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Sample records for alpha-chlorohydrin-induced infertile rats

  1. ALPHA-CHLOROHYDRIN INDUCED CHANGES IN SPERM ATP LEVELS AND MOTILITY IN THE RAT: ASSOCIATION WITH DIMINISHED IN VITRO FERTILIZATION. (R825351)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility means not being able to become pregnant after a year of trying. If a woman can ... keeps having miscarriages or stillbirths, that's also called infertility. Infertility is fairly common. After one year of ...

  3. The Effect of Mirtazapine on Cisplatin-Induced Oxidative Damage and Infertility in Rat Ovaries

    OpenAIRE

    Durdu Altuner; Mine Gulaboglu; Omer Erkan Yapca; Nihal Cetin

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin causes infertility due to ovarian toxicity. The toxicity mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests oxidative stress. In this study, the effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced infertility and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. 64 female rats were divided into 4 groups of 16. Except for the controls that received physiologic saline only, all were administered with cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and mirtazapine (15 mg/kg p.o.) or mirtazapine (30 mg/kg p.o.) for 10 days. After t...

  4. Aphrodisiac Activity and Curative Effects of Pedalium Murex (L) Against Ethanol Induced Infertility in Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    BALAMURUGAN, Gunasekaran; P. Muralidharan; POLAPALA, Satyanarayana

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that chronic ethanol exposure may result in testicular damage and infertility in males. Petroleum ether extract of Pedalium murex, family Pedaliaceae (PEPM), is evaluated in this study for its ability to increase aphrodisiac activity and to cure ethanol induced germ cell damage and infertility in male rat models. Doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg of PEPM showed a significant increase (P < 0.01, P < 0.001) in mating and mounting behaviour. The effect on fertility factors s...

  5. A diet containing the soy phytoestrogen genistein causes infertility in female rats partially deficient in UDP glucuronyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppen, Jurgen, E-mail: j.seppen@amc.uva.nl

    2012-11-01

    Soy beans contain genistein, a natural compound that has estrogenic effects because it binds the estrogen receptor with relatively high affinity. Genistein is therefore the most important environmental estrogen in the human diet. Detoxification of genistein is mediated through conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1 and 2 (UGT1 and UGT2) isoenzymes. Gunn rats have a genetic deficiency in UGT1 activity, UGT2 activities are not affected. Because our Gunn rats stopped breeding after the animal chow was changed to a type with much higher soy content, we examined the mechanism behind this soy diet induced infertility. Gunn and control rats were fed diets with and without genistein. In these rats, plasma levels of genistein and metabolites, fertility and reproductive parameters were determined. Enzyme assays showed reduced genistein UGT activity in Gunn rats, as compared to wild type rats. Female Gunn rats were completely infertile on a genistein diet, wild type rats were fertile. Genistein diet caused a persistent estrus, lowered serum progesterone and inhibited development of corpora lutea in Gunn rats. Concentrations of total genistein in Gunn and control rat plasma were identical and within the range observed in humans after soy consumption. However, Gunn rat plasma contained 25% unconjugated genistein, compared to 3.6% in control rats. This study shows that, under conditions of reduced glucuronidation, dietary genistein exhibits a strongly increased estrogenic effect. Because polymorphisms that reduce UGT1 expression are prevalent in the human population, these results suggest a cautionary attitude towards the consumption of large amounts of soy or soy supplements. -- Highlights: ► Gunn rats are partially deficient in detoxification by UDP glucuronyltransferases. ► Female Gunn rats are infertile on a soy containing diet. ► Soy contains genistein, a potent phytoestrogen. ► Inefficient glucuronidation of genistein causes female infertility.

  6. A diet containing the soy phytoestrogen genistein causes infertility in female rats partially deficient in UDP glucuronyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soy beans contain genistein, a natural compound that has estrogenic effects because it binds the estrogen receptor with relatively high affinity. Genistein is therefore the most important environmental estrogen in the human diet. Detoxification of genistein is mediated through conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1 and 2 (UGT1 and UGT2) isoenzymes. Gunn rats have a genetic deficiency in UGT1 activity, UGT2 activities are not affected. Because our Gunn rats stopped breeding after the animal chow was changed to a type with much higher soy content, we examined the mechanism behind this soy diet induced infertility. Gunn and control rats were fed diets with and without genistein. In these rats, plasma levels of genistein and metabolites, fertility and reproductive parameters were determined. Enzyme assays showed reduced genistein UGT activity in Gunn rats, as compared to wild type rats. Female Gunn rats were completely infertile on a genistein diet, wild type rats were fertile. Genistein diet caused a persistent estrus, lowered serum progesterone and inhibited development of corpora lutea in Gunn rats. Concentrations of total genistein in Gunn and control rat plasma were identical and within the range observed in humans after soy consumption. However, Gunn rat plasma contained 25% unconjugated genistein, compared to 3.6% in control rats. This study shows that, under conditions of reduced glucuronidation, dietary genistein exhibits a strongly increased estrogenic effect. Because polymorphisms that reduce UGT1 expression are prevalent in the human population, these results suggest a cautionary attitude towards the consumption of large amounts of soy or soy supplements. -- Highlights: ► Gunn rats are partially deficient in detoxification by UDP glucuronyltransferases. ► Female Gunn rats are infertile on a soy containing diet. ► Soy contains genistein, a potent phytoestrogen. ► Inefficient glucuronidation of genistein causes female infertility.

  7. GENE ARRAYS FOR ELUCIDATING MECHANISTIC DATA FROM MODELS OF MALE INFERTILITY AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURE IN MICE, RATS AND HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene arrays for elucidating mechanistic data from models of male infertility and chemical exposure in mice, rats and humansJohn C. Rockett and David J. Dix Gamete and Early Embryo Biology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects ...

  8. Splicing mutation in Sbf1 causes nonsyndromic male infertility in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liška, František; Chylíková, Blanka; Janků, Michaela; Šeda, Ondřej; Vernerová, Zdeňka; Pravenec, Michal; Křen, Vladimír

    2016-09-01

    In the inbred SHR/OlaIpcv rat colony, we identified males with small testicles and inability to reproduce. By selectively breeding their parents, we revealed the infertility to segregate as an autosomal recessive Mendelian character. No other phenotype was observed in males, and females were completely normal. By linkage using a backcross with Brown Norway strain, we mapped the locus to a 1.2Mbp segment on chromosome 7, harboring 35 genes. Sequencing of candidate genes revealed a G to A substitution in a canonical 'AG' splice site of intron 37 in Sbf1 (SET binding factor 1, alias myotubularin-related protein 5). This leads to either skipping exon 38 or shifting splicing one base downstream, invariantly resulting in frameshift, premature stop codon and truncation of the protein. Western blotting using two anti-Sbf1 antibodies revealed absence of the full-length protein in the mutant testis. Testicles of the mutant males were significantly smaller compared with SHR from 4weeks, peaked at 84% wild-type weight at 6weeks and declined afterward to 28%, reflecting massive germ cell loss. Histological examination revealed lower germ cell number; latest observed germ cell stage were round spermatids, resulting in the absence of sperm in the epididymis (azoospermia). SBF1 is a member of a phosphatase family lacking the catalytical activity. It probably modulates the activity of a phosphoinositol phosphatase MTMR2. Human homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for missense SBF1 mutations exhibit Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (manifested mainly as progressive neuropathy), while a single mouse knockout reported in the literature identified male infertility as the only phenotype manifestation. PMID:27335132

  9. Stereological study of the effect of ginger's alcoholic extract on the testis in busulfan-induced infertility in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Bordbar; Tahereh Esmaeilpour; Farzaneh Dehghani; Mohammad Reza Panjehshahin

    2013-01-01

    Background: In traditional medicine zingiber officinale used to regulate female menstural cycle and treat male infertility. Recent studies have suggested the possible role of ginger extract in improving the testicular damage of busulfan. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of zingiber officinale on the sperm parameters, testosterone level and the volume of the testes and seminiferous tubules by stereological methods. Materials and Methods: Fifty rats were divided into...

  10. Effects of Cynodon dactylon on Stress-Induced Infertility in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidrawar, Vr; Chitme, Hr; Patel, Kn; Patel, Nj; Racharla, Vr; Dhoraji, Nc; Vadalia, Kr

    2011-01-01

    Cynodon dactylon (Family: Poaceae) is known to be a tackler in Indian mythology and is offered to Lord Ganesha. It is found everywhere, even on waste land, road side, dry places, and spreads vigorously on cultivated ground. This study was carried out with an objective to test if the constituents of this plant are useful in coping stress-induced sexual In this study, we considered immobilization stress to induce male infertility and the effect of C. dactylon in restoration of the dysfunction was evaluated by considering sexual behavioral observations, sexual performance, fructose content of the seminal vesicles, epididymal sperm concentration and histopathological examinations as parameters. Treatment of rats under stress with methanolic extract of C. dactylon has shown a promising effect in overcoming stress-induced sexual dysfunction, sexual performance, fructose content, sperm concentration and its effect on accessory sexual organs and body weight. We conclude that active constituents of C. dactylon present in methanolic extract have a potent aphrodisiac and male fertility activity. PMID:21607051

  11. Infertility - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - infertility ... The following organizations are good resources for information on infertility : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc/gov/reproductivehealth/infertility March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/ ...

  12. Female Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility means not being able to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or 6 ... woman keeps having miscarriages, it is also called infertility. Female infertility can result from age, physical problems, ...

  13. Radioprotective and Anti-infertility Role of Resveratrol in Adult Male Rats Exposed to Whole-body ?-Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GAMMA-Radiation destroys the process of spermatogenesis and even leads to male infertility. Moreover, seminal oxidative stress is known to end in per oxidative damage of the sperm plasma membrane and loss of its DNA integrity. Man infertility is defined as one year of regular and unprotected intercourse without conception. Plants provide a treatment option that is affordable and available for infertile couples and phyto therapy is an essential form of treatment in nowadays health system. Resveratrol (RSV) is a natural phytoalexin with a wide range of biological activities. Male rats were divided into six groups under investigation, each of six animals. Control group, two RSV groups which received intra gastric RSV (20 and 40 mg kg-1 day-1) for 7 weeks, irradiated group (2 Gy gamma-rays) and two irradiated and RSV groups which received the same preceding doses of RSV for the same period after 2 Gy gamma-rays exposure. Hormonal assay in serum; testosterone, follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin were recorded for fertility assessment. The abnormalities occurred in the reproductive system of the irradiated rats were evaluated: Chromosomal aberration frequencies in spermatocytes, metaphase-1, sperm-head abnormalities and oxidative parameters in testes tissue; malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO). Also, the findings suggest that the anti-fertility effect of melatonin was proved to be transient and reversed completely or in part at the end of the second recovery period. The results showed that RSV has a curative role against the oxidative stress involved by gamma-rays in the rats and showed a significant improvement on the male reproductive functions.

  14. Improvement of sperm density in neem-oil induced infertile male albino rats by Ipomoea digitata Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanashyam Keshav Mahajan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Investigation has been carried out to validate folkloric claim of the potential of ID based on reproductive health status in experimentally induced male albino rats. Materials and Methods: Emulsified neem oil (ENO fed albino rats were orally administered root powder of ID suspended in water for the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 40 days. Change in organ weight, sperm density and motility, serum hormonal levels and histomorphological changes were evaluated. Results: Significant increase in the sperm density and the sperm motility (P< 0.01 along with increase in the testis, and epididymes weight in neem-oil induced infertile rats treated with ID at both dose levels. This effect is vis- and agrave;-vis to serum hormonal levels. Presence of beta-sitosterol in the root of ID likely to enhance the process of spermatogenesis as it is evident from histomorphological studies. Conclusion: Results of the present investigation reveal that ID is a good candidate for the management of male infertility. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(2.000: 125-128

  15. Stereological study of the effect of ginger's alcoholic extract on the testis in busulfan-induced infertility in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bordbar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In traditional medicine zingiber officinale used to regulate female menstural cycle and treat male infertility. Recent studies have suggested the possible role of ginger extract in improving the testicular damage of busulfan. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of zingiber officinale on the sperm parameters, testosterone level and the volume of the testes and seminiferous tubules by stereological methods. Materials and Methods: Fifty rats were divided into four groups. All the rats were given a single intraperitoneally injection of 5mg/kg busulfan solution. The first group was kept as busulfan control, while the other groups were orally administrated ginger extract in graded doses of 50, 100 and 150mg/kg b.wt, for 48 consecutive days. At the end, all animals were anesthetized and their testes and vas deference were removed, fixed, embedded, and stained. The volume of testes and seminiferous tubules were estimated by cavalieri methods. Results: The result showed, that zingiber officinale increased the volumes of seminiferous tubule in 100mg/kg treated group compared to control group. Sperm count (706×105 and 682×105 and the level of testosterone (50.90 ng/mL and 54.10 ng/mL enhanced in 100 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg treated groups compared to control group (p=0.00. Conclusion: It seems that zingiber officinale stimulate male reproductive system in induce busulfan infertility

  16. Infertility FAQ's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Infertility & STDs Infertility FastStats Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Reproductive Health For The Media 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. (404) 639-3286 After hours (404) 639-2888 Contact Media Infertility FAQs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page What is ...

  17. Causes of Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility Causes of male infertility Causes of female infertility Infertility is clinically defined as the inability to conceive naturally after one year of frequent, unprotected intercourse. Approximately 7. ...

  18. Effects of aminoguanidine on infertile varicocelized rats: A functional and morphological study

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    N Alizadeh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackgrounds and the purpose of the study:Inducible NO synthase activity has been frequently reported in varicose veins. Aminoguanidine is known to inhibit iNOS. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of aminoguanidine on varicocelized rats. "nMethods:Male Wistar rats were divided into groups A, B, C, D, E, and F (control group. Groups A, B, C, and D rats underwent left varicocele induction with a 20-gauge needle. Group E (sham rats underwent a similar procedure, but the renal vein was left intact. Ten weeks after varicocele induction, sperm parameters were evaluated in groups D, E, and F. Groups A and B received 50 mg/kg aminoguanidine or placebo, respectively, daily for 10 weeks. After 10 and 20 weeks of varicocele induction, the fertility outcomes of the experimental groups were evaluated. "nResults: The values of the sperm parameters did not differ significantly between groups B and D, but were significant when compared with groups F and E (P ≤ 0.05. The values of the sperm parameters of groups F and E showed no significant changes (P ≤ 0.05. The changes between group A and groups B and D were significant (P ≤ 0.05. Ten weeks after varicocele induction, rats of groups A, B, and C were still fertile. After 20 weeks, only half of the rats in group A were fertile. Conclusions: Aminoguanidine improved the sperm parameters and mating outcomes in vari-cocelized rats.

  19. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reproductive Medicine discusses the various methods to evaluate infertility. Causes of Female Infertility 450 x 274 | Running Time: 2 min 35 ... Society for Reproductive Medicine explains the causes of female infertility. Causes of Male Infertility 450 x 274 | Running ...

  20. The radioprotective effects of Moringa oleifera against mobile phone electromagnetic radiation-induced infertility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed; El-Kott, Attalla Farag

    2015-01-01

    The present study has investigated the effects of mobile phone electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on fertility in rats. The purpose of this study was to explore the capability of polyphenolic-rich Moringa oleifera leaf extract in protecting rat testis against EMR-induced impairments based on evaluation of sperm count, viability, motility, sperm cell morphology, anti-oxidants (SOD & CAT), oxidative stress marker, testis tissue histopathology and PCNA immunohistochemistry. The sample consisted of sixty male Wistar rats which were divided into four equal groups. The first group (the control) received only standard diet while the second group was supplemented daily and for eight weeks with 200 mg/kg aqueous extract of Moringa leaves. The third group was exposed to 900 MHz fields for one hour a day and for (7) days a week. As for the fourth group, it was exposed to mobile phone radiation and received the Moringa extract. The results showed that the EMR treated group exhibited a significantly decrease sperm parameters. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to EMR and treated with MOE significantly enhanced the sperm parameters. However, histological results in EMR group showed irregular seminiferous tubules, few spermatogonia, giant multinucleated cells, degenerated spermatozoa and the number of Leydig cells was significantly reduced. PCNA labeling indices were significant in EMR group versus the control group. Also, EMR affects spermatogenesis and causes to apoptosis due to the heat and other stress-related EMR in testis tissue. This study concludes that chronic exposure to EMR marked testicular injury which can be prevented by Moringa oleifera leaf extract.

  1. Female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infertility, defined as 1 year of unprotected intercourse without conception, is becoming of increasingly important medical concern. Fertility in both the male and the female is at its peak in the twenties. Many couples today have postponed marriage and/or childbearing into their 30s until careers are established, but at that point fertility may be diminished. The current epidemic of venereal disease has been associated with an increasing incidence of tubal scarring. In addition, the use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) and birth control pills for contraception have let to later problems with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and ovulation disturbances. The problem of infertility intensifies as the number of babies available for adoption decreases. Therefore, it is estimated that approximately 10-20% of couples will eventually seek medical attention for an infertility-related problem. Fortunately, marked improvements in the results of tubal surgery are concurrently occurring secondary to refinements in microsurgical techniques, and many medical alternatives to induce ovulation are being developed. The male factor causes infertility in 30-40 % of couples, and the female factor is responsible in approximately 50% of couples. No cause is found in 10-20% of couples. This chapter discusses the role of coordinated imaging in the diagnosis and therapy of infertility in the female

  2. Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the hospital overnight. Questions to Ask Your Doctor Can my infertility be corrected with surgery? How long is the recovery time after surgery? If I stop smoking, would that help? Will treatment make it possible for us to have a ...

  3. STUDIES ON THE REVERSIBILITY OF INFERTILITY CAUSED BY LONG TERM ADMINISTRATION OF TRIPTERYGIUM HYPOGLAUCUM IN MALE RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShi-Min; WANGYi; LINNing; XUYe; QIANShao-Zhen

    1989-01-01

    An alcoholic extract of the root of Triptcrygium hypoglaucum (ATFI) is a Chinese herbal medicine, available in the market as tabtcts, used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and some skin diseases. ATH had bccn shown to cause infertility in male

  4. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... discusses various methods of coping with infertility. Infertility Treatments 450 x 274 | Running Time: 4 min 42 ... American Society for Reproductive Medicine discusses the various treatments for infertility. Understanding Fertility 450 x 274 | Running ...

  5. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reproductive Medicine discusses the various methods to evaluate infertility. Causes of Female Infertility 450 x 274 | Running Time: 2 min 35 ... Society for Reproductive Medicine explains the causes of female infertility. Causes of Male Infertility 450 x 274 | Running ...

  6. Immunologic mechanism at infertility

    OpenAIRE

    İlknur Aydın; Behice Erci

    2006-01-01

    Infertility has been serious problem for couples that want to have a child. It is estimated that %10-15 of marriages are involuntary childless; that is, there is the serious problem of infertility. In more than 40% of infertility couples that is the reason of their infertility was unknown. In those couples, probably immunological factors were found to be responsible for the infertility. In the article, it was aimed to review the immunologic causes of male and female infertility in the light o...

  7. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here . Basic Infertility Evaluation 450 x 274 | Running Time: 3 min 40 sec Dr. Roger Lobo of ... Causes of Female Infertility 450 x 274 | Running Time: 2 min 35 sec Dr. Roger Lobo, of ...

  8. Primary infertility (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  9. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Roger Lobo of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine covers causes of male infertility. "Understanding Infertility - The ... videos produced for the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Looking for Additional Information? Visit our provider site ...

  10. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basic Infertility Evaluation 450 x 274 | Running Time: 3 min 40 sec Dr. Roger Lobo of the ... Coping With Infertility 450 x 274 | Running Time: 3 min 31 sec Dr. Roger Lobo of the ...

  11. Improvement of sperm density in neem-oil induced infertile male albino rats by Ipomoea digitata Linn

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanashyam Keshav Mahajan; Raghunath Totaram Mahajan; Mahajan, Arun Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Investigation has been carried out to validate folkloric claim of the potential of ID based on reproductive health status in experimentally induced male albino rats. Materials and Methods: Emulsified neem oil (ENO) fed albino rats were orally administered root powder of ID suspended in water for the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 40 days. Change in organ weight, sperm density and motility, serum hormonal levels and histomorphological changes were evaluated. Results: Significa...

  12. Genome-wide identification of gene expression in the epididymis of infertile rat induced by alpha-chlorohydrin using oligonucleotide microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Shu-wu; ZHU Yan; MA Li; LI Zhi-ling; GUI You-lun; LU Ying-ying; ZHAO Zhi-fang; CAO Lin

    2008-01-01

    general functions of the down or up regulated epididymal genes by chlorhydrin with the GeneSpring gene ontology(GO) analysis, which are involved in macromolecular metabolism and transport, primary metabolism process, cell metabolism, biological process regulation, immunology regulation, ion combination, hydratase and oxidoreductase activity. Among all the different expressed genes, we analyzed and screened the down-regulated genes associated with glucose, lipid, protein and other energy metabolism, which are considered as the major ACH action targets. Simultaneously, the up-regulated genes by chlorhydrin were detected and their characters of negative regulated sperm maturation and fertility analyzed, which are apoptosis and immune-related genes and not reported before. Conclusions We established male infertile rat model with ACH(10 mg·kg-1·d-1, po, 10 days) through evaluating changes of sperm motility and morphology, mating index, fertility index and pregnancy index. Simultaneously, the ACH didn' t affect the major androgen (T and DHT) metabolism and sexual ability, which is considered as the best way for male contraception. Then we determined the down-regulated epididymal genes relation to substance metabolism, which can affect the epididymal sperm maturation and presumed the major antifertility targets by ACH. Further more, we found and analyzed the epididymal up-regulated genes associated with apoptosis and immune functions, which maybe the new possible sites of action by ACH and other male antifertility agents.

  13. The ter mutation in the rat Dnd1 gene initiates gonadal teratomas and infertility in both genders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Northrup, E.; Zschemisch, N.H.; Eisenblatter, R.; Glage, S.; Wedekind, D.; Cuppen, E.; Dorsch, M.; Hedrich, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    A spontaneous mutation leading to the formation of congenital ovarian and testicular tumors was detected in the WKY/Ztm rat strain. The histological evaluation revealed derivatives from all three germ layers, thereby identifying these tumors as teratomas. Teratocarcinogenesis was accompanied by infe

  14. Infertility, infertility treatment, and fetal growth restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Hammer Bech, Bodil;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between infertility, with or without treatment, and fetal growth, as well as perinatal and infant mortality. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51,041 singletons born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy 12 months or less......), 5,787 born of infertile couples conceiving naturally (time to pregnancy more than 12 months), and 4,317 born after treatment. We defined small for gestational age (SGA) as the lowest 5% of birth weight by sex and gestational age. RESULTS: Crude estimates suggested an increased risk of perinatal...... mortality and SGA among infertile couples (treated and untreated), but the odds ratios (ORs) of perinatal mortality among infertile couples were attenuated after adjustment for maternal age and body mass index (1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95-1.84 among untreated and 1.26, 95% CI 0.86-1.85 among...

  15. Impairments in testicular function indices in male wistar rats: a possible mechanism for infertility induction by Xylopia aethiopica fruit extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ologhaguo Macstephen Adienbo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The accumulating evidence about alterations in male fertility necessitates the need to screen more medicinal plants for their effect on male reproductive functions. This study is aimed at evaluating the effects of fruit extract of Xylopia aethiopica on testicular functions in males using wistar rats as models. Methods: Forty eight adult male rats, randomly divided into four groups of 12 each, were used for the study. Group 1 (control, while groups 2, 3 and 4 (test groups. Daily oral doses of 0.5, 2.0 and 10.0 mg/kg b.w. of hydro-methanol extract were given to the test groups for 30 days followed by 30 days withdrawal. From each group, 6 animals were sacrificed on days 31 and 61 of the study and samples collected: Testes and epididymis were each weighed; blood was assayed for serum testosterone; testes processed for tissue biochemical studies. Results: Results show significant (P <0.05 reductions in the weight of reproductive organs, serum testosterone; testicular glycogen, cholesterol, protein and malondialdehyde; while testicular superoxide dismutaase increased. Conclusions: It was concluded that Xylopia aethiopica impairs testicular functions in rats and therefore fertility in males. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 71-75

  16. Teasing apart socially-induced infertility in non-reproductive female Damaraland mole-rats, Fukomys damarensis (Rodentia: Bathyergidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Nigel C

    2011-12-01

    The Damaraland mole-rat is a subterranean mammal exhibiting extreme reproductive skew with a single reproductive female in each colony responsible for procreation. Non-reproductive female colony members are physiologically suppressed while in the colony, exhibiting reduced concentrations of plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and a decreased response of the pituitary, as measured by the release of bioactive LH, to an exogenous dose of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH). Removal of the reproductive female from the colony results in an elevation of LH and an enhanced response of the pituitary to a GnRH challenge in non-reproductive females comparable to reproductive females, implying control of reproduction in these individuals by the reproductive female. The Damaraland mole-rat is an ideal model for investigating the physiological and behavioral mechanisms that regulate the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. In contrast, we know less about the control of reproduction at the level of the hypothalamus. The immunohistochemistry of the GnRH system of both reproductive and non-reproductive female Damaraland mole-rats has revealed no significant differences with respect to morphology, distribution or numbers of immunoreactive GnRH perikarya. We examined whether the endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin was responsible for the inhibition of the release of the GnRH from the neurons indirectly by measuring LH concentrations in these non-reproductive females following single, hourly and 8 hourly injections of the opioid antagonist naloxone. The results imply that the endogenous opioid peptide, beta-endorphin, is not responsible for the inhibition of GnRH release from the perikarya in non-reproductive females. Preliminary data examining the circulating levels of cortisol also do not support a role for circulating glucocorticoids. The possible role of kisspeptin is discussed.

  17. Counselling Psychology of Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    J.M. Perkins

    2006-01-01

    The central theme of this thesis is infertility. It links different areas of my work as a chartered counselling psychologist working with clients experiencing difficulties conceiving. I currently work in private practice specialising in this area. Previously I worked as an NF counsellor at the Assisted Conception Unit of the Lister Hospital in London. Although the term `infertility' is commonly used, being `infertile' means a total absence of reproductive function and this condition is rare (...

  18. Hysterosalpingography in Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda Islam Khan; Suha Jesmin; Jesmin Jerin; Shahana Shermin; TA Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a common medical problem. It can be due to problems in either partner, or both. Ovulatory dysfunction, tubal and peritoneal factors comprise the majority of female factor for infertility. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) plays an important role in the evaluation of abnormalities related to the uterus and fallopian tubes. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the hysterosalpingographic findings of women with infertility in our setting. Materials and met...

  19. Infertility Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > ePublications > Our ePublications > Infertility fact sheet ePublications Infertility fact sheet This information in Spanish (en español) ... to the fallopian tube instead of the uterus. Gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) involves transferring eggs and sperm into the ...

  20. Cytogenetic of Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfiye Ozpak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility by definition, is not to get pregnant within one year of regular sexual relationship without protection, affects 15-20% of reproductive age couples. Approximately 30% of infertility cases are male originated. Male infertility is caused by endocrine-related genetic defects affecting urogenital system function. These defects adversely affect subsequent spermatogenesis, sexual function, fertility, early embryonic stage of sexual maturation. Autosomal and gonosomal, numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities and related syndromes rank at the top causes of male infertility. Similar chromosome abnormalities are detected in male infertility and as the rate of these abnormalities increase, it was found to reduce sperm count especially in azospermic and oligozoospermic men. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(4.000: 230-245

  1. Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Society for Reproductive Medicine Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility An evaluation of a woman for infertility is ... or suspected male infertility problems Any evaluation for infertility should be ... as well as female partners. The least invasive methods that can detect ...

  2. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  3. Infertility: Inability or Disability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Khetarpal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Disability is a complex phenomenon. It reflects an interaction between features of a person’s body and features of the society in which he or she lives. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, lays stress on the functional as well as the structural problem of a person. All the definitions of disability also include the disorders of the reproductive and endocrine system. So infertility and impotency should also be included in the category of disability. It affects the participation in areas of life and can have a disabling affect on an individual. Like any other disability the couple has to adapt and integrate infertility in their sense of self thus infertility comes as a major life crisis. Medically, infertility, in most cases, is considered to be the result of a physical impairment or a genetic abnormality. Socially, couples are incapable of their reproductive or parental roles. On social level, infertility in most cultures remains associated with social stigma and taboo just like the social model of disability. Couples who are unable to reproduce may be looked down upon due to social stigmatisation. Infertility can lead to divorces and separation leading to a broken family life. Without labelling infertility as a disability, it is difficult for the people to access services and welfare benefits offered by the government. Infertility treatments are highly sophisticated so they are very expensive and are even not covered by insurance and government aid.In the light of all this it becomes imperative to categorise infertility as disability.

  4. Causes of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Saridi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Infertility seems to be a multidimensional health issue with personal, economic and social dimensions. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, approximately 8-10% of couples are facing some kind of infertility problem. Infertility is defined as the inability of getting pregnant after trying for at least 6 months or one year, for women over 35 years old, without use of birth control means and while having normal sexual intercourse. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the literature about the causes οf infertility, as well as the risk factors. The method οf this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature, mainly of the last five years in the “pubmed data base” which referred to the causes οf infertility, as well as the risk factors. Results: During recent years, it has been noticed a remarkable increase in the prevalence of infertility, globally. According to the literature, nowadays, infertility occurs not only due to health problems but it may also be a result of the choices imposed by the modern lifestyle. Results of recent studies indicate that, regarding women’s aspect, problems of fallopian tubes, ovary, matrix or disorders menstruation, are the main causes of infertility, while in regard to men’s aspect, the poor quality of sperm and varicocele. Other contributing factors were environmental, socio-economic as well as advanced age of child-bearing and smoking. Conclusions: As it is supported by published evidence, infertility is an issue of great complexity, which threatens with demographic problem. Information of couples regarding risk factors consist the cornerstone for prevention.

  5. STDs and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... literature review to support an infertility prevention social marketing campaign Male Chlamydia Screening Consultation - Review and guidance ( ... Health Follow STD STD on Twitter STD on Facebook File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  6. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Smoking Cessation Links to Professional Societies and Organizations Home › Understanding Infertility - The Basics A series of patient ... Find a Health Care Provider Back to Top Home | About Us | Reproductive Health Topics | News & Publications | Resources ...

  7. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Smoking Cessation Links to Professional Societies and Organizations Home › Causes of Male Infertility Dr. Roger Lobo of ... Find a Health Care Provider Back to Top Home | About Us | Reproductive Health Topics | News & Publications | Resources ...

  8. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in 2011 for the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Be sure to check out more of ASRM's ... Roger Lobo of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine discusses the various methods to evaluate infertility. Causes ...

  9. Male infertility microsurgical training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akanksha Mehta; Philip S Li

    2013-01-01

    Microsurgical training is imperative for urologists and clinical andrologists specializing in male infertility.Success in male infertility microsurgery is heavily dependent on the surgeon's microsurgical skills.Laboratory-based practice to enhance microsurgical skills improves the surgeon's confidence,and reduces stress and operating time,benefiting both the patient and the surgeon.This review provides guidelines for setting up a microsurgical laboratory to develop and enhance microsurgical skills using synthetic and animal models.The role of emerging techniques,such as robotic-assisted microsurgery,is also discussed.

  10. Infertility: Medical and Social Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report illustrates a range of options for Congressional action in nine principal areas of public policy related to infertility: (1) collecting data on reproductive health; (2) preventing infertility; (3) information to inform and protect consumers; (4) providing access to infertility services; (5) reproductive health of veterans; (6) transfer…

  11. Psychosocial Problems during Infertility Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Kirca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a complex situation crisis which is often psychologically-threatening and emotionally stressful for both partners as well as economically expensive and causes physical pain due to the operations performed for diagnosis and treatment purposes. Infertility has physical, psychological, social, emotional and financial impacts. Infertile couples are under a great social pressure, and need to conceal the problem as it is exceptionally private for them. Infertile individuals are destitute of support when they do not share their pregnancy problems with their families and relatives. Couples define their infertility experience as the most stressful experience of their lives.

  12. Fertility and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

  13. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  14. Hysterosalpingographic evaluation in infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H.S.G. has been proven to be an important diagnostic method in clinical gynecology for under 50 yrs. It is valuable in the investigation of the uterine and tubal factors of female infertility. Hysterosalpingograms of 81 patients with infertility were analyzed and following brief results were obtained. Ratio between primary and secondary infertility was 3 : 5, secondary infertility was more frequent. 2. Age distribution was more frequent under 30 years of age than over 30 years of age. 3. Abnormal uterine findings was only seen in 18 cases, abnormal tubal finding was only seen in 25 cases and combined uterine and tubal abnormalities were seen in 14 cases. 4. Abnormal uterine findings were malposition (12 cases), filling defect (5), spastic uterus (5), irregular contour (3), arcuate uterus (3), didelphia (1), in order of frequency. 5. Abnormal tubal findings were hydrosalpinx (21 cases), occlusion (19), intravasation (6), beaded appearance (3), and diverticula (2), in order of frequency. 6. Negative finding in both uterus tube was seen in 23 cases. 7. In 2 cases, pregnancy after the H.S.G. examination was confirmed.

  15. Lycopene and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam; Ashok Agarwal; Chloe Ong; Pallavi Prashast

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inlficted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneifcial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility-lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4-8 mg of lycopene daily for 3-12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility.

  16. Endometriosis and infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pjević Mirko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Endometriosis is frequent in infertile women, but the relation between these two conditions has still remained unclear. Our intention was to present the pathogenesis of endometriosis, mechanism of the associated infertility and a rational approach to treatment of this frequent medical problem. Pathogenesis of endometriosis The peritoneal form is most probably generated by implantation of the endometrium by menstrual reflux. Endometriomas are most probably formed by invagination and metaplasia of the ovarian mesothelium or by metaplasia of the epithelium of inclusion cysts. Adenomyosis of the rectovaginal septum develops from embryonic remnants of the Mullerian ducts. Diagnosis Laparoscopy is a method of choice which provides safe diagnosis, estimation of the disease and is an optimal method of treatment. Pathogenesis and therapy of infertility The relation between mild forms of disease (Stage I and II and infertility has remained unclear Surgical removal of ectopic foci does not affect female fertility. The expectant treatment during one to four years has been followed by pregnancy in 50% of patients. In patients with III and IV stage disease, there is a frequent mechanical cause of infertility. Expectant treatment was followed by 25% incidence of pregnancy in patients with stage III disease and 0% in patients with stage IV endometriosis. Surgical reconstruction of normal anatomical relations resulted in pregnancy in 40-60% of patients. Administration of any drug therapy, either single or combined with surgical treatment does not increase the fertility rate. Methods of assisted reproduction are alternative approaches to treatment and they have to be administered after unsuccessful surgical treatment. Pretreatment with GnRH agonists in-creases the efficacy of in vitro fertilization.

  17. [The validation of the use of prostatilen and testilin for treating male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, M I

    1995-01-01

    The paper substantiates the use in clinical setting of medicinal preparations obtaining from prostate and tests, in male infertility. Using male rats for an experimental model of infertility it was shown that prostatilene and testilin exert a stimulating effect on spermatogenesis and androgenic functions of the testis. Those agents appear to correct androgenic-estrogenic balance in the animal organism as a model of infertility. The experiment permitted a conclusion to be drawn to the effect that prostatilene and testilin are liable to be of clinical benefit when used to stimulate spermatogenesis in infertility and hypoandrogenization; besides, the rise in androgens may stimulate copulative function in patients with sexual problems.

  18. Management of Unexplained Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Kan

    2014-06-01

    In the management of the unexplained infertility, the initial treatment must be observational approach and changing the life style. It is demonstrated that using only the clomiphene citrate or intrauterine insemination is not effective. For this reason, as the patients age and ovarian reserve considered, after the observational approach, the initial treatment must be the combination of clomiphene citrate and intrauterine insemination. With this approach, pregnancy rate is rises to 10 percent for a cycle. Management wise, choosing the cheapest effective treatment for increased fertilization should be the priority, before moving onto more expensive and aggresive approaches. Apart from the diagnostic work-up, which more or less the same for every patient, treatment protocol should be individualised for every infertile couple. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 506-518

  19. Testicular membrane lipid damage by complex mixture of leachate from municipal battery recycling site as indication of idiopathic male infertility in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintunde, Jacob K; Oboh, Ganiyu; Akindahunsi, Akintunde A

    2013-12-01

    Leachate from a municipal battery recycling site is a potent source of mixed-metal released into the environment. The present study investigated the degree at which mixed-metal exposure to the municipal auto-battery leachate (MABL) and to the Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site leachate (EOMABRL) affected the lipid membrane of the testes in in vitro experiment. The results showed elevated level of mixed-metals over the permissible levels in drinking water, as recommended by regulatory authorities. In the leachate samples, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a biomarker of lipid damage, was significantly (pmunicipal auto-battery leachate (MABL) was significantly (pmunicipal auto-battery recycling site (EOMABRL). The testicular lipid membrane capacity was compromised following treatment with leachate from the municipal battery recycling site, implicating mixed-metal exposure as the causative agent of testicular damage and male infertility.

  20. Immunology of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W R

    1981-12-01

    Recent research on immunological infertility in men and women is reviewed and the possibilities for therapeutic success in this area are assessed. Surface antigens of the acrosome and main tail piece appear to provoke antibodies of special relevance to male and female infertility and are recognized by circulating sperm-immobilizing antibodies in women and by immobilizing and agglutinizing antibodies in men. Assessment methods have focused on the development of tests of local immunity to sperm. Antisperm antibodies have been tested via sperm microagglutination, the gelatin agglutination test, the sperm immobilization test, and immunofluorescence techniques. In addition, measurement has focused on antibodies in cervical mucus, antibodies in seminal plasma, and cell-mediated immunity. Methods involving both partners include postcoital test, the sperm-cervical mucus penetration test, and the sperm-cervical mucus contact test. There remains a need for the development of specific radioimmunoassys for the precise detection and quantitation of antibodies to sperm antigens, especially those of cell membrane origin. In males, autoimmunity to sperm antigens can be related to infertility by 2 main pathogenic mechanisms: 1) the adverse effects of antibodies directly on spermatozoa, and 2) the association with disordered spermatogenesis resulting in oligospermia and azoospermia. In women, the effector pathways of local immunization mediate both systemic and cell-mediated immune responses. Local antibodies can interfere with the reproductive process by arming macrophages and enhancing phagocytic clearance of spermatozoa from the genital tract, mediating cytotoxic effects on sperm, preventing sperm from adequately penetrating cervical mucus, intefering with sperm capacitation, and influencing sperm selection within the female genital tract. Between 5-10% of infertile men and women show evidence of anitbodies to sperm. Treatment has included occlusion therapy, intrauterine

  1. Fertility prognosis for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bostofte, E; Bagger, P; Michael, A;

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a fertility prognosis model for infertile couples. DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study. PARTICIPANTS: In the period November 30, 1977 to June 1, 1985, 321 consecutive couples were investigated for infertility at Hvidovre University Hospital. Investigation of the female...... MEASURE: The Cox regression model was used to predict the time required to conceive based on informations provided by fertility investigations. RESULTS: Three of 16 prognostic variables (the period of infertility, the female infertility factor, and the P-test) possess significant prognostic information....... The period of infertility and the P-test are best scored as continuous variables, whereas the female infertility factor are best categorized in four classes, i.e., normal, ovulation or cervical disorder, anatomic disorder, or a combination of disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The three prognostic variables...

  2. What Infertility Treatments Are Available?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health care provider? How is it diagnosed? What infertility treatments are available? Fertility Treatments for Males Fertility Treatments for Females Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Treatments for Diseases That ...

  3. Is hyperprolactinemia the main cause of infertility?

    OpenAIRE

    Mikaily J; Malekzadeh R; Ziadalizadeh B; Valizadeh Toosi M; Khoncheh A; Masserat S

    1999-01-01

    Hyperprolactinemia probably is one of infertility causes. Its incidence is 20% in infertile patients. In this study importance of hyperprolactinema was studied. Importance of hyperprolactinemia as a primary factor of infertility, is uncertain. We studied 500 infertile women in infertility center of Shariati hospital. Prevalence of hyperprolactinemia was 19%. Hyperprolactinemia as a sole cause of infertility was found in only 0.8%. There was a good correlation between galactorrhea and hyperpro...

  4. Infertility, infertility treatment and twinning: the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously observed that an increasing time to pregnancy (TTP) is associated with a reduced frequency of twin deliveries in couples not receiving infertility treatment. By using updated information, we assessed the frequencies of dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin...... deliveries as a function of infertility (TTP > 12 months), as well as infertility treatment. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51 730 fertile couples with TTP 12 months and 5163 infertile couples who conceived after treatment. Information on zygosity, available...... for part of the cohort (1997-2000), was based on standardized questions on the similarities between the twins at the age of 3-5 years. RESULTS: Compared with fertile couples, the frequency of DZ twin deliveries was lower for infertile couples conceiving naturally (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0...

