in homozygous ter rats of both genders. Morphologically non-tumorous testes of homozygous ter males were reduced in both size and weight. This testicular malformation was linked to a lack of spermatogenesis using immunohistochemical and histological staining. Our WKY-Dnd1(ter/Ztm rat is a novel animal model to investigate gonadal teratocarcinogenesis and the molecular mechanisms involved in germ cell development of both genders.

  14. Identification of New Epididymal Luminal Fluid Proteins Involved in Sperm Maturation in Infertile Rats Treated by Dutasteride Using iTRAQ

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    Shu-Wu Xie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spermatozoa become mature and acquire fertilizing capacity during their passage through the epididymal lumen. In this study, we identified new epididymal luminal fluid proteins involved in sperm maturation in infertile rats by dutasteride, a dual 5α-reductase inhibitor, in order to provide potential epididymal targets for new contraceptives and infertility treatment. Methods: Male rats were treated with dutasteride for 28 consecutive days. We observed the protein expression profiles in the epididymal luminal fluids in infertile and normal rats using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ technique. The confidence of proteome data was validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: 1045 proteins were tested, and 23 of them presented different expression profiling in the infertile and normal rats. The seven proteins were down-regulated, and 16 proteins were up-regulated. Among the seven proteins which were significantly down-regulated by dutasteride in the epididymal luminal fluids, there were three β-defensins (Defb2, Defb18 and Defb39, which maybe the key proteins involved in epididymal sperm maturation and male fertility. Conclusions: We report for the first time that dutasteride influences the protein expression profiling in the epididymal luminal fluids of rats, and this result provides some new epididymal targets for male contraception and infertility therapy.

  15. Improvement of sperm density in neem-oil induced infertile male albino rats by Ipomoea digitata Linn.

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    Ghanashyam Keshav Mahajan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Investigation has been carried out to validate folkloric claim of the potential of ID based on reproductive health status in experimentally induced male albino rats. Materials and Methods: Emulsified neem oil (ENO fed albino rats were orally administered root powder of ID suspended in water for the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 40 days. Change in organ weight, sperm density and motility, serum hormonal levels and histomorphological changes were evaluated. Results: Significant increase in the sperm density and the sperm motility (P< 0.01 along with increase in the testis, and epididymes weight in neem-oil induced infertile rats treated with ID at both dose levels. This effect is vis- and agrave;-vis to serum hormonal levels. Presence of beta-sitosterol in the root of ID likely to enhance the process of spermatogenesis as it is evident from histomorphological studies. Conclusion: Results of the present investigation reveal that ID is a good candidate for the management of male infertility. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(2.000: 125-128

  16. The radioprotective effects of Moringa oleifera against mobile phone electromagnetic radiation-induced infertility in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed; El-kott, Attalla Farag

    2015-01-01

    The present study has investigated the effects of mobile phone electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on fertility in rats. The purpose of this study was to explore the capability of polyphenolic-rich Moringa oleifera leaf extract in protecting rat testis against EMR-induced impairments based on evaluation of sperm count, viability, motility, sperm cell morphology, anti-oxidants (SOD & CAT), oxidative stress marker, testis tissue histopathology and PCNA immunohistochemistry. The sample consisted of ...

  17. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  18. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  19. Psychological Component of Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  20. Smoking and Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  1. Ovarian Drilling for Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  2. Stress and Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  3. Effects of aminoguanidine on infertile varicocelized rats: A functional and morphological study

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    N Alizadeh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackgrounds and the purpose of the study:Inducible NO synthase activity has been frequently reported in varicose veins. Aminoguanidine is known to inhibit iNOS. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of aminoguanidine on varicocelized rats. "nMethods:Male Wistar rats were divided into groups A, B, C, D, E, and F (control group. Groups A, B, C, and D rats underwent left varicocele induction with a 20-gauge needle. Group E (sham rats underwent a similar procedure, but the renal vein was left intact. Ten weeks after varicocele induction, sperm parameters were evaluated in groups D, E, and F. Groups A and B received 50 mg/kg aminoguanidine or placebo, respectively, daily for 10 weeks. After 10 and 20 weeks of varicocele induction, the fertility outcomes of the experimental groups were evaluated. "nResults: The values of the sperm parameters did not differ significantly between groups B and D, but were significant when compared with groups F and E (P ≤ 0.05. The values of the sperm parameters of groups F and E showed no significant changes (P ≤ 0.05. The changes between group A and groups B and D were significant (P ≤ 0.05. Ten weeks after varicocele induction, rats of groups A, B, and C were still fertile. After 20 weeks, only half of the rats in group A were fertile. Conclusions: Aminoguanidine improved the sperm parameters and mating outcomes in vari-cocelized rats.

  4. The radioprotective effects of Moringa oleifera against mobile phone electromagnetic radiation-induced infertility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed; El-Kott, Attalla Farag

    2015-01-01

    The present study has investigated the effects of mobile phone electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on fertility in rats. The purpose of this study was to explore the capability of polyphenolic-rich Moringa oleifera leaf extract in protecting rat testis against EMR-induced impairments based on evaluation of sperm count, viability, motility, sperm cell morphology, anti-oxidants (SOD & CAT), oxidative stress marker, testis tissue histopathology and PCNA immunohistochemistry. The sample consisted of sixty male Wistar rats which were divided into four equal groups. The first group (the control) received only standard diet while the second group was supplemented daily and for eight weeks with 200 mg/kg aqueous extract of Moringa leaves. The third group was exposed to 900 MHz fields for one hour a day and for (7) days a week. As for the fourth group, it was exposed to mobile phone radiation and received the Moringa extract. The results showed that the EMR treated group exhibited a significantly decrease sperm parameters. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to EMR and treated with MOE significantly enhanced the sperm parameters. However, histological results in EMR group showed irregular seminiferous tubules, few spermatogonia, giant multinucleated cells, degenerated spermatozoa and the number of Leydig cells was significantly reduced. PCNA labeling indices were significant in EMR group versus the control group. Also, EMR affects spermatogenesis and causes to apoptosis due to the heat and other stress-related EMR in testis tissue. This study concludes that chronic exposure to EMR marked testicular injury which can be prevented by Moringa oleifera leaf extract.

  5. Cryptorchidism and infertility in rats with targeted disruption of the Adamts16 locus.

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    Shakila Abdul-Majeed

    Full Text Available A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase with ThromboSpondin motifs16 (ADAMTS-16 is a member of a family of metalloproteinases. Using a novel zinc-finger nuclease based gene-edited rat model harboring a targeted mutation of the Adamts16 locus, we previously reported this gene to be linked to blood pressure regulation. Here we document our observation with this model that Adamts16 is essential for normal development of the testis. Absence of Adamts16 in the homozygous Adamts16mutant males resulted in cryptorchidism and male sterility. Heterozygous Adamts16mutant males were normal, indicating that this is a recessive trait. Testes of homozygous Adamts16mutant males were significantly smaller with significant histological changes associated with the lack of sperm production. Temporal histological assessments of the testis demonstrated that the seminiferous tubules did not support active spermatogenesis, but progressively lost germ cells, accumulated vacuoles and did not have any sperm. These observations, taken together with our previous report of renal abnormalities observed with the same Adamts16mutant rats, suggest an important mechanistic link between Adamts16 and the functioning of the male genitourinary system.

  6. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  7. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and ... Page not found! Please click on one of the links in the navigation bar. FAQs Reproductive Health ...

  8. STUDIES ON THE REVERSIBILITY OF INFERTILITY CAUSED BY LONG TERM ADMINISTRATION OF TRIPTERYGIUM HYPOGLAUCUM IN MALE RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShi-Min; WANGYi; LINNing; XUYe; QIANShao-Zhen

    1989-01-01

    An alcoholic extract of the root of Triptcrygium hypoglaucum (ATFI) is a Chinese herbal medicine, available in the market as tabtcts, used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and some skin diseases. ATH had bccn shown to cause infertility in male

  9. Infertility Infertilidad

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    Práxedes Rojas Quintana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Literature review on the main issues related to infertile couples. It includes concept and classification, physiology of ovulation, causes in women and men, basic tests that are commonly performed evolution and prognosis, and health actions to provide appropriate orientation to the infertile couple. It is aimed at creating a teaching complementary material for Medicine and Nursing students, as well as for residents and specialists in general medicine and gynecology.Revisión bibliográfica sobre los principales temas referidos a la infertilidad de las parejas. Incluye concepto y clasificación, fisiología de la ovulación, causas en la mujer y en el hombre, exámenes complementarios básicos que se les realiza, evolución y pronóstico, así como acciones de salud para la orientación correcta de la pareja infértil. Tiene como objetivo crear un material de apoyo a la docencia, para estudiantes de la carrera de Medicina y de Enfermería, así como para residentes y especialistas en Medicina General Integral y Ginecoobstetricia.

  10. Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility?

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  11. Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility

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  12. Experiencing Male Infertility

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    Esmée Hanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the qualitative research literature that exists in relation to men’s experiences of male infertility. Since men have often been marginalized in the realm of reproduction, including academic research on infertility, it is important to focus on any qualitative research that gives voices to male perspectives and concerns. Given the distress documented by studies of infertile women, we focus in particular on the emotive responses and lived experiences of men in relation to infertility. In this article then, we present an analysis of the core themes across 19 qualitative articles, which include “infertility as crisis”; “emoting infertility- men as “being strong”’ “infertility as a source of stigma”; and the “desire for fatherhood.” In light of these insights, we identify key areas for future research and development including men’s emotional responses to infertility, how men seek support for infertility, the intersection between masculinity and infertility, the relationship between the desire to father and infertility, and the outcomes of infertility for men in terms of other aspects of their lives. We suggest that such research would facilitate making the experiences of men more central within our understandings of infertility within a field that has primarily been female focused.

  13. Primary infertility (image)

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    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  14. Genome-wide identification of gene expression in the epididymis of infertile rat induced by alpha-chlorohydrin using oligonucleotide microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Shu-wu; ZHU Yan; MA Li; LI Zhi-ling; GUI You-lun; LU Ying-ying; ZHAO Zhi-fang; CAO Lin

    2008-01-01

    general functions of the down or up regulated epididymal genes by chlorhydrin with the GeneSpring gene ontology(GO) analysis, which are involved in macromolecular metabolism and transport, primary metabolism process, cell metabolism, biological process regulation, immunology regulation, ion combination, hydratase and oxidoreductase activity. Among all the different expressed genes, we analyzed and screened the down-regulated genes associated with glucose, lipid, protein and other energy metabolism, which are considered as the major ACH action targets. Simultaneously, the up-regulated genes by chlorhydrin were detected and their characters of negative regulated sperm maturation and fertility analyzed, which are apoptosis and immune-related genes and not reported before. Conclusions We established male infertile rat model with ACH(10 mg·kg-1·d-1, po, 10 days) through evaluating changes of sperm motility and morphology, mating index, fertility index and pregnancy index. Simultaneously, the ACH didn' t affect the major androgen (T and DHT) metabolism and sexual ability, which is considered as the best way for male contraception. Then we determined the down-regulated epididymal genes relation to substance metabolism, which can affect the epididymal sperm maturation and presumed the major antifertility targets by ACH. Further more, we found and analyzed the epididymal up-regulated genes associated with apoptosis and immune functions, which maybe the new possible sites of action by ACH and other male antifertility agents.

  15. Infertility, infertility treatment, and fetal growth restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Hammer Bech, Bodil

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between infertility, with or without treatment, and fetal growth, as well as perinatal and infant mortality. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51,041 singletons born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy 12 months or less......), 5,787 born of infertile couples conceiving naturally (time to pregnancy more than 12 months), and 4,317 born after treatment. We defined small for gestational age (SGA) as the lowest 5% of birth weight by sex and gestational age. RESULTS: Crude estimates suggested an increased risk of perinatal...... mortality and SGA among infertile couples (treated and untreated), but the odds ratios (ORs) of perinatal mortality among infertile couples were attenuated after adjustment for maternal age and body mass index (1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95-1.84 among untreated and 1.26, 95% CI 0.86-1.85 among...

  16. Impairments in testicular function indices in male wistar rats: a possible mechanism for infertility induction by Xylopia aethiopica fruit extract

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    Ologhaguo Macstephen Adienbo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The accumulating evidence about alterations in male fertility necessitates the need to screen more medicinal plants for their effect on male reproductive functions. This study is aimed at evaluating the effects of fruit extract of Xylopia aethiopica on testicular functions in males using wistar rats as models. Methods: Forty eight adult male rats, randomly divided into four groups of 12 each, were used for the study. Group 1 (control, while groups 2, 3 and 4 (test groups. Daily oral doses of 0.5, 2.0 and 10.0 mg/kg b.w. of hydro-methanol extract were given to the test groups for 30 days followed by 30 days withdrawal. From each group, 6 animals were sacrificed on days 31 and 61 of the study and samples collected: Testes and epididymis were each weighed; blood was assayed for serum testosterone; testes processed for tissue biochemical studies. Results: Results show significant (P <0.05 reductions in the weight of reproductive organs, serum testosterone; testicular glycogen, cholesterol, protein and malondialdehyde; while testicular superoxide dismutaase increased. Conclusions: It was concluded that Xylopia aethiopica impairs testicular functions in rats and therefore fertility in males. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 71-75

  17. Teasing apart socially-induced infertility in non-reproductive female Damaraland mole-rats, Fukomys damarensis (Rodentia: Bathyergidae).

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    Bennett, Nigel C

    2011-12-01

    The Damaraland mole-rat is a subterranean mammal exhibiting extreme reproductive skew with a single reproductive female in each colony responsible for procreation. Non-reproductive female colony members are physiologically suppressed while in the colony, exhibiting reduced concentrations of plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and a decreased response of the pituitary, as measured by the release of bioactive LH, to an exogenous dose of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH). Removal of the reproductive female from the colony results in an elevation of LH and an enhanced response of the pituitary to a GnRH challenge in non-reproductive females comparable to reproductive females, implying control of reproduction in these individuals by the reproductive female. The Damaraland mole-rat is an ideal model for investigating the physiological and behavioral mechanisms that regulate the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. In contrast, we know less about the control of reproduction at the level of the hypothalamus. The immunohistochemistry of the GnRH system of both reproductive and non-reproductive female Damaraland mole-rats has revealed no significant differences with respect to morphology, distribution or numbers of immunoreactive GnRH perikarya. We examined whether the endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin was responsible for the inhibition of the release of the GnRH from the neurons indirectly by measuring LH concentrations in these non-reproductive females following single, hourly and 8 hourly injections of the opioid antagonist naloxone. The results imply that the endogenous opioid peptide, beta-endorphin, is not responsible for the inhibition of GnRH release from the perikarya in non-reproductive females. Preliminary data examining the circulating levels of cortisol also do not support a role for circulating glucocorticoids. The possible role of kisspeptin is discussed.

  18. Infertility with Testicular Cancer.

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    Ostrowski, Kevin A; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer is one of the most curable cancers. Most patients are treated during their reproductive years, making infertility a significant quality of life issue after successful treatment. This focused review evaluates the factors that contribute to infertility and specific fertility risks with the various testicular cancer treatments. Timing of patient discussions and current fertility treatments are reviewed.

  19. Cytogenetic of Male Infertility

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    Lutfiye Ozpak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility by definition, is not to get pregnant within one year of regular sexual relationship without protection, affects 15-20% of reproductive age couples. Approximately 30% of infertility cases are male originated. Male infertility is caused by endocrine-related genetic defects affecting urogenital system function. These defects adversely affect subsequent spermatogenesis, sexual function, fertility, early embryonic stage of sexual maturation. Autosomal and gonosomal, numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities and related syndromes rank at the top causes of male infertility. Similar chromosome abnormalities are detected in male infertility and as the rate of these abnormalities increase, it was found to reduce sperm count especially in azospermic and oligozoospermic men. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(4.000: 230-245

  20. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

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    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  1. Infertility: Inability or Disability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Khetarpal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Disability is a complex phenomenon. It reflects an interaction between features of a person’s body and features of the society in which he or she lives. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, lays stress on the functional as well as the structural problem of a person. All the definitions of disability also include the disorders of the reproductive and endocrine system. So infertility and impotency should also be included in the category of disability. It affects the participation in areas of life and can have a disabling affect on an individual. Like any other disability the couple has to adapt and integrate infertility in their sense of self thus infertility comes as a major life crisis. Medically, infertility, in most cases, is considered to be the result of a physical impairment or a genetic abnormality. Socially, couples are incapable of their reproductive or parental roles. On social level, infertility in most cultures remains associated with social stigma and taboo just like the social model of disability. Couples who are unable to reproduce may be looked down upon due to social stigmatisation. Infertility can lead to divorces and separation leading to a broken family life. Without labelling infertility as a disability, it is difficult for the people to access services and welfare benefits offered by the government. Infertility treatments are highly sophisticated so they are very expensive and are even not covered by insurance and government aid.In the light of all this it becomes imperative to categorise infertility as disability.

  2. Iatrogenic causes of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoysman, R; Segal, L

    1990-01-01

    The Authors review the list of the iatrogenic causes of infertility. In their opinion the more delicate the structure, the more heavy the price paid to clumsy or erroneous investigation. Such eventual incompetence may lead to further damage of the already existing situation. The Authors however look at the future with relative optimism: incidents become rarer, specialists in gynecology and infertility pay more attention to the delicacy of genital structures and there is an encouraging tendency to refer to infertility specialists those cases who need adequate work-up of their condition.

  3. STDs and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... literature review to support an infertility prevention social marketing campaign Male Chlamydia Screening Consultation - Review and guidance ( ... of STD Prevention , National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention , Centers for Disease ...

  4. Breast Cancer and Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and may accompany infertility. The relationship between infertility treatment and breast cancer has not yet been proven. However, estrogen exposure is well known to cause breast cancer. Recent advances in treatment options have provided young patients with breast cancer a chance of being mother [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000): 317-323

  5. Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  6. Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  7. Infertility Research at the NICHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Interviews & Selected Staff Profiles Multimedia Focus on Infertility Research at the NICHD Skip sharing on social ... Unravel the Complex Causes of and Treatments for Infertility According to the Centers for Disease Control and ...

  8. Infertility: psychotherapeutic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M B

    1992-01-01

    In supportive therapy with infertility patients, the clinician tries to relieve dysphoria and enhance self-esteem. Dynamically informed supportive interventions are designed to decrease guilt that may relate to past sexual activities, sexually related diseases, or abortions. These interventions should also be empathetic, promote optimism and reality testing, help with problem solving, allow catharsis and ventilation, decrease feelings of isolation and loneliness, educate and clarify, and praise and encourage where appropriate. Mental health clinicians have an important role to play in the treatment of these patients, provided they learn enough about the psychology of the experience of infertility and about the technology utilized in its treatment. As the number of people seeking treatment for infertility grows, the need for skilled therapists for this population will grow at a parallel rate.

  9. Oxidative stress & male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-04-01

    The male factor is considered a major contributory factor to infertility. Apart from the conventional causes for male infertility such as varicocoele, cryptorchidism, infections, obstructive lesions, cystic fibrosis, trauma, and tumours, a new and important cause has been identified: oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. It is a powerful mechanism that can lead to sperm damage, deformity and eventually, male infertility. This review discusses the physiological need for ROS and their role in normal sperm function. It also highlights the mechanism of production and the pathophysiology of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system and enumerate the benefits of incorporating antioxidants in clinical and experimental settings.

  10. Male infertility microsurgical training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akanksha Mehta; Philip S Li

    2013-01-01

    Microsurgical training is imperative for urologists and clinical andrologists specializing in male infertility.Success in male infertility microsurgery is heavily dependent on the surgeon's microsurgical skills.Laboratory-based practice to enhance microsurgical skills improves the surgeon's confidence,and reduces stress and operating time,benefiting both the patient and the surgeon.This review provides guidelines for setting up a microsurgical laboratory to develop and enhance microsurgical skills using synthetic and animal models.The role of emerging techniques,such as robotic-assisted microsurgery,is also discussed.

  11. Infertility: Medical and Social Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report illustrates a range of options for Congressional action in nine principal areas of public policy related to infertility: (1) collecting data on reproductive health; (2) preventing infertility; (3) information to inform and protect consumers; (4) providing access to infertility services; (5) reproductive health of veterans; (6) transfer…

  12. Infertility, infertility treatment and behavioural problems in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Basso, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural patterns in children of infertile couples may be influenced by both the underlying causes of infertility and stress in the couples. Treatment procedures, such as culture media and manipulation of gametes and embryos, may also result in developmental problems. We examined behavioural...... problems in children as a function of infertility and infertility treatment, using data from three population-based birth cohorts in Denmark (Aalborg-Odense Birth Cohort, Aarhus Birth Cohort and Danish National Birth Cohort). Information on time to pregnancy and infertility treatment was collected during...... to pregnancy of >12 months and no infertility treatment had a behavioural pattern similar to children of fertile parents. Teachers reported a higher total difficulties score for children born after infertility treatment, but no significant differences were seen on any subscales of the teachers' report...

  13. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  14. Fertility and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

  15. Lycopene and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam; Ashok Agarwal; Chloe Ong; Pallavi Prashast

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inlficted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneifcial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility-lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4-8 mg of lycopene daily for 3-12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility.

  16. Psychosocial Problems during Infertility Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Kirca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a complex situation crisis which is often psychologically-threatening and emotionally stressful for both partners as well as economically expensive and causes physical pain due to the operations performed for diagnosis and treatment purposes. Infertility has physical, psychological, social, emotional and financial impacts. Infertile couples are under a great social pressure, and need to conceal the problem as it is exceptionally private for them. Infertile individuals are destitute of support when they do not share their pregnancy problems with their families and relatives. Couples define their infertility experience as the most stressful experience of their lives.

  17. [The validation of the use of prostatilen and testilin for treating male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, M I

    1995-01-01

    The paper substantiates the use in clinical setting of medicinal preparations obtaining from prostate and tests, in male infertility. Using male rats for an experimental model of infertility it was shown that prostatilene and testilin exert a stimulating effect on spermatogenesis and androgenic functions of the testis. Those agents appear to correct androgenic-estrogenic balance in the animal organism as a model of infertility. The experiment permitted a conclusion to be drawn to the effect that prostatilene and testilin are liable to be of clinical benefit when used to stimulate spermatogenesis in infertility and hypoandrogenization; besides, the rise in androgens may stimulate copulative function in patients with sexual problems.

  18. Management of Unexplained Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Kan

    2014-06-01

    In the management of the unexplained infertility, the initial treatment must be observational approach and changing the life style. It is demonstrated that using only the clomiphene citrate or intrauterine insemination is not effective. For this reason, as the patients age and ovarian reserve considered, after the observational approach, the initial treatment must be the combination of clomiphene citrate and intrauterine insemination. With this approach, pregnancy rate is rises to 10 percent for a cycle. Management wise, choosing the cheapest effective treatment for increased fertilization should be the priority, before moving onto more expensive and aggresive approaches. Apart from the diagnostic work-up, which more or less the same for every patient, treatment protocol should be individualised for every infertile couple. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 506-518

  19. Chronic endometritis and infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jong; Kim, You Shin; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chronic endometritis (CE) is a condition involving the breakdown of the peaceful co-existence between microorganisms and the host immune system in the endometrium. A majority of CE cases produce no noticeable signs or mild symptoms, and the prevalence rate of CE has been found to be approximately 10%. Gynecologists and pathologists often do not focus much clinical attention on CE due to the time-consuming microscopic examinations necessary to diagnose CE, its mild clinical manifestations, and the benign nature of the disease. However, the relationship between CE and infertility-related conditions such as repeated implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage has recently emerged as an area of inquiry. In this study, we reviewed the literature on the pathophysiology of CE and how it may be associated with infertility, as well as the literature regarding the diagnosis and treatment of CE. In addition, we discuss the value of hysteroscopic procedures in the diagnosis and treatment of CE. PMID:28090456

  20. Fertility prognosis for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bostofte, E; Bagger, P; Michael, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a fertility prognosis model for infertile couples. DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study. PARTICIPANTS: In the period November 30, 1977 to June 1, 1985, 321 consecutive couples were investigated for infertility at Hvidovre University Hospital. Investigation of the female...... MEASURE: The Cox regression model was used to predict the time required to conceive based on informations provided by fertility investigations. RESULTS: Three of 16 prognostic variables (the period of infertility, the female infertility factor, and the P-test) possess significant prognostic information....... The period of infertility and the P-test are best scored as continuous variables, whereas the female infertility factor are best categorized in four classes, i.e., normal, ovulation or cervical disorder, anatomic disorder, or a combination of disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The three prognostic variables...

  1. Testicular membrane lipid damage by complex mixture of leachate from municipal battery recycling site as indication of idiopathic male infertility in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintunde, Jacob K; Oboh, Ganiyu; Akindahunsi, Akintunde A

    2013-12-01

    Leachate from a municipal battery recycling site is a potent source of mixed-metal released into the environment. The present study investigated the degree at which mixed-metal exposure to the municipal auto-battery leachate (MABL) and to the Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site leachate (EOMABRL) affected the lipid membrane of the testes in in vitro experiment. The results showed elevated level of mixed-metals over the permissible levels in drinking water, as recommended by regulatory authorities. In the leachate samples, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a biomarker of lipid damage, was significantly (pbattery leachate (MABL) was significantly (pbattery recycling site (EOMABRL). The testicular lipid membrane capacity was compromised following treatment with leachate from the municipal battery recycling site, implicating mixed-metal exposure as the causative agent of testicular damage and male infertility.

  2. Dermatoglyphic pattern in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontakke, B R; Talhar, S; Ingole, I V; Shende, M R; Pal, A K; Bhattacharaya, T

    2013-06-01

    Dermatoglyphics in infertile male patients were studied and compared with that of age matched controls to see whether any specific dermatoglyphic pattern exists in infertile male patients. Infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile were referred to Cytogenetic Laboratory for karyotyping. We selected twenty-four infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile. Out of twenty-four infertile male patients, nineteen were with normal Karyotype and five patients were with abnormal Karyotype. Loop was the commonest pattern observed in the infertile male patients. All these fingertip and palmar dermatoglyphic findings were compared with that of result on finger and palmar dermatoglyphics of equal number of age matched controls. Statistical evaluation was done with software "EPI- info, version-6.04 d". Infertile males had reduced number of loops as compared to that of controls which was statistically significant. Total whorls were increased in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant. Percentage of true palmar pattern in I 3 and I 4 areas was reduced in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Y chromosome infertility Y chromosome infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Y chromosome infertility is a condition that affects the production of ...

  4. Infertility, infertility treatment and twinning: the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously observed that an increasing time to pregnancy (TTP) is associated with a reduced frequency of twin deliveries in couples not receiving infertility treatment. By using updated information, we assessed the frequencies of dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin...... deliveries as a function of infertility (TTP > 12 months), as well as infertility treatment. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51 730 fertile couples with TTP 12 months and 5163 infertile couples who conceived after treatment. Information on zygosity, available...... for part of the cohort (1997-2000), was based on standardized questions on the similarities between the twins at the age of 3-5 years. RESULTS: Compared with fertile couples, the frequency of DZ twin deliveries was lower for infertile couples conceiving naturally (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0...

  5. Ethical issues in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serour, Gamal I; Serour, Ahmed G

    2017-03-01

    Infertility is a global medico-socio-cultural problem with gender-based suffering particularly in developing countries. Conventional methods of treatment for infertility do not usually raise ethical concerns. However, assisted reproductive technology (ART) has initiated considerable ethical debate, disagreement, and controversy. There are three ethical principles that provide an ethical basis for ART: the principle of liberty, principle of utility, and principle of justice. Medical ethics are based on the moral, religious, and philosophical ideas and principles of the society and are influenced by economics, policies, and law. This creates tension between the principles of justice and utility, which can result in disparity in the availability of and access to ART services between the rich and the poor. The moral status of the embryo is the key for all the ethical considerations and law regarding ART in different societies. This has resulted in cross-border ART. Conscientious objection of healthcare providers should not deprive couples from having access to a required ART service.

  6. Thyroid dysfunction in infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G Perminova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the rate and structure of thyroid diseases in infertile women and to asses their reproductive system depending upon the thyroid pathology. Subjects and methods. The study was based on the results of screening of T status of 496 women with infertility (main group and 80 fertile women (control group. Traditional methods of diagnosis of infertility were used along with special methods of investigation including assessment of function and structure of T (TTH, fT4, fT3, AT-TPO, AT-rTTH, ultrasound examination of T, thin-niddle aspirational biopsy, scintigraphy of T. A complex evaluation of the reproductive system status in infertile women was done depending on the type of T pathology. Results. Infertile women were found to suffer from thyroid dysfunction 3.8 times as more often as fertile ones (48% and 12.5%, p <0.05. Its structure included mainly AT-TPO carrier phenomenon in combination with ultrasound markers of thyroid autoimmunity (24%, hypothyroidism following thyroid autoimmunity (9.4% demonstrating itself as clinical (0.8%, subclinical (8.6%, and euthyroid (7.8% goiters. The portion of women with infertility and hyperthyroidism was small (0.6%. An association of thyroid autoimmunity with idiopathic infertility, endometriosis, endocrine infertility was found. Conclusion. It is necessary to perform a screening assessment of the function and structure of T in infertile women within diagnostic search for the reasons of infertility and in-time correction of the revealed thyroid dysfunction.

  7. Hysterosalpingographic findings in infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M. S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, J. S.; Bai, B. C. [Seoul Red Cross Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-12-15

    Four hundred and fifty four cases of H.S.G. in infertility were analyzed and following brief results were obtained. 1. Most frequent age group was 25-29 year old, and those number of patient were 188 (41.4%). 2. Most frequent abnormal uterine findings was intravasation (113 cases), and malposition (119), irregular margin (104), filling defect (37), and diverticulum (6) in decreasing order. 3. Most frequent abnormal tubal finding was obstruction (199 cases), and hydrosalpinx (99), diverticulosis (22), intravasation (17), peritubal adhesion (13), and beaded tube (10) in decreasing order. 4. Nagative findings was seen in 155 cases (34.1%) of uterus and in 227 cases (50.0%) of fallopian tubes. 5. Nagative findings in both uterus and fallopian tubes was seen only 87 cases (19.2%)

  8. Focus Issue on Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Kobayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Male infertility problems can occur when sperms are limited in number or function. In this paper, we describe the clinical evaluation of male infertility. A detailed history, physical examination, and basic semen analysis are required. In addition, ultrasound, karyotyping, and hormonal studies are needed to determine specific causes of infertility. In addition, the World Health Organization (WHO, 2009 has developed a manual to provide guidance in performing a comprehensive semen analysis. Among the possible reasons for male infertility, nonobstructive azoospermia is the least treatable, because few or no mature sperm may be produced. In many cases, men with nonobstructive azoospermia typically have small-volume testes and elevated FSH. Although treatment may not completely restore the quality of semen from men with subnormal fertility, in some cases a successful pregnancy can still be achieved through assisted reproductive technology.

  9. Infertility Counseling and Support: When and Where to Find It

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  10. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary L Harton; Helen G Tempest

    2012-01-01

    infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family.Despite this,the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered.Nevertheless,more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified.This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically:chromosomal aneuploidy,structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions.Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans.Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin,but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts.Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm.Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed,as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases.Clinical recommendations where possible will be made,as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  11. [Orchitis and male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppe, H-C; Pilatz, A; Hossain, H; Meinhardt, A; Bergmann, M; Haidl, G; Weidner, W

    2010-05-01

    Infections and inflammations of the genital tract are considered the most frequent causes of reduced male fertility, but conclusive epidemiological data are not available. In view of the exposure of germ cells to pathogenic components as well as the cells and mediators involved in the inflammatory processes, irreversible damage to spermatogenesis and corresponding decline of ejaculate quality are to be expected, particularly in cases of chronic orchitis. While the consequences of orchitis and epididymo-orchitis that exhibit clinical symptoms due to systemic or local infections are well known, including testicular atrophy and complete loss of fertility, those cases of inflammatory reactions of the testicles that manifest an asymptomatic or subclinical course, or are not even due to an infection, have received little attention until now. However, systematic histopathological analyses have shown a high prevalence of asymptomatic inflammatory reactions in testicular biopsies from infertile men. The mostly focal lymphocytic infiltrates correlate with the degree of damage to spermatogenesis and corresponding clinical and endocrinological parameters of testicular function. Noninvasive diagnostic techniques are not yet available so that chronic asymptomatic inflammations of the testicles as the primary cause or cofactor of male fertility disorders are underestimated. Except for administration of pathogen-specific antibiotics, treatment recommendations are to a large extent still lacking.

  12. Infertility and uterine fibroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepiridis, Leonidas I; Grimbizis, Grigoris F; Tarlatzis, Basil C

    2016-07-01

    Uterine fibroids are the most common tumors in women and their prevalence is higher in patients with infertility. At present, they are classified according to their anatomical location, as no classification system includes additional parameters such as their size or number. There is a general agreement that submucosal fibroids negatively affect fertility, when compared to women without fibroids. Intramural fibroids above a certain size (>4 cm), even without cavity distortion, may also negatively influence fertility. However, the presence of subserosal myomas has little or no effect on fertility. Many possible theories have been proposed to explain how fibroids impair fertility: mechanisms involving alteration of local anatomical location, others involving functional changes of the myometrium and endometrium, and finally endocrine and paracrine molecular mechanisms. Nevertheless, any of the above mentioned mechanisms can cause reduced reproductive potential, thereby leading to impaired gamete transport, reduced ability for embryo implantation, and creation of a hostile environment. The published experience defines the best practice strategy, as not many large, well-designed, and properly powered studies are available. Myomectomy appears to have an effect in fertility improvement in certain cases. Excision of submucosal myomas seems to restore fertility with pregnancy rates after surgery similar to normal controls. Removal of intramural myomas affecting pregnancy outcome seems to be associated with higher pregnancy rates when compared to non-operated controls, although evidence is still nοt sufficient. Treatment of subserosal myomas of reasonable size is not necessary for fertility reasons. The results of endoscopic and open myomectomy are similar; thus, endoscopic treatment is the recommended approach due to its advantages in patient's postoperative course.

  13. Novel concepts in male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro C. Esteves

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Extraordinary advances have been achieved in the field of male infertility in the last decades. There are new concepts in sperm physiology and several modern tools for the assessment of spermatogenesis kinetics in vivo. New tests using molecular biology and DNA damage assays allow the clinician to correctly diagnose men so far classified as having idiopathic male infertility. In the field of treatment, microsurgery has increased success rates either for reconstruction of the reproductive tract or the retrieval of spermatozoa for assisted conception. Emerging evidence suggests that life-style and environmental conditions are of utmost importance in male fertility and subfertility. This review discusses several concepts that have changed over the last years, such as the duration of the spermatogenic cycle in humans, Y-chromosome infertility, the reproductive potential of non-mosaic Klinefelter syndrome men, the impact of paternal age and sperm DNA in male infertility, the role of antioxidants in the treatment of infertile men, the predictive factors and techniques for sperm retrieval in non-obstructive azoospermia, and the microsurgical treatment of clinical varicoceles. Whenever possible, levels of evidence are provided as suggested by the Oxford Center of Evidence-based Medicine.

  14. Genetic aspects of male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Witczak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, infertility affects up to 140 million people worldwide. It is considered that the male factor is responsible for nearly a half of problems in obtaining pregnancy. Increasingly, infertility treatment clinics, as well as standard examinations, also offer genetic tests in the diagnostics of the male infertility factor, such as: karyotype analysis, detection of Y chromosome microdeletions, and examination of the chromosome composition of sperm by the fluorescent in situ hybridisation method (FISH. Genetic factors, defined to date, which cover both chromosomal aberrations and monogenic disorders, are responsible for approximately 10–15% of cases of male infertility. Usually, their phenotypic manifestations are disorders in spermatogenesis, structural changes in the genital organs (e.g. reduced size of the testicles, or sperm dysfunction. Molecular studies intensively carried out in the area of diagnostics and treatment of infertility indicate an increasingly large number of relationships between genetic factors and fertility; however, many genes related with human fertility still remain unidentified.

  15. Treatments for Diseases That Cause Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its symptoms is available from the NICHD PCOS topic page . Treatments for infertility in women with PCOS include ... this topic can be found on the NICHD topic page on endometriosis . Treatments for the infertility that can ...

  16. REVIEW ARTICLE: Infertility and Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Chatterjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environment is coming up as one of the causative factors for many physical and mental diseases. Infertility is not only a medicalproblem; it is a social and psychological problem as well. Air and soil pollutions are disturbing the male and female reproductiveprocesses in various ways. Endocrine disruptors otherwise called Estrogen Mimics not only induce endometriosis, but can influence the reproductive process by competing with estrogen receptors. Insecticides and environmental toxicants also disrupt the reproductive process. Psychological stress is an important factor for infertility. This is also a stimulating factor for many gynecological conditions like Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS. In treating the infertile couples, psychological treatment & support areof equal importance as that of medical treatment.

  17. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brazdova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility.

  18. Mendelian genetics of male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kathleen; Yatsenko, Alexander N.; Jorgez, Carolina J.; Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Nalam, Roopa Lata; Matzuk, Martin M.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2013-01-01

    Infertility is defined as the inability of a couple to conceive despite trying for a year, and it affects approximately 15% of the reproductive-age population. It is considered a genetically lethal factor, as the family lineage stops at that individual with no progeny produced. A genetic defect associated with an infertile individual cannot be transmitted to the offspring, ensuring the maintenance of reproductive fitness of the species. However, with the advent of assisted reproductive techniques (ART), we are now able to overcome sterility and bypass nature’s protective mechanisms that developed through evolution to prevent fertilization by defective or deficient sperm. PMID:21382200

  19. Is hyperprolactinemia the main cause of infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaily J

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperprolactinemia probably is one of infertility causes. Its incidence is 20% in infertile patients. In this study importance of hyperprolactinema was studied. Importance of hyperprolactinemia as a primary factor of infertility, is uncertain. We studied 500 infertile women in infertility center of Shariati hospital. Prevalence of hyperprolactinemia was 19%. Hyperprolactinemia as a sole cause of infertility was found in only 0.8%. There was a good correlation between galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia (P=0.00007. Galactorrhea is not a screening test for hyperprolactinemia (sensivity=25%, but its specifity is high (91%. If we omit prolactin assay for patients without galactorrhea, we will miss primary cause of infertility in probably 0.1% of patients, so we find that performing prolactin assay for patients without galactorrhea is under question. Subpopulation of infertile patients with hyperprolactinemia are not different with infertile population in mean age (P=0.09, mean duration of infertility (P=0.28 and type of infertility. We suggest that hyperprolactinemia is not a primary or sole factor of infertility

  20. Cigarette smoking and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taymour Mostafa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have identified specific body systems affected by the hazardous effects of the cigarette smoking particularly the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The effect of smoking on male reproduction has also been studied where semen quality was investigated in different cross-sectional studies including infertile patients with conflicting results. This article aimed to assess the relationship between smoking and male infertility. A review of published articles was carried out, using PubMed, medical subject heading (MSH databases and Scopus engine excluding the effects of smoking outside male infertility. Key words used to assess exposure, outcome, and estimates for the concerned associations were: smoking, semen, male infertility, sperm, humans, and fertility. Most of the reports showed that smoking reduces sperm production, sperm motility, sperm normal forms and sperm fertilising capacity through increased seminal oxidative stress and DNA damage. Few papers reported nonsignificant differences in semen parameters between smokers or non-smokers. It is concluded that although some smokers may not experience reduced fertility, men with marginal semen quality can benefit from quitting smoking.

  1. Psychological Factors Affecting Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sati Unal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study was performed to determine the psychological factors affecting infertile women presenting at the infertility outpatients department. METHOD: The sample of this cross-sectional study consisted of 344 women who presented at the IVF center of a special branch hospital or a university hospital, March 2008 through September 2008, as determined by the non-random sampling method. All participating women gave their informed consent. The data were collected using the Data Form that consisted of questions on socio-demographic features and the Infertility Distress Scale (IDS. In the results, percentages were provided along with the Kruskal-Wallis H, Mann-Whitney U and Spearman correlation tests. RESULTS: The mean IDS was 39.01±9.6. There was a statistically significant linear relationship between the mean IDS score and age (r=0.106, p=0.048, marriage duration (r=0.232, p<0.001 and duration of desire to have a child (r=0.217, p<0.001. Women who were primary school graduates (X²=13.03, p=0.004, did not work (p=0.007, had no social security benefits (p=0.021 or from low socioeconomic status (X²=24.85, p<0.001 had significantly higher mean IDS scores. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show women become more adversely affected by infertility as their age, duration of marriage, and duration of desire to have a child increase. Women who are primary school graduates, do not work, have no social security benefits or have lower income are affected more negatively. We believe that taking these features into account when evaluating and planning supportive approaches for women presenting at the infertility treatment center and determining the psychological state of the women using the IDS will increase treatment success. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 481-486

  2. A Survey on Infertility in Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kamali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as failure in pregnancy after one year of unprotected intercourse.Several centers have reported different causes of infertility. The most common causes of infertility are:male factor such as sperm disturbance, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal factor,both male and female factor, and unexplained infertility .The aim of this study was to survey theepidemiology of infertility in Royan institute.Material and Methods: In this descriptive retrospective study, 2492 infertile couples were studied.These couples were selected by systematic sampling among couples referred to Royan institutebetween 1995 and 2001.All existing demographic data and diagnostic methods were recorded inquestionnaires .Results were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5.Results: In this study, the frequency of primary and secondary infertility was 90.1% and 9.9%,respectively. Among 2492 couples, 50.5% had male factor, 28.6% had female factor, 11.6% had bothmale and female factors and in 9.3% of couples, the cause of infertility was unknown .Results showedthat 32.3% of men had normal spermogram, 23.6% of couples had azoospermia, and 40.3% had spermdisturbance including oligospermia, asthenospermia, oligoasthenospermia and teratospermia .3.8%were not able to collect sample for semen analysis. Among women, different infertility factors included:ovarian factor (20.36%, tubal factor (12.64%, uterine factor (4.13%, endometriosis (1.28% andrecurrent abortion (0.68%. 50.48% of women were normal.Conclusion: Although male factor was the most common cause of infertility in Royan institute, we cannot conclude that this factor is the most common cause of infertility in Iran since this center isconsidered referral especially for male infertility. We suggest performance of similar researches inother centers to evaluate the most common causes of infertility in Iran.

  3. Value of hysteroscopy in management of unexplained infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha M. Elbareg

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: As a cause of unexplained infertility, subtle uterine abnormalities are diagnosed only during hysteroscopy and they are relatively common in infertility women. Although the presence of these abnormalities is not detected by the basic investigations for infertility, their correction seems to be necessary when infertility is desired and other infertility causes are excluded.

  4. Male factor infertility and ART

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Herman Tournaye

    2012-01-01

    For years,the management and treatment of male factor infertility has been ‘experience’ and not ‘evidence’ based.Although not evidence-based,current clinical practice involves extensive use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART).Where specific treatments are not indicated or have failed,ART have become popular adjunctive treatments for alleviating male factor infertility.According to the limited evidence available,intrauterine insemination (IUI) may be considered as a first-line treatment in a couple in which the female partner has a normal fertility status and at least 1x 106 progressively motile spermatozoa are recovered after sperm preparation.If no pregnancy is achieved after 3-6 cycles of IUI,optimized in vitro fertilization (IVF) can be proposed.When less than 0.5x 106 progressively motile spermatozoa are obtained after seminal fluid processing or sperm are recovered surgically from the testis or epididymis,intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) should be performed.Although the outcome of no other ART has ever been scrutinized as much before,no large-scale ‘macroproblems’ have as yet been observed after ICSI.Yet,ICSI candidates should be rigorously screened before embarking on IVF or ICSI,and thoroughly informed of the limitations of our knowledge on the hereditary aspects of male infertility and the safety aspects of ART.

  5. Male Infertility and Its Causes in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Miyamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings.

  6. Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; AlaviMajd, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence agai...

  7. Role of Ultrasound in Male Infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    US evaluation is the mainstay of diagnostic imaging of infertile men. In this editorial, we review the spectrum of diseases responsible for male infertility, discuss the way in which US imaging studies can be used for evaluation of male infertility, and illustrate characteristic US imaging features that allow for specific diagnosis. The discussion will be divided into three main categories: obstruction in sperm passage, impairment of sperm function, and defect in sperm genesis.

  8. Role of female pelvic anatomy in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Glocker, Miranda; McLaren, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    Infertility is defined as a couple's failure to achieve pregnancy after one year of regular, unprotected intercourse. The etiology of infertility can be due to female factors, male factors, combined male and female factors, or have an unknown etiology. This review focuses on the role of female pelvic anatomy in infertility. Normal anatomy and the physiology of reproduction will be discussed, as well as the anatomic and pathophysiologic processes that cause infertility including ovulatory disorders, endometriosis, pelvic adhesions, tubal blockage, mullerian anomalies, and abnormalities affecting the uterine cavity such as leiomyomata and endometrial polyps.

  9. Infertility trial outcomes: healthy moms and babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the primary outcome of infertility trials has been a positive pregnancy test or a clinically recognized pregnancy. However, parents desire a healthy baby that grows up to be a healthy adult, rather than a positive pregnancy test. Too often results of infertility trials are lacking in crucial obstetric details. This is problematic because treatments for infertility have the capacity to increase the risk for a variety of adverse obstetric outcomes. This review will outline important obstetric variables that should be included when reporting infertility research. The rationale for including these data, precise definitions of the variables, and cost-effective strategies for obtaining these obstetric details will be highlighted.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA mutations and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as difficulty in conceiving a child after 1 year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility can arise either because of the male factor or female factor or both. According to the current estimates, 15% of couples attempting their first pregnancy could not succeed. Infertility is either primary or secondary. Mitochondria have profound effect on all biochemical pathways, including the one that drivessperm motility. Sperm motility is heavily dependent on the ATP generated by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondrial sheath. In this review, the very positive role of mitochondrial genome′s association with infertility is discussed

  11. Missing Motherhood: Jordanian Women's Experiences with Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Mahmoud Obeidat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim, Background, and Introduction. Bearing and rearing children are an important part of life in nearly all cultures and are a central role for Jordanian Muslim women. Infertility can create anxiety, stress, and depression for couples who are infertile. Women frequently bear the emotional stigma of a couple’s infertility. There is a paucity of literature focusing on Jordanian Muslim women experiencing infertility and failed assistive reproductive technology. Therefore, this study explored these women’s lived experience. Methods. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with 30 Jordanian Muslim women who experienced failed assistive reproductive technology for infertility. Perceptions of experiences with failed treatment of infertility were documented and analyzed. Results. Major themes were identified: missing out on motherhood and living with infertility, experiencing marital stressors, feeling social pressure, experiencing depression and disappointment, having treatment associated difficulties, appreciating support from family and friends, using coping strategies, and fear of an unknown future. Discussion, Conclusion, and Implications for Clinical Practice. Being infertile significantly influences the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health of Jordanian Muslim women as well as their quality of life. Perceived social support and personal coping strategies were used by study participants to mediate failed attempts to conceive. Designing and implementing culturally appropriate interventions for Muslim women globally who are experiencing infertility are essential.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related nonsyndromic male infertility CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description CATSPER1 -related nonsyndromic male infertility is a condition that affects the function of ...

  13. Structural and functional differences of the reproductive system in fertile and infertile male naked mole rats%雄性裸鼹鼠可育个体与不可育个体生殖系统结构与功能差异初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余琛琳; 林丽芳; 袁子彦; 赵善民; 汤球; 孙伟; 蔡丽萍; 徐晨; 崔淑芳

    2016-01-01

    目的:观察和分析雄性裸鼹鼠中可育个体和不可育个体生殖系统结构和功能的差异,初步探索雄性不可育个体不能繁育后代的原因。方法雄性裸鼹鼠可育个体和不可育个体各5只,先采集一侧睾丸和附睾组织,称重后换算脏器系数;再采集另一侧睾丸组织,用中性甲醛溶液进行固定后制备组织切片;取另一侧附睾用作精子计数、精子活动度的测定;采集血清测定血清中黄体生成素( LH)和睾酮( T)浓度。结果与可育个体组相比较,不可育个体组的睾丸重量下降(P<0.05),附睾重量显著下降(P<0.01),且睾丸系数和附睾系数均显著下降(P<0.01);精子数量显著减少(P<0.01),精子活动度也显著减弱(P<0.01);血清黄体生成素和睾酮水平均显著降低(P<0.01);睾丸组织切片观察显示,不可育个体各级生精细胞严重脱落,排列混乱无序,支持细胞和间质细胞均有减少。结论雄性裸鼹鼠不可育个体生殖系统存在睾丸和附睾萎缩、生精功能下降和性激素分泌减少等现象。%Objective The aim of this study was to observe and analyze the differences of reproductive system in fertile and infertile male naked mole rats. Methods Five fertile and 5 infertile 2-5-year old male naked mole rats were used in this study. The testis and epididymis on one side were collected, weighted, and measured to get their viscera coeffi-cient. The other side testicle was collected and fixed in neutral formalin solution for histological examination. The other side epididymis was used to examine the sperm count and sperm activity. Serum of the naked mole rats was collected to measure the level of luteinizing hormone ( LH) and testosterone ( T) . Results Compared with the fertile group, the testis weight of infertile group was significantly decreased (P<0. 05), their epididymis weight, testicular coefficient and the

  14. Might uterus transplantation be an option for uterine factor infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Münire Erman

    2015-01-01

    Current data on uterus allotransplantation research has been reviewed and summarized. Over the past 15 years, progress in uterus transplantation research has increased dramatically. As a consequence, the first pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation in rats have been reported. The technique has been better defined. Although clinical pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation has been reported in humans, there are still many questions to be answered before clinical application. Gestational surrogacy still remains an important option for being a genetic parent in selected cases with uterine factor infertility.

  15. Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

  16. Genes Causing Male Infertility in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lawrence C. Layman

    2002-01-01

    There are an accumulating number of identified gene mutations that cause infertility in humans. Most of the known gene mutations impair normal puberty and subsequently cause infertility by either hypothalamic /pituitary deficiency of important tropic factors to the gonad or by gonadal genes.

  17. Effect of the Modern Life on Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keziban Amanak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is defined as failing to become pregnant at the end of one year although unprotected sexual intercourse of the couples. Infertility affects 15 % of couples at the reproductive age according to data of the World Health Organization. It was stated that approximately 1,5-2 million individuals in our country face infertility problem and problem increases gradually. One of the most important factors of increasing infertility problem is the adverse effects of modern life on our existence. Adverse effects of modern life are the common problems of the whole World. Postponement of gestational age as the result of modern life, obesity, electromagnetic waves, hormone-injected and genetically modified foodstuffs, stress, smoking and using alcohol, sexually transmitted diseases are among the increasing infertility causes. Adverse effects of the modern life on infertility may be minimized if the midwives and nurses know the harmful effects of modern life on infertility and provide consultancy services to couples, wishing to have a child. Effects of modern life on infertility and consultancy role of the midwives-nurses are discussed in this article. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(4.000: 345-350

  18. Early Marriage: a Policy for Infertility Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Karimzadeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Female fertility begins to decline many years prior to the onset of menopause despite continued regular ovulatory cycles. Age related infertility is due to oocyte abnormalities and decreased ovarian reserve. Treatment of infertility when the cause is limited to decreased ovarian reserve is empirical at present except for oocyte donation. This mini review of the literature covers all available English biomedical journals that have been published from 1995 to 2008. The search based on combination of the words age, fertility, infertility, and oocyte abnormalities. The important findings from this search strategy are summarized and presented in the sub headings including female age and fertility, miscarriage and in vitro fertilization. Regarding infertility prevention, this mini review suggested that early marriage is a primordial, effective, inexpensive and easy way to prevent infertility.

  19. Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms associated with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Madon, Prochi F; Parikh, Firuza R

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a complex human condition and is known to be caused by numerous factors including genetic alterations and abnormalities. Increasing evidence from studies has associated perturbed epigenetic mechanisms with spermatogenesis and infertility. However, there has been no consensus...... on whether one or a collective of these altered states is responsible for the onset of infertility. Epigenetic alterations involve changes in factors that regulate gene expression without altering the physical sequence of DNA. Understanding these altered epigenetic states at the genomic level along...... with higher order organisation of chromatin in genes associated with infertility and pericentromeric regions of chromosomes, particularly 9 and Y, could further identify causes of idiopathic infertility. Determining the association between DNA methylation, chromatin state, and noncoding RNAs...

  20. General aspects of fertility and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damario, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Fertility rates have been declining in most Western nations over the past several decades, although it is not entirely clear if an increased rate of infertility substantially contributes to this. As compared to other species, the reproductive efficiency of humans is relatively low. Factors related to fertility include age, exposure to sexually transmitted diseases, frequency of intercourse, coital timing, as well as diet and lifestyle habits. Infertility is considered a disease due to its major disruption of major organ systems and life functions. An infertility evaluation is recommended after 12 months or more of regular, unprotected intercourse and may be considered after 6 months for those female patients over the age of 35 or with other known abnormalities. A proper infertility evaluation is a comprehensive examination of possibly identifiable infertility factors of both female and male partners, lending itself to the most appropriate and potentially effective treatment.

  1. Consequences of infertility in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouchou, Brittany

    2013-05-01

    Infertility affects more than 10% of the world's population. In developing countries, there are severe social, psychological and economic consequences for infertile men and women. All of the cited references are compiled from primary peer-reviewed research articles that were conducted through one-to-one interviews or focus groups in countries of developing regions, such as Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The following paper seeks to raise awareness of the consequences of infertility in developing nations and identify infertility as an under-observed, but significant public health issue. It is proposed that education programmes tailored to each society's specific religious beliefs and grounded traditions must be implemented in order to reverse the social stigma, detrimental psychological effects, and loss of economic security that results from infertility.

  2. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility.