  5. Oral Drugs for Unexplained Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahbadia, Gautam N

    2016-02-01

    Of the infertile couples unable to conceive without any identifiable cause, 30 % are defined as having unexplained infertility. Management depends on duration of infertility and age of female partner. The treatment of unexplained infertility is empirical, and many different regimens have been used. Among these are expectant management, ovarian stimulation with clomiphene citrate, gonadotropins and aromatase inhibitors, fallopian tube sperm perfusion, tubal flushing, intrauterine insemination, gamete intrafallopian transfer, and IVF. The first approach to treatment of unexplained infertility generally is the use of drugs that stimulate oocyte production. For over four decades, the first-line treatment for ovarian stimulation in unexplained infertility has been clomiphene citrate. Multiple reports suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be effective alternative agents for ovarian stimulation in couples with unexplained infertility. Their administration is reported to be associated with monofollicular development in most cases, which may result in enhanced fertility and a reduced risk of ovarian hyperstimulation and multiple births, as compared to current standard therapies such as gonadotropin and clomiphene. Despite world evidence to the contrary, letrozole has been banned for use for infertility management in India since 2011. PMID:26924899

  6. Female infertility and endocrinological diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan İbrahim Boyar

    2013-01-01

    In this review endocrinologic diseases are briefly discussedregarding their interrelated aspects with infertility.Many endocrinologic diseases are underestimated duringinfertility treatment. As careful differential diagnosis performed,this problem can be easily overcome.Key words: endocrine diseases, infertility, diagnosis,treatment

  7. Stress and infertility: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Hajela

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the couples suffering from infertility report it to be the most stressful and depressing period of their life. Stress can be a contributor to infertility and can adversely affect the treatment success, Recent scientific evidence suggest that psychological therapy, especially mind body therapy to counter stress can significantly improve pregnancy rates in women undergoing ART. Yoga is an ideal mind body therapy that is indigenous and one that can be effectively applied in the Indian scenario to optimize the psychological milieu of the sub fertile undergoing treatment. Infertility and ART from well-structured government run IVF centres can greatly reduce the financial burden of the infertile couple and further reduce their stress levels. Thus stress reducing strategies and low cost infertility treatment facility offer to be the ideal combination to fulfill the dreams of parenthood for the suffering sub fertile couples in India. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(4.000: 940-943

  8. Laparoscopic evaluation of female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Sub-fertility is inability to ensure child bearing when it is wanted. Prevalence of sub-fertility in industrialised countries has been quoted as 20%, and seems to be on the rise. Traditional way to assess the uterine cavity, tubal structure and tubal patency was hysterosalpingography but it has now been largely superseded by laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. The objective of this study was to highlight the role of laparoscopy in establishing diagnosis of female infertility. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in Gynaecology Unit of Liaquat University of Medical Health Sciences, Hyderabad, Pakistan from August 28, 2000 to July 1, 2001. Total 200 sub-fertile patients attended the gynaecology OPD. Out of these 30 patients were selected for laparoscopy and dye test who were suspected cases of endometriosis, abnormal HSG and unexplained infertility. Those patients who had medical disorders and contraindication for laparoscopy were excluded from study. Detailed history of every patient was recorded on a proforma and physical examination was performed. Laparoscopy was scheduled in proliferative phase of menstrual cycle. Data were analysed using SPSS 11. Frequency and percentages were calculated to describe the results. Results: Out of 200 sub-fertile patients total 30 patients were selected for laparoscopy. Twenty (66%) patients were in primary infertility group while 10 (33%) patients were in secondary infertility group. Eleven (55%) patients of primary infertility belong to age group of 18-25 years while 6(60%) patients of secondary infertility belong to age group of 26- 33 years. Mean duration of sub fertility at time of presentation in primary infertility group was 1.95 years while in secondary infertility was 2.70 years. In primary infertility group main associated symptoms were dysmenorrhoeal in 8 (40%), irregular cycles 5 (25%), and dyspareunia in 4 (20%). In secondary infertility group 3 (30%) patients had dysmenorrhoeal and dyspareunia while 2

  9. Leiomyomas and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vaidakis, Dennis; Rigos, Ioannis; Chrelias, George; Papantoniou, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    Leiomyomas are the commonest benign tumor in the female reproductive tract. Even though their role on infertility is still questionable, evidence to date suggest that the anatomic location may be related to reproductive outcomes. Several possible mechanisms suggest that leiomyomas may affect fertility, especially in terms of the anatomical distortion of endometrial cavity, the abnormal uterine contractility, reduced blood supply to the endometrium and altered endometrial receptivity. The effect of leiomyomas on IVF outcomes has been the subject of many studies; however, a definitive direction is yet required to adjust clinical management accordingly. Management of leiomyomas is challenging in terms of clinical decision, especially among subfertile patients, since potential treatment complications and their consequences in endometrial dynamics should be also accounted. Expectant management is recommended for asymptomatic patients, whereas in symptomatic subfertile patients, medical and/ or surgical management is usually recommended. PMID:26824506

  10. Infertility, infertility treatment, and congenital malformations: Danish national birth cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Bille, Camilla; Olsen, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether infertile couples (with a time to pregnancy of > 12 months), who conceive naturally or after treatment, give birth to children with an increased prevalence of congenital malformations. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Danish national birth cohort. Participants Three groups of liveborn children and their mothers: 50 897 singletons and 1366 twins born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy ≤ 12 months), 5764 singletons and 100 twins born of infertile couples who conceived naturally (time to pregnancy > 12 months), and 4588 singletons and 1690 twins born after infertility treatment. Main outcome measures Prevalence of congenital malformations determined from hospital discharge diagnoses. Results Compared with singletons born of fertile couples, singletons born of infertile couples who conceived naturally or after treatment had a higher prevalence of congenital malformations—hazard ratios 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.35) and 1.39 (1.23 to 1.57). The overall prevalence of congenital malformations increased with increasing time to pregnancy. When the analysis was restricted to singletons born of infertile couples, babies born after treatment had an increased prevalence of genital organ malformations (hazard ratio 2.32, 1.24 to 4.35) compared with babies conceived naturally. No significant differences existed in the overall prevalence of congenital malformations among twins. Conclusions Hormonal treatment for infertility may be related to the occurrence of malformations of genital organs, but our results suggest that the reported increased prevalence of congenital malformations seen in singletons born after assisted reproductive technology is partly due to the underlying infertility or its determinants. The association between untreated infertility and congenital malformations warrants further examination. PMID:16893903

  11. A Survey on Infertility in Royan Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Kamali; Ahmad Reza Baghestani; Fahimeh Kashfi; Hossein Kashani; Shahram Tavajohi; Elham Amirchaghmaghi

    2007-01-01

    Background: Infertility is defined as failure in pregnancy after one year of unprotected intercourse.Several centers have reported different causes of infertility. The most common causes of infertility are:male factor such as sperm disturbance, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal factor,both male and female factor, and unexplained infertility .The aim of this study was to survey theepidemiology of infertility in Royan institute.Material and Methods: In this descriptive retro...

  12. MedlinePlus: Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish What Treatment Options Are Available for Male Infertility? (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Living With How a Man's Diet Affects Fertility Too (Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) Related Issues Finasteride (Propecia/Proscar) and ...

  13. Therapeutic management of idiopathic infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolov Bogoje; Folić Miroslav; Tabš Dunja; Nikolić Romana

    2003-01-01

    Introduction During the period 1996-2000, we investigated 900 couples with infertility. In 71 (7.9%) couples no cause of sterility was revealed. These patients were divided according to age, parity and infertility duration. Material and methods We established the cumulative conception rate and cycle fecundity after three months without therapy, after three cycles of intrauterine insemination and after three cycles of in vitro fertilization (eventually intracytoplasmic sperm injection). Among ...

  14. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary L Harton; Helen G Tempest

    2012-01-01

    infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family.Despite this,the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered.Nevertheless,more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified.This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically:chromosomal aneuploidy,structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions.Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans.Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin,but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts.Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm.Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed,as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases.Clinical recommendations where possible will be made,as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  15. Therapeutic management of idiopathic infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolov Bogoje

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction During the period 1996-2000, we investigated 900 couples with infertility. In 71 (7.9% couples no cause of sterility was revealed. These patients were divided according to age, parity and infertility duration. Material and methods We established the cumulative conception rate and cycle fecundity after three months without therapy, after three cycles of intrauterine insemination and after three cycles of in vitro fertilization (eventually intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Among patients with less than three years of infertility, cumulative conception rate was 34.8% after three months without therapy, 27.3% after three cycles of intrauterine insemination and 66.7% after three cycles of in vitro fertilization. Results and Discussion In patients with infertility longer than three years, cumulative conception rate without therapy was 12.5%, with intrauterine insemination 16.1% and with in vitro fertilization 40.5%. Differences regarding the age of patients were significant. Based on these findings, we proposed an optimal therapy regimen: three months therapy delay is desirable in patients under 30 years of age with infertility duration under three years. If there is no pregnancy in that period, intrauterine insemination is performed in three to four cycles. In case of intrauterine insemination failure in these women, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer should be applied. In the group of women over 30 years of age, with infertility longer than three years, the possibility for occurrence of pregnancy with intrauterine insemination is slightly increased. If more than 4 follicles develop during preparations for intrauterine insemination, it is advisable to change the course to in vitro fertilization. In women older than 35, with primary or secondary infertility, in vitro fertilization should be performed from the very beginning.

  16. Infertility and uterine fibroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepiridis, Leonidas I; Grimbizis, Grigoris F; Tarlatzis, Basil C

    2016-07-01

    Uterine fibroids are the most common tumors in women and their prevalence is higher in patients with infertility. At present, they are classified according to their anatomical location, as no classification system includes additional parameters such as their size or number. There is a general agreement that submucosal fibroids negatively affect fertility, when compared to women without fibroids. Intramural fibroids above a certain size (>4 cm), even without cavity distortion, may also negatively influence fertility. However, the presence of subserosal myomas has little or no effect on fertility. Many possible theories have been proposed to explain how fibroids impair fertility: mechanisms involving alteration of local anatomical location, others involving functional changes of the myometrium and endometrium, and finally endocrine and paracrine molecular mechanisms. Nevertheless, any of the above mentioned mechanisms can cause reduced reproductive potential, thereby leading to impaired gamete transport, reduced ability for embryo implantation, and creation of a hostile environment. The published experience defines the best practice strategy, as not many large, well-designed, and properly powered studies are available. Myomectomy appears to have an effect in fertility improvement in certain cases. Excision of submucosal myomas seems to restore fertility with pregnancy rates after surgery similar to normal controls. Removal of intramural myomas affecting pregnancy outcome seems to be associated with higher pregnancy rates when compared to non-operated controls, although evidence is still nοt sufficient. Treatment of subserosal myomas of reasonable size is not necessary for fertility reasons. The results of endoscopic and open myomectomy are similar; thus, endoscopic treatment is the recommended approach due to its advantages in patient's postoperative course. PMID:26856931

  17. Infertility, infertility treatment and behavioural problems in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Basso, Olga;

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural patterns in children of infertile couples may be influenced by both the underlying causes of infertility and stress in the couples. Treatment procedures, such as culture media and manipulation of gametes and embryos, may also result in developmental problems. We examined behavioural...... pregnancy. Children aged between 7 and 21 years were assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The SDQ was completed by mothers in all cohorts and, in addition, by teachers in the Aarhus cohort and by children themselves in the Aalborg-Odense cohort. Children born after a time...

  18. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brazdova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility.

  19. Cytomegalovirus infection in infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Yossif Saour

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cytomegalovirus (CMV is a virus that can be transmitted to a developing child before birth. For most healthy persons who acquire CMV after birth, there are few symptoms. Once a person becomes infected, the virus remains alive, but usually dormant within that person’s body for life. There are two different types of infection: primary CMV and recurrent CMV infection. Primary infection can cause more serious problems in pregnancy than recurrent infection can. However, if a person's immune system is seriously weakened in any way, the virus can become active and cause CMV disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate CMV infection, antisperm antibodies in infertile women and its relation to other parameters. Method: Fifty infertile women who presented at the Infertility Clinic of Kammal Al-Sammaree Hospital from May 2008 to July 2009 and thirty fertile control group were included in this study. CMV IgG and IgM measurements were performed by ELISA and antisperm antibody was measured by immunofluorescence test. High vaginal and cervical swabs taken for wet mount, Gram stain and culture. Results: There was no significant difference between infertile and control group regarding CMV IgG. The presence of CMV IgG in the serum was significantly related with previous genital infection of infertility (p<0.001 and previous abortion (p=0.032. Seropositive CMV IgG did not reflect a significant relation with leukocytes number, type of bacteria and antisperm antibody. Conclusion: CMV IgG was detected in infertile women and had no significant relation with antisperm antibodies and other parameters. [J Exp Integr Med 2011; 1(4.000: 273-276

  20. Infertility: A Crisis with No Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Robert R.; Koraleski, Stephanie

    1990-01-01

    Discusses helpful ways for mental health counselors to work with infertile clients, explaining nature of infertility, psychological crisis it provokes, common reactions of infertile clients, and strategies to help clients cope. Discusses specific strategies for assessing clients' potential for suicide or self-destructive acts and improving their…

  1. Infertility and Life Satisfaction among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Julia; Stone, Rosalie A. Torres; Greil, Arthur L.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from a random sample of 580 midwestern women, the authors explore the association between lifetime infertility and life satisfaction. Past research shows lower life satisfaction among those seeking help for infertility. The authors find no direct effects of lifetime infertility, regardless of perception of a problem, on life…

  2. Infertility experience and health differentials - a population-based comparative study on infertile and non-infertile women (the HUNT Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostad, Berit; Schmidt, Lone; Sundby, Johanne;

    2014-01-01

    . METHODS: Health measures were compared between women with infertility experience (infertile women) and women without infertility experience (non-infertile women). Disparities in health and life satisfaction among the infertile women were assessed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported health, functional...... impairment, depression, anxiety, and life satisfaction. RESULTS: Some 15.4% of the women had experienced infertility. Infertile women reported poor self-reported health and functional impairment significantly more often than non-infertile women. Childless infertile women had significantly raised adjusted...

  3. Thyroid, spermatogenesis, and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajender, Singh; Monica, Marie Gray; Walter, Lee; Agarwal, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Since the identification of thyroid hormone receptors on the testes, thyroid has been suggested to have a significant impact on the male reproductive tract, spermatogenesis, and male fertility. Several research articles on the role of thyroid in spermatogenesis or male infertility have been published in the last three decades. We conducted an exhaustive literature search was conducted in order to create an up-to-date review of literature. This review aims to discuss the impact of thyroid on testicular development, spermatogenesis, hypo- or hyper- thyroidism and male infertility, and the management of thyroid related abnormal semen profile. The literature revealed that thyroid significantly impacts testicular development and that abnormal thyroid profile affects semen quality and male fertility by compromising testicular size, sperm motility and ejaculate volume. A clear link exists between thyroid hormones, testicular development and spermatogenesis. Thyroid disease negatively affects spermatogenesis and consequently may cause male infertility. In such cases, infertility is reversible, but more studies need to be conducted, especially in post-pubertal males to cement the current findings. PMID:21622096

  4. Cigarette smoking and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taymour Mostafa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have identified specific body systems affected by the hazardous effects of the cigarette smoking particularly the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The effect of smoking on male reproduction has also been studied where semen quality was investigated in different cross-sectional studies including infertile patients with conflicting results. This article aimed to assess the relationship between smoking and male infertility. A review of published articles was carried out, using PubMed, medical subject heading (MSH databases and Scopus engine excluding the effects of smoking outside male infertility. Key words used to assess exposure, outcome, and estimates for the concerned associations were: smoking, semen, male infertility, sperm, humans, and fertility. Most of the reports showed that smoking reduces sperm production, sperm motility, sperm normal forms and sperm fertilising capacity through increased seminal oxidative stress and DNA damage. Few papers reported nonsignificant differences in semen parameters between smokers or non-smokers. It is concluded that although some smokers may not experience reduced fertility, men with marginal semen quality can benefit from quitting smoking.

  5. Evaluation and treatment of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Tammy J; Vitrikas, Kristen R

    2015-03-01

    Infertility is defined as the inability to achieve pregnancy after one year of regular, unprotected intercourse. Evaluation may be initiated sooner in patients who have risk factors for infertility or if the female partner is older than 35 years. Causes of infertility include male factors, ovulatory dysfunction, uterine abnormalities, tubal obstruction, peritoneal factors, or cervical factors. A history and physical examination can help direct the evaluation. Men should undergo evaluation with a semen analysis. Abnormalities of sperm may be treated with gonadotropin therapy, intrauterine insemination, or in vitro fertilization. Ovulation should be documented by serum progesterone level measurement at cycle day 21. Evaluation of the uterus and fallopian tubes can be performed by hysterosalpingography in women with no risk of obstruction. For patients with a history of endometriosis, pelvic infections, or ectopic pregnancy, evaluation with hysteroscopy or laparoscopy is recommended. Women with anovulation may be treated in the primary care setting with clomiphene to induce ovulation. Treatment of tubal obstruction generally requires referral for subspecialty care. Unexplained infertility in women or men may be managed with another year of unprotected intercourse, or may proceed to assisted reproductive technologies, such as intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization. PMID:25822387

  6. Psychological Factors Affecting Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sati Unal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study was performed to determine the psychological factors affecting infertile women presenting at the infertility outpatients department. METHOD: The sample of this cross-sectional study consisted of 344 women who presented at the IVF center of a special branch hospital or a university hospital, March 2008 through September 2008, as determined by the non-random sampling method. All participating women gave their informed consent. The data were collected using the Data Form that consisted of questions on socio-demographic features and the Infertility Distress Scale (IDS. In the results, percentages were provided along with the Kruskal-Wallis H, Mann-Whitney U and Spearman correlation tests. RESULTS: The mean IDS was 39.01±9.6. There was a statistically significant linear relationship between the mean IDS score and age (r=0.106, p=0.048, marriage duration (r=0.232, p<0.001 and duration of desire to have a child (r=0.217, p<0.001. Women who were primary school graduates (X²=13.03, p=0.004, did not work (p=0.007, had no social security benefits (p=0.021 or from low socioeconomic status (X²=24.85, p<0.001 had significantly higher mean IDS scores. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show women become more adversely affected by infertility as their age, duration of marriage, and duration of desire to have a child increase. Women who are primary school graduates, do not work, have no social security benefits or have lower income are affected more negatively. We believe that taking these features into account when evaluating and planning supportive approaches for women presenting at the infertility treatment center and determining the psychological state of the women using the IDS will increase treatment success. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 481-486

  7. A Survey on Infertility in Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kamali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as failure in pregnancy after one year of unprotected intercourse.Several centers have reported different causes of infertility. The most common causes of infertility are:male factor such as sperm disturbance, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal factor,both male and female factor, and unexplained infertility .The aim of this study was to survey theepidemiology of infertility in Royan institute.Material and Methods: In this descriptive retrospective study, 2492 infertile couples were studied.These couples were selected by systematic sampling among couples referred to Royan institutebetween 1995 and 2001.All existing demographic data and diagnostic methods were recorded inquestionnaires .Results were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5.Results: In this study, the frequency of primary and secondary infertility was 90.1% and 9.9%,respectively. Among 2492 couples, 50.5% had male factor, 28.6% had female factor, 11.6% had bothmale and female factors and in 9.3% of couples, the cause of infertility was unknown .Results showedthat 32.3% of men had normal spermogram, 23.6% of couples had azoospermia, and 40.3% had spermdisturbance including oligospermia, asthenospermia, oligoasthenospermia and teratospermia .3.8%were not able to collect sample for semen analysis. Among women, different infertility factors included:ovarian factor (20.36%, tubal factor (12.64%, uterine factor (4.13%, endometriosis (1.28% andrecurrent abortion (0.68%. 50.48% of women were normal.Conclusion: Although male factor was the most common cause of infertility in Royan institute, we cannot conclude that this factor is the most common cause of infertility in Iran since this center isconsidered referral especially for male infertility. We suggest performance of similar researches inother centers to evaluate the most common causes of infertility in Iran.

  8. [Circulating nucleic acids and infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici, E; Mullet, T; Ferrières Hoa, A; Gala, A; Loup, V; Anahory, T; Belloc, S; Hamamah, S

    2015-09-01

    Circulating nucleic acids (cell-free DNA and microRNAs) have for particularity to be easily detectable in the biological fluids of the body. Therefore, they constitute biomarkers of interest in female and male infertility care. Indeed, in female, they can be used to detect ovarian reserve disorders (polycystic ovary syndrome and low functional ovarian reserve) as well as to assess follicular microenvironment quality. Moreover, in men, their expression levels can vary in case of spermatogenesis abnormalities. Finally, circulating nucleic acids have also the ability to predict successfully the quality of in vitro embryo development. Their multiple contributions during assisted reproductive technology (ART) make of them biomarkers of interest, for the development of new diagnostic and/or prognostic tests, applied to our specialty. Circulating nucleic acids would so offer the possibility of personalized medical care for infertile couples in ART. PMID:26298813

  9. Male factor infertility and ART

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Herman Tournaye

    2012-01-01

    For years,the management and treatment of male factor infertility has been ‘experience’ and not ‘evidence’ based.Although not evidence-based,current clinical practice involves extensive use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART).Where specific treatments are not indicated or have failed,ART have become popular adjunctive treatments for alleviating male factor infertility.According to the limited evidence available,intrauterine insemination (IUI) may be considered as a first-line treatment in a couple in which the female partner has a normal fertility status and at least 1x 106 progressively motile spermatozoa are recovered after sperm preparation.If no pregnancy is achieved after 3-6 cycles of IUI,optimized in vitro fertilization (IVF) can be proposed.When less than 0.5x 106 progressively motile spermatozoa are obtained after seminal fluid processing or sperm are recovered surgically from the testis or epididymis,intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) should be performed.Although the outcome of no other ART has ever been scrutinized as much before,no large-scale ‘macroproblems’ have as yet been observed after ICSI.Yet,ICSI candidates should be rigorously screened before embarking on IVF or ICSI,and thoroughly informed of the limitations of our knowledge on the hereditary aspects of male infertility and the safety aspects of ART.

  10. Male Infertility and Its Causes in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Miyamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings.

  11. Admissibility Investigation and Validation of Infertility Distress Scale (IDS) in Iranian Infertile Women

    OpenAIRE

    Khadijeh Arab-sheybani; Masoud Janbozorgi; Aygul Akyuz

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychological stress has a profound effect on infertility and its treatment. The aim of this study was to develop a specific scale to determine distress levels among Iranian infertile women. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study the samples included 300 women (145 fertile and 155 infertile) who completed the Infertility Distress Scale (IDS) form. Data was analysed using correlation method and main component analysis. Results These results show that all 21 items had a ...

  12. Hysterosalpingographic evaluation of primary and secondary infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Muhammad Usman; Anwar, Saleha; Mahmood, Syed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pathological patterns of fallopian tubes and uterus on hysterosalpingogrphy (HSG) examination in cases of infertility. Methods: Two years retrospective charts review of patients referred to our centre for HSG evaluation of infertility, from July 2008 to July 2010. Results: Four thousand one hundred eight hysterosalpingograms were carried out at our centre during the study period. Out of these, 1999 (48.6%) were primary infertility cases while the 2109 (51.3%) were ...

  13. Role of Ultrasound in Male Infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    US evaluation is the mainstay of diagnostic imaging of infertile men. In this editorial, we review the spectrum of diseases responsible for male infertility, discuss the way in which US imaging studies can be used for evaluation of male infertility, and illustrate characteristic US imaging features that allow for specific diagnosis. The discussion will be divided into three main categories: obstruction in sperm passage, impairment of sperm function, and defect in sperm genesis.

  14. The cytogenetic aspect of male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima Ammar-Khodja; Zohra Hamouli; Fella Boukerbout

    2014-01-01

    The cytogenetic aspect of male infertility Figure 1. Karyotype of a syndrome Klinefelter: 47,XXY Figure 2. Karyotype of aneuploidy 47,XYY Figure 3. Karyotype 45,XYder(13)(14) Figure 4. Karyotype 46, XY t(3q)(10q) Dear Editor Infertility affects approximately 15% of couples worldwide. Within 50% of cases, man provides reproductive function disorders (1). The cause of infertility in men with oligospermia and azoospermia seems to be due to underlying genetic abnormalities (2). ...

  15. Secondary infertility in women: radiologic evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey Dee Olpin; Anne Kennedy

    2011-01-01

    Jeffrey Dee Olpin, Anne KennedyUniversity of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USAAbstract: Female infertility is a commonly encountered problem that presently accounts for a significant percentage of women seeking gynecologic services. While primary infertility is defined as the inability to conceive or carry a pregnancy successfully to full term, secondary infertility is defined as difficulty in conceiving after already having previously conceived (either carrying a pregnancy...

  16. Mitochondrial DNA mutations and male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar D; Sangeetha N

    2009-01-01

    Infertility can be defined as difficulty in conceiving a child after 1 year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility can arise either because of the male factor or female factor or both. According to the current estimates, 15% of couples attempting their first pregnancy could not succeed. Infertility is either primary or secondary. Mitochondria have profound effect on all biochemical pathways, including the one that drivessperm motility. Sperm motility is heavily dependent on the ATP ge...

  17. SOCIAL CORRELATES OF FEMALE INFERTILITY IN UZBEKISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    JUMAYEV, IZATULLA; Harun-Or-Rashid, Md; RUSTAMOV, OYBEK; ZAKIROVA, NODIRA; KASUYA, HIDEKI; Sakamoto, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this matched case-control study was to investigate the social correlates of primary infertility among females aged 35 years or less. The study was conducted in the Clinics of Samarkand Medical Institute, Uzbekistan, among 120 infertile and 120 healthy women matched by age, residential area, and occupation from January to June 2009. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. Median duration of infertility was 10.0 months (interquart...

  18. Estimating the prevalence of infertility in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Bushnik, Tracey; Cook, Jocelynn L.; Yuzpe, A. Albert; Tough, Suzanne; Collins, John

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over the past 10 years, there has been a significant increase in the use of assisted reproductive technologies in Canada, however, little is known about the overall prevalence of infertility in the population. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of current infertility in Canada according to three definitions of the risk of conception. METHODS Data from the infertility component of the 2009–2010 Canadian Community Health Survey were analyzed for married a...

  19. Age-related infertility and unexplained infertility: an intricate clinical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somigliana, Edgardo; Paffoni, Alessio; Busnelli, Andrea; Filippi, Francesca; Pagliardini, Luca; Vigano, Paola; Vercellini, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    A diagnosis of unexplained infertility is commonly made when clinical investigations fail to identify any obvious barriers to conception. As a consequence, unexplained infertility includes several heterogeneous conditions, one being women with age-related infertility. However, the latter represent a peculiar and different situation. Women with age-related infertility may have a different prognosis and may benefit from different treatments. Unfortunately, since fecundity declines with age, discerning between unexplained infertility and age-related infertility becomes more and more difficult as the woman's age increases. In this opinion, with the use of a mathematical model we show that the rate of false positive diagnoses of unexplained infertility increases rapidly after 35 years of age. Using a threshold of 2 years of unfruitful, regular unprotected intercourse, this rate exceeds 50% in women starting pregnancy seeking after 37 years. The scenario is much worse using a threshold of 1 year. From a clinical perspective, extrapolating results obtained in a population of young women with unexplained infertility to those with age-related infertility is not justified. It is noteworthy that, if Assisted Reproductive Technologies are unable to overcome age-related infertility, the older women erroneously labeled with unexplained infertility may receive inappropriate therapies. These may expose women to unjustified risks and waste financial resources. Unfortunately, the available literature about older women is scanty and does not provide valid evidence. Randomized controlled trials aimed at identifying the most suitable clinical management of older women with a normal infertility work-up are pressingly needed. PMID:27060173

  20. Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms associated with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Madon, Prochi F; Parikh, Firuza R

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a complex human condition and is known to be caused by numerous factors including genetic alterations and abnormalities. Increasing evidence from studies has associated perturbed epigenetic mechanisms with spermatogenesis and infertility. However, there has been no consensus...... on whether one or a collective of these altered states is responsible for the onset of infertility. Epigenetic alterations involve changes in factors that regulate gene expression without altering the physical sequence of DNA. Understanding these altered epigenetic states at the genomic level along...... with the phenotype could further determine what possible mechanisms are involved. This paper reviews certain mechanisms of epigenetic regulation with particular emphasis on their possible role in infertility....

  1. Mitochondrial DNA mutations and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as difficulty in conceiving a child after 1 year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility can arise either because of the male factor or female factor or both. According to the current estimates, 15% of couples attempting their first pregnancy could not succeed. Infertility is either primary or secondary. Mitochondria have profound effect on all biochemical pathways, including the one that drivessperm motility. Sperm motility is heavily dependent on the ATP generated by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondrial sheath. In this review, the very positive role of mitochondrial genome′s association with infertility is discussed

  2. Missing Motherhood: Jordanian Women's Experiences with Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Mahmoud Obeidat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim, Background, and Introduction. Bearing and rearing children are an important part of life in nearly all cultures and are a central role for Jordanian Muslim women. Infertility can create anxiety, stress, and depression for couples who are infertile. Women frequently bear the emotional stigma of a couple’s infertility. There is a paucity of literature focusing on Jordanian Muslim women experiencing infertility and failed assistive reproductive technology. Therefore, this study explored these women’s lived experience. Methods. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with 30 Jordanian Muslim women who experienced failed assistive reproductive technology for infertility. Perceptions of experiences with failed treatment of infertility were documented and analyzed. Results. Major themes were identified: missing out on motherhood and living with infertility, experiencing marital stressors, feeling social pressure, experiencing depression and disappointment, having treatment associated difficulties, appreciating support from family and friends, using coping strategies, and fear of an unknown future. Discussion, Conclusion, and Implications for Clinical Practice. Being infertile significantly influences the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health of Jordanian Muslim women as well as their quality of life. Perceived social support and personal coping strategies were used by study participants to mediate failed attempts to conceive. Designing and implementing culturally appropriate interventions for Muslim women globally who are experiencing infertility are essential.

  3. Routine use of diagnostiv hysteroscopy in infertile patients

    OpenAIRE

    ÇÖĞENDEZ, Ebru; SOĞUKTAŞ, Suna; ALTINKAŞ, Kemal; Alkan, Akif; EREN, Sadiye

    2008-01-01

    Routine use of diagnostic hysteroscopy in infertile patients Objective: We examined the place of hysteroscopy in investigation ofbasic infertility. Material and Methods: To invastigate the uterine cavity, 53 primary infertile and 28 secondary infertile patients were evaluated by Endoscopic Surgery Clinic, which were referred from Assisted Reproductive Technics Unit and infertility polyclinic. We planned diagnostic hysteroscopy to 30 of 53 primary infertile patients because of abnormal hyste...

  4. Sexual behavior of infertile women: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Mahshid Bokaie; Masoumeh Simbar; Seyed Mojtaba Yassini Ardekani

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility makes an essential challenge to the sexual life of couples, especially infertile women. When pregnancy does not happen, infertile women think that sexual intercourse is not fruitful and sexual desire became reduce gradually. Infertile women progressively forget that their sexual relationship is also a response to their natural need. Objective: This qualitative study was conducted to explore the infertility consequences in the sexual behavior of infertile women. M...

  5. Sperm DNA damage in male infertility: etiologies, assays, and outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Ryan T.; Ohl, Dana A; Sigman, Mark; Smith, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    Male factor infertility is the sole cause of infertility in approximately 20% of infertile couples, with an additional 30% to 40% secondary to both male and female factors. Current means of evaluation of male factor infertility remains routine semen analysis including seminal volume, pH, sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. However, approximately 15% of patients with male factor infertility have a normal semen analysis and a definitive diagnosis of male infertility often cannot be m...

  6. ENHANCING STRESS COPING SKILLS AMONG INFERTILITY WOMEN – AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    S.M. Pandian; S. Kadhiravan

    2015-01-01

    Women infertility is the failure of a couple to conceive a pregnancy after trying to do so for at least one full year. In primary infertility, pregnancy has never occurred. In secondary infertility, one or both members of the couple have previously conceived, but are unable to conceive again after a full year of trying. The cause of female infertility can be difficult to diagnose, but many treatments are available. The stress does not cause infertility, infertility most definitely ca...

  7. Incidence and main causes of infertility in patients attending the infertility center of Imam khomeini hospital in 2002-2004

    OpenAIRE

    A. Karimpour; A. Esmaeelnezhad Moghadam; N. Moslemizadeh; NA. Mousanezhad; S. Peyvandi; M. Gahandar

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Infertility is a common problem in all connunities. Between 8 to 12 percent of couples around the world have difficulties conceiving a child. Cultural, Socioeconomic and environmental factors play major roles in the etiology of infertility. The objective of this study was to estimate and analyse the causes of infertility in patients attending the infertility clinic.Materials and methods: The medical records of 657 infertile couples attending Imam infertility clinic, Sa...

  8. Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

  9. Effect of the Modern Life on Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keziban Amanak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is defined as failing to become pregnant at the end of one year although unprotected sexual intercourse of the couples. Infertility affects 15 % of couples at the reproductive age according to data of the World Health Organization. It was stated that approximately 1,5-2 million individuals in our country face infertility problem and problem increases gradually. One of the most important factors of increasing infertility problem is the adverse effects of modern life on our existence. Adverse effects of modern life are the common problems of the whole World. Postponement of gestational age as the result of modern life, obesity, electromagnetic waves, hormone-injected and genetically modified foodstuffs, stress, smoking and using alcohol, sexually transmitted diseases are among the increasing infertility causes. Adverse effects of the modern life on infertility may be minimized if the midwives and nurses know the harmful effects of modern life on infertility and provide consultancy services to couples, wishing to have a child. Effects of modern life on infertility and consultancy role of the midwives-nurses are discussed in this article. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(4.000: 345-350

  10. Genes Causing Male Infertility in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lawrence C. Layman

    2002-01-01

    There are an accumulating number of identified gene mutations that cause infertility in humans. Most of the known gene mutations impair normal puberty and subsequently cause infertility by either hypothalamic /pituitary deficiency of important tropic factors to the gonad or by gonadal genes.

  11. 活血助孕方对输卵管炎性不孕大鼠sICAM-1表达的研究%Research on Activating Blood and Promoting Pregnancy Formula for the sICAM-1 Expression of Infertile Rats with Salpingitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱宇清

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the impacts and curative effect mechanism of activating blood and promoting pregnancy formula on the chronic inflammatory infertile rats' cell factor sICAM - 1 ,and to compare the curative effect of high - dose group,middle - dose group and low - dose group respectively. Methods: Wista female rats were taken as study subjects, and mixed bacterial inoculation method was used to duplicate the obstructive infertility model with salpingitis. 80 rats were randomly divided into normal control group, model group, low - dose group, middle - dose group and high - dose group treated with activating blood and promoting pregnancy formula. After treatment, immunohistochemical method was used to detect sICAM - 1 expression. Results: Activating blood and promoting pregnancy formula in low - dose group, middle - dose group and high - dose group could regain model rats' ability of restraining sICAM - 1 expression in varying degrees. The effective rate of activating blood and promoting pregnancy formula in high - dose group was obviously superior to the low - dose group and middle - dose group. Conclusion: Mixed bacterial inoculation method can be used to duplicate the obstructive infertility model with salpingitis; Activating blood and promoting pregnancy formula can improve the construction and function of oviduct in rats with salpingitis; Activating blood and promoting pregnancy formula can restrain sICAM - 1 expression to exert its role in anti -inflammation.%目的:探讨中药活血助孕方对慢性炎性不孕大鼠可溶性细胞粘附因子(sICAM-1)的影响及其疗效机理,并比较高剂量组、中剂量组、低剂量组三种剂量的疗效.方法:以Wista雌性大鼠为受试对象,用混合菌接种法复制输卵管炎性阻塞性不孕模型,80只大鼠随机分为正常对照组、模型组、活血助孕方低剂量组、中剂量组、高剂量组,治疗后用免疫组化法检测sICAM-1的表达.结果:活血助孕方高、中、低剂

  12. Early Marriage: a Policy for Infertility Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Karimzadeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Female fertility begins to decline many years prior to the onset of menopause despite continued regular ovulatory cycles. Age related infertility is due to oocyte abnormalities and decreased ovarian reserve. Treatment of infertility when the cause is limited to decreased ovarian reserve is empirical at present except for oocyte donation. This mini review of the literature covers all available English biomedical journals that have been published from 1995 to 2008. The search based on combination of the words age, fertility, infertility, and oocyte abnormalities. The important findings from this search strategy are summarized and presented in the sub headings including female age and fertility, miscarriage and in vitro fertilization. Regarding infertility prevention, this mini review suggested that early marriage is a primordial, effective, inexpensive and easy way to prevent infertility.

  13. [Cervix factors as a cause of infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, P; Westergaard, L

    1990-04-23

    The uterine cervix plays an important role in the natural fertilization process and, consequently, it is also a significant factor in infertility. In about 6% of infertile couples, the infertility is caused by the cervical factor. The post coital test (PCT) is the most essential diagnostic procedure. A good PCT result excludes the cervical factor as the cause of infertility. A poor or negative PCT result, on the other hand, only indicates that the cervical tract is the cause in the case of women with verified ovulation and in whom other causes have been excluded. Treatment of the cervical factor has always been difficult. Intrauterine insemination is the best documented treatment method with a pregnancy rate of about 30%. In future, gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) may be alternatives in the treatment of infertility owing to the cervical factor. PMID:2184560

  14. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ... Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  15. Social and Cultural Aspects of Infertility in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, Trudie

    1997-01-01

    The sociocultural aspects of infertility among members of the matrilineal ethnic group Macua are studied. Strategies applied by infertile women, the use of traditional healers versus modern hospital, and explanations given for infertility are presented. Solutions attempted, social consequences of infertility, and recommendations for culturally…

  16. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC HYSTEROLAPAROSCOPY IN EVALUATION OF FEMALE INFERTILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Jayanthy; Suvarna; Nirmala

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of hysterolaparoscopy in female infertility. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Kempegowda Institute of Medical sciences, Bengaluru were evaluated for infertility by hysterolaparoscopy and chromopertubation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to ...

  17. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility.

  18. Variations in Antioxidant Genes and Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolan Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated from both endogenous and environmental resources, which in turn may cause defective spermatogenesis and male infertility. Antioxidant genes, which include catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, glutathione S-transferase (GST, nitric oxide synthase (NOS, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2, and superoxide dismutase (SOD, play important roles in spermatogenesis and normal sperm function. In this review, we discuss the association between variations in major antioxidant genes and male infertility. Numerous studies have suggested that genetic disruption or functional polymorphisms in these antioxidant genes are associated with a higher risk for male infertility, which include low sperm quality, oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, oligozoospermia, and subfertility. The synergistic effects of environmental ROS and functional polymorphisms on antioxidant genes that result in male infertility have also been reported. Therefore, variants in antioxidant genes, which independently or synergistically occur with environmental ROS, affect spermatogenesis and contribute to the occurrence of male infertility. Large cohort and multiple center-based population studies to identify new antioxidant genetic variants that increase susceptibility to male infertility as well as validate its potential as genetic markers for diagnosis and risk assessment for male infertility for precise clinical approaches are warranted.

  19. Variations in Antioxidant Genes and Male Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bolan; Huang, Zhaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from both endogenous and environmental resources, which in turn may cause defective spermatogenesis and male infertility. Antioxidant genes, which include catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S-transferase (GST), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), play important roles in spermatogenesis and normal sperm function. In this review, we discuss the association between variations in major antioxidant genes and male infertility. Numerous studies have suggested that genetic disruption or functional polymorphisms in these antioxidant genes are associated with a higher risk for male infertility, which include low sperm quality, oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, oligozoospermia, and subfertility. The synergistic effects of environmental ROS and functional polymorphisms on antioxidant genes that result in male infertility have also been reported. Therefore, variants in antioxidant genes, which independently or synergistically occur with environmental ROS, affect spermatogenesis and contribute to the occurrence of male infertility. Large cohort and multiple center-based population studies to identify new antioxidant genetic variants that increase susceptibility to male infertility as well as validate its potential as genetic markers for diagnosis and risk assessment for male infertility for precise clinical approaches are warranted. PMID:26618172

  20. Hysterosalpingography and laparoscopy in infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Despite dynamic development of diagnostic imaging methods and endoscopic procedures, X-ray hysterosalpingography remains the basic diagnostic procedure when anatomical cause of infertility is suspected. The aim of the study was to assess the correlation between HSG results and laparoscopy findings, especially in infertile women with normal results of hysterosalpingography. Material/Methods: The results of HSG and laparoscopies performed between 2002 and 2005 years in 53 infertile women were analyzed retrospectively. The indication for HSG was primary infertility in 44 cases and secondary infertility in 9 cases.Results: The result of HSG was normal in 51%. Pathological findings were observed in 49% of HSG and in 93% of laparoscopies. The most common pathological findings observed during laparoscopy were tubal occlusion (26% cases) and endometriosis (25% cases). Polycystic ovaries and myomas were observed in 20% of the performed laparoscopies. HSG and laparoscopy yield consistent results in evaluation of tubal patency (p < 0.001). Conclusions: HSG remains the method of first choice in the diagnostics of uterine malformations and tubal diseases as causes of infertility. When mechanical factors of female infertility are suspected, HSG allows the optimal choice of more invasive procedure. (authors)

  1. Male infertility: an obstacle to sexuality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechoua, S; Hamamah, S; Scalici, E

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between infertility and sexuality are numerous and complex. Infertile men may suffer from sexual dysfunction (SD) when undergoing an assisted reproductive technology programme. We undertook a review both in French and English of the available data on male SD when being diagnosed with a fertility problem with a specific focus on azoospermic men. The review was performed over a 30-year time period using PubMed/Medline. The sexual concerns and needs of infertile/sterile men for whom potential parenting can be compromised were evaluated. When diagnosed with infertility, men usually go through a crisis that can have a deleterious effect on their sexuality with sometimes a feeling of sexual inadequacy. Infertile men will feel stigmatized because they are perceived as being deficient in a specific component of their masculinity. Hence, subsequent SD may occur that can impact the couple sexuality and the infertility management. However, little is known on how the announcement of azoospermia may affect male on a sexual and psychological point of view. The present review suggests that a global management through a healthcare network (biologist, andrologist, sexologist and psychologist) is required which will allow to consider infertility and its subsequent sexual disorders as a whole and not as dichotomized issues. PMID:27061770

  2. Prevalence of hypothyroidism in infertile women and evaluation of response of treatment for hypothyroidism on infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Mohana Priya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim was to study the prevalence of hypothyroidism in infertile women and evaluation of response of treatment for hypothyroidism on infertility. Materials and Methods: A total of 95 infertile women were investigated for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH. Infertile women with clinical/subclinical hypothyroidism were given thyroxine ranges from 25 to 150 μg. Results: Of 95 infertile women, 53.7% were hypothyroid (TSH > 4.6 μIU/ml. After the treatment with thyroxine, 33.3% of subclinical hypothyroid women conceived within 6 weeks to 2-year period. The mean time to conception was 14.56 ± 4.83 months. Conclusion: Thyroid profile should be done in infertility work up. Women with normal TSH levels who are positive for thyroid antibodies should also be treated with levothyroxine.

  3. Frequency of endometrial tuberculosis in female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of endometrial tuberculosis in infertility patients. Design: an observational analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital Rawalpindi and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi from August 1998 to April 1999. Subjects and Methods: Endometrial biopsies were taken from 50 cases of infertility and subjected to culture on BACTEC 460 TB instrument. Results: Tuberculous endometritis was found in 10 % (n=5) of cases. Conclusion: It was concluded that endometrial tuberculosis is not an infrequent cause of infertility in our setup. (author)

  4. Genital tract infections and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellati, Donatella; Mylonakis, Ioannis; Bertoloni, Giulio; Fiore, Cristina; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Armanini, Decio

    2008-09-01

    Infectious agents can impair various important human functions, including reproduction. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites are able to interfere with the reproductive function in both sexes. Infections of male genito-urinary tract account for about 15% of the case of male infertility. Infections can affect different sites of the male reproductive tract, such as the testis, epididymis and male accessory sex glands. Spermatozoa themselves subsequently can be affected by urogenital infections at different levels of their development, maturation and transport. Among the most common microorganisms involved in sexually transmitted infections, interfering with male fertility, there are the Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Less frequently male infertility is due to non-sexually transmitted epididymo-orchitis, mostly caused by Escherichia coli. In female, the first two microorganisms are certainly involved in cervical, tubal, and peritoneal damage, while Herpes simplex cervicitis is less dangerous. The overall importance of cervical involvement is still under discussion. Tubo-peritoneal damage seems to be the foremost manner in which microorganisms interfere with human fertility. C. trachomatis is considered the most important cause of tubal lacerations and obstruction, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and adhesions. N. gonorrhoeae, even though its overall incidence seems to decline, is still to be considered in the same sense, while bacterial vaginosis should not be ignored, as causative agents can produce ascending infections of the female genital tract. The role of infections, particularly co-infections, as causes of the impairment of sperm quality, motility and function needs further investigation. Tropical diseases necessitate monitoring as for their diffusion or re-diffusion in the western world. PMID:18456385

  5. Recommended foods for male infertility in Iranian traditional medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Nejatbakhsh; Esmaeil Nazem; Ashrafeddin Goushegir; Mohammad Mahdi Isfahani; Alireza Nikbakht Nasrabadi; Marzieh Baygom Siahpoosh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Male infertility accounts for 30-50% of all infertilities among couples. Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) stressed the importance of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of male infertility. Many Iranian traditional physicians have described the traits of specific foods for prevention and treatment of male infertility. Objective: To explore the principles and roles of foods recommended by ITM scientists in prevention and treatment of male infertility as well as enlisting al...

  6. Association of Positive History of Pulmonary Tuberculosis with Female Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Babak Eshrati; Koorosh Houlakooei; Mohammad Kamali; Jafar Hassanzadeh; Fahimeh Kashfi; Farshad Pourmalek

    2007-01-01

    Background: The etiology of infertility has direct influence on the plan and outcome of its management.In this paper we showed the effect of history of tuberculosis (TB) on female infertility among infertilecouples admitted to Royan infertility management center.Material and Methods: This case control study was performed on cases that were diagnosed withfemale infertility (308 women). Controls were women whose husbands were infertile due to some malefactor (314 women). Those who had both fema...

  7. Frequency and outcome of treatment in polycystic ovaries related infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Arain, Farzana; Arif, Nesreen; Halepota, Hafeez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is defined as inability of couple to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse. The prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is 21.9%. The most common cause of medically treatable infertility is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCO). This study was conducted to see the frequency and outcome of treatment in PCOs related infertility in infertile couples coming to Mohammad Medical College Hospital, Mirpurkhas, Sindh. Methods: This prospective observational study was con...

  8. The impact of infertility on sexuality: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Maycock; Rosemary Coates2; Peng Tao

    2011-01-01

    Background: Most studies address medical treatment of infertility and psychosocial outcomes caused by infertility-related stress, but few studies examine the infertility’s impact on sexuality.Aim: A literature review was conducted to answer the questions: 1) How is sexual self concept impacted in infertile individuals and their partners? 2) Does infertility have a negative impact on sexual relationships? 3) Is sexual function affected by infertility? In answering these questions, we may devel...

  9. VINCLOZOLIN (V) TREATMENT INDUCES REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS AND INFERTILITY IN F1 MALE RATS WHEN ADMINISTERED DURING SEXUAL BUT NOT GONADAL DIFFERENTIATION. THE EFFECTS ARE NOT TRANSMITTED TO THE SUBSEQUENT GENERATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V produces adverse reproductive effects in male rats when administered during sexual differentiation by acting as an androgen-antagonist. It was recently reported that four generations of SD rats, derived from dams dosed via ip injection GD8-15 with 100 mg V/kg/day, displayed pro...

  10. Prevalence of Infertility Problems among Iranian Infertile Patients Referred to Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sepidarkish

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have been conducted on the infertility problems in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of infertility problems and related factors in Iranian infertile patients. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 405 infertile patients referred to Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between 2014 and 2015, were selected by simple random sampling. Participants completed the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI including 46 questions in five domains (social concern, sexual concern, relationship concern, rejection of parenthood, and need for parenthood. Mean difference between male and female was verified using independent-samples Student’s t test. A generalized linear model (GLM was also used for testing the effect of variables on the fertility problems. Data was analyzed using Stata software version 13. Results: The mean age (SD of participants was 31.28 (5.42. Our results showed that 160 infertile men (95.23% were classified as very high prevalence of infertility problems. Among infertile women, 83 patients (35.02% were as very high prevalence of infertility problems, and 154 patients (64.98% were as high prevalence. Age (P<0.001, sex (P<0.001, a history of abortion (P=0.009, failure of previous treatment (P<0.001, and education (P=0.014 had a significant relationship with FPI scores. Conclusion: Bases on the results of current study, an younger male with lower education level, history of abortion and history of previous treatments failure experienced more infertility problems.

  11. DNA methylation in spermatogenesis and male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiangrong; Jing, Xuan; Wu, Xueqing; Yan, Meiqin; Li, Qiang; Shen, Yan; Wang, Zhenqiang

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a significant problem for human reproduction, with males and females equally affected. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying male infertility remain unclear. Spermatogenesis is a highly complex process involving mitotic cell division, meiosis cell division and spermiogenesis; during this period, unique and extensive chromatin and epigenetic modifications occur to bring about specific epigenetic profiles in spermatozoa. It has recently been suggested that the dysregulation of epigenetic modifications, in particular the methylation of sperm genomic DNA, may serve an important role in the development of numerous diseases. The present study is a comprehensive review on the topic of male infertility, aiming to elucidate the association between sperm genomic DNA methylation and poor semen quality in male infertility. In addition, the current status of the genetic and epigenetic determinants of spermatogenesis in humans is discussed.

  12. Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility SREI Members-only Forum Home About Us About SREI Vision and Mission ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SREI is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  13. Unexplained Male infertility: diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Hamada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Unexplained male infertility is a diagnosis reserved for men in whom routine semen analyses results are within normal values and physical as well as endocrine abnormalities were ruled out. In addition to erectile problems and coital factors, immunologic causes and sperm dysfunction may contribute to such condition. New etiologies of unexplained male infertility include low level leukocytospermia and mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene polymorphism. Contemporary andrology may reveal cellular and sub-cellular sperm dysfunctions which may explain subfertility in such cases, thus aiding the clinician to direct the further work-up, diagnosis and counseling of the infertile male. The objective of this article is to highlight the concept of unexplained male infertility and focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of this condition in the era of modern andrology and assisted reproductive techniques. Extensive literature review was performed using the search engines: Pubmed, Science-direct, Ovid and Scopus.

  14. Infertility Patients' Mental Health Problems Often Unaddressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy on top of that. To Pasch, the solution is for clinics to have a mental health ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Depression Infertility Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  15. Who's Most Likely to Seek Infertility Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... said study leader Jessica Datta. She is a lecturer at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine ... Those with infertility who did seek help were more likely to be better educated, have higher incomes ...

  16. An epidemiologic survey on the causes of infertility in patients referred to infertility center in Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan

    OpenAIRE

    Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi; Parisa Parsa; Nooshin Darvish; Sahar Mokhtari; Mahnaz Yavangi; Ghodratollah Roshanaei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is considered as a major health care problem of different communities. The high prevalence of this issue doubled its importance. A significant proportion of infertility have been related to environmental conditions and also acquired risk factors. Different environmental conditions emphasized the need to study the different causes of infertility in each area. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency causes of infertility in infertile couples. ...

  17. Y chromosome microdeletions in Turkish infertile men

    OpenAIRE

    Zamani Ayse; Kutlu Ruhusen; Durakbasi-Dursun H; Gorkemli Huseyin; Acar Aynur

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To detect the frequency and types of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men attending to our university intracytoplasmic sperm injection ICSI/IVF centre and fertile control subjects in our patient population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A total of 50 infertile men who were referred to IVF center of Meram medical faculty were selected for the molecular azospermia factor (AZF) screening program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Karyotype analysis and polymeras...

  18. Early Marriage: a Policy for Infertility Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ali Karimzadeh; Sedigheh Ghandi

    2008-01-01

    Female fertility begins to decline many years prior to the onset of menopause despite continued regular ovulatory cycles. Age related infertility is due to oocyte abnormalities and decreased ovarian reserve. Treatment of infertility when the cause is limited to decreased ovarian reserve is empirical at present except for oocyte donation. This mini review of the literature covers all available English biomedical journals that have been published from 1995 to 2008. The search based on combinati...

  19. Investigation and Management of Male Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Vallely, John F.

    1983-01-01

    Infertility is rarely due only to the male or female partner. Usually each partner's fertility is in some way diminished. Male infertility may be related to deficiencies in spermatogenesis or sperm transport. Accurate diagnosis can be achieved only by a careful evaluation including precise semen analyses and, where indicated, gonadotropin and other assays. Treatment may be specific for physical or endocrine deficits, but is often empirical. Factors other than the sperm count, such as emission...

  20. Aneuploidy in spermatozoa in infertile men

    OpenAIRE

    Grabar V.V.; Feskov A.M.; Stefanovich A.V.; Zhilkova E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. An important problem is to investigate the frequency of aneuploidy in sperms of infertile men according to their changes in karyotype, that would allow to understand the contribution of paternal factor in the formation of chromosomal aberrations of embryos. Objective. To study the frequency of aneuploidy in spermatozoa from infertile men with normal karyotype and chromosomal changes. Methods. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of spermatozoa (chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21, 22,...

  1. Aneuploidy in spermatozoa in infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabar V.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. An important problem is to investigate the frequency of aneuploidy in sperms of infertile men according to their changes in karyotype, that would allow to understand the contribution of paternal factor in the formation of chromosomal aberrations of embryos. Objective. To study the frequency of aneuploidy in spermatozoa from infertile men with normal karyotype and chromosomal changes. Methods. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of spermatozoa (chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21, 22, X and Y was performed in 79 infertile men with normal karyotype, in 16 with chromosomal abnormalities, in 18 with chromosomal polymorphism and in 29 healthy men. In total 23,867 of sperm cores were analyzed. Results. In men with infertility an aneuploid sperms were in 5.7 times more often than in fertile patients (P˂0,01. An aneuploidy of sperms in infertile men with a chromosomal abnormality were in 2.1 times, with a chromosomal polymorphism in 1.4 times more often than in infertile patients with a normal karyotype (P˂0,05. In all patients the most common aneuploidies were in chromosomes XY, 21 and 22. The study of aneuploidy frequency in spermatozoa at different variants of chromosomal pathology showed that in men with paracentric inversions rate was 5.75 - 7.65%, whereas in patients with quantitative and other structural chromosomal abnormalities it was above 11.73 - 17.82%. Conclusion. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations in spermatozoa is highest in men with genomic and chromosomal mutations. In infertile patients with changes in the karyotype the gametes with mutations de novo can be produced. Citation: Grabar VV, Feskov AM, Stefanovich AV, Zhilkova ES. [Aneuploidy in spermatozoa in infertile men]. Morpho-logia. 2014;8(3:7-12. Russian.

  2. Gestational surrogacy: Viewpoint of Iranian infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surrogacy is a popular form of assisted reproductive technology of which only gestational form is approved by most of the religious scholars in Iran. Little evidence exists about the Iranian infertile women′s viewpoint regarding gestational surrogacy. Aim: To assess the viewpoint of Iranian infertile women toward gestational surrogacy. Setting and Design: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 238 infertile women who were selected using the eligible sampling method. Data were collected by using a researcher developed questionnaire that included 25 items based on a five-point Likert scale. 0 Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was conducted by SPSS statistical software using descriptive statistics. 0 Results: Viewpoint of 214 women (89.9% was positive. 36 (15.1% women considered gestational surrogacy against their religious beliefs; 170 women (71.4% did not assume the commissioning couple as owners of the baby; 160 women (67.2% said that children who were born through surrogacy would better not know about it; and 174 women (73.1% believed that children born through surrogacy will face mental problems. Conclusion: Iranian infertile women have positive viewpoint regarding the surrogacy. However, to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile women, further efforts are needed.

  3. The impact of infertility on sexuality: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Maycock3

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most studies address medical treatment of infertility and psychosocial outcomes caused by infertility-related stress, but few studies examine the infertility’s impact on sexuality.Aim: A literature review was conducted to answer the questions: 1 How is sexual self concept impacted in infertile individuals and their partners? 2 Does infertility have a negative impact on sexual relationships? 3 Is sexual function affected by infertility? In answering these questions, we may develop a better understanding of sexuality in the context of infertility, and thus better inform infertility management. Ultimately the aim is to improve the quality of life for infertile couples.Method: A literature search was conducted for publications from 1990 to 2011 via the electronic databases PubMed, PsycInfo and Scopus, which focused on sexuality in infertile subjects or couples.Results: In this review, all studies were descriptive quantitative studies which mapped the different aspects of sexuality in the context of infertility. The results suggested that infertility and its treatment approaches for fertilisationcould lead to changes in sexual self-esteem, sexual relationship and sexual function.Conclusion: The literature substantiated that many infertile subjects experienced trouble in various aspects of sexuality. However, further research should examine the reciprocal relations between sexual self concept, sexual relationship and sexual function in the context of infertility. How these changes affect the partners of infertile subjects should also be addressed.

  4. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  5. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Dupree

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws.

  6. Identification of human candidate genes for male infertility by digital differential display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, C; Hansen, C; Bendsen, E; Byskov, A G; Schwinger, E; Lopez-Pajares, I; Jensen, P K; Kristoffersson, U; Schubert, R; Van Assche, E; Wahlstroem, J; Lespinasse, J; Tommerup, N

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for the importance of genetic factors in male fertility is accumulating. In the literature and the Mendelian Cytogenetics Network database, 265 cases of infertile males with balanced reciprocal translocations have been described. The candidacy for infertility of 14 testis-expressed transcripts (TETs) were examined by comparing their chromosomal mapping position to the position of balanced reciprocal translocation breakpoints found in the 265 infertile males. The 14 TETs were selected by using digital differential display (electronic subtraction) to search for apparently testis-specific transcripts in the TIGR database. The testis specificity of the 14 TETs was further examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on adult and fetal tissues showing that four TETs (TET1 to TET4) were testis-expressed only, six TETs (TET5 to TET10) appeared to be differentially expressed and the remaining four TETs (TET11 to TET14) were ubiquitously expressed. Interestingly, the two tesis expressed-only transcripts, TET1 and TET2, mapped to chromosomal regions where seven and six translocation breakpoints have been reported in infertile males respectively. Furthermore, one ubiquitously, but predominantly testis-expressed, transcript, TET11, mapped to 1p32-33, where 13 translocation breakpoints have been found in infertile males. Interestingly, the mouse mutation, skeletal fusions with sterility, sks, maps to the syntenic region in the mouse genome. Another transcript, TET7, was the human homologue of rat Tpx-1, which functions in the specific interaction of spermatogenic cells with Sertoli cells. TPX-1 maps to 6p21 where three cases of chromosomal breakpoints in infertile males have been reported. Finally, TET8 was a novel transcript which in the fetal stage is testis-specific, but in the adult is expressed in multiple tissues, including testis. We named this novel transcript fetal and adult testis-expressed transcript (FATE). PMID:11134355

  7. Identification of human candidate genes for male infertility by digital differential display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, C; Hansen, C; Bendsen, E; Byskov, A G; Schwinger, E; Lopez-Pajares, I; Jensen, P K; Kristoffersson, U; Schubert, R; Van Assche, E; Wahlstroem, J; Lespinasse, J; Tommerup, N

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for the importance of genetic factors in male fertility is accumulating. In the literature and the Mendelian Cytogenetics Network database, 265 cases of infertile males with balanced reciprocal translocations have been described. The candidacy for infertility of 14 testis-expressed transcripts (TETs) were examined by comparing their chromosomal mapping position to the position of balanced reciprocal translocation breakpoints found in the 265 infertile males. The 14 TETs were selected by using digital differential display (electronic subtraction) to search for apparently testis-specific transcripts in the TIGR database. The testis specificity of the 14 TETs was further examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on adult and fetal tissues showing that four TETs (TET1 to TET4) were testis-expressed only, six TETs (TET5 to TET10) appeared to be differentially expressed and the remaining four TETs (TET11 to TET14) were ubiquitously expressed. Interestingly, the two tesis expressed-only transcripts, TET1 and TET2, mapped to chromosomal regions where seven and six translocation breakpoints have been reported in infertile males respectively. Furthermore, one ubiquitously, but predominantly testis-expressed, transcript, TET11, mapped to 1p32-33, where 13 translocation breakpoints have been found in infertile males. Interestingly, the mouse mutation, skeletal fusions with sterility, sks, maps to the syntenic region in the mouse genome. Another transcript, TET7, was the human homologue of rat Tpx-1, which functions in the specific interaction of spermatogenic cells with Sertoli cells. TPX-1 maps to 6p21 where three cases of chromosomal breakpoints in infertile males have been reported. Finally, TET8 was a novel transcript which in the fetal stage is testis-specific, but in the adult is expressed in multiple tissues, including testis. We named this novel transcript fetal and adult testis-expressed transcript (FATE).

  8. Infertility, infertility treatment and twinning: the Danish National BirthCohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have previously observed that an increasing time to pregnancy (TTP) is associated with a reduced frequency of twin deliveries in couples not receiving infertility treatment. By using updated information, we assessed the frequencies of dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin...... deliveries as a function of infertility (TTP>12 months), as well as infertility treatment. METHODS From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51 730 fertile couples with TTPwith TTP>12 months and 5163 infertile couples who conceived after treatment. Information on zygosity, available...... for part of the cohort (1997-2000), was based on standardized questions on the similarities between the twins at the age of 3-5 years. RESULTS Compared with fertile couples, the frequency of DZ twin deliveries was lower for infertile couples conceiving naturally (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0...

  9. The prevalence of coeliac disease in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, G F; Dessole, S; Vargiu, N; Tomasi, P A; Musumeci, S

    1999-11-01

    An increased incidence of reproductive problems, including infertility, miscarriage, low birth weight newborns, and shorter duration of breast-feeding, are known to exist in women with coeliac disease; some of these conditions are improved by a gluten-free diet. We have tried to ascertain the prevalence of coeliac disease in 99 couples who were being evaluated for infertility, compared with the known prevalence of silent disease in the population of Northern Sardinia, in which it is endemic. Of all women, four tested positive for at least two out of three markers: immunoglobulin A (IgA) antigliadin, immunoglobulin (IgG) antigliadin, and anti-endomysium antibodies, and underwent a jejunal biopsy; three had histological evidence of coeliac disease. One male partner was positive for two markers, and had a diagnostic jejunal biopsy. The prevalence of coeliac disease in infertile women seems higher (three out of 99, 3. 03%) in the study group than in the general population (17 out of 1607, 1.06%), and particularly in the subgroup with unexplained infertility (two out of 25, 8%, P infertile women, particularly when no apparent cause can be ascertained after standard evaluation. PMID:10548618

  10. Attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensiyeh Mohebbi Kian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surrogacy arrangements are multifaceted in nature, involving multiple controversial aspects and engaging ethical, moral, psychological and social issues. Successful treatment in reproductive medicine is strongly based on the mutual agreement of both partners, especially in Iran where men often make the final decision for health-related problems of this nature. AIM: The aim of the following study is to assess the attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy. Setting and Design: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Hamadan university of medical sciences, Iran. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 150 infertile couples selected using a systematic randomized method. Data collection was based on responses to a questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. Statistical Analysis: P <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Results: While 33.3% of men and 43.3% of women surveyed insisted on not using surrogacy, the overall attitudes toward surrogacy were positive (53.3% of women and 54.6% of men surveyed. Conclusion: Although, there was not a significant difference between the overall positive attitudes of infertile women and men toward surrogacy, the general attitude toward using this method is not strongly positive. Therefore, further efforts are required to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile couples.

  11. [Protamine gene polymorphisms and male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei-jun; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Xin-yi; Xu, Hao-qin

    2015-12-01

    Protamine (PRM) is one of the most abundant arginine-rich nucleoproteins in sperm and plays an important role in spermatogenesis. In the late stage of spermatogenesis, the replacement of PRM by histone prompts the closer combination between the nuclear matrix of sperm and nucleoprotein in order for high enrichment and condensation of nuclear chromatin in addition to preventing the sperm genome from mutation induced by internal and external factors. With the development of DNA sequencing techniques, researches on the association between PRM polymorphisms and male fertility are surfacing as a hot field. Many studies show that rs2301365 polymorphism is a risk factor for male infertility and increases the risk of male infertility by 27 - 66%, that rs737008 polymorphism of PRM1 and rs1646022 polymorphism of PRM2 are protective factors against Asian infertility, and that the ratio of PRM1 to PRM2 is intensively associated with male infertility. This review presents an update on the association between PRM gene polymorphisms and male infertility. PMID:26817310

  12. Relationship between blood groups and male infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Blood is man's complete and unchangeable identity. The ABO and Rh groups are recognised as major and clinically significant blood groups. Blood group antigens are not only important in relation to blood transfusion and organ transplantation, but also have been utilised in genetic research, anthropology and tracing ancestral relation of humans. The objective the present study is to examine the blood group antigens in infertile men for assessing the relationship to male infertility and to know the frequency of various blood groups among infertile males in our population. Method: A total of 1,521 patients along with 460 proven fathers as controls were recruited for the present study from both rural and urban areas of Pakistan and referred to Department of Reproductive Physiology/Health, Public Health Divisions, NIH, Islamabad, during 2002 to 2006. Blood grouping (ABO) and Rhesus factors (Rh) was done by the antigen antibody agglutination test. Results: Overall distribution of blood groups in the studied population of 1,521 subjects was 35.50%, 28.27%, 26.89% and 9.34% for blood groups O, B, A and AB respectively. The ratio of control to patient was 1:3.3. Conclusions: The present preliminary study revealed that in our population the prevalence of male infertility in blood group O is invariably higher than in all other ABO blood groups, showing a strong relationship between blood group O and male infertility. (author)

  13. Forgotten intrauterine device contributing to infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel O. Igberase

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to show that long standing forgotten intrauterine device contributes to infertility, reporting three cases presented at Central Hospital Warri, Nigeria, a government tertiary health center. Three cases of forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD contributing to infertility were seen. Two were inserted for contraceptive reasons while one was inserted while being managed for uterine synechae. Health care providers should ensure proper documentation of all procedures carried out, adequate counseling which should include taking an informed consent and also ensuring both short and long term follow up of their clients. Also all patients being evaluated for infertility and clients with past history of intrauterine device must have a speculum examination and ultrasound scan carried out.

  14. Exploring infertile women's experiences about sexual life: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Kohan, Shahnaz; Ghasemi, Zahra; Beigi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a serious problem in a couple's life that affects their marriage relationships. So, dissatisfaction with sexual function resulting from interpersonal problems is common among these couples. This qualitative study aimed to explore the experiences of infertile women in their sexual life. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative study with a phenomenological approach. The participants were 20 infertile women referring to the health care centers and infertility clin...

  15. Exploration of Infertile Couples’ Support Requirements: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to high prevalence of infertility, increasing demand for infertility treatment, and provision of high quality of fertility care, it is necessary for healthcare professionals to explore infertile couples’ expectations and needs. Identification of these needs can be a prerequisite to plan the effective supportive interventions. The current study was, therefore, conducted in an attempt to explore and to understand infertile couples’ experiences and needs. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative study based on a content analysis approach. The participants included 26 infertile couples (17 men and 26 women and 7 members of medical personnel (3 gynecologists and 4 midwives as the key informants. The infertile couples were selected from patients attending public and private infertility treatment centers and private offices of infertility specialists in Isfahan and Rasht, Iran, during 2012-2013. They were selected through purposive sampling method with maximum variation. In-depth unstructured interviews and field notes were used for data gathering among infertile couples. The data from medical personnel was collected through semi-structured interviews. The interview data were analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: Data analysis revealed four main categories of infertile couples’ needs, including: i. Infertility and social support, ii. Infertility and financial support, iii. Infertility and spiritual support and iv. Infertility and informational support. The main theme of all these categories was assistance and support. Conclusion: The study showed that in addition to treatment and medical needs, infertile couples encounter various challenges in different emotional, psychosocial, communicative, cognitive, spiritual, and economic aspects that can affect various areas of their life and lead to new concerns, problems, and demands. Thus, addressing infertile couples’ needs and expectations alongside their

  16. Comparison of Mental Health Ratings of Fertile and Infertile Couples

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrdad Mazaheri; Reyhaneh Mohsenian

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of current study was to compare the mental health of fertile and infertile couples.Materials and Method: A sample of four groups (infertile couples who gave birth child after treatment, infertile couples who brought adopted child, fertile couples who gave birth normally and infertile couples who have no children) have been selected using available sampling method and were asked to complete the mental health questionnaire (GHQ-28). A descriptive design has been used as th...

  17. Chinese Herbal Products for Female Infertility in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Yu-Chiang; Kao, Chao-Wei; Lin, Che-Chen; Liao, Yen-Nung; Wu, Bei-Yu; Hung, I-Ling; Hu, Wen-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Female infertility and low birth rate are significant public health issues with profound social, psychological, and economic consequences. Some infertile women resort to conventional, complementary, or alternative therapies to conceive. The aim of this study was to identify the Chinese herbal products (CHPs) most commonly used for female infertility in Taiwan. The usage of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the frequency of CHP prescriptions to infertile women were determined bas...

  18. Laparoscopic evaluation of tubal factor in cases of infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Shraddha K. Shetty; Harish Shetty; Supriya Rai

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tubal factor infertility accounts for approximately 25-35% of cases of female infertility. The evaluation of the fallopian tube is necessary to determine the management plan for infertility. Tubal patency can be diagnosed by hysterosalpingography (HSG) or laparoscopy with chromopertubation. The aim of this study was to determine the role of laparoscopy in the evaluation of tubal factor in infertile women. Methods: Fifty women presenting with complaints of primary and secondary inf...

  19. Characteristics of infertile couples attending OPD of a teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Parul Sinha; Kiran Pandey; Anand Srivastava; Iti Chowdhary

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is defined as failure to conceive even after one year of regular, frequent and unprotected intercourse. Infertility has, in the last few years surfaced in society as a significant problem affecting as many as 15% of couples. This study aimed at identifying the characteristics of infertility among Indian couples. Methods: The present study was carried out on 100 infertile couples attending the OPD of upper India sugar exchange maternity hospital attached to GSVM med...

  20. Association between endometriosis and hyperprolactinemia in infertile women

    OpenAIRE

    Seddigheh Esmaeilzadeh; Parvaneh Mirabi; Zahra Basirat; Mahtab Zeinalzadeh; Soraya Khafri

    2015-01-01

    Background: The association of endometriosis with hyperprolactinemia is controversial. Objective: The present study aimed to determine the frequency of endometriosis and association of prolactin with endometriosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods: 256 infertile women who underwent diagnostic laparoscopy for the evaluation of infertility, referred to Fatemezahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center were included in a cross-sectional study. The presence of endometr...

  1. Infertility: Ongoing Global challenge of new millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantibhai Naranbhai Sonaliya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility tends to be the global challenge even in the second decade of the new millennium. Especially in developing countries like India, it is still one the most lethal social evil responsible for a big proportion of cases of psychological disturbances including suicide. Again, recently, few conditions other than communicable or Non-communicable diseases are given place among the categories of significant public health problems like Road Traffic Accidents, Burns, Poisoning, drowning and few more. But, for developing countries like India, the list is incomplete without inclusion of Infertility (there may be several others also. In public health, tuberculosis, leprosy and some other diseases are considered social diseases which produce social stigma for the patients and/or his family members.1 In same manner, Infertility is an important cause of social stigmatization since centuries for a couple suffering from, especially for woman involved. During a transitory phase of industrialization and socio-economic development, the situation is changed a minute smidgen at urban areas of India but at rural parts, sub-urban or even at urban slums (mainly among pockets of recent migrants the situation is as same as a few hundred years ago. A female of no religion, caste, social status or higher level of education are barred from some stringent mores related to infertility. Infertile females are still not allowed to take part in so many religious or social ceremonies; on the contrary, they have to face more harassment including domestic violence than their counterparts, who have given birth to the child. Due to social, psychological, economic disturbances, they are forced to take multiple sorts of treatments including religious quacks. So many infertile women are exploited physically and economically also in such weird ways of treatment to gain a pregnancy.

  2. Physical and psychological violence against infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Moghadam

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the prevalence of physical and psychological violence against women with female factor infertility.Materials and methods: A total of 400 women with primary infertility attending the Vali-e-asr Reproductive Health Research Center in Tehran, Iran, were interviewed using the conflict tactics Scales (CTS2 questionnaire to investigate their experiences of physical and psychological violence.Results: The prevalence of psychological violence was 135 (33.8%, followed by physical 56 (14%. All women reported their husbands to be the perpetrators.Conclusion: Clinicians should identify the abused women and provide them with medical care and supportive counseling.

  3. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Infertility Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Eifert, Georg H.

    2011-01-01

    Women and men diagnosed with infertility experience a variety of infertility-related stressors, including changes to their family and social networks, strain on their sexual relationship, and difficulties and unexpected challenges in their relationship. Infertility stress is linked with depression and psychological distress, and can lead to…

  4. Prevalence and predictors of infertility-specific stress in women diagnosed with primary infertility: A clinic-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansha Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: According to the existing literature on infertility, stress appears to be inevitably associated with infertility diagnosis and treatment in sub-fertile individuals. The epidemiological data on the prevalence and predictors of infertility-specific stress in cultural specific scenario are scarce. The objective of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of infertility-specific stress and identify predictors of infertility-specific stress in women diagnosed with primary infertility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 300 infertile married women, diagnosed with primary infertility. The tools used for the assessment were “semi-structured questionnaire ” compiled by the authors, “ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders (Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines, ” and “Psychological Evaluation Test for infertility. ” STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 15. Chi-square test was used for univariate analysis followed by multiple logistic regressions between stress and the predictor variables. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The prevalence of stress among women was 80%. Univariate analysis revealed that predictors of stress were years of marital life, duration of infertility, infertility type, history of gynecological surgery, cycles of ovulation induction with timed intercourse and intra-uterine inseminations, present and past psychiatric morbidity, coping difficulties, gynecological diagnosis, and severity of premenstrual dysphoria. Multivariate analysis showed leading associations of stress with infertility type and coping difficulties.

  5. Reversible Infertility Associated with Testosterone Therapy for Symptomatic Hypogonadism in Infertile Couple

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Jeong Kyoon; Lim, Jung Jin; Choi, Jin; Won, Hyung Jae; Yoon, Tae Ki; Hong, Jae Yup; Park, Dong Soo; Song, Seung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Androgen replacement therapy has been shown to be safe and effective for most patients with testosterone deficiency. Male partners of infertile couples often report significantly poorer sexual activity and complain androgen deficiency symptoms. We report herein an adverse effect on fertility caused by misusage of androgen replacement therapy in infertile men with hypogonadal symptoms. Materials and Methods The study population consisted of 8 male patients referred from a local clinic ...

  6. Do Infertile Women and Government Staff Differ in the Evaluation of Infertility-related Web Sites?

    OpenAIRE

    Takabayashi, Chikako; Shimada, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the evaluation of local government Web sites carrying information on infertility by infertile women and by government staff. In particular, the study investigated whether the women and staff differed with respect to the information they rate as important and their self-reported satisfaction with the Web sites. Design and Sample: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Sixty-two local government staff members, of whom 46 were public health nurses managing subsidy programs ...

  7. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms "IBD AND male infertility", "Crohn's disease AND male infertility", "ulcerative colitis AND male infertility". References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, smoking, medications, and surgery may cause infertility in men with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, rectal incision seems to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the medications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces male fertility. No other medications appear to affect male fertility significantly, although small studies suggested some adverse effects. There are limited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on male fertility and pregnancy outcomes; however, patients should be informed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides information on fertility-related issues in men with IBD and discusses treatment options. PMID:27602237

  8. Impaired Leydig cell function in infertile men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A-M; Jørgensen, N; Frydelund-Larsen, L;

    2004-01-01

    of the fertile levels.Thus, the group of infertile men showed significant signs of impaired Leydig cell function in parallel to their impaired spermatogenesis. The association of decreased spermatogenesis and impaired Leydig cell function might reflect a disturbed paracrine communication between the seminiferous...

  9. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve...

  10. CLINICAL TRIAL OF PHALAGHRITA ON FEMALE INFERTILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Otta, S.P.; Tripaty, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was carried out in a sample of 30 numbers of female infertility cases with the use of phalagritam in the from of intra uterine insuffulation. After the treatment of three consecutive cycles an overall encouraging result was observed which will be represented in the full paper.

  11. A new classification for female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoonian, A; Baghianimoghadam, B; Partovi, P; Abdoli, A; Hemmati, P; Tabibnejad, N; Dehghani, M

    2011-01-01

    Infertility is defined as the inability of a couple to conceive after 12 months of regular, unprotected intercourse. However infertility is a clinical presentation and not a disease. Thus to be able to offer a new classification, it is necessary to apply a clinical presentation (philosophy) suggested by the University of Calgary in 1991. In recent years several classification algorithms have been proposed which apply key predictors of clinical, imaging, or morphological types to determine the diseases that can cause infertility. On the other hand, an algorithm is a product of an expert's mind after many years of practice and experience, which is too difficult to understand by a medical student. However there has not been any simple schematic classification based on a logical justification applying integration of etiologies with basic science to break down etiologies into categories, subcategories and disease classes of this clinical presentation. Because etiology has also become an important criterion for the characterization of causes of infertility, a classification proposal is presented here that attempts to include all relevant (basic science) features of the causative diseases of this clinical presentation.

  12. Masculinity, infertility, stigma and media reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Kenneth; Glover, Lesley; Abel, Paul

    2004-09-01

    There is growing concern about the health of men in the developed West. Compared with women they have higher rates of morbidity and mortality and are less likely to seek out and employ medical services. Several authors have drawn on social constructionist models, such as the concept of hegemonic masculinity, to account for these gender differences in risk and behaviour. One might anticipate that certain conditions, such as male infertility, would be perceived as posing a particular threat to conventional views of masculinity. There is some support for this, although there is little research into the social construction of male infertility. In this study Discourse Analysis was employed to analyse newspaper accounts of a reported decline in sperm counts in order to study the way in which infertility and masculinity were represented and constructed in the media. The results indicate a construction of fertility as being in crisis and of male infertility as conflated with impotence. Men were positioned as vulnerable and threatened by forces outside their control. The accounts drew on a range of stereotypically masculine reference points, such as warfare and mechanical analogies. These results are consistent with concepts of hegemonic masculinity and suggest that men are offered a highly restricted set of options in terms of perceiving and representing their bodies and their health.

  13. Guidelines for counselling in infertility: outline version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, J; Appleton, T C; Baetens, P; Baron, J; Bitzer, J; Corrigan, E; Daniels, K R; Darwish, J; Guerra-Diaz, D; Hammar, M; McWhinnie, A; Strauss, B; Thorn, P; Wischmann, T; Kentenich, H

    2001-06-01

    The Guidelines for Counselling in Infertility describe the purpose, objectives, typical issues and communication skills involved in providing psychosocial care to individuals using fertility services. The Guidelines are presented in six sections. The first section describes how infertility consultations differ from other medical consultations in obstetrics and gynaecology, whereas the second section addresses fundamental issues in counselling, such as what is counselling in infertility, who should counsel and who is likely to need counselling. Section 3 focuses on how to integrate patient-centred care and counselling into routine medical treatment and section 4 highlights some of the special situations which can provoke the need for counselling (e.g. facing the end of treatment, sexual problems). Section 5 deals exclusively with third party reproduction and the psychosocial implications of gamete donation, surrogacy and adoption for heterosexual and gay couples and single women without partners. The final section of the Guidelines is concerned with psychosocial services that can be used to supplement counselling services in fertility clinics: written psychosocial information, telephone counselling, self-help groups and professionally facilitated group work. This paper summarizes the different sections of the Guidelines and describes how to obtain the complete text of the Guidelines for Counselling in Infertility. PMID:11387309

  14. Germ cell transplantation in infertility mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This work investigated the spermatogenesis in an infertility BALB/c-nu mouse model by reinfusing germline stem cells into seminiferous tubules.Donor germ cells were isolated from male FVB/NJ-GFP transgenic mice.Seminiferous tubule microiniection was applied to achieve intratubular germ cell transfer.The germ cells were injected into exposed testes of the infertility mice.We used green fluorescence and DNA analysis of donor cells from GFP transgenic mice as genetic marker.The natural mating and Southern blot methods were applied to analyze the effect of sperm cell transplantation and the sperm function after seminiferous tubule microinjecUon.The spermatogenesis was morphologically observed from the seminiferous tubules in 41/60(68.33%)of the injected recipient mice using allogeneic donor cells.In the colonized testes,matured spermatozoa were seen in the lumen of the seminiferous tubules.In this research,BALB/c-nu infertility mouse model,the recipient animal,was used to avoid immunological rejection of donor cells,and germ cell transplantation was applied to overcome infertility caused by busulfan treatment.These results demonstrate that this technique of germ cell transplantation is of great use.Germ cell transplantation could be potentially valuable to oncological patients.

  15. Effect of ingested sperm on fecundity in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The intragastric administration of homologous strain epididymal sperm to adult virgin NZBW (Rt 1) female rats was shown to induce short-to long-term infertility. Infertility was associated with an early rise of genital secretory fluid IgA antisperm antibody preceding mating.

  16. Evaluation of the general health of the infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Baghiani Moghadam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of infertility is variable between 5-30% around the world. In Iran, more than 2 million couples suffer from infertility. Infertility causes depression, anxiety, social isolation and sexual dysfunction. Objective: This descriptive study was undertaken to determine general health in infertile couples.Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty infertile couples attending Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility were randomly selected during March till September 2009. The GHQ-28 questionnaires were completed by researchers, based on face to face interview. It contains 28 items, which have been divided to four sub- items. The results come out by scoring the patients answer from 0 to 84. All data were analyzed by Chi-square and t-test in SPSS software. Results: GHQ scores of all sub-scales and total in women were more than men, which shows general health condition in women is worse than men. There was no relation between the duration of infertility and general health scores. Conclusion: This study suggests that the infertility has significant effect (p=0.001 on health situation of infertile couples, especially infertile women. They are at risk of somatic symptoms (p=0.0001, social dysfunction (p=0.0001 and severe depression (p=0.0001. GHQ could provided help and support in order to improve the health situation of infertile couples.

  17. Molecular insights into the causes of male infertility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polani B Seshagiri

    2001-11-01

    Infertility is a reproductive health problem that affects many couples in the human population. About 13–18% of couple suffers from it and approximately one-half of all cases can be traced to either partner. Regardless of whether it is primary or secondary infertility, affected couples suffer from enormous emotional and psychological trauma and it can constitute a major life crisis in the social context. Many cases of idiopathic infertility have a genetic or molecular basis. The knowledge of the molecular genetics of male infertility is developing rapidly, new ``spermatogenic genes” are being discovered and molecular diagnostic approaches (DNA chips) established. This will immensely help diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to alleviate human infertility. The present review provides an overview of the causes of human infertility, particularly the molecular basis of male infertility and its implications for clinical practice.