  3. Definition and epidemiology of unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbaya, Tarek A; Potdar, Neelam; Jeve, Yadava B; Nardo, Luciano G

    2014-02-01

    The diagnosis of unexplained infertility can be made only after excluding common causes of infertility using standard fertility investigations,which include semen analysis, assessment of ovulation, and tubal patency test. These tests have been selected as they have definitive correlation with pregnancy. It is estimated that a standard fertility evaluation will fail to identify an abnormality in approximately 15% to 30% of infertile couples. The reported incidence of such unexplained infertility varies according to the age and selection criteria in the study population. We conducted a review of the literature via MEDLINE. Articles were limited to English-language, human studies published between 1950 and 2013. Since first coined more than 50 years ago, the term unexplained infertility has been a subject of debate. Although additional investigations are reported to explain or define other causes of infertility, these have high false-positive results and therefore cannot be recommended for routine clinical practice. Couples with unexplained infertility might be reassured that even after 12 months of unsuccessful attempts, 50% will conceive in the following 12 months and another 12% in the year after.

  4. Prevalence of Infertility Problems among Iranian Infertile Patients Referred to Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sepidarkish

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have been conducted on the infertility problems in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of infertility problems and related factors in Iranian infertile patients. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 405 infertile patients referred to Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between 2014 and 2015, were selected by simple random sampling. Participants completed the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI including 46 questions in five domains (social concern, sexual concern, relationship concern, rejection of parenthood, and need for parenthood. Mean difference between male and female was verified using independent-samples Student’s t test. A generalized linear model (GLM was also used for testing the effect of variables on the fertility problems. Data was analyzed using Stata software version 13. Results: The mean age (SD of participants was 31.28 (5.42. Our results showed that 160 infertile men (95.23% were classified as very high prevalence of infertility problems. Among infertile women, 83 patients (35.02% were as very high prevalence of infertility problems, and 154 patients (64.98% were as high prevalence. Age (P<0.001, sex (P<0.001, a history of abortion (P=0.009, failure of previous treatment (P<0.001, and education (P=0.014 had a significant relationship with FPI scores. Conclusion: Bases on the results of current study, an younger male with lower education level, history of abortion and history of previous treatments failure experienced more infertility problems.

  5. Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below are links to publications authored by ASRM and its affiliated societies. Latest Additions: Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility Robotic surgery The Intrauterine Device (IUD): A Long-acting ...

  6. Impaired Leydig cell function in infertile men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A-M; Jørgensen, N; Frydelund-Larsen, L

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether an impaired Leydig cell function is present in severely oligospermic men, serum testosterone (T), LH, estradiol (E(2)), and SHBG levels in 357 idiopathic infertile men were compared with levels in 318 proven fertile men. In addition, the T/LH ratio, E(2)/T ratio...... of the fertile levels.Thus, the group of infertile men showed significant signs of impaired Leydig cell function in parallel to their impaired spermatogenesis. The association of decreased spermatogenesis and impaired Leydig cell function might reflect a disturbed paracrine communication between the seminiferous......, and calculated free T index (cFT) were compared between the two groups.A shift toward lower serum T levels, cFT, and T/LH ratio and higher serum LH, E(2), and E(2)/T levels was observed in the group of infertile men. On average, the infertile men had 18, 26, and 34% lower serum T, cFT, and T/LH levels...

  7. Polycystic ovary syndrome: current infertility management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubuchon, Mira; Legro, Richard S

    2011-12-01

    This review summarizes the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome and management of associated infertility. The goal is to guide clinicians through basic evaluation, initial treatment, and briefly describe more complex therapies.

  8. Basic infertility including polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Maryse; AinMelk, Youssef; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice

    2008-09-01

    Infertility in women has many possible causes and must be approached systematically. The most common cause of medically treatable infertility is the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This syndrome is common in young women and is the cause of anovulatory infertility in 70% of cases. It is therefore an important condition to screen and manage in primary care medical settings. In the past 10 years, insulin sensitization with weight loss or metformin has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for PCOS infertility that eliminates the risk of multiple pregnancy and may reduce the risk of early pregnancy loss as compared with ovulation-inductor drugs. The authors believe metformin should be considered as first-line therapy because it has the advantage to allow for normal single ovulation, for reduced early pregnancy loss, and, most importantly, lifestyle modifications and weight loss before pregnancy. Losing weight not only improves fertility but also reduces adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity.

  9. Infertility Patients' Mental Health Problems Often Unaddressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy on top of that. To Pasch, the solution is for clinics to have a mental health ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Depression Infertility Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  10. The social epidemiology of coping with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Christensen, Ulla; Holstein, B E

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To analyse the cross-sectional association between coping responses with infertility and occupational social class. Infertility is evenly distributed across social classes in Denmark, and there is free access to high-quality assisted reproduction technology. METHODS: Data were based...... on a questionnaire in a consecutive sample of 1169 women and 1081 Danish men who were about to begin assisted reproduction treatment. The coping measure was developed from an adaptation of Lazarus and Folkman's Ways of Coping Questionnaire and based on results from interviews with infertile people. The measure...... passive-avoidance coping and significantly less active-avoidance coping. CONCLUSION: Due to the significant social differences in coping with infertility, the study suggested that elements of coping may be learned from one's social network and reference group....

  11. Psychological and ethical implications related to infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minucci, Daria

    2013-12-01

    Being a parent is deeply demanding and one of the most important events in life; parents experience the deepening of human relationships with their partner, within their families, and in society, and moreover the fundamental relationship between parent and child. Every medical, social, and political effort must be made to prevent infertility but also to offer infertile couples the best diagnostic and therapeutic paths. Understanding the suffering of the couple and their families prevents and helps ease the possible psychological and social complications of infertility. Therefore, infertility concerns not only biomedical sciences but also psychological and social ones-ethics and law-in their combined efforts to identify areas of understanding and of research for solutions while respecting the dignity of the couple and unborn child. The Catholic Church offers an ongoing contribution through dialogue in looking for ethical principles guiding scientific and medical research respectful of the true life of human beings.

  12. Infertility experience and health differentials - a population-based comparative study on infertile and non-infertile women (the HUNT Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostad, Berit; Schmidt, Lone; Sundby, Johanne

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies suggest that health complaints, distress and poor life satisfaction are associated with infertility experience. Research on health consequences of infertility experience in women has relied heavily on clinic-based samples. This population-based study investigates the association...... between infertility and health and life satisfaction. DESIGN: Cross-sectional population-based health study, conducted between 2006 and 2008. SETTING: All women in a county in Norway were invited. The current material is restricted to women aged 20-49 years. POPULATION: A total of 9200 women participated....... METHODS: Health measures were compared between women with infertility experience (infertile women) and women without infertility experience (non-infertile women). Disparities in health and life satisfaction among the infertile women were assessed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported health, functional...

  13. VINCLOZOLIN (V) TREATMENT INDUCES REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS AND INFERTILITY IN F1 MALE RATS WHEN ADMINISTERED DURING SEXUAL BUT NOT GONADAL DIFFERENTIATION. THE EFFECTS ARE NOT TRANSMITTED TO THE SUBSEQUENT GENERATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V produces adverse reproductive effects in male rats when administered during sexual differentiation by acting as an androgen-antagonist. It was recently reported that four generations of SD rats, derived from dams dosed via ip injection GD8-15 with 100 mg V/kg/day, displayed pro...

  14. Psychopathology, emotional aspects and psychological counselling in infertility: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Berardis, D; Mazza, M; Marini, S; Del Nibletto, L; Serroni, N; Pino, M C; Valchera, A; Ortolani, C; Ciarrocchi, F; Martinotti, G; Di Giannantonio, M

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, infertility has been variably defined. Infertility affects approximately 80 million people from all parts of the world. An important area of discussion has been represented by the possible causal link between psychopathology and infertility. In the past, the prevalence of psychiatric problems among infertile couples was estimated to be 25-60%. The incidence of depression and anxiety in infertile couples is significantly high than in fertile controls and in the general population respectively. Infertility has been linked to obsessive-compulsive symptoms, psychoticism, substance abuse and eating disorders. Psychological impact of infertility is greater in women than in men. Additionally, authors found that infertile patients were more alexithymic than healthy controls. In relation to the different needs, different psychological therapeutic interventions may be indicated. Psychological counseling can provide valuable assistance in dealing with infertility treatments and their eventual failures.

  15. The impact of infertility on sexuality: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Maycock3

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most studies address medical treatment of infertility and psychosocial outcomes caused by infertility-related stress, but few studies examine the infertility’s impact on sexuality.Aim: A literature review was conducted to answer the questions: 1 How is sexual self concept impacted in infertile individuals and their partners? 2 Does infertility have a negative impact on sexual relationships? 3 Is sexual function affected by infertility? In answering these questions, we may develop a better understanding of sexuality in the context of infertility, and thus better inform infertility management. Ultimately the aim is to improve the quality of life for infertile couples.Method: A literature search was conducted for publications from 1990 to 2011 via the electronic databases PubMed, PsycInfo and Scopus, which focused on sexuality in infertile subjects or couples.Results: In this review, all studies were descriptive quantitative studies which mapped the different aspects of sexuality in the context of infertility. The results suggested that infertility and its treatment approaches for fertilisationcould lead to changes in sexual self-esteem, sexual relationship and sexual function.Conclusion: The literature substantiated that many infertile subjects experienced trouble in various aspects of sexuality. However, further research should examine the reciprocal relations between sexual self concept, sexual relationship and sexual function in the context of infertility. How these changes affect the partners of infertile subjects should also be addressed.

  16. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  17. Infertility, infertility treatment and twinning: the Danish National BirthCohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have previously observed that an increasing time to pregnancy (TTP) is associated with a reduced frequency of twin deliveries in couples not receiving infertility treatment. By using updated information, we assessed the frequencies of dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin...... deliveries as a function of infertility (TTP>12 months), as well as infertility treatment. METHODS From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51 730 fertile couples with TTPwith TTP>12 months and 5163 infertile couples who conceived after treatment. Information on zygosity, available...... for part of the cohort (1997-2000), was based on standardized questions on the similarities between the twins at the age of 3-5 years. RESULTS Compared with fertile couples, the frequency of DZ twin deliveries was lower for infertile couples conceiving naturally (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0...

  18. 金匮肾气丸对腺嘌呤致不育大鼠精子质量与肾脏功能的影响%Effect of Jinkui Shenqi Pill on Sperm Quality and Renal Function in Rats Adenine-induced Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马亮; 刘华剑; 南亚昀; 刘镘利; 王南丁; 陈艳秋; 王宗仁; 马静

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To observe the influence of Jinkui Shenqi Pill on sperm quality and renal function in rats with adenine-induced infertility. Method: Thirty adult male SD rats were randomly divided into Jinkui Shenqi Pill group, model group and control group. Sperm qualities of experimental rats were detected by automatic sperm quality analyzer, and contents of testosterone(T), estradiol( E2 ), luteinizing hormone(LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured by radioimmunoassay. Contents of BUN and Scr were ested by automatic biochemical analyzer. Renal tissue was observed by optical microscope. Testis was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Result: Jinkui Shenqi Pill could significantly improve symptoms of Shen-yang deficiency in adenineinduced infertility rats, and it could improve the sperm quality, including sperm density, sperm motility and sperm activity. It could increase content of T obviously, lower contents of E2, LH and FSH, lower contents of BUN and Scr. And it can better the damaged kidney tissue in model rats. Conclusion: Jinkui Shenqi pill can improve sperm quality significantly and improve function of kidney. And the mechanism of improving sperm quality may be related to the increase in content of T by stimulating the interstitial cells and lowering level of E2.%目的:观察金匮肾气丸对腺嘌呤致雄性不育大鼠精子质量及肾功能的影响.方法:30只成年雄性SD大鼠随机分为空白组、模型组、金匮肾气丸组.应用自动精子质量分析仪检测实验大鼠的精子质量(精子密度、活率及活动度);应用放射免疫法测定血清睾酮(T)、雌二醇(E2)、促黄体激素(LH)和促卵泡激素(FSH)含量;自动生化分析仪分析血清尿素氮(BUN)、肌酐(Scr)含量;HE染色、光镜观察肾脏组织变化,透射电镜观察实验大鼠睾丸中精子鞭毛密度.结果:金匮肾气丸能明显增加大鼠精子密度、活率及活动度,提高大鼠血清T含量,降低E2,LH,FSH含

  19. Identification of human candidate genes for male infertility by digital differential display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, C; Hansen, C; Bendsen, E; Byskov, A G; Schwinger, E; Lopez-Pajares, I; Jensen, P K; Kristoffersson, U; Schubert, R; Van Assche, E; Wahlstroem, J; Lespinasse, J; Tommerup, N

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for the importance of genetic factors in male fertility is accumulating. In the literature and the Mendelian Cytogenetics Network database, 265 cases of infertile males with balanced reciprocal translocations have been described. The candidacy for infertility of 14 testis-expressed transcripts (TETs) were examined by comparing their chromosomal mapping position to the position of balanced reciprocal translocation breakpoints found in the 265 infertile males. The 14 TETs were selected by using digital differential display (electronic subtraction) to search for apparently testis-specific transcripts in the TIGR database. The testis specificity of the 14 TETs was further examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on adult and fetal tissues showing that four TETs (TET1 to TET4) were testis-expressed only, six TETs (TET5 to TET10) appeared to be differentially expressed and the remaining four TETs (TET11 to TET14) were ubiquitously expressed. Interestingly, the two tesis expressed-only transcripts, TET1 and TET2, mapped to chromosomal regions where seven and six translocation breakpoints have been reported in infertile males respectively. Furthermore, one ubiquitously, but predominantly testis-expressed, transcript, TET11, mapped to 1p32-33, where 13 translocation breakpoints have been found in infertile males. Interestingly, the mouse mutation, skeletal fusions with sterility, sks, maps to the syntenic region in the mouse genome. Another transcript, TET7, was the human homologue of rat Tpx-1, which functions in the specific interaction of spermatogenic cells with Sertoli cells. TPX-1 maps to 6p21 where three cases of chromosomal breakpoints in infertile males have been reported. Finally, TET8 was a novel transcript which in the fetal stage is testis-specific, but in the adult is expressed in multiple tissues, including testis. We named this novel transcript fetal and adult testis-expressed transcript (FATE).

  20. Hormonal and seminal parameters in infertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B; Francavilla, S; Properzi, G; Martini, M; Fabbrini, A

    1986-01-01

    500 infertile patients (250 with and 250 without left side varicocele) and 33 fertile men were evaluated as far as seminal parameters and the hormonal status were concerned. Sperm motility was constantly lower in infertile patients also when infertile group was compared to fertile one with the same sperm density. Serum testosterone levels were lower in infertile groups when compared to fertile men, and this confirms the existence of an androgenic deficit as a common finding in infertility associated or not to varicocele. FSH and LH increased (p less than 0.001) when sperm density dropped to less than 5 X 10(6) spermatozoa/ml. A negative correlation was found between both gonadotropins and sperm count (p less than 0.001), also after exclusion of azoo- and oligozoospermic (less than 5 X 10(6) spermatozoa/ml) patients (p less than 0.01). Gonadotropins were moreover tightly correlated between each other (p less than 0.001). Our data suggest that both gonadotropins are tightly tuned with sperm output and thus with the spermatogenic potential.

  1. Metabolic syndrome and male infertility (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The literary review is devoted to one of the most actual problems of modern andrology – pathogenetic communication of metabolic syndrome components and male infertility. Now a steady growth of metabolic syndrome frequency in world men population is observed, and that is accompanied by progressing deterioration of fertility parameters at them. Negative influence of key metabolic syndrome components – obesity and insulin resistance – at male reproductive function is shown on the basis of modern clinical, epidemiological and experimental data, and known pathophysiological mechanisms of this influence are described also. Induced by a metabolic syndrome oxidative stress of spermatozoas, neuropathy and androgen deficiency are the most significant mechanisms of neuro-endocrinological and reproductive consequences realization. The imperative necessity of early revealing and pharmacological correction of obesity and insulin resistance in all infertility men is shown, as well as they are curable reasons of male infertility . However, they seldom come to light and even less often corrected in routine clinical practice owing to insufficient knowledge of urologists and andrologists about these system hormonal-metabolic factors of male infertility, which role in male infertility pathogenesis will increase only in the conditions of world epidemic of a metabolic syndrome.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and male infertility (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The literary review is devoted to one of the most actual problems of modern andrology – pathogenetic communication of metabolic syndrome components and male infertility. Now a steady growth of metabolic syndrome frequency in world men population is observed, and that is accompanied by progressing deterioration of fertility parameters at them. Negative influence of key metabolic syndrome components – obesity and insulin resistance – at male reproductive function is shown on the basis of modern clinical, epidemiological and experimental data, and known pathophysiological mechanisms of this influence are described also. Induced by a metabolic syndrome oxidative stress of spermatozoas, neuropathy and androgen deficiency are the most significant mechanisms of neuro-endocrinological and reproductive consequences realization. The imperative necessity of early revealing and pharmacological correction of obesity and insulin resistance in all infertility men is shown, as well as they are curable reasons of male infertility . However, they seldom come to light and even less often corrected in routine clinical practice owing to insufficient knowledge of urologists and andrologists about these system hormonal-metabolic factors of male infertility, which role in male infertility pathogenesis will increase only in the conditions of world epidemic of a metabolic syndrome.

  3. Infertility, infertility treatment and psychomotor development: the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Olsen, Jørn

    2009-03-01

    Babies born of infertile couples, regardless of treatment, have a higher risk of preterm birth and low birthweight, conditions associated with delayed development. We examined developmental milestones in singletons as a function of parental infertility [time to pregnancy (TTP) > 12 months] and infertility treatment. From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 37 897 singletons born of fertile couples (TTP 12 months), and 3309 born after infertility treatment. When the children were about 18 months old, mothers reported 12 developmental milestones by responding to structured questions. We defined a failure to achieve the assessed milestone or the minimal numbers of milestones in a summary (motor, or cognitive/language skills) as delay. Naturally conceived children born of infertile couples had a pattern of psychomotor development similar to that of children born of fertile couples, but increasing TTP correlated with a modest delay. When the analysis was restricted to infertile couples (treated and untreated), children born after treatment showed a slight delay in cognitive/language development (odds ratio 1.24, [95% confidence interval 1.01, 1.53]) for not meeting at least three out of six cognitive/language milestones); children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) had the highest estimated relative risk of delay for most milestones, especially motor milestones. These results suggest that a long TTP may be associated with a modest developmental delay. Infertility treatment, especially ICSI, may be associated with a slight delay for some of these early milestones.

  4. Individualised gonadotrophin ovulation induction in women with normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Mette Petri; Loft, Anne; Pinborg, Anja

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate an individualised gonadotrophin starting dose regimen for women with anovulatory infertility. STUDY DESIGN: We included 71 normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertile women in a prospective, observational study. All underwent one ovulation induction...

  5. Gene Linked to Excess Male Hormones in Female Infertility Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gene linked to excess male hormones in female infertility disorder Discovery by NIH-supported researchers may lead ... androgens, symptoms of PCOS include irregular menstrual cycles, infertility, and insulin resistance (difficulty using insulin.) The condition ...

  6. What Treatment Options Are Available for Male Infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications What treatment options are available for male infertility? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... deliver a live-born infant, in most cases, infertility has no other outward symptoms. The evaluation of ...

  7. Treatments for Infertility Resulting from Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Treatments for Infertility Resulting from PCOS Skip sharing on social media ... reason for these problems. Before beginning treatment for infertility possibly related to PCOS, be sure that your ...

  8. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura O.; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H.; Kesmodel, Ulrik S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment....... RESULTS: A total of 60 440 pregnancies were included, and 0.8% of the children developed epilepsy.The primary analyses showed no association between parental infertility or fertility treatment, and the overall risk of childhood epilepsy (hazard rate ratios (HRs); 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.08 (0......, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. METHODS: This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment...

  9. Forgotten intrauterine device contributing to infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel O. Igberase

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to show that long standing forgotten intrauterine device contributes to infertility, reporting three cases presented at Central Hospital Warri, Nigeria, a government tertiary health center. Three cases of forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD contributing to infertility were seen. Two were inserted for contraceptive reasons while one was inserted while being managed for uterine synechae. Health care providers should ensure proper documentation of all procedures carried out, adequate counseling which should include taking an informed consent and also ensuring both short and long term follow up of their clients. Also all patients being evaluated for infertility and clients with past history of intrauterine device must have a speculum examination and ultrasound scan carried out.

  10. Infertility: Ongoing Global challenge of new millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantibhai Naranbhai Sonaliya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility tends to be the global challenge even in the second decade of the new millennium. Especially in developing countries like India, it is still one the most lethal social evil responsible for a big proportion of cases of psychological disturbances including suicide. Again, recently, few conditions other than communicable or Non-communicable diseases are given place among the categories of significant public health problems like Road Traffic Accidents, Burns, Poisoning, drowning and few more. But, for developing countries like India, the list is incomplete without inclusion of Infertility (there may be several others also. In public health, tuberculosis, leprosy and some other diseases are considered social diseases which produce social stigma for the patients and/or his family members.1 In same manner, Infertility is an important cause of social stigmatization since centuries for a couple suffering from, especially for woman involved. During a transitory phase of industrialization and socio-economic development, the situation is changed a minute smidgen at urban areas of India but at rural parts, sub-urban or even at urban slums (mainly among pockets of recent migrants the situation is as same as a few hundred years ago. A female of no religion, caste, social status or higher level of education are barred from some stringent mores related to infertility. Infertile females are still not allowed to take part in so many religious or social ceremonies; on the contrary, they have to face more harassment including domestic violence than their counterparts, who have given birth to the child. Due to social, psychological, economic disturbances, they are forced to take multiple sorts of treatments including religious quacks. So many infertile women are exploited physically and economically also in such weird ways of treatment to gain a pregnancy.

  11. Exploration of Infertile Couples’ Support Requirements: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari; Ataollah Ghahiri; Mojtaba Habibi; Ali Zargham-Boroujeni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to high prevalence of infertility, increasing demand for infertility treatment, and provision of high quality of fertility care, it is necessary for healthcare professionals to explore infertile couples’ expectations and needs. Identification of these needs can be a prerequisite to plan the effective supportive interventions. The current study was, therefore, conducted in an attempt to explore and to understand infertile couples’ experiences and needs. Materi...

  12. Exploration of Infertile Couples’ Support Requirements: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to high prevalence of infertility, increasing demand for infertility treatment, and provision of high quality of fertility care, it is necessary for healthcare professionals to explore infertile couples’ expectations and needs. Identification of these needs can be a prerequisite to plan the effective supportive interventions. The current study was, therefore, conducted in an attempt to explore and to understand infertile couples’ experiences and needs. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative study based on a content analysis approach. The participants included 26 infertile couples (17 men and 26 women and 7 members of medical personnel (3 gynecologists and 4 midwives as the key informants. The infertile couples were selected from patients attending public and private infertility treatment centers and private offices of infertility specialists in Isfahan and Rasht, Iran, during 2012-2013. They were selected through purposive sampling method with maximum variation. In-depth unstructured interviews and field notes were used for data gathering among infertile couples. The data from medical personnel was collected through semi-structured interviews. The interview data were analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: Data analysis revealed four main categories of infertile couples’ needs, including: i. Infertility and social support, ii. Infertility and financial support, iii. Infertility and spiritual support and iv. Infertility and informational support. The main theme of all these categories was assistance and support. Conclusion: The study showed that in addition to treatment and medical needs, infertile couples encounter various challenges in different emotional, psychosocial, communicative, cognitive, spiritual, and economic aspects that can affect various areas of their life and lead to new concerns, problems, and demands. Thus, addressing infertile couples’ needs and expectations alongside their

  13. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Infertility Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Eifert, Georg H.

    2011-01-01

    Women and men diagnosed with infertility experience a variety of infertility-related stressors, including changes to their family and social networks, strain on their sexual relationship, and difficulties and unexpected challenges in their relationship. Infertility stress is linked with depression and psychological distress, and can lead to…

  14. Prevalence and predictors of infertility-specific stress in women diagnosed with primary infertility: A clinic-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansha Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: According to the existing literature on infertility, stress appears to be inevitably associated with infertility diagnosis and treatment in sub-fertile individuals. The epidemiological data on the prevalence and predictors of infertility-specific stress in cultural specific scenario are scarce. The objective of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of infertility-specific stress and identify predictors of infertility-specific stress in women diagnosed with primary infertility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 300 infertile married women, diagnosed with primary infertility. The tools used for the assessment were “semi-structured questionnaire ” compiled by the authors, “ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders (Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines, ” and “Psychological Evaluation Test for infertility. ” STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 15. Chi-square test was used for univariate analysis followed by multiple logistic regressions between stress and the predictor variables. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The prevalence of stress among women was 80%. Univariate analysis revealed that predictors of stress were years of marital life, duration of infertility, infertility type, history of gynecological surgery, cycles of ovulation induction with timed intercourse and intra-uterine inseminations, present and past psychiatric morbidity, coping difficulties, gynecological diagnosis, and severity of premenstrual dysphoria. Multivariate analysis showed leading associations of stress with infertility type and coping difficulties.

  15. Sexual behavior of infertile women: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Bokaie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility makes an essential challenge to the sexual life of couples, especially infertile women. When pregnancy does not happen, infertile women think that sexual intercourse is not fruitful and sexual desire became reduce gradually. Infertile women progressively forget that their sexual relationship is also a response to their natural need. Objective: This qualitative study was conducted to explore the infertility consequences in the sexual behavior of infertile women. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative content analysis study; and it was part of a widespread study, used a sequential mixed-method and conducted from August 2014 until February 2015. A purposeful sampling was used to recruit infertile women who had referred to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility. Data gathering techniques employed in this research included in-depth semi structured open face-to-face interviews and field notes. Credibility, transferability, confirm ability, and dependability were assessed for the rigor of the data collection. Results: Totally, 15 infertile women and 8 key informants were interviewed. Data analysis showed four themes about impact of infertility on female sexual behavior: 1/ Impact of infertility drugs on couple sexual behavior, 2/ Impact of assisted reproductive technologies on female sexual behavior, 3/ Timed intercourse during infertility and 4/ The psychological impact of infertility on sexual behavior. Conclusion: Some of Iranian infertile women could cope with their problems, but some of them were very affected by infertility drugs and assisted reproductive technologies procedures. Psychosexual counseling before medical treatment could help them to have a better sexual life.

  16. Melatonin hormone profile in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Hosni; Halawa, Fawzy; Mostafa, Taymour; Atta, Hazem

    2006-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland. There is much controversy about its relationship to the male reproductive process. In this study, seminal plasma as well as the serum melatonin levels were studied in different infertile male groups and were correlated with their semen parameters and hormonal levels. One hundred twenty male cases subdivided into six equal groups were consecutively included; fertile normozoospermic men, oligoasthenozoospermia (OA), OA with leucocytospermia, OA with varicocele, non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) with high serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and NOA with normal FSH. Semen analysis, estimation of melatonin, FSH, testosterone (T) and prolactin (PRL) hormone was carried out. Mean level of serum melatonin was higher than its corresponding seminal concentrations in all investigated groups with a positive correlation between their levels (r = 0.532, p = 0.01). Serum and seminal plasma melatonin levels in all infertile groups were reduced significantly compared with their levels in the fertile group. The lowest concentrations were in OA with leucocytospermia group. Melatonin in both serum and semen demonstrated significant correlation with sperm motility (r = 607, 0.623 respectively, p = 0.01). Serum melatonin correlated positively with serum PRL (r = 0.611, p = 0.01). It may be concluded that melatonin may be involved in the modulation of reproductive neuroendocrine axis in male infertility. Also, low levels of melatonin in semen were observed in infertile groups having reduced sperm motility, leucocytospermia, varicocele and NOA.

  17. Hypnosis in the treatment of functional infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravitz, M A

    1995-07-01

    The literature was reviewed and found to contain sparse information regarding the applicability of clinical hypnosis in the treatment of functional infertility. Two cases were then described in which hypnosis based on imagery and a relaxation strategy was successful in facilitating pregnancy in both instances. The treatment was considered to have resulted in beneficial modification of attitude, optimism, and mind-body interaction.

  18. Germ cell transplantation in infertility mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This work investigated the spermatogenesis in an infertility BALB/c-nu mouse model by reinfusing germline stem cells into seminiferous tubules.Donor germ cells were isolated from male FVB/NJ-GFP transgenic mice.Seminiferous tubule microiniection was applied to achieve intratubular germ cell transfer.The germ cells were injected into exposed testes of the infertility mice.We used green fluorescence and DNA analysis of donor cells from GFP transgenic mice as genetic marker.The natural mating and Southern blot methods were applied to analyze the effect of sperm cell transplantation and the sperm function after seminiferous tubule microinjecUon.The spermatogenesis was morphologically observed from the seminiferous tubules in 41/60(68.33%)of the injected recipient mice using allogeneic donor cells.In the colonized testes,matured spermatozoa were seen in the lumen of the seminiferous tubules.In this research,BALB/c-nu infertility mouse model,the recipient animal,was used to avoid immunological rejection of donor cells,and germ cell transplantation was applied to overcome infertility caused by busulfan treatment.These results demonstrate that this technique of germ cell transplantation is of great use.Germ cell transplantation could be potentially valuable to oncological patients.

  19. Bariatric Surgery, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, and Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Butterworth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the commonest cause of female infertility. Visceral obesity and insulin resistance are key pathophysiological mechanisms behind PCOS. Women suffering from this syndrome and infertility often seek bariatric surgery hoping that they would be able to conceive postoperatively. Objective. At present, there is no consensus on the role of bariatric surgery in the management of PCOS-associated infertility within the medical community, making it difficult to give specific advice to these women, so a review of the literature was necessary. Results. A detailed review of the literature was performed. Only 6 manuscripts were relevant and contained quantitative data. They demonstrated that bariatric surgery results in postoperative conception rates varying from 33% to 100%. Surgery is also associated with amelioration of menstrual irregularities, hormonal abnormalities, and hirsutism that are associated with PCOS. These studies were retrospective and only had a small number of participants with infertility. Conclusions. Bariatric surgery has been shown to conclusively improve life expectancy, quality of life, and comorbidities like type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea. However, further research is required to identify whether weight loss surgery results in significant improvement in fertility of women with PCOS and to investigate which operation has the best results.

  20. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve...

  1. Infertility as a transformational process: a framework for psychotherapeutic support of infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L O

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to investigate the phenomenon of infertility as experienced by infertile women. A purposive sample of 25 infertile women participated in the study. Data were extracted from taped interviews and the researcher's observational field notes. Data analysis was conducted according to the techniques described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Participant responses to interviews were categorized by examining the interview transcripts and identifying significant statements and meanings. Themes which emerged from the statements were then ascertained and cross-case comparisons were made in order to confirm or to reconsider these themes. Five key themes emerged from the data: failure to fulfill a prescribed societal norm, assault on personal identity, mourning, transformation, and restitution. The women experienced infertility as a transformational process in which they mourned their loss of reproductive function and parenting roles and struggled to make restitution for the perceived stigma and powerlessness associated with nonfulfillment of a prescribed societal norm, the exclusion from cherished societal rituals, and the deprivation of ties of descent. Findings from this study have provided a framework for increased awareness of the phenomenon of infertility and for the essential components of supportive counseling or psychotherapy, regardless of the outcome of the infertility experience.

  2. Evaluation of the general health of the infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Baghiani Moghadam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of infertility is variable between 5-30% around the world. In Iran, more than 2 million couples suffer from infertility. Infertility causes depression, anxiety, social isolation and sexual dysfunction. Objective: This descriptive study was undertaken to determine general health in infertile couples.Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty infertile couples attending Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility were randomly selected during March till September 2009. The GHQ-28 questionnaires were completed by researchers, based on face to face interview. It contains 28 items, which have been divided to four sub- items. The results come out by scoring the patients answer from 0 to 84. All data were analyzed by Chi-square and t-test in SPSS software. Results: GHQ scores of all sub-scales and total in women were more than men, which shows general health condition in women is worse than men. There was no relation between the duration of infertility and general health scores. Conclusion: This study suggests that the infertility has significant effect (p=0.001 on health situation of infertile couples, especially infertile women. They are at risk of somatic symptoms (p=0.0001, social dysfunction (p=0.0001 and severe depression (p=0.0001. GHQ could provided help and support in order to improve the health situation of infertile couples.

  3. Molecular insights into the causes of male infertility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polani B Seshagiri

    2001-11-01

    Infertility is a reproductive health problem that affects many couples in the human population. About 13–18% of couple suffers from it and approximately one-half of all cases can be traced to either partner. Regardless of whether it is primary or secondary infertility, affected couples suffer from enormous emotional and psychological trauma and it can constitute a major life crisis in the social context. Many cases of idiopathic infertility have a genetic or molecular basis. The knowledge of the molecular genetics of male infertility is developing rapidly, new ``spermatogenic genes” are being discovered and molecular diagnostic approaches (DNA chips) established. This will immensely help diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to alleviate human infertility. The present review provides an overview of the causes of human infertility, particularly the molecular basis of male infertility and its implications for clinical practice.

  4. VALUE OF DIAGNOSTIC HYSTEROSCOPY IN INFERTILITY AS FIRST LINE INVESTIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: AIM OF THE STUDY: To evaluate the value of Diagnostic Hysteroscopy in a primary work-up of infertility To compare its use in primary versus secondary infert ility MATERIAL & METHODS: Prospective study from Jan 2012 – Oct 2012 at Radha krishna Multispecialty Hospital and IVF centre, Girinagar ,B angalore INCLUSION CRITERIA: Both primary and secondary infertile women A Total No. of patients – 170 (110 primary infertilit y & 60 secondary infertility were studied Intervention Office Hysteroscopy Main outcome measure Abnormalities of uterine cavity RESULTS: 30 %( n=51 of the total infertile patients studied had uterine a bnormalities .34% (n=37 of primary infertility patients had uterine ab normalities whereas 23 %( n=14 of secondary infertility patients also had uterine abno rmalities. The acquired and congenital causes for uterine abnormalities accounted for 20 % ( n=22 and 14% (n=15 respectively in the primary infertility group whereas it accounted for 17 %( n=10 and 6% (n=4 respectively in the secondary infertility group CONCLUSION: Routine use of diagnostic hysteroscopy in the work-up of infertility is recommended. Diagnostic hysteroscopy has a similar importance in the evaluation of both primary and secondary infertility

  5. Isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency presenting as primary infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, S L; Masson, E A; White, M C

    1995-06-01

    A 31 year old female presented with primary infertility and gave a two year history of amenorrhea without symptoms or signs of endocrine dysfunction. Examination was normal and investigation showed low oestradiol and progesterone levels with decreased LH pulsatility. The cortisol responses were impaired following hypoglycaemic stress and a short synacthen test, but the cortisol response to a prolonged synacthen test was normal. An inadequate ACTH response to CRF testing confirmed the diagnosis of isolated ACTH deficiency. Hydrocortisone therapy was followed by an ovulatory menstrual cycle. Amenorrhea again ensued following the reduction of the steroid dose and normal menses resumed on normal steroid replacement therapy. Six hourly gonadotrophin pulsatility showed a significant increase in both pulse amplitude and mean LH and FSH levels following steroid treatment. Isolated ACTH deficiency is a rare but treatable cause of hypogonadism and infertility, and this case gives further insight on the role of cortisol on the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis.

  6. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takeshi Shin; Hiroshi Okada

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore im-portant in the m-anagem-ent of patients with IBD. However, relatively m-odest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by m-en with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatm-ent on m-ale fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a system-atic search for published studies. A PubM ed search were perform-ed using the m-ain search term-s "IBD AND m-ale infertility", "Crohn’s disease AND m-ale infertility", "ulcerative colitis AND m-ale infertility". References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, sm-oking, m-edications, and surgery m-ay cause infertility in m-en with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectom-y with ileal pouch-anal anastom-osis, rectal incision seem-s to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the m-edications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces m-ale fertility. No other m-edications appear to affect m-ale fertility significantly, although sm-all studies suggested som-e adverse effects. There are lim-ited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on m-ale fertility and pregnancy outcom-es; however, patients should be inform-ed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides inform-ation on fertility-related issues in m-en with IBD and discusses treatm-ent options.

  7. [Stress and distress in infertility among women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damti, Osnat Bloch; Sarid, Orly; Sheiner, Eyal; Zilberstein, Tali; Cwikel, Julie

    2008-03-01

    In the industrialized world, approximately 12% of couples suffer from infertility. As a result of its collective political and historical experience, Israel boasts one of the world's most progressive fertility policies ranging from hormonal treatment to In Vitro Fertilization (IVF). Approximately 40% of the causes of infertility are attributed to the woman. Among the factors contributing to reduced fertility are endocrine factors, immune factors and mechanical factors. Studies have accumulated information regarding the contribution of psychological factors to infertility in women. Among the identified risk factors are depression, anxiety and stress-dependent changes like altered heart rate and increased blood cortisol levels. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) has been shown to be an important mediator of infertility, involved in the excretion of CRH, ACTH and cortisol, respectively. Data gathered in the literature suggests the involvement of the HPA axis on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadotropic axis (HPG). Specifically, changes in diurnal excretion patterns of cortisol have been shown to accompany mental stress and to mediate the down-regulation of the HPG axis. This impact could possibly involve inhibitory mechanisms at the pituitary level, by reducing the release of FSH and LH by GnRH. Furthermore, research has shown that the effect of cortisol on the HPG axis is dependent on the endocrine status of the ovary in its different stages within the menstrual cycle. From the studies presented in this review it can be hypothesized that stress can induce altered cortisol-excretion patterns along the menstrual cycle, which ultimately affect the hormonal profile in critical stages of the fertilization process.

  8. Searching for candidate genes for male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.N.Truong; E.K.Moses; J.E.Armes; D.J.Venter; H.W.G.Baker

    2003-01-01

    Aim: We describe an approach to search for candidate genes for male infertility using the two human genome databases: the public University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and private Celera databases which list known and predicted gene sequences and provide related information such as gene function, tissue expression,known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methods and Results: To demonstrate this in silico research, the following male infertility candidate genes were selected: (1) human BOULE, mutations of which may lead to germ cell arrest at the primary spermatocyte stage, (2) mutations of casein kinase 2 alpha genes which may cause globozoospermia, (3) DMR-N9 which is possibly involved in the spermatogenic defect of myotonic dystrophy and (4) several testes expressed genes at or near the breakpoints of a balanced translocation associated with hypospermatogenesis. We indicate how information derived from the human genome databases can be used to confirm these candidate genes may be pathogenic by studying RNA expression in tissue arrays using in situ hybridization and gene sequencing. Conclusion: The paper explains the new approach to discovering genetic causes of male infertility using information about the human genome. ( Asian J Andro1 2003 Jun; 5:137-147 )

  9. Human infertility: are endocrine disruptors to blame?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Pinto, André; Carvalho, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Over recent decades, epidemiological studies have been reporting worrisome trends in the incidence of human infertility rates. Extensive detection of industrial chemicals in human serum, seminal plasma and follicular fluid has led the scientific community to hypothesise that these compounds may disrupt hormonal homoeostasis, leading to a vast array of physiological impairments. Numerous synthetic and natural substances have endocrine-disruptive effects, acting through several mechanisms. The main route of exposure to these chemicals is the ingestion of contaminated food and water. They may disturb intrauterine development, resulting in irreversible effects and may also induce transgenerational effects. This review aims to summarise the major scientific developments on the topic of human infertility associated with exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs), integrating epidemiological and experimental evidence. Current data suggest that environmental levels of EDs may affect the development and functioning of the reproductive system in both sexes, particularly in foetuses, causing developmental and reproductive disorders, including infertility. EDs may be blamed for the rising incidence of human reproductive disorders. This constitutes a serious public health issue that should not be overlooked. The exposure of pregnant women and infants to EDs is of great concern. Therefore, precautionary avoidance of exposure to EDs is a prudent attitude in order to protect humans and wildlife from permanent harmful effects on fertility. PMID:23985363

  10. Y chromosome microdeletions in Turkish infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani Ayse

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To detect the frequency and types of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men attending to our university intracytoplasmic sperm injection ICSI/IVF centre and fertile control subjects in our patient population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A total of 50 infertile men who were referred to IVF center of Meram medical faculty were selected for the molecular azospermia factor (AZF screening program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Karyotype analysis and polymerase chain reaction amplification using 15 Y-specific sequence-tagged sites of AZF region were done. RESULTS: The total prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities was found to be 10% (5/50, including 4 patients with numerical and 1 patient with structural abnormalities. Overall, 4 of the 50 patients tested (8% exhibited deletions of the Y chromosome, 3 of them being azospermic and 1 of them oligospermic men. The frequency of the microdeletions in subgroups with azospermia and oligozoospermia was found to be 10.7% (3/29 and 4.7% (1/21 respectively. Microdeletions of AZFb and AZFc regions were detected in all of the 4 patients. Neither AZFa nor AZFd microdeletions were indicated. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that one must know whether there is a genetic cause for male infertility before patients can be subjected to ISCI or testicular sperm extraction (TESE/ISCI treatment.

  11. An epidemiologic survey on the causes of infertility in patients referred to infertility center in Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is considered as a major health care problem of different communities. The high prevalence of this issue doubled its importance. A significant proportion of infertility have been related to environmental conditions and also acquired risk factors. Different environmental conditions emphasized the need to study the different causes of infertility in each area. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency causes of infertility in infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional descriptive study 1200 infertile men and women that were referred to infertility clinic of Fatemieh Hospital during 2010 to 2011, were examined. This center is the only governmental center for infertility in Hamadan. Sampling was based on census method. Information about the patients was obtained from medical examinations and laboratory findings. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics such as frequencies and the mean were used. Results: The prevalence of primary and secondary infertility was 69.5% and 30.5% respectively. Among the various causes of infertility women factors (88.6% had the highest regard. In the causes of female infertility, menstrual disorders, diseases (obesity, thyroid diseases, and diabetes, ovulation dysfunction, uterine factor, fallopian tubes and cervical factor had the highest prevalence respectively. The causes of male infertility based on their frequency included semen fluid abnormalities, genetic factors, vascular abnormalities, and anti-spermatogenesis factors, respectively. Conclusion: Etiology pattern of infertility in our study is similar with the many other patterns that have been reported by the World Health Organization. However, frequency of menstrual disorders is much higher than other studies that require further consideration.

  12. The status of depression and anxiety in infertile Turkish couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert Kazandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a major psychosocial crisis as well as being a medical problem. The factors that predict psychosocial consequences of infertility may vary in different gender and different infertile populations.Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether Turkish infertile couples had higher levels of depression and anxiety when compared to non-infertile couples. Our secondary aim was to evaluate the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and levels of depression and anxiety in Turkish infertile couples.Materials and Methods: We designed a descriptive cross sectional study of 248 infertile women and 96 infertile men with no psychiatric disturbance and 51 women and 40 men who have children to evaluate the depression and anxiety levels between infertile couples and fertile couples. A gynecologist evaluated participants for demographic data and then they were visited by a psychologist to perform questionnaire scales which were The Beck Depression Inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for the evaluation of the degree of psychopathology. The data were statistically analyzed, with p<0.05 as the level of statistical significance.Results: We observed significant differences between the infertile couples and fertile couples with respect to state and trait anxiety (p<0.0001 while no difference was regarding with depression, both of women and men. Anxiety and depression were observed as independent from gender when infertile women and men were compared (p=0.213.Conclusion: We believed that the psychological management at infertile couples must be individualized with cultural, religious, and class related aspects.

  13. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses...... of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male...... factor infertility...

  14. Online negotiations of infertility: Knowledge production in (in)fertility blogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, K.

    2014-01-01

    Although now used for a wide range of functions such as education, marketing and political commentary, blogs were originally a space for narrating personal life stories and have much in common with autobiography and diary genres. This article examines (in)fertility blogs written by women trying...... and traditional discourses concerning fertility. I show how bloggers use their blogs to 'make sense' of their (in)fertility experiences by looking at the distinctive content, style and format of their blogs. Finally, the knowledge produced in the blogs is problematized by 'situating' them within a broader...

  15. Current medical management of endocrine-related male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Ring

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Male factor contributes to 50%-60% of overall infertility but is solely responsible in only 20% of couples. Although most male factor infertility is ascertained from an abnormal semen analysis, other male factors can be contributory especially if the sample returns normal. Male infertility can be due to identifiable hormonal or anatomical etiologies that may be reversible or irreversible. This manuscript will highlight existing guidelines and our recommendations for hormone evaluation for male infertility and empiric therapies including multivitamins, estrogen receptor modulators (clomiphene, estrogen conversion blockers (anastrozole, and hormone replacement.

  16. Assessing infertility-related stress: the factor structure of the Fertility Problem Inventory in Italian couples undergoing infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donarelli, Zaira; Gullo, Salvatore; Lo Coco, Gianluca; Marino, Angelo; Scaglione, Piero; Volpes, Aldo; Allegra, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    The factor structure of the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI) and its invariance across gender were examined in Italian couples undergoing infertility treatment. About 1000 subjects (both partners of 500 couples) completed two questionnaires prior to commencing infertility treatment at a private Clinic in Palermo, Italy. Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that the original factor structure of the FPI was partially confirmed. Two correlated factors (Infertility Life Domains and Importance of Parenthood) were obtained via a post hoc Exploratory Factor Analysis. Finally, the invariance of this factor structure across gender was confirmed. The study supported the relevance of two interrelated factors specific to infertility stress which could help clinicians to focus on the core infertility-related stress domains of infertile couples.

  17. Variation in distress among women with infertility: evidence from a population-based sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greil, Arthur L; Shreffler, Karina M; Schmidt, Lone

    2011-01-01

    with infertility with no prior pregnancies (primary infertility, n = 399). We further distinguish between women with infertility who were actually 'trying' to become pregnant (the infertile with intent) with those who met the medical definition of infertile but did not describe themselves as trying to become...... pregnant (infertile without intent). RESULTS Both types of infertility (primary versus secondary) (ß = 0.31*) and intentionality (infertile with and without intent) (ß = 0.08*) are associated with FSD. These associations persist when we control for resource and demographic variables, life course variables...

  18. Infertility-related stress in men and women predicts treatment outcome 1 year later

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boivin, J; Schmidt, Lone

    2005-01-01

    stress, psychology, psychosocial, reproduction, marital, gender, counselling, infertility, in vitro fertilization, fertility......stress, psychology, psychosocial, reproduction, marital, gender, counselling, infertility, in vitro fertilization, fertility...

  19. [L-arginine and male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scibona, M; Meschini, P; Capparelli, S; Pecori, C; Rossi, P; Menchini Fabris, G F

    1994-12-01

    The clinical efficacy and acceptance of L-arginina HCL was tested in 40 infertile men. All of these men had a normal number of spermatozoa (> 20 million/ml), but a decreased motility; this decreased motility was not due to infection or to immunological disorders. The treatment consisted of 80 ml of 10% L-arginine HCL administered daily per os for 6 months. L-arginine HCL showed to be able to improve the motility of spermatozoa without any side-effects.

  20. New insights into the genetic basis of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thejaswini Venkatesh,1 Padmanaban S Suresh,2 Rie Tsutsumi3 1Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, 2Centre for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, India; 3University of Tokushima, Institute of Health Bioscience, Department of Public Health and Nutrition, Tokushima, Japan Abstract: Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system characterized by inability to achieve pregnancy after 12 or more months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. A variety of factors, including ovulation defects, spermatogenic failure, parental age, obesity, and infections have been linked with infertility, in addition to specific karyotypes and genotypes. The study of genes associated with infertility in rodent models has expanded the field of translational genetics in identifying the underlying cause of human infertility problems. Many intriguing aspects of the molecular basis of infertility in humans remain poorly understood; however, application of genetic knowledge in this field looks promising. The growing literature on the genetics of human infertility disorders deserves attention and a critical concise summary is required. This paper provides information obtained from a systematic analysis of the literature related to current research into the genetics of infertility affecting both sexes. Keywords: infertility, genetics, polycystic ovary syndrome, premature ovarian failure, spermatogenic failure, cystic fibrosis

  1. The Evaluation of the Relationship Between Obesity and Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Erdemir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available   Infertility, defined as the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse, affects approximately 15% of couples. Male factor infertility is the sole cause of infertility in approximately 20% of infertile couples, with an additional 30% to 40% secondary to both male and female factors. Thus, male factor infertility is present in approximately half of all infertile couples. Known etiologies of male infertility include cryptorchidism, testicular torsion or trauma, varicocele, seminal tract infections, anti-sperm antibodies, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, gonadal dysgenesis, and obstruction of the reproductive channels. Recently in some studies, it has been reported that increased body mass index negatively affect on male fertility or semen parameters.Overweight and obesity have become a major public health concern worldwide. The prevalence of male obesity or overweight in the united states was reported to be 71%. This ratio changes between 10% and 60% in the world. Negative effects of obesity on male fertility are postulated to occur through several mechanisms. Obese men have been shown to exhibit higher levels of circulating estradiol. Several studies reveal a direct correlation between a rise in BMI and a decline in both free and total blood testosterone levels. In addition, obesity may cause to oxidative stress. All these changes may affect to semen parameters in obese cases. However, the relationship between male obesity and fertility parameters has not been well established. The aim of this review is to evaluate the relationship between the obesity and male infertility.

  2. Serum and seminal plasma hormonal profiles of infertile Nigerian male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinloye, O; Arowojolu, A O; Shittu, O B; Abbiyesuku, F M; Adejuwon, C A; Osotimehin, B

    2006-12-01

    Male infertility constitutes a worldwide problem, especially in Nigeria where most men do not readily accept that they may contribute to the couple's infertility. In order to assess hormonal disturbances in the male infertility we compared male reproductive hormonal levels in human serum and seminal plasma and evaluated the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular-axis in infertile Nigerian males. The biophysical semen parameters were assessed by W.H.O. standard manual method. Serum and seminal plasma male reproductive hormones (Leutinizing hormones, Follicular stimulating hormone, Prolactin and Testosterone) were measured by Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA) technique of W.H.O. in sixty (60) infertile adult male Nigerians (Oligospermic; n = 40 and azoopermic; n = 20) and forty controls of proven fertility (Normospermic subjects; n = 40). The results show that the serum concentrations of gonadotropins (LH and FSH) were significantly higher (Pinfertile subjects than controls. Patterns of serum prolactin levels were similar. The values of gonadotropins in serum were significantly higher (Pseminal plasma. Seminal plasma testosterone in infertile subjects was significantly higher (Phormonal level and seminal plasma hormonal level in all the groups (Pinfertility in Nigerians is characterized by hyperprolactinaemia, raised serum gonadotropins (LH, FSH), and raised seminal plasma testosterone. Hormonal profiles in serum and seminal plasma were not significantly correlated, and hence cannot be used as exclusive alternative in male infertility investigations. The observed spermogram in spite of significant elevation of seminal plasma testosterone in infertile males investigated suggests Sertoli cells malfunction.

  3. [Genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Aguilar, Raúl Eduardo; Chima-Galán, María del Carmen; Yerena-de-vega, María de la Concepción A; Regalado-Hernández, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Guerrero, Cecilia; García-Ortiz, Liliana; Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi; Moreno-García, Jesús Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Recently Mexican Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Colleges (Federación Mexicana de Colegios de Obstetricia y Ginecologia, FEMECOG) published the Mexican guideline forthe management of male infertility, which suggests performing genetic laboratory tests as part of diagnosis and management of infertile patients and states that these should receive genetic counseling. This paper reviews the genetic approach proposed by Mexican guideline. A systematic review of medical literature was performed in Pubmed and Web of Knowledge from 1980 to 2012 in order to find reports of genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients. Also it is discussed the current knowledge of these variants, their clinical implications and finally the guidelines and recommendations for their molecular diagnosis. Most genetic variants in Mexican infertile patients are chromosome abnormalities. In relation to other variants there is only a report of Y chromosome microdeletions, repeated CAG in androgen receptor and more common mutations in CFTR, and other article reporting mutations in CFTR in patients with congenital absence of vas deferens. Little is known about the genetics of Mexican infertile patients apart from chromosome abnormalities. However, the contribution of genetics as etiology of male infertility is taking more relevance and currently the consensual management of infertile male should include the screening of genetic background. This review pretends to be a quick guide for clinicians who want to know about reports of genetic variants related to male infertility in Mexican population and how to approach their diagnosis.

  4. Procreative sex in infertile couples: the decay of pleasure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marci Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility represents a major challenge to the emotional balance and sexual life of couples, with long-lasting and gender-specific effects. The objective of this study is to explore personality features of infertile patients and detect possible sexual disorders in couples undergoing infertility treatment. Materials and methods In this prospective study 60 infertile couples and 52 fertile control couples were asked to complete standardized and validated questionnaires: the Adjective Check List (ACL to enquire about personality features and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI or the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF to assess sexual functioning of female and male partners. The study population was divided into 3 groups: Group A (N = 30, recently diagnosed infertile couples Group B (N = 30, infertile couples already undergoing Intrauterine Insemination and Group C (N = 52, fertile control group. Results Infertile patients did not display any distinguishing personality features. Regarding sexual function, men of all the three groups scored higher in both questionnaires (sexual satisfaction, desire and orgasm than their female partners. Comparing results between groups, Group A male partners obtained lower scores in all the subscales. Women belonging to Group A and Group B showed an impairment of sexual arousal, satisfaction, lubrification and orgasm when compared to fertile controls. Conclusions Even if at the very first stages of infertility treatment no personality disturbances can be detected, the couples’ sexual life is already impaired with different sexual disorders according to gender.

  5. Counseling and diagnostic evaluation for the infertile couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshburn, Paul B

    2015-03-01

    Educating couples about natural means to improve fertility should include a discussion about appropriate timing to initiate a diagnostic evaluation for infertility. Complete infertility testing for both male and female factors allows directed care for all abnormalities to optimize chances for conception.