  18. Prevalence of primary infertility in China: in-depth analysis of infertility differentials in three minority province/autonomous regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jihong; Larsen, Ulla; Wyshak, Grace

    2005-01-01

    Following the 1994 UN International Conference on Population and Development, there was a shift in emphasis on women's reproductive health and there emerged a need for more knowledge about levels and differentials of infertility. Using the data from the 1988 National Two-Per-Thousand Sample Survey on Fertility and Contraception, this paper estimated the prevalence of primary infertility in China. To determine the predictors of primary infertility, multiple logistic regression analyses were done on three minority province/autonomous regions where primary infertility was the highest. A non-contracepting, sexually active woman was considered to have primary infertility if she had not reported a recognized pregnancy after at least seven years of marriage. The analysis shows that the national level of primary infertility was relatively low (1.3%). Primary infertility was higher in Qinghai (2.3%), Tibet (3.7%) and Xinjiang (3.7%) compared with other provinces. Tibetans in Qinghai and Uygurs in Xinjiang had a higher level of primary infertility than the Han Chinese. Ethnic differences remained after adjusting for other background characteristics. Divorced and remarried women had significantly higher odds of primary infertility compared with first-married women in Qinghai and Xinjiang. The elevated level of primary infertility in Qinghai, Tibet and Xinjiang and its disproportionate prevalence among Tibetans and Uygurs highlight the need for further work to understand the causes and social consequences of infertility for the minority population in China. PMID:15688571

  19. Infertility and psychological distress: a critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greil, A L

    1997-12-01

    This essay reviews the literature on the social psychological impact of infertility, paying special attention to the relationship between gender and the infertility experience. It is convenient to divide the literature into articles which explore the possibility that infertility may have psychological causes (Psychogenic Hypothesis) and those which examine the psychological consequences of infertility (Psychological Consequences Hypothesis). The psychogenic hypothesis is now rejected by most researchers, but a related hypothesis, which states that stress may be a causal factor in infertility, is worthy of exploration. The descriptive literature on the psychological consequences of infertility presents infertility as a devastating experience, especially for women. Attempts to test the psychological consequences hypothesis have produced more equivocal results. In general, studies which look for psychopathology have not found significant differences between the infertile and others. Studies which employ measures of stress and self-esteem have found significant differences. The psychological consequences literature is characterized by a number of flaws, including over sampling of women, small sample size, non-representative samples, failure to study those who have not sought treatment, primitive statistical techniques, and an over-reliance on self-reports. Studies on infertility and psychological distress need to take into consideration both the duration of infertility and the duration of treatment. Finding an appropriate set of "controls" is a particularly intractable problem for this area of research. In general, the psychological distress literature shows little regard for the social construction of infertility. By taking what should be understood as a characteristic of a social situation and transforming it into an individual trait, the literature presents what is essentially a medical model of the psycho-social impact of infertility. Most researchers conclude that

  20. Emoting infertility online: A qualitative analysis of men's forum posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Esmée; Gough, Brendan

    2016-07-01

    Relatively little research on infertility focuses exclusively or significantly on men's experiences, particularly in relation to emotional aspects. Evidence that does exist around male infertility suggests that it is a distressing experience for men, due to stigma, threats to masculinity and the perceived need to suppress emotions, and that men and women experience infertility differently. Using thematic analysis, this article examines the online emoting of men in relation to infertility via forum posts from a men-only infertility discussion board. It was noted that men 'talked' to each other about the emotional burdens of infertility, personal coping strategies and relationships with others. Three major themes were identified following in-depth analysis: 'the emotional rollercoaster', 'the tyranny of infertility' and 'infertility paranoia'. This article then offers insights into how men experience infertility emotionally, negotiate the emotional challenges involved (especially pertaining to diagnosis, treatment outcomes and their intimate relationships) and how they share (and find value in doing so) with other men the lived experience of infertility. PMID:27246813

  1. The social epidemiology of coping with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Christensen, Ulla; Holstein, B E

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To analyse the cross-sectional association between coping responses with infertility and occupational social class. Infertility is evenly distributed across social classes in Denmark, and there is free access to high-quality assisted reproduction technology. METHODS: Data were based...... was developed in four categories: active-avoidance coping; active-confronting coping; passive-avoidance coping; meaning-based coping. These subscales were later confirmed by factor analysis. Occupational social class was measured in a standardized way. RESULTS: Contrary to expectations, the logistic regression...... analyses showed that women from lower social classes V + VI and men from social classes III + IV used significantly more active-confronting coping. Women from lower social classes V + VI used significantly more meaning-based coping. Both men and women from social classes III - VI used significantly more...

  2. Possible fetal determinants of male infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Almstrup, Kristian; Andersson, Anna-Maria;

    2014-01-01

    Although common reproductive problems, such as male infertility and testicular cancer, present in adult life, strong evidence exists that these reproductive disorders might have a fetal origin. The evidence is derived not only from large epidemiological studies that show birth-cohort effects...... with regard to testicular cancer, levels of testosterone and semen quality, but also from histopathological observations. Many infertile men have histological signs of testicular dysgenesis, including Sertoli-cell-only tubules, immature undifferentiated Sertoli cells, microliths and Leydig cell nodules...... of testicular dysgenesis potentially induced by exposure to environmental and lifestyle factors. Interestingly, maternal smoking during pregnancy has a stronger effect on spermatogenesis than a man's own smoking. Other lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption and obesity might also have a role. However...

  3. [Treatment options for age-related infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle

    2010-06-20

    There has been a consistent trend towards delayed childbearing in most Western countries. Treatment options for age-related infertility includes controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilization (IVF). A sharp decline in pregnancy rate with advancing female age is noted with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) including IVF. Evaluation and treatment of infertility should not be delayed in women 35 years and older. No treatment other than oocyte donation has been shown to be effective for women over 40 and for those with compromised ovarian reserve, but its pratice is not easy in France hence the procreative tourism. As an increasing number of couples choose to postpone childbearing, they should be informed that maternal age is an important risk factor for failure to conceive. PMID:20623902

  4. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura O.; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H.; Kesmodel, Ulrik S.;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment......, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. METHODS: This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment...... was obtained from pregnancy questionnaires in early pregnancy. Children developing epilepsy were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Prescription Registry until 2013. Data were analysed using Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for potential confounders...

  5. Isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency presenting as primary infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, S L; Masson, E A; White, M C

    1995-06-01

    A 31 year old female presented with primary infertility and gave a two year history of amenorrhea without symptoms or signs of endocrine dysfunction. Examination was normal and investigation showed low oestradiol and progesterone levels with decreased LH pulsatility. The cortisol responses were impaired following hypoglycaemic stress and a short synacthen test, but the cortisol response to a prolonged synacthen test was normal. An inadequate ACTH response to CRF testing confirmed the diagnosis of isolated ACTH deficiency. Hydrocortisone therapy was followed by an ovulatory menstrual cycle. Amenorrhea again ensued following the reduction of the steroid dose and normal menses resumed on normal steroid replacement therapy. Six hourly gonadotrophin pulsatility showed a significant increase in both pulse amplitude and mean LH and FSH levels following steroid treatment. Isolated ACTH deficiency is a rare but treatable cause of hypogonadism and infertility, and this case gives further insight on the role of cortisol on the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis.

  6. Male infertility in spinal cord trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiano Utida; Jose C. Truzzi; Homero Bruschini; Rogerio Simonetti; Cedenho, Agnaldo P.; Miguel Srougi; Valdemar Ortiz

    2005-01-01

    Every year there are 10 thousand new cases of patients victimized by spinal cord trauma (SCT) in the United States and it is estimated that there are 7 thousand new cases in Brazil. Eighty percent of patients are fertile males. Infertility in this patient group is due to 3 main factors resulting from spinal cord lesions: erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory disorder and low sperm counts. Erectile dysfunction has been successfully treated with oral and injectable medications, use of vacuum device...

  7. [Stress and distress in infertility among women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damti, Osnat Bloch; Sarid, Orly; Sheiner, Eyal; Zilberstein, Tali; Cwikel, Julie

    2008-03-01

    In the industrialized world, approximately 12% of couples suffer from infertility. As a result of its collective political and historical experience, Israel boasts one of the world's most progressive fertility policies ranging from hormonal treatment to In Vitro Fertilization (IVF). Approximately 40% of the causes of infertility are attributed to the woman. Among the factors contributing to reduced fertility are endocrine factors, immune factors and mechanical factors. Studies have accumulated information regarding the contribution of psychological factors to infertility in women. Among the identified risk factors are depression, anxiety and stress-dependent changes like altered heart rate and increased blood cortisol levels. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) has been shown to be an important mediator of infertility, involved in the excretion of CRH, ACTH and cortisol, respectively. Data gathered in the literature suggests the involvement of the HPA axis on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadotropic axis (HPG). Specifically, changes in diurnal excretion patterns of cortisol have been shown to accompany mental stress and to mediate the down-regulation of the HPG axis. This impact could possibly involve inhibitory mechanisms at the pituitary level, by reducing the release of FSH and LH by GnRH. Furthermore, research has shown that the effect of cortisol on the HPG axis is dependent on the endocrine status of the ovary in its different stages within the menstrual cycle. From the studies presented in this review it can be hypothesized that stress can induce altered cortisol-excretion patterns along the menstrual cycle, which ultimately affect the hormonal profile in critical stages of the fertilization process.

  8. An epidemiologic survey on the causes of infertility in patients referred to infertility center in Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is considered as a major health care problem of different communities. The high prevalence of this issue doubled its importance. A significant proportion of infertility have been related to environmental conditions and also acquired risk factors. Different environmental conditions emphasized the need to study the different causes of infertility in each area. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency causes of infertility in infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional descriptive study 1200 infertile men and women that were referred to infertility clinic of Fatemieh Hospital during 2010 to 2011, were examined. This center is the only governmental center for infertility in Hamadan. Sampling was based on census method. Information about the patients was obtained from medical examinations and laboratory findings. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics such as frequencies and the mean were used. Results: The prevalence of primary and secondary infertility was 69.5% and 30.5% respectively. Among the various causes of infertility women factors (88.6% had the highest regard. In the causes of female infertility, menstrual disorders, diseases (obesity, thyroid diseases, and diabetes, ovulation dysfunction, uterine factor, fallopian tubes and cervical factor had the highest prevalence respectively. The causes of male infertility based on their frequency included semen fluid abnormalities, genetic factors, vascular abnormalities, and anti-spermatogenesis factors, respectively. Conclusion: Etiology pattern of infertility in our study is similar with the many other patterns that have been reported by the World Health Organization. However, frequency of menstrual disorders is much higher than other studies that require further consideration.

  9. Y chromosome microdeletions in Turkish infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani Ayse

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To detect the frequency and types of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men attending to our university intracytoplasmic sperm injection ICSI/IVF centre and fertile control subjects in our patient population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A total of 50 infertile men who were referred to IVF center of Meram medical faculty were selected for the molecular azospermia factor (AZF screening program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Karyotype analysis and polymerase chain reaction amplification using 15 Y-specific sequence-tagged sites of AZF region were done. RESULTS: The total prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities was found to be 10% (5/50, including 4 patients with numerical and 1 patient with structural abnormalities. Overall, 4 of the 50 patients tested (8% exhibited deletions of the Y chromosome, 3 of them being azospermic and 1 of them oligospermic men. The frequency of the microdeletions in subgroups with azospermia and oligozoospermia was found to be 10.7% (3/29 and 4.7% (1/21 respectively. Microdeletions of AZFb and AZFc regions were detected in all of the 4 patients. Neither AZFa nor AZFd microdeletions were indicated. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that one must know whether there is a genetic cause for male infertility before patients can be subjected to ISCI or testicular sperm extraction (TESE/ISCI treatment.

  10. Anabolic steroids abuse and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Osta, Rabih; Almont, Thierry; Diligent, Catherine; Hubert, Nicolas; Eschwège, Pascal; Hubert, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, testosterone and its synthetic derivatives have been used with anabolic and androgenic purposes. These substances were first restricted to professional bodybuilders, but become more and more popular among recreational athletes. Up to date, 3,000,000 anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) users have been reported in the United States with an increasing prevalence, making AAS consumption a major public health growing concern. Infertility is defined by the WHO as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse and a male factor is present in up to 50 % of all infertile couples. Several conditions may be related to male infertility. Substance abuse, including AAS, is commonly associated to transient or persistent impairment on male reproductive function, through different pathways. Herein, a brief overview on AAS is offered. Steroids biochemistry, patterns of use, physiological and clinical issues are enlightened. A further review about fertility outcomes among male AAS abusers is also presented, including the classic reports on transient anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH), and the more recent experimental reports on structural and genetic sperm damage.

  11. Searching for candidate genes for male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.N.Truong; E.K.Moses; J.E.Armes; D.J.Venter; H.W.G.Baker

    2003-01-01

    Aim: We describe an approach to search for candidate genes for male infertility using the two human genome databases: the public University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and private Celera databases which list known and predicted gene sequences and provide related information such as gene function, tissue expression,known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methods and Results: To demonstrate this in silico research, the following male infertility candidate genes were selected: (1) human BOULE, mutations of which may lead to germ cell arrest at the primary spermatocyte stage, (2) mutations of casein kinase 2 alpha genes which may cause globozoospermia, (3) DMR-N9 which is possibly involved in the spermatogenic defect of myotonic dystrophy and (4) several testes expressed genes at or near the breakpoints of a balanced translocation associated with hypospermatogenesis. We indicate how information derived from the human genome databases can be used to confirm these candidate genes may be pathogenic by studying RNA expression in tissue arrays using in situ hybridization and gene sequencing. Conclusion: The paper explains the new approach to discovering genetic causes of male infertility using information about the human genome. ( Asian J Andro1 2003 Jun; 5:137-147 )

  12. Anabolic steroids abuse and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Osta, Rabih; Almont, Thierry; Diligent, Catherine; Hubert, Nicolas; Eschwège, Pascal; Hubert, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, testosterone and its synthetic derivatives have been used with anabolic and androgenic purposes. These substances were first restricted to professional bodybuilders, but become more and more popular among recreational athletes. Up to date, 3,000,000 anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) users have been reported in the United States with an increasing prevalence, making AAS consumption a major public health growing concern. Infertility is defined by the WHO as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse and a male factor is present in up to 50 % of all infertile couples. Several conditions may be related to male infertility. Substance abuse, including AAS, is commonly associated to transient or persistent impairment on male reproductive function, through different pathways. Herein, a brief overview on AAS is offered. Steroids biochemistry, patterns of use, physiological and clinical issues are enlightened. A further review about fertility outcomes among male AAS abusers is also presented, including the classic reports on transient anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH), and the more recent experimental reports on structural and genetic sperm damage. PMID:26855782

  13. Male factor in infertility: study from a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Kalavathi D. Biradar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a condition with important psychological, economic, demographic and medical implications. Male infertility refers to a male's inability to result pregnancy in a fertile female. Methods: The present hospital based study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, East Point Hospital, Bangalore. Duration of the study was for 6 months from October 2015 to March 2016. A total of 250 infertile couples couple coming for evaluation to the outpatient d...

  14. The status of depression and anxiety in infertile Turkish couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert Kazandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a major psychosocial crisis as well as being a medical problem. The factors that predict psychosocial consequences of infertility may vary in different gender and different infertile populations.Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether Turkish infertile couples had higher levels of depression and anxiety when compared to non-infertile couples. Our secondary aim was to evaluate the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and levels of depression and anxiety in Turkish infertile couples.Materials and Methods: We designed a descriptive cross sectional study of 248 infertile women and 96 infertile men with no psychiatric disturbance and 51 women and 40 men who have children to evaluate the depression and anxiety levels between infertile couples and fertile couples. A gynecologist evaluated participants for demographic data and then they were visited by a psychologist to perform questionnaire scales which were The Beck Depression Inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for the evaluation of the degree of psychopathology. The data were statistically analyzed, with p<0.05 as the level of statistical significance.Results: We observed significant differences between the infertile couples and fertile couples with respect to state and trait anxiety (p<0.0001 while no difference was regarding with depression, both of women and men. Anxiety and depression were observed as independent from gender when infertile women and men were compared (p=0.213.Conclusion: We believed that the psychological management at infertile couples must be individualized with cultural, religious, and class related aspects.

  15. Infertility in Mazandaran province - north of Iran: an etiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Nadali Musanejad; Gholamali Jursarayee; Ayyub Barzegarnejad; Sepideh Peivandi; Narges Moslemizadeh; Amir Esmailnejad Moghaddam; Abbasali Karimpour Malekshah

    2011-01-01

    Background: The prevalence and etiology of infertility are not similar in different parts of the world. There are only few reports of this topic in Iran. Objective: This study was conducted to determine the clinical patterns and major causes of infertility in Mazandaran province in north of Iran. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 3734 consecutive couples attending two infertility clinics in Mazandaran province, from 2003 to 2008, were reviewed. The couples had not had a viable bir...

  16. The Genetics of Infertility: Current Status of the Field

    OpenAIRE

    Zorrilla, Michelle; Yatsenko, Alexander N

    2013-01-01

    Infertility is a relatively common health condition, affecting nearly 7% of all couples. Clinically, it is a highly heterogeneous pathology with a complex etiology that includes environmental and genetic factors. It has been estimated that nearly 50% of infertility cases are due to genetic defects. Hundreds of studies with animal knockout models convincingly showed infertility to be caused by gene defects, single or multiple. However, despite enormous efforts, progress in translating basic re...

  17. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    James M Dupree

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of h...

  18. A new strategy for professional medical support couples with infertility

    OpenAIRE

    O. B. Zhukov; V. V. Evdokimov; Zhukov, A. A.; L. H. Shugusheva; E. E. Bragina

    2014-01-01

    From our point of view, the problem of infertility in a pair of appropriately addressed jointly by the two related disciplines. This process has been actively helping set newsupplements Spematon and Pregnoton. The study included 50 couples planning to conceive: 25 couples with male factor infertility secretory type (group 1), 25 couples with infertility caused by varicocele in the postoperative period (group 2). The first group included patients with hyperprolactinemia relative to a second gr...

  19. Current medical management of endocrine-related male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Ring

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Male factor contributes to 50%-60% of overall infertility but is solely responsible in only 20% of couples. Although most male factor infertility is ascertained from an abnormal semen analysis, other male factors can be contributory especially if the sample returns normal. Male infertility can be due to identifiable hormonal or anatomical etiologies that may be reversible or irreversible. This manuscript will highlight existing guidelines and our recommendations for hormone evaluation for male infertility and empiric therapies including multivitamins, estrogen receptor modulators (clomiphene, estrogen conversion blockers (anastrozole, and hormone replacement.

  20. A unique view on male infertility around the globe

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Ashok; Mulgund, Aditi; Hamada, Alaa; Chyatte, Michelle Renee

    2015-01-01

    Background Infertility affects an estimated 15% of couples globally, amounting to 48.5 million couples. Males are found to be solely responsible for 20-30% of infertility cases and contribute to 50% of cases overall. However, this number does not accurately represent all regions of the world. Indeed, on a global level, there is a lack of accurate statistics on rates of male infertility. Our report examines major regions of the world and reports rates of male infertility based on data on femal...

  1. Characteristics of infertile couples attending OPD of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Sinha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as failure to conceive even after one year of regular, frequent and unprotected intercourse. Infertility has, in the last few years surfaced in society as a significant problem affecting as many as 15% of couples. This study aimed at identifying the characteristics of infertility among Indian couples. Methods: The present study was carried out on 100 infertile couples attending the OPD of upper India sugar exchange maternity hospital attached to GSVM medical college, Kanpur, other hospital and nursing homes of Kanpur. Both the partners were completely evaluated by taking proper history, examination and investigation to assess the cause of infertility. Results: Majority of female partners were between ages of 25-29. Female factors were found in 45% couples and male factors in 30 % couples. Among female factors, tuboperitoneal factor was found in 32% cases and ovulatory factor was found in 40% cases. Oligospermia was the commonest cause in male factor infertility. Conclusions: From this study we concluded that infertility is a public health problem in India and the main infertility pattern is a primary rather than secondary infertility. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 373-377

  2. Infertility-related stress in men and women predicts treatment outcome 1 year later

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boivin, J; Schmidt, Lone

    2005-01-01

    stress, psychology, psychosocial, reproduction, marital, gender, counselling, infertility, in vitro fertilization, fertility......stress, psychology, psychosocial, reproduction, marital, gender, counselling, infertility, in vitro fertilization, fertility...

  3. Interventional therapy of ovarian tube infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of selective salpinography (SSG)and fallopian tube recanalization (FTR). Methods: 215 patients with Infertilis Feminis were performed with hysterosalpinoraphy (HSG)SSG and FRT. Anti-infection and physical therapy were then undertaken postoperatively. Results: The successful rates of properly performed catheterization and recanalization reached 92.8% and 90.2%, respectively. During the follow-up of six years, 98 cases (51.3%)obtained the ability of intrauterine pregnancy. Conclusions: HSG and FTR are simple, reliable, symptomless, very effective for treatment of ovarian tube infertility. (authors)

  4. Procreative sex in infertile couples: the decay of pleasure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marci Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility represents a major challenge to the emotional balance and sexual life of couples, with long-lasting and gender-specific effects. The objective of this study is to explore personality features of infertile patients and detect possible sexual disorders in couples undergoing infertility treatment. Materials and methods In this prospective study 60 infertile couples and 52 fertile control couples were asked to complete standardized and validated questionnaires: the Adjective Check List (ACL to enquire about personality features and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI or the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF to assess sexual functioning of female and male partners. The study population was divided into 3 groups: Group A (N = 30, recently diagnosed infertile couples Group B (N = 30, infertile couples already undergoing Intrauterine Insemination and Group C (N = 52, fertile control group. Results Infertile patients did not display any distinguishing personality features. Regarding sexual function, men of all the three groups scored higher in both questionnaires (sexual satisfaction, desire and orgasm than their female partners. Comparing results between groups, Group A male partners obtained lower scores in all the subscales. Women belonging to Group A and Group B showed an impairment of sexual arousal, satisfaction, lubrification and orgasm when compared to fertile controls. Conclusions Even if at the very first stages of infertility treatment no personality disturbances can be detected, the couples’ sexual life is already impaired with different sexual disorders according to gender.

  5. The Sexual Impact of Infertility Among Women Seeking Fertility Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Winkelman, MD

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: In women seeking fertility treatment, younger age and female factor infertility were associated with increased sexual impact and thus these women are potentially at higher risk of sexual dysfunction. Providers should consider the role young age and an infertility diagnosis plays in a women’s sexual well-being.

  6. New insights into the genetic basis of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thejaswini Venkatesh,1 Padmanaban S Suresh,2 Rie Tsutsumi3 1Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, 2Centre for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, India; 3University of Tokushima, Institute of Health Bioscience, Department of Public Health and Nutrition, Tokushima, Japan Abstract: Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system characterized by inability to achieve pregnancy after 12 or more months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. A variety of factors, including ovulation defects, spermatogenic failure, parental age, obesity, and infections have been linked with infertility, in addition to specific karyotypes and genotypes. The study of genes associated with infertility in rodent models has expanded the field of translational genetics in identifying the underlying cause of human infertility problems. Many intriguing aspects of the molecular basis of infertility in humans remain poorly understood; however, application of genetic knowledge in this field looks promising. The growing literature on the genetics of human infertility disorders deserves attention and a critical concise summary is required. This paper provides information obtained from a systematic analysis of the literature related to current research into the genetics of infertility affecting both sexes. Keywords: infertility, genetics, polycystic ovary syndrome, premature ovarian failure, spermatogenic failure, cystic fibrosis

  7. A Study of Couple Burnout in Infertile Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavi, Fatemeh; Jamale, Safieh; Mosalanejad, Leili; Mosallanezhad, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is a major crisis that can cause psychological problems and emotionally distressing experiences, and eventually affect a couples’ relationship. The objective of this study is to investigate couple burnout in infertile couples who were undergoing treatmentat the Infertility Clinic of Yazd, Iran. Method: The present study is a cross-sectional descriptive one on 98 infertile couples referringto the Infertility Centerof Yazd, Iran, who were chosen on a simple random sampling basis. The measuring tools consisted of the Couple Burnout Measure (CBM) and a demographic questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 16 and the statistical tests of ANOVA and t-test. P-values less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: The results show that infertile women experience higher levels of couple burnout than their husbands (pburnout—psychological burnout (pburnout (pburnout (p<0.001)—between wives and husbands show that women are at greater risk. Conclusion: Infertile couples’ emotional, mental, and sexual problems need to be addressed as part of the infertility treatment programs, and psychotherapists should be included in the medical team. PMID:26573033

  8. Is There a Relationship between Ovarian Epithelial Dysplasia and Infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier Chene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Ovarian epithelial dysplasia was initially described in material from prophylactic oophorectomies performed in patients at genetic risk of ovarian cancer. Similar histopathological abnormalities have been revealed after ovulation stimulation. Since infertility is also a risk factor for ovarian neoplasia, the aim of this study was to study the relationship between infertility and ovarian dysplasia. Methods. We blindly reviewed 127 histopathological slides of adnexectomies or ovarian cystectomies according to three groups—an exposed group to ovulation induction (n = 30, an infertile group without stimulation (n = 35, and a spontaneously fertile control group (n = 62—in order to design an eleven histopathological criteria scoring system. Results. The ovarian dysplasia score was significantly higher in exposed group whereas dysplasia score was low in infertile and control groups (resp., 8.21 in exposed group, 3.69 for infertile patients, and 3.62 for the controls. In the subgroup with refractory infertility there was a trend towards a more severe dysplasia score (8.53 in ovulation induction group and 5.1 in infertile group. Conclusion. These results raise questions as to the responsibility of drugs used to induce ovulation and/or infertility itself in the genesis of ovarian epithelial dysplasia.

  9. Living with infertility : Experiences among urban slum populations in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papreen, N; Sabin, K; Begum, L; Ahsan, SK; Baqui, AH

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the perceived causes of infertility, treatment-seeking for infertility and the consequences of childlessness, particularly for women, among a predominantly Muslim population in urban slums of Dhaka in Bangladesh. In-depth interviews were conducted with 60 women and GO men randoml

  10. An employer's experience with infertility coverage: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Kaylen; Meletiche, Dennis; Del Rosario, Gina

    2009-12-01

    A case study of Southwest Airlines, a Fortune 500 company, demonstrates that a well-designed infertility coverage plan can control resource use. This successful model could be used by employers who wish to ensure that their employees have access to high-quality, cost-effective infertility services in a managed-care environment. PMID:19631318

  11. Psychological issues of infertility and assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlstedt, P P

    1994-08-01

    This article presents a model for conceptualizing the emotional consequences of infertility experienced by most couples with this problem. The article also discusses the need for patient preparation for alternative reproductive techniques with donor gametes and examines the main issues that need to be explored. Recommendations are made for physicians and couples challenged by infertility's intense and surprising emotional consequences. PMID:8059508

  12. Counseling and diagnostic evaluation for the infertile couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshburn, Paul B

    2015-03-01

    Educating couples about natural means to improve fertility should include a discussion about appropriate timing to initiate a diagnostic evaluation for infertility. Complete infertility testing for both male and female factors allows directed care for all abnormalities to optimize chances for conception.

  13. Periodontal status in infertile women attending in vitro fertilization clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godavarthi Lalasa

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that altered hormonal levels in infertile women undergoing assisted reproductive therapy and infertile women not undergoing this treatment can lead to increased attachment loss, suggesting that these women may require constant periodontal monitoring.

  14. Management of the infertile couple: an evidence-based protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Remah M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility is defined as inability of a couple to conceive naturally after one year of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. It remains a major clinical and social problem, affecting perhaps one couple in six. Evaluation usually starts after 12 months; however it may be indicated earlier. The most common causes of infertility are: male factor such as sperm abnormalities, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal pathology, combined male and female factors and unexplained infertility. Objectives The aim of this study is to provide the healthcare professionals an evidence-based management protocol for infertile couples away from medical information overload. Methods A comprehensive review where the literature was searched for "Management of infertility and/or infertile couples" at library website of University of Bristol (MetaLib by using a cross-search of different medical databases besides the relevant printed medical journals and periodicals. Guidelines and recommendations were retrieved from the best evidence reviews such as that from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG, American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM, Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society (CFAS, and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG. Results A simple guide for the clinicians to manage the infertile couples. Conclusions The study deploys a new strategy to translate the research findings and evidence-base recommendations into a simplified focused guide to be applied on routine daily practice. It is an approach to disseminate the recommended medical care for infertile couple to the practicing clinicians.

  15. Associations of Psychosocial Factors with the Stress of Infertility Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Myra G.; Forthofer, Melinda S.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial factors thought to be associated with perceived stress over the course of infertility treatment. The research was based on secondary analysis of data from the Study of Marriage, Family, and Life Quality with a sample of 128 people who completed an infertility-related stress instrument at all three measurement…

  16. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in subgroups of infertile men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dul, E. C.; Groen, H.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.; Dijkhuizen, T.; van Echten-Arends, J.; Land, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities is assumed to be higher in infertile men and inversely correlated with sperm concentration. Although guidelines advise karyotyping infertile men, karyotyping is costly, therefore it would be of benefit to identify men with the highest risk of c

  17. Unexplained infertility: overall ongoing pregnancy rate and mode of conception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandes, M.; Hamilton, C.J.C.M.; Steen, J.O. van der; Bruin, J.P. de; Bots, R.S.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unexplained infertility is one of the most common diagnoses in fertility care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of current fertility management in unexplained infertility. METHODS: In an observational, longitudinal, multicentre cohort study, 437 couples were diagnosed wi

  18. Frequency of depression among fertile and infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the frequency of depression among fertile and infertile women reporting in CMH Abbottabad. Study Design: A case control study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted in Combined Military Hospital Abbottabad, over a period of six months from January 2013 to June 2013. Patients and Methods: The inclusion criteria were all those patients who were married. All the cases were selected from the women reporting in the obstetrics and gynecology department of CMH Abbottabad for investigation and treatment of infertility. A total of 200 patients, 100 fertile and 100 infertile women were included. Patients were given questionnaire form with their consent for research. Beck depression inventory (BDI) was used to assess depression among fertile and infertile women. Other factors such as age, educational level, and duration of infertility, pressure from family members, miscarriages, and support from husband were studied. Results: Depression was significantly higher in infertile women as compared to fertile women i.e. 95% vs. 63% (p < 0.001). It was higher among women with more than 1 year of duration of marriage as compared to those with infertility of one year duration or less. Conclusion: Infertility is associated with depression. (author)

  19. [Genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Aguilar, Raúl Eduardo; Chima-Galán, María del Carmen; Yerena-de-vega, María de la Concepción A; Regalado-Hernández, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Guerrero, Cecilia; García-Ortiz, Liliana; Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi; Moreno-García, Jesús Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Recently Mexican Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Colleges (Federación Mexicana de Colegios de Obstetricia y Ginecologia, FEMECOG) published the Mexican guideline forthe management of male infertility, which suggests performing genetic laboratory tests as part of diagnosis and management of infertile patients and states that these should receive genetic counseling. This paper reviews the genetic approach proposed by Mexican guideline. A systematic review of medical literature was performed in Pubmed and Web of Knowledge from 1980 to 2012 in order to find reports of genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients. Also it is discussed the current knowledge of these variants, their clinical implications and finally the guidelines and recommendations for their molecular diagnosis. Most genetic variants in Mexican infertile patients are chromosome abnormalities. In relation to other variants there is only a report of Y chromosome microdeletions, repeated CAG in androgen receptor and more common mutations in CFTR, and other article reporting mutations in CFTR in patients with congenital absence of vas deferens. Little is known about the genetics of Mexican infertile patients apart from chromosome abnormalities. However, the contribution of genetics as etiology of male infertility is taking more relevance and currently the consensual management of infertile male should include the screening of genetic background. This review pretends to be a quick guide for clinicians who want to know about reports of genetic variants related to male infertility in Mexican population and how to approach their diagnosis.

  20. SERUM PROLACTIN ASSAY: AN IMPORTANT SCREENING METHOD IN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY INFERTILITY IN FEMALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjaya

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Infertility represents a common condition nowadays with important medical, economic and psychological implications. Traditionally, measurement of Prolactin has been considered an important component of infertility workup in women. AIMS The study was designed to evaluate the serum prolactin assay in patients with primary and secondary infertility. METHOD In this retrospective case control study, we investigated one fifty (150 infertile women in the age range of 20-40 years attending Department of Obs. and Gynae. MLB Medical College, Jhansi, for infertility treatment. Fifty (50 fertile women with similar age range were selected as controls. The association between infertility and levels of serum Prolactin was reviewed. RESULTS Hyperprolactinemia was depicted in 24.66% infertile women. Prevalence of primary infertility was 68%, while that of secondary infertility cases was 32%. There was a correlation between Prolactin levels in infertile subjects (p <0.05. CONCLUSION There was higher prevalence of hyperprolactinemia in infertile patients

  1. Comparison of Mental Health Ratings of Fertile and Infertile Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Mazaheri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of current study was to compare the mental health of fertile and infertile couples.Materials and Method: A sample of four groups (infertile couples who gave birth child after treatment, infertile couples who brought adopted child, fertile couples who gave birth normally and infertile couples who have no children have been selected using available sampling method and were asked to complete the mental health questionnaire (GHQ-28. A descriptive design has been used as the research method.Results: Infertile couples who had no children compared to other studied groups showed more risk for different psychological problems.Conclusion: Having no children seemed to make an important influence on psychological health

  2. Increasing trend of prevalence of infertility in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hongxia; Wang Shuyu; Zhang Songwen; Wang Tao; Deng Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Background Infertility is one of the most important and underappreciated reproductive health problems in developing countries.However,epidemiological data in the Chinese population are still sparse.The aim of the present study was to determine the current prevalence and prevalence trend of infertility in Beijing,and to identify the risk factors associated with infertility.Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in Beijing in 2012.A stratified cluster sampling method was used to select 12 448 couples of whom the female partners were born between 1955 and 1985.All subjects were interviewed face to face.Infertility was defined as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse.Results Of the 12 448 couples,12 342 (99.1%) answered the questions appropriately.The prevalence of infertility was 4.2% (3.1% as primary and 1.1% as secondary infertility).An increase in the prevalence of infertility according to the age of the female partner was found:1.3% infertility for married females born in the 1950s and 11.4% for married females born in the 1980s.The increase was found in both urban and suburban areas.In addition,a Logistic regression showed that for the female partner,higher education levels,an older age at first marriage,adverse occupational conditions,mental labor and pre-pregnancy contraception after marriage were all significantly associated with a higher risk of infertility.Conclusion The prevalence of infertility has increased significantly among couples in Beijing,possibly because of an interaction among multiple factors.

  3. Ethical and legal dilemmas in infertility treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragojević-Dikić Svetlana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main characteristics of the new millennium is the affirmation of human rights in all aspects of human existence, with the intention of turning declarative statements into reality. Development of up-to-date assisted reproductive technologies (ART and their application in infertility treatment have raised numerous ethical, legal, religious, social and other questions. In vitro fertilization, donation of gametes, embryos and pre-embryos, cryopreservation of gametes, embryos, ovarian and testicular tissues, embryo transfer, genetic reproductive techniques, cloning and other sophisticated methods used in infertility treatment require cooperation between the medical and legal professions. Ethical aspects of human reproduction and assisted fertilization are based on full respect of the life of an individual even before conception, from pre-embryo stage, via embryo stage and fetus stage to a newborn infant. Regarding investigative and clinical projects, this standpoint implies the legalization of all ART procedures, unencumbered exchange of information and consensus about their application, and adherence to the basic ethical principles of autonomy benefit, justice and common welfare. Ethical postulates provide unequivocal directions in the creation of new life and resolve all possible ethical dilemmas, protecting the rights of doctors and participant in relevant procedures alike and reasserting the crucial principle - respect of human dignity.

  4. Possible fetal determinants of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Anders; Almstrup, Kristian; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Jensen, Tina K; Jørgensen, Niels; Main, Katharina M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Toppari, Jorma; Skakkebæk, Niels E

    2014-09-01

    Although common reproductive problems, such as male infertility and testicular cancer, present in adult life, strong evidence exists that these reproductive disorders might have a fetal origin. The evidence is derived not only from large epidemiological studies that show birth-cohort effects with regard to testicular cancer, levels of testosterone and semen quality, but also from histopathological observations. Many infertile men have histological signs of testicular dysgenesis, including Sertoli-cell-only tubules, immature undifferentiated Sertoli cells, microliths and Leydig cell nodules. The most severe gonadal symptoms occur in patients with disorders of sexual development (DSDs) who have genetic mutations, in whom even sex reversal of individuals with a 46,XY DSD can occur. However, patients with severe DSDs might represent only a small proportion of DSD cases, with milder forms of testicular dysgenesis potentially induced by exposure to environmental and lifestyle factors. Interestingly, maternal smoking during pregnancy has a stronger effect on spermatogenesis than a man's own smoking. Other lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption and obesity might also have a role. However, increasing indirect evidence exists that exposure to ubiquitous endocrine disrupting chemicals, present at measurable concentrations in individuals, might affect development of human fetal testis. If confirmed, health policies to prevent male reproductive problems should not only target adult men, but also pregnant women and their children. PMID:24935122

  5. [Myoma and infertility: analysis of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncelet, C; Benifla, J L; Batallan, A; Daraï, E; Madelenat, P

    2001-06-01

    The influence of myomas on reproduction has been clearly demonstrated, however their effects on fertility remain debated. The aim of this review, between January 1988 and December 2000, was to clarify the relation between myoma and fertility, and to assess pregnancy rates after myomectomy in infertile patients. Spontaneously, 54 publications were selected and 40 eligible. No study compared pregnancy rates with or without myomas. Pregnancy rates after myomectomy varied between 9.6% and 76.9%, with descriptive series. In medically assisted procreation, five publications were eligible. Myoma presence was associated with decreased pregnancy rates. Hysteroscopic sub-mucous myoma resection increased pregnancy rates. Relation between myoma and sterility is probable, however no proof was obtained. Myomectomy efficacy has not been statistically proven, but spontaneously almost 60% of patients became pregnant 24 months after surgery. Decreased pregnancy rates are observed when other infertility factors are associated. Concerning myomectomy in medically assisted procreation, conflicting results are available. Prospective randomised studies are needed. PMID:11462956

  6. Evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jacky; Gameiro, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    Five key paradigm shifts are described to illustrate the evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility. The first paradigm shift was in the 1930s when psychosomatic concepts were introduced in obstetrics and gynecology as causal factors to explain why some couples could not conceive despite the absence of organic pathology. In the second shift, the nurse advocacy movement of the 1970s stimulated the investigation of the psychosocial consequences of infertility and promoted counseling to help couples grieve childlessness when medical treatments often could not help them conceive. The third shift occurred with the advent of IVF, which created a demand for mental health professionals in fertility clinics. Mental health professionals assessed the ability of couples to withstand the demands of this new high technology treatment as well as their suitability as potential parents. The fourth shift, in the 1990s, saw reproductive medicine embrace the principles of evidence-based medicine, which introduced a much more rigorous approach to medical practice (effectiveness and safety) that extended to psychosocial interventions. The most recent paradigm shift, in the new millennium, occurred with the realization that compliance with protracted fertility treatment depended on the adoption of an integrated approach to fertility care. An integrated approach could reduce treatment burden arising from multiple sources (i.e., patient, clinic, and treatment). This review describes these paradigm shifts and reflects on future clinical and research directions for mental health professionals.

  7. Developments in infertility counselling and its accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monach, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Infertility counselling was placed in a unique position by the passage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 and the requirement that couples being treated should be offered counselling. However professional counselling was, and largely still is, at a stage at which there was no universal agreement on the knowledge, standards or qualifications required for practice. Nevertheless, infertility counselling became the first example of counselling to be required by statute, beyond the more generalised requirement in adoption birth records access. Counselling is intended to describe skilled talking therapy offered by a professional with specific training and qualifications directed to helping individuals and couples to achieve goals they own themselves. The therapeutic intervention of counselling is primarily directed to helping clients in a stressful situation to deploy their own coping skills effectively and thus make the difficult choices inseparable from ART. Counselling outcome research consistently demonstrates the effectiveness of the sort of counselling delivered in assisted conception units with mild-moderate anxiety and depression delivered by skilled and experienced practitioners. This article reviews the role of counsellors as members of the assisted conception clinical team and the status of regulation and accreditation in this very new profession.

  8. SERUM PROLACTIN ASSAY: AN IMPORTANT SCREENING METHOD IN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY INFERTILITY IN FEMALE

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjaya,; Vidya; Sushila; Preeti; Seema; Pratima; Shashi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Infertility represents a common condition nowadays with important medical, economic and psychological implications. Traditionally, measurement of Prolactin has been considered an important component of infertility workup in women. AIMS The study was designed to evaluate the serum prolactin assay in patients with primary and secondary infertility. METHOD In this retrospective case control study, we investigated one fifty (150) infertile women in the...

  9. Evaluation of urinary metal concentrations and sperm DNA damage in infertile men from an infertility clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Fu, Xiao-Ming; He, Dong-Liang; Zou, Xue-Min; Wu, Cheng-Qiu; Guo, Wei-Zhen; Feng, Wei

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to examine associations between urinary metal concentrations and sperm DNA damage. Thirteen metals [arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn)] were detected in urine samples of 207 infertile men from an infertility clinic using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and also, sperm DNA damage (tail length, percent DNA tail, and tail distributed moment) were assessed using neutral comet assay. We found that urinary Hg and Ni were associated with increasing trends for tail length (both p for trend<0.05), and that urinary Mn was associated with increasing trend for tail distributed moment (p for trend=0.02). These associations did persist even when considering multiple metals. Our results suggest that environmental exposure to Hg, Mn, and Ni may be associated with increased sperm DNA damage. PMID:27262988

  10. Online negotiations of infertility: Knowledge production in (in)fertility blogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, K.

    2014-01-01

    Although now used for a wide range of functions such as education, marketing and political commentary, blogs were originally a space for narrating personal life stories and have much in common with autobiography and diary genres. This article examines (in)fertility blogs written by women trying...... to conceive, arguing that blogging helps women to renegotiate their experiences of femininity when motherhood is denied or difficult. To do this, I focus on blogs as a space for knowledge production, creating a new paradigm for fertility information which challenges both the doctor/patient power dynamic...... and traditional discourses concerning fertility. I show how bloggers use their blogs to 'make sense' of their (in)fertility experiences by looking at the distinctive content, style and format of their blogs. Finally, the knowledge produced in the blogs is problematized by 'situating' them within a broader...

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in women with unexplained infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genital tuberculosis (GTB is an important cause of female infertility, especially in developing countries. The positive results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in endometrial GTB in the absence of tubal damage raise the possibility of the detection of sub-clinical or latent disease, with doubtful benefits of treatment. Objective: To evaluate the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in endometrial biopsy samples collected from unexplained infertile women attending Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility by using PCR techniques. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 144 infertile women with unexplained infertility aged 20-35 years old and normal Histro-saplango graphy findings were enrolled. Endometrial biopsy samples from each participant were tested for mycobacterium tuberculosis detecting by PCR. In 93 patients, peritoneal fluid was also taken for culture and PCR. Results: The PCR results of endometrial specimens were negative in all cases, demonstrating that there was no GTB infection among our patients. Conclusion: Our results showed that GTB could not be considered as a major problem in women with unexplained infertility. Although, studies have indicated that PCR is a useful method in diagnosing early GTB disease in infertile women with no demonstrable evidence of tubal or endometrial involvement.

  12. Ozone Therapy in Treatment of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maradi A. Burduli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone therapy and physiotherapy have been successfully used in obstetric practice. The paper summarizes the results of studies on the use of ozone therapy in the postoperative rehabilitation of gynecological patients operated on for female infertility of various origins. Biomechanisms systemic impact methods of ozone therapy on the human body to meet the requirements of the tactics of the impact on the etiopathogenic mechanisms of chronic inflammatory diseases of the pelvic organs and their complications. It is advisable to wider use of ozone therapy in the complex treatment standards gynecological patients. Postoperative rehabilitation, including ozone therapy, can have a significant impact on the clinical course of gynecological and extragenital pathology, pregnancy rate and its outcomes.

  13. Swyer syndrome presenting as primary infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Chauhan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Swyer syndrome was first described by Jim Swyer in 1955. It is a form of and ldquo;Pure gonadal dysgenesis and rdquo;. The affected female has 46, XY karyotype. A 21 year old married female came with complaints of primary infertility. On examination she has normal built with normal secondary sexual characteristics. She had normal vaginal opening with small uterus. Serum FSH was 71.54 mIU/ml. Thyroid and Prolactin was in normal range. Karyotype showed genotype of 46, XY. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed streak gonads, small uterus, and normal patent fallopian tubes. Diagnosis of Swyer syndrome was made. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 499-501

  14. Serum inhibin B values in infertile patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Kadyrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased interest in inhibin B generated by Sertoli cells is due to the fact that on the basis of findings, some authors recorded a relationship between the level of this hormone and infertility. The paper gives the results of an investigation of male sex hormones (inhibin B, follicle-stimulating and anti-Müllerian hormones in the serum of patients with azoospermia (Group 1, who had spermatogenesis, as evidenced by testicular biopsy, who had no spermatogenesis (Group 2, and who had oligoasthenozoospermia (Group 3. The investigation indicated that Group 1 had a normal inhibin B level that was more than twice lower in Group 2. In addition, the latter group was recorded to have elevated follicle-stimulating hormone levels and low anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations as compared to Group 1.

  15. Embryo splitting: a role in infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C

    2001-01-01

    Embryo splitting may be used to increase the potential fertility of couples requiring IVF. Using cattle as a model, it is possible to increase pregnancy rates from 70% per transfer of good quality in-vivo-produced embryos, to 110% by transferring the two demi-embryos resulting from the bisection of one embryo. The 30-40% greater chance of conception would reduce costs for the government, health authorities and patients, and reduce stress, time and complications for women having IVF treatment. Embryo splitting may also provide donor embryos for infertile couples that cannot conceive naturally or with IVF. The shortage of children for adoption and donor embryos may be overcome by the production of demi-embryos.

  16. Distributive justice and infertility treatment in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisker, Jeff

    2008-05-01

    An exploration of distributive justice in Canadian infertility treatment requires the integration of ethical, clinical, and economic principles. In 1971, American philosopher John Rawls proposed a theoretical model for fair decision-making in which "rational" and "self-interested" citizens are behind a "veil of ignorance" with respect to both their own position and the position of other decision-makers. Rawls proposed that these self-interested decision-makers, fearing that they are among the least advantaged persons who could be affected by the decision, will agree only upon rules that encode equality of opportunity and that bestow the greatest benefit on the least advantaged citizens. Regarding health policy decision-making, Rawls' model is best illustrated by Canadian philosopher Warren Bourgeois in his panel of "volunteers." These rational and self-interested volunteers receive an amnestic drug that renders them unaware of their health, social, and financial position, but they know that they are representative of diverse spheres of citizens whose well-being will be affected by their decision. After describing fair decision-making, Bourgeois considers the lack of a distributive justice imperative in Canada's Assisted Human Reproduction Act, in contrast to legislation in European nations and Australia, summarizes the economic and clinical considerations that must be provided to the decision-makers behind the "veil of ignorance" for fair decisions to occur, and considers altruism in relation to equality of access. He concludes by noting that among countries with legislation governing assisted reproduction Canada is alone in having legislation that is void of distributive justice in providing access to clinically appropriate infertility care.

  17. Polycystic ovaries and infertility: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Rajashekar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common (15-20% endocrine disorders in women of childbearing age. Although it is a major cause of infertility, its etiology remains unknown and its treatment difficult. Aim: To evaluate the incidence, treatment and outcome of patients with PCOS. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: PCOS patients (914 of the 1057 attending the outpatient department (OPD from June 2003 to February 2008 were evaluated for this study. Of the 914 patients investigated, 814 came for treatment and these patients were studied for hormonal disturbances and their response to various modalities of treatment. Results: Of the 2270 infertility patients, 46.50% (1057 had PCOS, out of these, 86.47% (914 were investigated and 77% (814 came for treatment. Our overall pregnancy rate was 48.40% (394/814. The pregnancy rate per cycle with timed intercourse (TI was 44.77% (47/105, 17.09% (286/1673 with intrauterine insemination (IUI, 29.82% (51/171 with in vitro fertilization (IVF and 22.22% (10/45 with frozen embryo transfer (FET. The maximum number of pregnancies (85.29%, 284/333 were achieved in the first three treatment cycles. The abortion rate was 19.01% (73/384 and the incidence of ectopic pregnancy was 5.47% (21/384. Complications seen were in the form of ovarian hyperstimulation (OHSS, retention cyst on day two and multiple pregnancies in 11.71% (228/1946 of the total treatment cycles. Conclusion: Most PCOS symptoms could be adequately controlled or eliminated with proper diagnosis and treatment. Thus, ovulation induction (OI protocols and treatment modalities must be balanced for optimal results.

  18. AB084. The fertility quality of life (FertiQol) in Chinese infertile women

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Ming; Ji, Xingzhe; Liang ZHOU; Zhang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective Infertility is defined as the failure to achieve clinical pregnancy after twelve months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. In recent years, there is a rising trend of infertility in China, data shows that every eight couples have a pair of infertility, and the number of Chinese infertility patients has more than 50 million. Female infertility has various negative impacts on quality of life. In the past, various generic measurement tools were used for assessing Qol in inferti...

  19. The Effect of The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Pharmacotherapy on Infertility Stress: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mahbobeh Faramarzi; Hajar Pasha; Seddigheh Esmailzadeh; Farzan Kheirkhah; Shima Heidary; Zohreh Afshar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infertility has been described as creating a form of stress leading to a variety of psychological problems. Both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are effective treatments for infertility stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy along with fluoxetine for improvement infertility stress in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical trial, 89 infertile women with mild to moderate depression (Beck ...

  20. Anti-Müllerian hormone levels in salpingectomized compared with nonsalpingectomized women with tubal factor infertility and women with unexplained infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grynnerup, Anna Garcia-Alix Haugen; Lindhard, Anette; Sørensen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the consequence of salpingectomy on ovarian reserve by measuring anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels before in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment in salpingectomized women compared with nonsalpingectomized women with tubal factor infertility, women with unexplained infertility...

  1. Surgical techniques for the management of male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalya A Lopushnyan; Thomas J Walsh

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation and surgical treatment of male infertility has evolved and expanded,now leading to more precise diagnoses and tailored treatments with diminished morbidity and greater success.Surgeries for male infertility are divided into four major categories:(i)diagnostic surgery; (ii) surgery to improve sperm production; (iii) surgery to improve sperm delivery; and (iv) surgery to retrieve sperm for use with in vitrofertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI).While today we are more successful than ever in treating male infertility,pregnancy is still not always achieved likely due to factors that remain poorly understood.Clinicians treating infertility should advocate for couple-based therapy,and require that both partners have a thorough evaluation and an informed discussion before undergoing specific surgical therapies.

  2. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility ResearchDavid Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3 1Reproductive ...

  3. Homeopathic treatment for infertility in a prize Nelore bull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobreiro, J

    2007-01-01

    Treatments for infertility in bulls are not described in homeopathic literature. A few treatments, such as changing the protein content of the diet, giving extra minerals, etc have been proposed. This case report describes homeopathic treatment for infertility in a prize bull. A Nelore bull, considered infertile for 3 years, was treated with homeopathic Pulsatilla nigricans 200 CH. Decreased total sperm defects, increased sperm motility and a very impressive increased number of doses of semen produced were observed. The bull relapsed after treatment was withdrawn, but again responded when it was resumed. Since only one animal was observed one cannot assume that the observed changes were due only to this treatment. Further studies may establish the real benefits of a homeopathic medicine in bull infertility. PMID:17227749

  4. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein;

    2010-01-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses...

  5. Gene Linked to Excess Male Hormones in Female Infertility Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Releases News Release Tuesday, April 15, 2014 Gene linked to excess male hormones in female infertility ... form cyst-like structures. A variant in a gene active in cells of the ovary may lead ...

  6. ROLE OF HYSTEROLAPAROSCOPY IN THE EVALUATION OF PRIMARY INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanyukta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available : Infertility has always been one of the most elusive symptom complexes that perplex a gynecologist. Laparoscopy is the most rapidly evolving area in medicine. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of hysterolaparoscopy in comprehensive work up of infertility and to help in planning appropriate management. To identify the incidence of various pathological condition in female reproductive tract leading to infertility. To develop the plan of therapy for such patient. To analyze the rate of complications in diagnostic hysterolaparoscopy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 100 infertile women with primary infertility of the age group 18-40 years with normal hormone profile and without male factor infertility were randomly selected from Infertility clinic of rural tertiary care hospital over 2 and ½ year from 1st January 2011 to October 2013. Initially all women were examined by taking detailed history, physical examination, basic endocrinological investigations, USG pelvis, endometrial biopsy and semen analysis. After that general examination, systemic and genital examinations were carried out on patients selected for the study. Hysterolaparoscopy was performed in post menstrual phase under general anesthesia. RESULTS: The present study showed maximum cases of infertility (40% in the age group of 21-25 years followed by (35% cases of infertility in the age group of 26-30years. Mean age of women was 24.6 years. On laparoscopy 34 patients revealed abnormal findings and rest had normal pelvic findings. Tubal blockage without adhesion was found to be the most important abnormality and was seen in 11 cases followed by tubal blockage with adhesion 7 cases. Laparoscopy revealed 18 cases of tubal blockage (11 bilateral and 7 unilateral and 78 cases were with normal tubal patency. Out of 78 cases, 12 cases had other abnormalities (endometriosis-2, PCOD-3, peritubal adhesions-7 21 women conceived after ovulation induction, IUI and tubal cannulation (cornual. Of them

  7. Comparison of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment strategies in promotion of infertility self-efficacy scale in infertile women: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hajar Pasha; Mahbobeh Faramarzi; Seddigheh Esmailzadeh; Farzan Kheirkhah; Hajar Salmalian

    2013-01-01

    Background: The infertility is associated with psychological consequence including depression, and lack of self-efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacological and no pharmacological strategies in promotion of self-efficacy of infertile women. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 89 infertile women who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center and were randomized into three grou...

  8. Health-promoting Lifestyle and its Demographic Predictors in Infertile Couples Referred to Infertility Clinic of Tabriz Al-Zahra Hospital, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Sehhati, Fahimeh; Rahimi, Mareieh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Improving the lifestyle of infertile couples led to the preservation of their performance, increase their quality of life, and reduce health cost. So, the aims of this study were to determine the health-promoting lifestyle and its predictors among infertile couples. Methods: In a cross-sectional, analytical study 322 infertile couples referred to an infertility clinic in Tabriz was participated with convenience sampling method. The demographic and the standard ...

  9. A qualitative study of Ottawa university students’ awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART)

    OpenAIRE

    Sabarre, Kelley-Anne; Khan, Zainab; Whitten, Amanda N; Remes, Olivia; Phillips, Karen P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Awareness of infertility risk factors is an essential first step to safeguard future fertility. Whereas several studies have examined university students’ awareness of female fertility and related risk factors, the topic of male infertility has not been well examined. The objective of this study was to assess young men and women’s awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, male and female infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Methods Semi-...

  10. An Epidemiologic Survey of Infertility in Dalian District of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛秦生; 张党生; 赵珩; 徐苓; 徐人庆; 陈玉芬; 曲阿珠

    1994-01-01

    An epidemiologic survey of infertility was carried out in Dalian district from September to December 1989. A two-stage random sampling was used to select subjects. Date were collected by household, interview with standardized questionnaire.Quality control was strictly executed. The respondent rate was 96%. A total of 5 918 couples were included in the analysis. The prevalence of primary infertility was 1.01% in this district. There was no significant difference between urban and rural

  11. Prof. Li Yueqing's Experience in Treating Male Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Haisong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Prof. Li Yueqing (李曰庆), an expert in the Andriatry Department of Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine,has been engaged in medicine for 30 years, who has aprofound knowledge in TCM surgery, especially in treating andriatric diseases such as impotence,infertility, and prostatitis. The following is an introduction to Prof. Li's experience in treating male infertility.

  12. Hysteroscopic evaluation in infertile patients: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latika Sahu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hysteroscopy is the gold standard procedure for uterine cavity exploration. However, hysteroscopy is only recommended by the WHO when clinical or complementary exams (ultrasound, HSG suggest intrauterine abnormality or after in vitro fertilization failure. Nevertheless, many specialists feel that hysteroscopy is a more accurate tool. The aim of this prospective study is to assess the value of diagnostic hysteroscopy in a primary workup of infertility by describing hysteroscopy findings in a population of 324 infertile patients during 18 months (December 2010 - May 2012. Methods: We analysed prospectively 324 infertile patients in gynaecology OT setting. Diagnostic video-assisted hysteroscopy was performed using a flexible hysteroscope. Hysteroscopy was performed with a standard sequence, inspecting the endocervical canal, uterine cavity, endometrium, and tubal ostia and findings recorded. Results: Hysteroscopy was normal in 65.12% of patients. Cervico-isthmic abnormalities were present in 6.48% of patients with cervical stenosis being the major abnormality. Uterine cavity was normal in 86% of patients. Observed abnormalities were septate uterus in 10 cases, intrauterine synechiae in 16 cases, sub mucus myoma in 2 cases, deformed cavity in 10 cases and endometrial polyp in 2 cases. Ostial fibrosis was observed in 29 patients. Endometrial abnormalities (fibrosis, inflammation were observed in 30 patients. Seven patients turned out to be of genital tuberculosis with endometrial biopsy. No significance was found regarding the total number of intrauterine pathologies when comparing the groups of primary versus secondary infertility. Conclusions: Rates of abnormal findings in infertile patient who underwent diagnostic hysteroscopy was 34.88% in our study. Our data are an additional argument to suggest hysteroscopy as part of investigation in infertile woman. Routine diagnostic hysteroscopy should be part of an infertility workup in primary

  13. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Guerrero-Bosagna; Skinner, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Decreasing male fertility has been observed for the past fifty years. Examples of affected reproductive parameters include decreases in sperm count and sperm quality and increases in testicular cancer, cryptorchidism and hypospadias. Exposures to environmental toxicants during fetal development and early postnatal life have been shown to promote infertility. Environmental exposures inducing epigenetic changes related to male infertility range from life style, occupational exposures, environme...

  14. Application of ultrasonography in female infertility: a comprehensive review

    OpenAIRE

    Okeke, Tochukwu C; Kennedy K. Agwuna; Ezenyeaku, Cyril C; Ikeako, Lawrence C

    2015-01-01

    The quest for detailed evaluation of the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries that is radiation free, inexpensive, readily available, non-invasive, relatively less time consuming and easily repeatable in female infertility has resulted in further studies. However, ultrasonography (US) remains the first line indispensable tool for gynecologic workup, monitoring and treating infertility. The aim is to review the current knowledge regarding the application of ultrasonography in female infertilit...

  15. Power of Proteomics in Linking Oxidative Stress and Female Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Sajal Gupta; Jana Ghulmiyyah; Rakesh Sharma; Jacques Halabi; Ashok Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis, PCOS, and unexplained infertility are currently the most common diseases rendering large numbers of women infertile worldwide. Oxidative stress, due to its deleterious effects on proteins and nucleic acids, is postulated to be the one of the important mechanistic pathways in differential expression of proteins and in these diseases. The emerging field of proteomics has allowed identification of proteins involved in cell cycle, as antioxidants, extracellular matrix (ECM), cytosk...

  16. Growth hormone in the management of female infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Navneet Magon; Swati Agrawal; Sonia Malik; K M Babu

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is involved in the regulation of male and female infertility and has been used in the management of both male and female infertility. GH is also produced by the ovary apart from it being produced from pituitary. GH helps in monofollicular growth. GH therapy is one of the adjuvant treatment used in ovarian stimulation and Assisted Reproductive Technologies Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART). GH supplementation has been shown to improve pregnancy rates in poor responders...

  17. Pituitary gonodal axis in fertile and infertile human males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafiez, A.A.; Mahmoud, K.Z.; Abbas, E.Z.; Halawa, F. (Cairo Univ. (Egypt))

    1984-08-01

    Radioimmunoassays of serum PRL, LH, FSH, testosterone and estradiol were performed in normal fertile subjects and infertile patients. The findings in the fertile group suggest that prolactin in human males has a role in steroidogenesis. Oligospermic and azospermic patients revealed hormonal patterns which were significantly higher than in the fertile group. Hyperprolactinemia was found in most cases of both infertile groups indicating that PRL has a significant role.

  18. Pituitary gonodal axis in fertile and infertile human males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunoassays of serum PRL, LH, FSH, testosterone and estradiol were performed in normal fertile subjects and infertile patients. The findings in the fertile group suggest that prolactin in human males has a role in steroidogenesis. Oligospermic and azospermic patients revealed hormonal patterns which were significantly higher than in the fertile group. Hyperprolactinemia was found in most cases of both infertile groups indicating that PRL has a significant role. (author)

  19. Laparascopic ventrosuspension in infertile patients. A new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serour, G I; Hefnawi, F

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Falope-Ring via laparascopy to the round ligaments in 86 infertile patients, for correction of retroversion of the uterus. Diagnostic laparascopy was performed on 2600 cases of infertility at Al-Azhar University Teaching Hospitals during a 3-year period. Laparascopy was performed as a primary mehtod of investigation of infertility, after clinical examination and semen analysis in 866 patients. These included long term cases of infertility, late marriage and cases where pelvic pathology was suspected on clinical grounds. Laparascopy was used as a final line of investigation of infertility in 1734 patients. In 86 patients with retroverted uterus as the only abnormality deteched, ventrosuspension was performed via the laparascope, by applying Falope-Rings to the round ligaments. These patients were followed up for periods varying from 6 months to 2 years. Pregnancy occurred in 24 patients and improvement of backache, deep dysparunea, congestive dysmenorrhea and leukorrhea occurred in 88.37%, 83.72%, 72.05% and 68.76%, respectively. The technique described in this paper is simple, easy to learn, can be performed under general or local anesthesia and is performed during the laparascopic investigation of the infertile cases and thus does not add an extra risk of operation or cost to the patient.

  20. Correlation between HPV sperm infection and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yang; Chan-Wei Jia; Yan-Min Ma; Li-Ying Zhou; Shu-Yu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases which comprises a group of small DNA viruses that intect both cutaneous and mucous squamous epithelia.Liquid bead microarray technology (LBMA) were used to evaluate 24 HPV genotypes in confirmed fertile and infertile males of North China so that the effects of HPV infection on semen parameters and relationship with male infertility could be discussed.A total of 1138 subjects were recruited in this study; 142 were HPV-pesitive (12.48%).Among 523 confirmed fertile males,only 35 were HPV-positive (6.70%),and two of them had multiple infections.Among 615 infertile males,107 were HPV-positive (17.4%),and 29 of them had multiple infections.Infertile males had a relatively high HPV infection rate compared with confirmed fertile males.Sperm progpessive motility (PR) and the normal morphology rate were significantly decreased in HPV-positive subjects.HPV-45,HPV-52,HPV-18,HPV-59 and HPV-16 infections were more frequently in infertile males.Hence,HPV infection is closely related to male infertility which will decrease sperm PR and rnorphology.HPV-45,HPV-52,HPV-18,HPV-59 and HPV-16 infection seems to be major risk factors.

  1. Counselling, care in infertility: the ethic of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, T

    1990-07-01

    Infertility is a health-care problem which has very definite physiological, psychological and social implications. Infertile couples are continually reminded of their plight--the structure of society is based on the family unit; simple activities such as shopping are a constant reminder, the shops being geared to the family; the neighbours fill their cars with all the paraphernalia which accompanies children--the stigma of infertility often leads to mental disharmony, marital difficulties, divorce, and in some cultures to ostracism. The suffering experienced by infertile people is very real. We need to remind ourselves that we are treating 'people who are infertile' rather than 'infertility'. Our care goes beyond their physical treatment--their stresses and strains are our concern and we must be careful not to add additional stress to their existing problems. Successful treatment can transform their lives: 'They are bright, healthy, beautiful children--a dream come true. Our lives are transformed and complete. Thank you a million times.' Failure after years of trying is all the more painful. The availability of effective, informed, independent and involved counselling is essential. PMID:2207611

  2. [Association study of telomere length with idiopathic male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuyuan, Liu; Changjun, Zhang; Haiying, Peng; Xiaoqin, Huang; Hao, Sun; Keqin, Lin; Kai, Huang; Jiayou, Chu; Zhaoqing, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Telomeres are evolutionary conserved, multifunctional DNA-protein complexes located at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres maintain chromosome stability and genome integrity and also play an important role in meiosis which aid in synapsis, homologous recombination, and segregation. Sperm telomere has been reported to play an important role in fertilization and embryo development. Nowadays, the association between telomere and reproduction is one of the major areas of interest, however whether sperm telomere associated with male infertility is not clear. In this study, in order to find out the association between Chinese idiopathic infertility and sperm telomere length, we analyzed the difference of sperm telomere length between idiopathic infertile men and normal fertile men, as well as the correlations between sperm telomere length and human semen characteristics. We analyzed 126 Chinese idiopathic infertile men and 138 normal fertile men for sperm telomere length by using quantitative PCR. We found that the relative sperm mean telomere length of infertile men was significantly shorter than that of fertile men (2.894 ± 0.115 vs. 4.016 ± 0.603, P=5.097 x 10⁻⁵). Both sperm count and semen progressive motility are related with telomere length. Our results suggest that sperm telomere length is associated with idiopathic male infertility of China and we proposed the possibility that shorter telomeres in sperm chromosome will reduce spermatogenesis and sperm functions, which finally affected the fertility of male.

  3. Infertility and assisted reproduction in Denmark. Epidemiology and psychosocial consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lone

    2006-11-01

    Clinically a couple is considered to be infertile after at least one year without contraception and without pregnancy. There was scant knowledge about the prevalences of infertility, involuntary childlessness and the seeking of fertility treatment and only few longitudinal studies about the psychosocial consequences of infertility and its treatment. This thesis is about the epidemiological aspects of infertility; the conceptualization and measurement of important psychosocial aspects of infertility; and a medical sociological analysis of the associations between these psychosocial variables among Danish women and men in fertility treatment. The thesis is based on nine papers. The three main purposes were: (i) to review critically, population based studies of infertility and medical care seeking in industrialised countries. Further, to examine these prevalences and subsequent motherhood among women in former assisted reproduction in a Danish population. (ii) To develop measures of psychosocial consequences of infertility: fertility problem stress, marital benefit, communication, coping strategies, attitudes to and evaluation of fertility treatment. (iii) To examine these phenomena and to analyse their interrelations among Danish women and men in fertility treatment. The thesis is based on four empirical studies: (i) The Women and Health Survey, a cross-sectional population-based study among 15-44 year old women (n=907, 25-44 year old) in Copenhagen County, 1989. (ii) The Psychosocial Infertility Interview Study, a qualitative interview study among 16 couples (n=2 participants) infertility treatment at The Fertility Clinic, Herlev University Hospital,1992. (iii) The Infertility Cohort, a longitudinal cohort study consecutively including all couples (n=250 participants) beginning anew fertility treatment period at one of four public (Braedstrup, Herlev, Odense, Rigshospitalet) and one private fertility clinic (Trianglen),2000-2002. (iv) The Communication and Stress

  4. Induced Abortion and the Risk of Tubal Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between induced abortion and tubal infertility in Chengdu, China.Methods A 1 :2 case-control study was designed. Infertile women with bilateral tubal occlusion in the case group compared with two control groups: infertile control group with bilateral tubal patency and pregnant control group with currently pregnancy. Data were collected using questionnaires through face-to-face interviews, covering the subjects' demographic details and histories of gynecology and obstetrics. Adjusted odds ratio was calculated as a measure of the association using stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis.Results Induced abortion was not found to be associated with tubal infertility in the analysis including either the infertile controls or the pregnant controls, but other risk factors were found, such as history of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), lower abdominal surgeries, dysmenorrhea and pregnancy.Conclusion It is contended that facing an increasing trend of infertile cases with tubal occlusion in China, it is emphasized that special attention should paid to the long term impact of reproductive tract infection, especially, asymptomatic ones, rather than induced abortion.

  5. Indonesian infertility patients’ health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett Linda Rae; Wiweko Budi; Hinting Aucky; Adnyana IB Putra; Pangestu Mulyoto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive tec...

  6. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  7. Efficacy of aphrodisiac plants towards improvement in semen quality and motility in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ghanashyam Keshav; Mahajan, Arun Yashwant; Mahajan, Raghunath Totaram

    2012-01-01

    Infertility is the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse. In the present study, herbal composition prepared by using medicinal plants having aphrodisiac potentials was administered orally to the albino rats for 40 days and to the oligospermic patients for 90 days in order to prove the efficacy of herbal composition. Herbal composition was the mixture (powder form) of the medicinal plants namely, Mucuna pruriens (Linn), Chlorophytum borivillianum (Sant and Fernand), and Eulophia campestris (Wall). In the neem oil treated albino rats, there was significant reduction in almost all the parameters viz. body weight, testes and epididymes weight, sperm density and motility, serum levels of testosterone, FSH, and LH compared with control rats. Treatment with said herbal composition for 40 days results significant increased in the body weight, testis, and epididymes weight in rats. Concomitantly the sperm motility and the sperm density were significantly increased. After 90 days of treatment with this herbal composition, sperm density vis-a-vis motility was increased in oligozoospermic patients as a result of elevation in serum testosterone levels. No side effects were noticed during the entire duration of the trial. PMID:22499723

  8. Coping with infertility: Comparison of coping mechanisms and psychological immune competence in fertile and infertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Erika; Nagy, Beáta Erika

    2016-08-01

    This study compared coping strategies and psychological immunity of parents with a child conceived with assisted reproductive technology (n = 84) and parents with a naturally conceived child (n = 84) in a Hungarian fertility-age population. Results showed that in vitro fertilization parents are able to control their emotions in a better way than comparison couples. They interpret trials as challenges and consider themselves more worthy than the members of the control group. Our research confirms that consideration and management of psychological factors in treating infertility have an important preventive role to play. PMID:25616427

  9. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Reza Khatami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The androgen receptor (AR gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (NTAD. We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12 of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdeletions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12 patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26 and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25 in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%, while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%. Conclusion: Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran.

  10. Causes of infertility among 1000 patients in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiander, A

    1990-07-01

    Infertility is a serious problem in Africa; affecting large number of women and causing much suffering. To address this problem an infertility clinic was opened in an isolated District General Hospital in Ghana. Statistics were kept over an 18-month period to identify the numbers of patients involved and the main cause of infertility. 1000 patients were registered during the course of twice-weekly clinics over 18 months. 118 patients (11.8%) became pregnant during this time and in 482 (48.2%) others a definite diagnosis was reached. The remaining patients were still under investigation or lost to follow-up at the end of the study period. Of the 118 pregnancies 40% had suffered from primary and 60% from secondary infertility. The duration of infertility ranged from 1 to 10 years. As expected the "successful" patients tended to be young (65% under 25 years) and to have had subfertility of limited duration (77% 4 years). 113 patients had evidence of tubal damage (43% primary and 57% secondary infertility), 63% had a history of pelvic inflammatory disease and 37% had a history of abdominal or pelvic surgery. 219 male partners were subfertile: 38% were azoospermic; 33% severely oligospermic ( 5 x 10 to the 6th power/ml); 29% moderately oligospermic (20 x 10 tot he 6th power/ml); and 40% had never fathered a child. 61 patients were anovulatory as judged by amenorrhea or an irregular menstrual cycle. 10 of them were thought to be perimenopausal. 37 patients had uterine factors (27% primary and 73% secondary). 33 women had fibroids, 2 congenital abnormalities and 2 previous subtotal hysterectomies. 52 patients had unexplained infertility, although there were associated factors in 5; 3 men refused to have seminal analysis, 1 woman had unilateral tubal block on hysterosalpingogram and 1 required dilatation of a stenosed cervix early in the study. That infertility is a serious problem in Africa is shown by the large numbers of patients registering at the clinic during the

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging structured reporting in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoliu-Fornas, Guillermina; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Our objective was to define and propose a standardized magnetic resonance (MR) imaging structured report in patients with infertility to have clinical completeness on possible diagnosis and severity. Patients should be studied preferable on 3T equipment with a surface coil. Standard MR protocol should include high-resolution fast spin-echo T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted images and gradient-echo T1-weighted fat suppression images. The report should include ovaries (polycystic, endometrioma, tumor), oviduct (hydrosalpinx, hematosalpinx, pyosalpinx, peritubal anomalies), uterus (agenesia, hypoplasia, unicornuate, uterus didelphys, bicornuate, septate uterus), myometrium (leiomyomas, adenomyosis), endometrium (polyps, synechia, atrophy, neoplasia), cervix and vagina (isthmoceles, mucosal-parietal irregularity, stenosis, neoplasia), peritoneum (deep endometriosis), and urinary system-associated abnormalities. To be clinically useful, radiology reports must be structured, use standardized terminology, and convey actionable information. The structured report must comprise complete, comprehensive, and accurate information, allowing radiologists to continuously interact with patients and referring physicians to confirm that the information is used properly to affect the decision making process. PMID:27105717

  12. Symptoms: Menopause, Infertility, and Sexual Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Debra L; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    By 2022, the number of survivors is expected to grow to nearly 18 million. Therefore, addressing acute and chronic negative sequelae of a cancer diagnosis and its treatments becomes a health imperative. For women with a history of breast cancer, one of the common goals of treatment and prevention of recurrence is to reduce circulating concentrations of estradiol, especially in women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Hormone deprivation after a diagnosis of breast cancer impacts physiological targets other than in the breast tissue and can result in unwanted side effects, all of which can negatively impact quality of life and function and cause distress. Symptoms that are most strongly linked by evidence to hormone changes after cancer diagnosis and treatment include hot flashes, night sweats, sleep changes, fatigue, mood changes, and diminishing sexual function, including vaginal atrophy (decreased arousal, dryness and dyspareunia), infertility, decreased desire and negative self-image. Weight gain and resulting body image changes are often concomitants of the abrupt onset of treatment-induced menopause. The purpose of this chapter is to briefly review what is known about the advent of premature menopause in women treated for breast cancer, menopausal symptoms that are exacerbated by endocrine treatments for breast cancer, and the associated concerns of hot flashes and related menopausal symptoms, sexual health and fertility issues. We will discuss limitations in the current research and propose strategies that address current limitations in order to move the science forward. PMID:26059933

  13. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve injury. Normal ejaculation is the result of coordinated reflex activity involving both the sympathetic and somatic nervous systems. Nerve injury can result in retrograde ejaculation, and anejaculation. With retrograde ejaculation, the ejaculate is propelled into the bladder instead of out through the urethra. In mild cases this condition can be reversed by sympathomimetic medications and, in more severe cases, sperm cells can be extracted from the bladder following ejaculation. With anejaculation, the ejaculatory reflex is not activated by normal sexual stimulation. In such cases, the first choice of treatment is assisted ejaculation, preferably by penile vibratory stimulation. If vibratory stimulation is unsuccessful, then ejaculation can almost always be induced by electroejaculation. In cases where assisted ejaculation fails, sperm can be retrieved surgically from either the epididymis or from the testis. Once viable sperm cells have been obtained, these are used in assisted reproductive techniques, including intravaginal insemination, intrauterine insemination, and in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:26003259

  14. Papillomavirus DNA in sperm from infertile patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Gennari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human Papillomaviruses (HPV are causative agents of sexually transmitted disease that affect both men and women (6, 7.The genus includes more than 150 types divided in according to different tropism for skin surfaces and paved mucosal epithelia. Although HPV infection has a very high incidence in both sexes, HPV infection in men is often neglected because of its transitory nature and its lack of clinical relevance.The HPV infection in males was found to be borne by the anal region, perineum, scrotum, urethra and glans. The persistence of the virus in these sites of infection has been linked both to male infertility and to the development of neoplasia in genital areas and not. In addition, several studies have documented the presence of HPV in the semen but with conflicting results regarding the location of the virus in the various components of semen (5, 9,10. The objective of this study was to highlight the presence of HPV DNA in the sperm of patients waiting for a Medically Assisted Procreation and to evaluate if there is a correlation between the semen parameters (motility, concentration and morphology of spermatozoa and HPV infection.

  15. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms “IBD AND male infertility”, “Crohn’s disease AND male infertility”, “ulcerative colitis AND male infertility”. References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, smoking, medications, and surgery may cause infertility in men with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, rectal incision seems to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the medications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces male fertility. No other medications appear to affect male fertility significantly, although small studies suggested some adverse effects. There are limited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on male fertility and pregnancy outcomes; however, patients should be informed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides information on fertility-related issues in men with IBD and discusses treatment options. PMID:27602237

  16. Male infertility in spinal cord trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Utida

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Every year there are 10 thousand new cases of patients victimized by spinal cord trauma (SCT in the United States and it is estimated that there are 7 thousand new cases in Brazil. Eighty percent of patients are fertile males. Infertility in this patient group is due to 3 main factors resulting from spinal cord lesions: erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory disorder and low sperm counts. Erectile dysfunction has been successfully treated with oral and injectable medications, use of vacuum devices and penile prosthesis implants. The technological improvement in penile vibratory stimulation devices (PVS and rectal probe electro-ejaculation (RPE has made such procedures safer and accessible to patients with ejaculatory dysfunction. Despite the normal number of spermatozoa found in semen of spinal cord-injured patients, their motility is abnormal. This change does not seem to be related to changes in scrotal thermal regulation, frequency of ejaculation or duration of spinal cord damage but to factors related to the seminal plasma. Despite the poor seminal quality, increasingly more men with SCT have become fathers through techniques ranging from simple homologous insemination to sophisticated assisted reproduction techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI.

  17. Mental health status of infertile couples based on treatment outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Baghianimoghadam

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is accompanied by numerous psychological and social problems. Infertile couples are more anxious and emotionally distressed than other fertile people. Previous studies suggested that infertility is more stressful for women than men. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the status of general health of infertile couples. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study evaluated general health of 150 infertile couples attending to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility that were selected consequently. The data were gathered by the researchers, based on face to face interview before and after three months of treatment by two questionnaires. The first questionnaire had questions on demographic information and the second one was the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28. This questionnaire has four sub- scales areas. All data were transferred directly to SPSS 15 and analyzed. Results: The mean age of women was 28.3 and men were 32.4 years. The scores for all sub- scales of GHQ in women were more than men. There was significant difference between age and general health at physical symptoms scales (p=0.002, anxiety and sleep disorders (p=0.003. The age group 25-29 years had higher scores (more than 7 than other age groups. There was significant difference between the scale of social dysfunction and results of treatment. Conclusion: Our results, similar to the previous studies have revealed negetive social and mental effects of infertility on women is more than men, so there is need that they be educated specially.

  18. THE EFFECT OF THE MULTIGLYCOSIDES OF TRIPTERYGIUM WILFORDII ON THE HYPOTHALAMOPITUITARY-TESTIS AXIS OF MALE RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONGJian-Sun; QINJin-Xi; LIUXi-Guang; SUNYun-Tian; D.M.deKretser

    1989-01-01

    The multiglycosides of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. f. (GTW) is a Chinese herb medicine used traditionally for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, chronic nephritis and some skin diseases. It has been recently shown to cause infertility in men, male rats and

  19. HIV infection and sexual behaviour in primary and secondary infertile relationships: a case-control study in Kigali, Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Dhont, N.; Muvunyi, C.; Luchters, S; Vyankandondera, J.; Naeyer, de, L.; Temmerman, M; Wijgert, van de, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (including HIV) and of high-risk sexual behaviour in the following three groups: primary infertile relationships, secondary infertile relationships and fertile relationships. Primary infertility is here defined as never having conceived before, secondary infertility as infertility subsequent to having conceived at least once. Design Unmatched case-control study. Methods Sexually active infertile women aged 21-45&ems...

  20. Evaluation on Sperm Acrosome Integrity of Infertile Men with Varicocele

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Tzvetkova; Wei-jie ZHU; Jing LI; D.Tzvetkov

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the sperm acrosome integrity of samples from infertile men with varicocele.Methods Forty-nine infertile men with varicocele were divided into three groups according to the grade of varicocele. Group A (grade Ⅰ), B (grade Ⅱ), and C (grade Ⅲ) consisted of 15, 18, and 16 cases, respectively. Besides, 15 semen samples from normospermic donors were used as the control. The acrosome integrity of sperm was examined with fluorescein-labeled Pisum sativum agglutinin. Acrosomal ultrastructure was observed with transmission electron microscopy.Results In three varicocele groups, most samples had high sperm abnormal morphology rates. There were significant differences in acrosome integrity rates between each varicocele group and the control (P<0.01). Group C had the lowest acrosome integrity rate among the three groups. Ultrastructural observation showed that acrosome malformations revealed acrosomal membranes defects, swelling, hypoplasia, and dissolution of the matrix.Conclusions Infertile men with varicocele had low level of acrosome integrity. Severe varicocele for infertile men might be associated with severe acrosomal defects. Evaluating sperm acrosome should aid the understanding of the sperm structural state and benefit the treatment for infertile men.

  1. Web-based treatment for infertility-related psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Minden B; Byrd, Michelle R; O'Donohue, William T; Jacobs, Negar Nicole

    2010-08-01

    Infertility has been associated with stigma and negative psychosocial functioning. However, only a small proportion of this population actually receives care. Fertility patients predominantly use the Internet for information gathering, social support, and assistance with decision-making; yet, available web resources are unreliable sources of mental health care. Web-based alternatives also have the potential to assist with intervention access difficulties and may be of significant lower cost. This study evaluated the efficacy of a web-based approach to providing a cognitive behavioral intervention with 31 infertile women seeking medical reproductive technologies. Following randomized assignment, participants using the web-based intervention were compared with those in a wait-list control condition on general and infertility-related psychological stress measures. Results were mixed regarding intervention efficacy. Significant declines in general stress were evidenced in the experimental group compared with a wait-list control group. However, website access did not result in statistically significant improvements on a measure of infertility-specific stress. These findings add to the literature on psychological interventions for women experiencing fertility problems. Moreover, despite the widespread use of the Internet by this population, the present study is one of the first to investigate the usefulness of the Internet to attenuate stress in this population. Preliminary results suggest general stress may be significantly reduced in infertile women using an online cognitive behavioral approach. PMID:20127127

  2. The role of Tadalafil in treatment of infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgio Cavallini; Giulio Biagiotti

    2012-01-01

    Objective: It was the aim of this research to assess whether Tadalafil 5 mg once daily can improves the sperm count of unexplained infertile males with erectile deficiency induced by the emotional stress of attempting to father children. Methods: Two groups, each made up of 30 unexplained infertile males with psychogenic erectile deficiency related to attempts to father children received Tadalafil 5 mg once daily (Group 1) or a placebo (Group 2) for one month. Unexplained infertile men are intended as normospermic men who could not father children over a one year period and whose female partner is free of factors causing infertility. The endpoints were:differences between the groups in restoring erectile response, modifying sperm count, side effects and modifications of sperm analyses with respect to resolution or not of the erectile deficiency irrespective of the substance (Tadalafil or placebo) used. The means were compared using analysis of variance and the percentages using the chi square test. Results:The patients who received Tadalafil had their sperm volume, concentration and motility increased, but not the percentage of typical forms. Patients who received a placebo had no significant improvement. Additional analyses indicated that sperm volume, concentration and motility (but not morphology) significantly increased only in the patients who restored erectile response to sexual stimulation, independently of Tadalafil or placebo administration. No significant side effects were present. Conclusions: It is thought that therapies aimed at removing emotional stress linked to the performance anxiety of fathering children might improve sperm count in unexplained infertile couples.