  6. Living with infertility : Experiences among urban slum populations in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papreen, N; Sabin, K; Begum, L; Ahsan, SK; Baqui, AH

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the perceived causes of infertility, treatment-seeking for infertility and the consequences of childlessness, particularly for women, among a predominantly Muslim population in urban slums of Dhaka in Bangladesh. In-depth interviews were conducted with 60 women and GO men randoml

  7. Management of the infertile couple: an evidence-based protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Remah M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility is defined as inability of a couple to conceive naturally after one year of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. It remains a major clinical and social problem, affecting perhaps one couple in six. Evaluation usually starts after 12 months; however it may be indicated earlier. The most common causes of infertility are: male factor such as sperm abnormalities, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal pathology, combined male and female factors and unexplained infertility. Objectives The aim of this study is to provide the healthcare professionals an evidence-based management protocol for infertile couples away from medical information overload. Methods A comprehensive review where the literature was searched for "Management of infertility and/or infertile couples" at library website of University of Bristol (MetaLib by using a cross-search of different medical databases besides the relevant printed medical journals and periodicals. Guidelines and recommendations were retrieved from the best evidence reviews such as that from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG, American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM, Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society (CFAS, and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG. Results A simple guide for the clinicians to manage the infertile couples. Conclusions The study deploys a new strategy to translate the research findings and evidence-base recommendations into a simplified focused guide to be applied on routine daily practice. It is an approach to disseminate the recommended medical care for infertile couple to the practicing clinicians.

  8. Is There a Relationship between Ovarian Epithelial Dysplasia and Infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier Chene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Ovarian epithelial dysplasia was initially described in material from prophylactic oophorectomies performed in patients at genetic risk of ovarian cancer. Similar histopathological abnormalities have been revealed after ovulation stimulation. Since infertility is also a risk factor for ovarian neoplasia, the aim of this study was to study the relationship between infertility and ovarian dysplasia. Methods. We blindly reviewed 127 histopathological slides of adnexectomies or ovarian cystectomies according to three groups—an exposed group to ovulation induction (n = 30, an infertile group without stimulation (n = 35, and a spontaneously fertile control group (n = 62—in order to design an eleven histopathological criteria scoring system. Results. The ovarian dysplasia score was significantly higher in exposed group whereas dysplasia score was low in infertile and control groups (resp., 8.21 in exposed group, 3.69 for infertile patients, and 3.62 for the controls. In the subgroup with refractory infertility there was a trend towards a more severe dysplasia score (8.53 in ovulation induction group and 5.1 in infertile group. Conclusion. These results raise questions as to the responsibility of drugs used to induce ovulation and/or infertility itself in the genesis of ovarian epithelial dysplasia.

  9. A Study of Couple Burnout in Infertile Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavi, Fatemeh; Jamale, Safieh; Mosalanejad, Leili; Mosallanezhad, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is a major crisis that can cause psychological problems and emotionally distressing experiences, and eventually affect a couples’ relationship. The objective of this study is to investigate couple burnout in infertile couples who were undergoing treatmentat the Infertility Clinic of Yazd, Iran. Method: The present study is a cross-sectional descriptive one on 98 infertile couples referringto the Infertility Centerof Yazd, Iran, who were chosen on a simple random sampling basis. The measuring tools consisted of the Couple Burnout Measure (CBM) and a demographic questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 16 and the statistical tests of ANOVA and t-test. P-values less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: The results show that infertile women experience higher levels of couple burnout than their husbands (pburnout—psychological burnout (pburnout (pburnout (p<0.001)—between wives and husbands show that women are at greater risk. Conclusion: Infertile couples’ emotional, mental, and sexual problems need to be addressed as part of the infertility treatment programs, and psychotherapists should be included in the medical team. PMID:26573033

  10. Periodontal status in infertile women attending in vitro fertilization clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godavarthi Lalasa

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that altered hormonal levels in infertile women undergoing assisted reproductive therapy and infertile women not undergoing this treatment can lead to increased attachment loss, suggesting that these women may require constant periodontal monitoring.

  11. Associations of Psychosocial Factors with the Stress of Infertility Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Myra G.; Forthofer, Melinda S.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial factors thought to be associated with perceived stress over the course of infertility treatment. The research was based on secondary analysis of data from the Study of Marriage, Family, and Life Quality with a sample of 128 people who completed an infertility-related stress instrument at all three measurement…

  12. The Sexual Impact of Infertility Among Women Seeking Fertility Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Winkelman, MD

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: In women seeking fertility treatment, younger age and female factor infertility were associated with increased sexual impact and thus these women are potentially at higher risk of sexual dysfunction. Providers should consider the role young age and an infertility diagnosis plays in a women’s sexual well-being.

  13. Implications of immune dysfunction on endometriosis associated infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica E; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P; Khalaj, Kasra; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-01-24

    Endometriosis is a complex, inflammatory disease that affects 6-10% of reproductive-aged women. Almost half of the women with endometriosis experience infertility. Despite the excessive prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility is unknown and a cure is not available. While many theories have been suggested to link endometriosis and infertility, a consensus among investigators has not emerged. In this extensive review of the literature as well as research from our laboratory, we provide potential insights into the role of immune dysfunction in endometriosis associated infertility. We discuss the implication of the peritoneal inflammatory microenvironment on various factors that contribute to infertility such as hormonal imbalance, oxidative stress and how these could further lead to poor oocyte, sperm and embryo quality, impaired receptivity of the endometrium and implantation failure.

  14. Evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jacky; Gameiro, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    Five key paradigm shifts are described to illustrate the evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility. The first paradigm shift was in the 1930s when psychosomatic concepts were introduced in obstetrics and gynecology as causal factors to explain why some couples could not conceive despite the absence of organic pathology. In the second shift, the nurse advocacy movement of the 1970s stimulated the investigation of the psychosocial consequences of infertility and promoted counseling to help couples grieve childlessness when medical treatments often could not help them conceive. The third shift occurred with the advent of IVF, which created a demand for mental health professionals in fertility clinics. Mental health professionals assessed the ability of couples to withstand the demands of this new high technology treatment as well as their suitability as potential parents. The fourth shift, in the 1990s, saw reproductive medicine embrace the principles of evidence-based medicine, which introduced a much more rigorous approach to medical practice (effectiveness and safety) that extended to psychosocial interventions. The most recent paradigm shift, in the new millennium, occurred with the realization that compliance with protracted fertility treatment depended on the adoption of an integrated approach to fertility care. An integrated approach could reduce treatment burden arising from multiple sources (i.e., patient, clinic, and treatment). This review describes these paradigm shifts and reflects on future clinical and research directions for mental health professionals.

  15. Developments in infertility counselling and its accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monach, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Infertility counselling was placed in a unique position by the passage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 and the requirement that couples being treated should be offered counselling. However professional counselling was, and largely still is, at a stage at which there was no universal agreement on the knowledge, standards or qualifications required for practice. Nevertheless, infertility counselling became the first example of counselling to be required by statute, beyond the more generalised requirement in adoption birth records access. Counselling is intended to describe skilled talking therapy offered by a professional with specific training and qualifications directed to helping individuals and couples to achieve goals they own themselves. The therapeutic intervention of counselling is primarily directed to helping clients in a stressful situation to deploy their own coping skills effectively and thus make the difficult choices inseparable from ART. Counselling outcome research consistently demonstrates the effectiveness of the sort of counselling delivered in assisted conception units with mild-moderate anxiety and depression delivered by skilled and experienced practitioners. This article reviews the role of counsellors as members of the assisted conception clinical team and the status of regulation and accreditation in this very new profession.

  16. Selenium status of idiopathic infertile Nigerian males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinloye, Oluyemi; Arowojolu, A O; Shittu, O B; Adejuwon, C A; Osotimehin, Babatunde

    2005-04-01

    Selenium concentration in the sera and seminal plasma of 60 infertile males (40 oligospermia and 20 azoospermia) and 40 males with proven evidence of fertility (normospermia; control group) were estimated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results were correlated with spermatogram and hormonal levels in order to determine their relationship and significance in male infertility. The mean serum concentrations of selenium was found to be significantly increased in oligospermic compared to azoospermic subjects and controls (p selenium to seminal plasma selenium was 1: 1 in controls, 4: 1 in oligospermia, and 1: 2 in azoospermic subject.A significant inverse correlation was observed between serum selenium level and sperm count (p selenium correlated with spermatozoa motility, viability, and morphology. Serum selenium level shows positive correlation with the serum testosterone level (p selenium in serum and seminal plasma compartment of control males. A disturbance in this balance has a significant influence on spermatogenesis. Selenium appears to have a positive influence on Leydig cells, thus influencing the secretion of testosterone.

  17. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches for treatment of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolmohammadi-Vahid, Samaneh; Danaii, Shahla; Hamdi, Kobra; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Ahmadi, Majid; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important reasons of infertility and human reproductive failure is related to uncontrolled immunological response of maternal immune system to early embryo or fetus, that cause rejection of this semi-allograft. Therefore, a tolerance in the immune system is essential to modulate the reactions against the fetus to avoid rejection. The immune system imbalance during implantation or pregnancy may lead to implantation failure or miscarriage. So, use of immunosuppressive or immunomodulator agents can be helpful to prevent immunological attack. Initially, there was a focus on steroids like prednisolone or intralipids in treatment of miscarriage that suppressed the activity of most immune cells, Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) was then introduced with various mechanisms. Nowadays, novel and specific strategies are established such as monoclonal antibodies and cytokines. More recently, Tacrolimus and Cyclosporine, which were utilized in prevention of transplantation reject, are used as immunosuppressive factors in modulation of immune responses against the fetus. This review is focused on the main immunotherapeutic methods of infertility treatment.

  18. SERUM PROLACTIN ASSAY: AN IMPORTANT SCREENING METHOD IN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY INFERTILITY IN FEMALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjaya

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Infertility represents a common condition nowadays with important medical, economic and psychological implications. Traditionally, measurement of Prolactin has been considered an important component of infertility workup in women. AIMS The study was designed to evaluate the serum prolactin assay in patients with primary and secondary infertility. METHOD In this retrospective case control study, we investigated one fifty (150 infertile women in the age range of 20-40 years attending Department of Obs. and Gynae. MLB Medical College, Jhansi, for infertility treatment. Fifty (50 fertile women with similar age range were selected as controls. The association between infertility and levels of serum Prolactin was reviewed. RESULTS Hyperprolactinemia was depicted in 24.66% infertile women. Prevalence of primary infertility was 68%, while that of secondary infertility cases was 32%. There was a correlation between Prolactin levels in infertile subjects (p <0.05. CONCLUSION There was higher prevalence of hyperprolactinemia in infertile patients

  19. Female Infertility and Serum Auto-antibodies: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroux, Alban; Dumestre-Perard, Chantal; Dunand-Faure, Camille; Bouillet, Laurence; Hoffmann, Pascale

    2016-09-14

    On average, 10 % of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Auto-immune disease (systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome) accounts for a part of these cases. In the last 20 years, aspecific auto-immunity, defined as positivity of auto-antibodies in blood sample without clinical or biological criteria for defined diseases, has been evoked in a subpopulation of infertile women. A systematic review was performed (PUBMED) using the MESH search terms "infertility" and "auto-immunity" or "reproductive technique" or "assisted reproduction" or "in vitro fertilization" and "auto-immunity." We retained clinical and physiopathological studies that were applicable to the clinician in assuming joint management of both infertility associated with serum auto-antibodies in women. Thyroid auto-immunity which affects thyroid function could be a cause of infertility; even in euthyroidia, the presence of anti-thyroperoxydase antibodies and/or thyroglobulin are related to infertility. The presence of anti-phospholipid (APL) and/or anti-nuclear (ANA) antibodies seems to be more frequent in the population of infertile women; serum auto-antibodies are associated with early ovarian failure, itself responsible for fertility disorders. However, there exist few publications on this topic. The methods of dosage, as well as the clinical criteria of unexplained infertility deserve to be standardized to allow a precise response to the question of the role of serum auto-antibodies in these women. The direct pathogenesis of this auto-immunity is unknown, but therapeutic immunomodulators, prescribed on a case-by-case basis, could favor pregnancy even in cases of unexplained primary or secondary infertility.

  20. Increasing trend of prevalence of infertility in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hongxia; Wang Shuyu; Zhang Songwen; Wang Tao; Deng Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Background Infertility is one of the most important and underappreciated reproductive health problems in developing countries.However,epidemiological data in the Chinese population are still sparse.The aim of the present study was to determine the current prevalence and prevalence trend of infertility in Beijing,and to identify the risk factors associated with infertility.Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in Beijing in 2012.A stratified cluster sampling method was used to select 12 448 couples of whom the female partners were born between 1955 and 1985.All subjects were interviewed face to face.Infertility was defined as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse.Results Of the 12 448 couples,12 342 (99.1%) answered the questions appropriately.The prevalence of infertility was 4.2% (3.1% as primary and 1.1% as secondary infertility).An increase in the prevalence of infertility according to the age of the female partner was found:1.3% infertility for married females born in the 1950s and 11.4% for married females born in the 1980s.The increase was found in both urban and suburban areas.In addition,a Logistic regression showed that for the female partner,higher education levels,an older age at first marriage,adverse occupational conditions,mental labor and pre-pregnancy contraception after marriage were all significantly associated with a higher risk of infertility.Conclusion The prevalence of infertility has increased significantly among couples in Beijing,possibly because of an interaction among multiple factors.

  1. Knowledge of Men and Women about Infertility Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirreza Talaiekhozani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With technological developments, creation of new industries and changing lifestyles, infertility risk factors (IRF increased. Therefore creation of suitable solutions in society is crucial for the prevention of infertility. Since prevention of infertility in a society is directly related to awareness about infertility, in the present study the awareness of people about infertility risk factors was assessed. In this study, a survey questionnaire containing 24 factors related to IRF was developed and 170 persons (62 men and 108 women from Fooladshahr, Najafabad and Mobarakeh participated and data were extracted from these questionnaires and were statistically analyzed. Our study showed that average infertility awareness for men and women is 38% and 49% respectively. Also overall awareness was 44%. Also results showed that women’s awareness about mobile radiation and fast foods is significantly higher than men. On the other hand men have significantly higher awareness about adverse effects of chlorine in swimming pool on fertility. Higher women awareness may be related to their higher sensitivity for fertility. Also, generally a higher level of awareness was observed relating to mobile, air pollution, stress, fast foods, smoking and alcohol. Women have a higher level of awareness about infertility risk factors. Higher awareness about some IRFs may be results from widespread media coverage.

  2. Investigation of male infertility using quantitative comparative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, Christine; Droit, Arnaud; Fournier, Frédéric; Bourassa, Sylvie; Force, André; Cloutier, Francine; Tremblay, Roland; Sullivan, Robert

    2014-12-05

    Male factors account for 40% of infertility cases. The identification of differentially expressed proteins on spermatozoa from fertile and infertile men can help in the elucidation of the molecular basis of male infertility. The aim of this study was to compare sperm proteomes from 3 different groups: fertile men, normozoospermic men consulting for infertility, and normozoospermic men with an impaired capacity for fertilization (IVF-failure). We used differential proteomics with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling, and LC-MS analysis to identify proteins that are differentially expressed. A total of 348 unique proteins were identified and quantified. The analysis identified 33 proteins that were differentially expressed in the IVF-failure group vs the fertile group. Comparison of the infertile and fertile groups revealed that 18 proteins appeared to be differentially expressed. Four proteins were similarly altered in the IVF-failure and infertile groups: semenogelin 1 (SEMG1), prolactin-induced protein (PIP), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS), and phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2). These protein markers were selected for validation using multiple reactions monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) and further confirmed by Western blot analysis. Overall, these results suggest that a panel of proteins may be used as biomarkers for future studies of infertility.

  3. A Sectional Study: The Relationship between Perceived Social Support and Depression in Turkish Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubra Erdem

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies conducted on infertile women in the literature investigated some features such as depression, anxiety, loneliness, and social support. However, there has been no study examining the relationship between levels of perceived social support and depression in infertile women. Considering this deficiency, the study was conducted to determine the relationship between perceived social support and depression in infertile women. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between perceived social support and depression in infertile women. Materials and Methods: This descriptive and sectional study was conducted between 16 April and 31 October 2012 in in vitro fertilisation (IVF Centre of Fırat University Research Hospital. Sampling formula was used in cases when the number of elements in the population was not known to calculate minimum sample size required to be included in the study. A total of 238 women who applied to the relevant centre between the specified dates constituted the sample group of the study. A Questionnaire Form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS were used to collect the data. A pilot study was carried out on nine infertile women. As a result of the pilot study, we formed the final version of the Questionnaire Form. The data of these nine women were not involved in the research. The data obtained from the study was assessed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA version 15.0. Percentage distribution, mean, t test, one-way analysis of variance (One-Way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation analysis were used to evaluate the data. Results: The women’s total mean score on the BDI was 12.55 ± 8.07. Scores obtained by women on the MSPSS was 15.75 ± 8.53 for the subscale of friend, 21.52 ± 8.20 for the subscale of family, and 15.62 ± 8.45 for the subscale of significant others. The women’s total

  4. Swyer syndrome presenting as primary infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Chauhan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Swyer syndrome was first described by Jim Swyer in 1955. It is a form of and ldquo;Pure gonadal dysgenesis and rdquo;. The affected female has 46, XY karyotype. A 21 year old married female came with complaints of primary infertility. On examination she has normal built with normal secondary sexual characteristics. She had normal vaginal opening with small uterus. Serum FSH was 71.54 mIU/ml. Thyroid and Prolactin was in normal range. Karyotype showed genotype of 46, XY. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed streak gonads, small uterus, and normal patent fallopian tubes. Diagnosis of Swyer syndrome was made. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 499-501

  5. Androgen receptor roles in spermatogenesis and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-08-01

    Androgens such as testosterone are steroid hormones essential for normal male reproductive development and function. Mutations of androgen receptors (AR) are often found in patients with disorders of male reproductive development, and milder mutations may be responsible for some cases of male infertility. Androgens exert their action through AR and its signalling in the testis is essential for spermatogenesis. AR is not expressed in the developing germ cell lineage so is thought to exert its effects through testicular Sertoli and peri-tubular myoid (PTM) cells. AR signalling in spermatogenesis has been investigated in rodent models where testosterone levels are chemically supressed or models with transgenic disruption of AR. These models have pinpointed the steps of spermatogenesis that require AR signalling, specifically maintenance of spermatogonial numbers, blood-testis barrier integrity, completion of meiosis, adhesion of spermatids and spermiation, together these studies detail the essential nature of androgens in the promotion of male fertility.

  6. Ozone Therapy in Treatment of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maradi A. Burduli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone therapy and physiotherapy have been successfully used in obstetric practice. The paper summarizes the results of studies on the use of ozone therapy in the postoperative rehabilitation of gynecological patients operated on for female infertility of various origins. Biomechanisms systemic impact methods of ozone therapy on the human body to meet the requirements of the tactics of the impact on the etiopathogenic mechanisms of chronic inflammatory diseases of the pelvic organs and their complications. It is advisable to wider use of ozone therapy in the complex treatment standards gynecological patients. Postoperative rehabilitation, including ozone therapy, can have a significant impact on the clinical course of gynecological and extragenital pathology, pregnancy rate and its outcomes.

  7. Treating polycystic ovary syndrome and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Between 4% and 18% of women worldwide are affected by polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and have the hormonal imbalances that lead to the cascade of symptoms, including weight gain and obesity. One of the first suggested treatments for infertility associated with PCOS is weight reduction, which has been shown to increase the chance of spontaneous ovulation and menstruation. Pharmacologic treatment usually includes metformin alone or in conjunction with clomiphene; both have been shown to increase conception rates and decrease risk of preeclampsia once pregnancy is achieved. Limited research has been published about the efficacy of oral contraceptives in producing conception. If pregnancy still eludes women with PCOS after initial pharmacologic treatments, gonadotropin therapy by itself or in conjunction with assisted reproductive therapy is considered. These treatments come with higher expense, and increased risk, and require extensive counseling prior to implementation. Additional research is needed to better understand what risks exist for pregnant women with PCOS and for their newborns.

  8. Serum inhibin B values in infertile patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Kadyrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased interest in inhibin B generated by Sertoli cells is due to the fact that on the basis of findings, some authors recorded a relationship between the level of this hormone and infertility. The paper gives the results of an investigation of male sex hormones (inhibin B, follicle-stimulating and anti-Müllerian hormones in the serum of patients with azoospermia (Group 1, who had spermatogenesis, as evidenced by testicular biopsy, who had no spermatogenesis (Group 2, and who had oligoasthenozoospermia (Group 3. The investigation indicated that Group 1 had a normal inhibin B level that was more than twice lower in Group 2. In addition, the latter group was recorded to have elevated follicle-stimulating hormone levels and low anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations as compared to Group 1.

  9. Embryo splitting: a role in infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C

    2001-01-01

    Embryo splitting may be used to increase the potential fertility of couples requiring IVF. Using cattle as a model, it is possible to increase pregnancy rates from 70% per transfer of good quality in-vivo-produced embryos, to 110% by transferring the two demi-embryos resulting from the bisection of one embryo. The 30-40% greater chance of conception would reduce costs for the government, health authorities and patients, and reduce stress, time and complications for women having IVF treatment. Embryo splitting may also provide donor embryos for infertile couples that cannot conceive naturally or with IVF. The shortage of children for adoption and donor embryos may be overcome by the production of demi-embryos.

  10. Polycystic ovaries and infertility: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Rajashekar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common (15-20% endocrine disorders in women of childbearing age. Although it is a major cause of infertility, its etiology remains unknown and its treatment difficult. Aim: To evaluate the incidence, treatment and outcome of patients with PCOS. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: PCOS patients (914 of the 1057 attending the outpatient department (OPD from June 2003 to February 2008 were evaluated for this study. Of the 914 patients investigated, 814 came for treatment and these patients were studied for hormonal disturbances and their response to various modalities of treatment. Results: Of the 2270 infertility patients, 46.50% (1057 had PCOS, out of these, 86.47% (914 were investigated and 77% (814 came for treatment. Our overall pregnancy rate was 48.40% (394/814. The pregnancy rate per cycle with timed intercourse (TI was 44.77% (47/105, 17.09% (286/1673 with intrauterine insemination (IUI, 29.82% (51/171 with in vitro fertilization (IVF and 22.22% (10/45 with frozen embryo transfer (FET. The maximum number of pregnancies (85.29%, 284/333 were achieved in the first three treatment cycles. The abortion rate was 19.01% (73/384 and the incidence of ectopic pregnancy was 5.47% (21/384. Complications seen were in the form of ovarian hyperstimulation (OHSS, retention cyst on day two and multiple pregnancies in 11.71% (228/1946 of the total treatment cycles. Conclusion: Most PCOS symptoms could be adequately controlled or eliminated with proper diagnosis and treatment. Thus, ovulation induction (OI protocols and treatment modalities must be balanced for optimal results.

  11. Distributive justice and infertility treatment in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisker, Jeff

    2008-05-01

    An exploration of distributive justice in Canadian infertility treatment requires the integration of ethical, clinical, and economic principles. In 1971, American philosopher John Rawls proposed a theoretical model for fair decision-making in which "rational" and "self-interested" citizens are behind a "veil of ignorance" with respect to both their own position and the position of other decision-makers. Rawls proposed that these self-interested decision-makers, fearing that they are among the least advantaged persons who could be affected by the decision, will agree only upon rules that encode equality of opportunity and that bestow the greatest benefit on the least advantaged citizens. Regarding health policy decision-making, Rawls' model is best illustrated by Canadian philosopher Warren Bourgeois in his panel of "volunteers." These rational and self-interested volunteers receive an amnestic drug that renders them unaware of their health, social, and financial position, but they know that they are representative of diverse spheres of citizens whose well-being will be affected by their decision. After describing fair decision-making, Bourgeois considers the lack of a distributive justice imperative in Canada's Assisted Human Reproduction Act, in contrast to legislation in European nations and Australia, summarizes the economic and clinical considerations that must be provided to the decision-makers behind the "veil of ignorance" for fair decisions to occur, and considers altruism in relation to equality of access. He concludes by noting that among countries with legislation governing assisted reproduction Canada is alone in having legislation that is void of distributive justice in providing access to clinically appropriate infertility care.

  12. The impact of partner coping in couples experiencing infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, B D; Pirritano, M; Christensen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most studies examining coping with infertility use the individual as the unit of analysis. Although valuable, these studies fail to show the impact that partner coping has on individual distress. Since infertility is a shared stressor, examining the impact of partner coping...... was associated with decreased marital distress in men and increased social distress in women. CONCLUSIONS: Although understudied, partner coping patterns play a key role in a partner's ability to cope with the infertility experience. Physicians and mental health providers can help couples to understand...

  13. Need for accessible infertility care in Ghana: the patients’ voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Nana Yaw

    2016-01-01

    Abstract According to the Ghana Statistical Service (GSS) infertility and childlessness are the most important reason for divorce in Ghana. The traditional Ghanaian society is pro-natal and voluntary childlessness is very uncommon. Patient groups are almost non-existent in Sub-Saharan Africa, aggravating the situation of childless couples. Due to the lack of enough and affordable high quality infertility services, many women resort to traditional healing, witchcraft and spiritual mediation. Considering the severe sociocultural and economic consequences of childlessness, especially for women, there is an urgent need for accessible and affordable high quality infertility care in Ghana. PMID:27909570

  14. Anti-Müllerian hormone levels in salpingectomized compared with nonsalpingectomized women with tubal factor infertility and women with unexplained infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grynnerup, Anna Garcia-Alix Haugen; Lindhard, Anette; Sørensen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the consequence of salpingectomy on ovarian reserve by measuring anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels before in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment in salpingectomized women compared with nonsalpingectomized women with tubal factor infertility, women with unexplained infertility...

  15. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility ResearchDavid Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3 1Reproductive ...

  16. Bacterial agents as a cause of infertility in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Melania; Cannas, Sara; Cubeddu, Marina; Molicotti, Paola; Piras, Gennarina Laura; Dessole, Salvatore; Zanetti, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    Infertility is a problem affecting almost 15% of couples. There are many causes for this condition, among which urogenital bacterial infections seem to play an important role. Many studies have explained the mechanisms by which bacteria cause infertility both in men and women. Therefore we undertook this study to evaluate the presence of genito-urinary infections in infertile couples who sought counselling to investigate their condition. Microbiological analysis was performed on semen and vaginal/cervical samples of both partners of each couple. The percentage of individuals affected by a urogenital bacterial infection was between 14 and 20%. More significantly, most of the species isolated both in men and women have been described in the literature as potential causes of infertility.

  17. Surgical techniques for the management of male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalya A Lopushnyan; Thomas J Walsh

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation and surgical treatment of male infertility has evolved and expanded,now leading to more precise diagnoses and tailored treatments with diminished morbidity and greater success.Surgeries for male infertility are divided into four major categories:(i)diagnostic surgery; (ii) surgery to improve sperm production; (iii) surgery to improve sperm delivery; and (iv) surgery to retrieve sperm for use with in vitrofertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI).While today we are more successful than ever in treating male infertility,pregnancy is still not always achieved likely due to factors that remain poorly understood.Clinicians treating infertility should advocate for couple-based therapy,and require that both partners have a thorough evaluation and an informed discussion before undergoing specific surgical therapies.

  18. How Common is Male Infertility, and What Are Its Causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and what are its causes? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Infertility is defined clinically in women and men who cannot achieve pregnancy after 1 year of having intercourse without using ...

  19. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in etiopathogenesis of male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monis Bilal Shamsi

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: In the context of male infertility, mt mutations, generation of reactive oxygen species and lowered antioxidant capacity are interlinked and constitute a unified pathogenic molecular mechanism. In the era of assisted reproduction technique (ART, it is very important to distinguish between mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in sperm, as mtDNA mutations are better diagnostic and prognostic markers in infertile men opting for ART.

  20. Pituitary gonodal axis in fertile and infertile human males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafiez, A.A.; Mahmoud, K.Z.; Abbas, E.Z.; Halawa, F. (Cairo Univ. (Egypt))

    1984-08-01

    Radioimmunoassays of serum PRL, LH, FSH, testosterone and estradiol were performed in normal fertile subjects and infertile patients. The findings in the fertile group suggest that prolactin in human males has a role in steroidogenesis. Oligospermic and azospermic patients revealed hormonal patterns which were significantly higher than in the fertile group. Hyperprolactinemia was found in most cases of both infertile groups indicating that PRL has a significant role.

  1. Females become infertile as the stored sperm's oxygen radicals increase

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    International audience; AbstractPredicting infertility is central to reproductive biology, medicine and evolutionary biology. In-vitro studies suggest that oxidative sperm damage causes infertility. Oxidative sperm damage can be reduced via two fundamental pathways: the removal of oxygen radicals by antioxidants, or the interference with cell metabolism to reduce the formation of oxygen radicals. Oxidative damage protection of spermatozoa should evolve frequently, especially during female spe...

  2. The biology of infertility: research advances and clinical challenges

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Reproduction is required for the survival of all mammalian species, and thousands of essential ‘sex’ genes are conserved through evolution. Basic research helps to define these genes and the mechanisms responsible for the development, function and regulation of the male and female reproductive systems. However, many infertile couples continue to be labeled with the diagnosis of idiopathic infertility or given descriptive diagnoses that do not provide a cause for their defect. For other indivi...

  3. An Epidemiologic Survey of Infertility in Dalian District of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛秦生; 张党生; 赵珩; 徐苓; 徐人庆; 陈玉芬; 曲阿珠

    1994-01-01

    An epidemiologic survey of infertility was carried out in Dalian district from September to December 1989. A two-stage random sampling was used to select subjects. Date were collected by household, interview with standardized questionnaire.Quality control was strictly executed. The respondent rate was 96%. A total of 5 918 couples were included in the analysis. The prevalence of primary infertility was 1.01% in this district. There was no significant difference between urban and rural

  4. Evidence-Based Care for Couples With Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Eleanor L; Hershberger, Patricia E; Bergh, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    When couples cannot achieve pregnancy, they often seek health care from medical and nursing specialists. The care the couple receives begins with a thorough assessment to determine the possible cause of infertility and to plan appropriate care to ensure the best chance for the couple to have a biological child. In this article, we provide an overview of the etiology and evaluation of infertility, the various treatment options available, and the appropriate clinical implications.

  5. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic and retroperito......Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic...

  6. Prof. Li Yueqing's Experience in Treating Male Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Haisong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Prof. Li Yueqing (李曰庆), an expert in the Andriatry Department of Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine,has been engaged in medicine for 30 years, who has aprofound knowledge in TCM surgery, especially in treating andriatric diseases such as impotence,infertility, and prostatitis. The following is an introduction to Prof. Li's experience in treating male infertility.

  7. Hysteroscopic evaluation in infertile patients: a prospective study

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    Latika Sahu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hysteroscopy is the gold standard procedure for uterine cavity exploration. However, hysteroscopy is only recommended by the WHO when clinical or complementary exams (ultrasound, HSG suggest intrauterine abnormality or after in vitro fertilization failure. Nevertheless, many specialists feel that hysteroscopy is a more accurate tool. The aim of this prospective study is to assess the value of diagnostic hysteroscopy in a primary workup of infertility by describing hysteroscopy findings in a population of 324 infertile patients during 18 months (December 2010 - May 2012. Methods: We analysed prospectively 324 infertile patients in gynaecology OT setting. Diagnostic video-assisted hysteroscopy was performed using a flexible hysteroscope. Hysteroscopy was performed with a standard sequence, inspecting the endocervical canal, uterine cavity, endometrium, and tubal ostia and findings recorded. Results: Hysteroscopy was normal in 65.12% of patients. Cervico-isthmic abnormalities were present in 6.48% of patients with cervical stenosis being the major abnormality. Uterine cavity was normal in 86% of patients. Observed abnormalities were septate uterus in 10 cases, intrauterine synechiae in 16 cases, sub mucus myoma in 2 cases, deformed cavity in 10 cases and endometrial polyp in 2 cases. Ostial fibrosis was observed in 29 patients. Endometrial abnormalities (fibrosis, inflammation were observed in 30 patients. Seven patients turned out to be of genital tuberculosis with endometrial biopsy. No significance was found regarding the total number of intrauterine pathologies when comparing the groups of primary versus secondary infertility. Conclusions: Rates of abnormal findings in infertile patient who underwent diagnostic hysteroscopy was 34.88% in our study. Our data are an additional argument to suggest hysteroscopy as part of investigation in infertile woman. Routine diagnostic hysteroscopy should be part of an infertility workup in primary

  8. Correlation between HPV sperm infection and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yang; Chan-Wei Jia; Yan-Min Ma; Li-Ying Zhou; Shu-Yu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases which comprises a group of small DNA viruses that intect both cutaneous and mucous squamous epithelia.Liquid bead microarray technology (LBMA) were used to evaluate 24 HPV genotypes in confirmed fertile and infertile males of North China so that the effects of HPV infection on semen parameters and relationship with male infertility could be discussed.A total of 1138 subjects were recruited in this study; 142 were HPV-pesitive (12.48%).Among 523 confirmed fertile males,only 35 were HPV-positive (6.70%),and two of them had multiple infections.Among 615 infertile males,107 were HPV-positive (17.4%),and 29 of them had multiple infections.Infertile males had a relatively high HPV infection rate compared with confirmed fertile males.Sperm progpessive motility (PR) and the normal morphology rate were significantly decreased in HPV-positive subjects.HPV-45,HPV-52,HPV-18,HPV-59 and HPV-16 infections were more frequently in infertile males.Hence,HPV infection is closely related to male infertility which will decrease sperm PR and rnorphology.HPV-45,HPV-52,HPV-18,HPV-59 and HPV-16 infection seems to be major risk factors.

  9. Laparascopic ventrosuspension in infertile patients. A new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serour, G I; Hefnawi, F

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Falope-Ring via laparascopy to the round ligaments in 86 infertile patients, for correction of retroversion of the uterus. Diagnostic laparascopy was performed on 2600 cases of infertility at Al-Azhar University Teaching Hospitals during a 3-year period. Laparascopy was performed as a primary mehtod of investigation of infertility, after clinical examination and semen analysis in 866 patients. These included long term cases of infertility, late marriage and cases where pelvic pathology was suspected on clinical grounds. Laparascopy was used as a final line of investigation of infertility in 1734 patients. In 86 patients with retroverted uterus as the only abnormality deteched, ventrosuspension was performed via the laparascope, by applying Falope-Rings to the round ligaments. These patients were followed up for periods varying from 6 months to 2 years. Pregnancy occurred in 24 patients and improvement of backache, deep dysparunea, congestive dysmenorrhea and leukorrhea occurred in 88.37%, 83.72%, 72.05% and 68.76%, respectively. The technique described in this paper is simple, easy to learn, can be performed under general or local anesthesia and is performed during the laparascopic investigation of the infertile cases and thus does not add an extra risk of operation or cost to the patient.

  10. Induced Abortion and the Risk of Tubal Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between induced abortion and tubal infertility in Chengdu, China.Methods A 1 :2 case-control study was designed. Infertile women with bilateral tubal occlusion in the case group compared with two control groups: infertile control group with bilateral tubal patency and pregnant control group with currently pregnancy. Data were collected using questionnaires through face-to-face interviews, covering the subjects' demographic details and histories of gynecology and obstetrics. Adjusted odds ratio was calculated as a measure of the association using stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis.Results Induced abortion was not found to be associated with tubal infertility in the analysis including either the infertile controls or the pregnant controls, but other risk factors were found, such as history of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), lower abdominal surgeries, dysmenorrhea and pregnancy.Conclusion It is contended that facing an increasing trend of infertile cases with tubal occlusion in China, it is emphasized that special attention should paid to the long term impact of reproductive tract infection, especially, asymptomatic ones, rather than induced abortion.

  11. Infertility and assisted reproduction in Denmark. Epidemiology and psychosocial consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lone

    2006-11-01

    Clinically a couple is considered to be infertile after at least one year without contraception and without pregnancy. There was scant knowledge about the prevalences of infertility, involuntary childlessness and the seeking of fertility treatment and only few longitudinal studies about the psychosocial consequences of infertility and its treatment. This thesis is about the epidemiological aspects of infertility; the conceptualization and measurement of important psychosocial aspects of infertility; and a medical sociological analysis of the associations between these psychosocial variables among Danish women and men in fertility treatment. The thesis is based on nine papers. The three main purposes were: (i) to review critically, population based studies of infertility and medical care seeking in industrialised countries. Further, to examine these prevalences and subsequent motherhood among women in former assisted reproduction in a Danish population. (ii) To develop measures of psychosocial consequences of infertility: fertility problem stress, marital benefit, communication, coping strategies, attitudes to and evaluation of fertility treatment. (iii) To examine these phenomena and to analyse their interrelations among Danish women and men in fertility treatment. The thesis is based on four empirical studies: (i) The Women and Health Survey, a cross-sectional population-based study among 15-44 year old women (n=907, 25-44 year old) in Copenhagen County, 1989. (ii) The Psychosocial Infertility Interview Study, a qualitative interview study among 16 couples (n=2 participants) infertility treatment at The Fertility Clinic, Herlev University Hospital,1992. (iii) The Infertility Cohort, a longitudinal cohort study consecutively including all couples (n=250 participants) beginning anew fertility treatment period at one of four public (Braedstrup, Herlev, Odense, Rigshospitalet) and one private fertility clinic (Trianglen),2000-2002. (iv) The Communication and Stress

  12. [Association study of telomere length with idiopathic male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuyuan, Liu; Changjun, Zhang; Haiying, Peng; Xiaoqin, Huang; Hao, Sun; Keqin, Lin; Kai, Huang; Jiayou, Chu; Zhaoqing, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Telomeres are evolutionary conserved, multifunctional DNA-protein complexes located at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres maintain chromosome stability and genome integrity and also play an important role in meiosis which aid in synapsis, homologous recombination, and segregation. Sperm telomere has been reported to play an important role in fertilization and embryo development. Nowadays, the association between telomere and reproduction is one of the major areas of interest, however whether sperm telomere associated with male infertility is not clear. In this study, in order to find out the association between Chinese idiopathic infertility and sperm telomere length, we analyzed the difference of sperm telomere length between idiopathic infertile men and normal fertile men, as well as the correlations between sperm telomere length and human semen characteristics. We analyzed 126 Chinese idiopathic infertile men and 138 normal fertile men for sperm telomere length by using quantitative PCR. We found that the relative sperm mean telomere length of infertile men was significantly shorter than that of fertile men (2.894 ± 0.115 vs. 4.016 ± 0.603, P=5.097 x 10⁻⁵). Both sperm count and semen progressive motility are related with telomere length. Our results suggest that sperm telomere length is associated with idiopathic male infertility of China and we proposed the possibility that shorter telomeres in sperm chromosome will reduce spermatogenesis and sperm functions, which finally affected the fertility of male.

  13. Pilot prevalence evaluation of Chlamydia Trachomatis by PCR in female infertile referred to study center of infertility in Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Goshayeshi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most common diseases as sexually transferred in world. According to the World Health Organization statistics, approximately 92 million new Chlamydia trachomatis infection occur in the world. Chlamydia trachomatis (CT is the cause of tubal obstruction, ectopic pregnancy and infertility in women. The aim of this study is prevalence evaluation of Chlamydia Trachomatis by PCR in female infertile referred to Montasarieh study center of infertility in Mashhad. Materials and Methods: The cervical swab specimens were collected from 100 infertile (as case and 30 fertile (as control group women attending to the infertility center of Mash-had Medical University. DNA extraction was performed from clinical specimens using DNA extraction kit. In this study, in addition to PCR reaction by commercial kit, PCR test was performed using specific primers and probe for CTCP gene. Results: The results of PCR reaction using the kit was match with PCR test and showed that the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis is 21% in infertile women and 3.3% in normal fertile women that was statistically significant (p=0.024. Conclusion: Considering the high sensitivity of PCR method for diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis infection, this method can be useful for routine screening.

  14. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

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    Saeid Reza Khatami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The androgen receptor (AR gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (NTAD. We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12 of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdeletions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12 patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26 and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25 in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%, while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%. Conclusion: Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran.

  15. STUDY OF GENITAL TUBERCULOSIS IN INFERTILE WOMEN

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    Shrikant

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM To determine the incidence of female Genital Tuberculosis (GTB and to analyse clinicopathological features for GTB and comparison of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR, Acid Fast Bacillus (AFB staining and Histopathology (HPR. STUDY SETTING A prospective study conducted on 50 infertile patients in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Krishna Hospital, Karad, for a period of 2 years between December 2013 and December 2015. METHODS Patients were investigated for the presence of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (MTB on samples collected by endometrial curettage by PCR, AFB and HPR. Additional tests like Hysterosalpingography (HSG Laparoscopic chromopertubation and hysteroscopy were performed if not done earlier. RESULT PCR demonstrated MTB DNA in 9 patients, and 2 were positive with AFB and HPR. Within positive patients HSG findings were suggestive of TB in 3 cases and laparoscopy in 5 cases and hysteroscopy in 4 cases. Two MTB PCR positive patients conceived spontaneously after 6 months of anti-tubercular treatment. CONCLUSION Genital tuberculosis is a diagnostic challenge if untreated it is chronic, progressive and destructive disease. Early diagnosis is crucial because once the infection damages the tubes, reverting tubal patency is very difficult. Molecular tests like DNA PCR have enabled us to detect the organism in its latent stage and initiation of treatment early in the disease can prevent many irreversible changes in the female genital tract.

  16. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms “IBD AND male infertility”, “Crohn’s disease AND male infertility”, “ulcerative colitis AND male infertility”. References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, smoking, medications, and surgery may cause infertility in men with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, rectal incision seems to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the medications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces male fertility. No other medications appear to affect male fertility significantly, although small studies suggested some adverse effects. There are limited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on male fertility and pregnancy outcomes; however, patients should be informed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides information on fertility-related issues in men with IBD and discusses treatment options. PMID:27602237

  17. Efficacy of aphrodisiac plants towards improvement in semen quality and motility in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ghanashyam Keshav; Mahajan, Arun Yashwant; Mahajan, Raghunath Totaram

    2012-02-17

    Infertility is the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse. In the present study, herbal composition prepared by using medicinal plants having aphrodisiac potentials was administered orally to the albino rats for 40 days and to the oligospermic patients for 90 days in order to prove the efficacy of herbal composition. Herbal composition was the mixture (powder form) of the medicinal plants namely, Mucuna pruriens (Linn), Chlorophytum borivillianum (Sant and Fernand), and Eulophia campestris (Wall). In the neem oil treated albino rats, there was significant reduction in almost all the parameters viz. body weight, testes and epididymes weight, sperm density and motility, serum levels of testosterone, FSH, and LH compared with control rats. Treatment with said herbal composition for 40 days results significant increased in the body weight, testis, and epididymes weight in rats. Concomitantly the sperm motility and the sperm density were significantly increased. After 90 days of treatment with this herbal composition, sperm density vis-a-vis motility was increased in oligozoospermic patients as a result of elevation in serum testosterone levels. No side effects were noticed during the entire duration of the trial.

  18. Mental health status of infertile couples based on treatment outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Baghianimoghadam

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is accompanied by numerous psychological and social problems. Infertile couples are more anxious and emotionally distressed than other fertile people. Previous studies suggested that infertility is more stressful for women than men. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the status of general health of infertile couples. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study evaluated general health of 150 infertile couples attending to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility that were selected consequently. The data were gathered by the researchers, based on face to face interview before and after three months of treatment by two questionnaires. The first questionnaire had questions on demographic information and the second one was the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28. This questionnaire has four sub- scales areas. All data were transferred directly to SPSS 15 and analyzed. Results: The mean age of women was 28.3 and men were 32.4 years. The scores for all sub- scales of GHQ in women were more than men. There was significant difference between age and general health at physical symptoms scales (p=0.002, anxiety and sleep disorders (p=0.003. The age group 25-29 years had higher scores (more than 7 than other age groups. There was significant difference between the scale of social dysfunction and results of treatment. Conclusion: Our results, similar to the previous studies have revealed negetive social and mental effects of infertility on women is more than men, so there is need that they be educated specially.

  19. Prevalence of Primary Infertility in Iran in 2010.

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    Mohammad Mehdi Akhondi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is one of the most significant medical, as well as social problems that affect psychological health of families and societies. Determining the prevalence of infertility is important for evaluating the potential of fertility. There are different reports on the prevalence of infertility in Iran, but the current research employs fertility history in order to provide an unbiased estimation of primary infertility.Data from a national survey of Iranian women aged 20-40 years was used in this study in year 2011. Totally, 1011 clusters were randomly selected according to post office codes, proportional to the population of the province. We evaluated the history of fertility as the basis for gathering information. Accordingly, we designed a questionnaire. Subsequently, we recruited and trained nurses and obstetricians to call on married women to fill the questionnaires. Primary infertility refers to a condition in which couples have not been able to conceive a child after one year of un-protected intercourse.In this research, we questioned 17187 women in 1011 clusters. The mean age of the women at the time of their marriage was 20.1, and that of their husbands was 25.4 years. The mean age of women at the time of their first pregnancy was 21.1. This research revealed the prevalence of primary infertility to be 20.2% in Iran.The prevalence of primary infertility in Iran seems to be higher than the world average. Therefore, it is crucially important to support the large number of couples who face this problem.

  20. Quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, P; Ishrat, S; Rahman, D; Banu, J; Deeba, F; Begum, N; Anwary, S A; Hossain, H B

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is an important health issue which has been neglected in the developing countries. First test-tube babies (triplet) in Bangladesh were born on 30th May, 2001. Although there is no tertiary level infertility center in the public sector, several private centers have come up with the facilities. The objective of the study was to find i) the quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh and ii) the cause of infertility in the attending patients iii) the treatment seeking behaviors iv) and the reasons for not taking treatment among the attending patients. There are now 10 tertiary level Infertility centers in Bangladesh. The information was collected in a preformed datasheet about the facilities and the profile of the patients and the treatment seeking behavior of the attending patients. Out of the ten centers two centers refused to respond and did not disclose their data. Around 16700 new patients are enrolled in a year in the responsive clinics. Five percent (5%) of the patients underwent ART, 7% of the patients gave only one visit, 84% of the patients completed their evaluation, 76% of the patients took treatment. Causes of infertility in the patients taking treatment were male factor in 36.4%, bilateral tubal block in 20.2%, PCOS and anovulation in 31.7%, endometriosis in 19.6%, unexplained in 10.95, combined in 3.5%, ovarian failure in 1.4%, testicular failure in 0.33%, congenital anomaly in 0.3%. The main reason for not taking treatment was financial constrainment. The quality and quantity of infertility care is dependent on the available resources and on the use of the resources by the patients. In developing countries the resources are merging and confined to specified areas which cannot meet the demand of their population. The study gives us the idea of the need and the demand of the services in the country.

  1. Seminal biomarkers for the evaluation of male infertility

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    Jared M Bieniek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For men struggling to conceive with their partners, diagnostic tools are limited and often consist of only a standard semen analysis. This baseline test serves as a crude estimation of male fertility, leaving patients and clinicians in need of additional diagnostic biomarkers. Seminal fluid contains the highest concentration of molecules from the male reproductive glands, therefore, this review focuses on current and novel seminal biomarkers in certain male infertility scenarios, including natural fertility, differentiating azoospermia etiologies, and predicting assisted reproductive technique success. Currently available tests include antisperm antibody assays, DNA fragmentation index, sperm fluorescence in situ hybridization, and other historical sperm functional tests. The poor diagnostic ability of current assays has led to continued efforts to find more predictive biomarkers. Emerging research in the fields of genomics, epigenetics, proteomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics holds promise for the development of novel male infertility biomarkers. Seminal protein-based assays of TEX101, ECM1, and ACRV1 are already available or under final development for clinical use. Additional panels of DNA, RNA, proteins, or metabolites are being explored as we attempt to understand the pathophysiologic processes of male infertility. Future ventures will need to continue data integration and validation for the development of clinically useful infertility biomarkers to aid in male infertility diagnosis, treatment, and counseling.

  2. Evaluation on Sperm Acrosome Integrity of Infertile Men with Varicocele

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Tzvetkova; Wei-jie ZHU; Jing LI; D.Tzvetkov

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the sperm acrosome integrity of samples from infertile men with varicocele.Methods Forty-nine infertile men with varicocele were divided into three groups according to the grade of varicocele. Group A (grade Ⅰ), B (grade Ⅱ), and C (grade Ⅲ) consisted of 15, 18, and 16 cases, respectively. Besides, 15 semen samples from normospermic donors were used as the control. The acrosome integrity of sperm was examined with fluorescein-labeled Pisum sativum agglutinin. Acrosomal ultrastructure was observed with transmission electron microscopy.Results In three varicocele groups, most samples had high sperm abnormal morphology rates. There were significant differences in acrosome integrity rates between each varicocele group and the control (P<0.01). Group C had the lowest acrosome integrity rate among the three groups. Ultrastructural observation showed that acrosome malformations revealed acrosomal membranes defects, swelling, hypoplasia, and dissolution of the matrix.Conclusions Infertile men with varicocele had low level of acrosome integrity. Severe varicocele for infertile men might be associated with severe acrosomal defects. Evaluating sperm acrosome should aid the understanding of the sperm structural state and benefit the treatment for infertile men.

  3. The biology of infertility: research advances and clinical challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzuk, Martin M; Lamb, Dolores J

    2013-01-01

    Reproduction is required for the survival of all mammalian species, and thousands of essential ‘sex’ genes are conserved through evolution. Basic research helps to define these genes and the mechanisms responsible for the development, function and regulation of the male and female reproductive systems. However, many infertile couples continue to be labeled with the diagnosis of idiopathic infertility or given descriptive diagnoses that do not provide a cause for their defect. For other individuals with a known etiology, effective cures are lacking, although their infertility is often bypassed with assisted reproductive technologies (ART), some accompanied by safety or ethical concerns. Certainly, progress in the field of reproduction has been realized in the twenty-first century with advances in the understanding of the regulation of fertility, with the production of over 400 mutant mouse models with a reproductive phenotype and with the promise of regenerative gonadal stem cells. Indeed, the past six years have witnessed a virtual explosion in the identification of gene mutations or polymorphisms that cause or are linked to human infertility. Translation of these findings to the clinic remains slow, however, as do new methods to diagnose and treat infertile couples. Additionally, new approaches to contraception remain elusive. Nevertheless, the basic and clinical advances in the understanding of the molecular controls of reproduction are impressive and will ultimately improve patient care. PMID:18989307

  4. [Infertility over forty: Pros and cons of IVF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaisch-Allart, J; Maget, V; Mayenga, J-M; Grefenstette, I; Chouraqui, A; Belaid, Y; Kulski, O

    2015-09-01

    The population attempting pregnancy and having babies is ageing. The declining fertility potential and the late age of motherhood are increasing significantly the number of patients over forty consulting infertility specialists. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) cannot compensate the natural decline in fertility with age. In France, in public hospital, ART is free of charge for women until 43 years, over 43, social insurance does not reimburse ART. Hence, 43 years is the usual limit, but between 40 and 42 is ART useful? The answer varies according to physicians, couples or society. On medical level, the etiology of the infertility must be taken into account. If there is an explanation to infertility (male or tubal infertility) ART is better than abstention. If the infertility is only due to age the question is raised. In France, the reimbursement by the society of a technique with very low results is discussed. However efficacy is not absolutely compulsory in Medicine. On the opposite to give false hopes may be discussed too. To obtain a reasonable consensus is rather difficult.

  5. The role of Tadalafil in treatment of infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgio Cavallini; Giulio Biagiotti

    2012-01-01

    Objective: It was the aim of this research to assess whether Tadalafil 5 mg once daily can improves the sperm count of unexplained infertile males with erectile deficiency induced by the emotional stress of attempting to father children. Methods: Two groups, each made up of 30 unexplained infertile males with psychogenic erectile deficiency related to attempts to father children received Tadalafil 5 mg once daily (Group 1) or a placebo (Group 2) for one month. Unexplained infertile men are intended as normospermic men who could not father children over a one year period and whose female partner is free of factors causing infertility. The endpoints were:differences between the groups in restoring erectile response, modifying sperm count, side effects and modifications of sperm analyses with respect to resolution or not of the erectile deficiency irrespective of the substance (Tadalafil or placebo) used. The means were compared using analysis of variance and the percentages using the chi square test. Results:The patients who received Tadalafil had their sperm volume, concentration and motility increased, but not the percentage of typical forms. Patients who received a placebo had no significant improvement. Additional analyses indicated that sperm volume, concentration and motility (but not morphology) significantly increased only in the patients who restored erectile response to sexual stimulation, independently of Tadalafil or placebo administration. No significant side effects were present. Conclusions: It is thought that therapies aimed at removing emotional stress linked to the performance anxiety of fathering children might improve sperm count in unexplained infertile couples.

  6. Genotyping of Israeli infertile men with idiopathic oligozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madgar, I; Green, L; Kent-First, M; Weissenberg, R; Gershoni-Baruch, R; Goldman, B; Friedman, E

    2002-09-01

    Microdeletions of the long arm of the Y chromosome involving the azoospermia factor (AZF) region are associated with severe oligo- or azoospermia. Abnormal androgen receptor (AR) structure or function has also been implicated in male infertility. To assess the contribution of these genetic defects to male infertility, 61 Israeli men with severe oligo- (n = 15) or azoospermia (n = 46), were screened for Y chromosome microdeletions, and the AR-(CAG)n repeat length. Fifty fertile Israeli men were similarly analyzed. PCR amplification of 20-54 simple tag sequences (STSs) located at Yq was used to determine the rate and extent of Y chromosome microdeletions. PCR with primers flanking the AR-(CAG)n region and subsequent size fractionation on gradient acrylamide gels were used to determine AR-(CAG)n length. Five azoospermic individuals (5/61-8.2% and 5/46-10.8% of azoospermic patients) displayed Y chromosome microdeletions. The mean CAG repeat number in infertile men was 18.6 +/- 3.0 compared with 16.6 + 2.7 in fertile men (n = 50), a statistically significant difference (p = 0.003). Y chromosome microdeletions contribute to male infertility in our azoospermic population, and the mean length of the AR-CAG is significantly longer in our infertile population than in fertile men.

  7. Anatomical causes of female infertility and their management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrao, Mauricio S; Muzii, Ludovico; Marana, Riccardo

    2013-12-01

    The main female anatomical causes of infertility include post-infectious tubal damage, endometriosis, and congenital/acquired uterine anomalies. Congenital (septate uterus) and acquired (myomas and synechiae) diseases of the uterus may lead to infertility, pregnancy loss, and other obstetric complications. Pelvic inflammatory disease represents the most common cause of tubal damage. Surgery still remains an important option for tubal factor infertility, with results in terms of reproductive outcome that compare favorably with those of in vitro fertilization. Endometriosis is a common gynecologic condition affecting women of reproductive age, which can cause pain and infertility. The cause of infertility associated with endometriosis remains elusive, suggesting a multifactorial mechanism involving immunologic, genetic, and environmental factors. Despite the high prevalence of endometriosis, the exact mechanisms of its pathogenesis are unknown. Specific combinations of medical, surgical, and psychological treatments can ameliorate the quality of life of women with endometriosis. In the majority of cases, surgical treatment of endometriosis has promoted significant increases in fertilization rates. There are obvious associations between endometriosis and the immune system, and future strategies to treat endometriosis might be based on immunologic concepts.

  8. The prevalence of Y chromosome microdeletions in Pakistani infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Tabassum Siddiqui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microdeletions of the azoospermia factor locus of the long arm of Y chromosome are an etiological factor of severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in AZF region and their role in infertility in Pakistani population. Materials and Methods: The type of deletions in AZF locus were detected in infertile men (n=113 and the association of Y chromosome microdeletions with male infertility was assessed by including men (50 with normal karyotype and having children. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by multiplex PCR using 10 sequence tagged sites namely sY81, sY130, sY141, sY142, sY155, sY157, sY160, sY182, sY231, and sY202 that covered all three regions of AZF. Results: Individuals with severe oligozoospermia showed 2.86% deletion frequency in AZFc region as compared to azoospermic males (5.5%. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that deletions in Y chromosome are not playing major part in male infertility. Moreover, multiplex-PCR strategy might preferably be employed for the detection of Y chromosome microdeletions allied to male infertility.

  9. A case-control study identifying chromosomal polymorphic variations as forms of epigenetic alterations associated with the infertility phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Athalye, Arundhati S; Madon, Prochi F

    2009-01-01

    To study the association of chromosomal polymorphic variations with infertility and subfertility.......To study the association of chromosomal polymorphic variations with infertility and subfertility....

  10. Study of correlation of thyroid profile and clinical parameters in patients with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameswaramma K.

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Every infertile woman with ovulatory dysfunction should also investigated thyroid profile along with other investigations, to open better prospects for such desperate infertile women. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(5.000: 1410-1413

  11. 2.5 Million U.S. Women Have Condition That Can Cause Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Million U.S. Women Have Condition That Can Cause Infertility Pelvic inflammatory disease often caused by sexually transmitted ... infection of the reproductive tract that can cause infertility and lasting abdominal pain, a new U.S. government ...

  12. Infertility in the light of new scientific reports – focus on male factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Szkodziak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data indicate that infertility is a problem of global proportions, affecting one- fifth of couples trying to conceive worldwide (60–80 mln. According to the trends observed, the problem is predicted to increase by another two million cases annually. In Poland, infertility-related issues are found in about 19% of couples, including 4% with infertility and 15% with limited fertility. Inability to conceive occurs equally in men and women (50%, irrespective of the direct cause. Although it is generally thought that reproductive issues concern women, infertility affects men and women equally. This study is an attempted to systematize knowledge about the role of the male factor in infertility, particularly current knowledge concerning the environmental factors of infertility. For this purpose, the Medline and CINAHL databases and the Cochrane Library was searched for articles published in English during the last 10 years, using the following keywords: infertility, male factor, semen examination and environmental factor of infertility.

  13. Ultrastructural Study of an Atypical Case of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Sánchez Sánchez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An atypical case of infertility associated with severe sperm abnormalities is presented. A 29-year-old man with 4 years of primary infertility had no history of significant illness, and no hereditary pathology or male infertility existed in his family. Physical examination of the patient showed no pathological findings. The analyses of four semen samples showed: sperm count, 67-83 106/ml; 0% motility. The morphological analysis showed absence of flagellum, 14-16%; short-tail spermatozoa, 45-64%; coiled tails, 12-17%; and an abnormal proportion of spermatids and spermatocytes. Normal spermatozoa were found in 11-16%. Endocrine profile was found within the normal range. Testicular biopsy revealed impaired spermatogenesis. Scanning electron microscopy revealed sperm heads with intact nuclei and acrosomal regions. To our surprise, some of the stunted tails were uniflagellate. To our knowledge, this is a very uncommon case of sperm tail defect.

  14. Epigenetic: A new approach to etiology of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia W. Lestari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a complex disease which could be caused by male and female factors. The etiology from both factors needs further study. There are some approaches to understanding the etiology of infertility, one of them is epigenetic. Epigenetic modifications consist of DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodelling. Male and female germinal cells undergo epigenetic modifications dynamically during differentiation into matured sperm and oocyte cells. In a male, the alteration of DNA methylation in spermatogenesis will cause oligo/asthenozoospermia. In addition, the histone methylation, acetylation, or other histone modification may lead sperm lose its ability to fertilize oocyte. Similarly, in a female, the alteration of DNA methylation and histone modification affects oogenesis, created aneuploidy in fertilized oocytes and resulted in embryonic death in the uterus. Alteration of these epigenetic modification patterns will cause infertility, both in male and female.

  15. A Review: Role of oxidative stress in male infertility

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    Hamed Fanaei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS have a very important role in the intracellular signaling process in physiological conditions. On the other hand, during the recent decade it has been indicated that ROS play a role in various types of male infertility and it is due to the overproduction of ROS or decrease in the antioxidant defense system in the reproductive system and sperm. In pathological conditions, ROS via interferences in the spermatogenesis process, sperm function, and sperm structure (motility, viability, acrosome reaction, sperm-oocyte fusion, and damage to DNA and cell membrane as well as reduction in fertilization and implantation can lead to infertility. Knowledge of how ROS affect the physiological process of the reproductive system is crucial in the treatment of infertility. Thus, in this review article we will discuss experimental and clinical findings related to the effects of ROS on male fertility.

  16. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of infertility among Saudi couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfotouh MA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa A Abolfotouh,1 Abdullah A Alabdrabalnabi,2 Rehab B Albacker,3 Umar A Al-Jughaiman,4 Samar N Hassan5 1King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2University of Dammam, College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 3King Saud University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4King Faisal University, College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 5Division of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: Infertility places a huge psychological burden on infertile couples, especially for women. Greater knowledge of the factors affecting fertility may help to decrease the incidence of infertility by allowing couples to avoid certain risk factors. The aim of our study was (1 to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infertile and fertile Saudi participants on infertility, possible risk factors, and social consequences; and (2 to determine the practices of infertile Saudi couples to promote their fertility before having them attend an in vitro fertilization (IVF clinic. Methods and materials: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 277 fertile participants from outpatient clinics and 104 infertile patients from the IVF clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City between June 24, 2012 and July 4, 2012, using a previously validated interview questionnaire. Descriptive and analytical statistics were applied with a significance threshold of P ≤ 0.05. Results: A generally poor level of knowledge (59% and a neutral attitude (76% toward infertility were reported by participants. Mistaken beliefs commonly held by the study participants regarding the causes of infertility were Djinns and supernatural causes (58.8%, black magic (67.5%, intrauterine devices (71.3%, and contraceptive pills (42.9%. The healer/Sheikh was reported as the primary and secondary preference for infertility

  17. Is infertility after surgery for cryptorchidism congenital or acquired?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Thorup, J M; Visfeldt, J

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated whether deletions of the DAZ (deleted in azoospermia) gene, abnormal karyotypes or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) were demonstrable in infertile men who had undergone surgery in childhood for cryptorchidism with a simultaneous testicular biopsy that demonstrated no or almost...... no germ cells. In six men with infertility after surgery for cryptorchidism, the adult karyotype and analyses for the DAZ gene, serum follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone were performed from a peripheral blood sample. Testicular volume was also measured. All patients...... exhibited a 46,XY karyotype. There were no deletions of the DAZ-gene, no HH and no testicular atrophy. The infertility was thus not proved to be congenital, and consequently, surgical treatment is indicated before the germ cells disappear from undescended testes. This appears to be before 15 months of age....

  18. Infertility in resource-constrained settings: moving towards amelioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarberg, Karin; Kirkman, Maggie

    2013-02-01

    It is often presumed that infertility is not a problem in resource-poor areas where fertility rates are high. This is challenged by consistent evidence that the consequences of childlessness are very severe in low-income countries, particularly for women. In these settings, childless women are frequently stigmatized, isolated, ostracized, disinherited and neglected by the family and local community. This may result in physical and psychological abuse, polygamy and even suicide. Attitudes among people in high-income countries towards provision of infertility care in low-income countries have mostly been either dismissive or indifferent as it is argued that scarce healthcare resources should be directed towards reducing fertility and restricting population growth. However, recognition of the plight of infertile couples in low-income settings is growing. One of the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals was for universal access to reproductive health care by 2015, and WHO has recommended that infertility be considered a global health problem and stated the need for adaptation of assisted reproductive technology in low-resource countries. This paper challenges the construct that infertility is not a serious problem in resource-constrained settings and argues that there is a need for infertility care, including affordable assisted reproduction treatment, in these settings. It is often presumed that infertility is not a problem in densely populated, resource-poor areas where fertility rates are high. This presumption is challenged by consistent evidence that the consequences of childlessness are very severe in low-income countries, particularly for women. In these settings, childless women are frequently stigmatized, isolated, ostracized, disinherited and neglected by the family and local community. This may result in physical and psychological abuse, polygamy and even suicide. Because many families in low-income countries depend on children for economic survival

  19. Effect of Palm Pollen on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekh, Athar; Jashni, Hojjatollah Karimi; Rahmanian, Karamatollah; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh

    2015-04-01

    There is a rapidly growing trend in the consumption of herbal remedies in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of orally administered Date Palm Pollen (DPP) on the results of semen analysis in adult infertile men. Forty infertile men participated in our study. They were treated by Pollen powder 120 mg kg(-1) in gelatinous capsules every other day, for two months. Before and at the end of therapy, the semen was collected after masturbation and sperm numbers, motility and morphology were determined. Our findings revealed that consumption of DPP improved the sperm count. The treatment was significantly increased sperm motility, morphology and forward progressive motility. Date palm pollen seems to cure male infertility by improving the quality of sperm parameters.

  20. In vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection for male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Merchant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the field of assisted reproduction, and particularly micromanipulation, now heralds a new era in the management of severe male factor infertility, not amenable to medical or surgical correction. By overcoming natural barriers to conception, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET, subzonal sperm insemination, partial zona dissection, and intracytoplasmatic injection of sperm (ICSI now offer couples considered irreversibly infertile, the option of parenting a genetically related child. However, unlike IVF, which necessitates an optimal sperm number and function to successfully complete the sequence of events leading to fertilization, micromanipulation techniques, such as ICSI, involving the direct injection of a spermatozoon into the oocyte, obviate all these requirements and may be used to alleviate severe male factor infertility due to the lack of sperm in the ejaculate due to severely impaired spermatogenesis (non-obstructive azoospermia or non-reconstructable reproductive tract obstruction (obstructive azoospermia. ICSI may be performed with fresh or cryopreserved ejaculate sperm where available, microsurgically extracted epididymal or testicular sperm with satisfactory fertilization, clinical pregnancy, and ongoing pregnancy rates. However, despite a lack of consensus regarding the genetic implications of ICSI or the application and efficacy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART, the widespread use of ICSI, increasing evidence of the involvement of genetic factors in male infertility and the potential risk of transmission of genetic disorders to the offspring, generate major concerns with regard to the safety of the technique, necessitating a thorough genetic evaluation of the couple, classification of infertility and adequate counseling of the implications and associated risks prior to embarking on the procedure. The objective of this review is to highlight the indications

  1. Enhanced Fertility after Diagnostic Hysterosalpingography in Unexplained Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fallah- Tafti

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infertility is a common complication present in 10-15% of the population. It causes serious problems for the family. There are different methods for evaluation and treatment of infertility. One of the routine tests is hysterosalpingography that was first used in1922 and with changes in types of contrast media and its techniques, it is the primary test for simultaneous evaluation of tube, uterus body and cervix. Methods: This descriptive clinical outcome study was carried out on the base of a case series study. The study was performed on 117 patients who referred for HSG procedure and were followed for 2 years for detection of pregnancy. Data was analyzed by SPSS.14, and statistical tests included student’s t-test, chi-square and Fisher exact test. Results: The mean age of patients was 26±4.7 years. Duration of infertility was 6 years. Of the total, 98(83.8% cases had one or both patent tubes on HSG. They didn’t have any established causes of infertility after scrutiny of other findings and 51(43.6% cases became pregnant during 2 years (CI=95%,34.6-52.6%. Notable point was that 86.3% of pregnancies occurred in the first 6-months after HSG procedure. Conclusion: HSG plays a significant role in infertility diagnosis and treatment in spite of the new techniques and methods for infertility diagnosis and treatment; so follow up and control of patient for 6 months after HSG is recommended. If HSG fails, other procedures such as laparoscopy can be done.

  2. MicroRNA and Male Infertility: A Potential for Diagnosis

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    Yahya Khazaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding single stranded RNA molecules that are physiologically produced in eukaryotic cells to regulate or mostly down-regulate genes by pairing with their complementary base-sequence in related mRNA molecules in the cytoplasm. It has been reported that other than its function in many physiological cell processes, dysregulation of miRNAs plays a role in the development of many diseases. In this short review, the association between miRNAs and some male reproductive disorders is surveyed. Male factor Infertility is a devastating problem from which a notable percentage of couples suffer. However, the molecular mechanism of many infertility disorders has not been clearly elucidated. Since miRNAs have an important role in numerous biological cell processes and cellular dysfunctions, it is of interest to review the related literature on the role of miRNAs in the male reproductive organs. Aberrant expression of specific miRNAs is associated with certain male reproductive dysfunctions. For this reason, assessment of expression of such miRNAs may serve as a suitable molecular biomarker for diagnosis of those male infertility disorders. The presence of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at the miRNAs’ binding site in its targeted mRNA has been reported to have an association with idiopathic male infertility. Also, a relation with male infertility has been shown with SNP in the genes of the factors necessary for miRNA biogenesis. Therefore, focusing on the role of miRNAs in male reproductive disorders can further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of male infertility and generate the potential for locating efficient biomarkers and therapeutic agents for these disorders.

  3. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with Endometriosis in Infertile Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Sadatmahalleh, Shahideh Jahanian; Akhoond, Mohammad Reza; Talebi, Mehrak

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometriosis affects women’s physical and mental wellbeing. Symptoms include dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain, and infertility. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between some relevant factors and symptoms and risk of an endometriosis diagnosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods A retrospective study of 1282 surgical patients in an infertility Institute, Iran between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated by laparoscopy. Of these, there were 341 infertile women with endometriosis (cases) and 332 infertile women with a normal pelvis (comparison group). Chi-square and t tests were used to compare these two groups. Logistic regression was done to build a prediction model for an endometriosis diagnosis. Results Gravidity [odds ratio (OR): 0.8, confidence interval (CI): 0.6-0.9, P=0.01], parity (OR: 0.7, CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01), family history of endometriosis (OR: 4.9, CI: 2.1-11.3, Pgalactorrhea (OR: 2.3, CI: 1.5-3.5, P=0.01), history of pelvic surgery (OR: 1.9, CI: 1.3-2.7, P0.05). Fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain and premenstrual spotting were more significant among late-stage endometriosis patients than in those with early-stage endometriosis and more prevalent among patients with endometriosis than that of the comparison group. In the logistic regression model, gravidity, family history of endometriosis, history of galactorrhea, history of pelvic surgery, dysmenorrhoea, pelvic pain, dysparaunia, premenstrual spotting, fatigue, and diarrhea were significantly associated with endometriosis. However, the number of pregnancies was negatively related to endometriosis. Conclusion Endometriosis is a considerable public health issue because it affects many women and is associated with the significant morbidity. In this study, we built a prediction model which can be used to predict the risk of endometriosis in infertile women. PMID:27123195

  4. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with Endometriosis in Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Ashrafi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endometriosis affects women’s physical and mental wellbeing. Symptoms include dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain, and infertility. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between some relevant factors and symptoms and risk of an endometriosis diagnosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 1282 surgical patients in an infertility Institute, Iran between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated by laparoscopy. Of these, there were 341 infertile women with endometriosis (cases and 332 infertile women with a normal pelvis (comparison group. Chi-square and t tests were used to compare these two groups. Logistic regression was done to build a prediction model for an endometriosis diagnosis. Results: Gravidity [odds ratio (OR: 0.8, confidence interval (CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01], parity (OR: 0.7, CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01, family history of endometriosis (OR: 4.9, CI: 2.1-11.3, P0.05. Fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain and premenstrual spotting were more significant among late-stage endometriosis patients than in those with early-stage endometriosis and more prevalent among patients with endometriosis than that of the comparison group. In the logistic regression model, gravidity, family history of endometriosis, history of galactorrhea, history of pelvic surgery, dysmenorrhoea, pelvic pain, dysparaunia, premenstrual spotting, fatigue, and diarrhea were significantly associated with endometriosis. However, the number of pregnancies was negatively related to endometriosis. Conclusion: Endometriosis is a considerable public health issue because it affects many women and is associated with the significant morbidity. In this study, we built a prediction model which can be used to predict the risk of endometriosis in infertile women.

  5. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management Therapy on Happiness among Infertile Women

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemi, F; A ALi poor; A Feili

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background & aim: infertility and the attitude of the society toward it, makes women and even men deal with many emotional disturbances. Infertile women tolerate more stress than fertile women. Stress can reduce the amount of happiness and mental health. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of stress management skills training (cognitive-behavioral) on happiness of infertile women. Methods: In this clinical-trial study, the cases of infertile women who were ref...

  6. Dimensions of neuroticism and androgeny: fertile versus infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasemi A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Infertility influences various aspects of a woman's personality and psyche, and affects her functions within her family and occupation, as well as her ability to communicate. Studies have shown that infertility is associated with depression, stress, anxiety, dissatisfaction with life and other psychological problems. The purpose of the present study was to compare the dimensions of neuroticism and androgyny in fertile, infertile and postmenopausal women."n"n Methods: This study included of 180 fertile, infertile and postmenopausal women (60 in each group selected from inpatients at Imam Khomeini and Mirza Koochak Khan Hospitals, Tehran, Iran, during 2004. Data were collected using the NEO Personality Inventory Neuroticism Scale and Bem Sex-Role Inventory and analyzed using the one-way ANOVA technique."n"n Results: LSD test results show that mean neuroticism scores were significantly different between the three groups, with scores following the trend: infertile women > postmenopausal women > fertile women. The mean androgyny scores were also significantly different between the three groups, following the trend: infertile women < postmenopausal women < fertile women (p<0

  7. Quantitative electron microscopic examination of sperm for male infertility diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Ye. Bragina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional study of spermogram readings is a main method for examination of male infertility. However, the spermogram readings may be considerably covered in the group of fertile and infertile men and fail to give a full insight into sperm fertilizing ability. In recent years, tests determining the functional properties of sperm have been intensively developed. This review considers a quantitative electron microscopic technique of sperm (EMTS, which assesses the structure and function of the sperm penetration and motor apparatus. The detection of sperm chromatin structural disorders can understand the causes of early embryonic malformation. Indications for EMTS and interpretation of its results are given.

  8. Quantitative electron microscopic examination of sperm for male infertility diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Ye. Bragina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The traditional study of spermogram readings is a main method for examination of male infertility. However, the spermogram readings may be considerably covered in the group of fertile and infertile men and fail to give a full insight into sperm fertilizing ability. In recent years, tests determining the functional properties of sperm have been intensively developed. This review considers a quantitative electron microscopic technique of sperm (EMTS, which assesses the structure and function of the sperm penetration and motor apparatus. The detection of sperm chromatin structural disorders can understand the causes of early embryonic malformation. Indications for EMTS and interpretation of its results are given.

  9. Genetic and epigenetic factors: Role in male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M B Shamsi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic factors contribute upto 15%-30% cases of male infertility. Formation of spermatozoa occurs in a sequential manner with mitotic, meiotic, and postmeiotic differentiation phases each of which is controlled by an intricate genetic program. Genes control a variety of physiologic processes, such as hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, germ cell development, and differentiation. In the era of assisted reproduction technology, it is important to understand the genetic basis of infertility to provide maximum adapted therapeutics and counseling to the couple.

  10. Psychological stress and infertility. Part 2: Psychometric test data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, H J

    1982-12-01

    The hypothesis tested in this study was that a group of female functional infertile patients would show significantly more personality maladjustment than a group with definite organic reproductive pathology and a normal fertile group. No significant differences between the functional and organic groups were found on any of the subscores of four personality questionnaires. The normal group (wives of sterile men) scored higher on extraversion than both the functional and organic groups. On self-control the normal group also scored lower (negative connotation) than the other two groups. In general no evidence for personality maladjustment in functional infertility was found.

  11. THE EFFECT OF THE MULTIGLYCOSIDES OF TRIPTERYGIUM WILFORDII ON THE HYPOTHALAMOPITUITARY-TESTIS AXIS OF MALE RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONGJian-Sun; QINJin-Xi; LIUXi-Guang; SUNYun-Tian; D.M.deKretser

    1989-01-01

    The multiglycosides of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. f. (GTW) is a Chinese herb medicine used traditionally for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, chronic nephritis and some skin diseases. It has been recently shown to cause infertility in men, male rats and

  12. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  13. Sperm DNA damage in men from infertile couples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juris Erenpreiss; Saad Elzanaty; Aleksander Giwercman

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the prevalence of high levels of sperm DNA damage among men from infertile couples with both normal and abnormal standard semen parameters. Methods: A total of 350 men from infertile couples were assessed. Standard semen analysis and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) were carried out. Results: Ninety-seven men (28% of the whole study group) had a DNA fragmentation index (DFI) > 20%, and 43 men (12%) had a DFI > 30%. In the group of men with abnormal semen parameters (n = 224), 35% had a DFI > 20%, and 16% had a DFI > 30%, whereas these numbers were 15% and 5%, respectively, in the group of men with normal semen parameters (n = 126). Men with low sperm motility and abnormal morphology had significantly higher odds ratios (Ors) for having a DFI > 20% (4.0 for motility and 1.9 for morphology) and DFI > 30% (6.2 for motility and 2.8 for morphology) compared with men with normal sperm motility and morphology. Conclusion: In almost one-third of unselected men from infertile couples, the DFI exceeded the level of 20% above which, according to previous studies, the in vivo fertility is reduced. A significant proportion of men with otherwise normal semen parameters also had high sperm DNA damage levels. Thus, the SCSA test could add to explaining causes of infertility in cases where semen analysis has not shown any deviation from the norm. We also recommend running the SCSA test to choose the appropriate assisted reproductive technique (ART).

  14. Study of semen parameters in male partners among infertile couples

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    Sheela N. Kulkarni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Semen analysis provides valuable information about the etiology and fertility potential of an infertile male. The study was conducted to determine the abnormalities in semen parameters of male partners of infertile couples and to find out contribution of male factors. Methods: The descriptive study with cross sectional design was conducted in the department of Pathology at MIMSR medical college, Latur, Maharashtra, India, between January 2013 to December 2014. A total of 220 cases were analyzed during this period. Semen analysis was performed according to the methods and the standards defined by World Health Organisation (WHO 5th edition 2010. Results: Out of 220 male partners of infertile couples 96 (43.6% men had abnormal semen parameters. The male factor was responsible in 43.6% of cases. Asthenozoospermia constitutes maximum of 19.9%, followed by Oligozoospermia in 18.6%, Azoospermia in 10.9%, Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia in 7.3% and Oligoasthenozoospermia in 6.8% cases. Leucocytospermia was detected in 15.5% cases. Conclusions: Abnormal semen quality remains a significant contribution to overall infertility. Asthenozoospermia is the most common semen abnormality seen. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(4.000: 1016-1019

  15. Male factor in infertility: study from a tertiary care hospital

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    Kalavathi D. Biradar

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: High prevalence of male factor in infertility was noted in the present study. Refraining from addictions, certain life style changes including exercise and timely medical attention can address the issue. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 2022-2025

  16. Sperm mitochondrial DNA deletion in Iranian infertiles with asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrehmand Namaghi, I; Vaziri, H

    2017-04-01

    Asthenozoospermia is an important cause of male infertility. The mutations in sperm mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) result in either functionless or malfunctioning some proteins, subsequently affecting sperm motility leading to asthenozoospermia. The purpose of this study was to investigate sperm mtDNA 4,977-bp deletion in infertile men with low sperm motility/immotile spermatozoa compared to healthy subjects with high sperm motility. Semen samples of 256 asthenozoospermic infertiles and 200 controls from northern Iran were collected. After extraction of spermatozoa total DNA, Gap-polymerase chain reaction (Gap-PCR) was performed. The deletion was observed in 85.93% of patients with asthenozoospermia compared with 14% in controls [OR = 37.5397, 95% confidence interval = 12.937-108.9276, p asthenozoospermia-induced infertility in the population examined. Large-scale mtDNA deletions in spermatozoa may induce bioenergetic disorders. Nevertheless, to validate our results broader research may be needed.

  17. Spermatozoal protein profiles in male infertility with asthenozoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-jun; YU Ning; ZHANG Xin-yu; JIN Wei; LI Han-zhong

    2010-01-01

    Background Infertility is a major medical and social problem, and elementary research on the spermatozoal proteins and their functions are relatively scarce and there are very few confirmed and effective options for the treatment of male infertility. Thus, it is essential to find candidate proteins that affect male infertility. This study was designed to detect the proteins with differential expression in sperm from infertile patients and normal donors.Methods Semen samples from patients with idiopathic asthenozoospermia (n=114) and from fertile men with normal spermiograms (n=37) were collected. Semen sample analysis, sperm protein extraction, SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and Western blotting analysis were performed. Results were analyzed by SPSS 16.0 statistical software.Results Western blotting analysis of spermatic proteins displayed a major differentially expressed protein in spermatozoa from fertile and idiopathic asthenozoospermia patients. Densities and volumes of the identified protein in the patients were significantly decreased compared to normal donors (P=0.034 and P=0.036, respectively). The protein was identified as DEAD-box protein 4 (DDX4, VASA). The expression and correction value (CV) of DDX4/VASA in the patients was reduced significantly compared to normal donors (P=0.037 and P=0.031, respectively).Conclusions The expression of spermatic protein DDX4/VASA associates with spermatic motility, implying that DDX4NASA may be a candidate marker for evaluation of spermatic motility.

  18. Testicular touch preparation cytology in the evaluation of male infertility

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    Isil Z Yildiz-Aktas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Male infertility is traditionally evaluated by tissue core biopsies of the testes. Touch preparations (TP of these biopsies have been infrequently used. The aim of this study is to report our experience with using testicular biopsy TP for the evaluation of male infertility. Materials and Methods: A retrospective search was performed for cases of testes biopsies with concurrent TP. These cases were evaluated for clinical information, specimen adequacy, and cytological-histological correlation. Results: A total of 39 cases were identified from men with a mean age of 34 years (range 23 to 50 years. TP slides were satisfactory for evaluation in 31 (89% cases, and less than optimal in four due to low cellularity, obscuring blood or air drying artifact. Cytopathology showed concordance with the biopsy in almost all cases. In one discordant case where the biopsies showed no active spermatogenesis, a rare sperm were identified on the TP. Conclusions: TP of the testis is a helpful adjunct to biopsy because of its ability to clearly evaluate all stages of spermatogenesis. These data demonstrate that TP cytopathology of the testes in our experience has an excellent correlation with both normal testicular biopsies and those showing pathological spermatogenesis, and in rare cases may provide added benefit in evaluating the presence of spermatogenesis for male infertility. Albeit uncommon, cytopathologists may be required to identify and evaluate spermatogenic elements in cytology specimens being submitted from men with infertility.

  19. Prediction of ovulation induction outcome in normogonadotropic anovulatory infertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Imani (Babak)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAnovulation is a major cause of female reproductive dysfunction and can be identified in approximately 18-25% of couples presenting with infertility (Hull et al., 1985). Oligomenorrhea (arbitrarily defined as menstrual periods occurring at intervals betvveen 35 days to 6 months) or ameno

  20. A new strategy for professional medical support couples with infertility

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    O. B. Zhukov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From our point of view, the problem of infertility in a pair of appropriately addressed jointly by the two related disciplines. This process has been actively helping set newsupplements Spematon and Pregnoton. The study included 50 couples planning to conceive: 25 couples with male factor infertility secretory type (group 1, 25 couples with infertility caused by varicocele in the postoperative period (group 2. The first group included patients with hyperprolactinemia relative to a second group – 25 somatically healthy patients. All groups patients takes Spematon and Pregnoton during 3 months. Terms of infertility in couples ranged from 1 to 4,5 years and an average reached 2,8 ± 1,6 years. According to the results of the comparative analysis the reproductive value of sperm had been enhanced, functional status of the female reproductive system had been improved, the menstrual cycle had been normalized and relatively elevated levels of prolactin had been decreased after co-application of these supplements. Five woman became pregnant.

  1. Cultural Considerations in Counseling Couples Who Experience Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    Infertility creates challenges affecting various aspects of couples' intimate lives. Practices regarding reproduction are often shaped by cultural messages. Culturally sensitive treatment methods help counselors provide effective therapy to couples with fertility problems. This article describes cultural influences, challenges, and counseling…

  2. Primary infertility associated with neuroendocrine tumor (Carcinoid) of the appendix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brad B Swelstad; Paul R Brezina; Clark T Johnson; Nina Resetkova; Irene Woo; Lisa Kolp

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the appendix(NET-A), formerly called appendiceal carcinoids, are rare tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.Appendiceal tumors have also been associated with infertility. However, in many of these cases, significant abdominal pathology, specifically pseudomyxoma peritonei, was identified during definitive surgical intervention.A34-year-old nulligravid woman undergoing infertility evaluation presented to an academic tertiary care fertility center. An abnormal mass was identified on hysterosalpingogram andCT confirmed appendiceal mass. Surgical removal of the mass was performed and histopathology was consistent with anNET-A with negative margins extending to the serosa.Two months after surgical intervention, the patient spontaneously conceived pregnancy and subsequently delivered a normal infant.This case exemplifies the importance of careful inspection of radiologic films by the gynecologic physician. Of added interest, this case describes an asymptomaticNET-A associated with primary infertility. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an incidentally indentifiedNET-A that resulted in primary infertility.

  3. Incorporating Ideological Context in Counseling Couples Experiencing Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Judith A.; Panchal, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the influence of ideological values on couples' experience of infertility. Contextual issues are considered in terms of how they influence medical decision making as well as emotional factors. Strength-based counseling interventions that attend to couples' diverse values are described. Last, implications for counselors,…

  4. Salpingitis isthmica nodosa in female infertility and tubal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, L; Sperling, Lene; Hansen, U

    1991-01-01

    with infertility, pregnancies, outcome of pregnancies, births, pelvic inflammatory disease and salpingitis. Sections from the isthmus were present in the specimens from 223 tubes from 193 patients and were analysed by the same pathologist. Originally, SIN was found in 12 patients but on re...

  5. Dr. Yi Juqing's Experience in Treating Female Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Jimin

    2006-01-01

    @@ With rich experience accumulated in medical practice for 40 years, Dr. Yi Juqing (易菊清), a chief physician, is good at treating various kinds of refractory diseases. The following is an introduction of his experience in treating female infertility.

  6. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Analysis of Protamine Genes in Infertile Men

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    Ahamad Salamian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs are considered as one of the underlyingcauses of male infertility. Proper sperm chromatin packaging which involves replacement ofhistones with protamines has profound effect on male fertility. Over 20 SNPs have been reportedfor the protamine 1 and 2.Materials and Methods: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of two previouslyreported SNPs using polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP approach in 35, 96 and 177 normal, oligozoospermic and azoospermic individuals. TheseSNPs are: 1. A base pair substitution (G at position 197 instead of T in protamine type 1 Openreading frame (ORF including untranslated region, which causes an Arg residue change to Serresidue in a highly conserved region. 2. cytidine nucleotide change to thymidine in position of 248of protamine type 2 ORF which caused a nonsense point mutation.Results: The two mentioned SNPs were not present in the studied population, thus concluding thatthese SNPs can not serves as molecular markers for male infertility diagnosis.Conclusion: The results of our study reveal that in a selected Iranian population, the SNP G197Tand C248T are completely absent and are not associated with male infertility and therefore theseSNPs may not represent a molecular marker for genetic diagnosis of male infertility.

  7. Role of diagnostic laparoscopy in the management of female infertility

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    Rajshree Dayanand Katke

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that Laparoscopy has important role in the diagnosis and treatment of unexplained infertility. It also helps in Prediction and improvement of success rate of assisted reproductive technologies like IUI and IVF. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(8.000: 2592-2595

  8. Approaches to improve the diagnosis and management of infertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devroey, P.; Fauser, B. C. J. M.; Diedrich, K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the causes of infertility and of assisted reproductive technology (ART) have led to the development of complex diagnostic tools, prognostic models and treatment options. The Third Evian Annual Reproduction (EVAR) Workshop Meeting was held on 26-27 April 2008 t

  9. Anticardiolipin antibodies in pathogenesis of infertility

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    Lončar Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disorder clinically characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis and/or specific obstetric complications and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL in the serum. It occurs in 0.3% of pregnant women, while 1% of them have two spontaneous abortions. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of biphospholipid antibodies in pregnant women with recurrent spontaneous abortions. Methods. We analyzed 60 pregnant women who had two or more recurrent miscarriages. The control group included 60 healthy pregnant women. We analyzed titres of anticardiolipin (aCL IgG and/or IgM with high titres (> 20 U/mL, lupus anticoagulant (LAC antibodies and anti-beta-2 glycoprotein (b2-GP1 IgG as well as parameters of coagulation status of pregnant women. Results. Analyzing Spearman's rank correlation coefficient in a group of affected patients, we noticed a slightly positive correlation of lupus anticoagulants (LAC with aCL antibodies of both classes, while the correlation with b2GP1 IgG was negative. Both classes of aCL antibodies and antib2GP1 IgG were in a discrete positive correlation with the given variables. In the control group, there was a lack of consistency in correlation of the study variables with LAC-aCl IgG, compared to the affected patients, and there was a standard negative coefficient of correlation with anti-b2GP1 IgG. The correlation ratio of anti-b2GP1 IgG was negative for all studied test parameters. Analysis of hemostatic parameters showed a statistically significant difference in the concentration of fibrinogen (p < 0.01 and thrombocyte count (p < 0.05 between the study and the control group of pregnant women. Lower mean values of fibrinogen (2.90 ± 0.45 g/L and lower thrombocyte count [(179.20 ± 6.00 × 109] were found in the study group of pregnant women with secondary infertility compared to the mean values of fibrinogen (3.60 ± 0.55 g/L and thrombocyte count

  10. Risk factors for secondary infertility among women in Karachi, Pakistan.

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    Neelofar Sami

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secondary infertility in developing countries is mostly attributable to blockage of the fallopian tubes due to adhesions caused by reproductive tract infections. There is a dearth of information on the prevalence and causes of secondary infertility from Pakistan. This paper presents results on factors associated with secondary infertility among married women in Karachi, Pakistan. METHODS: A matched case-control study was conducted. Cases were women aged 15-35 years with history of at least one previous conception and currently seeking treatment for secondary infertility. Controls were women residing in the neighborhood of cases with at least one live birth and not taking treatment for secondary infertility. The age of controls was matched by ±5 years to that of cases. Data was collected from June to August 2003. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI for factors associated with secondary infertility. RESULTS: The final multivariate logistic regression model revealed that after adjusting for age, cases were more likely to be the housewives (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI:1.5-4.4, had used inappropriate material to absorb blood during menstruation (AOR = 9.0, 95% CI: 5.0-16.4, and at their last delivery, had a birth attendant who did not wash hands with soap and water (AOR = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.4-5.7. Moreover, women with secondary infertility were more likely to report current or past history of having STI symptoms (AOR = 3.6, 95% CI: 2.4-5.6 and use of intra-vaginal indigenous medicines during their last post-partum period (AOR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.6-5.7. CONCLUSION: We recommend health education and awareness messages for safe practices during menstruation, delivery, and the postpartum period for women in general. Additionally, sanitary napkins should be made available at an affordable cost, and safe delivery kits should contain

  11. Mitochondrial Genetic Variation in Iranian Infertile Men with Varicocele

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    Mohammad Mehdi Heidari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several recent studies have shown that mitochondrial DNA mutations lead to major disabilities and premature death in carriers. More than 150 mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genes have been associated with a wide spectrum of disorders. Varicocele, one of the causes of infertility in men wherein abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus is observed within spermatic cord, can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS production in semen and cause oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in patients. Given that mitochondria are the source of ROS production in cells, the aim of this study was to scan nine mitochondrial genes (MT-COX2, MT-tRNALys, MT-ATP8, MT-ATP6, MT-COX3, MT-tRNAGly, MT-ND3, MT-tRNAArg and MT-ND4L for mutations in infertile patients with varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing were used to detect and identify point mutations respectively in 9 mitochondrial genes in 72 infertile men with varicocele and 159 fertile men. In brief, the samples showing altered electrophoretic patterns of DNA in the SSCP gel were sent for DNA sequencing to identify the exact nucleotide variation. Results: Ten type nucleotide variants were detected exclusively in mitochondrial DNA of infertile men. These include six novel nucleotide changes and four variants previously reported for other disorders. Conclusion: Mutations in mitochondrial genes may affect respiratory complexes in combination with environmental risk factors. Therefore these nucleotide variants probably lead to impaired ATP synthesis and mitochondrial function ultimately interfering with sperm motility and infertility.

  12. EVIDENCE BASED INCIDENCE OF TUBAL FACTOR IN SECONDARY INFERTILITY AS DETECTED BY HYSTEROSALPINGOGRAPHY IN WESTERN MAHARASHTRA

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    Anil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND It is documented that 15% of all women experience primary or secondary infertility at one point in time in their reproductive life. Tubal causes of infertility account for 35 to 40% of causes of infertility. HSG is still a commonly used investigation in the evaluation of the female genital tract and the main indication for the HSG is infertility. AIMS  To find out incidence of tubal factor in secondary infertility in Western Maharashtra population.  To establish reliability of Hysterosalpingography in evaluating tubal status. MATERIALS AND METHOD A retrospective study of 464 hysterosalpingographies of women having secondary infertility was done over period of two years. The patients having tubal defects were further studied and statistically analysed. Statistical analysis was performed with the SPSS computer software, version 17.0. Results were presented in tables and graphs. RESULTS  Hysterosalpingography has proved to be an ideal (or ‘gold standard’ test to detect tubal abnormalities in infertile women.  The commonest structural cause of infertility in Western Maharashtra as per this study was bilateral tubal blockage and was commoner in patients with secondary infertility. CONCLUSIONS Evaluation of tubal patency and tubal integrity is a key component of the diagnostic work-up in infertile couples. In conclusion, bilateral tubal occlusion remains the major tubal pathology in female infertility in Western Maharashtra. Tubal blockages with subsequent tubal factor infertility are still common among infertile couples. This may probably be due to chronic pelvic inflammatory disease or pelvic infection following sexually transmitted infections, mismanaged pregnancies and septic abortions, since the majority of the women presented with secondary infertility. Measures to prevent the occurrence of these infections should be paramount.

  13. Indonesian infertility patients’ health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics

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    Bennett Linda Rae

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients’ patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. Methods An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Results Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women’s age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. Conclusions The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources

  14. Protective effect of resveratrol on spermatozoa function in male infertility induced by excess weight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiangrong; Jing, Xuan; Wu, Xueqing; Yan, Meiqin

    2016-11-01

    Male infertility is a complex, multifactorial and polygenic disease that contributes to ~50% cases of infertility. Previous studies have demonstrated that excess weight and obesity factors serve an important role in the development of male infertility. An increasing number of studies have reported that resveratrol may regulate the response of cells to specific stimuli that induce cell injury, as well as decrease germ cell apoptosis in mice or rats. In the present study, the semen quality and serum sex hormone levels were evaluated in 324 men, which included 73 underweight, 82 normal weight, 95 overweight and 74 obese men. All patients were referred to The Reproductive Medicine Center of Shanxi Women and Infants Hospital (Taiyuan, China) between January 2013 and January 2015. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol treatment on the motility, plasma zinc concentration and acrosin activity of sperm from obese males. The sperm concentration, normal sperm morphology, semen volumes, DNA fragmentation rates and testosterone levels in men from the overweight and obese groups were markedly decreased when compared with men in the normal weight group. In addition, the progressive motility, seminal plasma zinc concentration and spermatozoa acrosin activity were notably decreased in the obese group compared with the normal weight group. However, estradiol levels were significantly increased in the overweight, obese and underweight groups compared with the normal weight group. Notably, semen samples from obese males with astenospermia treated with 0‑100 µmol/l resveratrol for 30 min demonstrated varying degrees of improvement in sperm motility. When these semen samples were treated with 30 µmol/l resveratrol, sperm motility improved when compared to other doses of resveratrol. Therefore, 30 µmol/l resveratrol was selected for further experiments. Upon treatment of semen samples with resveratrol (30 µmol/l) for 30 min, the seminal

  15. Protective effect of resveratrol on spermatozoa function in male infertility induced by excess weight and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiangrong; Jing, Xuan; Wu, Xueqing; Yan, Meiqin

    2016-01-01

    Male infertility is a complex, multifactorial and polygenic disease that contributes to ~50% cases of infertility. Previous studies have demonstrated that excess weight and obesity factors serve an important role in the development of male infertility. An increasing number of studies have reported that resveratrol may regulate the response of cells to specific stimuli that induce cell injury, as well as decrease germ cell apoptosis in mice or rats. In the present study, the semen quality and serum sex hormone levels were evaluated in 324 men, which included 73 underweight, 82 normal weight, 95 overweight and 74 obese men. All patients were referred to The Reproductive Medicine Center of Shanxi Women and Infants Hospital (Taiyuan, China) between January 2013 and January 2015. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol treatment on the motility, plasma zinc concentration and acrosin activity of sperm from obese males. The sperm concentration, normal sperm morphology, semen volumes, DNA fragmentation rates and testosterone levels in men from the overweight and obese groups were markedly decreased when compared with men in the normal weight group. In addition, the progressive motility, seminal plasma zinc concentration and spermatozoa acrosin activity were notably decreased in the obese group compared with the normal weight group. However, estradiol levels were significantly increased in the overweight, obese and underweight groups compared with the normal weight group. Notably, semen samples from obese males with astenospermia treated with 0–100 µmol/l resveratrol for 30 min demonstrated varying degrees of improvement in sperm motility. When these semen samples were treated with 30 µmol/l resveratrol, sperm motility improved when compared to other doses of resveratrol. Therefore, 30 µmol/l resveratrol was selected for further experiments. Upon treatment of semen samples with resveratrol (30 µmol/l) for 30 min, the seminal plasma

  16. Folic acid supplementation and IVF pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murto, T; Skoog Svanberg, A; Yngve, A; Nilsson, T K; Altmäe, S; Wånggren, K; Salumets, A; Stavreus-Evers, A

    2014-06-01

    Folic acid supplements are commonly used by infertile women which leads to a positive folate status. However, the effect of folic acid supplements on pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility has not been well investigated. This study evaluated folic acid supplement use and folate status in women with unexplained infertility in relation to IVF pregnancy outcome. In addition, use of folic acid supplements and folate status were compared between women with unexplained infertility and fertile, nonpregnant control women. Women with unexplained infertility used significantly more folic acid supplements and had higher median total folic acid intake from supplements compared with fertile control women (both P folic acid supplementation or folate status were not related to pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility. In conclusion, folic acid supplementation or good folate status did not have a positive effect on pregnancy outcome following infertility treatment in women with unexplained infertility. Folate is one of the B vitamins which has been suggested to be related to infertility. Folic acid is an artificial form of folate which is commonly used in dietary supplements. Folic acid supplementation has been shown to increase folate concentrations and decrease concentrations of the amino acid homocysteine in the blood. Folic acid supplementation is commonly used by infertile women, but the effect on pregnancy outcome in women with a diagnosis of unexplained infertility has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, folic acid supplement use and folate status (concentrations of folate and homocysteine) in women with unexplained infertility were evaluated in relation to pregnancy outcome. In addition, the use of folic acid supplements and folate status were compared between women with unexplained infertility and fertile control women. Our results showed that women with unexplained infertility used considerably more folic acid

  17. Patient evaluation of infertility management in an ISO 9001:2008-certified centre for reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Uschi; Spiessens, Carl; Dancet, Eline; Bakelants, Els; Vrancken, Annelies; Demyttenaere, Koen; Enzlin, Paul; D'Hooghe, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Quality management according to ISO 9001:2008 guidelines includes infertility care quality assessment and improvement. This study aimed to describe the development process of a questionnaire for infertility management. A literature review, qualitative interviews with experts and patients resulted in a content-valid and face-valid questionnaire. Three cross-sectional surveys were performed in 2004, 2007 and 2008 in a tertiary university infertility centre. First (2004), the questionnaire – measuring eight a-priori dimensions of infertility management – was tested. Second (2007), improvement projects for infertility management were evaluated. Third (2008), factor analysis was performed and internal consistency was documented. The developed patient questionnaire to evaluate infertility management and pre-set desired levels of agreement served to set targets for and assess quality improvement projects. The final patient questionnaire to evaluate infertility management within an ISO framework was valid and reliable and contained 14 items covering four dimensions of infertility management: Telephone Access, Reception, Information and Patient-centeredness. ISO 9001:2008-certified infertility centres can evaluate infertility management with this 14-item questionnaire. This top-down approach to evaluate the patients’ perspective on quality aspects selected by health professionals can be complementary to the bottom-up approach evaluating the patients’ complete experiences of quality of care.

  18. The Impact of Emotionally Focused Therapy on Emotional Distress in Infertile Couples

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    Marzieh Soltani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study investigated the effect of emotionally focused therapy (EFT on factors contributing to emotional distress among infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, the subjects consisted of 12 Iranian couples: six infertile men and six infertile women. They were assessed as depressed, anxious and stressful individuals using depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS. The subjects were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group with six couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women received EFT, while the control group with similar number of couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women was deprived of the treatment. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding job, educational level, income, age, marriage and infertility duration. The pre- and post-test comparisons of DASS subscales showed that level of depression, anxiety and stress among couples with EFT instruction was significantly less than those without such instructions (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Emotionally focused therapy could reduce the rate of depression, anxiety and stress in infertile couples, regardless of the man or woman as the cause of infertility.

  19. Relationship between perceived social support and clinical variables in infertile couples

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    Nurdan Eren BODUR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study it was aimed to assess and evaluate the impact of the levels of perceived social support in infertile couples on stress related with infertility and marital adjustment. The study included 104 couples with primary or secondary infertility and 44 healthy couples with children for the control group. Control group was given the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS, Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS. Infertile group was given HADS, DAS, MSPSS and also Fertility Problem Inventory. Women in infertile couples reported greater psychological symptoms and more decreased marital adjustment than men in infertile couples; but the couples did not show any significant difference with those in control groups regarding these parameters. It was determined that, in general, while marital adjustment in infertile couples increases, depression and anxiety levels decrease. It was also observed that perceieved social support from the family has a positive effect on the marital adjustment. The perceived social support level in men in infertil couples is lower than women in the same group, and this outcome is also related with the increasing anxiety in men. These results showed that psychosocial problems in infertile couples should be evaluated with specific scales. Psychosocial support which will be given to infertile couples and motivating social support systems while providing this service would have positive effects especially on men. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 214-223

  20. A mechanistic overview on male infertility and germ cell cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépieux, Pascale; Lécureuil, Charlotte; Marion, Sébastien; Kara, Elodie; Piketty, Vincent; Martinat, Nadine; Guillou, Florian; Royère, Dominique; Reiter, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The testis is devoted to two important tasks: haploid cell production and sexual steroid synthesis. A number of highly sophisticated and unique strategies operate during spermatogenesis, a process crucial for reproduction, heredity and evolution. It is particularly important to decipher the underlying molecular mechanisms whose function can be perverted in pathological situations, such as infertility and testicular cancers, which represent an increasing biomedical issue today. This review summarises the currently available data concerning some key molecular components that are altered or potentially involved in male infertility and testicular tumors, with the aim of defining some common "hot spots". We particularly focused on genetically engineered in vivo models in which testicular functions are altered and we pinpointed to the potential involvement of the targeted genes in testicular pathologies. Those molecular mechanisms peculiar to the male gonad can be envisioned as a basis for the design of novel drugs potentially dedicated to testicular dysfunction.

  1. Retained Fetal Bone in Infertile Patients: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensieh ShahrokhTehraninejad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The prolonged retention of fetal bone structure is an uncommon condition after a previous abortion.We describe two cases with fetal bone fragment amongst 3589 hysteroscopies (0.05%, who hadno complaint other than secondary infertility. In both patients, hyperechogenic areas were foundthrough transvaginal ultrasound and the bones were removed by hysteroscopy. Despite meticulousevaluation during hysteroscopy, some bones were not observed and were stable during the nextsonography. According to the formation of fetal bones after 11 weeks of pregnancy; patientswith secondary infertility who have a history of abortion that progressed beyond this time andendometrial hyperechoic areas by transvaginal ultrasound should be evaluated for any retainedfetal bone. Hysteroscopy should be performed under abdominal ultrasonography guide to ensurefetal bone tissue is entirely removed during a single surgery.

  2. Treatment strategies for the infertile polycystic ovary syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannus, Samer; Burke, Yechiel Z; Kol, Shahar

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age. Infertility is a prevalent presenting feature of PCOS, and approximately 75% of these women suffer infertility due to anovulation. Lifestyle modification is considered the first-line treatment and is associated with improved endocrine profile. Clomiphene citrate (CC) should be considered as the first line pharmacologic therapy for ovulation induction. In women who are CC resistant, second-line treatment should be considered, as adding metformin, laparoscopic ovarian drilling or treatment with gonadotropins. In CC treatment failure, Letrozole could be an alternative or treatment with gonadotropins. IVF is considered the third-line treatment; the 'short', antagonist-based protocol is the preferred option for PCOS patients, as it is associated with lower risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (specifically by using a gonadotropin--releasing hormone agonist as ovulation trigger), but with comparable outcomes as the long protocol.

  3. Infertility as a Motive for Murder in Macbeth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Ying-jie

    2014-01-01

    From the perspective of Macbeth’s infertility, this paper explores the protagonist’s motive for murder in Shakespeare’s Macbeth. With the help of an analysis of three major murders in the play, a bond is charted out between the protagonist’s barren-ness and the murderous acts he commits against the three father figures:Duncan, Banquo, and Macduff.

  4. Evaluation of Iranian College Students’ Awareness about Infertility Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background With technological developments, creation of new industries, and changing human behavior and lifestyles, several new infertility risk factors (IRFs are discovered annually. Although many studies have been conducted on IRFs, no research has yet been carried out on the awareness of Iranian college students about the many IRFs. Objectives Since prevention of infertility in a society is directly related to awareness about infertility, in the present study the awareness of male and female college students about IRFs was evaluated and compared at Jami institute of technology. Patients and Methods For this purpose, a survey questionnaire containing 24 factors related to IRFs was developed and 123 college students from Jami institute of technology completed it. All data was extracted from these questionnaires and was statistically analyzed. Results The results showed that both male and female participants had moderate awareness (55.86% about IRFs. Female participants had significantly more awareness about the effects of cell phone radiation, fast food, and stress in comparison with their male counterparts. However, significantly higher numbers of male participants knew that smoking has negative effects on fertility. Generally, the awareness of females about IRFs was greater than that of males (59.46% vs. 52.27%. Conclusions College students have a considerable knowledge gap relating to infertility risk factors, which could be due to the lack of a suitable module on IRFs in the curricula of Iranian universities. Generally, females have more awareness than males. The greatest awareness about IRFs concerned smoking, which may result from widespread media coverage.

  5. Molecular basis of cryptorchidism-induced infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Artificial cryptorchidism or local testicular heat treatment can induce reversible oligospermia or azoospermia in monkeys and rats via germ cell apoptosis. Local warming of monkey testes in water at 43°C for 2 consecutive days (30 min per day) decreased the number of sperm in the semen by up to 80% on d 28, and the effect was completely reversed on d 144. Germ cells rely heavily on Sertoli cells for structural and nutritional support. Specialized junctions that play a pivotal role in spermatogenesis occur at sites of Sertoli-Sertoli and Sertoli-germ cell contact in the seminiferous epithelium. We demonstrated that expression of tight junction (TJ)-associated molecules, such as occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), were greatly reduced 24–48 h after heat treatment, while the permeability of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) was simultaneously increased, but recovered 10 d later. These results indicate a reversible disruption of the BTB associated with transient inductions of transforming growth factor (TGF) β2 and β3 expression, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, and concomitant loss of occludin and ZO-1. This suggests that expression of TJ-associated molecules and the BTB was reversibly perturbed by mild testicular hyperthermia, and that the heat-induced induction of TGF-β might be involved in downregulating TJ-associated proteins, leading to cell junction reduction. This review discusses the changes in total gene expression patterns after experimental cryptorchidism in adult mouse testes, and the cloning of several novel, physiologically significant spermatogenesis-specific genes.