  3. The prevalence of Y chromosome microdeletions in Pakistani infertile men

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    Rubina Tabassum Siddiqui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microdeletions of the azoospermia factor locus of the long arm of Y chromosome are an etiological factor of severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in AZF region and their role in infertility in Pakistani population. Materials and Methods: The type of deletions in AZF locus were detected in infertile men (n=113 and the association of Y chromosome microdeletions with male infertility was assessed by including men (50 with normal karyotype and having children. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by multiplex PCR using 10 sequence tagged sites namely sY81, sY130, sY141, sY142, sY155, sY157, sY160, sY182, sY231, and sY202 that covered all three regions of AZF. Results: Individuals with severe oligozoospermia showed 2.86% deletion frequency in AZFc region as compared to azoospermic males (5.5%. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that deletions in Y chromosome are not playing major part in male infertility. Moreover, multiplex-PCR strategy might preferably be employed for the detection of Y chromosome microdeletions allied to male infertility.

  4. A case-control study identifying chromosomal polymorphic variations as forms of epigenetic alterations associated with the infertility phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Athalye, Arundhati S; Madon, Prochi F;

    2009-01-01

    To study the association of chromosomal polymorphic variations with infertility and subfertility.......To study the association of chromosomal polymorphic variations with infertility and subfertility....

  5. Study of correlation of thyroid profile and clinical parameters in patients with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameswaramma K.

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Every infertile woman with ovulatory dysfunction should also investigated thyroid profile along with other investigations, to open better prospects for such desperate infertile women. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(5.000: 1410-1413

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Infertility: Cultural and Religious Influences in a Multicultural Canadian Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Suzanne C.; Carrier, Marie-Eve; Whitley, Rob; Gold, Ian; Tulandi, Togas; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for infertility in a multicultural healthcare setting and to compare Western and non-Western infertility patients' reasons for using CAM and the meanings they attribute to CAM use.

  7. Infertility in the light of new scientific reports – focus on male factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Szkodziak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data indicate that infertility is a problem of global proportions, affecting one- fifth of couples trying to conceive worldwide (60–80 mln. According to the trends observed, the problem is predicted to increase by another two million cases annually. In Poland, infertility-related issues are found in about 19% of couples, including 4% with infertility and 15% with limited fertility. Inability to conceive occurs equally in men and women (50%, irrespective of the direct cause. Although it is generally thought that reproductive issues concern women, infertility affects men and women equally. This study is an attempted to systematize knowledge about the role of the male factor in infertility, particularly current knowledge concerning the environmental factors of infertility. For this purpose, the Medline and CINAHL databases and the Cochrane Library was searched for articles published in English during the last 10 years, using the following keywords: infertility, male factor, semen examination and environmental factor of infertility.

  8. Effect of Palm Pollen on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekh, Athar; Jashni, Hojjatollah Karimi; Rahmanian, Karamatollah; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh

    2015-04-01

    There is a rapidly growing trend in the consumption of herbal remedies in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of orally administered Date Palm Pollen (DPP) on the results of semen analysis in adult infertile men. Forty infertile men participated in our study. They were treated by Pollen powder 120 mg kg(-1) in gelatinous capsules every other day, for two months. Before and at the end of therapy, the semen was collected after masturbation and sperm numbers, motility and morphology were determined. Our findings revealed that consumption of DPP improved the sperm count. The treatment was significantly increased sperm motility, morphology and forward progressive motility. Date palm pollen seems to cure male infertility by improving the quality of sperm parameters. PMID:26506651

  9. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of infertility among Saudi couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfotouh MA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa A Abolfotouh,1 Abdullah A Alabdrabalnabi,2 Rehab B Albacker,3 Umar A Al-Jughaiman,4 Samar N Hassan5 1King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2University of Dammam, College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 3King Saud University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4King Faisal University, College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 5Division of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: Infertility places a huge psychological burden on infertile couples, especially for women. Greater knowledge of the factors affecting fertility may help to decrease the incidence of infertility by allowing couples to avoid certain risk factors. The aim of our study was (1 to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infertile and fertile Saudi participants on infertility, possible risk factors, and social consequences; and (2 to determine the practices of infertile Saudi couples to promote their fertility before having them attend an in vitro fertilization (IVF clinic. Methods and materials: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 277 fertile participants from outpatient clinics and 104 infertile patients from the IVF clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City between June 24, 2012 and July 4, 2012, using a previously validated interview questionnaire. Descriptive and analytical statistics were applied with a significance threshold of P ≤ 0.05. Results: A generally poor level of knowledge (59% and a neutral attitude (76% toward infertility were reported by participants. Mistaken beliefs commonly held by the study participants regarding the causes of infertility were Djinns and supernatural causes (58.8%, black magic (67.5%, intrauterine devices (71.3%, and contraceptive pills (42.9%. The healer/Sheikh was reported as the primary and secondary preference for infertility

  10. Denying and preserving self: Batswana women's experiences of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogobe, Dintle K

    2005-08-01

    This qualitative study was conducted to understand and theoretically explain infertility from the perspective of 40 infertile women and four members of the traditional health care system. Symbolic interaction and feminism were combined to under-gird the study. Through ongoing data collection and analysis, a theoretical framework of denying and preserving self was constructed. Preserving self or self-preservation means developing personal measures aimed at preventing o rreducing harm inflicted by others as a result of one's infertility. Contributory factors to denying of self include denial of status as a woman; denial of immortality; denial of experiences of pregnancy, labour and delivery; denial of economic and social security; and the belief that they are being chastised by God and the forefathers. In addition, the women develop strategies to deal with such denials by looking for deeper meaning, working it out, giving in to feelings, getting more involved, getting away, and doin gadoption. Implications of the study are discussed. PMID:16485584

  11. Effect of Palm Pollen on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekh, Athar; Jashni, Hojjatollah Karimi; Rahmanian, Karamatollah; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh

    2015-04-01

    There is a rapidly growing trend in the consumption of herbal remedies in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of orally administered Date Palm Pollen (DPP) on the results of semen analysis in adult infertile men. Forty infertile men participated in our study. They were treated by Pollen powder 120 mg kg(-1) in gelatinous capsules every other day, for two months. Before and at the end of therapy, the semen was collected after masturbation and sperm numbers, motility and morphology were determined. Our findings revealed that consumption of DPP improved the sperm count. The treatment was significantly increased sperm motility, morphology and forward progressive motility. Date palm pollen seems to cure male infertility by improving the quality of sperm parameters.

  12. The Role of Estrogen Modulators in Male Hypogonadism and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhatla, Amarnath; Mills, Jesse N; Rajfer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol, normally considered a female hormone, appears to play a significant role in men in a variety of physiologic functions, such as bone metabolism, cardiovascular health, and testicular function. As such, estradiol has been targeted by male reproductive and sexual medicine specialists to help treat conditions such as infertility and hypogonadism. The compounds that modulate estradiol levels in these clinical conditions are referred to as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). In a certain subset of infertile men, particularly those with hypogonadism, or those who have a low serum testosterone to estradiol ratio, there is some evidence suggesting that SERMs and AIs can reverse the low serum testosterone levels or the testosterone to estradiol imbalance and occasionally improve any associated infertile or subfertile state. This review focuses on the role these SERMs and AIs play in the aforementioned reproductive conditions. PMID:27601965

  13. Is infertility after surgery for cryptorchidism congenital or acquired?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, D; Thorup, J M; Visfeldt, J;

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated whether deletions of the DAZ (deleted in azoospermia) gene, abnormal karyotypes or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) were demonstrable in infertile men who had undergone surgery in childhood for cryptorchidism with a simultaneous testicular biopsy that demonstrated no or almost...... no germ cells. In six men with infertility after surgery for cryptorchidism, the adult karyotype and analyses for the DAZ gene, serum follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone were performed from a peripheral blood sample. Testicular volume was also measured. All patients...... exhibited a 46,XY karyotype. There were no deletions of the DAZ-gene, no HH and no testicular atrophy. The infertility was thus not proved to be congenital, and consequently, surgical treatment is indicated before the germ cells disappear from undescended testes. This appears to be before 15 months of age....

  14. Is infertility after surgery for cryptorchidism congenital or acquired?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Thorup, J M; Visfeldt, J;

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated whether deletions of the DAZ (deleted in azoospermia) gene, abnormal karyotypes or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) were demonstrable in infertile men who had undergone surgery in childhood for cryptorchidism with a simultaneous testicular biopsy that demonstrated no or almost no...... germ cells. In six men with infertility after surgery for cryptorchidism, the adult karyotype and analyses for the DAZ gene, serum follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone were performed from a peripheral blood sample. Testicular volume was also measured. All patients...... exhibited a 46,XY karyotype. There were no deletions of the DAZ-gene, no HH and no testicular atrophy. The infertility was thus not proved to be congenital, and consequently, surgical treatment is indicated before the germ cells disappear from undescended testes. This appears to be before 15 months of age....

  15. Saline infusion sonography in evaluation of uterine cavity abnormalities in infertility: a comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Sitimani; Indu Chawla; Poonam Vohra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility is defined as one year of unprotected intercourse without pregnancy. Female factor is responsible for 40-50% of cases of infertility. Uterine pathologies are the cause of infertility in as many as 15% of couples seeking treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of trans-vaginal sonography (TVS) and saline infusion sonography (SIS) for detection of uterine cavity abnormalities in patients of infertility taking hysteroscopy as gold standard. ...

  16. Comparison of lifestyle in fertile and infertile couples in Kermanshah during 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Tahereh Khosrorad; Mahrokh Dolatian; Hedyeh Riazi; Zohreh Mahmoodi; Hamid Alavimajd; Soodeh Shahsavari; Mitra Bakhtiari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a major reproductive health in gynecology. According to the world health organization, there are currently 50-80 million infertile couples in the world. Objective: Considering the critical effects of lifestyle on reproductive health, this study aimed to compare the lifestyle of fertile and infertile couples in Kermanshah during 2013. Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive cross sectional study that was done on 216 fertile and infertile couples a...

  17. Infertility in Females with Cystic Fibrosis Is Multifactorial: Evidence from Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Hodges, Craig A.; Palmert, Mark R.; Drumm, Mitchell L.

    2008-01-01

    Infertility is commonly associated with cystic fibrosis (CF). Although infertility in men with CF has been thoroughly investigated, the infertility observed in women with CF has not been well studied. To investigate female infertility associated with CF, we used two independently derived mouse models of CF. Both of these models displayed decreased fertility characterized by a reduction in litter number and litter size. Our findings suggest that much of the reduced fertility in these mice orig...

  18. Analysis of partial AZFc deletions in Malaysian infertile male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeamar, Hussein Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Ismail, Patimah; Nadkarni, Prashan; Fawzi, Nora

    2013-04-01

    Complete deletions in the AZF (a, b, and c) sub-regions of the Y-chromosome have been shown to contribute to unexplained male infertility. However, the role of partial AZFc deletions in male infertility remains to be verified. Three types of partial AZFc deletions have been identified. They are gr/gr, b1/b3, and b2/b3 deletions. A recent meta-analysis showed that ethnic and geographical factors might contribute to the association of partial AZFc deletions with male infertility. This study analyzed the association of partial AZFc deletions in Malaysian infertile males. Fifty two oligozoospermic infertile males and 63 fertile controls were recruited to this study. Screening for partial AZFc deletions was done using the two sequence-tagged sites approach (SY1291 and SY1191) which were analyzed using both the conventional PCR gel-electrophoresis and the high resolution melt, HRM method. Gr/gr deletions were found in 11.53% of the cases and 9.52% of the controls (p = 0.725). A B2/b3 deletion was found in one of the cases (p = 0.269). No B1/b3 deletions were identified in this study. The results of HRM analysis were consistent with those obtained using the conventional PCR gel-electrophoresis method. The HRM analysis was highly repeatable (95% limit of agreement was -0.0879 to 0.0871 for SY1191 melting temperature readings). In conclusion, our study showed that partial AZFc deletions were not associated with male infertility in Malaysian subjects. HRM analysis was a reliable, repeatable, fast, cost-effective, and semi-automated method which can be used for screening of partial AZFc deletions. PMID:23231020

  19. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with Endometriosis in Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Ashrafi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endometriosis affects women’s physical and mental wellbeing. Symptoms include dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain, and infertility. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between some relevant factors and symptoms and risk of an endometriosis diagnosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 1282 surgical patients in an infertility Institute, Iran between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated by laparoscopy. Of these, there were 341 infertile women with endometriosis (cases and 332 infertile women with a normal pelvis (comparison group. Chi-square and t tests were used to compare these two groups. Logistic regression was done to build a prediction model for an endometriosis diagnosis. Results: Gravidity [odds ratio (OR: 0.8, confidence interval (CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01], parity (OR: 0.7, CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01, family history of endometriosis (OR: 4.9, CI: 2.1-11.3, P0.05. Fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain and premenstrual spotting were more significant among late-stage endometriosis patients than in those with early-stage endometriosis and more prevalent among patients with endometriosis than that of the comparison group. In the logistic regression model, gravidity, family history of endometriosis, history of galactorrhea, history of pelvic surgery, dysmenorrhoea, pelvic pain, dysparaunia, premenstrual spotting, fatigue, and diarrhea were significantly associated with endometriosis. However, the number of pregnancies was negatively related to endometriosis. Conclusion: Endometriosis is a considerable public health issue because it affects many women and is associated with the significant morbidity. In this study, we built a prediction model which can be used to predict the risk of endometriosis in infertile women.

  20. MicroRNA and Male Infertility: A Potential for Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Khazaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding single stranded RNA molecules that are physiologically produced in eukaryotic cells to regulate or mostly down-regulate genes by pairing with their complementary base-sequence in related mRNA molecules in the cytoplasm. It has been reported that other than its function in many physiological cell processes, dysregulation of miRNAs plays a role in the development of many diseases. In this short review, the association between miRNAs and some male reproductive disorders is surveyed. Male factor Infertility is a devastating problem from which a notable percentage of couples suffer. However, the molecular mechanism of many infertility disorders has not been clearly elucidated. Since miRNAs have an important role in numerous biological cell processes and cellular dysfunctions, it is of interest to review the related literature on the role of miRNAs in the male reproductive organs. Aberrant expression of specific miRNAs is associated with certain male reproductive dysfunctions. For this reason, assessment of expression of such miRNAs may serve as a suitable molecular biomarker for diagnosis of those male infertility disorders. The presence of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at the miRNAs’ binding site in its targeted mRNA has been reported to have an association with idiopathic male infertility. Also, a relation with male infertility has been shown with SNP in the genes of the factors necessary for miRNA biogenesis. Therefore, focusing on the role of miRNAs in male reproductive disorders can further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of male infertility and generate the potential for locating efficient biomarkers and therapeutic agents for these disorders.

  1. The role of parasites and fungi in secondary infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kranjčić-Zec Ivana F.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Parasite-host relationships can cause diminished or absent ability to conceive, ectopic pregnancy or pregnancy with undesired course. Literature review There are reports that some protozoa, helminths and fungi may impair women's reproductive capacity, causing deformites of genital tract, so that conception is impossible, or, if it does occur, normal implantation and development of placenta are impossible. Schistosoma haematobium may cause vulvar papule, swelling, tumors, irregular vaginal hemorrhage, tubular infertility and ectopic pregnancies. Patients with cirrhosis caused by schistosomas have gonadal dysfunction and schistosomiasis itself can lead to tubular infertility. Some authors found microfilaria of Mansonella perstans in folicular aspirates in patients with tubular adhesions. Chronic Entamoeba histolytica infection can cause pelvic pain and dyspareunia in some patients. Although Trichomonas vaginalis is a common cause of tubal inflammation, this protozoa affects semen quality and leads to secondary infertility. Soluble parasite extract of T. vaginalis can lead to impaired motility of 50% spermatozoa in vitro and affects semen quality by increased viscosity and amount of debris, or damage spermatozoid membrane. In enterobiosis, presence of adult worms and eggs in fallopian tube, can be followed by chronic salpingitis and tubal occlusion. Also in ascariosis, presence of adult forms and eggs can lead to acute colpitis, chronic endometritis, salpingitis or ovarian abscess. The concequence of fungal infections, such as colpitis and endometritis, caused by Candida albicans, may be infertility. Also, according to some reports, C. albicans leads to decreased spermatozoan motility. Conclusion Hence parasites and fungi can cause infertility, we recommend examination of both partners in treatment of infertility.

  2. Psychological stress and infertility. Part 2: Psychometric test data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, H J

    1982-12-01

    The hypothesis tested in this study was that a group of female functional infertile patients would show significantly more personality maladjustment than a group with definite organic reproductive pathology and a normal fertile group. No significant differences between the functional and organic groups were found on any of the subscores of four personality questionnaires. The normal group (wives of sterile men) scored higher on extraversion than both the functional and organic groups. On self-control the normal group also scored lower (negative connotation) than the other two groups. In general no evidence for personality maladjustment in functional infertility was found.

  3. The impact of partner coping in couples experiencing infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, B D; Pirritano, M; Christensen, Ulla;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most studies examining coping with infertility use the individual as the unit of analysis. Although valuable, these studies fail to show the impact that partner coping has on individual distress. Since infertility is a shared stressor, examining the impact of partner coping...... as the unit of analysis. RESULTS: A partner's use of active-avoidance coping was related to the increased personal, marital and social distress for men and women. A woman's use of active-confronting coping was related to increased male marital distress. And a partner's use of meaning-based coping...

  4. Epidemiology of depression among infertile and fertile couples in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkani H

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is considered as one of the main psychological disorders associated with infertility. Depression may play a significant role in the life of infertile individuals, their infertility treatment follow-up and in their hopefulness for the future; it may also influence the intensity and continuousness of the mutual relationship of the affected couple. AIMS: This study was done to determine the depression rate and make a comparison between infertile and fertile couples with respect to the same. SETTING AND DESIGN: The depression rate was evaluated between two groups - infertile couples (case group and fertile couples (control group. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety-one infertile couples (cases and 9l fertile ones (controls were randomly enrolled in our study. Beck depression inventory (BDI and demographic information were provided. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: We used Chi-square, t-test; and one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA was performed to find out significant difference between infertility duration in various couples and its effect on the score of depression. RESULTS: The BDI mean difference between infertile and fertile couples was significant (P=0.015. It was significantly more among couples with infertility from 1-3 years′ duration compared to those with infertility of 1-year duration or less. CONCLUSION: Regarding the high rate of depression among infertile couples, it seems necessary to pay more attention to infertility centers that offer psychological and psychiatric services.

  5. Measuring infertility in populations: constructing a standard definition for use with demographic and reproductive health surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Mascarenhas Maya N; Cheung Hoiwan; Mathers Colin D; Stevens Gretchen A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Infertility is a significant disability, yet there are no reliable estimates of its global prevalence. Studies on infertility prevalence define the condition inconsistently, rendering the comparison of studies or quantitative summaries of the literature difficult. This study analyzed key components of infertility to develop a definition that can be consistently applied to globally available household survey data. ...

  6. Frequency and patterns of abnormal Pap smears in Sudanese women with infertility: What are the perspectives?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed O Almobarak

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Epithelial cell abnormalities are significantly higher in women with infertility as compared with fertile women. Importantly, inflammatory smears were reported two times more than in the controls. We recommend pap smear as a routine practice for all women assessed for infertility problems. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the incidence of human papilloma virus infections in infertile women with abnormal cervical cytology.

  7. Role of imaging in female infertility [Dr. K.M. Rai Memorial Oration Award

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infertility in females is multifactorial in origin. Though hysterolaparoscopy is the gold-standard investigation, USG is usually the first-line investigation. MRI has expanded the usefulness of imaging in female infertility. This pictorial essay reviews the role of imaging in the evaluation of female infertility

  8. What Are the Issues Confronting Infertile Women? A Qualitative and Quantitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerli, Katja; Znoj, Hansjorg; Berger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a stressful experience, yet little is known about the specific issues confronting infertile women. In the present study, researchers sought to identify themes important to infertile women and examine possible associations with mental health levels. Using qualitative content analysis, researchers analyzed the email messages of 57…

  9. Role of imaging in female infertility [Dr. K.M. Rai Memorial Oration Award

    OpenAIRE

    Rastogi Rajul

    2010-01-01

    Infertility in females is multifactorial in origin. Though hysterolaparoscopy is the gold-standard investigation, USG is usually the first-line investigation. MRI has expanded the usefulness of imaging in female infertility. This pictorial essay reviews the role of imaging in the evaluation of female infertility.

  10. Variation in distress among women with infertility: evidence from a population-based sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greil, Arthur L; Shreffler, Karina M; Schmidt, Lone;

    2011-01-01

    , social support and social pressure variables. General distress does not vary by infertility type or intentionality. CONCLUSIONS Results reveal variation in women's recalled experiences of infertility and that FSD is more sensitive to effects of different experiences than general distress. Women...... pregnant (infertile without intent). RESULTS Both types of infertility (primary versus secondary) (ß = 0.31*) and intentionality (infertile with and without intent) (ß = 0.08*) are associated with FSD. These associations persist when we control for resource and demographic variables, life course variables...

  11. Randomized Trial of a Lifestyle Program in Obese Infertile Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaerts, Meike A Q; van Oers, Anne M; Groen, Henk; Burggraaff, Jan M; Kuchenbecker, Walter K H; Perquin, Denise A M; Koks, Carolien A M; van Golde, Ron; Kaaijk, Eugenie M; Schierbeek, Jaap M; Oosterhuis, Gerrit J E; Broekmans, Frank J; Bemelmans, Wanda J E; Lambalk, Cornelis B; Verberg, Marieke F G; van der Veen, Fulco; Klijn, Nicole F; Mercelina, Patricia E A M; van Kasteren, Yvonne M; Nap, Annemiek W; Brinkhuis, Egbert A; Vogel, Niels E A; Mulder, Robert J A B; Gondrie, Ed T C M; de Bruin, Jan P; Sikkema, J Marko; de Greef, Mathieu H G; ter Bogt, Nancy C W; Land, Jolande A; Mol, Ben W J; Hoek, Annemieke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small lifestyle-intervention studies suggest that modest weight loss increases the chance of conception and may improve perinatal outcomes, but large randomized, controlled trials are lacking. METHODS: We randomly assigned infertile women with a body-mass index (the weight in kilograms d

  12. Approaches to improve the diagnosis and management of infertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devroey, P.; Fauser, B. C. J. M.; Diedrich, K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the causes of infertility and of assisted reproductive technology (ART) have led to the development of complex diagnostic tools, prognostic models and treatment options. The Third Evian Annual Reproduction (EVAR) Workshop Meeting was held on 26-27 April 2008 t

  13. Testicular touch preparation cytology in the evaluation of male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Z Yildiz-Aktas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Male infertility is traditionally evaluated by tissue core biopsies of the testes. Touch preparations (TP of these biopsies have been infrequently used. The aim of this study is to report our experience with using testicular biopsy TP for the evaluation of male infertility. Materials and Methods: A retrospective search was performed for cases of testes biopsies with concurrent TP. These cases were evaluated for clinical information, specimen adequacy, and cytological-histological correlation. Results: A total of 39 cases were identified from men with a mean age of 34 years (range 23 to 50 years. TP slides were satisfactory for evaluation in 31 (89% cases, and less than optimal in four due to low cellularity, obscuring blood or air drying artifact. Cytopathology showed concordance with the biopsy in almost all cases. In one discordant case where the biopsies showed no active spermatogenesis, a rare sperm were identified on the TP. Conclusions: TP of the testis is a helpful adjunct to biopsy because of its ability to clearly evaluate all stages of spermatogenesis. These data demonstrate that TP cytopathology of the testes in our experience has an excellent correlation with both normal testicular biopsies and those showing pathological spermatogenesis, and in rare cases may provide added benefit in evaluating the presence of spermatogenesis for male infertility. Albeit uncommon, cytopathologists may be required to identify and evaluate spermatogenic elements in cytology specimens being submitted from men with infertility.

  14. Dietary intakes in infertile women a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nappi Rossella E

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reproductive axis is closely linked to nutritional status. The purpose of this study was to compare the nutritional status in two groups of young infertile women, without clinically overt eating disorders: hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Methods Eighteen young infertile women (10 HA, 8 PCOS attending an outpatient gynecological endocrinology unit, underwent evaluation of anthropometry, body composition, dietary intakes by means of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ and a seven-day food diary (7DD, and psychological characteristics by means of EDI2 and SCL90 tests. Results HA women had lower BMI and body fat compared to PCOS women. Habitual intake derived from FFQs showed a similar macronutrient distribution between groups (about 16% protein, 33% fat, 52% carbohydrates. The psychometric profiles of the two groups did not differ significantly. The underreporting of dietary intakes (measured as habitual energy intake by FFQs/basal metabolic rate was found to be negatively correlated with the interpersonal sensitivity SCL-90 subscale scores (r = -0.54, p = 0.02. Conclusion Our study identified differences in body composition but not in dietary habits between HA and PCOS infertile women. We documented, for the first time, a relationship between the accuracy of dietary surveys and the psychological characteristics of subjects with anovulation. This finding suggests that it may be important to be aware of the psychological terrain when planning a dietary survey in infertile women.

  15. Dr. Yi Juqing's Experience in Treating Female Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Jimin

    2006-01-01

    @@ With rich experience accumulated in medical practice for 40 years, Dr. Yi Juqing (易菊清), a chief physician, is good at treating various kinds of refractory diseases. The following is an introduction of his experience in treating female infertility.

  16. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L.; Ohl, Dana A; Lynne, Charles M; Sønksen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic and retroperitoneal surgery, diabetes, congenital spinal abnormalities, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Erectile dysfunction can be managed by an increasingly invasive range of treatments including medica...

  17. Primary infertility associated with neuroendocrine tumor (Carcinoid) of the appendix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brad B Swelstad; Paul R Brezina; Clark T Johnson; Nina Resetkova; Irene Woo; Lisa Kolp

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the appendix(NET-A), formerly called appendiceal carcinoids, are rare tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.Appendiceal tumors have also been associated with infertility. However, in many of these cases, significant abdominal pathology, specifically pseudomyxoma peritonei, was identified during definitive surgical intervention.A34-year-old nulligravid woman undergoing infertility evaluation presented to an academic tertiary care fertility center. An abnormal mass was identified on hysterosalpingogram andCT confirmed appendiceal mass. Surgical removal of the mass was performed and histopathology was consistent with anNET-A with negative margins extending to the serosa.Two months after surgical intervention, the patient spontaneously conceived pregnancy and subsequently delivered a normal infant.This case exemplifies the importance of careful inspection of radiologic films by the gynecologic physician. Of added interest, this case describes an asymptomaticNET-A associated with primary infertility. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an incidentally indentifiedNET-A that resulted in primary infertility.

  18. Salpingitis isthmica nodosa in female infertility and tubal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, L; Sperling, Lene; Hansen, U;

    1991-01-01

    with infertility, pregnancies, outcome of pregnancies, births, pelvic inflammatory disease and salpingitis. Sections from the isthmus were present in the specimens from 223 tubes from 193 patients and were analysed by the same pathologist. Originally, SIN was found in 12 patients but on re...

  19. Zinc deficiency in malabsorption states: a cause of infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, S

    1976-01-01

    Thirteen patients with malabsorption, 7 women and 5 men, were investigated extensively. All showed low serum zinc concentrations irrespective of the duration of illness and degree of malabsorption. Eleven of the 13 had active coeliac disease. It was suspected that the low serum zinc concentrations reflected a state of zinc deficiency, and this theory was borne out by the fact that no inflammatory reaction, no clear-cut albumin deficiency, and no oestrogen or corticosteroid influence could be demonstrated. All 7 women suffered from infertility, in most of them of long standing. Two showed secondary infertility after pregnancy and abnormal labour resulting in infants with congenital malformations (one case of bilateral congenital dislocation of the hip and one of multiple cardiac anomalies). I have reported similar complications in pregnancies in which the serum zinc was low. One of the infertile women conceived after the institution of gluten-free diet and zinc therapy, but later aborted spontaneously. Investigations on zinc metabolism and intestinal absorption might well prove valuable in otherwise unexplained infertility and could open up a new therapeutic approach. PMID:1067747

  20. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Analysis of Protamine Genes in Infertile Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamad Salamian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs are considered as one of the underlyingcauses of male infertility. Proper sperm chromatin packaging which involves replacement ofhistones with protamines has profound effect on male fertility. Over 20 SNPs have been reportedfor the protamine 1 and 2.Materials and Methods: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of two previouslyreported SNPs using polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP approach in 35, 96 and 177 normal, oligozoospermic and azoospermic individuals. TheseSNPs are: 1. A base pair substitution (G at position 197 instead of T in protamine type 1 Openreading frame (ORF including untranslated region, which causes an Arg residue change to Serresidue in a highly conserved region. 2. cytidine nucleotide change to thymidine in position of 248of protamine type 2 ORF which caused a nonsense point mutation.Results: The two mentioned SNPs were not present in the studied population, thus concluding thatthese SNPs can not serves as molecular markers for male infertility diagnosis.Conclusion: The results of our study reveal that in a selected Iranian population, the SNP G197Tand C248T are completely absent and are not associated with male infertility and therefore theseSNPs may not represent a molecular marker for genetic diagnosis of male infertility.

  1. A new strategy for professional medical support couples with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Zhukov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From our point of view, the problem of infertility in a pair of appropriately addressed jointly by the two related disciplines. This process has been actively helping set newsupplements Spematon and Pregnoton. The study included 50 couples planning to conceive: 25 couples with male factor infertility secretory type (group 1, 25 couples with infertility caused by varicocele in the postoperative period (group 2. The first group included patients with hyperprolactinemia relative to a second group – 25 somatically healthy patients. All groups patients takes Spematon and Pregnoton during 3 months. Terms of infertility in couples ranged from 1 to 4,5 years and an average reached 2,8 ± 1,6 years. According to the results of the comparative analysis the reproductive value of sperm had been enhanced, functional status of the female reproductive system had been improved, the menstrual cycle had been normalized and relatively elevated levels of prolactin had been decreased after co-application of these supplements. Five woman became pregnant.

  2. Cultural Considerations in Counseling Couples Who Experience Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    Infertility creates challenges affecting various aspects of couples' intimate lives. Practices regarding reproduction are often shaped by cultural messages. Culturally sensitive treatment methods help counselors provide effective therapy to couples with fertility problems. This article describes cultural influences, challenges, and counseling…

  3. Incorporating Ideological Context in Counseling Couples Experiencing Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Judith A.; Panchal, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the influence of ideological values on couples' experience of infertility. Contextual issues are considered in terms of how they influence medical decision making as well as emotional factors. Strength-based counseling interventions that attend to couples' diverse values are described. Last, implications for counselors,…

  4. Role of diagnostic laparoscopy in the management of female infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshree Dayanand Katke

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that Laparoscopy has important role in the diagnosis and treatment of unexplained infertility. It also helps in Prediction and improvement of success rate of assisted reproductive technologies like IUI and IVF. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(8.000: 2592-2595

  5. Prediction of ovulation induction outcome in normogonadotropic anovulatory infertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Imani

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAnovulation is a major cause of female reproductive dysfunction and can be identified in approximately 18-25% of couples presenting with infertility (Hull et al., 1985). Oligomenorrhea (arbitrarily defined as menstrual periods occurring at intervals betvveen 35 days to 6 months) or ameno

  6. Risk factors for secondary infertility among women in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelofar Sami

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secondary infertility in developing countries is mostly attributable to blockage of the fallopian tubes due to adhesions caused by reproductive tract infections. There is a dearth of information on the prevalence and causes of secondary infertility from Pakistan. This paper presents results on factors associated with secondary infertility among married women in Karachi, Pakistan. METHODS: A matched case-control study was conducted. Cases were women aged 15-35 years with history of at least one previous conception and currently seeking treatment for secondary infertility. Controls were women residing in the neighborhood of cases with at least one live birth and not taking treatment for secondary infertility. The age of controls was matched by ±5 years to that of cases. Data was collected from June to August 2003. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI for factors associated with secondary infertility. RESULTS: The final multivariate logistic regression model revealed that after adjusting for age, cases were more likely to be the housewives (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI:1.5-4.4, had used inappropriate material to absorb blood during menstruation (AOR = 9.0, 95% CI: 5.0-16.4, and at their last delivery, had a birth attendant who did not wash hands with soap and water (AOR = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.4-5.7. Moreover, women with secondary infertility were more likely to report current or past history of having STI symptoms (AOR = 3.6, 95% CI: 2.4-5.6 and use of intra-vaginal indigenous medicines during their last post-partum period (AOR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.6-5.7. CONCLUSION: We recommend health education and awareness messages for safe practices during menstruation, delivery, and the postpartum period for women in general. Additionally, sanitary napkins should be made available at an affordable cost, and safe delivery kits should contain

  7. Potential association between male infertility and occupational psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiner, Einat K; Sheiner, Eyal; Carel, Refael; Potashnik, Gad; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of working conditions, occupational exposures to potential reproductive toxic agents, and psychological stress on male fertility. The study population consisted of 202 consecutive male patients attending a fertility clinic. Of those, 106 patients had attended the clinic because of a male infertility problem (case group), 66 patients had attended the clinic because of a female infertility problem (control group), and 30 patients had a combined infertility problem (male and female). Male infertility was associated with working in industry and construction as compared with other occupations (78.6% vs 58.3%, P = 0.044). Industry and construction workers were of lower educational level than the other workers (mean: 12.1 vs 13.4 years, P = 0.021). These patients also tended to smoke more than the other workers (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.08 to 5.98), more often worked in shifts (OR = 3.12, 95% CI = 1.19 to 8.13), reported physical exertion in work (OR = 3.35, 95% CI = 1.44 to 7.80), and were more exposed to noise and welding (OR = 3.84, 95% CI = 1.63 to 9.14, OR = 4.40, 95% CI = 1.11 to 1.76, respectively). Male infertility (case group) was found to be statistically related to higher marks in all four measures of burnout as compared with the controls. The largest difference was obtained in the measure of cognitive weariness (mean: 2.9 vs 2.1, P < 0.001). In a multiple logistic regression analysis, industry and construction jobs (adjusted OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.7) and cognitive weariness (adjusted OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.03 to 4.6) were found to be independent risk factors for male infertility problems. Male infertility was independently associated with industry and construction jobs as well as job burnout.

  8. Anticardiolipin antibodies in pathogenesis of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disorder clinically characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis and/or specific obstetric complications and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL in the serum. It occurs in 0.3% of pregnant women, while 1% of them have two spontaneous abortions. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of biphospholipid antibodies in pregnant women with recurrent spontaneous abortions. Methods. We analyzed 60 pregnant women who had two or more recurrent miscarriages. The control group included 60 healthy pregnant women. We analyzed titres of anticardiolipin (aCL IgG and/or IgM with high titres (> 20 U/mL, lupus anticoagulant (LAC antibodies and anti-beta-2 glycoprotein (b2-GP1 IgG as well as parameters of coagulation status of pregnant women. Results. Analyzing Spearman's rank correlation coefficient in a group of affected patients, we noticed a slightly positive correlation of lupus anticoagulants (LAC with aCL antibodies of both classes, while the correlation with b2GP1 IgG was negative. Both classes of aCL antibodies and antib2GP1 IgG were in a discrete positive correlation with the given variables. In the control group, there was a lack of consistency in correlation of the study variables with LAC-aCl IgG, compared to the affected patients, and there was a standard negative coefficient of correlation with anti-b2GP1 IgG. The correlation ratio of anti-b2GP1 IgG was negative for all studied test parameters. Analysis of hemostatic parameters showed a statistically significant difference in the concentration of fibrinogen (p < 0.01 and thrombocyte count (p < 0.05 between the study and the control group of pregnant women. Lower mean values of fibrinogen (2.90 ± 0.45 g/L and lower thrombocyte count [(179.20 ± 6.00 × 109] were found in the study group of pregnant women with secondary infertility compared to the mean values of fibrinogen (3.60 ± 0.55 g/L and thrombocyte count

  9. Limitations and barriers in access to care for male factor infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Akanksha; Nangia, Ajay K; Dupree, James M; Smith, James F

    2016-05-01

    The primary challenge to identifying and addressing barriers in access to care for male factor infertility is accurate measurement of the prevalence of male infertility. Current estimates are based on couples pursuing assisted reproduction, and likely underestimate the problem. These estimates also fail to account for the number of patients facing infertility due to cancer or cancer treatment. Lack of health insurance coverage for the diagnosis and treatment of infertility presents a major barrier for couples struggling with infertility. However, it is not the only barrier. Education level, household income, cultural norms, religious beliefs, geographic location, and the availability of specialty-trained reproductive urologists are all important factors in determining the ease with which patients access and obtain infertility care. Addressing each of these obstacles directly is imperative to improving reproductive care and outcomes for infertile couples in the United States. PMID:27054307

  10. Mitochondrial Genetic Variation in Iranian Infertile Men with Varicocele

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    Mohammad Mehdi Heidari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several recent studies have shown that mitochondrial DNA mutations lead to major disabilities and premature death in carriers. More than 150 mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genes have been associated with a wide spectrum of disorders. Varicocele, one of the causes of infertility in men wherein abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus is observed within spermatic cord, can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS production in semen and cause oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in patients. Given that mitochondria are the source of ROS production in cells, the aim of this study was to scan nine mitochondrial genes (MT-COX2, MT-tRNALys, MT-ATP8, MT-ATP6, MT-COX3, MT-tRNAGly, MT-ND3, MT-tRNAArg and MT-ND4L for mutations in infertile patients with varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing were used to detect and identify point mutations respectively in 9 mitochondrial genes in 72 infertile men with varicocele and 159 fertile men. In brief, the samples showing altered electrophoretic patterns of DNA in the SSCP gel were sent for DNA sequencing to identify the exact nucleotide variation. Results: Ten type nucleotide variants were detected exclusively in mitochondrial DNA of infertile men. These include six novel nucleotide changes and four variants previously reported for other disorders. Conclusion: Mutations in mitochondrial genes may affect respiratory complexes in combination with environmental risk factors. Therefore these nucleotide variants probably lead to impaired ATP synthesis and mitochondrial function ultimately interfering with sperm motility and infertility.

  11. Modalities for treatment of antisperm antibody mediated infertility: novel perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Rajesh K

    2004-05-01

    Immunoinfertility because of antisperm antibodies (ASA) is an important cause of infertility in humans. The incidence of ASA in infertile couples is 9-36% depending on the reporting center. Early claims regarding the incidence and involvement of ASA in involuntary infertility were probably overemphasized, which has resulted in subsequent confusion, doubt, and underestimation of their clinical significance. No immunoglobulin that binds to sperm should be called an antisperm antibody in a strict sense unless it is directed against a sperm antigen that plays a role in fertilization and fertility. ASA directed against the fertilization-related antigens are more relevant to infertility than the immunoglobulins that bind to sperm associated antigens. Several methods have been reported for treatment of immunoinfertility. These include: immunosuppressive therapies using corticosteroids or cyclosporine; assisted reproductive technologies such as intrauterine insemination, gamete intrafallopian transfer, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection; laboratory techniques such as sperm washing, immunomagnetic sperm separation, proteolytic enzyme treatment, and use of immunobeads. Most of the available techniques have side effects, are invasive and expensive, have low efficacy, or provide conflicting results. Recent findings using defined sperm antigens that have a role in fertilization/fertility have provided animal models and innovative novel perspectives for studying the mechanism of immunoinfertility and possible modalities for treatment. The better understanding of local immunity and latest advances in hybridoma and recombinant technologies, proteomics and genomics leading to characterization of sperm antigens relevant to fertility will help to clarify the controversy and to establish the significance of ASA in infertility. PMID:15212677

  12. EVIDENCE BASED INCIDENCE OF TUBAL FACTOR IN SECONDARY INFERTILITY AS DETECTED BY HYSTEROSALPINGOGRAPHY IN WESTERN MAHARASHTRA

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    Anil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND It is documented that 15% of all women experience primary or secondary infertility at one point in time in their reproductive life. Tubal causes of infertility account for 35 to 40% of causes of infertility. HSG is still a commonly used investigation in the evaluation of the female genital tract and the main indication for the HSG is infertility. AIMS  To find out incidence of tubal factor in secondary infertility in Western Maharashtra population.  To establish reliability of Hysterosalpingography in evaluating tubal status. MATERIALS AND METHOD A retrospective study of 464 hysterosalpingographies of women having secondary infertility was done over period of two years. The patients having tubal defects were further studied and statistically analysed. Statistical analysis was performed with the SPSS computer software, version 17.0. Results were presented in tables and graphs. RESULTS  Hysterosalpingography has proved to be an ideal (or ‘gold standard’ test to detect tubal abnormalities in infertile women.  The commonest structural cause of infertility in Western Maharashtra as per this study was bilateral tubal blockage and was commoner in patients with secondary infertility. CONCLUSIONS Evaluation of tubal patency and tubal integrity is a key component of the diagnostic work-up in infertile couples. In conclusion, bilateral tubal occlusion remains the major tubal pathology in female infertility in Western Maharashtra. Tubal blockages with subsequent tubal factor infertility are still common among infertile couples. This may probably be due to chronic pelvic inflammatory disease or pelvic infection following sexually transmitted infections, mismanaged pregnancies and septic abortions, since the majority of the women presented with secondary infertility. Measures to prevent the occurrence of these infections should be paramount.