  6. Clinical evaluation of the infertile male: new options, new challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert I McLachlan; Csilla Krausz

    2012-01-01

    Male reproductive dysfunction is the sole or contributory cause of infertility in half of couples making the systematic clinical and laboratory evaluation of the male,and the application of costeffective management strategies tailored to the individual patient's need,vital parts of fertility practice.1,2 Male infertility has a wide range of etiologies and effective approaches to initiate,restore or preserve natural fertility are available in some settings.But the most striking development in the past 20 years has been in the area of assisted reproductive technologies (ART),especially intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI);the latter provides an extraordinarily effective bypass of the natural processes involved such that a single viable sperm,obtained from any part of the reproductive tract,will often successfully fertilize an oocyte and has allowed many previously sterile men to father healthy children.However,our understanding of the genetic and environmental factors causing male factor infertility has lagged behind these technological advances and still for a significant minority,no options exist other than adoption,donor sperm or abandonment of their aspirations for a family.

  7. Experimental autoimmune orchitis as a model of immunological male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Munekazu; Terayama, Hayato; Hirai, Shuichi; Qu, Ning; Lustig, Livia; Itoh, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Clinically, 60-75% of male infertility cases are categorized as idiopathic spermatogenic disturbance. In previous studies of this condition, lymphocytic infiltration and immune deposits were present in several testis biopsy specimens, indicating that inflammatory or immunological factors contribute to the occurrence of the lesions. However, there is currently little evidence regarding immunological infertility in men. Previously, we established an immunological infertility model, experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO), that can be induced in mice by two subcutaneous injections of viable syngeneic testicular germ cells without the use of any adjuvant. In this EAO model, lymphocytes surround the tubuli recti and then induce spermatogenic disturbance. In addition, after the active inflammation stage of this model, the seminiferous epithelium is damaged irreversibly, resembling the histopathology of human male idiopathic spermatogenic disturbance. In the majority of patients with testicular autoimmunity, there is a chronic and asymptomatic development of the inflammatory reaction. Therefore, this disease is very difficult to diagnose at the ongoing stage, and it is possible that the histopathology of idiopathic spermatogenic disturbance in the clinic is reported at the post-active inflammation stage of autoimmune orchitis. In this review, the histopathology of EAO before and after inflammation is discussed, comparing it with human orchitis.

  8. Infertility and pregnancy in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, S

    2010-12-01

    Management of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) usually spans a woman's reproductive years. While treatment of androgenic symptoms is often a primary concern, periodically, the regimen has to be modified because of a desire for pregnancy. At this time the couple should be evaluated for factors that may contribute to infertility and this should include semen analysis. However, for many, anovulation is likely to be the cause of infertility and ovulation induction is generally required. The premise on which ovulation induction in PCOS is based is two-fold: increasing ovarian exposure to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and/or correcting hormonal derangements. Potential differences in pathogenesis, evidenced clinically by phenotypic diversity, would suggest that treatment should be individualized. After a brief overview of factors relating to infertility, this paper outlines treatments available for ovulation induction in women with PCOS and provides a critical appraisal of management options. These options include the use of clomiphene citrate, insulin sensitizers, and the combination. Protocols for ovulation induction with FSH injections are outlined and the relative risks of multiple gestation and severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome of these various protocols discussed. The use of aromatase inhibitors and the occasional use of glucocorticoids are briefly reviewed, and indications for in vitro fertilization and laparoscopic ovarian diathermy outlined. Pregnancy outcome in this patient population is also discussed.

  9. Associations between peripheral androgens and cortisol in infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleicher, Norbert; Seier, Kenneth; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Weghofer, Andrea; Wu, Yan-Guang; Wang, Qi; Albertini, David F; Barad, David H

    2016-04-01

    Testosterone has in recent years been proven essential for normal growth and maturation of small growing follicles. Concomitantly, low functional ovarian reserve (LFOR), characterized by a small growing follicle pool, has been associated with low testosterone levels, which can be of ovarian and/or adrenal origin. In this study we, therefore, investigated whether peripheral sex steroid precursors and testosterone levels potentially reflect on adrenal function. In a retrospective cohort study of 355 consecutive infertile women, who presented to an academically affiliated fertility center in New York City, we investigated in a series of statistical models whether low peripheral sex steroid precursors and testosterone are associated with peripheral cortisol (C) levels, reflecting adrenal function. To determine potential correlations, we investigated the dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), androstenedione (AD), total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT); sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and C in a series of multivariate and logistic regression analyses, utilizing C either as a continuous variable or with cut off infertile women peripheral sex hormone precursors, especially DHEA, reflect C levels and, therefore, adrenal function. In infertile women, at all ages low levels of sex hormone precursors, therefore, should be considered indications for further adrenal assessments.

  10. Antioxidant therapy in male infertility: fact or fiction?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Armand Zini; Naif Al-Hathal

    2011-01-01

    Infertile men have higher levels of semen reactive oxygen species (ROS) than do fertile men. High levels of semen ROS can cause sperm dysfunction, sperm DNA damage and reduced male reproductive potential. This observation has led clinicians to treat infertile men with antioxidant supplements. The purpose of this article is to discuss the rationale for antioxidant therapy in infertile men and to evaluate the data on the efficacy of dietary and in vitro antioxidant preparations on sperm function and DNA damage. To date, most clinical studies suggest that dietary antioxidant supplements are beneficial in terms of improving sperm function and DNA integrity. However, the exact mechanism of action of dietary antioxidants and the optimal dietary supplement have not been established. Moreover, most of the clinical studies are small and few have evaluated pregnancy rates. A beneficial effect of in vitro antioxidant supplements in protecting spermatozoa from exogenous oxidants has been demonstrated in most studies; however, the effect of these antioxidants in protecting sperm from endogenous ROS, gentle sperm processing and cryopreservation has not been established conclusively.

  11. Hypothetical link between infertility and genetically modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingxia; Li, Bin; Yuan, Wenzhen; Zhao, Lihui; Zhang, Xuehong

    2014-01-01

    It is speculated that genetically modified food (GMF)/genetically modified organism (GMO) is responsible for infertility development. The risk linked with a wide use of GMFs/GMOs offers the basic elements for social criticism. However, to date, it has not been justified whether the bad effects are directly resulted from products of genetic modifications or trans-genesis process. Extensive experience with the risk assessment of whole foods has been applied recently on the safety and nutritional testing of GMFs/GMOs. Investigations have tested the safety of GMFs including sub-acute, chronic, reproductive, multi-generation and carcinogenicity studies. We extrapolated the potential risks associated with GMFs/GMOs on reproduction, and analyzed the multi-aspect linked between infertility and GMFs/GMOs. It could be conjectured that GMFs/GMOs could be potential hazard on reproduction, linking to the development of infertility through influencing the endocrine metabolism, endometriosis. However, little evidence shows the impaction on embryo or reproductive related tumor due to the limited literatures, and needs further research. The article presents some related patents on GMFs/GMOs, and some methods for tracking GMOs.

  12. Mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase 4 disruption causes male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Manuela; Förster, Heidi; Boersma, Auke; Seiler, Alexander; Wehnes, Helga; Sinowatz, Fred; Neumüller, Christine; Deutsch, Manuel J; Walch, Axel; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Ursini, Fulvio; Roveri, Antonella; Maleszewski, Marek; Maiorino, Matilde; Conrad, Marcus

    2009-09-01

    Selenium is linked to male fertility. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4), first described as an antioxidant enzyme, is the predominant selenoenzyme in testis and has been suspected of being vital for spermatogenesis. Cytosolic, mitochondrial, and nuclear isoforms are all encoded by the same gene. While disruption of entire GPx4 causes early embryonic lethality in mice, inactivation of nuclear GPx4 does not impair embryonic development or fertility. Here, we show that deletion of mitochondrial GPx4 (mGPx4) allows both normal embryogenesis and postnatal development, but causes male infertility. Infertility was associated with impaired sperm quality and severe structural abnormalities in the midpiece of spermatozoa. Knockout sperm display higher protein thiol content and recapitulate features typical of severe selenodeficiency. Interestingly, male infertility induced by mGPx4 depletion could be bypassed by intracytoplasmic sperm injection. We also show for the first time that mGPx4 is the prevailing GPx4 product in male germ cells and that mGPx4 disruption has no effect on proliferation or apoptosis of germinal or somatic tissue. Our study finally establishes that mitochondrial GPx4 confers the vital role of selenium in mammalian male fertility and identifies cytosolic GPx4 as the only GPx4 isoform being essential for embryonic development and apoptosis regulation.

  13. Evaluation of Sperm Parameters of Infertile Men with Retrograde Ejaculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-xing ZHONG; Wei-jie ZHU; Jing LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate sperm parameters of infertile men with retrograde ejaculation.Methods Twelve infertile men with retrograde ejaculation (group A) were enrolled into this study. Sperm samples were obtained from the postejaculation urine. After sperm recovery and washing procedure, sperm parameters were assessed. Twelve semen samples from normospermic donors were used as the control (group B).Results In all retrograde cases, motile sperm with forward movement were observed in the medium. Motility of group A was significantly lower than that of group B (P<0. 01).In group A, sperm motility ranged from 11% to 56%, sperm with intact both head and tail membranes was 42.2 ± 12.3%, sperm count ranged (13-85)×106/ml, and the sperm survival time was highly shortened. Sperm with normal morphology and intact acrosome were observed in retrograde specimens.Conclusion Sperm parameters recovered from retrograde specimens were highly variable between subjects. The toxicity of urine caused deleterious to sperm functions.Motile sperm could be collected by sperm recovery procedure. Sperm parameters could meet the requirement for the use of assisted reproductive techniques for treating infertile men with retrograde ejaculation.

  14. EFFECT OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON ANTISPERM ANTIBODIES IN MALE INFERTILITY PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伦新; 荣莉

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To explore the therapeutic effect of electroacupuncture (EA) for treatment of male immune-infertility patients and to observe the effect of EA on antisperm antibody (AsAb) positive reaction. Methods: A total of 100 male infertility AsAb-positive patients were randomized into EA group (n = 50, BL- 15, BL- 17, -18, -23, etc. ) and medication group (n=50, oral administration of prednisone, 5 mg/time, t. i. d. ). Serum and sperm AsAb were determined with enzyme immunoassay technique. Results: Following 4 months' treatment, the cure rates and the total effective rates of EA and medication groups were 40.4% (20 cases/50 cases) and 92.0% (45/50), 10.0% (5/50) and 64.0% (32/50) respectively. The cure rate of EA group was significantly superior to that of medication group (P<0.01). But, no significant difference was found between two groups in the total effective rate (P >0.05). After treatment, AsAb positive rates of both groups particularly that of EA group decreased significantly compared with pre-treatment of each group (P<0.05-0.01). Conclusion: EA treatment can work well in the treatment of some immune-mediated male infertility patients and possesses a favorable regulation action on AsAb reaction.

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis and sperm lipid peroxidation in infertile men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Segnini; M.I.Camejo; F.Proverbio

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To relate thepresence of anti-Chlamydial trachomatis IgA in semen with sperm lipid membrane peroxidation and changes in seminal parameters.Methods:Semen samples of the male partners of 52 couples assessed for undiagnosed infertility were examined for the presence of IgA antibody against C.trachomatis.The level of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation was estimated by determining the malondialdehyde(MDA) formation.Results:Sperm membrane of infertile males with positive IgA antibodies against C.trachomatis showed a higher level of lipid peroxidation than that of infertile males with negative IgA antibody(P<0.05).There was a positive correlation(P<0.01) between the level of C.trachomatis antibody and the magnitude of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation.All the other tested semen parameters were found to be similar in the two groups.Conclusion:The activation of immune system by C.trachomatis may promote lipid peroxidation of the sperm membrane.This could be the way by which C.trachomatis affects fertility.

  16. Infertility and Perinatal Loss: When the Bough Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Amritha; Byatt, Nancy

    2016-03-01

    Infertility and perinatal loss are common, and associated with lower quality of life, marital discord, complicated grief, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Young women, who lack social supports, have experienced recurrent pregnancy loss or a history of trauma and / or preexisting psychiatric illness are at a higher risk of experiencing psychiatric illnesses or symptoms after a perinatal loss or during infertility. It is especially important to detect, assess, and treat depression, anxiety, or other psychiatric symptoms because infertility or perinatal loss may be caused or perpetuated by such symptoms. Screening, psychoeducation, provision of resources and referrals, and an opportunity to discuss their loss and plan for future pregnancies can facilitate addressing mental health concerns that arise. Women at risk of or who are currently experiencing psychiatric symptoms should receive a comprehensive treatment plan that includes the following: (1) proactive clinical monitoring, (2) evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy, and (3) discussion of risks, benefits, and alternatives of medication treatment during preconception and pregnancy.

  17. Association between periodontal status and idiopathic male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, Norbert; Kárpáti, Krisztina; Szöllősi, János; Keresztúri, Márk; Kozinszky, Zoltan; Gorzó, István; Radnai, Márta

    2016-01-01

    About 30% of male infertility cases are idiopathic. Previous studies reported a positive correlation between deep periodontal pockets and sperm sub-motility, which suggests that periodontitis might have a role in idiopathic semen abnormality pathospermia. We evaluated correlations between periodontal infection parameters and the results of sperm analysis of men with idiopathic infertility. In this observational study, semen quality and periodontal status were analyzed for 95 otherwise healthy men attending an andrology unit for sperm analysis. Half the men in the sperm pathology and normozoospermia groups (50.8% and 50%, respectively) had poor periodontal status. Among the 95 participants, 38% had oligozoospermia, 28% had asthenozoospermia, 16% had cryptozoospermia, and 15% were classified as normozoospermic. Sperm pathology category was not associated with frequency of deep periodontal pockets or calculus. Bleeding on probing was significantly lower among men with asthenozoospermia than among those with normozoospermia. Poor periodontal status was not associated with any sperm pathology category or parameter. In contrast with previous findings, the present results indicate that pathospermia and poor semen quality are not associated with periodontal infection in men with idiopathic infertility. (J Oral Sci 58, 247-253, 2016).

  18. Metabolomics: a state-of-the-art technology for better understanding of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minai-Tehrani, A; Jafarzadeh, N; Gilany, K

    2016-08-01

    Male factor infertility affects approximately half of the infertile couples, in spite of many years of research on male infertility treatment and diagnosis; several outstanding questions remain to be addressed. In this regard, metabolomics as a novel field of omics has been suggested to be applied for male infertility problems. A variety of terms associated with metabolite quantity and quality have been established to demonstrate mixtures of metabolites. Despite metabolomics and metabolite analyses have been around more than decades, a limited number of studies concerning male infertility have been carried out. In this review, we summarised the latest finding in metabolomics techniques and metabolomics biomarkers correlated with male infertility. The rapid progress of a variety of metabolomics platforms, such as nonoptical and optical spectroscopy, could ease separation, recognition, classification and quantification of several metabolites and their metabolic pathways. Here, we recommend that the novel biomarkers determined in the course of metabolomics analysis may stand for potential application of treatment and future clinical practice.

  19. Iranian and English women's use of religion and spirituality as resources for coping with infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Allan, Helen T; Smith, Pam A

    2014-06-01

    The study reported in this paper explores how infertile women cope with infertility using their religious and spiritual beliefs. In total, 30 infertile women affiliated to different denominations of Christianity and Islam were interviewed in the UK and Iranian fertility clinics using grounded theory. The categories which emerged included governing ones' 'Self' through gaining control of emotions, adopting religious coping strategies, and handling the burden of infertility peacefully, which all related to the core category of 'relying on a higher being'. We argue that infertile women employ a variety of religious and spiritual coping strategies which are associated with adaptive health outcomes. Further scientific inquiry is required to investigate how religion and spirituality promote adaptation to infertility.

  20. Study of the Relationship between Obesity and Infertility in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Hashemi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common cause of infertility and endocrine glands disorder among women. The common symptoms are menstrual disorders, acne, hear loss, increased risk of endometrial and breast cancer, increased risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure in pregnancy and high obesity are more prevalent compared with healthy women. In this study, after measuring body mass index (BMI of the participants, obese infertile women with PCOS were compared with obese infertile women without PCOS. This study was conducted on all infertile women with PCOS, infertile, and healthy individuals referred to infertility clinics in Shariati Hospital, Tehran, Iran during 2014 to 2015. The BMI of the individuals was measured and its relationship with PCOS was studied. The results showed a significant relationship between BMI and PCOS.

  1. Maternal stress before and during pregnancy and subsequent infertility in daughters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Li, Jiong; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is maternal stress following the death of a close relative before or during pregnancy associated with the risk of infertility in daughters? SUMMARY ANSWER: Compared with unexposed women, women whose mothers had experienced bereavement stress during, or in the year before, pregnancy...... had a similar risk of infertility overall, but those exposed to maternal bereavement during the first trimester had a higher risk of infertility. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Animal studies have shown that prenatal maternal stress results in reduced offspring fertility. In humans, there is evidence......, or a sibling during pregnancy or in the year before conception. Infertility was defined as any record of infertility treatment or diagnosis of female infertility. We considered the date of onset as the date of the first appearance of any such record. The association between exposure and outcome was examined...

  2. Major Disease Prevalence and Menstrual Characteristics in Infertile Female Korean Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of smoking and factors associated with smoking in infertile Korean women. Smoking status, education, occupation, personal habits, past medical history, current illness, stress level, and menstrual characteristics were collected from self-report questionnaires. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to assess the degree of depression. Data on the causes of infertility and levels of six reproductive hormones were collected from medical records. Among 785 women less than 42 years of age, the prevalence of current, secondhand, past, and never smokers were 12.7%, 45.7%, 0.9%, and 40.6%, respectively. Primary infertility was more frequent in secondhand smokers. Causes of infertility were similar among current, secondhand, and never smokers. Current smokers were less educated (P infertility and diabetes mellitus were significantly different according to smoking status among infertile women. PMID:28049245

  3. Local Signaling Environments and Human Male Infertility: What Can Be Learned from Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most prevalent public health problems facing young adult males in today’s society. A clear, treatable cause of infertility cannot be determined in a large number of these patients, and a growing body of evidence suggests that infertility in many of these men may be due to genetic causes. Studies utilizing animal models, and most importantly, mouse knockout technology, have been integral not only for the study of normal spermatogenesis but also for identifying protein...

  4. Serum Levels of Melatonin and Oxidative Stress Markers and Correlation between Them in Infertile Men

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Soleimani Rad; Shamsi Abbasalizadeh; Amir Ghorbani Haghjo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is the problem of 15% of young couples in different societies. One of the factors that could affect fertility is oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the level of Melatonin, a free radical scavenger, and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in infertile men. Methods:For this purpose, fertile and infertile men in 2 groups, 30 people in each group, were studied. The fertile men were selected from husbands of patients admitted...

  5. Serum Levels of Melatonin and Oxidative Stress Markers and Correlation between Them in Infertile Men

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimani Rad, Sara; Abbasalizadeh, Shamsi; Ghorbani Haghjo, Amir; Sadagheyani, Mehzad; Montaseri, Azadeh; Soleimani Rad, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is the problem of 15% of young couples in different societies. One of the factors that could affect fertility is oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the level of Melatonin, a free radical scavenger, and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in infertile men. Methods: For this purpose, fertile and infertile men in 2 groups, 30 people in each group, were studied. The fertile men were selected from husbands o...

  6. Clinical management and therapeutic outcome of infertile couples in southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menuba IE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ifeanyi E Menuba,1 Emmanuel O Ugwu,1 Samuel N Obi,1 Lucky O Lawani,2 Chidinma I Onwuka11Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku Ozalla Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria; 2School of Postgraduate Studies, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu, Enugu State, NigeriaBackground: Infertility is highly prevalent in Nigeria and most infertile couples in southeast Nigeria are offered conventional forms of treatment, which consist mainly of ovulation induction and tubal surgery, due to limited availability and high cost of endoscopic and assisted reproductive technologies like laparoscopy and in vitro fertilization. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of infertility, outcome of infertility investigation, and the treatment outcome of infertile couples following therapeutic interventions in southeast Nigeria over a 12-month period.Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 218 consecutive infertile couples presenting for infertility management at the infertility clinics of two tertiary health institutions in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. Infertility investigations were carried out on these couples using the available conventional diagnostic facilities. Following the results of the investigations/diagnosis, conventional treatment was offered to the couples as appropriate. Data analysis was both descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level.Results: The mean age of the women was 33.5±4.62 (range: 15–49 years. Most (58.3% [n=127] were nulliparous. The prevalence of infertility was 12.1%. Infertility was primary in 28.4% (n=62 and secondary in 71.6% (n=156. Female etiologic factors were responsible in 32.1% (n=70, male factors in 26.1% (n=57, and a combination of male/female factors in 29.4% (n=64. The etiology was unknown in 12.4% (n=27. Tubal factors 23.8 % (n=52 and ovulation failures 26.1% (n=57 are common female factors implicated

  7. Systematic characterization of seminal plasma piRNAs as molecular biomarkers for male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yeting; Wang, Cheng; Fu, Zheng; Liang, Hongwei; Zhang, Suyang; Lu, Meiling; Sun, Wu; Ye, Chao; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Shi, Liang; Zhang, Chunni; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Although piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) play pivotal roles in spermatogenesis, little is known about piRNAs in the seminal plasma of infertile males. In this study, we systematically investigated the profiles of seminal plasma piRNAs in infertile males to identify piRNAs that are altered during infertility and evaluate their diagnostic value. Seminal plasma samples were obtained from 211 infertile patients (asthenozoospermia and azoospermia) and 91 fertile controls. High-throughput sequencing technology was employed to screen piRNA profiles in seminal plasma samples pooled from healthy controls and infertile patients. The results identified 61 markedly altered piRNAs in infertile patient groups compared with control group. Next, a quantitative RT-PCR assay was conducted in the training and validation sets to measure and confirm the concentrations of altered piRNAs. The results identified a panel of 5 piRNAs that were significantly decreased in seminal plasma of infertile patients compared with healthy controls. ROC curve analysis and risk score analysis revealed that the diagnostic potential of these 5 piRNAs to distinguish asthenozoospermic and azoospermic individuals from healthy controls was high. In summary, this study identifies a panel of piRNAs that can accurately distinguish fertile from infertile males. This finding may provide pathophysiological clues about the development of infertility. PMID:27068805

  8. Increased incidence of infertility treatment among women working in the plastics industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, K.S.; Hannerz, H.; Feveile, H.

    2009-01-01

    Several plastic chemicals adversely affect reproductive ability. This study examined the possible association between employment in the plastics industry and infertility. Dynamic cohorts of economically active women and men were followed for hospital contacts due to infertility in the Danish...... infertility were observed among female plastic workers, as opposed to an expected 87.15 cases, i.e. relative risk was 1.23 (95% CI: 1.01-1.48). For male workers the numbers were 41 respectively 49.9 cases, with relative risk being 0.82 (95% CI: 0.59-1.11). The increased incidence of infertility treatment...

  9. Factor structure of the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28 from infertile women attending the Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shayan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, infertility problems have become a social concern, and are associated with multiple psychological and social problems. Also, it affects the interpersonal communication between the individual, familial, and social characteristics. Since women are exposed to stressors of physical, mental, social factors, and treatment of infertility, providing a psychometric screening tool is necessary for disorders of this group. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the factor structure of the general health questionnaire-28 to discover mental disorders in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this study, 220 infertile women undergoing treatment of infertility were selected from the Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility with convenience sampling in 2011. After completing the general health questionnaire by the project manager, validity and, reliability of the questionnaire were calculated by confirmatory factor structure and Cronbach's alpha, respectively. Results: Four factors, including anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction, depression, and physical symptoms were extracted from the factor structure. 50.12% of the total variance was explained by four factors. The reliability coefficient of the questionnaire was obtained 0.90. Conclusion: Analysis of the factor structure and reliability of General Health Questionnaire-28 showed that it is suitable as a screening instrument for assessing general health of infertile women.

  10. Genetic susceptibility to male infertility: news from genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, K I

    2014-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the genetic basis of male infertility has eluded researchers in spite of significant efforts to identify novel genetic causes of the disease, particularly over the past decade. Approximately half of male factor infertility cases have no known cause; however, it is likely that the majority of idiopathic male factor infertility cases have some unidentified genetic basis. Well-established genetic causes of male infertility are limited to Y chromosome microdeletions and Klinefelter's syndrome, together accounting for 10-20% of cases of severe spermatogenic failure. In addition to these, several genetic polymorphisms have been demonstrated to be significantly associated with male infertility. The discovery of new genetic associations with male infertility has been hampered by two primary factors. First, most studies are underpowered because of insufficient sample size and ethnic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Second, most studies evaluate a single gene, an approach that is very inefficient in the context of male infertility, considering that many hundreds of genes are involved in the process of testicular development and spermatogenesis. Significant recent advances in microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled the application of whole-genome approaches to the study of male infertility. We recently performed a pilot genome-wide association study (GWAS) for severe spermatogenic failure, and several additional male infertility GWAS have since been published. More recently, genomic microarray tools have been applied to the association of copy number variants with male infertility. These studies are beginning to shed additional light on the genetic architecture of male infertility, and whole-genome studies have proven effective in identifying novel genetic causes of the disease. This review will discuss some of the recent findings of these whole-genome studies as well as future directions for this research that will likely

  11. Surrogate motherhood as a medical treatment procedure for women's infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovic, Olga S

    2011-03-01

    The content of this work is conceived on the research of the consequences of surrogate motherhood as a process of assisted procreation, which represent a way of parenthood in cases when it is not possible to realize parenthood through a natural way. Surrogate motherhood is a process in which a woman (surrogate mother) agrees to carry a pregnancy with the intent to give the child to the couple with whom she has made a contract on surrogate maternity after the birth. This process of conception and birth makes the determination of the child's origin on its mother's side hard to determine, because of the distinction of the genetic and gestation phases of the two women. The concept of surrogate motherhood is to appear in two forms, depending on the existence or the non-existence of the genetic link between the surrogate mother and the child she gives birth to. There are gestation (full) and genetic (partial) surrogates each with different modalities and legal and ethical implications. In Serbia, Infertility Treatment and the Bio-medically Assisted Procreation Act from 2009 explicitly forbids surrogate motherhood, despite the fact that an infertile couple decides to use it, as a rule, after having tried all other treatment procedures, in cases when there is a diagnosis but the conventional treatment applied has not produced the desired results. Given the fact that no one has the right to ignore the sufferings of people who cannot procreate naturally, the medical practice and legal science in our country plead for a formulation of a legal framework in which to apply surrogate motherhood as an infertility treatment, under particular conditions.

  12. Prediction of Infertility Treatment Outcomes Using Classification Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milewska Anna Justyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is currently a common problem with causes that are often unexplained, which complicates treatment. In many cases, the use of ART methods provides the only possibility of getting pregnant. Analysis of this type of data is very complex. More and more often, data mining methods or artificial intelligence techniques are appropriate for solving such problems. In this study, classification trees were used for analysis. This resulted in obtaining a group of patients characterized most likely to get pregnant while using in vitro fertilization.

  13. Hypothesis: intracellular acidification contributes to infertility in varicocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabili, Kamyar; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Agutter, Paul S; Agarwal, Ashok

    2009-07-01

    We suggest that varicocele leads to male factor infertility by a mechanism involving underperfusion of the testis, a shortfall in glucose supply to the tissue, decreased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, lowering of the reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate/oxidized nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate ratio and the supply of glutathione to the antioxidant systems, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, peroxidation of spermatozoon membrane lipids, and the consequent generation of acidic degradation products and sequestering of spermine. Acidification of the seminal plasma impairs sperm motility and also inhibits most antioxidant enzymes, exacerbating the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and the resultant lowering of pH.

  14. Tuberculosis, bronchiectasis, and infertility: what ailed George Orwell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John J

    2005-12-01

    In the last and most productive years of his life, George Orwell struggled with pulmonary tuberculosis, dying at the dawn of the era of chemotherapy. His case history illustrates clinical aspects of tuberculosis with contemporary relevance: the role of poverty in its spread, the limited efficacy of monotherapy, the potential toxicity of treatment, and the prominence of cachexia as a terminal symptom. Orwell's ordeals with collapse therapy may have influenced the portrayal of the tortures of Winston Smith in the novel 1984. I discuss unifying diagnoses for Orwell's respiratory problems and apparent infertility, including tuberculous epididymitis, Young syndrome, immotile cilia syndrome, and cystic fibrosis.

  15. Role of laparoscopic surgery in treatment of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Šijanović

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of laparoscopy in assisted reproduction is disputed by many. A rising problem of infertility is battled by an increasingnumber of centres for reproductive medicine in the region. Nevertheless,there is a large number of indications and conditionswhere laparoscopic surgery should not be avoided as a therapeuticchoice or an aid in assisted reproductive techniques (ART.The number of centres where laparoscopic surgery is performed is significantly higher than the number of reproductive centres; anumber of gynaecologists educated in laparoscopic gynaecologyis growing, making it more available for patients.

  16. Classification of Patients Treated for Infertility Using the IVF Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinowski Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most effective methods of infertility treatment is in vitro fertilization (IVF. Effectiveness of the treatment, as well as classification of the data obtained from it, is still an ongoing issue. Classifiers obtained so far are powerful, but even the best ones do not exhibit equal quality concerning possible treatment outcome predictions. Usually, lack of pregnancy is predicted far too often. This creates a constant need for further exploration of this issue. Careful use of different classification methods can, however, help to achieve that goal.

  17. Infertility in India: social, religion and cultural influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sheoran

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The study concluded that there is a huge burden on the part of female to have a baby after marriage. Also the childless women face social and financial adversities at time and this is not limited to low income or low education strata. Health care professionals need to understand cultural and social implications of infertility in order to provide counseling, and referring women with fertility concerns for consultation and further treatment. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(6.000: 1783-1788

  18. Patient evaluation of infertility management in an ISO 9001:2008-certified centre for reproductive medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeck, U. van den; Spiessens, C.; Dancet, E.; Bakelants, E.; Vrancken, A.C.; Demyttenaere, K.; Enzlin, P.; D'Hooghe, T.

    2012-01-01

    Quality management according to ISO 9001:2008 guidelines includes infertility care quality assessment and improvement. This study aimed to describe the development process of a questionnaire for infertility management. A literature review, qualitative interviews with experts and patients resulted in

  19. Estimation of the frequency of involuntary infertility on a nation-wide basis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slama, R.; Hansen, O. K. H.; Ducot, B.; Bohet, A.; Sorensen, D.; Allemand, L. Giorgis; Eijkemans, M. J. C.; Rosetta, L.; Thalabard, J. C.; Keiding, N.; Bouyer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing couple fecundity on a nation-wide basis without excluding couples who eventually remain infertile is challenging. Our aim was to describe couple fecundity (in terms of frequency of involuntary infertility) among the general population living in France. We used a current-duration design. A

  20. Chromosomal aberrations, Yq microdeletion, and sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile men opting for assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Monis B; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Neena; Singh, Nita; Mittal, Suneeta; Upadhyay, Ashish D; Dada, Rima

    2012-09-01

    Male infertility is a multi-factorial disorder, and identification of its etiology in an individual is critical for treatment. Systematically elucidating the underlying genetic causes (chromosomal and Yq microdeletion) and factors, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), which contribute to sperm DNA damage, may help to reduce the number of men with idiopathic infertility and provide them with the most suitable therapeutics and counseling. This study was done to comprehensively investigate genetic and oxidative stress factors that might be the etiology of a large percentage of men with idiopathic infertility. One hundred twelve infertile men and 76 fertile controls were screened for chromosomal aberrations and Yq microdeletions. ROS, TAC, and sperm DNA damage were assessed in cytogenetically normal, non-azoospermic men with intact Y chromosome (n = 93). ROS was assessed in neat and washed semen by chemiluminescence; seminal TAC with a commercially available kit; and sperm DNA damage by the comet assay. Two men had cytogenetic abnormalities and seven men harbored Yq microdeletions. ROS levels in neat and washed semen of infertile men were significantly higher (P fragmentation in infertile men was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than controls. Genetic factors and oxidative stress cumulatively account for large number of idiopathic infertile cases. Unlike, genetic causes, which cannot be cured, timely identification and management of oxidative stress may help to reverse/reduce the effects on induced DNA damage, and improve the outcomes for infertile males.

  1. Correlation of serum thyroid hormones and prolactin levels to female infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliki Hymavathi

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: Identifying and treating hypothyroidism and hyperprolactinemia at an early stage can have potentially great preventive value in the screening of all infertile females levels should be included in the primary workup of the infertile female. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(11.000: 4018-4024

  2. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management Therapy on Happiness among Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Hashemi

    2013-12-01

    Background & aim: infertility and the attitude of the society toward it, makes women and even men deal with many emotional disturbances. Infertile women tolerate more stress than fertile women. Stress can reduce the amount of happiness and mental health. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of stress management skills training (cognitive-behavioral on happiness of infertile women. Methods: In this clinical-trial study, the cases of infertile women who were referred to the Infertility Center of Shiraz in the summer of 2011were studied. A total of 24 infertile women with high stress scores were selected by purposive sampling and divided into two experimental and control groups. The stress management training (cognitive-behavioral was instructed during 10 weekly sessions on the target group. Using Oxford Happiness Questionnaire, a pre-test and a post-test was completed. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and ANCOVA. Results: The difference between the mean happiness was significant after controlling of the pretest variables in the two groups. The mean scored happiness of the experimental group significantly increased compared to the control group in the post-test (P=0.0001. Conclusion: The results indicated that the control effectiveness of stress management therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy on happiness levels of infertile women. Key words: Happiness, Cognitive- Behavioral, Stress Management, Infertility

  3. Impact of asymptomatic urogenital tract infections on ejaculate parameters in infertile men with varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Kurilo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicocele, a pathology developing in 15 % males, is associated with 30 % male infertility cases. The role of urogenital infections coinciding with varicocele in infertile men has not been studied in sufficient detail.Objective: to examine the effects of bacterial and viral infections on ejaculate parameters in infertile patients with varicocele. The study included 49 patients with infertility and varicocele and 26 healthy males undergoing prophylactic medical examination. Highlevel infection was recorded after examination of ejaculates and urethral scrapes of 49 patients: bacterial (30.6 % and viral (14.3 % pathogens. Quantitative analysis of viral DNA showed high contamination of ejaculates with herpes viruses (> 3 lg10/ml. Detailed analysis of spermatograms demonstrated a decrease in all basic parameters in patients with varicocele and infertility compared with those in healthy subjects. The presence of infectious agents had a statistically significant negative effect on ejaculate parameters. Spermiological examination revealed high level of sperm abnormalities (astenozoospermia, oligoteratozoospermia, and oligoastenoteratozoospermia in patients with infertility, varicocele and bacterioviral infection of urogenital tract compared with uninfected infertile patients with varicocele. Laboratory tests for bacterial and viral infections should be recommended in infertility associated with varicocele even in the absence of clinical signs of these infections. Quantitative analysis of urogenital pathogens allows one to determine the necessity of etiotherapy of hidden infection and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment.

  4. In-vitro maturation treatment for infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Bi-lu; Zhao Jun-zhao; Wang Pei-yt

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of anovulatory infertility.If PCOS infertile women fail to conceive after conventional induction of ovulation,the assisted reproductive therapy is an alternative method for pregnancy.In-vitro maturation is an efficient,more economical and simple method without ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome complication.

  5. Introducing a Quantitative Method to Calculate the Rate of Primary Infertility

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    MM Akhondi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the previous studies, the rate of primary infertility was reported differently. It seems the main reasons are related to the different methods of data collection and information analysis. Therefore, introducing a precise method to determine the infertile couples and the population exposed to the risk of infertility is an important issue to study primary infertility.Methods: The proposed methodology for assessing primary infertility rate has been designed and applied by Avicenna Research Institute in a national survey. Sampling was conducted based on probability proportional to size cluster method. In this survey, after reviewing the former studies, the reproductive history was used as a basis for data collection. Every reproductive event was recorded with a code and a date in the questionnaire. To introduce a precise method, all possible events were considered thoroughly and for each situation, it was determined whether these cases should be considered in numerator, denominator or it should be eliminated from the study. Also in some situations where the correct diagnosis of infertility was not possible, a sensitivity analysis was recommended to see the variability of results under different scenarios.Conclusion: The proposed methodology can precisely define the infertile women and the population exposed to the risk of infertility. So, this method is more accurate than other available data collection strategies. To avoid bias and make a consistent methodology, using this method is recommended in future prevalence studies.

  6. Infertility in Women: Hysterosalpingographic Assessment of the Fallopian Tubes in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Fabamwo, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Tubal disease constitutes a major factor in infertility especially in developing countries. This study was undertaken to assess the hysterosalpingographic patterns seen in infertile patients in an urban centre in Lagos. Two hundred and twenty patients who reported from the gynaecology clinic to the radiology department of Lagos State University…

  7. Access to infertility care in the developing world: the family promotion gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemota, Obehi A; Klatsky, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infertility in resource-poor settings is an overlooked global health problem. Although scarce health care resources must be deployed thoughtfully, prioritization of resources may be different for recipient and donor countries, the latter of whom focus on maternal health care, prevention, and family planning. For women and couples with involuntary childlessness, the negative psychosocial, sociocultural, and economic consequences in low-income countries are severe, possibly more so than in most Western societies. Despite the local importance of infertility, few resources are committed to help advance infertility care in regions like sub-Saharan Africa. The worldwide prevalence of infertility is remarkably similar across low-, middle-, and high-income countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes infertility as a global health problem and established universal access to reproductive health care as one of the United Nation's Millennium Developmental Goals for 2015. Currently, access to infertility care is varied and is usually only attainable by the very wealthy in low-income countries. We provide an overview on the current state of access to infertility care in low-income countries such as in sub-Saharan Africa and a rationale for providing comprehensive reproductive care and possible solutions for providing cost-effective infertility services in these settings.

  8. Motherhood and Female Labor Supply in the Developing World: Evidence from Infertility Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguero, Jorge M.; Marks, Mindy S.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new instrument for family size, infertility, to investigate the causal relationship between children and female labor force participation. Infertility mimics an experiment where nature assigns an upper bound for family size, independent of a woman's background. This new instrument allows us to investigate the differential labor…

  9. Male-mediated infertility in sons of building painters and gardeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia; Stoltenberg, Christian Ditlev G; Hougaard, K S

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether sons of gardeners and building painters have increased risk of infertility in comparison with sons of bricklayers, carpenters and electricians.......To investigate whether sons of gardeners and building painters have increased risk of infertility in comparison with sons of bricklayers, carpenters and electricians....

  10. Mental Health and Its Personal and Social Predictors in Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Hasanpour

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infertility is considered a traumatic stressor for infertile couples, and it becomes a psychosocial crisis for that person. Considering the importance of fertility and based on the cultural and social aspects of it in Iran, the present study aimed to determine mental health and its individual and social predictors in infertile women referring to the infertility center of Al-Zahra hospital in Tabriz, Iran, during 2012-2013. Methods: This was a descriptive-correlational study on 345 infertile women referring to Al-Zahra hospital in Tabriz, Iran, via convenient sampling. Data was gathered by the perceived social support questionnaire and mental health questionnaire. To determine the relationship between social support and personal and social characteristics, and mental health, multivariate linear regression was used. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The mean (SD total score of mental health of women was 29.70 (11.50, the score ranged from 0 to 84. The best condition was below the depression scale, and the worst condition was below the social dysfunction scale. Social support from the family was also a predictor of the mental health of infertile women. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that infertile women, in terms of mental health and its subscales, have unfavorable conditions. Moreover, social support from the family is an important factor influencing mental health. Therefore, strengthening the social support of the family to improve the mental health of infertile women seems necessary.

  11. Survey of the Situation of Infertile Women Seeking In Vitro Fertilization Treatment in China

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    Xuan Jin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In previous studies, people’s knowledge of reproductive health and infertile women’s psychological states was surveyed in several countries. However, there has been limited information concerning the psychological states of infertile women seeking treatment and the outcomes of in vitro fertilization (IVF in China. Methods. Infertile women were asked to complete short questionnaires on the day that their oocytes were retrieved; these questionnaires covered the durations of their infertility, levels of education, sources of pressure, and psychological states. Data concerning IVF outcomes were provided by embryologists and clinicians. The correlations between the duration of infertility and educational level, psychological state and education level, and psychological state and outcome of IVF were analyzed in the cohort study. Results. The duration of infertility in more than half of the females was longer than 5 years. Compared with less-educated women, women with higher levels of education sought treatment earlier and their rates of depressive symptoms were lower. There is an association between negative emotions and outcome of IVF. Conclusions. The survey of the situations of infertile women seeking IVF treatment in China indicates the importance of popularizing knowledge concerning reproductive health. Improving medical conditions, reducing the costs of treatment, and developing social culture will aid in relieving the stress of infertile women and improving assisted reproductive treatment.

  12. A study on Irrational Beliefs and Emotions Associated with the Sexual Desire of Infertile Women

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    N Honarparvaran

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: The main aim of this study was to determine the irrational beliefs and emotions associated with the sexual desire of infertile women in Shiraz. Methods: one hundred infertile women were selected by simple random method and examined with Tangi’s test of self conscious affect, Jonse’s irrational beliefs, and Hulbert’s index sexual desire. Regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. Results: Results showed that there was a linear relation between irrational beliefs and self conscious affect with rate of sexual desire and irrational beliefs had reversal impact on sexual desire. Two subscale perfectionism and high self had reversal affect on sexual desire in infertile women. Conclusions: This study showed that infertility threatens women’s mental health. Key words: Self Conscious Affect, Irrational Believes, Sexual Desire, Infertility Women

  13. Differential proteomics of human seminal plasma: A potential target for searching male infertility marker proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2012-04-01

    The clinical fertility tests, available in the market, fail to define the exact cause of male infertility in almost half of the cases and point toward a crucial need of developing better ways of infertility investigations. The protein biomarkers may help us toward better understanding of unknown cases of male infertility that, in turn, can guide us to find better therapeutic solutions. Many clinical attempts have been made to identify biomarkers of male infertility in sperm proteome but only few studies have targeted seminal plasma. Human seminal plasma is a rich source of proteins that are essentially required for development of sperm and successful fertilization. This viewpoint article highlights the importance of human seminal plasma proteome in reproductive physiology and suggests that differential proteomics integrated with functional analysis may help us in searching potential biomarkers of male infertility.

  14. Indigenous knowledge systems and attitudes towards male infertility in Mhondoro-Ngezi, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Stanzia

    2013-01-01

    Male impotence and infertility are health and social problems that have resulted in significant suffering to men the world over. From an African perspective, and in Zimbabwe in particular, the taboo nature of male impotence and infertility carries a lot of mystique. Based on evidence from focus-group discussions, in-depth and key-informant interviews, this study reveals rural Shona people to have indigenous knowledge systems that trigger the investigation of signs of impotence (perceived as associated with male infertility) at infancy, puberty and after marriage. Male infertility carries overtones of failure, frustration, pain, social ostracism, stigma, marital instability, discomfiture and suicide. Intervention strategies to remedy perceived problems were exclusively sociocultural, involving the administration of traditional herbs and traditional healers' divination. Given the existence of indigenous knowledge systems for the investigation and mediation of male impotence and infertility, it is worth incorporating traditional healers in future strategies targeting these emasculating conditions.

  15. Abnormal expression of centrosome protein (centrin) in spermatozoa of male human infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To study the relations between male infertility and centrosome protein (centrin) and the functions of centrin in spermatogenesis, the matured spermatozoa of 10 normal male people and 18 male infertility patients were stained by immunofluorescence labeling antibody against centrin. The results showed that two fluorescence signal dots appeared in the normal male spermatozoa and were located at the base of flagellum. They are proximal centriole and distal centriole. However, in some spermatozoa of the male infertility, centrin protein was located abnormally at the base of flagellum and its staining signals were spread, the normal proximal and distal centrioles were confused and could not be recognized separately. These results suggest that abnormality of centrosome protein may be related to male infertility. This discovery may be used as a marker of abnormal sperm and male infertility.

  16. Klinefelter syndrome and its association with male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V Ramakrishnan; S GowthamKumar; RadhaPandiyan

    2014-01-01

    Klinefelter's syndrome is the most common genetic disorder in which there is at least one extraX chromosome.Males normally have anX chromosome and aY chromosome(XY).But males who haveKlinefelter syndrome have an extraX chromosome(XXY), giving them a total of47 instead of the normal46 chromosomes.Sex chromosome abnormalities are more frequently associated with male infertility.The prevalence ofXXYs has risen from1.09 to1.72 per1000 male births.A patient attended to fertility and genetic clinic, during the clinical diagnosis we found the following complaints of loss of secondary sexual characteristics and infertility.Physical examination revealed breast development, thin built, small size testes, and absence of beard and pubic hairs.Karyotype and biochemical analysis were performed to detect chromosomal abnormality as well as hormonal level to confirm the diagnosis ofKlinefelter's syndrome.Chromosomal analysis of the peripheral blood lymphocytes demonstrated the constitutional karyotype of47,XXY.Using karyotype the presence of extraX chromosome was confirmed, supporting the cytogenetic finding.The47,XXY syndrome is relatively uncommon and can be missedclinically because of its variable clinical presentations. Accurate diagnosis of this constitutional karyotype provides a valuable aid in the counselling and early management of the patients who undertake fertility evaluation.

  17. A Nutrition Screening Form for Female Infertility Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Susie

    2014-12-01

    A Nutrition Screening Form (NSF) was designed to identify lifestyle risk factors that negatively impact fertility and to provide a descriptive profile of 300 female infertility patients in a private urban infertility clinic. The NSF was mailed to all new patients prior to the initial physician's visit and self-reported data were assessed using specific criteria to determine if a nutrition referral was warranted. This observational study revealed that 43% of the women had a body mass index (BMI) history of "dieting" and unrealistic weight goals potentially limiting energy and essential nutrients. A high number reported eating disorders, vegetarianism, low fat or low cholesterol diets, and dietary supplement use. Fourteen percent appeared not to supplement with folic acid, 13% rated exercise as "extremely" or "very active", and 28% reported a "high" perceived level of stress. This preliminary research demonstrated that a NSF can be a useful tool to identify nutrition-related lifestyle factors that may negatively impact fertility and identified weight, BMI, diet, exercise, and stress as modifiable risk factors deserving future research. NSF information can help increase awareness among health professionals and patients about the important link between nutrition, fertility, and successful reproductive outcomes.

  18. The management of infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homburg Roy

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polycystic ovary syndrome [PCOS] is the commonest cause of anovulatory infertility. Treatment modes available are numerous mainly relying on ovarian stimulation with FSH, a reduction in insulin concentrations and a decrease in LH levels as the basis of the therapeutic principles. Clomiphene citrate is still the first line treatment and if unsuccessful is usually followed by direct FSH stimulation. This should be given in a low dose protocol, essential to avoid the otherwise prevalent complications of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and multiple pregnancies. The addition of a GnRH agonists, while very useful during IVF/ET, adds little to ovulation induction success whereas the position of GnRH antagonists is not yet clear. Hyperinsulinemia is the commonest contributor to the state of anovulation and its reduction, by weight loss or insulin sensitizing agents such as metformin, will alone often restore ovulation or will improve results when used in combination with other agents. Laparoscopic ovarian drilling is proving equally as successful as FSH for the induction of ovulation, particularly in thin patients with high LH concentrations. Aromatase inhibitors are presently being examined and may replace clomiphene in the future. When all else has failed, IVF/ET produces excellent results. In conclusion, there are very few women suffering from anovulatory infertility associated with PCOS who cannot be successfully treated today.

  19. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Mammalian spermatozoa are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are very susceptible to attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane lipid peroxide ion. Normally a balance is maintained between the amount of ROS produced and that scavenged. Cellular damage arises when this equilibrium is disturbed. A shift in the levels of ROS towards pro-oxidants in semen and vaginal secretions can induce an oxidative stress on spermatozoa. The aim was to study lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD and to correlate the same, with the ′water test′, in male infertility. SETTINGS: Experimental study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ejaculates from a total of 83 infertile and fertile healthy individuals were obtained. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme levels were studied and correlated with water test. RESULTS: The results indicate that (i the antioxidant enzyme catalase showed no significant changes in the various pathological samples, (ii antioxidant enzymes SOD and glutathione peroxidase correlate positively with asthenozoospermic samples and (iii the degree of lipid peroxidation also correlates positively with the poorly swollen sperm tails. The increase in SOD and glutathione peroxidase values, in the pathological cases represents an attempt made to overcome the reactive oxygen species. CONCLUSION: Water test could be used as a preliminary marker test for sperm tail damage by reactive oxygen species, since it correlates very well with lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes.

  20. Zoroastrians Support Oocyte and Embryo Donation Program for Infertile Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvaei, Iman; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi-Esmailabad, Saeed; Nabi, Ali; Shamsi, Farimah

    2014-01-01

    Background The main goal was to evaluate the attitudes and knowledge of Zoroastrians living in Iran towards oocyte donation (OD) and embryo donation (ED) program. Methods This cross sectional study consisted of 318 Zoroastrians (n=175 for OD and n=143 for ED) of both sexes. The questionnaire form comprised two parts of general demographic characteristics of the participants and twenty multiple-choice questions about attitude and knowledge of participants towards OD and ED. For statistical analysis, the chi-square test was applied for comparison of data generated from ED and OD groups. Results Majority of the participants supported OD (69.7%) and ED (71.3%) for infertile patients. In addition, 40% and 42% preferred donation program (OD and ED, respectively), compared to adoption. About 60% of the respondents believed that the donors have no right to find the child and claim it as their own. In addition, more than half of the respondents thought that the recipients of oocyte/embryo should never know the name and address of the donors. More than half of the participants did not know whether their religion accepts donation program or not. Approximately, 80% of respondents supported psychological counseling for both donors and recipients. Moreover, about 56% of the participants necessitated the advertisement on OD/ED program in the mass media. Conclusion Our preliminary data showed that Zoroastrians supported both OD and ED program equally for infertile couples. PMID:25473631

  1. Klinefelter syndrome and its association with male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Ramakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter's syndrome is the most common genetic disorder in which there is at least one extra X chromosome. Males normally have an X chromosome and a Y chromosome (XY. But males who have Klinefelter syndrome have an extra X chromosome (XXY, giving them a total of 47 instead of the normal 46 chromosomes. Sex chromosome abnormalities are more frequently associated with male infertility. The prevalence of XXYs has risen from 1.09 to 1.72 per 1 000 male births. A patient attended to fertility and genetic clinic, during the clinical diagnosis we found the following complaints of loss of secondary sexual characteristics and infertility. Physical examination revealed breast development, thin built, small size testes, and absence of beard and pubic hairs. Karyotype and biochemical analysis were performed to detect chromosomal abnormality as well as hormonal level to confirm the diagnosis of Klinefelter's syndrome. Chromosomal analysis of the peripheral blood lymphocytes demonstrated the constitutional karyotype of 47, XXY. Using karyotype the presence of extra X chromosome was confirmed, supporting the cytogenetic finding. The 47, XXY syndrome is relatively uncommon and can be missed clinically because of its variable clinical presentations. Accurate diagnosis of this constitutional karyotype provides a valuable aid in the counselling and early management of the patients who undertake fertility evaluation.

  2. Urinary phthalate monoesters and endometriosis in infertile Japanese women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Hiroaki [Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Iwasaki, Motoki, E-mail: moiwasak@ncc.go.jp [Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Hanaoka, Tomoyuki [Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Sasaki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Tadao [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-25-8, Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8461 (Japan); Tsugane, Shoichiro [Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Phthalates may act as an estrogen and are a potential risk factor for estrogen-related diseases such as endometriosis. We assessed the association between phthalate exposure and endometriosis in 166 consecutive women who presented at a university hospital for consultation regarding infertility. The subjects were interviewed and provided a urine specimen prior to a laparoscopic diagnosis of endometriosis. They were then categorized by the severity of endometriosis as controls (stages 0-I) and cases (stages II-IV). Urinary concentrations of the phthalate metabolites monoethyl phthalate, mono-n-butyl phthalate, monobenzyl phthalate, mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate, and mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate were measured in 57 cases and 80 controls using high-performance liquid chromatography isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry. Adjusted odds ratios for endometriosis in relation to dichotomized individual phthalate metabolites (standardized for creatinine) were calculated. No significant association between endometriosis and any urinary creatinine-adjusted phthalate monoester was seen. Adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for higher dichotomized MEHP by endometriosis was 1.57 (0.74-3.30). No monotonic trend was seen in urinary creatinine-adjusted concentration of phthalate metabolites by endometriosis stage (p = 0.23-0.90). Our results do not support the hypothesis that higher urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites are associated with the risk of endometriosis in infertile Japanese women.

  3. The link between infertility and poverty: evidence from Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Papreen

    2012-03-01

    The link between high fertility and poverty is well established. However, this paper shows how infertility may also generate poverty among childless families in Bangladesh. An ethnographic study was conducted, involving various qualitative research methods that revealed economic consequences to be one of the crucial sequelae of childlessness in Bangladesh. This paper details how the poverty/fertility relationship is dependent on social and institutional characteristics, including patriarchal values, education, urban-rural location and health services. Empirical data show that childlessness generates poverty in various ways, including the deprivation of children's earnings, decline in women's mobility, demoralisation of men to earn an income, marriage devaluation by the husband, disbursements for treatment and denial of microcredit (very small loans to those in poverty, which support them to become self-employed to generate income). The current study shows that the infertility/poverty relationship is mostly contingent upon class and gender. It is therefore the rural poor childless women who are most badly affected economically in Bangladesh rather than the urban middle class childless women. In other words, this study reveal that along with gender, class plays a dominant role in terms of the economic consequences of childlessness in Bangladesh. It sheds light on a different and unusual aspect of poverty and aims to contribute to the gender discussion of livelihood and poverty.

  4. Infertility after acute salpingitis with special reference to Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, L; Mårdh, P A; Weström, L

    1983-09-01

    Of 552 women with laparoscopically verified acute salpingitis (AS), 299 were reviewed 2.5 to 7.5 years later. Cervical secretions from these women had been cultured for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. For 49 of 82 women with visually normal pelvic organs, such cultures were also performed; these women served as control subjects. In women exposing themselves to pregnancy, 50 (23.3%) of 197 AS patients and 2 (6.7%) of 30 control women were infertile for at least 1 year (P less than 0.02). After one episode of AS, women harboring chlamydiae, gonococci, both, or neither of these microorganisms in the cervix on admission seemed to have the same fertility prognosis. Infertility was correlated with the number of AS episodes, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (millimeters per hour) at admission, and the severity of the inflammatory reactions of the tubes. The use of oral contraceptives at admission was found to be a positive prognostic factor regarding fertility. Oral contraceptives might protect the patient from severe tubal inflammatory reactions.

  5. HIV infection and sexual behaviour in primary and secondary infertile relationships: a case-control study in Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Dhont; C. Muvunyi; S. Luchters; J. Vyankandondera; L. de Naeyer; M. Temmerman; J. van de Wijgert

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (including HIV) and of high-risk sexual behaviour in the following three groups: primary infertile relationships, secondary infertile relationships and fertile relationships. Primary infertility is here defined as never ha

  6. A potential tool for diagnosis of male infertility: Plasma metabolomics based on GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyi; Wang, Yang; Yun, Yonghuan; Xia, Zian; Lu, Hongmei; Luo, Jiekun; Liang, Yizeng

    2016-01-15

    Male infertility has become an important public health problem worldwide. Nowadays the diagnosis of male infertility frequently depends on the results of semen quality or requires more invasive surgical intervention. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a novel approach for early diagnosis of male infertility. According to the presence or absence of normal sexual function, the male infertility is classified into two phenotypes, erectile dysfunction (ED) and semen abnormalities (SA). The aim of this study was to investigate the GC-MS plasma profiles of infertile male having erectile dysfunction (ED) and having semen abnormalities (SA) and discover the potential biomarkers. The plasma samples from healthy controls (HC) (n=61) and infertility patients with ED (n=26) or with SA (n=44) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for discrimination and screening potential biomarkers. The partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed on GC-MS dataset. The results showed that HC could be discriminated from infertile cases having SA (AUC=86.96%, sensitivity=78.69%, specificity=84.09%, accuracy=80.95%) and infertile cases having ED (AUC=94.33%, sensitivity=80.33%, specificity=100%, accuracy=87.36%). Some potential biomarkers were successfully discovered by two commonly used variable selection methods, variable importance on projection (VIP) and original coefficients of PLS-DA (β). 1,5-Anhydro-sorbitol and α-hydroxyisovaleric acid were identified as the potential biomarkers for distinguishing HC from the male infertility patients. Meanwhile, lactate, glutamate and cholesterol were the found to be the important variables to distinguish between patients with erectile dysfunction from those with semen abnormalities. The plasma metabolomics may be developed as a novel approach for fast, noninvasive, and acceptable diagnosis and characterization of male infertility.

  7. ANTIFERTILITY EFFECT OF THE MULTIGLYCOSIDES OF TRIPTERYGIUM WILFORDII (GTW) ON MALE RATS AND ITS MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENQiao-Qin; CHENHui

    1989-01-01

    It has been reported that GTW caused infertility in male rats and mice, In the present study, GTW was administered orally at a daffy dose of 10 rag/kg, 6 days a week:for 8 weeks to adult male rats. After treatment with the drug, the body weight growth of the

  8. Proteomic signatures of infertile men with clinical varicocele and their validation studies reveal mitochondrial dysfunction leading to infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the major differences in the distribution of spermatozoa proteins in infertile men with varicocele by comparative proteomics and validation of their level of expression. The study-specific estimates for each varicocele outcome were combined to identify the proteins involved in varicocele-associated infertility in men irrespective of stage and laterality of their clinical varicocele. Expression levels of 5 key proteins (PKAR1A, AK7, CCT6B, HSPA2, and ODF2 involved in stress response and sperm function including molecular chaperones were validated by Western blotting. Ninety-nine proteins were differentially expressed in the varicocele group. Over 87% of the DEP involved in major energy metabolism and key sperm functions were underexpressed in the varicocele group. Key protein functions affected in the varicocele group were spermatogenesis, sperm motility, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which were further validated by Western blotting, corroborating the proteomics analysis. Varicocele is essentially a state of energy deprivation, hypoxia, and hyperthermia due to impaired blood supply, which is corroborated by down-regulation of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial electron transport chain, and Krebs cycle enzymes. To corroborate the proteomic analysis, expression of the 5 identified proteins of interest was validated by Western blotting. This study contributes toward establishing a biomarker "fingerprint" to assess sperm quality on the basis of molecular parameters.

  9. The association between coping method and distress in infertile woman: A cross-sectional study from Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Dag, Hande; Yigitoglu, Sayime; Aksakal, Belgin Iyik; KAVLAK, Oya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the distress level in infertile women and their coping skills. Methods: One hundred and twenty-seven infertile women who had been referred to the Family Planning and Infertility Research and Practice Center (IRPC) of a university hospital to receive therapy between June 2012-2013 were enrolled in this study. Several surveys, including the “Infertile Woman Identification Form”, the “Infertility Distress Scale (IDS)” and the “Ways of Coping Inventory (WCI),” were used as d...

  10. Comparison of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment strategies in promotion of infertility self-efficacy scale in infertile women: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Pasha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The infertility is associated with psychological consequence including depression, and lack of self-efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacological and no pharmacological strategies in promotion of self-efficacy of infertile women. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 89 infertile women who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center and were randomized into three groups; cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, antidepressant therapy with flouxetine 20 mg daily for 3 month, and a control group. All participants completed Infertility Self-efficacy Inventory (ISE and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI at the beginning and end of the study. Results: The means ISE scores among the CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were 6.1±1.6 vs. 7.2±0.9, 6.4±1.4 vs. 6.9±1.3 and 6.1±1.1 vs. 5.9±1.4 respectively. Both CBT and fluoxetine increased the mean of ISE scores more than control group after intervention (p<0.0001, p=0.033; respectively, but increase in the CBT group was significantly greater than flouxetine group. Finally, there was evidence of high infertility self-efficacy for women exposed to the intervention compared with those in the control group. Also, there was an improvement in depression. Both fluoxetine and CBT decreased significantly the mean of BDI scores more than the control group; decrease in the CBT group was significantly more than that in the fluoxetine group. Conclusion: CBT can serve as an effective psychosocial intervention for promoting self-efficacy of infertile women

  11. "Rate of Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in Infertile Females and Control Group"

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    N Badami

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Infertility in famale is one of the most important sequela of genital infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum. In the present study the frequency of these bacteries was studied in 125 infertile female by direct and indirect immunofluorscence tests and culture method and compared with 250 normal population. Mycoplasma hominis was isolated from 32 (35.6% of infertile females compare with 18 (7.2% of normal population. Ureaplasma urealyticum was isolated from 41 (32.8% of infertile females compare to 48 (19.2% of normal population. Chlamydia trachomatis was detected by direct IF in 11 (8.8% of infertile and 2 (0.8% control group. The antibody titer against D-K serotypes of Chlamydia trachomatis was also measured in both groups of infertile and normal population and a positive titer of 1/16 and above was detected in 26 (20.8% of infertile cases and in 8 (3.2% of control group. The rate of Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in case and control groups was significant (respectively P<0.0001, P<0.0001, p= 0.0018.

  12. Level of infertility in regions according to Ministry of Public Health data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tymchenko O.I.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research: estimation of morbidity and prevalence, risks of female and male infertility among the different regions of Ukraine. Materials and methods. The Morbidity and prevalence of female and male infertility were calculated according to Ministry of Public Health official statistics (2002-2012 per 1 000 of population of reproductive age (15-44. Relative risk including 95% confidence interval was calculated for each region in comparison with whole Ukraine. Results. In Ukraine infertility level grows. Over the years interrelation of female infertility prevalence to male decreases. In 2002-2012 prevalence of infertility was 400,1±0,59 per 100 000 of women and 87,41±0,28 per 100 000 of men aged 15-44 years, including infertility morbidity - 122,8±0,33 and 33,63±0,17 per 100 000 accordingly. It was detected the increased risk of female and male infertility deve¬lopment in Odessa, Dnipropetrovsk and Zaporozhzhye regions, and decreased risk in Lviv, Rivne, Kyiv, Cherkassy, Kirovograd, Mykolaiv, Sumy, Kharkiv, Lugansk and Donetsk regions.

  13. Comprehensive 5-Year Study of Cytogenetic Aberrations in 668 Infertile Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsenko, Alexander N.; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Weedin, John W.; Lawrence, Amy E.; Patel, Ankita; Peacock, Sandra; Matzuk, Martin M.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The causes of male infertility are heterogeneous but more than 50% of cases have a genetic basis. Specific genetic defects have been identified in less than 20% of infertile males and, thus, most causes remain to be elucidated. The most common cytogenetic defects associated with nonobstructive azoospermia are numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities, including Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) and Y chromosome microdeletions. To refine the incidence and nature of chromosomal aberrations in males with infertility we reviewed cytogenetic results in 668 infertile men with oligozoospermia and azoospermia. Materials and Methods High resolution Giemsa banding chromosome analysis and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization were done in 668 infertile males referred for routine cytogenetic analysis between January 2004 and March 2009. Results The overall incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was about 8.2%. Of the 55 patients with abnormal cytogenetic findings sex chromosome aneuploidies were observed in 29 (53%), including Klinefelter syndrome in 27 (49%). Structural chromosome abnormalities involving autosomes (29%) and sex chromosomes (18%) were detected in 26 infertile men. Abnormal cytogenetic findings were observed in 35 of 264 patients (13.3%) with azoospermia and 19 of 365 (5.2%) with oligozoospermia. Conclusions Structural chromosomal defects and low level sex chromosome mosaicism are common in oligozoospermia cases. Extensive cytogenetic assessment and fluorescence in situ hybridization may improve the detection rate in males with oligozoospermia. These findings highlight the need for efficient genetic testing in infertile men so that couples may make informed decisions on assisted reproductive technologies to achieve parenthood. PMID:20172548

  14. Genetic variants in TP53 and MDM2 associated with male infertility in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Huang; Wei Liu; Gui-Xiang Ji; Ai-Hua Gu; Jian-Hua Qu; Ling Song; Xin-Ru Wang

    2012-01-01

    The TP53,a transcriptional regulator and tumor suppressor,is functionally important in spermatogenesis.MDM2 is a key regulator of the p53 pathway and modulates p53 activity.Both proteins have been functionally linked to germ cell apoptosis,which may affect human infertility,but very little is known on how common polymorphisms in these genes may influence germ cell apoptosis and the risk of male infertility.Thus,this study was designed to test whether three previously described polymorphisms 72Arg>Pro (rs1042522) and the Ex2+ 19C>T (rs2287498) in TP53,and the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) 309T>G (rs937283) in MDM2,are associated with idiopathic male infertility in a Chinese population.The three polymorphisms were genotyped using OpenArray assay in a hospital-based case-control study,including 580 infertile patients and 580 fertile controls.Our analyses revealed that TP53 Ex2+ 19C>T and MDM2309T>G polymorphisms are associated with mate infertility.Furthermore,we detected a nearly statistically significant additive interaction between TP53 rs2287498 and MDM2 rs937283 for the development of male.infertility (Pinteraction=0.055).In summary,this study found preliminary evidence,demonstrating that genetic variants in genes of the TP53 pathway are risk factors for male infertility.

  15. Prevalence of Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma in Infertile Men in Van Region and Effects to Semen Parameters

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    Kerem Taken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU and Mycoplasma hominis (MH in semen cultures of cases with primary infertility in the Van Province, and also to determine the effect of therapy on sperm parameters. Material and Method: The study included 106 individuals divided into three groups: The infertile group (41 cases, the group with lower urinary tract symptoms (33 cases, and the control group (32 cases. The patients in the infertile group had no history of varicocele, testicular torsion, hydrocele, undescended testis, and hormonal disorders. The control group included cases without infertility and lower urinary tract symptoms. The parameters of culture-positive cases in the infertile group were determined before and after therapy. The identification of Mycoplasma species was made using the Biomerieux® Mycoplasma IST 2 (RCS Lyon-France kit. The sperm count was carried out with the Makler counting chamber (Self Medical Industries, Haifa, Israel. Results: In the infertile group, UU was isolated from 17 and MH was isolated from 3 cases. In the group with lower urinary tract symptoms, UU was isolated from 15 (45.5% and MH was isolated from 6 (18.8% cases. In the control group, UU was isolated from 6 (18.8% cases, but MH was isolated from none of the cases. In the infertile group, the sperm counts in 3 culture-positive cases (15% and in 10 culture-negative cases (50% were

  16. Are superoxide dismutase 2 and nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms associated with idiopathic infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Celine; Leveille, Pauline; Dupont, Charlotte; Julia, Chantal; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Sutton, Angela; Levy, Rachel

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in a case-control study the associations between idiopathic infertility and antioxidant gene polymorphisms. One hundred ten infertile subjects (58 women and 52 men) with a history of idiopathic infertility and 69 fertile subjects (35 women and 34 men) with no history of infertility were included by three hospital departments of reproductive biology in the NCT01093378 French government clinical trial. Genotyping was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction with TaqMan assay. We examined genetic polymorphisms affecting five antioxidant enzymes: manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), myeloperoxidase (MPO), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1), catalase (CAT), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The presence of at least 1 Ala-MnSOD allele (rs4880) increased significantly the risk of infertility (odds ratio [OR] 2.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14, 7.60; p=0.03) in male subjects. Moreover, the presence of 2 G-eNOS allele (rs1799983) increased significantly the risk of infertility in both men and women (OR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.04, 3.54; p=0.04). Our observations lead to the hypothesis that the genetic susceptibility modulating oxidative stress may represent a risk factor for male idiopathic infertility.

  17. Analysis of Infertility Rate among Firstly Married Chinese Women During 1976-1985

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方可娟; 邓新清; 高尔生

    1993-01-01

    Data of “China Two-per-thousand Fertility and Contraception Survey', a project organized by the State Family Planning Commission in 1988, were applied to analyze the infertility rates in Chinese married women and its probable affectingfactors,The average infertility rate in firstly married Chinese women in 1976-1985 was 6.89%.The rates were gradually declining while calendar years in which Chinese women got married were close to 1985. Approximately 11.32percent of the women who were married in 1976 experienced infertility, whereas 3.89 percent of those did in 1985. The infertility rates in the women whose age of getting married were youhger than 20 years or elder than 29 years were apparently higher than those of the 20s. The rates were gradually going up while the age at women's menarche was increasing. The infertility rates were relatively lower in the developed economic regions of the eastern provinces and the metropolises in contrast to the western mountainous regions. The married women in rural area had slightly higher infertility rate than those in urban area. The infertility rates in women who used contraceptives before or immediately after their marriage showed no significant difference to those of nonuser.

  18. Alcohol use as predictor for infertility in a representative population of Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Holst, Claus

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our aim was to examine the association between use of alcohol and subsequent incidence of primary infertility. METHODS: The study subjects were chosen from a population-based cohort of Danish women aged 20-29 years. Eligible women were nulliparous and not pregnant (n = 7760). Informat......BACKGROUND: Our aim was to examine the association between use of alcohol and subsequent incidence of primary infertility. METHODS: The study subjects were chosen from a population-based cohort of Danish women aged 20-29 years. Eligible women were nulliparous and not pregnant (n = 7760...... and the Danish Infertility Cohort Register. Main outcome measures were hazard ratios of infertility according to alcohol intake at baseline estimated in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 4.9 years, 368 women had experienced infertility. Alcohol intake at baseline...... was unassociated with infertility among younger women, but was a significant predictor for infertility among women above age 30. In this age group, the adjusted hazard ratio for consuming seven or more drinks per week was 2.26 (95% confidence interval: 1.19-4.32) compared with women consuming less than one drink...

  19. Understanding the patterns of adjustment to infertility of IVF users using narrative and autobiographical timeline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geok Ling Lee; Eric Douglas Blyth; Cecilia Lai-Wan Chan

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To examine how Hong Kong Chinese women and men coped with and adjusted to the infertility problem over time.Methods:Using purposive sampling and theoretical sampling, nine heterosexual couples and ten women who had completed IVF were recruited. Data were collected using a narrative interviewing technique and autobiographical timeline, based on a grounded theory approach.Results:Regardless of the outcome of IVF, coping with infertility and treatment was emotionally taxing. Four themes relating to the coping experiences were identified and captured innovatively in pictorial and narrative forms. They were:‘one of the many’, resilience, recovery and prolonged grief. The findings concurred with the existing literature - coping with infertility is emotionally taxing, and variability exists in the degree of adjustment to infertility, which in turn influences well-being. The study also demonstrated the advantages of creative use of clinical-interview methods in research on couples subjective and lived experience of infertility.Conclusion:The findings suggest that the participants varied in their coping and adjustment to the experience of infertility, with most of them demonstrated positive meanings and resiliency over time. The combined use of both clinical-interview methods helped to facilitate exploration and articulation of the lived experiences of infertility among participants, allowing both in-depth understanding of the phenomenon and adherence to methodological rigor. The clinical-interview research methods can also promote evidence-based reflective practice for researchers and an empowering experience for participants.

  20. Psychological Disturbances and Quality of Life in Obese and Infertile Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kocełak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anovulatory cycles and endometriosis are the main causes of female infertility. The most frequently anovulatory cycles are related to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS commonly associated with obesity and hormonal disturbances in the course of obesity. Recently published studies revealed that infertility affects about one in six couples during their lifetime and is more frequent in obese. Obesity is also associated with male infertility related to erectile dysfunction, hormonal disturbances and lower semen quality. Any of these above mentioned disorder is the important risk factor of psychological disturbances and poor quality of life among women and men in the reproductive age. On the other hand the mood disorders may exacerbate the hormonal disturbances and worsen the effectiveness of infertility management. Infertility, its therapy with accompanying psychological disturbances may also significantly affect the partners relationships. The review summarize the results described in the current literature on the association between obesity and infertility and psychological disturbances as well as their impact on quality of life and sexual functioning in women and men. Moreover, the impact of infertility and psychological disturbances on partners relationships is discussed.

  1. Serum Levels of Melatonin and Oxidative Stress Markers and Correlation between Them in Infertile Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Soleimani Rad

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infertility is the problem of 15% of young couples in different societies. One of the factors that could affect fertility is oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the level of Melatonin, a free radical scavenger, and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in infertile men. Methods:For this purpose, fertile and infertile men in 2 groups, 30 people in each group, were studied. The fertile men were selected from husbands of patients admitted to Alzahra obstetric and gynecology hospital, according to WHO standards. The infertile men were selected from patients referred to infertility ward. Blood sampling from the participants carried out at a specific time, sera collected and the levels of malondialdehyde, total antioxidant capacity and Melatonin were detected in the sera. The data were analyzed using t-test and Sperman's correlation method. Results: Melatonin level in the sera from fertile men were 522 (39.32 ng/L and in infertile men were 511.78 (34.6 ng/L. MDA level in fertile and infertile men were 2.26 (0.34 vs 2.99 (0.44 nmol/ml which was significantly different. The level of TAC in the sera from fertile men were significantly higher than in infertile men. The result obtained for correlation coefficient Spearman's test revealed a significant, strong and direct correlation between Melatonin and TAC and a significant and reverse correlation between melatonin and MDA.Conclusion: It is concluded that melatonin could be involved in infertility. In other word, melatonin treatment and antioxidant-rich nutrition could help fertility by combating oxidative stress.

  2. Outdoor air pollution and human infertility: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa Vizcaíno, Miguel A; González-Comadran, Mireia; Jacquemin, Benedicte

    2016-09-15

    Air pollution is a current research priority because of its adverse effects on human health, including on fertility. However, the mechanisms through which air pollution impairs fertility remain unclear. In this article, we perform a systematic review to evaluate currently available evidence on the impact of air pollution on fertility in humans. Several studies have assessed the impact of air pollutants on the general population, and have found reduced fertility rates and increased risk of miscarriage. In subfertile patients, women exposed to higher concentrations of air pollutants while undergoing IVF showed lower live birth rates and higher rates of miscarriage. After exposure to similar levels of air pollutants, comparable results have been found regardless of the mode of conception (IVF versus spontaneous conception), suggesting that infertile women are not more susceptible to the effects of pollutants than the general population. In addition, previous studies have not observed impaired embryo quality after exposure to air pollution, although evidence for this question is sparse.

  3. Infertility of the breeding bull in insemination technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predojević Mirko R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of very strict breeding bull selection, especialy for A.I programes their infertility is a very serius problem in everyday practice. Especially bull semen has been marked as the main factor for unsatisfied cow fertility in the A.I.programme. The reason could be the bull semen which really may play as the spreading factor of the specific or non-specific reproductive infective disoders – IBR, IPV, BVD, Campylobacter-Vibrio fetus, brucellosis leptospirosis, tuberculosis and other reproductive diseases. Secondarily, the percentage of vitality, motility, penetration abilities, and immonological properties of bull spermatozoa also have an important role in unsuccessful bovine fecundation. That is, why it is necessary to secure professional health care for breedig bull in AI centres, becase only healthy bulls can ensure good bovine genetic transmission and progress in cattle production for today's growing population.

  4. STANDARDIZATION OF DHANVANTARI TAILA: MEDICATED OIL FOR FEMALE INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamidi Vijaya Kumari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dhanvantari Taila is an Ayurvedic Herbal Oil prepared from the drugs Balamoola, Dasamoola, Yava, Devadaru, Manjista, Chandana, Sariba, Shilajit, Vacha, Agaru, Punarnava, Aswagandha, Satavari, Yasti, Triphala, Tila Taila and Cow milk etc.The drugs of Dhanvantari Taila are indicated in all vatarogas in various classical Ayurvedic Literatures. This drug acts like Lekhana, Brimhana, Srotoavarodha, Vedanastapana, Sothahara, Vranaropana etc. Based on these properties, oil was prepared with this group of drugs using Tila Taila as base. This Dhanvantari Taila was selected to study through Uttaravasthi, into uterine cavity on infertility patients including tubal block, Anovulation and Gynecological problems. Before conducting the clinical trails this oil was subjected to certain chemical studies to find out the iodine value, Saponification value, acid value, total fat, weight for ml and HPTLC finger printing for standardization of the drug.

  5. Male infertility: lifestyle factors and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While we may be comfortable with an allopathic approach to male infertility, we are also responsible for knowledge about lifestyle modifications and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies that are used by many of our patients. This paper provides an evidence-based review separating fact from fiction for several of these therapies. There is sufficient literature to support weight reduction by diet and exercise, smoking cessation, and alcohol moderation. Supplements that have demonstrated positive effects on male fertility on small randomized controlled trial (RCT include aescin, coenzyme Q 10 , glutathione, Korean red ginseng, L-carnitine, nigella sativa, omega-3, selenium, a combination of zinc and folate, and the Menevit antioxidant. There is no support for the use of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, or saffron. The data for Chinese herbal medications, acupuncture, mind-body practice, scrotal cooling, and faith-based healing are sparse or inconclusive.

  6. Metabolic syndrome among infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim A Abdelazim; Walid Farok Elsawah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To detect the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) among infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods: Two hundred and twenty infertile PCOS women were included in this prospective cross section study. Diagnosis of PCOS was based on at least two of ESHRE/ASRM criteria and diagnosis of MS was based on at least three of NCEP ATP III criteria. A standard questionnaire was used to document length of menstrual cycles, personal and family history of medical disorders. Signs of androgen excess and insulin resistance were noted in the physical examination. Anthropometric measurements were done to measure waist circumference, hip circumference and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Overnight fasting blood sample and a 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test, TSH, prolactin, total testosterone, SHBG and lipid profile levels were evaluated in all studied PCOS women. Trans-vaginal ultrasound was also done to measure;ovarian volume and number of follicles in both ovaries. Results: The prevalence of MS in studied PCOS women was 30.5% (67/220). There is strong positive correlation between prevalence of MS and both age and BMI of the studied PCOS women. Logistic regression analysis showed that;the age>25 and waist-hip ratio≥0.85 were powerful predictors for the prevalence of MS in PCOS women. Conclusion:The prevalence of MS was 30.5%in the studied PCOS women. The age above 25 years and waist-hip ratio≥0.85 were powerful predictors for prevalence of MS in PCOS women.

  7. AZF deletions in infertile men from the Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaseski, Toso; Novevski, Predrag; Kocevska, Borka; Dimitrovski, Cedomir; Efremov, Georgi D; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2006-07-01

    Y chromosome deletions in the three azoospermia factor (AZF) regions constitute the most common genetic cause of spermatogenic failure. The aim of this study was to estimate the length and boundaries of the AZF deletions and to correlate the AZF deletions with the sperm concentrations, testicular histology, Y haplogroups and the ethnic origin of the men with deletions. PCR analysis of STS loci in the three AZF regions was used to characterize the deletions. Y haplogroup was predicted from a set of 17 Y short tandem repeats (STR) marker values. A total of nine men out of 218 infertile/subfertile men showed the presence of Y microdeletions. In eight patients the results were consistent with the presence of AZFc deletions, while in one patient a larger deletion involving both AZFb and AZFc regions was detected. In two patients, the deletion, initially diagnosed as AZFc, involved part of the distal part of the AZFb region and in one of them the deletion also extended into the region distal to the AZFc. The 3.5 Mb AZFc deletion, due to homologous recombination between b2 and b4 amplicons, was detected in six men (66.7% of all Y deletions), thus being the most common type of AZF deletion among infertile men from the Republic of Macedonia. Patients with the 3.5 Mb AZFc deletion had azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia and variable histological results [Sertoly cell only syndrome (SCOS), maturity arrest (MA) and hypospermatogenesis (HSG)]. They were of different ethnic origin (Macedonian, Albanian and Romany) and belonged to different Y haplogroups (I1b, J2, E3b and G).

  8. ROLE OF LAPAROSCOPY IN INVESTIGATION OF FEMALE INFERTILITY: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 50 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailatha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available : Infertility is not only a medical, but a serious social problem as well, especially in our country. Use of diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy in infertility has been a focus of attention in recent years and is found to be very effective method in evaluating these cases. Traditional way to assess the uterine cavity, tubal structures and tubal patency was hysterosalpingography, but it has now largely been superseded by hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. It is concluded that laparoscopy is useful in diagnosing cases with endometriosis, tubal factor infertility and exclusion of bilateral anatomical tubal pathology by diagnostic laparoscopy could avoid IVF treatment in these cases.

  9. Insight into the diagnosis and management of subclinical genital tuberculosis in women with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Mahajan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genital tuberculosis (GTB is an important cause of infertility in India. Lack of an accurate diagnostic test has led to an indiscriminate use of antitubercular treatment in infertile women. Apart from concerns of drug toxicity, this may be a contributing factor in the increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant TB reported in India. We conducted a study to analyze whether a combination of tests could help improve diagnostic accuracy. An algorithm for the management of GTB in infertile women based on the use of multiple tests is presented.

  10. Tuberculosis of the cervix and infertility: report of a rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guié, P; Iovenitti, P; N'guessan, K; Tegnan, J; Koffi, K; Carta, G; Anongba, S

    2008-01-01

    Tubercolosis is a frequent bacterial infection in less developed countries. Lung and lymph node localisations are common, while the genital apparatus is less involved. In this work a rare case of cervical tuberculosis followed by some lesions causing infertility in a 20-year-old woman is reported. The diagnosis was confirmed by a histological examination from a biopsy of the cervix. The patient was offered six-month antituberculosis therapy which eliminated the cervical lesions. A few years later she came under our care for infertility due to uterine adhesions diagnosed by hysterosalpingography. Now the patient is being treated for infertility complicated by amenorrhoea.

  11. Novel methods of treating ovarian infertility in older and POF women, testicular infertility, and other human functional diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovsky, Antonin

    2015-02-25

    In vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) technologies are facing with growing demands of older women to conceive. Although ovarian stem cells (OSCs) of older women are capable of producing in vitro fresh oocyte-like cells (OLCs), such cells cannot respond to IVM and IVF due to the lack of granulosa cells required for their maturation. Follicular renewal is also dependent on support of circulating blood mononuclear cells. They induce intermediary stages of meiosis (metaphase I chromosomal duplication and crossover, anaphase, telophase, and cytokinesis) in newly emerging ovarian germ cells, as for the first time demonstrated here, induce formation of granulosa cells, and stimulate follicular growth and development. A pretreatment of OSC culture with mononuclear cells collected from blood of a young healthy fertile woman may cause differentiation of bipotential OSCs into both developing germ and granulosa cells. A small blood volume replacement may enable treatment of ovarian infertility in vivo. The transferred mononuclear cells may temporarily rejuvenate virtually all tissues, including improvement of the function of endocrine tissues. Formation of new follicles and their development may be sufficient for IVM and IVF. The novel proposed in vitro approaches may be used as a second possibility. Infertility of human males affects almost a half of the infertility cases worldwide. Small blood volume replacement from young healthy fertile men may also be easy approach for the improvement of sperm quality in older or other affected men. In addition, body rejuvenation by small blood volume replacement from young healthy individuals of the same sex could represent a decline of in vitro methodology in favor of in vivo treatment for human functional diseases. Here we propose for the first time that blood mononuclear cells are essential for rejuvenation of those tissues, where immune system components participate in an appropriate division and differentiation

  12. ASSOCIATION OF THYROID DYSFUNCTION AMONG INFERTILE WOMEN VISITING NEPALGUNJ MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL, KOHALPUR-NEPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shrewastwa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is one of the medial, social, and psychological burdens in this part of world. Thyroid dysfunction can lead to menstrual disturbance, anovulatory cycles, and decreased fecundity. Proper management of thyroid dysfunction can result in restoration of normal fertility. Therefore it is very important to screen thyroid abnormalities among women with infertility. This study aimed to determine association of thyroid dysfunction among infertile women. This study comprises total of 735 primary infertile women with age ranging from 20 to 35 years. Blood samples were collected and subjected for estimation of thyroid hormones. Out of 635 cases 447 (74.4% were thyroid. A numberof 56 (7.6% have primary hypothyroidism, 31 (4.2% have primary hyperthyroidism, 87 (11.8% have subclinical hypothyroidism, and 8 (1.1% have subclinical hyperthyroidism.

  13. Genetic factors contributing to human primary ciliary dyskinesia and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhi-Yong; Sha, Yan-Wei; Ding, Lu; Li, Ping

    2016-06-07

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal-recessive disorder resulting from the loss of normal ciliary function. Symptoms include neonatal respiratory distress, chronic sinusitis, bronchiectasis, situs inversus, and infertility. However, only 15 PCD-associated genes have been identified to cause male infertility to date. Owing to the genetic heterogeneity of PCD, comprehensive molecular genetic testing is not considered the standard of care. Here, we provide an update of the progress on the identification of genetic factors related to PCD associated with male infertility, summarizing the underlying molecular mechanisms, and discuss the clinical implications of these findings. Further research in this field will impact the diagnostic strategy for male infertility, enabling clinicians to provide patients with informed genetic counseling, and help to adopt the best course of treatment for developing directly targeted personalized medicine.

  14. Differential protein expression in seminal plasma from fertile and infertile males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid J, Angela P.; Alvarez, Angela; Markert, Udo R.; Maya, Walter Cardona

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to analyze human seminal plasma proteins in association with male fertility status using the proteomic mass spectrometry technology Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (SELDI-TOF-MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Semen analysis was performed using conventional methods. Protein profiles of the seminal plasma were obtained by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry over a strong anion exchanger, ProteinChip® Q10 array. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: We found statistically significant differences in motility and sperm count between fertile and infertile men. In addition, we observed ten seminal proteins that are significantly up-regulated in the infertile group. In conclusion, comparison of seminal plasma proteome in fertile and infertile men provides new aspects in the physiology of male fertility and might help in identifying novel markers of male infertility. PMID:25395747

  15. Cytogenetic abnormalities in 222 infertile men with azoospermia and oligospermia in Iran: Report and review

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    Mohammad T Akbari

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Comparison of our results with the review of the literature shows a higher incidence (4- fold of gonosomal, in particular, numerical gonosomal, chromosomal anomalies. Cytogenetic analysis is strongly suggested for infertile men, particularly in those who suffer from azoospermia.

  16. Genetic risk factors in infertile men with severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Dohle (Gert); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); J.O. van Hemel; A.M. van den Ouwel; M.H. Pieters; R.F.A. Weber (Robert); L.C. Govaerts (Lutgarde)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Male infertility due to severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia has been associated with a number of genetic risk factors. METHODS: In this study 150 men from couples requesting ICSI were investigated for genetic abnormalities, such as constitutive chromosome

  17. The treatment of infertility in polycystic ovary syndrome: a brief update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael F; Misso, Marie L; Wong, Jennifer; Hart, Roger; Rombauts, Luk; Melder, Angela; Norman, Robert J; Teede, Helena J

    2012-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of anovulatory infertility. Lifestyle change alone is considered the first-line treatment for the management of infertile anovulatory PCOS women who are overweight or obese. First-line medical ovulation induction therapy to improve fertility outcomes is clomiphene citrate, whilst gonadotrophins, laparoscopic ovarian surgery or possibly metformin are second line in clomiphene citrate-resistant PCOS women. There is currently insufficient evidence to recommend aromatase inhibitors over that of clomiphene citrate in infertile anovulatory PCOS women in general or specifically in therapy naive or clomiphene citrate-resistant PCOS women. IVF/ICSI treatment is recommended either as a third-line treatment or in the presence of other infertility factors.

  18. Management of infertility in a patient presenting with ovarian dysfunction and McCune-Albright syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S.E. Laven (Joop); S. Lumbroso; C. Sultan; B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractPersistent autonomous ovarian dysfunction in McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) patients is associated with the development of multiple dominant follicles, premature luteinization, cyst formation, and anovulatory infertility. Due to the mosaic distribution of the mutation,

  19. An overview of the role of bacterial infection in male infertility

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    Hamed Fanaei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An important cause of male infertility is the bacterial infections of the genitourinary tract. These infections affect sperm cell function and whole spermatogenesis and also cause deterioration in spermatogenesis, obstruction of the seminal tract, and impairment of spermatozoa function. The most important bacteria associated with genitourinary tract infections include chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and genital mycoplasma species. Inappropriate or delayed therapy of the bacterial infections of the genitourinary tract will lead to reduced fertility and, subsequently in severe cases, infertility. In other words, a good understanding of the interaction between bacterial infections and the reproductive system plays an important role in the treatment of infertile men. In this review article, we will discuss clinical and laboratory findings related to the bacterial infection of the genitourinary tract and its effects on male infertility.

  20. Revised criteria for PCOS in WHO Group II anovulatory infertility – a revival of hypothalamic amenorrhoea?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Mette Petri; Pinborg, Anja; Loft, Anne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate revised criteria for polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in anovulatory infertility. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: WHO Group II anovulatory infertile women (n = 75). MEASUREMENTS: Clinical, sonographic......% vs 41% (P = 0·003) had an LH/FSH ratio >2 and 19% vs 41% (P = 0·04) had hirsutism and/or elevated total testosterone, free testosterone, and/or androstenedione. The non-PCOM group included significantly more women with secondary infertility. The median AMH in the non-PCOM group was 47 pmol/l, which...... was twofold lower than in the PCOM group but above the upper limit of normo-ovulatory women. CONCLUSIONS: According to a revised threshold of 25 follicles, almost half the anovulatory infertile women do not have PCOM. The characteristics of these women may be compatible with hypothalamic anovulation...

  1. Evidence of increased chromosomal instability in infertile males after exposure to mitomycin C and caffeine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fotini Papachristou; Theodore Lialiaris; Stavros Touloupidis; Christos Kalaitzis; Constantinos Simopoulos; Nikolaos Sofikitis

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the genetic instability of 11 fertile and 25 infertile men. Methods: The methodology of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) was applied to cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes, and the levels of SCEss were analyzed as a quantitative index of genotoxicity, along with the values of the mitotic index (MI) and the proliferation rate index (PRI) as qualitative indices of cytotoxicity and cytostaticity, respectively. The genotoxic and antineoplastic agent, mitomycin C (MMC), and caffeine (CAF) - both well-known inhibitors of DNA repair mechanism - were used in an attempt to induce chromosomal instability in infertile men, so as to more easily detect the probable underlying damage on DNA. Results: Our experiments illustrated that infertile men, compared with fertile ones, demonstrated a statistically significant DNA instability in peripheral blood lymphocytes after being exposed simultaneously to MMC and CAF. Conclusion: The current study showed vividly that there was genetic instability in infertile men which probably contributes to the development of an impaired reproductive capacity.

  2. Association of polymorphism in cell death pathway gene FASLG withhuman male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepika Jaiswal; Sameer Trivedi; Neeraj K Agrawal; Kiran Singh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate –844C>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) present in the promoter of cell death pathway gene FASLG with male infertile phenotype. Methods:Genotyping for SNP FASLG (rs763110) was done by polymerase chain reaction followed by analysis with specific endonuclease (PCR-RFLP). DNA sequencing was used to ascertain PCR-RFLP results. Results: FASLG –844C>T polymorphism, allele and genotype distribution did not differ significantly between patients and controls (OR: 1.03, 95% CI= 0.7638 to 1.3952, P=0.83). Thus SNP-844C>T of the FASLG gene is not associated with male infertility risk in the analyzed patients. Conclusion: Human male infertility is a complex disorder and thus other genetic or environmental factors may be contributing to the complex etiology, and further study in other region of Indian populations will verify whether it is associated with male infertility risk.

  3. Hypothyroidism and hyperprolactinemia showed positive correlation in women with primary and secondary infertility

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    Umakant Valvekar

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Hence it is recommended to screen serum prolactin levels along with thyroid hormones screening in women with infertility problems. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(7.000: 2079-2083

  4. Effects of Carnitine on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Males with Idiopathic Asthenospermia

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    I Amiri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Studies confirm that a number of nutritional and environmental factors may negatively affect spermatogenesis and cause male infertility. Carnitine is an important factor for sperm motility. Carnitine deficiency decreases sperm motility and may cause male infertility. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of carnitine on sperm parameters in infertile males with idiopathic asthenospermia. Materials & Methods: This study is a before and after clinical trial performed on 40 asthenospermia men who were treated with 750 mg per/day carnitine in Fatemieh infertility research center in years 2006-2007. Sperm parameters were assessed before and after treatment. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS10 and paired T-test Results: The results showed a significant increase in sperm concentration, morphology, sperm total motility and rapid progressive motility after treatment by carnitine (p<0.05. Conclusion: Carnitine supplementation has a significant effect on sperm parameters in men with idiopathic asthenospermia.

  5. Investigation of Personality Traits between Infertile Women Submitted to Assisted Reproductive Technology or Surrogacy

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    Najmeh Asgarini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personality traits affect human relationships, social interactions, treatment procedures, and essentially all human activities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the personality traits -including sensation seeking, flexibility, and happiness - among a variety of infertile women who were apt to choose assisted reproductive technology (ART or surrogacy. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that was performed on 251 infertile women who visited Isfahan and Tehran Reproductive Medicine Center. These fertility clinics are located in Isfahan and Tehran, Iran. In this study, 201 infertile women who underwent treatment using ART and 50 infertile women who tended to have surrogacy were chosen by convenience sampling. Zuckerman’s Sensation Seeking Scale Form V (SSS-V, Psychological Flexibility Questionnaire (adapted from NEO Personality Inventory-Revised and Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ were used as research instruments. All participants had to complete the research instruments in order to be included in this study. Data were analyzed by descriptive-analytical statistics and statistical tests including multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and Z Fisher. Statistically significant effects were accepted for P<0.05. Results: In the sensation-seeking variable, there was a meaningful difference between under-study groups. However, the flexibility and happiness variables did not have a significant difference between under-study groups (P<0.001. Interaction between education, employment, and financial status was effective in happiness of infertile women underwent ART (P<0.05, while age, education and financial status were also effective in happiness of infertile women sought surrogacy (P<0.05. A positive meaningful relationship was seen between sensation seeking and flexibility variables in both groups (P<0.05. And a negative meaningful relationship was seen between sensation seeking and happiness in infertile

  6. Selenium–vitamin E supplementation in infertile men: effects on semen parameters and pregnancy rate

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    Mohammad K Moslemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad K Moslemi1,2, Samaneh Tavanbakhsh31Highly Specialized Jihad Daneshgahi Infertility Center, Qom Branch (ACECR, Qom, Iran; 2Department of Urology, 3School of Medicine, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, IranObjectives: Infertility is an important medical and social problem that has an impact on well-being. A significant development in the last 10 years in the study of human infertility has been the discovery that oxidative sperm DNA damage has a critical role in the etiology of poor semen quality and male infertility. Selenium (Se is an essential element for normal testicular development, spermatogenesis, and spermatozoa motility and function. The predominant biochemical action of Se in both humans and animals is to serve as an antioxidant via the Se-dependent enzyme glutathione peroxidase and thus protect cellular membranes and organelles from peroxidative damage. We explored the efficacy of Se in combination with vitamin E for improving semen parameters and pregnancy rates in infertile men.Materials and methods: The study included 690 infertile men with idiopathic asthenoteratospermia who received supplemental daily Se (200 µg in combination with vitamin E (400 units for at least 100 days. The mean age of cases was 28.5 years (range 20–45, and the median age was 30 years. These cases had presented with male factor infertility (primary or secondary for at least 1 year. The longest and shortest duration of infertility was 10 years and 1 year, respectively. The median time of diagnosis of infertility was 1 year with a mean of 2.5 years.Results: We observed 52.6% (362 cases total improvement in sperm motility, morphology, or both, and 10.8% (75 cases spontaneous pregnancy in comparison with no treatment (95% confidence interval: 3.08 to 5.52. No response to treatment occurred in 253 cases (36.6% after 14 weeks of combination therapy. Mean difference between semen analyses of cases before and after treatment was 4.3% with a standard

  7. Seroevidence of Chlamydia Trachomatis Antibody in Infertile Women in University of Benin Teaching Hospital (Ubth Benin City, Nigeria

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    Ibadin, K. O.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Chlamydia trachomatis in the pathogenesis of Pelvic inflammatory disease and majority of cases of salpinigitis are well acknowledged in women. A total of 213 sera from infertile women were tested for antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis by using an indirect solid phases enzyme Immuno absorbent commercial ELISA test. Women with confirmed Hysterosalpinographic report suggesting tubal occlusion (tubal factor infertility had 92 (43.2% followed by 63 (29.6% infertile women with infertile male partner and 58 (27.2% were having unexplained infertility. Out of the tubal factor (TF infertile women 40 (18.8% were seropositive for Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies, as against 19 (8.9% in the group of women with normal patent tubes and 10 (4.6% women with infertile male partner. In this study there was a statistical significant correlation between the infertile women with tubal factor infertility in relation to seroevidence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection with p<0.05. There was no age bias in the serodetection of Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies. The seropositivity of Chlamydia trachomatis is an indication that the organism may be an independent risk factor in the development of an inflammatory process leading to scaring of the uterine tubes in women and thereby causing infertility.

  8. Looking at Infertility Treatment through The Lens of The Meaning of Life: The Effect of Group Logotherapy on Psychological Distress in Infertile Women

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    Anahita Khodabakshi Koolee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women in particular suffer from psychological stress when diagnosed with infertility.Psychosocial interventions are known to not only prevent and lessen various mental problems,but also to play a positive role in physical health and pregnancy rates. The aim of this study isto determine the unique impact of spiritual psychotherapy on concerns about infertility and theirperceived psychological stresses.Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial. The study population includednearly 800 infertile couples who attended the Maternity and Gynecology Clinic of Jahrom Universityof Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran. We enrolled65 people who were randomly divided into twogroups, experimental (n=33and control (n=32. The experimental group received spiritual grouppsychotherapy counseling for 12 sessions, 2 hours per week for a 3 months period. The controlgroup did not receive any intervention, but due to ethical considerations, we gave a presentation (onesession about infertility treatment for this group after the research process was completed. We usedtwo questionnaires to obtain data, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ and Perceived StressScale (PSS. Data analysis was done by descriptive and analytic statistics using SPSS 16 software.Results: Psychological intervention in the treatment group significantly decreased the PSWQ(p=0.004. There were significant differences in the mean score of the PSWQ in both groups asdetermined by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA; p=0.009. Psychological intervention in thetreatment group decreased the level of perceived stress, when compared with the control group.According to ANCOVA there were significant differences between the mean PSS scores of bothgroups (p=0.01.Conclusion: Logotherapy is related to stress reduction and can decrease psychiatric symptomsof worry and perceived stress. This approach tends to improve an infertile person's ability todeal with their problem of finding the

  9. Outcome of Loupe-Assisted Sub-inguinal Varicocelectomy in Infertile Men

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelrahman, Selim S.; Eassa, Bayoumy I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sub-inguinal varicocelectomy is widely used among surgeons. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of varicocelectomy using a modified microsurgical method, specifically a loupe-assisted method, and its effects on sperm parameters in infertile men. Patients and Methods This study was performed in 40 patients who presented with varicocele. All patients had at least a 1-year history of infertility with abnormal semen parameters and varicocele proven by physical ...

  10. Chinese Herbal Products for Female Infertility in Taiwan: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Chiang; Kao, Chao-Wei; Lin, Che-Chen; Liao, Yen-Nung; Wu, Bei-Yu; Hung, I-Ling; Hu, Wen-Long

    2016-03-01

    Female infertility and low birth rate are significant public health issues with profound social, psychological, and economic consequences. Some infertile women resort to conventional, complementary, or alternative therapies to conceive. The aim of this study was to identify the Chinese herbal products (CHPs) most commonly used for female infertility in Taiwan. The usage of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the frequency of CHP prescriptions to infertile women were determined based on a nationwide 1-million randomly sampled cohort of National Health Insurance Research Database beneficiaries. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were employed to estimate the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for TCM usage and potential risk factors. In total, 8766 women with newly diagnosed infertility were included in this study. Of those, 8430 (96.17%) had sought TCM treatment in addition to visiting the gynecologist. We noted that female infertility patients with risk factors (e.g., endometriosis, uterine fibroids, or irregular menstrual cycle) were more likely to use TCM than those without TCM medication (aOR = 1.83, 1.87, and 1.79, respectively). The most commonly used formula and single CHP were Dang-Gui-Sha-Yao-San (17.25%) and Semen Cuscutae (27.40%), respectively. CHP formula combinations (e.g., Dang-Gui-Sha-Yao-San plus Wen-Jing-Tang 3.10%) or single Chinese herbal combinations (e.g., Semen Cuscutae plus Leonurus japonicus 6.31%) were also commonly used to treat female infertility. Further well-conducted, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies will be needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these CHP combinations for female infertility.

  11. Wet heat exposure: a potentially reversible cause of low semen quality in infertile men

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the recovery of semen quality in a cohort of infertile men after known hyperthermic exposure to hot tubs, hot baths or whirlpool baths. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A consecutive cohort of infertile men had a history remarkable for wet heat exposure in the forms of hot tubs, Jacuzzi or hot baths. Clinical characteristics and exposure parameters were assessed before exposure was discontinued, and semen parameters analyzed before and after discontinuation of hyperthermic exposu...

  12. Traditional Chinese medical herbs staged therapy in infertile women with endometriosis: a clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Zhaorong; Lian, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease defined as the presence of endometrioid tissue (glands and stroma) outside the uterus. About 30 to 40% patients with endometriosis are infertile. In traditional Chinese medical system, endometriosis associated infertility is mostly caused by kidney deficiency and blood stasis. The herb of reinforcing kidney and removing blood stasis is designed to treat the disease. Material and methods: All the 80 up-to-standard patients were divide...

  13. A Case of Secondary Infertility Due to Retention of Fetal Bones in Cervix

    OpenAIRE

    Alev Ozer

    2014-01-01

    A case of secondary infertility related to prolonged retention of fetal bones in the cervix is presented. A 34-year-old nulliparous woman was admitted to the hospital with chronic pelvic pain, dyspareunia, and 12%u2013year-long secondary infertility following an induced abortion due to fetal demise. Transvaginal ultrasonography (USG) revealed a linear echogenic area around the posterior cervical wall. An hysteroscopic examination confirmed the existence of an irregular calcified mass embedded...

  14. A CLINICO-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF INFERTILE COUPLES AMONG THE SUBURBAN/RURAL POPULATION OF BOKAKHAT, ASSAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranabika

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system defined by the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse (WHO-ICMART. Infertility is the inability of a sexually active, non-contraception couple to achieve pregnancy in one year. Infertility affects relatively large number of couples, both globally as well as in India. There are sparse data on the prevalence of infertility in India. This study describes the correlates and prevalence of infertility among couples in Bokakhat, Assam, India. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study is a cross-sectional study done in the suburban/rural field practice area of Bokakhat Subdivisional Civil Hospital, during August 2008 to July 2009. Couples having infertility were identified using WHO definition by house to house survey and interviewed to know various epidemiological correlates including demographic characteristics, aetiology and treatment if taken for the same. RESULTS There were total of 1755 eligible couples and 167 were found to be having primary or secondary infertility. The study showed that among eligible couple’s prevalence of primary infertility was 6.4%, while secondary infertility was 3.01%. Among couples with primary infertility, male factors were responsible in 18 (15.78%, female factors in 32 (28.07%, both partners were accountable in 27 (23.68%, while 37 (32.45% couple’s cause of infertility was unexplained. CONCLUSION It was concluded that this study has provided significant information concerning the prevalence of infertility in our area and also provided information about different demographical and aetiological factors associated with infertility.

  15. Severe male infertility after failed ICSI treatment-a phenomenological study of men's experiences

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    Hellström Anna-Lena

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male-factor infertility underlies approximately 30% of infertility in couples seeking treatment; of which 10% is due to azoospermia. The development of assisted reproductive technology (ART, enabling the use of epididymal or testicular sperm for fertilization of the partner's oocytes, has made biological fatherhood possible for men with obstructive azoospermia. There is limited knowledge of men's experience of their own infertility. The aim of this study was to describe men's experiences of obstructive azoospermia infertility. Methods Eight men with obstructive azoospermia, who had terminated Swedish public health system ART treatment two years previously without subsequent childbirth, were interviewed using a descriptive phenomenological method. Results The essence of the phenomenon is expressed with a metaphor: climbing a mountain step by step with the aim of reaching the top, i.e. having a child and thus a family with a child. Four constituents are included (1 inadequacy followed by a feeling of redress (2 marginalisation, (3 chivalry (4 extension of life and starting a family as driving forces. Conclusions Knowledge of men's experiences of their own infertility is important as a supporting measure to increase the quality of care of infertile couples. By adopting this facet of gender perspective in fertility treatment guidelines, care can hopefully be optimized.

  16. Prevalence and distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis genovars in Indian infertile patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawre, Jyoti; Dhawan, Benu; Malhotra, Neena; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Broor, Shobha; Chaudhry, Rama

    2016-12-01

    To determine the prevalence and distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis genovars in patients with infertility by PCR-RFLP and ompA gene sequencing. Prevalence of other etiological agents (viz., Ureaplasma spp. and Mycoplasma hominis) were also assessed. Endocervical swabs were collected from 477 women and urine was collected from 151 men attending the Infertility Clinic. The samples were screened for C. trachomatis by cryptic plasmid, ompA gene and nested ompA gene PCR. Genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP and sequencing. Samples were screened for Ureaplasma spp. and M. hominis. The prevalence of C. trachomatis in infertile women and their male partners were 15.7% (75 of 477) and 10.0% (15 of 151) respectively. Secondary infertility was significantly associated with chlamydial infection. Genovar E was the most prevalent followed by genovar D and F. Twenty-four C. trachomatis strains were selected for ompA gene sequencing. No mixed infection was picked. Variability in ompA sequences was seen in 50.0%. Both PCR-RFLP and ompA gene sequencing showed concordant results. High prevalence of C. trachomatis in infertile couples warrants routine screening for C. trachomatis infection in all infertile couples. Genotyping of the ompA gene of C. trachomatis may be a valuable tool in understanding the natural history of C. trachomatis infection.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of the heat shock protein 90 gene in varicocele-associated infertility

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    Pericles A. Hassun Filho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Varicoceles are associated with impaired testicular function and male infertility, but the molecular mechanisms by which fertility is affected have not been satisfactorily explained. Spermatogenesis might be affected by increased scrotal temperature, such as that caused by varicocele. HSP90 is a molecular chaperone expressed in germ cells and is related to spermatogenesis, motility, and both heat and oxidative stress. Possible correlations between coding single region nucleotide polymorphisms (cSNPs in the HSP90 gene in patients with varicocele associated with infertility were analyzed, and polymorphisms in these exons were characterized through DNA sequencing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing were used to search for mutations in 18 infertile patients with varicocele, 11 patients with idiopathic infertility and 12 fertile men. DNA was extracted from leucocytes for PCR amplification and SSCP analysis. DNA from samples with an altered band pattern in the SSCP was then sequenced to search for polymorphisms. RESULTS: Three silent polymorphisms that do not lead to amino acid substitutions were identified. CONCLUSION: Mutations in the HSP90 gene do not appear to be a common cause of male factor infertility. The low incidence of gene variation, or SNPs, in infertile men demonstrates that this gene is highly conserved and thus confirms its key role in spermatogenesis and response to heat stress.

  18. Sexuality, Self-Esteem and Partnership Quality in Infertile Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmann, T; Schilling, K; Toth, B; Rösner, S; Strowitzki, T; Wohlfarth, K; Kentenich, H

    2014-08-01

    Introduction: Infertile couples often report quality-of-life impairments, especially in terms of sexuality, self-esteem and partnership quality. So far, there have been no systematic studies of the sex lives and behaviour of infertile women and men before and after the emergence of their mutual desire for a child. Materials and Methods: From February 2010 to August 2010 all couples starting treatment either at Heidelberg University's Women's Hospital or at the Fertility Center Berlin were asked to fill out the Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR). A total of n = 158 women and n = 153 men participated in the study. Results: Decreasing tendencies were observable for both partners in the domains Sexual Relationship Satisfaction and Confidence and in the subscales Self-Esteem and Overall Relationship Satisfaction. There were especially clear indications of a loss of spontaneous sexuality during the experience of infertility. We were also able to establish that infertility has a negative impact on women's self-esteem. Discussion: The results of this study indicate that SEAR can be used as a feasible instrument for identifying infertile women and men whose infertility has a negative effect on their relationship quality and/or sex lives.