  13. Indonesian infertility patients’ health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics

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    Bennett Linda Rae

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients’ patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. Methods An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Results Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women’s age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. Conclusions The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources

  14. Perceptions of infertile couples to assisted reproductive techniques

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    Maritsa Gourni

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Infertility treatment influences significantly not only the couples’ quality of life but also their psychology separately.Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions of infertility couples in regard to assisted reproductive techniques.Method and material: The sample study consisted of 110 infertile couples that seek medical help to a Center of Assisted Reproductive Techniques. A specially designed questionnaire was used for the needs of the survey, that included items related to the perceptions of infertile couples. Statistical analysis was performed by the statistical package SPSS-13.Results: Οf the 110 studied infertile couples, 44,3% followed (IVF In Vitro Fertilization method, 37,8% artificial Insemination, 14,1% (ICSI Intracytoplasmic sperm injection, 3,1% donor insemination and 0,7% (GIFT Gamete Intra – Fallopian Transfer. In regard to factors that make difficult the decision to choose Assisted Reproductive Techniques, in 27,3% of the participants was the side effects deriving from therapy, in 22,7% the cost, in 7,3% the attitude of the environment, in 10,0% the psychological and in 4,5% the religious factor. The 73,6% of the studied sample reported that they would try again to have a child even if the previous effort was successful and the 94,5% reported that they would try again even if the previous effort was not successful. Regarding what they had the intention to sacrifice of their life to the birth of a child, the 58,3% reported that they would sacrifice “everything”, the 14,5% free-time, the 4,5% the entertainment, the 3,6% occupation, the 2,7% athletics and the 16,4% would sacrifice nothing. The 73,6% of the couples that had undergone an Assisted Reproductive Techniques, received no psychological support, while 26,4% received. Τhe 55,4% reported that they desired the presence of their spouse during the procedures of medical treatment, the 36,4% in some of them and the 8,2% in every medical process. The 61

  15. The Impact of Emotionally Focused Therapy on Emotional Distress in Infertile Couples

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    Marzieh Soltani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study investigated the effect of emotionally focused therapy (EFT on factors contributing to emotional distress among infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, the subjects consisted of 12 Iranian couples: six infertile men and six infertile women. They were assessed as depressed, anxious and stressful individuals using depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS. The subjects were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group with six couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women received EFT, while the control group with similar number of couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women was deprived of the treatment. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding job, educational level, income, age, marriage and infertility duration. The pre- and post-test comparisons of DASS subscales showed that level of depression, anxiety and stress among couples with EFT instruction was significantly less than those without such instructions (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Emotionally focused therapy could reduce the rate of depression, anxiety and stress in infertile couples, regardless of the man or woman as the cause of infertility.

  16. Patient evaluation of infertility management in an ISO 9001:2008-certified centre for reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Uschi; Spiessens, Carl; Dancet, Eline; Bakelants, Els; Vrancken, Annelies; Demyttenaere, Koen; Enzlin, Paul; D'Hooghe, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Quality management according to ISO 9001:2008 guidelines includes infertility care quality assessment and improvement. This study aimed to describe the development process of a questionnaire for infertility management. A literature review, qualitative interviews with experts and patients resulted in a content-valid and face-valid questionnaire. Three cross-sectional surveys were performed in 2004, 2007 and 2008 in a tertiary university infertility centre. First (2004), the questionnaire – measuring eight a-priori dimensions of infertility management – was tested. Second (2007), improvement projects for infertility management were evaluated. Third (2008), factor analysis was performed and internal consistency was documented. The developed patient questionnaire to evaluate infertility management and pre-set desired levels of agreement served to set targets for and assess quality improvement projects. The final patient questionnaire to evaluate infertility management within an ISO framework was valid and reliable and contained 14 items covering four dimensions of infertility management: Telephone Access, Reception, Information and Patient-centeredness. ISO 9001:2008-certified infertility centres can evaluate infertility management with this 14-item questionnaire. This top-down approach to evaluate the patients’ perspective on quality aspects selected by health professionals can be complementary to the bottom-up approach evaluating the patients’ complete experiences of quality of care.

  17. Relationship between perceived social support and clinical variables in infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Eren BODUR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study it was aimed to assess and evaluate the impact of the levels of perceived social support in infertile couples on stress related with infertility and marital adjustment. The study included 104 couples with primary or secondary infertility and 44 healthy couples with children for the control group. Control group was given the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS, Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS. Infertile group was given HADS, DAS, MSPSS and also Fertility Problem Inventory. Women in infertile couples reported greater psychological symptoms and more decreased marital adjustment than men in infertile couples; but the couples did not show any significant difference with those in control groups regarding these parameters. It was determined that, in general, while marital adjustment in infertile couples increases, depression and anxiety levels decrease. It was also observed that perceieved social support from the family has a positive effect on the marital adjustment. The perceived social support level in men in infertil couples is lower than women in the same group, and this outcome is also related with the increasing anxiety in men. These results showed that psychosocial problems in infertile couples should be evaluated with specific scales. Psychosocial support which will be given to infertile couples and motivating social support systems while providing this service would have positive effects especially on men. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 214-223

  18. Retained Fetal Bone in Infertile Patients: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensieh ShahrokhTehraninejad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The prolonged retention of fetal bone structure is an uncommon condition after a previous abortion.We describe two cases with fetal bone fragment amongst 3589 hysteroscopies (0.05%, who hadno complaint other than secondary infertility. In both patients, hyperechogenic areas were foundthrough transvaginal ultrasound and the bones were removed by hysteroscopy. Despite meticulousevaluation during hysteroscopy, some bones were not observed and were stable during the nextsonography. According to the formation of fetal bones after 11 weeks of pregnancy; patientswith secondary infertility who have a history of abortion that progressed beyond this time andendometrial hyperechoic areas by transvaginal ultrasound should be evaluated for any retainedfetal bone. Hysteroscopy should be performed under abdominal ultrasonography guide to ensurefetal bone tissue is entirely removed during a single surgery.

  19. AB031. Challenge of microsurgery for male infertility in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yiming; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2016-01-01

    There are more than 15% couples suffer from infertility within 1 year. One in eight couples encounters problems when attempting to conceive a first child and one in six when attempting to conceive a subsequent child. The causes of infertility both of male and female could share 50%. With the recent advances in assisted fertilization such as in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), the couples suffer from infertility would like to choose assisted fertilization and nearly 1 million cycles ICSI were carried out in China every year, even its pregnancy rate 40% and live birth rate 35%, with very costed and with risks of inherent and born defects. Among of male factors of infertility, varicoceles are highly relevant (38%) and can result in a myriad of deleterious effects on male reproduction. Varicocele repair may be effective in men with subnormal semen analysis, a clinical varicocele and otherwise unexplained infertility. Numerous therapeutic options are available for correcting varicoceles, including surgical varicocelectomy and radiographic venous embolization. However, recent studies demonstrated that microsurgery for varicocele correction, with the lowest recurrence rate and the highest pregnancy rate compared with other surgical approaches, is a more cost-effective therapeutic modality than both assisted fertility for in infertility couples and it is safe and effective compared to the others surgical approaches. Obstructive azoospermia (OA) are highly prevalent (13%) in male infertility results from obstruction of the excurrent ducts (due to many causes) at any location between the rete testis and the ejaculatory ducts. Recent advances in microsurgical approaches with reversal rate 63.8–79.2%, pregnancy rate 30.6–35.8%. According to the calculations of cost per delivery for vasectomy reversal vs. sperm retrieval/ICSI, under a wide variety of initial assumptions, it is clear that vasectomy reversal/epididymovasostomy is associated

  20. Unusual presentation of seminal vesiculitis in an infertile man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Rocha, Fernando Tadeu

    2007-12-01

    Seminal vesiculitis is generally not investigated in infertile men, since it is uncommon and often nonspecific in signs and symptoms. In this article, the author reports an unusual presentation of seminal vesiculitis, incidentally diagnosed in a man referred for semen analysis to investigate infertility. Analyses of physical properties of the ejaculate (coagulation, liquefaction, volume, viscosity and pH) and of biochemical markers of the prostate (total calcium and zinc) and seminal vesicle (fructose and inorganic phosphorus) detected a dysfunction of the seminal vesicles that was subsequently diagnosed as vesiculitis using transrectal ultrasound. After treatment with a single 500-mg dose of oral ciprofloxacin, the patient was referred again for semen analysis. The analysis showed considerable improvement of the seminal vesicle function. The clinical significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:18163927

  1. Evaluating the Effect of Vitamins E and C on Sexual Cell Lineages in Adult Male Rats under Oxidative Stress Induced by Endosulfan Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    yazdan heydari; shirzad hosseini; mojtaba keshavarz; ahmad mozafar; mohammadhasaan meshkibaf; mohammadali takhshid

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objective: Endosulfan is one of the strong insecticides used in agriculture. This toxin is absorbed by inhalation and skin. Endosulfan has side effects such as infertility in men. This study surveys the effect of vitamins E and C on  preventing the harmful effects of Endosulfan on spermatogenesis in adult male rats. Materials & Methods: Adult male rats (200-250 g) from Wistar rats were divided into five groups of 10 rats. Rats in the experimental group...

  2. Intrauterine Retained Fetal Bones as a Cause of Secondary Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Srofenyoh, EK; Addison, M.; Dortey, B; Kuffour, PA

    2006-01-01

    Three cases of retained fetal bones, the first two after mid-trimester termination of pregnancy and the third after dilatation and evacuation (D&E) of the uterus for a missed abortion, are presented. All the cases were complicated by secondary infertility. In all the cases the diagnosis was confirmed by a high resolution pelvic ultrasound scan. The pieces of bones were removed at dilatation and evacuation under general anaesthesia. In two of the cases pregnancy occurred within 6 months of rem...

  3. Mesh hernia repair and male infertility: A retrospective register study.

    OpenAIRE

    Hallén, Magnus; Westerdahl, Johan; Nordin, Pär; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Sandblom, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have suggested that the use of mesh in groin hernia repair may be associated with an increased risk for male infertility as a result of inflammatory obliteration of structures in the spermatic cord. In a recent study, we could not find an increased incidence of involuntary childlessness. The aim of this study was to evaluate this issue further. METHODS: Men born between 1950 and 1989, with a hernia repair registered in the Swedish Hernia Register between 1992 and ...

  4. University School for Health Sciences Students' Opinions about Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Kerime Derya Tasci; Sevgi Ozkan

    2007-01-01

    This research was conducted as a descriptive study for the purpose of determining the opinions of students about infertility who are in health education, are single and do not have children. There were 246 students in the sample who were registered in the Nursing and Health Officer Schools of Denizli School for Health Sciences of Pamukkale University. It was planned to conducted the research on the entire population however because some students did not want to participate a total of 227 stud...

  5. Infertility of the breeding bull in insemination technology

    OpenAIRE

    Predojević Mirko R.; Marinković Miroslav; Jovičin Milovan; Prka Igor

    2004-01-01

    In spite of very strict breeding bull selection, especialy for A.I programes their infertility is a very serius problem in everyday practice. Especially bull semen has been marked as the main factor for unsatisfied cow fertility in the A.I.programme. The reason could be the bull semen which really may play as the spreading factor of the specific or non-specific reproductive infective disoders – IBR, IPV, BVD, Campylobacter-Vibrio fetus, brucellosis leptospirosis, tuberculosis and other reprod...

  6. New insights into the genetic basis of infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh T; Suresh PS; Tsutsumi R

    2014-01-01

    Thejaswini Venkatesh,1 Padmanaban S Suresh,2 Rie Tsutsumi3 1Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, 2Centre for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, India; 3University of Tokushima, Institute of Health Bioscience, Department of Public Health and Nutrition, Tokushima, Japan Abstract: Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system characterized by inability to achieve pregnancy after 12 or more months of regul...

  7. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein;

    2010-01-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses...... dysfunction and abnormal semen constituents contribute to the problem. Despite abnormalities, sperm from men with SCI can successfully induce pregnancy. In selected couples, the simple method of intravaginal insemination is a viable option. Another option is intrauterine insemination. The efficacy...

  8. Contemporary concepts in the evaluation and management of male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Kathleen; Walters, R. Chanc; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2011-01-01

    Infertility in men is a common condition. At the core of the medical evaluation of the male partner in a couple who are unable to conceive is the history and physical examination. Special attention should be directed to the patient’s developmental history and any use of testosterone products. The physical examination focuses on the genitals, and includes assessments of the size and consistency of the testicles, epididymis, vas deferens, and presence of varicoceles. Although many sophisticated...

  9. Infertility as a Motive for Murder in Macbeth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Ying-jie

    2014-01-01

    From the perspective of Macbeth’s infertility, this paper explores the protagonist’s motive for murder in Shakespeare’s Macbeth. With the help of an analysis of three major murders in the play, a bond is charted out between the protagonist’s barren-ness and the murderous acts he commits against the three father figures:Duncan, Banquo, and Macduff.

  10. EVALUATION OF LETROZOLE THERAPEUTIC EFFECT IN INFERTILE WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    F. Akbary-Asbagh; Z. Heidar; F. Frozan-Fard; K Nouri; O. Azmodeh; A. Ghasemynejad; N. Salsabily M. Amirian

    2007-01-01

    "nCombination therapy with clomiphene citrate plus gonadotropin (clomiphene citrate plus HMG) in induction ovulation reduce the gonadotropins dose but antiestrogenic effect of c.c. can decrease pregnancy rate. In a randomized clinical trial we compared 3 treatment protocol for induction ovulation and intra uterine insemination (I/o plus IUI) in women with infertility history more than one year, normal hysterosalpingogram (HSG), normal spermiogram and follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) ...

  11. Hypothetical link between infertility and genetically modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingxia; Li, Bin; Yuan, Wenzhen; Zhao, Lihui; Zhang, Xuehong

    2014-01-01

    It is speculated that genetically modified food (GMF)/genetically modified organism (GMO) is responsible for infertility development. The risk linked with a wide use of GMFs/GMOs offers the basic elements for social criticism. However, to date, it has not been justified whether the bad effects are directly resulted from products of genetic modifications or trans-genesis process. Extensive experience with the risk assessment of whole foods has been applied recently on the safety and nutritional testing of GMFs/GMOs. Investigations have tested the safety of GMFs including sub-acute, chronic, reproductive, multi-generation and carcinogenicity studies. We extrapolated the potential risks associated with GMFs/GMOs on reproduction, and analyzed the multi-aspect linked between infertility and GMFs/GMOs. It could be conjectured that GMFs/GMOs could be potential hazard on reproduction, linking to the development of infertility through influencing the endocrine metabolism, endometriosis. However, little evidence shows the impaction on embryo or reproductive related tumor due to the limited literatures, and needs further research. The article presents some related patents on GMFs/GMOs, and some methods for tracking GMOs.

  12. Infertility and Perinatal Loss: When the Bough Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Amritha; Byatt, Nancy

    2016-03-01

    Infertility and perinatal loss are common, and associated with lower quality of life, marital discord, complicated grief, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Young women, who lack social supports, have experienced recurrent pregnancy loss or a history of trauma and / or preexisting psychiatric illness are at a higher risk of experiencing psychiatric illnesses or symptoms after a perinatal loss or during infertility. It is especially important to detect, assess, and treat depression, anxiety, or other psychiatric symptoms because infertility or perinatal loss may be caused or perpetuated by such symptoms. Screening, psychoeducation, provision of resources and referrals, and an opportunity to discuss their loss and plan for future pregnancies can facilitate addressing mental health concerns that arise. Women at risk of or who are currently experiencing psychiatric symptoms should receive a comprehensive treatment plan that includes the following: (1) proactive clinical monitoring, (2) evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy, and (3) discussion of risks, benefits, and alternatives of medication treatment during preconception and pregnancy. PMID:26847216

  13. Infertility, impotence, and emasculation--psychosocial contexts for abandoning reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Erik; Johnson, Thomas W; Wassersug, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    From a Darwinian perspective we live to reproduce, but in various situations genetic males elect not to reproduce by choosing medical treatments leading to infertility, impotence, and, in the extreme, emasculation. For many men, infertility can be psychologically distressing. However, for certain genetic males, being infertile may improve their quality of life. Examples include (1) men who seek vasectomy, (2) individuals with Gender Dysphoria (e.g., transwomen, and modern day voluntary eunuchs), (3) most gay men, and (4) men treated for testicular and prostate cancer. Men who desire vasectomy typically have a Darwinian fitness W >1 at the time of their vasectomies; i.e., after they have their desired number of offspring or consider themselves past an age for parenting newborns. In contrast, prostate and testicular cancer patients, along with individuals with extreme Gender Dysphoria, do not necessarily seek to be sterile, but accept it as an unavoidable consequence of the treatment for their condition undertaken for survival (in case of cancer patients) or to achieve a better quality of life (for those with Gender Dysphoria). Most gay men do not father children, but they may play an avuncular role, providing for their siblings' offspring's welfare, thus improving their inclusive fitness through kin selection. In a strictly Darwinian model, the primary motivation for all individuals is to reproduce, but there are many situations for men to remove themselves from the breeding populations because they have achieved a fitness W ≥1, or have stronger medical or psychological needs that preclude remaining fertile. PMID:26924280

  14. Hypothetical link between infertility and genetically modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingxia; Li, Bin; Yuan, Wenzhen; Zhao, Lihui; Zhang, Xuehong

    2014-01-01

    It is speculated that genetically modified food (GMF)/genetically modified organism (GMO) is responsible for infertility development. The risk linked with a wide use of GMFs/GMOs offers the basic elements for social criticism. However, to date, it has not been justified whether the bad effects are directly resulted from products of genetic modifications or trans-genesis process. Extensive experience with the risk assessment of whole foods has been applied recently on the safety and nutritional testing of GMFs/GMOs. Investigations have tested the safety of GMFs including sub-acute, chronic, reproductive, multi-generation and carcinogenicity studies. We extrapolated the potential risks associated with GMFs/GMOs on reproduction, and analyzed the multi-aspect linked between infertility and GMFs/GMOs. It could be conjectured that GMFs/GMOs could be potential hazard on reproduction, linking to the development of infertility through influencing the endocrine metabolism, endometriosis. However, little evidence shows the impaction on embryo or reproductive related tumor due to the limited literatures, and needs further research. The article presents some related patents on GMFs/GMOs, and some methods for tracking GMOs. PMID:25342149

  15. Clinical evaluation of the infertile male: new options, new challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert I McLachlan; Csilla Krausz

    2012-01-01

    Male reproductive dysfunction is the sole or contributory cause of infertility in half of couples making the systematic clinical and laboratory evaluation of the male,and the application of costeffective management strategies tailored to the individual patient's need,vital parts of fertility practice.1,2 Male infertility has a wide range of etiologies and effective approaches to initiate,restore or preserve natural fertility are available in some settings.But the most striking development in the past 20 years has been in the area of assisted reproductive technologies (ART),especially intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI);the latter provides an extraordinarily effective bypass of the natural processes involved such that a single viable sperm,obtained from any part of the reproductive tract,will often successfully fertilize an oocyte and has allowed many previously sterile men to father healthy children.However,our understanding of the genetic and environmental factors causing male factor infertility has lagged behind these technological advances and still for a significant minority,no options exist other than adoption,donor sperm or abandonment of their aspirations for a family.

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis and sperm lipid peroxidation in infertile men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Segnini; M.I.Camejo; F.Proverbio

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To relate thepresence of anti-Chlamydial trachomatis IgA in semen with sperm lipid membrane peroxidation and changes in seminal parameters.Methods:Semen samples of the male partners of 52 couples assessed for undiagnosed infertility were examined for the presence of IgA antibody against C.trachomatis.The level of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation was estimated by determining the malondialdehyde(MDA) formation.Results:Sperm membrane of infertile males with positive IgA antibodies against C.trachomatis showed a higher level of lipid peroxidation than that of infertile males with negative IgA antibody(P<0.05).There was a positive correlation(P<0.01) between the level of C.trachomatis antibody and the magnitude of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation.All the other tested semen parameters were found to be similar in the two groups.Conclusion:The activation of immune system by C.trachomatis may promote lipid peroxidation of the sperm membrane.This could be the way by which C.trachomatis affects fertility.

  17. EFFECT OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON ANTISPERM ANTIBODIES IN MALE INFERTILITY PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伦新; 荣莉

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To explore the therapeutic effect of electroacupuncture (EA) for treatment of male immune-infertility patients and to observe the effect of EA on antisperm antibody (AsAb) positive reaction. Methods: A total of 100 male infertility AsAb-positive patients were randomized into EA group (n = 50, BL- 15, BL- 17, -18, -23, etc. ) and medication group (n=50, oral administration of prednisone, 5 mg/time, t. i. d. ). Serum and sperm AsAb were determined with enzyme immunoassay technique. Results: Following 4 months' treatment, the cure rates and the total effective rates of EA and medication groups were 40.4% (20 cases/50 cases) and 92.0% (45/50), 10.0% (5/50) and 64.0% (32/50) respectively. The cure rate of EA group was significantly superior to that of medication group (P<0.01). But, no significant difference was found between two groups in the total effective rate (P >0.05). After treatment, AsAb positive rates of both groups particularly that of EA group decreased significantly compared with pre-treatment of each group (P<0.05-0.01). Conclusion: EA treatment can work well in the treatment of some immune-mediated male infertility patients and possesses a favorable regulation action on AsAb reaction.

  18. Women and celiac disease: association with unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicano, R; Astegiano, M; Bruno, M; Fagoonee, S; Rizzetto, M

    2007-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent intolerance to gluten characterized by destructions of the small intestinal villi and malabsorption. The gluten-free diet (GFD) results in healing of the mucosa, resolution of the malabsorpitive states, and reversal of great part of CD effects. Among the extradigestive complications associated with CD, unexplained infertility has been reported since the 70's. The prevalence of CD among women with unexplained infertility is 2.5-3.5%, higher, although not always significantly, than control population. To date, it is widely accepted that untreated CD represents a risk for abortion, low birth weight babies and short-breast feeding period. These features can be corrected by GFD. Some discrepancies could stem from the heterogeneity of the studies. Regarding a potential pathogenic mechanism, since CD causes malabsorption of folic acid and other nutrients, this pathway has been proposed to explain the unfavourable outcomes of pregnancy. However, this remains a speculation. In conclusion, each woman with unexplained infertility should be screened for CD. PMID:17592443

  19. Antioxidant therapy in male infertility: fact or fiction?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Armand Zini; Naif Al-Hathal

    2011-01-01

    Infertile men have higher levels of semen reactive oxygen species (ROS) than do fertile men. High levels of semen ROS can cause sperm dysfunction, sperm DNA damage and reduced male reproductive potential. This observation has led clinicians to treat infertile men with antioxidant supplements. The purpose of this article is to discuss the rationale for antioxidant therapy in infertile men and to evaluate the data on the efficacy of dietary and in vitro antioxidant preparations on sperm function and DNA damage. To date, most clinical studies suggest that dietary antioxidant supplements are beneficial in terms of improving sperm function and DNA integrity. However, the exact mechanism of action of dietary antioxidants and the optimal dietary supplement have not been established. Moreover, most of the clinical studies are small and few have evaluated pregnancy rates. A beneficial effect of in vitro antioxidant supplements in protecting spermatozoa from exogenous oxidants has been demonstrated in most studies; however, the effect of these antioxidants in protecting sperm from endogenous ROS, gentle sperm processing and cryopreservation has not been established conclusively.

  20. Reproductive Phenotypes of Mouse Models Illuminate Human Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelfalk C

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility represents a significant health problem in industrialized nations because reproductive activity is increasingly delayed and couples face a risk of impaired fetal health at advanced maternal age (35 years. Furthermore, approx. fifteen percent of couples have difficulties to conceive within a year of unprotected intercourse. Reduced reproductive success often relates to a defective meiotic process that would normally lead to formation of ova and sperm. The understanding of the mechanisms of meiosis and fertility has largely benefitted from knockout and transgenic mouse models that display a fertility phenotype. Using information from meiosis-deficient mice has impacted on the diagnosis of infertility of unknown origin of human patients. In this paper we discuss insights gained in the etiology of infertility by looking at murine genetic models with a reproductive phenotype due to disruptions in genes acting during meiotic prophase. We focus on genes that are important for recombinational DNA repair, meiotic chromosome structure and reproductive aging and will compare these phenotypes to human conditions with reproductive impairmen

  1. Associations between peripheral androgens and cortisol in infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleicher, Norbert; Seier, Kenneth; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Weghofer, Andrea; Wu, Yan-Guang; Wang, Qi; Albertini, David F; Barad, David H

    2016-04-01

    Testosterone has in recent years been proven essential for normal growth and maturation of small growing follicles. Concomitantly, low functional ovarian reserve (LFOR), characterized by a small growing follicle pool, has been associated with low testosterone levels, which can be of ovarian and/or adrenal origin. In this study we, therefore, investigated whether peripheral sex steroid precursors and testosterone levels potentially reflect on adrenal function. In a retrospective cohort study of 355 consecutive infertile women, who presented to an academically affiliated fertility center in New York City, we investigated in a series of statistical models whether low peripheral sex steroid precursors and testosterone are associated with peripheral cortisol (C) levels, reflecting adrenal function. To determine potential correlations, we investigated the dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), androstenedione (AD), total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT); sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and C in a series of multivariate and logistic regression analyses, utilizing C either as a continuous variable or with cut off infertile women peripheral sex hormone precursors, especially DHEA, reflect C levels and, therefore, adrenal function. In infertile women, at all ages low levels of sex hormone precursors, therefore, should be considered indications for further adrenal assessments.

  2. Treatment strategies for infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitek, Wendy; Hoeger, Kathleen; Legro, Richard S

    2016-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common reproductive disorder that can be diagnosed when two of the following three criteria are present: menstrual irregularity, hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovaries. Factors such as the individual's body weight influence the severity of the phenotype and risk of metabolic comorbidities. While anovulatory infertility is a common issue among lean and obese reproductive-aged women with PCOS, obesity is associated with resistance to oral ovulation induction agents, lower pregnancy rates and a higher risk of pregnancy complications. Lifestyle modification is recommended as first line therapy among obese women with PCOS in order to optimize their outcomes. Among lean and obese women with PCOS, ovulation induction can be achieved with aromatase inhibitors, selective estrogen receptor modulators, insulin sensitizing agents, gonadotropins and ovarian drilling with varying rates of ovulation, live birth and multiple gestations. Assisted reproductive technologies are reserved for women who do not conceive despite restoration of ovulation or couples with additional factors contributing to their infertility. This review will outline treatment strategies for achieving a healthy pregnancy among lean and obese women with PCOS and infertility. PMID:26765152

  3. Evaluation of Sperm Parameters of Infertile Men with Retrograde Ejaculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-xing ZHONG; Wei-jie ZHU; Jing LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate sperm parameters of infertile men with retrograde ejaculation.Methods Twelve infertile men with retrograde ejaculation (group A) were enrolled into this study. Sperm samples were obtained from the postejaculation urine. After sperm recovery and washing procedure, sperm parameters were assessed. Twelve semen samples from normospermic donors were used as the control (group B).Results In all retrograde cases, motile sperm with forward movement were observed in the medium. Motility of group A was significantly lower than that of group B (P<0. 01).In group A, sperm motility ranged from 11% to 56%, sperm with intact both head and tail membranes was 42.2 ± 12.3%, sperm count ranged (13-85)×106/ml, and the sperm survival time was highly shortened. Sperm with normal morphology and intact acrosome were observed in retrograde specimens.Conclusion Sperm parameters recovered from retrograde specimens were highly variable between subjects. The toxicity of urine caused deleterious to sperm functions.Motile sperm could be collected by sperm recovery procedure. Sperm parameters could meet the requirement for the use of assisted reproductive techniques for treating infertile men with retrograde ejaculation.

  4. Perceptions and Experiences of Women in Karachi, Pakistan Regarding Secondary Infertility: Results from a Community-Based Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelofar Sami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is 22% with primary infertility at 4% and secondary infertility at 18%. This study explored perceptions and experiences of women in Karachi, Pakistan regarding the causes, treatment-seeking behavior for and consequences of secondary infertility. Methods. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with married women explored their perceptions and experiences for issues related to secondary infertility. Results. The knowledge of women about the causes and scientific treatment options for infertility was limited resulting in inclination for traditional unsafe health care. Infertility was stated to result in marital instability, stigmatization and abuse specially for women with no live child. Conclusions. Since infertility can have a serious effect on both the psychological well-being and the social status of women in Pakistan, effective interventions are the need of the day. There is a dire need for health education and counseling to be integrated into infertility management plans.

  5. Perceptions and experiences of women in karachi, pakistan regarding secondary infertility: results from a community-based qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Neelofar; Saeed Ali, Tazeen

    2012-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is 22% with primary infertility at 4% and secondary infertility at 18%. This study explored perceptions and experiences of women in Karachi, Pakistan regarding the causes, treatment-seeking behavior for and consequences of secondary infertility. Methods. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with married women explored their perceptions and experiences for issues related to secondary infertility. Results. The knowledge of women about the causes and scientific treatment options for infertility was limited resulting in inclination for traditional unsafe health care. Infertility was stated to result in marital instability, stigmatization and abuse specially for women with no live child. Conclusions. Since infertility can have a serious effect on both the psychological well-being and the social status of women in Pakistan, effective interventions are the need of the day. There is a dire need for health education and counseling to be integrated into infertility management plans. PMID:22474450

  6. Molecular basis of cryptorchidism-induced infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Artificial cryptorchidism or local testicular heat treatment can induce reversible oligospermia or azoospermia in monkeys and rats via germ cell apoptosis. Local warming of monkey testes in water at 43°C for 2 consecutive days (30 min per day) decreased the number of sperm in the semen by up to 80% on d 28, and the effect was completely reversed on d 144. Germ cells rely heavily on Sertoli cells for structural and nutritional support. Specialized junctions that play a pivotal role in spermatogenesis occur at sites of Sertoli-Sertoli and Sertoli-germ cell contact in the seminiferous epithelium. We demonstrated that expression of tight junction (TJ)-associated molecules, such as occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), were greatly reduced 24–48 h after heat treatment, while the permeability of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) was simultaneously increased, but recovered 10 d later. These results indicate a reversible disruption of the BTB associated with transient inductions of transforming growth factor (TGF) β2 and β3 expression, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, and concomitant loss of occludin and ZO-1. This suggests that expression of TJ-associated molecules and the BTB was reversibly perturbed by mild testicular hyperthermia, and that the heat-induced induction of TGF-β might be involved in downregulating TJ-associated proteins, leading to cell junction reduction. This review discusses the changes in total gene expression patterns after experimental cryptorchidism in adult mouse testes, and the cloning of several novel, physiologically significant spermatogenesis-specific genes.

  7. Metabolomics: a state-of-the-art technology for better understanding of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minai-Tehrani, A; Jafarzadeh, N; Gilany, K

    2016-08-01

    Male factor infertility affects approximately half of the infertile couples, in spite of many years of research on male infertility treatment and diagnosis; several outstanding questions remain to be addressed. In this regard, metabolomics as a novel field of omics has been suggested to be applied for male infertility problems. A variety of terms associated with metabolite quantity and quality have been established to demonstrate mixtures of metabolites. Despite metabolomics and metabolite analyses have been around more than decades, a limited number of studies concerning male infertility have been carried out. In this review, we summarised the latest finding in metabolomics techniques and metabolomics biomarkers correlated with male infertility. The rapid progress of a variety of metabolomics platforms, such as nonoptical and optical spectroscopy, could ease separation, recognition, classification and quantification of several metabolites and their metabolic pathways. Here, we recommend that the novel biomarkers determined in the course of metabolomics analysis may stand for potential application of treatment and future clinical practice.

  8. Iranian and English women's use of religion and spirituality as resources for coping with infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Allan, Helen T; Smith, Pam A

    2014-06-01

    The study reported in this paper explores how infertile women cope with infertility using their religious and spiritual beliefs. In total, 30 infertile women affiliated to different denominations of Christianity and Islam were interviewed in the UK and Iranian fertility clinics using grounded theory. The categories which emerged included governing ones' 'Self' through gaining control of emotions, adopting religious coping strategies, and handling the burden of infertility peacefully, which all related to the core category of 'relying on a higher being'. We argue that infertile women employ a variety of religious and spiritual coping strategies which are associated with adaptive health outcomes. Further scientific inquiry is required to investigate how religion and spirituality promote adaptation to infertility.

  9. The effect of marital violence on infertility distress among a sample of Turkish women.

    OpenAIRE

    Akyüz, Aygül; Seven, Memnun; Şahiner, Gönül; Bakır, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF) center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility ...

  10. The Social Consequences of Infertility among Iranian Women: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Syedeh Batool Hasanpoor-Azghdy; Masoumeh Simbar; Abouali Vedadhir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility may prevent couples to achieve the desired social roles and lead to some social and psychological problems. This study aimed to explain the social consequences of infertility in Iranian women seeking treatment. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted based on 32 semi-structured interviews with 25 women affected by primary and secondary infertility with no surviving children. The participants were purposefully selected with max...

  11. Body image and its relationship with sexual function and marital adjustment in infertile women

    OpenAIRE

    Karamidehkordi, Akram; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Body image is related to cognitive, emotional, and physical aspects of women's life. Therefore, it is expected to have an important role in women's sexual health and marital adjustment too. This issue seems to be salient in infertile women who suffer from psychological consequences of infertility. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship of body image with sexual function and marital adjustment in infertile women in 2011 in Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods: Thi...

  12. The Impact of Emotionally Focused Therapy on Emotional Distress in Infertile Couples

    OpenAIRE

    Marzieh Soltani; Mohammad Reza Shairi; Rasoul Roshan; Changiz Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study investigated the effect of emotionally focused therapy (EFT) on factors contributing to emotional distress among infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, the subjects consisted of 12 Iranian couples: six infertile men and six infertile women. They were assessed as depressed, anxious and stressful individuals using depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS). The subjects were randomly divided into control and experimental groups....

  13. Effectiveness of psychiatric and counseling interventions On fertility rate in infertile couples

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezanzadeh F; Noorbala AA.; Malak Afzali H.; Abedinia N.; Rahimi A; Shariet M.; Rashidi B.; Tehraninajad A.; Sohravand F.; Bagheri M

    2007-01-01

    Background: Considering the psycho-social model of diseases, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychiatric intervention on the pregnancy rate of infertile couples.Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 638 infertile patients referred to a university infertility clinic were evaluated. Among them, 140 couples with different levels of depression in at least one of the spouses were included in this substudy. These couples were divided randomly into two groups. The patients in ...

  14. Serum Levels of Melatonin and Oxidative Stress Markers and Correlation between Them in Infertile Men

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Soleimani Rad; Shamsi Abbasalizadeh; Amir Ghorbani Haghjo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is the problem of 15% of young couples in different societies. One of the factors that could affect fertility is oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the level of Melatonin, a free radical scavenger, and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in infertile men. Methods:For this purpose, fertile and infertile men in 2 groups, 30 people in each group, were studied. The fertile men were selected from husbands of patients admitted...

  15. Serum Levels of Melatonin and Oxidative Stress Markers and Correlation between Them in Infertile Men

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimani Rad, Sara; Abbasalizadeh, Shamsi; Ghorbani Haghjo, Amir; Sadagheyani, Mehzad; Montaseri, Azadeh; Soleimani Rad, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is the problem of 15% of young couples in different societies. One of the factors that could affect fertility is oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the level of Melatonin, a free radical scavenger, and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in infertile men. Methods: For this purpose, fertile and infertile men in 2 groups, 30 people in each group, were studied. The fertile men were selected from husbands o...

  16. Regional and geographical variations in infertility: effects of environmental, cultural, and socioeconomic factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Leke, R. J.; Oduma, J A; Bassol-Mayagoitia, S; Bacha, A M; Grigor, K M

    1993-01-01

    Fertility is affected by many different cultural, environmental, and socioeconomic factors, especially in developing countries where poverty and infections are commonplace. Environmental factors play a major role in infertility in Africa. One of the most important health problems in sub-Saharan Africa is the high rate of infertility and childlessness. The African society has a strong traditional heritage, and the study of the patterns of infertility in this part of the world would be incomple...

  17. A case of infertility with tuberculosis with multiple calcifications on both fallopian tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Meena Khatri; Preshit Chate

    2013-01-01

    Genital tract tuberculosis usually shows no symptoms and it is diagnosed as such incidentally during infertility investigations. In general, infertility is the most common clinical symptom of pelvic tuberculosis to the extent that it constitutes between 40 to 60 percent of the patients chief complaints. Female genital tuberculosis is still a major cause of infertility in India. This case highlights some of the well known facts about genital tuberculosis, that it is the relatively young female...

  18. Laparohysteroscopy in female infertility: A diagnostic cum therapeutic tool in Indian setting

    OpenAIRE

    Puri, Suman; Jain, Dinesh; Puri, Sandeep; Kaushal, Sandeep; Deol, Satjeet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the role of laparohysteroscopy in female infertility andto study the effect of therapeutic procedures in achieving fertility. Settings and Design: Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology were evaluated over a period of 18 months. Materials and Methods: Fifty consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to laparoscopy were subject to diagnostic laparoscopy a...

  19. Investigation of the prevalence of female genital tract tuberculosis and its relation to female infertility:

    OpenAIRE

    Sughra Shahzad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis is a common entity in gynecological practice particularly among infertile patients. It is rare in developed countries but is an important cause of infertility in developing countries. Objective: The present study has investigated the prevalence of female genital tract tuberculosis (FGT) among infertile patients, which was conducted at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit-I, Allied Hospital, affiliated with Punjab Medical College, Faisalabad, Pakistan. Materials ...

  20. Prevalence of Tubal Obstruction in the Hysterosalpingogram of Women with Primary and Secondary Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Al Subhi, Taimoora; Al Jashnmi, Ruqaiya Nasser; Al Khaduri, Maha; Gowri, Vaidyanathan

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fallopian tube of women with infertility and to observe whether there are any significant differences in the Hysterosalpingogram findings with regard to prevalence of tubal block in women with primary and secondary infertility. Methods A retrospective study of unilateral and bilateral tubal obstruction in Hysterosalpingogram of women with primary and secondary infertility was carried out. Results The frequencies of tubal obstruction wer...

  1. A survey of relationship between anxiety, depression and duration of infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Shariat Mamak; Khanafshar Navid; Zayeri Farid; Abedinia Nasrin; Aghssa Malek; Ramezanzadeh Fatemeh; Jafarabadi Mina

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background A cross sectional study was designed to survey the relationship between anxiety/depression and duration/cause of infertility, in Vali-e-Asr Reproductive Health Research Center, Tehran, Iran. Methods After obtaining their consents, 370 female patients with different infertility causes participated in, and data gathered by Beck Depression Inventory(BDI) and Cattle questionnaires for surveying anxiety and depression due to the duration of infertility. This was studied in rela...

  2. Birth characteristics in a clinical sample of women seeking infertility treatment: a case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Vikström, Josefin; Hammar, Mats; Josefsson, Ann; Bladh, Marie; Sydsjö, Gunilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the distribution of low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) by main cause of infertility (female, combined, male, unexplained) in women seeking infertility treatment. Design A case-control study. Setting A Centre for Reproductive Medicine in Sweden. Participants All women (n=1293) born in Sweden in 1973 or later and who were part of heterosexual couples seeking infertility treatment at a Centre of Reprod...

  3. Cognitive emotional consequences of male infertility in their female partners: a qualitative content analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Fatemeh Zahra; Taghipour, Ali; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad; Kimiaei, Seyed Ali; Mazlom, Seyed Reza; Amirian, Maliheh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Infertility, as a global phenomenon and one of the most important issues of reproductive health, affects women more often than men, even when the infertility is due to a male factor. The purpose of this study was to explore the cognitive emotional experiences of women faced with male infertility. Methods This qualitative study was conducted in 2014–2015 in Mashhad, Iran. The perceptions and experiences of healthy women whose husbands were diagnosed with primary male factor infert...

  4. Combined Hysterolaparoscopy for the Diagnosis of Female Infertility: a Retrospective Study of 132 Patients in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Erhong; Zhang, Yanan; Fang, Li; Li, Qingdong; Gu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects and safeness of combined hysterolaparoscopy on evaluation the causes of infertility. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Gynecology (The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China) from January 2011 to April 2014. Patients aged 21–43 years with infertility were included in this study. The prevalence of different lesions was collected to analyze. Results: 132 infertile patients were inclu...

  5. Estimation of the prevalence and causes of infertility in western Siberia.

    OpenAIRE

    Philippov, O. S.; Radionchenko, A. A.; Bolotova, V. P.; Voronovskaya, N. I.; Potemkina, T. V.

    1998-01-01

    The study examined the epidemiology and causes of infertility in Tomsk, Western Siberia, using methodological approaches recommended by WHO and was based on the findings for a randomly selected sample of 2000 married women aged 18-45 years. Among the respondents, 333 couples were considered infertile since they had not conceived after 12 months or more of unprotected intercourse. This group of infertile couples was offered comprehensive clinical investigations but only 186 couples completed t...

  6. Health-Related Quality of Life and its Predictive Factors among Infertile Women

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Alizadeh Charandabi, Sekineh; Kamalifard, Mahin; Mahzad Sedaghiani, Mehrzad; Montazeri, Ali; Dehghanpour Mohammadian, Elham

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The present study aimed to determine health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its predictive factors among infertile women. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on infertile women referring to Majidi Infertility Center (Tabriz, Iran). The data was collected through self-administered questionnaires including clinical and demographic characteristics and the Persian version of 36-item short form health survey (SF-36). One-sample t-test, independent ...

  7. Clinical management and therapeutic outcome of infertile couples in southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menuba IE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ifeanyi E Menuba,1 Emmanuel O Ugwu,1 Samuel N Obi,1 Lucky O Lawani,2 Chidinma I Onwuka11Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku Ozalla Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria; 2School of Postgraduate Studies, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu, Enugu State, NigeriaBackground: Infertility is highly prevalent in Nigeria and most infertile couples in southeast Nigeria are offered conventional forms of treatment, which consist mainly of ovulation induction and tubal surgery, due to limited availability and high cost of endoscopic and assisted reproductive technologies like laparoscopy and in vitro fertilization. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of infertility, outcome of infertility investigation, and the treatment outcome of infertile couples following therapeutic interventions in southeast Nigeria over a 12-month period.Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 218 consecutive infertile couples presenting for infertility management at the infertility clinics of two tertiary health institutions in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. Infertility investigations were carried out on these couples using the available conventional diagnostic facilities. Following the results of the investigations/diagnosis, conventional treatment was offered to the couples as appropriate. Data analysis was both descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level.Results: The mean age of the women was 33.5±4.62 (range: 15–49 years. Most (58.3% [n=127] were nulliparous. The prevalence of infertility was 12.1%. Infertility was primary in 28.4% (n=62 and secondary in 71.6% (n=156. Female etiologic factors were responsible in 32.1% (n=70, male factors in 26.1% (n=57, and a combination of male/female factors in 29.4% (n=64. The etiology was unknown in 12.4% (n=27. Tubal factors 23.8 % (n=52 and ovulation failures 26.1% (n=57 are common female factors implicated

  8. Pattern of mental illness among women attending an infertility clinic in Southern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    J O Omoaregba; O Morakinyo; James, O B; A O Lawani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Female infertility is highly co-morbid with mental illness. In Nigeria, very few studies have been conducted to determine the pattern of mental illness among women with infertility. We aimed to determine the pattern of mental illness in a sample of women with female infertility as well as its associated correlates.Patients and Methods: A cross sectional two-stage survey of women (n=100) attending an infertility clinic was conducted in a teaching hospital in Nigeria. A 30-item GHQ ...