  19. The mediator role of emotion regulation processes on infertility-related stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhardo, Ana; Cunha, M; Pinto-Gouveia, J; Matos, M

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate gender differences regarding the mediator role of self-compassion and self-judgment on the effects of external shame, internal shame, dyadic adjustment, on infertility-related stress. One hundred and sixty-two women and 147 men with a primary infertility diagnosis completed the following set of self-report measures: Others as Shamer, Experience of Shame Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Self-Compassion Scale, and Fertility Problem Inventory. Path analyses results revealed that in women self-compassion fully mediated the effect of internal shame on infertility-related stress and partially mediated the effect of dyadic adjustment on this variable, while external shame had only a direct effect. In men self-judgment fully mediated the effect of external and internal shame on infertility-related stress. Dyadic adjustment had only a direct effect on infertility-related stress. In conclusion, there is a distinct role of self-compassion and self-judgment on the relationship between shame and infertility-related stress in men and women. Such differences should be taken into account in psychological interventions with these patients. Future research is warranted to further support our results.

  20. The Social Consequences of Infertility among Iranian Women: A Qualitative Study

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    Syedeh Batool Hasanpoor-Azghdy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility may prevent couples to achieve the desired social roles and lead to some social and psychological problems. This study aimed to explain the social consequences of infertility in Iranian women seeking treatment. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted based on 32 semi-structured interviews with 25 women affected by primary and secondary infertility with no surviving children. The participants were purposefully selected with maximum variability from a fertility health research center in Tehran, Iran, from January to October 2012. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the conventional content analysis method. Results: Our findings indicate that the consequences of infertility are divided into five main categories: 1. violence including psychological violence and domestic physical violence, 2. marital instability or uncertainty, 3. social isolation including avoiding certain people or certain social events and self-imposed isolation from family and friends, 4. social exclusion and partial deprivation including being disregarded by family members and relatives and reducing social interactions with the infertile woman and 5. social alienation. Conclusion: This study reveals that Iranian women with fertility issues seeking treatment face several social problems that could have devastating effects on the quality of their lives. It is, therefore, recommended that, in Iran, infertility is only considered as a biomedical issue of a couple and pay further attention to its sociocultural dimensions and consequences.

  1. Sexuality, Self-Esteem and Partnership Quality in Infertile Women and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmann, T.; Schilling, K.; Toth, B.; Rösner, S.; Strowitzki, T.; Wohlfarth, K.; Kentenich, H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Infertile couples often report quality-of-life impairments, especially in terms of sexuality, self-esteem and partnership quality. So far, there have been no systematic studies of the sex lives and behaviour of infertile women and men before and after the emergence of their mutual desire for a child. Materials and Methods: From February 2010 to August 2010 all couples starting treatment either at Heidelberg Universityʼs Womenʼs Hospital or at the Fertility Center Berlin were asked to fill out the Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR). A total of n = 158 women and n = 153 men participated in the study. Results: Decreasing tendencies were observable for both partners in the domains Sexual Relationship Satisfaction and Confidence and in the subscales Self-Esteem and Overall Relationship Satisfaction. There were especially clear indications of a loss of spontaneous sexuality during the experience of infertility. We were also able to establish that infertility has a negative impact on womenʼs self-esteem. Discussion: The results of this study indicate that SEAR can be used as a feasible instrument for identifying infertile women and men whose infertility has a negative effect on their relationship quality and/or sex lives. PMID:25221344

  2. The CAG repeat polymorphism of mitochondrial polymerase gamma (POLG) is associated with male infertility in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklouti-Gargouri, S; Ghorbel, M; Chakroun, N; Sellami, A; Fakhfakh, F; Ammar-Keskes, L

    2012-05-01

    Male fertility largely depends on sperm quality, which may be affected by environmental and genetic factors. Recent data emphasised the implication of the polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) CAG repeats in male infertility. In this report, we explored a possible role of the (POLG) gene polymorphism in male infertility in Tunisian men. The polymorphic CAG repeat in the nuclear POLG gene was studied in 339 male subjects (216 patients with infertility (69 azoospermic, 115 oligoasthenoteratospermic and 32 normospermic) and 123 fertile) after DNA amplification by PCR, followed by genotyping using an automatic sequencer. The heterozygous and the homozygous mutant genotypes (10/ ≠ 10 and ≠ 10/ ≠ 10) were significantly more frequent among infertile patients than among fertile controls (11.2% versus 1.6%, P = 1.3 × 10(-3) and 4.6% versus 0.8%, P = 4.2 × 10(-7) respectively). We also found a significant difference between the frequencies of 10/ ≠ 10 genotype in azoospermic (4.4%) and in oligoasthenoteratospermic (15.6%) infertile patients (P = 2.6 × 10(-2) ). However, the homozygous mutant genotype (≠ 10/ ≠ 10) was seen at similar frequencies in azoospermic, normospermic and oligoasthenospermic men (4.4%, 3.1% and 5.2% respectively). Under our conditions, the findings showed an association between POLG CAG repeat polymorphism and male infertility in Tunisian population.

  3. Association Between Vitamin D Levels and Semen Parameters in Infertile Males

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    Erkan Ozdemir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and laboratory characteristics of infertile males according to their postwash progressively motile sperm count and to evaluate whether there was a relationship between serum vitamin D (VD levels and semen parameters. Material and Method: A total of 198 infertile men were included in this cross-sectional study. Study population was mainly divided into two groups according to post wash total progressively motile sperm count (TPMSC as less than 5 million/ml (study group and equal or greater than 5 million/ml (control group. The main parameters recorded for each patient were; age, BMI (body mass index, infertility type, infertility duration, previous operation, history of disease, smoking, drug usage and serum levels of 25OHVD3, total calcium (Ca and testosterone (TT, gonadotropins, and semen parameters. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of age, BMI, infertility type, infertility duration, and previous operation, history of disease, smoking, drug usage, TT, and 25OHVD3 levels. Serum levels of gonadotropins were significantly lower in the study group (p

  4. Is there a place for nutritional supplements in the treatment of idiopathic male infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Arcaniolo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Infertility affects 15% of couples in fertile age. Male factor is a cause of infertility in almost half of cases, mainly due to oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT. The purpose of this study is to review the effects of nutritional supplements as medical treatment for idiopathic male infertility. Material and methods: A Pub Med and Medline review of the published studies utilizing nutritional supplements for the treatment of male infertility has been performed. Results: Clinical trials on Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Vitamin C. Arginine, Carnitine, N-Acetyl-Carnitine, Glutathione, Coenzyme Q10, Selenium and Zinc were reviewed. Although there is a wide variability in selected population, dose regimen and final outcomes, nutritional supplements both alone and in combination seems to be able to improve semen parameters (sperm count, sperm motility and morphology and pregnancy rate in infertile men. Conclusions: There are rising evidences from published randomized trials and systematic review suggesting that nutritional supplementation may improve semen parameters and the likelihood of pregnancy in men affected by OAT. This improvement, however, is not consistent and there is a wide variation in the treatment regimens used. Well designed and adequately powered RCTs are needed to better clarify the role of nutritional supplements as treatment for male infertility.

  5. Antisperm autoantibodies and infertility Anticuerpos antiespermatozoides e infertilidad

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    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen human infertile couples were studied along with seven fertile control couples in order to determine the presence of antisperm au. toantibodies and to correlate results with their clinical reproductive status, spermogram parameters and the quality of cervical mucus. Immunoglobulins of IgG and IgA isotypes were evaluated on spermatozoa by the direct immunobead technique and in serum and cervical mucus by the indirect method. The following differences were found: Nine of 14 male patients but only 1 of 7 male controls had IgG on spermatozoa (p= 0.042 and OR= 10.8. Seven out of 14 male patiens and 1 of 7 controls were positive for IgA on spermatozoa (p= 0.12. Infertile males had a higher frequency of abnormal spermogram parameters as compared to controls (p= 0.0029 and OR= 3.32. Interestingly, the presence of only IgG in serum appeared to be a "protective factor" against IgG on sperm; only one out of the 16 positive males contradicted this observation. Para determinar la presencia de anticuerpos antiespermatozoides y correlacionarla con la situación reproductiva, el espermograma y la calidad del moco cervical, se estudiaron 7 parejas sanas, con hijos, y 14 infértiles. Se determinaron por las técnicas directa e indirecta de inmunoesferas los anticuerpos de los isotipos IgG e IgA en espermatozoides, suero y moco cervical. En 9 de los 14 hombres infértiles y en 1 de los 7 fértiles se encontraron anticuerpos IgG en la superficie de los espermatozoides (p= 0.042 y una Razón de disparidad [RD] = 10.8 y 8 de éstos también tuvieron IgA en los espermatozoides. El número de pruebas alteradas en el espermograma de los hombres infértiles fue significativamente mayor (p= 0.0029 y RD = 3.32. Tanto en los hombres infértiles como en los fértiles la presencia de sólo IgG en el suero parece ser un "factor de protección" contra IgG en los espermatozoides; de los 16 hombres que presentaron anticuerpos, fuera en el suero o en los espermatozoides, s

  6. Patients’ Knowledge about Causes and Solutions of Infertility in South West Nigeria

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    Olukunmi ‘Lanre OLAITAN

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility inability to conceive after exposure to continuous unprotected sex for twelve months, is a major cause of marriage conflict in south west Nigeria. Knowledge of causes and solutions to infertility among selected patients were assessed in 18 hospital/fertility centre across the 6 states in south west geo-political zone of Nigeria. Aims and objectives: To assess the knowledge of patients about causes and solutions to infertility in south west Nigeria. Methods/study Design: A survey of a consecutive sample of 390 cases of infertility were carried out in 18 hospital/fertility centers with a total of 65 cases of infertility evaluated in each of the 6 States centers between 2009 – 2012. Chi-square statistics was employed to test the hypotheses formulated at α=0.05 level of significance. Results/Findings: The knowledge of causes and solutions to infertility in the patients were established in all the States; (Lagos, Ogun, Oyo, Osun, Ondo and Ekiti. The commonest causes of infertility among these patients were, RTIs, damaged fallopian tubes, anovulation, poor semen analysis, distorted uterus. Low libido, previous use of IUCDs and uterine fibroids representing 81%, 70%, 68.7%, 65.9%, 65.9%, 65.7%, 65.3% and 62% respectively. The least common causes were taking of psychoactive drugs and working in hot condition/wearing of tight underclothing which was seen in 33.7% and 38.5% of the patients respectively. The patients also have knowledge about solutions of infertility in this order, that ART, regular sexual intercourse, taking hormonal drugs, antibiotics of choice, multivitamins and surgical removal of fibroids as follows; 72.3%, 69.2% 69%, 66.9%, 65.4% and 64.6% respectively. However, the least common solutions according to the patients are seen thus; engaging in varieties of sexual styles/positions, adoption of a child, corrective tubal surgery and wearing of loose/free underclothing representing 25.1%, 33.6%, 33.8% and 35

  7. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikkel Fode; Sheila Krogh-Jespersen; Nancy L Brackett; Dana A Ohl; Charles M Lynne; Jens Sonksen

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms.Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction,ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities.Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic and retroperitoneal surgery,diabetes,congenital spinal abnormalities,multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury.Erectile dysfunction can be managed by an increasingly invasive range of treatments including medications,injection therapy and the surgical insertion of a penile implant.Retrograde ejaculation is managed by medications to reverse the condition in mild cases and in bladder harvest of semen after ejaculation in more severe cases.Anejaculation might also be managed by medication in mild cases while assisted ejaculatory techniques including penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation are used in more severe cases.If these measures fail,surgical sperm retrieval can be attempted.Ejaculation with penile vibratory stimulation can be done by some spinal cord injured men and their partners at home,followed by in-home insemination if circumstances and sperm quality are adequate.The other options always require assisted reproductive techniques including intrauterine insemination or in vitrofertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection.The method of choice depends largely on the number of motile sperm in the ejaculate.

  8. Hormonal parameters in incidental varicoceles and those causing infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R W; Perez-Marrero, R A; Crawford, V A; McKay, D E

    1986-05-01

    The gonadotropin responses to a 4-hour infusion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the prolactin (PRL) responses to a bolus injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), and seminal plasma dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels were assessed before and 6 to 12 months after varicocelectomy was performed in 56 infertile men with varicoceles and sperm densities less than 30 X 10(6)/ml. The men were divided into four groups, determined by their sperm densities and hormonal parameters. Groups I (18 men) and II (12 men) had sperm densities less than 10 X 10(6)/ml, and groups III (16 men) and IV (10 men) had sperm densities of 11 to 30 X 10(6)/ml. The men from groups I and III had excessive preoperative gonadotropin and PRL responses, and lower-than-normal seminal plasma DHT levels. The men in groups II and IV had normal hormonal values. After operation, 12 of the men from group I and 11 from group II had improvements in seminal and hormonal parameters. The other men in these two groups and all of the men in groups II and IV had no changes in seminal and hormonal parameters after operation. This study indicates that an assessment of these hormonal parameters may be useful in predicting which men with varicoceles are likely to have an improvement in sperm density after varicocele repair.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of infertility-related male hormonal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathrins, Martin; Niederberger, Craig

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of infertility-related hormonal dysfunction in men requires an understanding of the hormonal basis of spermatogenesis. The best method for accurately determining male androgenization status remains elusive. Treatment of hormonal dysfunction can fall into two categories - empirical and targeted. Empirical therapy refers to experience-based treatment approaches in the absence of an identifiable aetiology. Targeted therapy refers to the correction of a specific underlying hormonal abnormality. However, the tools available for inferring the intratesticular hormonal environment are unreliable. Thus, understanding the limitations of serum hormonal assays is very important for determining male androgen status. Furthermore, bulk seminal parameters are notoriously variable and consequently unreliable for measuring responses to hormonal therapy. In the setting of azoospermia owing to spermatogenic dysfunction, hormonal therapy - relying on truly objective parameters including the return of sperm to the ejaculate or successful surgical sperm retrieval - is a promising treatment. This approach to the treatment of fertility-related hormonal dysfunction in men contrasts with the current state of its counterpart in female reproductive endocrinology. Treatment of male hormonal dysfunction has long emphasized empirical therapy, whereas treatment of the corollary female dysfunction has been directed at specific deficits.

  10. Infertility in reproductive-age female cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jennifer M; Kelvin, Joanne Frankel; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2015-05-15

    Improved survival rates among reproductive-age females diagnosed with cancer have increased the focus on long-term quality of life, including maintenance of the ability to conceive biological children. Cancer-directed therapies such as high-dose alkylating agents and radiation to the pelvis, which deplete ovarian reserve, radiation to the brain, which affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and surgical resection of reproductive structures can decrease the likelihood of having biological children. Standard fertility preservation strategies such as embryo and oocyte cryopreservation before the onset of therapy offer the opportunity to conserve fertility, but they may not be feasible because of the urgency to start cancer therapy, financial limitations, and a lack of access to reproductive endocrinologists. Ovarian tissue freezing is considered experimental, with limited data related to pregnancies, but it minimizes treatment delay. Studies evaluating gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues have had mixed results, although a recent randomized, prospective study in women with breast cancer demonstrated a protective effect. Fertility preservation programs are increasingly being developed within cancer programs. In this article, we describe risks to infertility and options for preservation, raise psychosocial and ethical issues, and propose elements for establishing an effective fertility preservation program.

  11. The relationship between body mass index and sexual function in infertile women: A cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Safieh Jamali; Hossein Zarei; Athar Rasekh Jahromi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility as the bitterest life experience can affect sexual function. Many studies have shown agitation, depression, marital dissatisfaction, and sexual dysfunction as the psychological outcomes resulting from infertility. Many factors, including body mass index, influence the female sexual function. Objective: This study aimed to assess the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction and the relationship between sexual function and body mass index in the Iranian infertile women wh...

  12. Causes of male infertility: a 9-year prospective monocentre study on 1737 patients with reduced total sperm counts

    OpenAIRE

    Punab, M.; Poolamets, O; Paju, P.; Vihljajev, V.; Pomm, K.; Ladva, R.; Korrovits, P.; Laan, M

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What are the primary causes of severe male factor infertility? SUMMARY ANSWER Although 40% of all patients showed primary causes of infertility, which could be subdivided into three groups based on the severity of their effect, ~75% of oligozoospermia cases remained idiopathic. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY There are few large-scale epidemiological studies analyzing the causes of male factor infertility. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A prospective clinical-epidemiological study was cond...

  13. Association of Obesity with Hormonal Imbalance in Infertility: A Cross-Sectional Study in North Indian Women

    OpenAIRE

    Seth, Bhavna; Arora, Sarika; Singh, Ritu

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play an important role in the development and regulation of reproductive function and the menstrual cycle of women. Extremes of body weight tend to affect the homeostasis of the hypothalamo–pituitary–gonadal axis. This cross-sectional study was carried out in 113 women (57 with primary infertility and 56 with secondary infertility) in the age group 20–35 years, presenting for hormonal evaluation of infertility in a tertiary care hospital. After preliminary clinical evaluation, anthro...

  14. Infertility among women working in horticulture. A follow-up study in the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Hannerz, Harald; Feveile, Helene; Bonde, Jens Peter; Burr, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    The possible association between employment in horticulture with potential exposure to pesticides and female infertility was examined by identification of women with hospital contact due to infertility and working in horticulture through the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register. This follow-up study gave a standardized incidence ratio of 1.06 (95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.32) for treatment of infertility in women working in horticulture compared with the standard population and did not confirm that women working in the horticultural industry are at increased risk for infertility.

  15. Don't Give Up! A Cyber-ethnography and Discourse Analysis of an Online Infertility Patient Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mihan

    2017-01-06

    Infertility affects women across the socioeconomic spectrum; however, it is by no means egalitarian in its distribution, nor uniform in its lived experience. Evidence shows striking disparities by income, race, and education in infertility prevalence, access to infertility services, and success rates after receiving infertility treatments. However, few studies so far have investigated disparities in patients' access to psychological support during the infertility journey. This paper undertakes a cyber-ethnography of the online patient forum, "Finding a Resolution for Infertility," hosted by RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association. It also draws from interviews with 54 infertility patients recruited from the forum. Our aim was to examine how social support operates within this virtual realm, by examining how the forum's language, norms, and values create and enforce categories of deserving and belonging among site users. We find that the forum's discourse privileges an infertility narrative we term the "persistent patient," in which a patient exhaustively researches treatment options, undergoes multiple cycles of treatment despite repeated failures, and ultimately achieves success (a healthy baby). Meanwhile, there is little to no discursive space for discussion of the financial and social resources necessary to act in accordance with this script. Thus, women without such resources can be alienated, silenced, and denied mental health support by this online community.

  16. Infertility among women working in horticulture. A follow-up study in the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Hannerz, Harald; Feveile, Helene

    2009-01-01

    The possible association between employment in horticulture with potential exposure to pesticides and female infertility was examined by identification of women with hospital contact due to infertility and working in horticulture through the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register. This follow......-up study gave a standardized incidence ratio of 1.06 (95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.32) for treatment of infertility in women working in horticulture compared with the standard population and did not confirm that women working in the horticultural industry are at increased risk for infertility....

  17. A review of management of infertility in Nigeria: framing the ethics of a national health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinloye, Oluyemi; Truter, Ernest J

    2011-01-01

    Infertility has recently been construed to be a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa. This problem seems to be viewed as of low priority with reference to the effective and efficient allocation of available health resources by national governments as well as by international donors sponsoring either research or service delivery in the public health sector. In this paper the problem of infertility in Nigeria is surveyed with a view to assessing the ethical dimension of proposals to manage infertility as a public sector priority in health care delivery. The population/individual and public/private distinction in the formulation of health policy has ethical implications that cannot simply be ignored and are therefore engaged in critically assessing the problem of infertility. Cost-utility analysis (such as Quality Adjusted Life-Year composite index) in the management of infertility in Nigeria entails the need for caution relevant to the country's efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals. This should remain the case whether the ethical evaluation appeals to utilitarian or contractarian (Rawlsian) principles. The "worst off " category of Nigerians includes (1) underweight children less than 5 years of age, with special concern for infants (0-1 years of age) and (2) the proportion of the population below a minimum level of dietary consumption. The Rawlsian ethic implies that any Federal Ministry of Health policy aimed at establishing public programs for infertility management can be considered a "fair" allocation and expenditure if, and only if, the situation for these two cohorts is not thereby made worse. Nigerian health policy cannot assume this type of increased allocation of its resources to infertility care without it being hard pressed to warrant defensible moral or rational argument.

  18. Interventional study to find out effect of human chorionic gonadotropin and antioxidants on idiopathic male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata V. Padvi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Male contributes about 50% for cases with combined male and female infertility. When the cause is not known, it is term as idiopathic infertility. It affects 25% of men. Many advances have been made in reproductive medicine which provides great opportunities, couples which were considered untreatable now have got chance to have their own babies. Various ART procedures like ICSI have been proven as an efficient therapy in severe male factor infertility. However, the cost per cycle and complications such as multiple gestations cannot be ignored. Medical management of infertility can be specific or empirical depending on etiology. Specific medical management is use when certain etiology is identified. However, in absence of specific etiology use of empirical medical treatment can be attempted in order to improve treatment results. In this study our aim is to evaluate the effect of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG and antioxidants on semen parameters in men with idiopathic male infertility. Methods: Thirty men with abnormal semen parameters were included in study. Patients were treated with injection hCG-2000 IU three times a week for three months along with the antioxidants. After 3 months of treatment repeat semen analysis were performed and results were compared with pre-treated seminal parameters. Results: Results showed significant increase in sperm count (p value ≤ 0.001, total motility (p value=<0.001, and progressive forward motility (p value = <0.001, while no significant difference is seen in rest of the parameters. Conclusions: Use of hCG and antioxidants in idiopathic male infertility can significantly improve seminal parameters in idiopathic male infertility.

  19. Effects of a psychological intervention on Quality of life in infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Abedinia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine factors affecting depression in infertile couples and effect of psychological intervention on pregnancy rate of infertile couples.Materials and Methods: In this study, 638 infertile patients referring to a university infertility clinic were evaluated. Among them, 140 couples with different levels of depression in at least one of the spouses were found and the study was continued by dividing them randomly into two groups, entering a randomized clinical trial. Patients in the case group received 6-8 sessions of psychotherapy before infertility treatment and were given daily Fluoxetin 20- 60 mg at the same period, and the control group did not receive any intervention. Three questionnaires including Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Stress Scale (Holmes-Rahe and a sociodemographic questionnaire were applied for all patients. Pregnancy rate was compared between two groups.Results: Depression was initially found in 48% of women and 23.8% of men. The mean±SD Beck scores fell from 18.7±9.7 to 10.7±5.8 in the group psychologically treated before receiving infertility treatment (P<0.001. Pregnancy rate was 47.1% in case group and 7.1% in control group. Pregnancy rate showed a significant relation with duration and cause of infertility and the level of stress in both groups (P< 0.001. Pregnancy rate was shown to be higher in couples with a second level of education in men (P< 0.001.Conclusion: The psychological intervention was found useful in alleviating depression and promoting pregnancy rate, it is crucial to mandate psychology counseling in all fertility centers.

  20. Accumulation of Organic Matter in Infertile Red Soils and Its Ecological Importance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Field experiments on the decomposition of organic materials and the accumulation of organic carbon in infertile red soils were conducted at the Ecological Experimental Station of Red Soil, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the potential of CO2 sequestration by reclamation and improving the fertility of these soils was estimated. Results showed that in infertile red soils, the humification coefficients of organic materials were rather high, ranging from 0.28 to 0.63 with an average of 0.43, which was 41% higher than those in corresponding red soils with medium fertility. This was mainly attributed to the high clay content, high acidity and low native organic matter content of infertile red soils. Compared to those in corresponding normal red soils, the decomposition rates of organic materials were significantly lower in infertile red soils in the first 2 years, thereafter no significant difference was observed between those in the two kinds of soils. Depending on the kind and amount of organic manure applied, the soil properties and the rotation systems, annual application of organic manure with a rate of 4 500 to 9 000 kg ha-1 increased the organic carbon content in surface 20 cm of infertile red soils by 2.1~7.5 g kg-1 with an average of 4.7 g kg-1 within the first 5 years. The organic carbon content in infertile red soils which received organic manure annually increased linearly in the first 10 years, thereafter it slowed down, implying that the fertility of the infertile red soils could reach middle or high level in 10 years if the soil was managed properly. It was estimated that through exploitation of wastelands, re-establishment of fuel forests and improvement of soil fertility, soils in red soil region of China could sequester an extra 1.50×1015 g of atmospheric CO2.

  1. Lessons from elective in vitro fertilization (IVF in, principally, non-infertile women

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    Gleicher Norbert

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We here report the first investigation of exclusively elective in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles in women with no apparent history of infertility. Since IVF outcome in women with infertility are always influenced by underlying causes of infertility, a study on non-infertile women may offer new insights. Methods We investigated 88 females without history of infertility in 109 consecutive elective IVF cycles, almost exclusively performed for purposes of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS; i.e., elective gender selection. The following questions were addressed: (i impact of PGS on IVF pregnancy chances; (ii impact of transfer of 1 vs. ≥2 embryos on IVF pregnancy chances; (iii correlation of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH levels to embryo ploidy (iv effect of gonadotropin dosage used in stimulation on available embryos for transfer; and (v in form of a 1:1 case control study, compared 33 elective PGS cycles with matched control cycles without PGS, performed in couples with either prior tubal ligations and/or severe male factor infertility as indication of IVF. Results The overall clinical pregnancy rate for the group was 36.7%; pregnancy was associated with number of euploid (P = 0.009 and number of embryos transferred (P = 0.001. Odds of pregnancy were 3.4-times higher if ≥4 euploid embryos were produced in comparison to Conclusions This study suggests that outcomes of elective IVF cycles may significantly deviate from infertility-associated cycles. Affirming proof of concept for PGS, utilizing day-3 embryo biopsy and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH, both widely held responsible for earlier failures to establish such proof, suggests that the principal cause of prior failures were likely not insufficient laboratory techniques but poor patient selection for PGS. Such a conclusion questions the current reintroduction of PGS with improved techniques and technologies in absence of prior determination of suited

  2. Study of association between ovarian volume with the number of antral follicles and third day of menstruation FSH in infertile patients referred to Omid Persian gulf infertility Clinic

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    Elham Rahmani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ovarian reserve tests have appeared as important, useful and new tools in evaluation of infertile women and by doing these tests, we can do for infertile couples advanced and necessary measures quickly. The goal of this study was to investigate the association between ovarian volume, Antral follicle counts and serum level of FSH at the third day of menstruation. Material and Methods: This study was conducted on 78 women between 18-49 years old who referred to Omid Persian gulf infertility Clinic with complaining of infertility in 2014. In patients who had inclusion criteria, measurement of ovarian volume were done with calculation of three diameters and the number of antral follicles by using vaginal ultrasound in third day of menstruation. Also, in this patients were measured the levels of FSH&LH in third day of menstruation. Pearson correlation coefficient were used to examine the relationship between ovarian volume and the number of Antral follicles and serum levels. Results: ovarian volume and Antral follicle counts (p=0.0001 decreased and serum level of FSH (p=0.0001 and LH (p=0,022 increased significantly with increasing of age. There was a strong positive correlation between ovarian volume and Antral follicle counts (r=0.96, p=0.0001 and there was a strong reversed correlation between ovarian volume and Antral follicle counts with FSH (r=0.50, p=0.0001. Conclusion: By increasing age, ovarian volume and Antral follicle counts decreased and FSH&LH levels increased. In fact, in the initial study of infertile patients, even by diagnosis of reduction in ovarian volume and Antral follicle count should be performed advanced therapies and there is no need to wait for expensive tests result.

  3. Infertility: an approach to management in a district hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiander, A

    1990-07-01

    Up to 1/3 of women of child bearing age are infertile in certain African areas. Over 1000 patients registered at Bawku Hospital, Upper East Region, Ghana during an 18-month period, where a scheme for the investigation and treatment of infertile patients was established. The 5 main causes of infertility are: 1) tubal damage; 2) male factor; 3) anovulation; 4) uterine factor; and 5) unexplained. Special clinics are set up for infertility; outpatient staff are recruited. A preprinted questionnaire should be used for a uniform approach. The one used in Bawku is shown in the appendix. Health talks should be given. They should use the local language be at the right level, and use visual aids. In large clinics, numbers should be used to insure a 1st come, 1st served basis. A treatment protocol is important. When the patient 1st walks in, the infertility form is completed; appropriate investigations are done--hemoglobin, VDRL, seminal analysis, and cervical or high vagina swabs, and others--and the results are reviewed. The patient is encouraged to keep a menstrual calendar for 3 months. At the 2nd visit, the menstrual calendar is reviewed. A pelvic examination and a tubal patency test (TPT) are done. At the 3rd visit, abdominal and pelvic examinations are done and a TPT. Then patients can be diagnosed and counselled accordingly. At the last visit, further explanation is given, further TPTs are done if necessary, and anovulation is treated with clomiphene. The visits are spread out over 6 months. In unexplained fertility cases, the couple is told there is nothing wrong, they should keep trying. The idea that the man may be causing the infertility is foreign to many communities. This needs changing. 20% of infertility is due to male factor in Bawku. Male infertility is hard to cure. Cultural considerations prevent the clinician from telling the patient that her partner is infertile. They will tell her that there is nothing wrong with her. Approximately 15% become pregnant

  4. Sperm counts and sperm sex ratio in male infertility patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael L Eisenberg; Lata Murthy; Kathleen Hwang; Dolores J Lamb; Larry I Lipshultz

    2012-01-01

    In recent years,investigators have noted a trend toward a declining proportion of male births in many industrialized nations.While men bear the sex-determining chromosome,the role of the female partner as it pertains to fertilization or miscarriage may also alter the gender ratio.We attempted to determine a man's secondary sex ratio (F1 generation) by directly examining the sex chromosomes of his sperm.We examined our male infertility clinic database for all men who had undergone a semen fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).Patient demographic and semen parameters were recorded.Chi-squared analysis was used to compare gender ratios (Ychromosomes/total chromosomes).Multivariable logistic regression was used to predict the odds of possessing a Y-bearing sperm after accounting for demographic and semen parameters.A total of 185 men underwent sperm FISH.For the entire cohort,the proportion of Y chromosome-bearing sperm was 51.5%.Men with less than five million motile sperm had a significantly lower proportion of Y chromosome-bearing sperm (50.8%) compared to men with higher sperm counts (51.6%; P=0.02).After multivariable adjustment,a higher sperm concentration,total motile sperm count and semen volume significantly increased the odds of having a Y chromosome-bearing sperm (P<0.01).As a man's sperm production declines,so does the proportion of Y chromosome-bearing sperm.Thus,a man's reproductive potential may predict his ability to sire male offspring.

  5. PREVALENCE OF Y CHROMOSOME MICRODELETIONS IN IRANIAN INFERTILE MEN

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    F. Akbari Asbagh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the frequency of Y chromosome AZF (Azoospermia Factor subregions, microdeletions in patients with idiopathic nonobstructive azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia. Subjects included 40 men who had been referred to infertility clinics for assisted reproduction, 37 were azoospermic and 3 had severe oligospermia. Medical history and physical exam revealed no evidence of infection, obstruction of seminal tract, endocrine failure or chromosomal anomalies. Hormonal study was performed for all patients. Twenty six men had biopsies of the testes including 11 patients with hypospermatogenesis, 9 patients with maturation arrest, 4 patients with sertoli cell only syndrome and 2 patients with tubular sclerosis. In 14 men who did not have a testicular biopsy multiple, epididymal and testicular sperm aspirations under anesthesia failed and testicular sperm extraction was subsequently performed for ICSI. DNA was isolated from blood samples. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of 11 loci spanning the AZFa, AZFb and AZFc subregions of the Y chromosome using sY81, sY83, sY127, sY130, sY131, sY147, sY149, sY157, sY158, sY254 and sY276 was performed. Microdeletions of the Y chromosome were found in two of the patients (5%, who had azoospermia. Deletions were restricted to DAZ (deleted in azoospermia locus in AZFc subregion. One of the patients had a history of cryptorchidism and the second had undergone a left side varicocelectomy. Testicular pathology showed sertoli cell only syndrome in both of them. Our experience adds to the current logic that men with azoospermia or severe oligospermia should be evaluated for Yq11 microdeletions before deciding to operate varicoceles or else scheduling them for assisted reproductive techniques.

  6. Transrectal ultrasonography in infertile patients with persistently elevated bacteriospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandro La Vignera; Aldo E. Calogero; Alessandro Arancio; Roberto Castighone; Gaetano De Grande; Enzo Vicari

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To identify and define prostate and seminal vesicle abnormalities in patients with chronic male accessory gland infection (MAGI) who failed to respond to antibacterial treatment. Methods: We selected 67 consecutive patients with MAGI and persistently elevated bacteriospermia (≥ 106 colony forming units [CFU]/mL) after three antibiotic courses. Fourteen infertile patients with initial chronic microbial (≥ 106 CFU/mL) MAGI who responded to antibac- terial treatment (< 103 CFU/mL) served as a control group. All patients and controls underwent transrectal ultrasonog- raphy (TRUS) scans and semen analysis. Patients with low seminal plasma volume (< 1.5 mL) underwent both pre- ejaculatory and post-ejaculatory TRUS examination. Results: TRUS revealed multiple abnormalities indicative of: (I) bilaterally extended prostato-vesiculitis (group A: 52 cases, 77.6%) (nine of these patients also had micro-emphyse- matous prostate abscess); and (ii) prostato-vesiculitis with unilateral or bilateral sub-obstruction of the ejaculatory ducts (group B: 15 cases, 22.4%). Mean sperm concentration, total sperm number, ejaculate volume and pH value were significantly higher in group A than in group B. In addition, sperm forward motility and the percentage of normal forms were significantly worse than in controls, whereas leukocyte concentration was significantly higher in group A. Group B patients had all sperm parameters, but their pH values, significantly different from those of controls. Confusion: Although antibiotic therapy is considered suitable when microbial MAGI is suspected, it is impossible to account for a poor response to antibiotics merely on the basis of conventional criteria (clinical history, physical and ejaculate signs). Thus, TRUS may be helpful in the follow-up of these patients.

  7. [Which is the method of choice for evaluating uterine cavity in infertility workup?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Benkaddour, Y; Gervaise, A; Fernandez, H

    2010-12-01

    Uterine factors represent only 2 to 3 % of infertility, but intra-uterine lesions are much more common in infertile women (40-50 %). These lesions can interfere with spontaneous fertility and can compromise pregnancy rates in assisted reproduction. Exploration of the uterine cavity is actually one of the basic explorations in infertility workup. Classically, hysterosalpingography and transvaginal sonography are most communally used for this purpose. Hysteroscopy, with the development and miniaturization of equipment, is currently simple, outpatient cost-effective exploration and it is considered the gold standard for diagnosis of intrauterine lesions. However, the benefit of the systematic use of hysteroscopy in the initial assessment of infertility remains unclear and the exploration of the uterine cavity in the initial assessment of infertility should be based on hysterosalpingography or hysterosonography. Systematic hysteroscopy before IVF is widely accepted practice that is supposed to improve pregnancy rates but still lacks scientific evidence. After repeated implantation failure in IVF cycles, uterine cavity should be reevaluated by hysteroscopy and this practice has been demonstrated to improve pregnancy rates.

  8. Zinc levels in seminal plasma are associated with sperm quality in fertile and infertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagar, Abasalt Hosseinzadeh; Marzony, Eisa Tahmasbpour; Chaichi, Mohammad Javad

    2009-02-01

    Zinc has antioxidative properties and plays an important role in scavenging reactive oxygen species. We hypothesized that in the absence of Zn, the possibility of increased oxidative damage exists that would contribute to poor sperm quality. Therefore, measurement of seminal Zn in the seminal plasma of males with a history of subfertility or idiopathic infertility is necessary and can be helpful in fertility assessment. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the relationship between Zn levels in seminal plasma with sperm quality in fertile and infertile men. Semen samples were provided by fertile (smoker [n = 17], nonsmoker [n = 19]) and infertile men (smoker [n = 15], nonsmoker [n = 21]). After semen analysis, concentrations of Zn, Mg, Ca, Na, and K in the seminal plasma of all groups were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Element concentrations in seminal plasma of all groups were in the order Na > K > Ca > Zn > Mg. Fertile subjects, smoker or not, demonstrated significantly higher seminal Zn levels than any infertile group (P sperm count (P sperm (P sperm and idiopathic male infertility.

  9. Local Signaling Environments and Human Male Infertility: What Can Be Learned from Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalam, Roopa L.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most prevalent public health problems facing young adult males in today’s society. A clear, treatable cause of infertility cannot be determined in a large number of these patients, and a growing body of evidence suggests that infertility in many of these men may be due to genetic causes. Studies utilizing animal models, and most importantly, mouse knockout technology, have been integral not only for the study of normal spermatogenesis but also for identifying proteins essential for this process, which in turn are candidate genes for causing human male infertility. Successful spermatogenesis depends on a delicate balance of local signaling factors, and this review focuses specifically on the genes that encode these factors. Normal functioning of all testicular cell types is not only essential for normal fertility but, as recently hypothesized, may also be crucial to prevent germ cell oncogenesis. Analysis of these processes using mouse models in vivo has provided investigators with an invaluable tool to effectively translate basic science research to the research of human disease and infertility. PMID:20456819

  10. Seminal miRNA Relationship with Apoptotic Markers and Oxidative Stress in Infertile Men with Varicocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, Laila A.; Nabil, Nashaat I.; Osman, Ihab; Mostafa, Rashad; Farag, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This study aimed to assess seminal miRNA relationship with seminal apoptotic markers and oxidative stress (OS) in infertile men associated with varicocele (Vx). Methods. In all, 220 subjects were divided into the following groups: fertile normozoospermic men, fertile normozoospermic men with Vx, infertile oligoasthenoteratozoospermic (OAT) men without Vx, and infertile OAT men with Vx. They were subjected to history taking, clinical examination, and semen analysis. In their semen, the following were estimated: miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 using quantitative real-time PCR, apoptotic markers (BAX, BCL2) protein expression, and OS markers [malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)]. Results. The mean levels of seminal miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 were significantly reduced in infertile OAT men with Vx compared with other groups coupled with Vx grade and Vx bilaterality. Seminal miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 were positively correlated with sperm concentration, total sperm motility, sperm normal morphology, seminal GPx, and seminal BCL2 and negatively correlated with seminal MDA and seminal BAX. Conclusions. Seminal miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 are decreased in infertile OAT men with Vx associated with increased Vx grade and Vx bilaterality. In addition, they are positively correlated with sperm parameters and negatively correlated with OS, apoptotic markers. PMID:28105423

  11. Seminal miRNA Relationship with Apoptotic Markers and Oxidative Stress in Infertile Men with Varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taymour Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This study aimed to assess seminal miRNA relationship with seminal apoptotic markers and oxidative stress (OS in infertile men associated with varicocele (Vx. Methods. In all, 220 subjects were divided into the following groups: fertile normozoospermic men, fertile normozoospermic men with Vx, infertile oligoasthenoteratozoospermic (OAT men without Vx, and infertile OAT men with Vx. They were subjected to history taking, clinical examination, and semen analysis. In their semen, the following were estimated: miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 using quantitative real-time PCR, apoptotic markers (BAX, BCL2 protein expression, and OS markers [malondialdehyde (MDA and glutathione peroxidase (GPx]. Results. The mean levels of seminal miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 were significantly reduced in infertile OAT men with Vx compared with other groups coupled with Vx grade and Vx bilaterality. Seminal miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 were positively correlated with sperm concentration, total sperm motility, sperm normal morphology, seminal GPx, and seminal BCL2 and negatively correlated with seminal MDA and seminal BAX. Conclusions. Seminal miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 are decreased in infertile OAT men with Vx associated with increased Vx grade and Vx bilaterality. In addition, they are positively correlated with sperm parameters and negatively correlated with OS, apoptotic markers.

  12. Study of psychiatric disorders among fertile and infertile women and some predisposing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ali Noorbala

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine prevalence and predisposing factors of psychiatric disorders among infertile in comparison to fertile women. Materials and Methods:  By a descriptive- analytic study in Vali-e-asr Reproductive Health Research Center, 300 women entered the research.   Symptom Checklist -90 -Revised (SCL-90-R test and structured researcher questionnaires were applied for all patients. Demographic characteristics and predisposing psychological and personality factors were recorded and psychological symptoms were scaled. For data analysis, SPSS-11-5 software system, chi-square and T-test were used.  P-value <0.05 was considered significant.Results: Results showed that 44% of infertile and 28.7% of fertile women had psychiatric disorders. Using SCL-90-R test, the highest mean scores among infertile women were found for paranoid ideation, depression and interpersonal sensitivity scales and the lowest scores were related to psychoticism and phobic anxiety scales. Interpersonal sensitivity, depression, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideas and psychoticism scales were significantly different between infertile and fertile women (p<0.05. Housewives were at a statistically significant higher risk for psychiatric disorders as compared to working women (p<0.001. Conclusion: The significantly higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders among infertile women mandates a more serious attention from gynecologists, psychiatrists and psychologists regarding to diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

  13. Mucuna pruriens Reduces Stress and Improves the Quality of Semen in Infertile Men

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    Kamla Kant Shukla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was undertaken to assess the role of Mucuna pruriens in infertile men who were under psychological stress. Study included 60 subjects who were undergoing infertility screening and were found to be suffering from psychological stress, assessed on the basis of a questionnaire and elevated serum cortisol levels. Age-matched 60 healthy men having normal semen parameters and who had previously initiated at least one pregnancy were included as controls. Infertile subjects were administered with M. pruriens seed powder (5 g day−1 orally. For carrying out morphological and biochemical analysis, semen samples were collected twice, first before starting treatment and second after 3 months of treatment. The results demonstrated decreased sperm count and motility in subjects who were under psychological stress. Moreover, serum cortisol and seminal plasma lipid peroxide levels were also found elevated along with decreased seminal plasma glutathione (GSH and ascorbic acid contents and reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase activity. Treatment with M. pruriens significantly ameliorated psychological stress and seminal plasma lipid peroxide levels along with improved sperm count and motility. Treatment also restored the levels of SOD, catalase, GSH and ascorbic acid in seminal plasma of infertile men. On the basis of results of the present study, it may be concluded that M. pruriens not only reactivates the anti-oxidant defense system of infertile men but it also helps in the management of stress and improves semen quality.

  14. Genital Tract Infection in Asymptomatic Infertile Men and Its Effect on Semen Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Golshani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Male urogenital tract infection plays an important role in men infertility. Asymptomatic bacteriospermia has been paid attention as a major cause of male infertility. The aim of this study was to microbiological investigation of semen sample of infertile men attending to infertility clinic and evaluation of the effects of bacteriospermia on semen quality. Eighty eight infertile men were evaluated by standard bacterial culture method. Standard semen analysis was performed according to WHO guidelines. Among total cases, 35.22% (31 cases showed at least one pathogen: 10.22% E.coli, 9.09% Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (Saprophyticcus, 6.81% Group B Streptococci, 5.88% Entrococci, 5.68% Candida sp., 2.27% Gonococci, 2.27% Staphylococcus aureus, 1.13% Klebsiella sp. and 1.13% Providencia sp. There was a significant relation between the bacteriospermia and the rate of no motile and morphologically abnormal sperms (P0.05. It seems that leukocytospermia is a poor marker to predict bacteriospermia.

  15. CAG repeat length in androgen receptor gene and male infertility in Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaad, Y M; Shahin, D; Elkholy, A A-M; Mosbah, A; Badawy, W

    2012-02-01

    The CAG repeat and its association with infertility has been debatable. Therefore, this study was planned to assess the distribution of CAG repeat expansion in Egyptian patients and to investigate its association with male infertility. Forty-five infertile men were eligible for the study in addition to 20 aged-matched fertile males as control. Semen analysis, scrotal sonography, assay of serum testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH), and determination of the CAG repeat number within exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene were carried out. Statistically significant difference was found between infertile and control groups regarding sperm count, sperm motility, serum FSH level and CAG repeats (P CAG repeats (P = 1.0) was found between oligozoospermic and asthenospermic groups; negative correlation was found between CAG repeat length and sperm count, and a positive correlation was found between CAG repeat length and serum FSH (P CAG repeat may be associated with lower AR function with derangement of sperm production, and this may contribute to male infertility in Egyptian men.

  16. Human catalase gene polymorphism (CAT C-262T) and risk of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouhi, S; Salehi, Z; Bahadori, M H; Mahdavi, M

    2015-02-01

    Infertility is the failure of a couple to engender after endeavouring at least one full year of unprotected intercourse. It has been reported that reactive oxygen species contributed to pathogenesis of various disease. To inactivate ROS cells biosynthesise several antioxidant enzymes, one of them is catalase which contributes H2 O2 to H2 O and O2 . This study set out to delineate the association of catalase C-262T polymorphism with idiopathic male infertility. The study included 195 men with idiopathic infertility and 190 healthy volunteers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes. Genotype and allele frequencies were determined in patients and controls using allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR). The prevalence of genotype frequencies of the CAT CC/CT/TT was 31.79%, 65.12% and 3.07%, respectively, in infertile subjects, as against 24.73%, 55.26% and 20%, respectively, in healthy volunteers. Statistical analysis has emerged significant difference from the comparison of either genotype (P catalase C-262T polymorphism indicates that CAT-262T/T genotype confers less susceptibility to male infertility. Further studies with larger numbers of patients are required for further evaluation and confirmation of our finding.

  17. Social Skills and Perceived Maternal Acceptance-Rejection in Relation to Depression in Infertile Women

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    Fariba Yazdkhasti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study examines the relationship between infertile women’s social skills andtheir perception of their own mothers’ acceptance or rejection, and the role this relationship playsin predicting self-reported depression.Materials and Methods: This was a correlational study. 60 infertile women aged 25 to 35 yearsparticipated in a self-evaluation. A Social Skills Inventory, Parental Acceptance and RejectionQuestionnaire and Beck Depression Inventory were used to measure social skills, acceptancerejection and depression. Data was analyzed by SPSS software, using independent two-sample ttest, logistic regression, and ANOVA.Results: Findings showed that there are significant differences between depressed and not depressedinfertile women in their perceptions of acceptance and rejection by their mothers. Further, women'sperceptions of rejection are a more significant predictor of depression among less socially skilledinfertile women than among those who are more socially skilled. Less socially skilled women didnot show symptoms of depression when they experienced their mothers as accepting. In generalthe results of this study revealed that poorer social skills were more predictive of depression whilegood social skills moderate the effect of infertile women’s perceptions of their mothers' rejection.At the same time, the findings showed that infertile women's perceptions of acceptance moderatedthe effects of poorer social skills in predicting depression.Conclusion: Results suggest that the perception of mothers’ rejection and poor social skills are thekey factors that make infertile women prone to depression.

  18. Is global access to infertility care realistic? The Walking Egg Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombelet, Willem

    2014-03-01

    Until very recently, the problem of infertility in developing countries has been ignored at all levels of healthcare management. Because many preventable or treatable diseases still claim millions of lives, and due to limited resources, provision of infertility care is not on the resource allocation agenda at all, prevention of sexually transmitted diseases remaining the number one priority. Tubal infertility due to sexually transmitted diseases, unsafe abortion and post-partum pelvic infections is the main cause of infertility. Most cases are only treatable with assisted reproduction technology, which are either unavailable or too costly. In December 2007, an expert meeting was organized in Arusha, Tanzania by the Walking Egg non-profit organization in co-operation with ESHRE. The meeting was the start of a global project aimed at increasing diagnostic and therapeutic options for childless couples in resource-poor countries. From the start, the Walking Egg Project has approached this problem in a multidisciplinary and global manner. It gathers medical, social, ethical, epidemiological, juridical and economic scientists to discuss and work together towards its goal. The final objective of the Walking Egg Project is the implementation of infertility services in many developing countries, preferably integrated in existing family planning and mother care services.

  19. Risk of adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes after high technology infertility treatment: a comprehensive systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Stefano; Homburg, Roy; Santagni, Susanna; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Orvieto, Raoul

    2016-11-04

    In the literature, there is growing evidence that subfertile patients who conceived after infertility treatments have an increased risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications and this is particularly true for patients who conceived through use of high technology infertility treatments. Moreover, high technology infertility treatments include many concomitant clinical and biological risk factors. This review aims to summarize in a systematic fashion the current evidence regarding the relative effect of the different procedures for high technology infertility treatments on the risk of adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcome. A literature search up to August 2016 was performed in IBSS, SocINDEX, Institute for Scientific Information, PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar and an evidence-based hierarchy was used to determine which articles to include and analyze. Data on prepregnancy maternal factors, low technology interventions, specific procedures for male factor, ovarian tissue/ovary and uterus transplantation, and chromosomal abnormalities and malformations of the offspring were excluded. The available evidences were analyzed assessing the level and the quality of evidence according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine guidelines and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, respectively. Current review highlights that every single procedure of high technology infertility treatments can play a crucial role in increasing the risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications. Due to the suboptimal level and quality of the current evidence, further well-designed studies are needed.

  20. Diagnosis and prognosis of male infertility in mammal: the focusing of tyrosine phosphorylation and phosphotyrosine proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Woo-Sung; Rahman, Md Saidur; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2014-11-01

    Male infertility refers to the inability of a man to achieve a pregnancy in a fertile female. In more than one-third of cases, infertility arises due to the male factor. Therefore, developing strategies for the diagnosis and prognosis of male infertility is critical. Simultaneously, a satisfactory model for the cellular mechanisms that regulate normal sperm function must be established. In this regard, tyrosine phosphorylation is one of the most common mechanisms through which several signal transduction pathways are adjusted in spermatozoa. It regulates the various aspects of sperm function, for example, motility, hyperactivation, capacitation, the acrosome reaction, fertilization, and beyond. Several recent large-scale studies have identified the proteins that are phosphorylated in spermatozoa to acquire fertilization competence. However, most of these studies are basal and have not presented an overall mechanism through which tyrosine phosphorylation regulates male infertility. In this review, we focus of this mechanism, discussing most of the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in spermatozoa that have been identified to date. We categorized tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in spermatozoa that regulate male infertility using MedScan Reader (v5.0) and Pathway Studio (v9.0).

  1. A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN SONOHYSTEROSALPINGOGRAP HY AND HYSTEROSALPINGOGRAPHY IN THE EVALUATION OF INFERTILITY

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    Saanida

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries and a dnexa with the help of trans-vaginal ultrasonography, and to evalua te the efficacy of SSG as compared to HSG in detecting fallopian tube patency. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Prospective Study of 61 patients for two years in 20-40 yrs age groups referred to Ra diology Department in SAT hospital presenting with primary or secondary infertility, Al l the patients were evaluated with SSG and HSG. Patients with signs of acute genital inflammat ion or bleeding were excluded from the study. RESULTS: In all the 61 patients presenting with infertility s onosalpingograpy was performed in out of which 46 were primary infertility and 15 were secondary infertility. The detection and characterization of uterine cavity ab normalities was more accurate with SSG than by radiographic HSG. In addition, SSG could detect u terine wall abnormalities, peritoneal abnormalities and ovarian abnormalities which could not be detected on HSG CONCLUSION: Sonohysterosalpingography (SSG is an effective meth od for detecting fallopian tube patency. It has a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 84% with respect to Hysterosalpingography (HSG.The absence of radiation and the fact that it can be performed as an outpatient procedure makes SSG an excellent screening test for evaluatio n of infertile women.

  2. Suicidal risk among infertile women undergoing in-vitro fertilization: Incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Chen; Yelena, Stukalina; Reut, Ben Kimhy; Adrian, Shulman; Sami, Hamdan

    2016-06-30

    Despite the fact that depression and other emotional distress are well documented in infertile women, little is known about the relationship between infertility and suicidal risk. The aim of this cross sectional study was to examine the rate of suicide risk (suicidal ideation/suicidal attempts) among 106 infertile women visiting Infertility and In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Hospital Unit, and to identify the demographic, medical and clinical correlates to suicidal risk. The incidence of suicide risk was 9.4%. Suicidal women were more likely to be childless or had fewer children and experienced higher levels of depressive symptoms. In addition, they reported more frequently on denial, social withdrawal and self-blame coping strategies compared to participants without suicidal risk. A multiple logistic regression model revealed that being childless, using non-positive reappraisal and exhibiting depressive symptoms were significant predictors of suicide risk in the future. These results suggest that routine assessment of suicidal risk and depression should be provided for infertile women in the course of IVF. Furthermore, future interventions should focus on helping them acquire different emotions regulation strategies and provide alternative skills for positive coping.

  3. High Prevalence of Infertility among Women with Graves’ Disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

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    Alessandra Quintino-Moro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the prevalence of infertility in women with Graves’ disease (GD or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT and associated factors. Material and Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Endocrinology Clinic for Thyroid Autoimmune Diseases, with 193 women aged 18–50 years with GD and 66 women aged 18–60 years with HT. The women were interviewed to obtain data on their gynecological and obstetric history and family history of autoimmune diseases. Their medical records were reviewed to determine the characteristics of the disease and to confirm association with other autoimmune diseases. Infertility was defined as 12 months of unprotected sexual intercourse without conception. Results. The prevalence of infertility was 52.3% in GD and 47.0% in HT. Mean age at diagnosis was 36.5 years and 39.2 years, in GD and HT, respectively. The mean number of pregnancies was lower in women who were 35 years old or younger at diagnosis and was always lower following diagnosis of the disease, irrespective of age. The only variable associated with infertility was a shorter time of the disease in HT. Conclusions. The prevalence of infertility was high in women with GD and HT and affected the number of pregnancies in young women.

  4. A case-control study of risk factors for male infertility in Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Friday Okonofua; Uche Menakaya; S. O. Onemu; L. O. Omo-Aghoja; Staffan Bergstrom

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the association between selected potential socio-demographic and behavioral risk factors and infertility in Nigerian men. Methods: There were two groups in this study. One group consisted of 150 men with proven male infertility, and the other consisted of 150 fertile men with normal semen parameters. Both were matched for age,place of residence and key socio-demographic variables. They were compared for sexual history, past medical and surgical history, past exposures to sexually transmitted infections and treatment, past and current use of drugs as well as smoking and alcohol intake history. Results: Infertile men were significantly more likely than fertile men to report having experienced penile discharge, painful micturition and genital ulcers, less likely to seek treatment for these symptoms and more likely to seek treatment with informal sector providers. Multivariate analysis showed that male infertility was significantly associated with bacteria in semen cultures, self-reporting of previous use of traditional medications and moderate to heavy alcohol intake, but not with smoking and occupational types. Conclusion:Infertility is associated with various proxies of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and poor healthcare-seeking behavior for STIs in Nigerian men.

  5. High Prevalence of Infertility among Women with Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintino-Moro, Alessandra; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise E; Tambascia, Marcos; Machado, Helymar da Costa; Fernandes, Arlete

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the prevalence of infertility in women with Graves' disease (GD) or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and associated factors. Material and Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Endocrinology Clinic for Thyroid Autoimmune Diseases, with 193 women aged 18-50 years with GD and 66 women aged 18-60 years with HT. The women were interviewed to obtain data on their gynecological and obstetric history and family history of autoimmune diseases. Their medical records were reviewed to determine the characteristics of the disease and to confirm association with other autoimmune diseases. Infertility was defined as 12 months of unprotected sexual intercourse without conception. Results. The prevalence of infertility was 52.3% in GD and 47.0% in HT. Mean age at diagnosis was 36.5 years and 39.2 years, in GD and HT, respectively. The mean number of pregnancies was lower in women who were 35 years old or younger at diagnosis and was always lower following diagnosis of the disease, irrespective of age. The only variable associated with infertility was a shorter time of the disease in HT. Conclusions. The prevalence of infertility was high in women with GD and HT and affected the number of pregnancies in young women.

  6. Psychological and cross-cultural aspects of infertility and human sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco Palha, Antonio; Lourenço, Mário F

    2011-01-01

    The influences of culture are present in different areas of human health, as is the case with reproductive behaviors. To have a child means to have made a responsible decision. If conception takes longer to happen, these patients require the help of doctors to stimulate the refractory body. In light of data suggesting that psychosexual symptoms may interfere with fertility, successful infertility treatment and the ability to tolerate ongoing treatment rely on paying attention to these symptoms. Infertility is not only a fault of nature, but it is also something that does not respect the established order, a fact that casts doubt on the truth of the femininity and masculinity representations prevailing in a culture. Infertility is always a disease of the couple, and it is the couple that must be treated. The same is true when it comes to addressing sexual dysfunction. The dominant values and cultural practices indelibly affect the sexuality of infertile couples. In order to be credible, humanization of the treatment protocols for infertile couples must take into account the problems of intimacy as well as the sexual health of these couples.

  7. Abnormal meiotic recombination in infertile men and its association with sperm aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kyle A; Wong, Edgar Chan; Chow, Victor; Nigro, Mark; Ma, Sai

    2007-12-01

    Defects in early meiotic events are thought to play a critical role in male infertility; however, little is known regarding the relationship between early meiotic events and the chromosomal constitution of human sperm. Thus, we analyzed testicular tissue from 26 men (9 fertile and 17 infertile men), using immunofluorescent techniques to examine meiotic chromosomes, and fluorescent in situ hybridization to assess sperm aneuploidy. Based on a relatively small sample size, we observed that 42% (5/12) of men with impaired spermatogenesis displayed reduced genome-wide recombination when compared to the fertile men. Analysis of individual chromosomes showed chromosome-specific defects in recombination: chromosome 13 and 18 bivalents with only a single crossover and chromosome 21 bivalents lacking a crossover were more frequent among the infertile men. We identified two infertile men who displayed a novel meiotic defect in which the sex chromosomes failed to recombine: one man had an absence of sperm in the testes, while the other displayed increased sex chromosome aneuploidy in the sperm, resulting in a 45,X abortus after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. When all men were pooled, we observed an inverse correlation between the frequency of sex chromosome recombination and XY disomy in the sperm. Recombination between the sex chromosomes may be a useful indicator for identifying men at risk of producing chromosomally abnormal sperm. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms that contribute to sperm aneuploidy in infertile men could aid in risk assessment for couples undergoing assisted reproduction.

  8. Combined manual therapy techniques for the treatment of women with infertility: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Mary Ellen

    2012-10-01

    Current management options for infertility, including hormone therapy, intrauterine insemination, and in vitro fertilization, tend to be expensive, are not necessarily covered by insurance, and carry different levels of short-term and long-term health risks. Many of the issues that contribute to infertility can be traced to scar tissue, fascial restriction, and lymphatic congestion in the pelvic region. Manual therapy techniques exist to release fascial restrictions, to mobilize tight ligaments, and to drain congested lymphatics, all of which can be applied to the reproductive system. In this case series, 10 infertile women were treated with 1 to 6 sessions of manual therapy applied to the pelvic region. Techniques included muscle energy, lymphatic drainage, and visceral manipulation. Six of the 10 women conceived within 3 months of the last treatment session, and all 6 of those women delivered at full term.

  9. Unexplained infertility as primary presentation of celiac disease, a case report and literature review

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    Mohammadreza Ghadir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac sprue (gluten sensitive enteropathy is an autoimmune disease which is hereditary and its pathology mainly bases on immunologic intolerance to gluten. It has a vast variety of signs and symptoms and its clinical features range from a silent disease to a typical gastrointestinal disorder. In this study we reviewed and summarized some other related issues about this disease and its relation with infertility.Case: The case is a 26 years old lady who had referred to a gynecologist because of infertility for 2 years and later it revealed that she has celiac sprue.Conclusion: Screening for its silent or subtle types especially among suspicious cases such as unexplained infertility seems to be a cost effective action. Meanwhile, in time administration of a gluten-free diet can lead to an almost complete cure

  10. Are severe depressive symptoms associated with infertility-related distress in individuals and their partners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal; Prritano, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    these psychosocial factors. Study funding/competing interests: Authors Brennan Peterson and Matthew Pirritano have no financial disclosures for this study. Camilla Sandal Sejbaek and Lone Schmidt have received research grants fromthe Danish Health Insurance Foundation (J. nr. 2008B105) and Merck Sharp & Dohme...... the individual and partner level. What is known already?: An infertility diagnosis, the stress of medical treatments and a prior history of depression are risk factors for future depression in those undergoing fertility treatments. Studies examining the impact of severe depressive symptoms on infertility...... of the findings: This study adds to the growing body of literature using the couple as the unit of analysis to study the relationship between depression and infertility distress. Recommendations for medical and mental health professionals that underscore the potential risk factors for depressed men and women who...

  11. Evidence-based lifestyle and pharmacological management of infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael F; Ledger, William L

    2012-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age and by far the most common cause of anovulatory infertility. Lifestyle change alone, and not in combination with pharmacological ovulation induction such as clomifene citrate or metformin, is generally considered the first-line treatment for the management of infertile anovulatory women with PCOS who are overweight or obese. Clomifene citrate should be considered as a first-line pharmacological therapy to improve fertility outcomes. Second-line medical treatments may include ovulation induction with gonadotropins (in clomifene citrate-resistant or clomifene citrate failure women) or laparoscopic ovarian drilling (in clomifene citrate-resistant women) or possibly with metformin combined with clomifene citrate (in clomifene citrate-resistant women). There is currently insufficient evidence to recommend aromatase inhibitors over that of clomifene citrate in infertile anovulatory women with PCOS in general or specifically in therapy-naive or clomifene citrate-resistant women with PCOS.

  12. Addressing the particular recordkeeping needs of infertile Orthodox Jewish couples considering the use of donated eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazi, Richard V; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2014-03-01

    Infertility counseling is a specialized field that will continue to grow in coming years as the impact of infertility and its treatment is documented more and more in terms of emotional, physical, social and life consequences. Counselors should anticipate issues that may arise in the future and assist couples in their efforts to address them. We report here on recordkeeping issues of possible future concern that should be addressed when Orthodox Jewish couples make use of donor eggs. Good medical practice values the importance of understanding the patient's individual concerns and values, including the complex psychological, sociological and cultural context in which they experience their infertility. Good counseling anticipates and addresses future problems about which patients might not currently be aware.

  13. The Dynamics of a Nonautonomous Predator-Prey Model with Infertility Control in the Prey

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    Xiaomei Feng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonautonomous predator-prey model with infertility control in the prey is formulated and investigated. Threshold conditions for the permanence and extinction of fertility prey and infertility prey are established. Some new threshold values of integral form are obtained. For the periodic cases, these threshold conditions act as sharp threshold values for the permanence and extinction of fertility prey and infertility prey. There are also mounting concerns that the quantity of biological sterile drug is obtained in the process of the prevention and control of pest in the grasslands and farmland. Finally, two examples are given to illustrate the main results of this paper. The numerical simulations shown that, when the pest population is permanet, different dynamic behaviors may be found in this model, such as the global attractivity and the chaotic attractor.

  14. A new rapid and effective method for treatment of unexplained infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelstam, G.; Sjosten, A.; Bjuresten, K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artificial insemination (intrauterine insemination by husband or artificial insemination by husband) is often tried as first treatment for couples with unexplained infertility. Perturbation has previously proved to increase the chance of achieving pregnancy for these couples. The effect...... and insemination cycles for couples with unexplained infertility. METHODS: In a prospective, open study, the patients were randomized, the day before ovulation, during a clomiphene citrate stimulated cycle to either perturbation with low-dose local anaesthetic or no perturbation before insemination. RESULTS......: The perturbation treatment significantly enhanced the clinical pregnancy rate and was well tolerated. No complications were noted. The combined treatment of clomiphene citrate, perturbation and insemination can be used as a cost-effective, first-line treatment for couples with unexplained infertility...

  15. PCR analysis of Yq microdeletions in infertile males,a study from South India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BabuSR; SwarM

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To estimate the frequency of microdeletions in the long arm of Y-chromosome of 20 infertile males from South India.Methods:Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using Y-specific STS of azoospermia factor (AZF) regions i.e.,SY 84 for AZFa,SY 127 for AZFb and SY 254 for AZFc.Results:Of the 20 infertile subjects 3(15%),one azoospermic and two oligozoospermic,showed microdeletions in the AZF region of Y-chromosome.Conclusion:The frequency of deletions involving AZF region of the Y-chromosome is 15% in azoospermic and severely oligozoospermic infertile men.PCR amplification of AZF locus is useful for the diagnosis of microdeletions in the Y-chromosome.

  16. A Case of Secondary Infertility Due to Retention of Fetal Bones in Cervix

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    Alev Ozer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of secondary infertility related to prolonged retention of fetal bones in the cervix is presented. A 34-year-old nulliparous woman was admitted to the hospital with chronic pelvic pain, dyspareunia, and 12%u2013year-long secondary infertility following an induced abortion due to fetal demise. Transvaginal ultrasonography (USG revealed a linear echogenic area around the posterior cervical wall. An hysteroscopic examination confirmed the existence of an irregular calcified mass embedded in the cervix. The mass turned out to be conglomerated fetal bone fragments which probably acted as an intrauterine device. After removal of the cervical mass, the patient conceived spontaneously within four months. The present case report emphasizes the significance of a detailed history and a thorough evaluation by transvaginal USG in the case of secondary infertility following an induced or spontaneous abortion.

  17. Dancing around infertility: the use of metaphors in a complex medical situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer-Wackerly, Angela L; Krieger, Janice L

    2015-01-01

    People use metaphors to cognitively frame their experiences as well as to explain those experiences to others, especially in complex medical situations. However, previous research has not fully explored the extent to which metaphors may be helpful or harmful to achieving well-being. This investigation fills this gap by identifying and explaining metaphor use in the context of infertility. Guided by self-determination theory, in-depth interviews were conducted with 22 women and men who had experienced an inability to conceive a child. Analysis of participant narratives yielded 10 prominent metaphors that reflect how participants' need for competence, autonomy, and relatedness were (and were not) met during their infertility experience. Results indicate that cognitively framing the infertility experience using certain metaphors is more likely to enhance personal and relational well-being, while others may be more harmful. Suggestions for communication with doctors, partners, families, and friends are discussed.

  18. Male infertility: a public health issue caused by sexually transmitted pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenes, Fabrícia; Souza, Raquel P; Bento, Jaqueline C; Teixeira, Jorge J V; Maria-Engler, Silvya S; Bonini, Marcelo G; Consolaro, Marcia E L

    2014-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are caused by several pathogens, including bacteria, viruses and protozoa, and can induce male infertility through multiple pathophysiological mechanisms. Additionally, horizontal transmission of STD pathogens to sexual partners or vertical transmission to fetuses and neonates is possible. Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma spp., human papillomavirus, hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses, HIV-1 and human cytomegalovirus have all been detected in semen from symptomatic and asymptomatic men with testicular, accessory gland and urethral infections. These pathogens are associated with poor sperm quality and decreased sperm concentration and motility. However, the effects of these STD agents on semen quality are unclear, as are the effects of herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma spp., Treponema pallidum and Trichomonas vaginalis, because few studies have evaluated the influence of these pathogens on male infertility. Chronic or inadequately treated infections seem to be more relevant to infertility than acute infections are, although in many cases the exact aetiological agents remain unknown.

  19. Dropout is a problem in lifestyle intervention programs for overweight and obese infertile women : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaerts, M. A. Q.; Kuchenbecker, W. K. H.; Mol, B. W.; Land, J. A.; Hoek, A.

    2013-01-01

    What are the dropout rates in lifestyle intervention programs (LIPs) for overweight and obese infertile women and can intervention- or patient-related baseline factors associated with dropout be identified in these women? The median dropout rate was 24 in overweight and obese infertile women who par

  20. Women's Perceptions of Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Failed Infertility Treatment on Marital and Sexual Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Margaret V.; Byrne, T. Jean

    1991-01-01

    Examined immediate and long-term effects of infertility treatment on the marital and sexual relationship, as perceived by women (n=40) who failed to become pregnant during treatment. Results indicated infertility treatment significantly affected both marital and sexual satisfaction after treatment was terminated, as well as during treatment. (ABL)

  1. Elevated antithyroid peroxidase antibodies indicating Hashimoto's thyroiditis are associated with the treatment response in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Johannes; Aust, Stefanie; Kurz, Christine; Nouri, Kazem; Wirth, Stefan; Huber, Johannes C; Mayerhofer, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    In infertile women suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies values exceeding the upper level of normal were found in significantly more clomiphene citrate resistant patients compared clomiphene citrate responders and metformin responders. Thus, elevated antiTPO levels are associated with poor treatment response in infertile women who suffer from PCOS.

  2. Age-Specific Serum Anti-Mullerian Hormone and Follicle Stimulating Hormone Concentrations in Infertile Iranian Women

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    Alireza Raeissi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH is secreted by the granulosa cells of growing follicles during the primary to large antral follicle stages. Abnormal levels of AMH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH may indicate a woman’s diminished ability or inability to conceive. Our aim is to investigate the changes in serum AMH and FSH concentrations at different age groups and its correlation with ovarian reserves in infertile women. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed serum AMH and FSH levels from 197 infertile women and 176 healthy controls, whose mean ages were 19-47 years. Sample collection was performed by random sampling and analyzed with SPSS version 16 software. Results: There were significantly lower mean serum AMH levels among infertile women compared to the control group. The mean AMH serum levels from different ages of infertile and control group (fertile women decreased with increasing age. However, this reduction was greater in the infertile group. The mean FSH serum levels of infertile women were significantly higher than the control group. Mean serum FSH levels consistently increased with increasing age in infertile women; however mean luteinizing hormone (LH levels were not consistent. Conclusion: We have observed increased FSH levels and decreased AMH levels with increasing age in women from 19 to 47 years of age. Assessments of AMH and FSH levels in combination with female age can help in predicting ovarian reserve in infertile women.

  3. Genetic Association Between Androgen Receptor Gene CAG Repeat Length Polymorphism and Male Infertility: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bihui; Li, Rui; Chen, Yao; Tang, Qiuqin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Liping; Lu, Chuncheng; Pan, Feng; Ding, Hongjuan; Xia, Yankai; Hu, Lingqing; Chen, Daozhen; Sha, Jiahao; Wang, Xinru

    2016-03-01

    The association between polymorphism of androgen receptor gene CAG (AR-CAG) and male infertility in several studies was controversial. Based on studies on association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in recent years, an updated meta-analysis is needed. We aimed to evaluate the association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in advantage of the data in all published reports.We searched for reports published before August 2015 using PubMed, CNKI, VIP, and WanFang. Data on sample size, mean, and standard deviation (SD) of AR-CAG repeat length were extracted independently by 3 investigators.Forty-four reports were selected based on criteria. The overall infertile patients and azoospermic patients were found to have longer AR-CAG repeat length (standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.10-0.28, P CAG repeat length was longer in infertile men in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races (SMD = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.08-0.43, P CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility. The subgroup study on races shows that increased AR-CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races. Increased AR-CAG repeat length was also associated with azoospermia.This meta-analysis supports that increased androgen receptor CAG length is capable of causing male infertility susceptibility.

  4. Fertility potential after unilateral orchiopexy: an age independent risk of subsequent infertility when biopsies at surgery lack germ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Thorup, J M; Lindenberg, S

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated whether adult fertility potential was better when unilateral orchiopexy was done at ages 2 to 6 years or later, and we identified those at risk for infertility.......We evaluated whether adult fertility potential was better when unilateral orchiopexy was done at ages 2 to 6 years or later, and we identified those at risk for infertility....

  5. Infertility and Subjective Well-Being: The Mediating Roles of Self-Esteem, Internal Control, and Interpersonal Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined relationship between self-esteem, perceived control, interpersonal conflict between spouses, global and intimacy life quality, and stress produced by infertility in 185 married infertile couples. Found that fertility problem stress had indirect negative effects on life quality via its mediating effects on self-esteem, internal control,…

  6. Varicocele and Male Factor Infertility Treatment : A New Meta-analysis and Review of the Role of Varicocele Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baazeem, Abdulaziz; Belzile, Eric; Ciampi, Antonio; Dohle, Gert; Jarvi, Keith; Salonia, Andrea; Weidner, Wolfgang; Zini, Armand

    2011-01-01

    Context: Varicocele is a common condition, found in many men who present for infertility evaluation. Objective: To assess the effect of varicocelectomy on male infertility. Evidence acquisition: A literature search was performed using Embase and Medline. Literature reviewed included meta-analyses an

  7. Comparison of abdominal skin temperature between fertile and infertile women by infrared thermography: A diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Junyoung; Kim, Hyunho

    2016-10-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the differences in abdominal temperature (AT) between fertile (n=206; age) and infertile (n=250) women between the ages of 30 and 39 years. We evaluated the differences in two distinctive skin temperatures by thermography: ΔT1 (CV8 index) - difference in temperature between the mid-abdomen (CV8 acupuncture area) and ventral upper arm (VUA) and ΔT2 (CV4 index) - difference in temperature between the lower abdomen (CV4 acupuncture area) and VUA. The results indicated that the ΔT1 and ΔT2 of infertile women were significantly lower (by 1.05°C and 0.79°C, respectively; p<0.001, both) compared to those of fertile women. Additionally, the area under the curve of ΔT1 (0.78) was greater compared to that of ΔT2 (0.736), and its threshold was set at 0.675°C, by which, the sensitivity and specificity of ΔT1 for determination of fertility were found to be 80.8% and 68.4%, respectively. In conclusion, infertility is associated with lower AT. The decrease in AT in infertile women might be due to poor blood perfusion to the core muscles and tissues of the body. These findings provide a basis for further research for evaluation of clinical feasibility of thermography for analysis of infertility in women. Further evaluation of the influence of AT on fertility outcomes is required to determine the causal relationship between AT and infertility.

  8. A CHROMOSOMAL KARYOTYPING STUDY IN MALE WITH PRIMARY INFERTILITY IN A WESTERN WEST BENGAL POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT It is interesting that the primary infertility is a major problem in a society like ours where the population is going to be exploded. It is because that infertility severely affects the family or couples psychological harmony, sexual life & social status. Of the many factors responsible for primary male infertility which may be manifested as azoospermia or oligozoospermia, one of the important etiological factors is genetic abnormality affecting the Y chromosome. Among the different parameters known to be responsible for normal spermatogenesis, a small region in the long arm of Y chromosome, containing genes or gene cluster, defined as ‘Azoospermia Factor’ (AZF is definitely maintains the normal spermatogenesis to occur. Any abnormality in that part of the Y chromosome in the form of deletion or deviation of normal gene arrangement produces azoospermia or oligozoospermia and subsequently produces primary male infertility. SETTINGS Bankura Sammilani Medical College and Hospitals, Bankura, West Bengal. DESIGN Simple random sampling method. DURATION OF STUDY November 2013 to march 2015 (One and a half year. METHOD 80 males suffering from primary infertility with azoospermia or oligozoospermia were selected attending the antenatal outpatient department. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 2.5% patients showed numerical chromosomal abnormality i.e. Klinefelter syndrome (47XXY. Structural abnormalities were detected in 3.75% patients in the form of deletion in the long arm of Y chromosome and ring chromosome. RESULT Out of 80 patients 5 patients showed chromosomal abnormalities in the form of both numerical as Klinefelter syndrome (2 patients & qualitative as deletions (2 patients & ring chromosome (1 patient. CONCLUSION Y chromosomal abnormalities either numerical or structural, is an important factor of male infertility as oligospermia or azoospermia. These abnormalities can be easily detected by simple aids like karyotyping and does not require high

  9. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC LAPAROHYSTEROSCOPY IN THE MANAGE MENT OF INFERTILE FEMALES

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    Richa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: AIMS: To evaluate the role of diagnostic laparohysterosco py in the management of infertile females. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The study was conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynaecology, S.N. Medi cal College, Agra. Total 100 infertile couples attending the outpatient department of obst etrics and Gynaecology were selected. 60 couples belonged to primary infertility group wh ile 40 couples belonged to secondary infertility group. METHODS AND MATERIAL : All patients underwent transvaginal sonography with sonosalpingography. Then all patien ts were subjected to combined laparohysteroscopy including chromopertubation and the results were recorded. All the findings were noted on case sheet and a master char t was prepared. X 2 test was applied to find out significance of tests. P value < 0.05 was considered as significant. RESULTS: The laparoscopy was abnormal in 68% cases: Peritoneal a nd peri-tubal adhesions (29%, phimosis / hydrosalpinx (19%, polycystic ovaries ( 26%, tubo-ovarian masses (16%, endometriosis (4%, congenital abnormalities (10%, myomas (3%, bilateral tubal blockage(49% and unilateral tubal blockage(17%. T he operative laparoscopy was performed in 53% of cases. The hysteroscopy was abn ormal in 50% cases : uterine synechias (11%, thick endometrium (15%, endometri al polyps (7%, myomas (2%, atrophy (6%, congenital abnormalities (7% and foe tal bones (2%. The operative hysteroscopy procedure was performed in 38% cases. The pregnancy rate was 32.30%. CONCLUSION: . Results show that laparohysteroscopy has a promis ing role in diagnosing and treating infertility. Thus laparohysteroscopy h as emerged as a new hope for infertile couples before they proceed to time-consuming and e xpensive in-vitro fertilization

  10. Differences in the endocannabinoid system of sperm from fertile and infertile men.

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    Sheena E M Lewis

    Full Text Available Male infertility is a major cause of problems for many couples in conceiving a child. Recently, lifestyle pastimes such as alcohol, tobacco and marijuana have been shown to have further negative effects on male reproduction. The endocannabinoid system (ECS, mainly through the action of anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG at cannabinoid (CB(1, CB(2 and vanilloid (TRPV1 receptors, plays a crucial role in controlling functionality of sperm, with a clear impact on male reproductive potential. Here, sperm from fertile and infertile men were used to investigate content (through LC-ESI-MS, mRNA (through quantitative RT-PCR, protein (through Western Blotting and ELISA expression, and functionality (through activity and binding assays of the main metabolic enzymes of AEA and 2-AG (NAPE-PLD and FAAH, for AEA; DAGL and MAGL for 2-AG, as well as of their binding receptors CB(1, CB(2 and TRPV1. Our findings show a marked reduction of AEA and 2-AG content in infertile seminal plasma, paralleled by increased degradation: biosynthesis ratios of both substances in sperm from infertile versus fertile men. In addition, TRPV1 binding was detected in fertile sperm but was undetectable in infertile sperm, whereas that of CB(1 and CB(2 receptors was not statistically different in the two groups. In conclusion, this study identified unprecedented alterations of the ECS in infertile sperm, that might impact on capacitation and acrosome reaction, and hence fertilization outcomes. These alterations might also point to new biomarkers to determine male reproductive defects, and identify distinct ECS elements as novel targets for therapeutic exploitation of ECS-oriented drugs to treat male fertility problems.

  11. Risk factors for atypical endometrial hyperplasia in infertile women:possible association with polycystic ovarv syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Qun; Shen Huan; Tian Li; Zhu Sainan; Chen Xi

    2008-01-01

    Objective:Endometrial hyperplasia is considered as a precursor of endometrial carcinoma,in which oncogenic potential is low in hyperplasia without atypia,but high in a-typical hyperplasia.The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for atypical endo-metrial hyperplasia in infertile women.Methods:Fifty four infertile women with endometrial hy-perplasia,which were selected from a large cohort of 2 098 women who desired for the future childbearing in our center,were diagnosed by hysteroscopy with directed biopsies or dilation and curettage(D&C),including 44 with hyperplasia without atypia,10 with atypical hyperplasia.Clinical characteristics were recorded in terms of age,body mass index(BMI),parity,insulin resistance,polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS).Statistical comparison was made between women with hyperplasia without atypia and atypical hyperplasia.Logistic regression analysis Was em-ployed to assess the contribution of PCOS,obesity and insulin resistance to atypical hyperplasia.Results:The incidence of endometrial hyperplasia in infertile women Was 2.57%(54/2098),which included 1 0 women(0.48%)were diagnosed as atypical hyperplasia.PCOS in women with atypical hyperplasia(70%,7/10)was significantly higher than those of hyperplasia with-out atypia(27.27%,12/44).Stepwise regression analysis showed that PCOS contributed maximally to atypical endometrial hyperplasia in infertile women.Conclusion:PCOS is an independent risk factor for atypical endometrial hyperplasia in women with infertility.The infertile women with PCOS are at an increased risk for atypical endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer.

  12. Ultrasound characterization of the seminal vesicles in infertile patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Vignera, Sandro; Vicari, Enzo; Condorelli, Rosita; D' Agata, Rosario [Section of Endocrinology, Andrology and Internal Medicine and Master in Andrological, Human Reproduction and Biotechnology Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Calogero, Aldo E., E-mail: acaloger@unict.it [Section of Endocrinology, Andrology and Internal Medicine and Master in Andrological, Human Reproduction and Biotechnology Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) may experience infertility because the disease affects negatively many aspects of reproduction, including seminal vesicle (SV) function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ultrasound characteristics of the SVs of infertile patients with DM because no such data are available in these patients. To accomplish this, 25 infertile patients with type 2 DM and no other known causes of sperm parameter abnormalities were selected. Two different control groups were also enrolled: healthy men with idiopathic infertility (n = 25) and infertile patients with male accessory gland infections (MAGI) (n = 25), a well-studied clinical model of SV inflammation. Patients and controls underwent prostate-vesicular transrectal ultrasonography after 1 day of sexual abstinence before and 1 h after ejaculation. The following SV ultrasound parameters were recorded: (1) body antero-posterior diameter (ADP); (2) fundus APD; (3) parietal thickness of the right and left SVs; (4) number of polycyclic areas within both SVs; (5) fundus/body ratio; (6) difference of the parietal thickness between the right and the left SV; and (7) pre- and post-ejaculatory APD difference. Patients with DM had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher F/B ratio compared to controls and patients with MAGI. Only patients with MAGI had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher number of polycyclic areas. Controls and MAGI patients have a similar pre- and post-ejaculatory difference of the body SV APD, whereas this difference was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in patients with DM. In conclusion, this study showed that infertile patients with DM have peculiar SV ultrasound features suggestive of functional atony.

  13. Effectiveness of psychiatric and counseling interventions On fertility rate in infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramezanzadeh F.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the psycho-social model of diseases, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychiatric intervention on the pregnancy rate of infertile couples.Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 638 infertile patients referred to a university infertility clinic were evaluated. Among them, 140 couples with different levels of depression in at least one of the spouses were included in this substudy. These couples were divided randomly into two groups. The patients in the case group received 6-8 sessions of psychotherapy before starting infertility treatment and were given fluoxetine 20-60 mg per day during the same period. The control group did not receive any intervention. Three questionnaires including the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Holmes-Rahe stress scale and a socio-demographic questionnaire were applied for all patients. The clinical pregnancy rates of the two groups, based on sonographic detection of the gestational sac six weeks after LMP, were compared. The data were analyzed by paired-T test, T-test, χ2 and the logistic regression method. Results: The pregnancy rate was 47.1% in the case group and 7.1% in the control group. The pregnancy rate was significantly related to the duration and cause of infertility and the level of stress in both groups (p< 0.001. The pregnancy rate was shown to be higher in couples in which the male has a secondary level of education (p< 0.001.Conclusions: Psychiatric interventions greatly improve pregnancy rates, and it is therefore crucial to mandate psychiatric counseling in all fertility centers in order to diagnose and treat infertile patients with psychiatric disorders and help couples deal with stress.

  14. Right to assisted reproductive technology: overcoming infertility in low-resource countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C

    2009-08-01

    This article examines the high prevalence of primary and secondary infertility in low-resource countries. Provision of assisted reproductive technology (ART) to overcome both female and male infertility is in line with the reproductive rights agenda developed at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo 15 years ago. In addition to the right to control fertility, reproductive rights must encompass the right to facilitate fertility when fertility is threatened. Facilitation of fertility may require resort to ART, among both men and women. Egypt is highlighted as a positive example of progress in this regard.

  15. Metabolic syndrome and prostate abnormalities in male subjects of infertile couples

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Lotti; Giovanni Corona; Linda Vignozzi; Matteo Rossi; Elisa Maseroli; Sarah Cipriani; Mauro Gacci; Gianni Forti; Mario Maggi

    2014-01-01

    No previous study has evaluated systematically the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and prostate-related symptoms and signs in young infertile men. We studied 171 (36.5 ± 8.3-years-old) males of infertile couples. MetS was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel. All men underwent hormonal (including total testosterone (TT) and insulin), seminal (including interleukin-8 (IL-8), seminal plasma IL-8 (sIL-8)), scrotal and transrectal ...

  16. Super Infection of An Ovarian Dermoid Cyst with Actinomyces in An Infertile Woman

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    Saghar Salehpour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile patient.This is a case-report study for evaluation a couple with male factor infertility, who was a goodcandidate for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, while a 10 cm dermoid cyst was foundin the woman’s right ovary. Patient complained of pelvic pain, intermittent fever, dysmenorrhea,and dyspareunia. The cyst was extracted using laparoscopy, whilst in histopathologicalexamination, an actinomycosis super infection was reported. Actinomyc super infection of anovarian dermoid cyst is a very rare incident which can also occur in women with no history ofintrauterine device (IUD usage or previous fertility.

  17. Super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Saghar; Akbari Sene, Azadeh

    2013-07-01

    We present super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile patient. This is a case-report study for evaluation a couple with male factor infertility, who was a good candidate for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), while a 10 cm dermoid cyst was found in the woman's right ovary. Patient complained of pelvic pain, intermittent fever, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia. The cyst was extracted using laparoscopy, whilst in histopathological examination, an actinomycosis super infection was reported. Actinomyc super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst is a very rare incident which can also occur in women with no history of intrauterine device (IUD) usage or previous fertility.

  18. Experience of a comprehensive infertility clinic in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, S S; Chew, P C; Tsakok, M

    1976-09-01

    The diagnosis, treatment, and pregnancy outcome for 709 infertile couples who attended the comprehensive infertility clinic of the University of Singapore's Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology from 1970-1974 are presented. Investigations for most of the couples were completed within 3 months. This short investigative period was attributable primarly to the use of laparoscopy to diagnose female infertility. In 22.5% of the 709 cases infertility was due to ovulation problems. After treatment eith either clomiphene, human pituitory gonadotrophin, or a combination of clomiphene and human chorinic gonadotrophin, pregnancy was achieved in 30.6% of the cases. 11.7% or 83 of the 709 infertility cases were attributed to blocked tubes. 28 of these patients received tubal surgery, but only 14.3% or 4 of these cases resulted in pregnancy. In 14.7% of the 709 cases, infertility was attributed to endometriosis. 90% of the patients with endometriosis were asymptomatic, and the liesons discovered by laparoscopy, were very small. Pregnancy eventually occurred in 27.6% of the cases treated for endometriosis. In 5.8% of the 709 cases infertility was due to mixed gynecological problems, and after treatment, conception occurred among 31.7% of the cases. For 23.1%, or 147 of the 709 couples, infertility was attributed to either oligospermia or azoospermia. 85 of the 147 patients were given hormone therapy and in 12.9% of these cases pregnancy was achieved. 14 of the 147 patients were treated with antibotics for 3-6 months and in 14.3% of these cases pregnancy was achieved. 9 of the 147 patients were surgically treated and in 4 of these cases pregnancy later occurred. 20 of the 147 couples were treated with artifical insemination of donor semen and in 25.0% of these cases pregnancy occurred. Another 19 of the 147 cases were treated with artificial insemination with the husband's semen and conception occurred in 26.8% of these cases. The remaining 22.1% of the 709 couples were

  19. A review of management of infertility in Nigeria: framing the ethics of a national health policy

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    Akinloye O

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Oluyemi Akinloye1,2, Ernest J Truter21Department of Chemical Pathology, Reproductive and Molecular Endocrinology Unit, College of Health Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Wellness Science, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville Campus, Cape Town, South AfricaAbstract: Infertility has recently been construed to be a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa. This problem seems to be viewed as of low priority with reference to the effective and efficient allocation of available health resources by national governments as well as by international donors sponsoring either research or service delivery in the public health sector. In this paper the problem of infertility in Nigeria is surveyed with a view to assessing the ethical dimension of proposals to manage infertility as a public sector priority in health care delivery. The population/individual and public/private distinction in the formulation of health policy has ethical implications that cannot simply be ignored and are therefore engaged in critically assessing the problem of infertility. Cost–utility analysis (such as Quality Adjusted Life-Year composite index in the management of infertility in Nigeria entails the need for caution relevant to the country's efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals. This should remain the case whether the ethical evaluation appeals to utilitarian or contractarian (Rawlsian principles. The "worst off" category of Nigerians includes (1 underweight children less than 5 years of age, with special concern for infants (0–1 years of age and (2 the proportion of the population below a minimum level of dietary consumption. The Rawlsian ethic implies that any Federal Ministry of Health policy aimed at establishing public programs for infertility management can be considered a "fair" allocation and expenditure if, and only if, the situation for

  20. An Epidemiological and Clinical Survey of Infertility Problems in Henan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程立法; 王敏峥; 杨文秀; 钱伟; 王一鑫

    1993-01-01

    An epidemiological survey of fertility was carried out in two cities and five counties of Henan province in China. 1.96% of couples were found to have primary infertility (2.01% if 12 women with recurrent rrdscarraiges were included ). The etiology, was analysed in 321 couples with primary infertility selected from the sample, In these 321 couples there were malefactors implicated in 26.8% of couples, female factors in 49% and both female and malefactors in 24%. The most commonly identified factors were: Varicocele ( 10.9% ) and ovulations disorders ( 32.08% ) in male and female respectively.

  1. Relationship between seminal malondialdehyde levels and sperm quality in fertile and infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abasalt Hosseinzadeh Colagar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the level of malondialdehyde in seminal plasma of fertile and infertile men and investigate its relationship with sperm quality. Results showed that the mean of ± S.D. MDA concentration in seminal plasma of infertile men (0.94 ± 0.28 nmol/ml was significantly higher than fertile men (0.65 ± 0.17 nmol/ml (p value< 0.001, and had negative relationship with sperm count, motility and morphology. Therefore it could be concluded that increase in lipid peroxidation was associated with sperm membrane destructed and high level of MDA.

  2. Super Infection of An Ovarian Dermoid Cyst with Actinomyces in An Infertile Woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Saghar; Akbari Sene, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    We present super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile patient. This is a case-report study for evaluation a couple with male factor infertility, who was a good candidate for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), while a 10 cm dermoid cyst was found in the woman’s right ovary. Patient complained of pelvic pain, intermittent fever, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia. The cyst was extracted using laparoscopy, whilst in histopathological examination, an actinomycosis super infection was reported. Actinomyc super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst is a very rare incident which can also occur in women with no history of intrauterine device (IUD) usage or previous fertility. PMID:24520476

  3. The Potential Use of Intrauterine Insemination as a Basic Option for Infertility: A Review for Technology-Limited Medical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman M. Abdelkader

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There is an asymmetric allocation of technology and other resources for infertility services. Intrauterine insemination (IUI is a process of placing washed spermatozoa transcervically into the uterine cavity for treatment of infertility. This is a review of literature for the potential use of IUI as a basic infertility treatment in technology-limited settings. Study design. Review of articles on treatment of infertility using IUI. Results. Aspects regarding the use of IUI are reviewed, including ovarian stimulation, semen parameters associated with good outcomes, methods of sperm preparation, timing of IUI, and number of inseminations. Implications of the finding in light of the needs of low-technology medical settings are summarized. Conclusion. The reviewed evidence suggests that IUI is less expensive, less invasive, and comparably effective for selected patients as a first-line treatment for couples with unexplained or male factor infertility. Those couples may be offered three to six IUI cycles in technology-limited settings.

  4. Might uterus transplantation be an option for uterine factor infertility?

    OpenAIRE

    Akar, Münire Erman

    2015-01-01

    Current data on uterus allotransplantation research has been reviewed and summarized. Over the past 15 years, progress in uterus transplantation research has increased dramatically. As a consequence, the first pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation in rats have been reported. The technique has been better defined. Although clinical pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation has been reported in humans, there are still many questions to be answered before ...

  5. Male infertility in long-term survivors of pediatric cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski-Masker, K; Seidel, K D; Leisenring, W; Mertens, A C; Shnorhavorian, M; Ritenour, C W; Stovall, M; Green, D M; Sklar, C A; Armstrong, G T; Robison, L L; Meacham, L R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of male infertility and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors. Methods Within the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, 1622 survivors and 274 siblings completed the Male Health Questionnaire. The analysis was restricted to survivors (938/1622; 57.8%) and siblings (174/274; 63.5%) who tried to become pregnant. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the prevalence of self-reported infertility were calculated using generalized linear models for demographic variables and treatment-related factors to account for correlation among survivors and siblings of the same family. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Among those who provided self-report data, the prevalence of infertility was 46.0% in survivors versus 17.5% in siblings (RR=2.64, 95% CI 1.88-3.70, p < 0.001). Of survivors who met the definition for infertility, 37% had reported at least one pregnancy with a female partner that resulted in a live birth. In a multivariable analysis, risk factors for infertility included an alkylating agent dose score (AAD) ≥ 3 (RR= 2.13, 95% CI 1.69-2.68 for AAD ≥ 3 versus AAD<3), surgical excision of any organ of the genital tract (RR=1.63, 95% CI 1.20-2.21), testicular radiation ≥ 4Gy (RR=1.99, 95% CI 1.52-2.61), and exposure to bleomycin (RR=1.55, 95% CI 1.20-2.01). Conclusion Many survivors who experience infertility father their own children suggesting episodes of both fertility and infertility. This and the novel association of infertility with bleomycin warrant further investigation. Implications for Cancer Survivors Though infertility is common, male survivors reporting infertility often father their own children. Bleomycin may pose some fertility risk. PMID:24711092

  6. Disability, psychiatric symptoms, and quality of life in infertile women: a cross-sectional study in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEZGIN, Hacer; HOCAOGLU, Cicek; GUVENDAG-GUVEN, Emine Seda

    2016-01-01

    Background Infertility is a major life crisis which can lead to the development of psychiatric symptoms and negative effects on the quality of life of affected couples, but the magnitude of the effects may vary depending on cultural expectations. Aim We compare the level of psychiatric symptoms, disability, and quality of life in fertile and infertile women in urban Turkey. Methods This cross-sectional study enrolled 100 married women being treated for infertility at the outpatient department of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Rize Education and Research Hospital and a control group of 100 fertile married women. All study participants were evaluated with a socio-demographic data screening form, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Brief Disability Questionnaire (BDQ), and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results The mean anxiety subscale score and depression subscale score of HADS were slightly higher in the infertile group than in controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. The proportion of subjects with clinically significant anxiety (i.e., anxiety subscale score of HADS ≥11) was significantly higher in infertile women than in fertile women (31% v. 17%, χ2=5.37, p=0.020), but the proportion with clinically significant depressive symptoms (i.e., depression subscale score of HADS >8) was not significantly different (43% v. 33%, χ2=2.12, p=0.145). Self-reported disability over the prior month was significantly worse in the infertile group than in the controls, and 4 of the 8 subscales of the SF-36 - general health, vitality, social functioning, and mental health - were significantly worse in the infertile group. Compared to infertile women who were currently working, infertile women who were not currently working reported less severe depression and anxiety and better general health, vitality, and mental health. Conclusions Married women from urban Turkey seeking treatment for infertility do not have

  7. Infertility and preterm delivery, birthweight, and Caesarean section: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basso, Olga; Baird, Donna D.

    2003-01-01

    , longitudinal studies enrolling couples irrespective of infertility treatment. METHODS: We used data from the Danish National Birth Cohort: 55 906 singleton live births from women who reported their waiting time to pregnancy (TTP) and other covariates in an interview during the 2nd trimester of pregnancy...

  8. Male infertility: An audit of 70 cases in a single centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Jeje

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Varicocoele represents the most common treatable cause of male factor infertility and treatment is accompanied with improved seminal fluid parameters as well pregnancy rate. Post-treatment sperm concentration and motility were the only factors that could predict the possibility of achieving pregnancy.

  9. Ethical Dilemma and Management of Infertility in HIV Seropositive Discordant Couples: A Case Study in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeora, Ouj; Chukwuneke, Fn

    2013-01-01

    The traditional African society places an invaluable premium on procreation and, in some communities, a woman's place in her matrimony is only confirmed on positive reproductive outcome. Infertility is rife in Nigeria, and HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) infection is a global pandemic, which has led to a drop in life expectancy across the world. In Nigeria, a number of cultural norms relating to gender roles and power dynamics constitute a serious barrier to issues of sexuality and infertility. Couples are concerned about their infertility diagnostic test being disclosed to each other, especially before marriage. This concern is understandable, especially in an environment that lacks the modern concepts and attitude toward sexual matters. This is complicated by the advent of HIV/AIDS infection and the societal mind-set that look at seropostive individuals as transgressors. At present, sexual and reproductive health rights are currently not in place because ethical issues are not given prominence by many physicians in Nigeria. A case of an infertile and seropostive discordant couple, which raised a lot of medical and ethical concerns, is presented here to awaken the consciousness of Nigerian physicians and stimulate discussions on the ethical matters such as this in clinical practice.

  10. Systematic Review of Premenstrual, Postmenstrual and Infertility Disorders of Vitex Agnus Castus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Movahedi, Mino

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Vitex agnus-castus, also called vitex is aboriginal to the Mediterranean region, with long leaves, tender stem, flowers and ripening seeds. The aim of this study was to overview premenstrual, postmenstrual and infertility disorder of Vitex agnus-castus. Methods This review article was carried out by searching studies in PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and IranMedex databases. The initial search strategy identified about 87 references. In this study, 43 studies were accepted for further screening, and met all our inclusion criteria (in English, full text, therapeutic effects of Vitex agnus-castus and dated mainly from the year 2009 to 2016). The search terms were Vitex agnus-castus, premenstrual, postmenstrual, infertility disorder properties and pharmacological effects. Result Vitex agnus-castus was shown to contribute to the treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Moreover, the result of the present study showed that this valuable plant is helpful in alleviation of pain resulting from postmenstrual disease. Furthermore, it was found that Vitex agnus-castus is beneficial in infertility disorder. Conclusion Vitex agnus-castus (AC) is a phytopharmaceutical compound and is shown to be widely used to treat PMS and PMDD. In addition, it was shown to be beneficial in post-menstrual cases and it can also contribute to treatment of infertility cases in both men and women. Dopaminergic compounds available in this plant help to treat premenstrual mastodynia as well as other symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome. PMID:28243425

  11. Detection of virulence factors of Uropathoigenic Escherichia coli isolates from infertile women high vaginal swabs

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    Farhad Safarpourdehkourdi

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The high vaginal Escherichia coli harbored certain virulence genes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. The urinary tract infections should be treated well to diminish its upstream transfer into vagina. Some more investigation should be perform for identifying the epidemiological aspects of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in high vaginal part of infertile women.

  12. ANTIOXIDANT DEFENSE SYSTEM CORRECTION IN TREATMENT OF PAYIENTS WITH INFERTILITY AND PERITONEAL ENDOMETRIOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubinskaya, E.D.

    2016-09-01

    The findings suggest that the efficiency of the proposed comprehensive treatment techniques (laparoscopy and subsequent course of therapeutic plasmapheresis of patients with peritoneal endometriosis and infertility and with point mutations in the gene NAT2. The use of plasmapheresis  is pathogenetically justified in patients of the studied group.

  13. Metabolic syndrome and prostate abnormalities in male subjects of infertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Francesco; Corona, Giovanni; Vignozzi, Linda; Rossi, Matteo; Maseroli, Elisa; Cipriani, Sarah; Gacci, Mauro; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    No previous study has evaluated systematically the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and prostate-related symptoms and signs in young infertile men. We studied 171 (36.5 ± 8.3-years-old) males of infertile couples. MetS was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel. All men underwent hormonal (including total testosterone (TT) and insulin), seminal (including interleukin-8 (IL-8), seminal plasma IL-8 (sIL-8)), scrotal and transrectal ultrasound evaluations. Because we have previously assessed correlations between MetS and scrotal parameters in a larger cohort of infertile men, here, we focused on transrectal features. Prostate-related symptoms were assessed using the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Twenty-two subjects fulfilled MetS criteria. In an age-adjusted logistic ordinal model, insulin levels increased as a function of MetS components (Wald = 29.5, P parameters of seminal vesicle size or function. In conclusion, in males of infertile couples, MetS is positively associated with prostate enlargement, biochemical (sIL8) and ultrasound-derived signs of prostate inflammation but not with prostate-related symptoms, which suggests that MetS is a trigger for a subclinical, early-onset form of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  14. Combined effects of urinary phytoestrogens metabolites and polymorphisms in metabolic enzyme gene on idiopathic male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yufeng; Du, Guizhen; Chen, Minjian; Hu, Weiyue; Lu, Chuncheng; Wu, Wei; Hang, Bo; Zhou, Zuomin; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2014-08-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds that may interact with estrogen receptors and mimic estrogenic effects. It remains unclear whether the individual variability in metabolizing phytoestrogens contributes to phytoestrogens-induced beneficial or detrimental effects. Our aim was to determine whether there is any interaction between metabolic rates (MR) of phytoestrogens and genetic polymorphisms in related xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme genes. MR was used to assess phytoestrogen exposure and individual metabolic ability. The amount of phytoestrogens in urine was measured by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 600 idiopathic infertile male patients and 401 controls. Polymorphisms were genotyped using the SNPstream platform combined with the Taqman method. Prototypes and metabolites of secoisolariciresinol (SEC) have inverse effects on male reproduction. It was found that low MR of SEC increased the risk of male infertility (OR 2.49, 95 % CI 1.78, 3.48, P trend = 8.00 × 10(-8)). Novel interactions were also observed between the MR of SEC and rs1042389 in CYP2B6, rs1048943 in CYP1A1, and rs1799931 in NAT2 on male infertility (P inter = 1.06 × 10(-4), 1.14 × 10(-3), 3.55 × 10(-3), respectively). By analyzing the relationships between urinary phytoestrogen concentrations, their metabolites and male infertility, we found that individual variability in metabolizing SEC contributed to the interpersonal differences in SEC's effects on male reproduction.

  15. Regulatory T-cells and immune tolerance in pregnancy : a new target for infertility treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerin, Leigh R.; Prins, Jelmer R.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation of the maternal immune response to accommodate the semi-allogeneic fetus is necessary for pregnancy success, and disturbances in maternal tolerance are implicated in infertility and reproductive pathologies. T regulatory (Treg) cells are a recently discovered subset of T-lymphocytes with

  16. An association study of HFE gene mutation with idiopathic male infertility in the Chinese Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ying Yu; Xu Ma; Bin-Bin Wang; Zhong-Cheng Xin; Tao Liu; Ke Ma; Jian Jiang; Xiang Fang; Li-Hua Yu; Yi-Feng Peng

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the haemochromatosis gene (HFE) influence iron status in the general population of Northern Europe,and excess iron is associated with the impairment of spermatogenesis.The aim of this study is to investigate the association between three mutations (C282Y,H63D and S65C) in the HFE gene with idiopathic male infertility in the Chinese Han population.Two groups of Chinese men were recruited:444 infertile men (including 169 with idiopathic azoospermia) and 423 controls with proven fertility.The HFEgene was detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique.The experimental results demonstrated that no C282Y or S65C mutations were detected.Idiopathic male infertility was not significantly associated with heterozygous H63D mutation (odds ratio=0.801,95% confidence interval=0.452-1.421,X2=0.577,P=0.448).The H63D mutation frequency did not correlate significantly with the serum luteinizing hormone (LH),follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T) levels in infertile men (P=0.896,P=0.404 and P=0.05,respectively).Our data suggest that the HFE H63D mutation is not associated with idiopathic male reproductive dysfunction.

  17. Differential clustering of sperm subpopulations in infertile males with clinical varicocele and carriers of rearranged genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Peiró, Agustín; Oliver-Bonet, María; Navarro, Joaquima; Abad, Carlos; Amengual, María José; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime; Benet, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Some methods for determining sperm DNA fragmentation, such as the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCD), provide additional information about particular subgroups of spermatozoa with specific irregularities. Thus, SCSA recognizes a specific sperm subpopulation, the high-DNA stainability sperm subpopulation (HDS), and SCD recognizes the so-called DNA-degraded sperm (DDS) subpopulation. Although some studies associate the presence of these subpopulations with specific aspects related to infertility, the relationship between both sperm subpopulations and their preponderance in specific clinical groups of infertile males has not been extensively investigated. In this study, HDS and DDS subpopulations were determined in a total of 37 human males: 8 males with proven fertility, 9 infertile males with asthenoteratozoospermia, 10 carriers of chromosomal reorganizations, and 10 infertile males with clinical varicocele. Results showed a significant increase of the DDS subpopulation (P HDS subpopulation (P = .542), but the highest values were found in the varicocele and rearranged-genome groups. However, no correlation between the HDS and DDS subpopulations were found (r = 0.196; P = .244), suggesting that both represent a different class of sperm subpopulation in the ejaculate. A significant increase in HDS, and especially DDS, can be associated with the presence of varicocele or the rearrangement of chromosomes. Specific diagnostic tests to confirm the diagnosis must be performed in patients with increased DDS and HDS values.

  18. Ectopic Pregnancy In Previously Infertile Women Subsequent Pregnancy Outcome After Laparoscopic Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Chatterjee

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic tubal pregnancy (ETP is a major event in a woman's reproductive life particularly if it happens after treatment of infertility. It complicates infertility treatment and must be recognized early to simplify the treatment strategy, which must always be directed towards optimizing subsequent fertility. All the treatment trials and the Cochrane database meta-analysis show that medical treatment with methotrexate, preferably multi-dose, is equivalent in efficacy to conservative treatment with laparoscopy in the populations studied. The prolonged follow up and repeated estimation of costly beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG hormone required in medical treatment become inconvenient for patients in this country. Hence people here prefer onetime surgical treatment with short stay in hospital. Occurring during infertility treatment, it marks a reproductive failure, which always results in psychological setback. Amongst 1119 patients conceived after treatment of infertilities in a five year period between ‘02 & ’07 sixty-eight ETP were detected. More than 50% of them resulted in intrauterine pregnancy (IUP spontaneously or after ovulation induction within a period of one to one & half year following the occurrence of ETP. Regardless of the treatment strategy, a successful outcome requires a subsequent ongoing IUP, the ultimate goal of fertility treatment. Nonetheless ETP resulting from fertility treatment is a specific entity, and better knowledge of it should help to improve diagnosis and prognosis, simplify treatment, and optimize subsequent pregnancy outcome.

  19. Semen quality of male partners of infertile couples living with HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Chukwujekwu Ezechi

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Male factor contributes about one third of infertility in this study and severity of HIV diseases impacts on semen quality. Further studies are needed to evaluate if antiretroviral therapy will reverse the effect of HIV infection on semen quality. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(5.000: 1423-1427

  20. Comparative study of laparoscopic and histerosalpingographic findings in 291 infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moini A

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of infertility is 15-20%. Tubal and peritontal factors are responsible for 30-40% of infertility cases. In evaluation of infertile women, hysterosalpingography (HSG is the first test in evaluating of fallopian tubes and laparoscopy is the gold standard test for diagnosing tubal problems and pelvic adhesions. In this study we evaluated 291 infertile couples. Study is prospective, descriptive and cross sectional. After ruling out male, ovulatory and cervical factors, HSG and laparoscopy was done for all women. In response to pathologic process, right or left tube will be damaged by the same rate (P<0.05. In evaluating of tubes, similarty of findings in HSG and laparoscopy was 50%. Sensitivity and specificity of HSG in diagnosing of patency of tubes was 82% and 81%, respectively, but sensitivity of it in diagnosing of peritubal adhesions is low (31%, but specificity is good (88%. After dividing the patients into groups with and without past history of pelvic surgery, we find that similarly of findings in HSG and laparoscopy in patients with positive history is lower than those with negative history. So, diagnostic accuracy of HSG in patients with past history of pelvic surgery is low (P<0.05.