  9. Systematic characterization of seminal plasma piRNAs as molecular biomarkers for male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yeting; Wang, Cheng; Fu, Zheng; Liang, Hongwei; Zhang, Suyang; Lu, Meiling; Sun, Wu; Ye, Chao; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Shi, Liang; Zhang, Chunni; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Although piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) play pivotal roles in spermatogenesis, little is known about piRNAs in the seminal plasma of infertile males. In this study, we systematically investigated the profiles of seminal plasma piRNAs in infertile males to identify piRNAs that are altered during infertility and evaluate their diagnostic value. Seminal plasma samples were obtained from 211 infertile patients (asthenozoospermia and azoospermia) and 91 fertile controls. High-throughput sequencing technology was employed to screen piRNA profiles in seminal plasma samples pooled from healthy controls and infertile patients. The results identified 61 markedly altered piRNAs in infertile patient groups compared with control group. Next, a quantitative RT-PCR assay was conducted in the training and validation sets to measure and confirm the concentrations of altered piRNAs. The results identified a panel of 5 piRNAs that were significantly decreased in seminal plasma of infertile patients compared with healthy controls. ROC curve analysis and risk score analysis revealed that the diagnostic potential of these 5 piRNAs to distinguish asthenozoospermic and azoospermic individuals from healthy controls was high. In summary, this study identifies a panel of piRNAs that can accurately distinguish fertile from infertile males. This finding may provide pathophysiological clues about the development of infertility. PMID:27068805

  10. Factor structure of the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28 from infertile women attending the Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shayan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, infertility problems have become a social concern, and are associated with multiple psychological and social problems. Also, it affects the interpersonal communication between the individual, familial, and social characteristics. Since women are exposed to stressors of physical, mental, social factors, and treatment of infertility, providing a psychometric screening tool is necessary for disorders of this group. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the factor structure of the general health questionnaire-28 to discover mental disorders in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this study, 220 infertile women undergoing treatment of infertility were selected from the Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility with convenience sampling in 2011. After completing the general health questionnaire by the project manager, validity and, reliability of the questionnaire were calculated by confirmatory factor structure and Cronbach's alpha, respectively. Results: Four factors, including anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction, depression, and physical symptoms were extracted from the factor structure. 50.12% of the total variance was explained by four factors. The reliability coefficient of the questionnaire was obtained 0.90. Conclusion: Analysis of the factor structure and reliability of General Health Questionnaire-28 showed that it is suitable as a screening instrument for assessing general health of infertile women.

  11. ANTIFERTILITY EFFECT OF THE MULTIGLYCOSIDES OF TRIPTERYGIUM WILFORDII (GTW) ON MALE RATS AND ITS MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENQiao-Qin; CHENHui

    1989-01-01

    It has been reported that GTW caused infertility in male rats and mice, In the present study, GTW was administered orally at a daffy dose of 10 rag/kg, 6 days a week:for 8 weeks to adult male rats. After treatment with the drug, the body weight growth of the

  12. Comparison of lifestyle in fertile and infertile couples in Kermanshah during 2013

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    Tahereh Khosrorad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a major reproductive health in gynecology. According to the world health organization, there are currently 50-80 million infertile couples in the world. Objective: Considering the critical effects of lifestyle on reproductive health, this study aimed to compare the lifestyle of fertile and infertile couples in Kermanshah during 2013. Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive cross sectional study that was done on 216 fertile and infertile couples attending Infertility Center and six medical centers that were selected through the convenience sampling. Data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire containing demographic and fertility-related information and also lifestyle items on nutrition, physical activity, perceived social support, responsibility for health, and inappropriate health behaviors. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression analysis, independent t, chi-square and Generalized Estimating equation were performed to analyze the data. Results: Fertile and infertile women (86.1% and 73. 1% respectively, p= 0. 03 as well as fertile and infertile men were significantly different in terms of physical activity (87% and 96.3% p<0.001, respectively and perceived social support (p<0.001. Moreover, there was a significant difference between fertile and infertile women in nutrition (p<0.001. Similar differences were observed in responsibility for health and inappropriate health behaviors between fertile and infertile men. However, all of the dimensions of lifestyle, except nutrition, were significantly different between fertile and infertile couples. Conclusion: As lifestyle plays a crucial role in reproductive health, the inappropriate lifestyle of infertile couples has to be modified through effective measures such as awareness promotion, behavioral changes, and development of a healthy environment.

  13. Anabolic steroids and male infertility: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Guilherme Leme; Hallak, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The negative impact of AAS abuse on male fertility is well known by urologists. The secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is often highlighted when AAS and fertility are being discussed. On the other hand, the patterns of use, mechanisms of action and direct effects over the testicle are usually overseen. The present study reviews the vast formal and "underground" culture of AAS, as well as their overall implications. Specific considerations about their impact on the male reproductive system are made, with special attention to the recent data on direct damage to the testicle. To our knowledge this kind of overview is absolutely unique, offering a distinguished set of information to the day-by-day urologists. For several decades, testosterone and its synthetic derivatives have been used with anabolic and androgenic purposes. Initially, these substances were restricted to professional bodybuilders, becoming gradually more popular among recreational power athletes. Currently, as many as 3 million anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) users have been reported in the United States, and considering its increasing prevalence, it has become an issue of major concern. Infertility is defined as the failure to achieve a successful pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected intercourse, with male factor being present in up to 50% of all infertile couples. Several conditions may be related to male infertility. Substance abuse, including AAS, is commonly associated to transient or persistent impairment on male reproductive function, through different pathways. Herein, a brief overview on AAS, specially oriented to urologists, is offered. Steroids biochemistry, patterns of use, physiological and clinical issues are enlightened. A further review about fertility outcomes among male AAS abusers is also presented, including the classic reports on transient axial inhibition, and the more recent experimental reports

  14. Infertility treatment outcome in sub groups of obese population

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    Al Deery Mashael A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a common disorder with a negative impact on IVF treatment outcome. It is not clear whether morbidly obese women (BMI >= 35 kg/m2 respond to treatment differently as compared to obese women (BMI = 30–34.9 kg/m2 in IVF. Our aim was to compare the outcome of IVF or ICSI treatments in obese patients to that in morbidly obese patients. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary care centre. Patients inclusion criteria were as follows; BMI ≥ 30, age 20–40 years old, first cycle IVF/ICSI treatment with primary infertility and long follicular pituitary down regulation protocol. Results A total of 406 obese patients (group A and 141 morbidly obese patients (group B satisfied the inclusion criteria. Average BMI was 32.1 ± 1.38 kg/m2 for group A versus 37.7 ± 2.99 kg/m2 for group B. Patient age, cause of infertility, duration of stimulation, fertilization rate, and number of transferred embryos were similar in both groups. Compared to group A, group B had fewer medium size and mature follicles (14 vs. 16, fewer oocytes collected (7 vs. 9 and required higher doses of HMG (46.2 vs. 38.5 amps. There was also a higher cancellation rate in group B (28.3% vs. 19% and lower clinical pregnancy rate per started cycle (19.9% vs. 28.6%. Conclusion In a homogenous infertile and obese patient population stratified according to their BMI, morbid obesity is associated with unfavorable IVF/ICSI cycle outcome as evidenced by lower pregnancy rates. It is recommended that morbidly obese patients undergo appropriate counseling before the initiation of this expensive and invasive therapy.

  15. Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields; male infertility and sex ratio of offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concern is growing about exposure to electromagnetic fields and male reproductive health. The authors performed a cross-sectional study among military men employed in the Royal Norwegian Navy, including information about work close to equipment emitting radiofrequency electromagnetic fields, one-year infertility, children and sex of the offspring. Among 10,497 respondents, 22% had worked close to high-frequency aerials to a 'high' or 'very high' degree. Infertility increased significantly along with increasing self-reported exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. In a logistic regression, odds ratio (OR) for infertility among those who had worked closer than 10 m from high-frequency aerials to a 'very high' degree relative to those who reported no work near high-frequency aerials was 1.86 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.46-2.37), adjusted for age, smoking habits, alcohol consumption and exposure to organic solvents, welding and lead. Similar adjusted OR for those exposed to a 'high', 'some' and 'low' degree were 1.93 (95% CI: 1.55-2.40), 1.52 (95% CI: 1.25-1.84), and 1.39 (95% CI: 1.15-1.68), respectively. In all age groups there were significant linear trends with higher prevalence of involuntary childlessness with higher self-reported exposure to radiofrequency fields. However, the degree of exposure to radiofrequency radiation and the number of children were not associated. For self-reported exposure both to high-frequency aerials and communication equipment there were significant linear trends with lower ratio of boys to girls at birth when the father reported a higher degree of radiofrequency electromagnetic exposure

  16. Effect of sesame on sperm quality of infertile men

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    Behnaz Khani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High level of semen reactive oxygen species is considered as an important factor in male infertility. Sesame has antioxidant properties, which could be effective on improvement of semen parameters. This study was designed to determine the effects of sesame on sperm quality. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five infertile men entered this clinical trial. They were treated with a 3-months course of taking 0.5 mg/kg sesame. The pre intervention sperm analysis (sperm count, motile sperm percentage and normal morphology sperm percentage was compared with post treatment sperm analysis. Based on the post intervention seamen analysis, patients were advised to undergo either IVF or ICSI to assess their fertility status. Results: There was significant improvement in the sperm count (10.56 ± 5.25 vs. 22.71 ± 30.14 million per ml and motility (15.32 ± 13.58 vs. 23.32 ± 20.61 percent after treatment with sesame (P value: 0.04 and <0.0001 respectively, but there was no significant improvement in sperm morphology after the treatment (10.72 ± 6.66 vs. 13.20 ± 11.14 percent, P value: 0.10. Three patients (12% underwent IUI, which resulted in 1 successful pregnancy. Two patients (8% underwent ICSI, which was not successful; however 2 (8% patients had spontaneous pregnancy. Fortunately, all pregnancies led to live birth. Except 1 case of diarrhea, no other major side effect was reported. Conclusion: Sesame improved sperm count and motility, and can be prescribed as an effective and safe method for male factor infertility.

  17. Hypothesis: intracellular acidification contributes to infertility in varicocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabili, Kamyar; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Agutter, Paul S; Agarwal, Ashok

    2009-07-01

    We suggest that varicocele leads to male factor infertility by a mechanism involving underperfusion of the testis, a shortfall in glucose supply to the tissue, decreased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, lowering of the reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate/oxidized nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate ratio and the supply of glutathione to the antioxidant systems, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, peroxidation of spermatozoon membrane lipids, and the consequent generation of acidic degradation products and sequestering of spermine. Acidification of the seminal plasma impairs sperm motility and also inhibits most antioxidant enzymes, exacerbating the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and the resultant lowering of pH.

  18. Classification of Patients Treated for Infertility Using the IVF Method

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    Malinowski Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most effective methods of infertility treatment is in vitro fertilization (IVF. Effectiveness of the treatment, as well as classification of the data obtained from it, is still an ongoing issue. Classifiers obtained so far are powerful, but even the best ones do not exhibit equal quality concerning possible treatment outcome predictions. Usually, lack of pregnancy is predicted far too often. This creates a constant need for further exploration of this issue. Careful use of different classification methods can, however, help to achieve that goal.

  19. Role of laparoscopic surgery in treatment of infertility

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    Ivanka Šijanović

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of laparoscopy in assisted reproduction is disputed by many. A rising problem of infertility is battled by an increasingnumber of centres for reproductive medicine in the region. Nevertheless,there is a large number of indications and conditionswhere laparoscopic surgery should not be avoided as a therapeuticchoice or an aid in assisted reproductive techniques (ART.The number of centres where laparoscopic surgery is performed is significantly higher than the number of reproductive centres; anumber of gynaecologists educated in laparoscopic gynaecologyis growing, making it more available for patients.

  20. Interventional radiology in female infertility: Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new field of interventional radiology is outlined. Presently the radiologist can help define the cause of interstitial fallopian tube obstruction. With the use of selective ostial salpingography, interstitial spasm can be differentiated from anatomic tubal obstruction. In the case of anatomic obstruction, tubal recanalization is performed with a coaxial system composed of a small guide wire and catheter. Illustrative cases of 20 patients with interstitial fallopian tube obstruction are presented. The potential future application of interventional radiology in female infertility includes selective intratubal insemination or fertilization and transcervical tubal obstruction for sterilization. Initial results of animal and clinical studies are presented

  1. Infertility in India: social, religion and cultural influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sheoran

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The study concluded that there is a huge burden on the part of female to have a baby after marriage. Also the childless women face social and financial adversities at time and this is not limited to low income or low education strata. Health care professionals need to understand cultural and social implications of infertility in order to provide counseling, and referring women with fertility concerns for consultation and further treatment. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(6.000: 1783-1788

  2. Impact of asymptomatic urogenital tract infections on ejaculate parameters in infertile men with varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Kurilo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicocele, a pathology developing in 15 % males, is associated with 30 % male infertility cases. The role of urogenital infections coinciding with varicocele in infertile men has not been studied in sufficient detail.Objective: to examine the effects of bacterial and viral infections on ejaculate parameters in infertile patients with varicocele. The study included 49 patients with infertility and varicocele and 26 healthy males undergoing prophylactic medical examination. Highlevel infection was recorded after examination of ejaculates and urethral scrapes of 49 patients: bacterial (30.6 % and viral (14.3 % pathogens. Quantitative analysis of viral DNA showed high contamination of ejaculates with herpes viruses (> 3 lg10/ml. Detailed analysis of spermatograms demonstrated a decrease in all basic parameters in patients with varicocele and infertility compared with those in healthy subjects. The presence of infectious agents had a statistically significant negative effect on ejaculate parameters. Spermiological examination revealed high level of sperm abnormalities (astenozoospermia, oligoteratozoospermia, and oligoastenoteratozoospermia in patients with infertility, varicocele and bacterioviral infection of urogenital tract compared with uninfected infertile patients with varicocele. Laboratory tests for bacterial and viral infections should be recommended in infertility associated with varicocele even in the absence of clinical signs of these infections. Quantitative analysis of urogenital pathogens allows one to determine the necessity of etiotherapy of hidden infection and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment.

  3. Mental Health and Its Personal and Social Predictors in Infertile Women

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    Shirin Hasanpour

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infertility is considered a traumatic stressor for infertile couples, and it becomes a psychosocial crisis for that person. Considering the importance of fertility and based on the cultural and social aspects of it in Iran, the present study aimed to determine mental health and its individual and social predictors in infertile women referring to the infertility center of Al-Zahra hospital in Tabriz, Iran, during 2012-2013. Methods: This was a descriptive-correlational study on 345 infertile women referring to Al-Zahra hospital in Tabriz, Iran, via convenient sampling. Data was gathered by the perceived social support questionnaire and mental health questionnaire. To determine the relationship between social support and personal and social characteristics, and mental health, multivariate linear regression was used. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The mean (SD total score of mental health of women was 29.70 (11.50, the score ranged from 0 to 84. The best condition was below the depression scale, and the worst condition was below the social dysfunction scale. Social support from the family was also a predictor of the mental health of infertile women. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that infertile women, in terms of mental health and its subscales, have unfavorable conditions. Moreover, social support from the family is an important factor influencing mental health. Therefore, strengthening the social support of the family to improve the mental health of infertile women seems necessary.

  4. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management Therapy on Happiness among Infertile Women

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    F Hashemi

    2013-12-01

    Background & aim: infertility and the attitude of the society toward it, makes women and even men deal with many emotional disturbances. Infertile women tolerate more stress than fertile women. Stress can reduce the amount of happiness and mental health. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of stress management skills training (cognitive-behavioral on happiness of infertile women. Methods: In this clinical-trial study, the cases of infertile women who were referred to the Infertility Center of Shiraz in the summer of 2011were studied. A total of 24 infertile women with high stress scores were selected by purposive sampling and divided into two experimental and control groups. The stress management training (cognitive-behavioral was instructed during 10 weekly sessions on the target group. Using Oxford Happiness Questionnaire, a pre-test and a post-test was completed. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and ANCOVA. Results: The difference between the mean happiness was significant after controlling of the pretest variables in the two groups. The mean scored happiness of the experimental group significantly increased compared to the control group in the post-test (P=0.0001. Conclusion: The results indicated that the control effectiveness of stress management therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy on happiness levels of infertile women. Key words: Happiness, Cognitive- Behavioral, Stress Management, Infertility

  5. Infertility in Women: Hysterosalpingographic Assessment of the Fallopian Tubes in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Fabamwo, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Tubal disease constitutes a major factor in infertility especially in developing countries. This study was undertaken to assess the hysterosalpingographic patterns seen in infertile patients in an urban centre in Lagos. Two hundred and twenty patients who reported from the gynaecology clinic to the radiology department of Lagos State University…

  6. Motherhood and Female Labor Supply in the Developing World: Evidence from Infertility Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguero, Jorge M.; Marks, Mindy S.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new instrument for family size, infertility, to investigate the causal relationship between children and female labor force participation. Infertility mimics an experiment where nature assigns an upper bound for family size, independent of a woman's background. This new instrument allows us to investigate the differential labor…

  7. Male-mediated infertility in sons of building painters and gardeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia; Stoltenberg, Christian Ditlev G; Hougaard, K S;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether sons of gardeners and building painters have increased risk of infertility in comparison with sons of bricklayers, carpenters and electricians.......To investigate whether sons of gardeners and building painters have increased risk of infertility in comparison with sons of bricklayers, carpenters and electricians....

  8. Patient evaluation of infertility management in an ISO 9001:2008-certified centre for reproductive medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeck, U. van den; Spiessens, C.; Dancet, E.; Bakelants, E.; Vrancken, A.C.; Demyttenaere, K.; Enzlin, P.; D'Hooghe, T.

    2012-01-01

    Quality management according to ISO 9001:2008 guidelines includes infertility care quality assessment and improvement. This study aimed to describe the development process of a questionnaire for infertility management. A literature review, qualitative interviews with experts and patients resulted in

  9. Estimation of the frequency of involuntary infertility on a nation-wide basis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slama, R.; Hansen, O. K. H.; Ducot, B.; Bohet, A.; Sorensen, D.; Allemand, L. Giorgis; Eijkemans, M. J. C.; Rosetta, L.; Thalabard, J. C.; Keiding, N.; Bouyer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing couple fecundity on a nation-wide basis without excluding couples who eventually remain infertile is challenging. Our aim was to describe couple fecundity (in terms of frequency of involuntary infertility) among the general population living in France. We used a current-duration design. A

  10. Glycodelin in endometrial flushing fluid and endometrial biopsies from infertile and fertile women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin-Ley, Ursula; Lindhard, Anette; Skovlund, Vibeke Ravn;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate in the natural cycle just before IVF, whether glycodelin levels in endometrial flushing fluid obtained days LH+1 and LH+7 can be used in predicting pregnancy in the following IVF cycle, and whether there are differences in women with tubal factor infertility compared to women with...... unexplained infertility and fertile controls....

  11. Biomedical infertility care in Sub-Saharan Africa: what is going on?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.E. Gerrits

    2011-01-01

    Infertility treatments, including the use of advanced reproductive technologies (ARTs), are nowadays provided at several places in sub-Saharan Africa. This article, which is based on a review of (scarce) social science studies, gives insight into the way biomedical infertility care is provided, cons

  12. Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis infection among infertile women in Saudi Arabia

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    Kamel RM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Remah M Kamel Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Jazan, Saudi Arabia Background: Chlamydia trachomatis infection is a worldwide-distributed sexually transmitted infection that may lead to infertility. Objectives: This study aims to report the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among infertile women in Saudi Arabia. Patients and methods: A community-based study carried out at the obstetrics and gynecology clinic at Jazan General Hospital, Saudi Arabia. The study group included 640 Saudi infertile women who were aged between 18 and 40 years and who attended the gynecology clinic for infertility examination throughout 1 year of study (from July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012. The randomized control group included 100 Saudi fertile women who attended the obstetrics clinic for routine antenatal care. All recruited women were screened for chlamydia infection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for detection of serum-specific antibodies and then retested by the McCoy cell culture technique. Results: The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among infertile women was high, at 15.0%. The rate of chlamydia infection detected by ELISA was 9.84%, and it was 12.03% by the culture method (P = 0.2443. Conclusion: The high prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among Saudi infertile women demands a national screening program for early detection among infertile couples. ELISA is available as a simple screening test alternative to the culture method. Keywords: Chlamydia trachomatis, ELISA, McCoy cell culture, infertility, sexually transmitted infection

  13. The Potential Use of Intrauterine Insemination as a Basic Option for Infertility: A Review for Technology-Limited Medical Settings

    OpenAIRE

    John Yeh; Abdelkader, Abdelrahman M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. There is an asymmetric allocation of technology and other resources for infertility services. Intrauterine insemination (IUI) is a process of placing washed spermatozoa transcervically into the uterine cavity for treatment of infertility. This is a review of literature for the potential use of IUI as a basic infertility treatment in technology-limited settings. Study design. Review of articles on treatment of infertility using IUI. Results. Aspects regarding the use of IUI are revi...

  14. STUDY TO FIND OUT THE INCIDENCE OF GENITAL TUBERCULOSIS AS A CAUSE FOR FEMALE INFERTILITY IN SEMI-URBAN POPULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Kajal P; Hemant.G; Chandrakant S.; Sumit

    2014-01-01

    : BACKGROUND: Infertility is the commonest symptom associated with genital tuberculosis, the presence of which must therefore be excluded before steps are taken to treat infertility. OBJECTIVE: To find out the incidence of Genital Tuberculosis as a cause for Female Infertility in Semi-Urban population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present study was conducted in Semi-Urban population attached to Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College. 50 cases of infertility were taken and subjected...

  15. The risk factor profile of women with secondary infertility: an unmatched case-control study in Kigali, Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    DHONT, Nathalie; Luchters, Stanley; Muvunyi, Claude; Vyankandondera, Joseph; De Naeyer, Ludwig; Temmerman, Marleen; van de Wijgert, Janneke

    2011-01-01

    Background Secondary infertility is a common, preventable but neglected reproductive health problem in resource-poor countries. This study examines the association of past sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV, bacterial vaginosis (BV) and factors in the obstetric history with secondary infertility and their relative contributions to secondary infertility. Methods Between November 2007 and May 2009 a research infertility clinic was set up at the Kigali University Teaching Hospi...

  16. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Infertility at a Rural Site of Northern China.

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    Jimei Cong

    Full Text Available To investigate and analyze prevalence and risk factors of infertility at a representative rural site of Northern China.This is a cross-sectional study. We conducted a face-to-face questionnaire survey from July 2014 to October 2014 involving 5,131 women who were at childbearing age in Suizhong, a medium-sized, representative county located in Northern China. Finally, data from 4,232 valid questionnaires were analyzed.Infertility is defined as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regularly unprotected sexual intercourse.Infertility prevalence in Suizhong County was 13.09% (95% CI, 12.09%-14.1%, of which the primary infertility incidence was 0.99% (95% CI, 0.72%-1.34%, and the secondary infertility incidence was 12.10% (95% CI, 11.13%-13.12%. For women, the infertility incidence of underweight women (Body Mass Index, BMI<18.5 kg/m2 was 1.5-fold higher than that of women with moderate BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m2. The infertility incidence of women with little exercise was 4 times more than that of women with regular exercise, and 2 times more than that of women with heavy exercise. The group with moderate menstrual flow had the lowest prevalence of infertility, while both scant and excessive menstruation led to increased infertility incidence. Number of pregnancies (OR = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.51-0.79 was a protective factor for infertility, while the number of abortions (OR = 2.15; 95% CI, 1.58-2.93 was a risk factor for infertility. For men, those who stayed up late at night more than 3 times per week showed a significantly higher infertility incidence. Men who engaged in occupations with high-temperature working environment also suffered from an infertility incidence of about four times more than the others.We found significant association between women's infertility incidence with their BMI, state of exercise, amount of menstrual flow, number of pregnancies and number of abortions. As for men, both staying up late and

  17. Adoption, infertility, and the new reproductive technologies: problems and prospects for social work and welfare policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, S M

    1990-07-01

    In this article, the author examines the social and psychological issues raised by infertility and addresses problems resulting from the increasing commercialization of children through adoption practices as well as through the proliferation of new reproductive technologies. The author begins with a discussion of infertility and considers some aspects of adoption, the traditional solution to infertility. Some historical, technical, ethical, psychological, and social aspects of artificial insemination, along with newer developments of surrogacy, such as in vitro fertilization and frozen embryos, also are discussed. Recommendations are suggested for meeting the service needs of people who have problems associated with infertility. Finally, the author stresses the importance of research along with the necessity for social workers to take a leadership role in helping society both to understand the ethical issues related to and to develop enlightened public policy on infertility, adoption, and the new reproductive technologies. PMID:2203152

  18. Abnormal expression of centrosome protein (centrin) in spermatozoa of male human infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To study the relations between male infertility and centrosome protein (centrin) and the functions of centrin in spermatogenesis, the matured spermatozoa of 10 normal male people and 18 male infertility patients were stained by immunofluorescence labeling antibody against centrin. The results showed that two fluorescence signal dots appeared in the normal male spermatozoa and were located at the base of flagellum. They are proximal centriole and distal centriole. However, in some spermatozoa of the male infertility, centrin protein was located abnormally at the base of flagellum and its staining signals were spread, the normal proximal and distal centrioles were confused and could not be recognized separately. These results suggest that abnormality of centrosome protein may be related to male infertility. This discovery may be used as a marker of abnormal sperm and male infertility.

  19. Bilateral ovarian maldescent: Unusual cause of infertility - A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, D; Grazi, R; Kankanala, N; Melzer-Ross, K

    2016-08-01

    Infertility due to ovarian maldescent is extremely rare and diagnosis can be challenging in the absence of uterine anomalies. We present a case of infertility due to bilateral ovarian maldescent with normal uterine anatomy who conceived after in vitro fertilization and did not require removal of the ovaries. A 19-year-old woman presented with primary infertility. After three failed cycles of ovulation induction/intrauterine insemination and one failed cycle of fresh embryo transfer, the patient underwent laparoscopy, which showed bilateral ovaries above the pelvic brim. The patient conceived after second in vitro fertilization and delivered at 34 weeks. Accurate diagnosis of ovarian maldescent in a patient of unexplained infertility and normal uterus is crucial for successful follicular aspiration and infertility treatment. It is important to counsel patients about the benign nature of this rare entity and future fertility. PMID:27094464

  20. HIV infection and sexual behaviour in primary and secondary infertile relationships: a case-control study in Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Dhont; C. Muvunyi; S. Luchters; J. Vyankandondera; L. de Naeyer; M. Temmerman; J. van de Wijgert

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (including HIV) and of high-risk sexual behaviour in the following three groups: primary infertile relationships, secondary infertile relationships and fertile relationships. Primary infertility is here defined as never ha

  1. Missed Conceptions or Misconceptions: Perceived Infertility Among Unmarried Young Adults In the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polis, Chelsea Bernhardt; Zabin, Laurie Schwab

    2014-01-01

    Context Perceived infertility is an individual's belief that she or he is unable to conceive or impregnate, regardless of whether this belief is medically accurate. This perception may lead to contraceptive nonuse, which may, in turn, lead to unintended pregnancy. Little research has examined perceived infertility among young adults, including potential associations with contraceptive behaviors. Methods The frequency of perceived infertility among young adults was assessed using 2009 data from a nationally representative telephone survey of 1,800 unmarried men and women aged 18–29. Multinomial regression analyses assessed associations between respondents' perceived infertility and selected background, reproductive knowledge, sexual experience and contraceptive use characteristics. Results Overall, 19% of women and 13% of men believed that they were very likely to be infertile. Hispanic women and women who had received public assistance in the past year had elevated odds of perceived infertility (odds ratios, 3.4 and 3.0, respectively), as did Hispanic men and men of other racial or ethnic minorities, except blacks (2.5 and 6.1, respectively). Men who had some college education, had received sex education or were not in a current relationship had decreased odds of thinking they were very likely to be infertile (0.3–0.4). Among men, perceived infertility was associated with the belief that they were likely to have sex without using a contraceptive in the next three months (2.6). Conclusions A substantial proportion of young adults believe they are infertile. Improved provider counseling and sex education may be useful in helping them to better understand their actual probability of infertility, and this knowledge may lead to improved contraceptive use. PMID:22405149

  2. A potential tool for diagnosis of male infertility: Plasma metabolomics based on GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyi; Wang, Yang; Yun, Yonghuan; Xia, Zian; Lu, Hongmei; Luo, Jiekun; Liang, Yizeng

    2016-01-15

    Male infertility has become an important public health problem worldwide. Nowadays the diagnosis of male infertility frequently depends on the results of semen quality or requires more invasive surgical intervention. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a novel approach for early diagnosis of male infertility. According to the presence or absence of normal sexual function, the male infertility is classified into two phenotypes, erectile dysfunction (ED) and semen abnormalities (SA). The aim of this study was to investigate the GC-MS plasma profiles of infertile male having erectile dysfunction (ED) and having semen abnormalities (SA) and discover the potential biomarkers. The plasma samples from healthy controls (HC) (n=61) and infertility patients with ED (n=26) or with SA (n=44) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for discrimination and screening potential biomarkers. The partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed on GC-MS dataset. The results showed that HC could be discriminated from infertile cases having SA (AUC=86.96%, sensitivity=78.69%, specificity=84.09%, accuracy=80.95%) and infertile cases having ED (AUC=94.33%, sensitivity=80.33%, specificity=100%, accuracy=87.36%). Some potential biomarkers were successfully discovered by two commonly used variable selection methods, variable importance on projection (VIP) and original coefficients of PLS-DA (β). 1,5-Anhydro-sorbitol and α-hydroxyisovaleric acid were identified as the potential biomarkers for distinguishing HC from the male infertility patients. Meanwhile, lactate, glutamate and cholesterol were the found to be the important variables to distinguish between patients with erectile dysfunction from those with semen abnormalities. The plasma metabolomics may be developed as a novel approach for fast, noninvasive, and acceptable diagnosis and characterization of male infertility.

  3. A STUDY ON SERUM FSH, LH AND PROLACTIN LEVELS AMONG INFERTILE WOMEN

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    Prasad Bheem, Parmar Dinesh, Sharma Nc

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Study of hormonal imbalance and its implications in female infertility are an interesting area that requires to be explored in recent time. Hormonal imbalance can associated with irregular menstrual cycle, Amenorrhea, obesity and infertility in women. Other medical conditions such as polycystic ovarian syndrome, Endometriosis, stress, sexually transmitted diseases and chromosomal anomalies may be responsible for infertility in females. Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the serum levels of Follicle Stimulating hormone (FSH, Luteinizing hormone (LH and Prolactin hormone in infertile women that were referred from different infertility clinics and centres. Materials and Methods: This study comprises total 176 female subjects with age ranging from 20 to 40 years and divided in two groups. The total number of 88 infertile women along with 88 fertile women as controls was included for the present study. Serum FSH, LH and Prolactin levels were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA methods. Results: The results showed maximum infertile women were found between the age group of 30-40 years. The Serum FSH, LH and Prolactin levels among infertile women was 8.77±4.65, 7.64±5.16 and 18.59±7.50 respectively. Whereas, levels of FSH, LH and Prolactin in fertile women showed that 6.71±4.12, 5.66±3.17 and 13.44±5.82 respectively. Conclusion: In this study, we found that the hormone levels have statistically significant with female infertility. The elevated levels of FSH, LH and Prolactin may be one of the important causes for infertility in women.

  4. A Nutrition Screening Form for Female Infertility Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Susie

    2014-12-01

    A Nutrition Screening Form (NSF) was designed to identify lifestyle risk factors that negatively impact fertility and to provide a descriptive profile of 300 female infertility patients in a private urban infertility clinic. The NSF was mailed to all new patients prior to the initial physician's visit and self-reported data were assessed using specific criteria to determine if a nutrition referral was warranted. This observational study revealed that 43% of the women had a body mass index (BMI) history of "dieting" and unrealistic weight goals potentially limiting energy and essential nutrients. A high number reported eating disorders, vegetarianism, low fat or low cholesterol diets, and dietary supplement use. Fourteen percent appeared not to supplement with folic acid, 13% rated exercise as "extremely" or "very active", and 28% reported a "high" perceived level of stress. This preliminary research demonstrated that a NSF can be a useful tool to identify nutrition-related lifestyle factors that may negatively impact fertility and identified weight, BMI, diet, exercise, and stress as modifiable risk factors deserving future research. NSF information can help increase awareness among health professionals and patients about the important link between nutrition, fertility, and successful reproductive outcomes.

  5. Urinary phthalate monoesters and endometriosis in infertile Japanese women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Hiroaki [Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Iwasaki, Motoki, E-mail: moiwasak@ncc.go.jp [Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Hanaoka, Tomoyuki [Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Sasaki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Tadao [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-25-8, Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8461 (Japan); Tsugane, Shoichiro [Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Phthalates may act as an estrogen and are a potential risk factor for estrogen-related diseases such as endometriosis. We assessed the association between phthalate exposure and endometriosis in 166 consecutive women who presented at a university hospital for consultation regarding infertility. The subjects were interviewed and provided a urine specimen prior to a laparoscopic diagnosis of endometriosis. They were then categorized by the severity of endometriosis as controls (stages 0-I) and cases (stages II-IV). Urinary concentrations of the phthalate metabolites monoethyl phthalate, mono-n-butyl phthalate, monobenzyl phthalate, mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate, and mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate were measured in 57 cases and 80 controls using high-performance liquid chromatography isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry. Adjusted odds ratios for endometriosis in relation to dichotomized individual phthalate metabolites (standardized for creatinine) were calculated. No significant association between endometriosis and any urinary creatinine-adjusted phthalate monoester was seen. Adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for higher dichotomized MEHP by endometriosis was 1.57 (0.74-3.30). No monotonic trend was seen in urinary creatinine-adjusted concentration of phthalate metabolites by endometriosis stage (p = 0.23-0.90). Our results do not support the hypothesis that higher urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites are associated with the risk of endometriosis in infertile Japanese women.

  6. Zoroastrians Support Oocyte and Embryo Donation Program for Infertile Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvaei, Iman; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi-Esmailabad, Saeed; Nabi, Ali; Shamsi, Farimah

    2014-01-01

    Background The main goal was to evaluate the attitudes and knowledge of Zoroastrians living in Iran towards oocyte donation (OD) and embryo donation (ED) program. Methods This cross sectional study consisted of 318 Zoroastrians (n=175 for OD and n=143 for ED) of both sexes. The questionnaire form comprised two parts of general demographic characteristics of the participants and twenty multiple-choice questions about attitude and knowledge of participants towards OD and ED. For statistical analysis, the chi-square test was applied for comparison of data generated from ED and OD groups. Results Majority of the participants supported OD (69.7%) and ED (71.3%) for infertile patients. In addition, 40% and 42% preferred donation program (OD and ED, respectively), compared to adoption. About 60% of the respondents believed that the donors have no right to find the child and claim it as their own. In addition, more than half of the respondents thought that the recipients of oocyte/embryo should never know the name and address of the donors. More than half of the participants did not know whether their religion accepts donation program or not. Approximately, 80% of respondents supported psychological counseling for both donors and recipients. Moreover, about 56% of the participants necessitated the advertisement on OD/ED program in the mass media. Conclusion Our preliminary data showed that Zoroastrians supported both OD and ED program equally for infertile couples. PMID:25473631

  7. Klinefelter syndrome and its association with male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V Ramakrishnan; S GowthamKumar; RadhaPandiyan

    2014-01-01

    Klinefelter's syndrome is the most common genetic disorder in which there is at least one extraX chromosome.Males normally have anX chromosome and aY chromosome(XY).But males who haveKlinefelter syndrome have an extraX chromosome(XXY), giving them a total of47 instead of the normal46 chromosomes.Sex chromosome abnormalities are more frequently associated with male infertility.The prevalence ofXXYs has risen from1.09 to1.72 per1000 male births.A patient attended to fertility and genetic clinic, during the clinical diagnosis we found the following complaints of loss of secondary sexual characteristics and infertility.Physical examination revealed breast development, thin built, small size testes, and absence of beard and pubic hairs.Karyotype and biochemical analysis were performed to detect chromosomal abnormality as well as hormonal level to confirm the diagnosis ofKlinefelter's syndrome.Chromosomal analysis of the peripheral blood lymphocytes demonstrated the constitutional karyotype of47,XXY.Using karyotype the presence of extraX chromosome was confirmed, supporting the cytogenetic finding.The47,XXY syndrome is relatively uncommon and can be missedclinically because of its variable clinical presentations. Accurate diagnosis of this constitutional karyotype provides a valuable aid in the counselling and early management of the patients who undertake fertility evaluation.

  8. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Mammalian spermatozoa are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are very susceptible to attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane lipid peroxide ion. Normally a balance is maintained between the amount of ROS produced and that scavenged. Cellular damage arises when this equilibrium is disturbed. A shift in the levels of ROS towards pro-oxidants in semen and vaginal secretions can induce an oxidative stress on spermatozoa. The aim was to study lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD and to correlate the same, with the ′water test′, in male infertility. SETTINGS: Experimental study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ejaculates from a total of 83 infertile and fertile healthy individuals were obtained. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme levels were studied and correlated with water test. RESULTS: The results indicate that (i the antioxidant enzyme catalase showed no significant changes in the various pathological samples, (ii antioxidant enzymes SOD and glutathione peroxidase correlate positively with asthenozoospermic samples and (iii the degree of lipid peroxidation also correlates positively with the poorly swollen sperm tails. The increase in SOD and glutathione peroxidase values, in the pathological cases represents an attempt made to overcome the reactive oxygen species. CONCLUSION: Water test could be used as a preliminary marker test for sperm tail damage by reactive oxygen species, since it correlates very well with lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes.

  9. [Bacterial infection as a cause of infertility in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleha, Radek; Boštíková, Vanda; Salavec, Miloslav; Mosio, Petra; Kusáková, Eva; Kukla, Rudolf; Mazurová, Jaroslava; Spliňo, Miroslav

    2013-04-01

    Microorganisms which are present in the human urogenital tract may be involved in the development of inflammatory changes negatively affecting the genitals in both men and women. Pathological conditions due to inflammatory alterations may result in complete loss of fertility. Infections of the urogenital tract are responsible for 15% of all cases of infertility in couples. Negative impact on the human reproduction is mainly caused by direct damage to the genital tract mucosa by metabolic products of microorganisms or by induction of pro-inflammatory responses of the body. Another mechanism is indirect impact of microorganisms on the genital function. Moreover, the effect of bacteria on spermatogenesis and semen quality is important in men. Infections mainly caused by Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae represent the greatest risk in terms of permanent consequences for human reproduction. As for other sexually transmitted disorders, such as infections caused by Gardnerella vaginalis, urogenital mycoplasmas or ureaplasmas, the link between infection and infertility has been intensively researched. PMID:23768092

  10. Human Papillomavirus Infection, Infertility, and Assisted Reproductive Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV is a sexually transmitted infection common among men and women across all geographic and socioeconomic subgroups worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that HPV infection may affect fertility and alter the efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies. In men, HPV infection can affect sperm parameters, specifically motility. HPV-infected sperm can transmit viral DNA to oocytes, which may be expressed in the developing blastocyst. HPV can increase trophoblastic apoptosis and reduce the endometrial implantation of trophoblastic cells, thus increasing the theoretical risk of miscarriage. Vertical transmission of HPV during pregnancy may be involved in the pathophysiology of preterm rupture of membranes and spontaneous preterm birth. In patients undergoing intrauterine insemination for idiopathic infertility, HPV infection confers a lower pregnancy rate. In contrast, the evidence regarding any detrimental impact of HPV infection on IVF outcomes is inconclusive. It has been suggested that vaccination could potentially counter HPV-related sperm impairment, trophoblastic apoptosis, and spontaneous miscarriages; however, these conclusions are based on in vitro studies rather than large-scale epidemiological studies. Improvement in the understanding of HPV sperm infection mechanisms and HPV transmission into the oocyte and developing blastocyst may help explain idiopathic causes of infertility and miscarriage.

  11. Klinefelter syndrome and its association with male infertility

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    V Ramakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter's syndrome is the most common genetic disorder in which there is at least one extra X chromosome. Males normally have an X chromosome and a Y chromosome (XY. But males who have Klinefelter syndrome have an extra X chromosome (XXY, giving them a total of 47 instead of the normal 46 chromosomes. Sex chromosome abnormalities are more frequently associated with male infertility. The prevalence of XXYs has risen from 1.09 to 1.72 per 1 000 male births. A patient attended to fertility and genetic clinic, during the clinical diagnosis we found the following complaints of loss of secondary sexual characteristics and infertility. Physical examination revealed breast development, thin built, small size testes, and absence of beard and pubic hairs. Karyotype and biochemical analysis were performed to detect chromosomal abnormality as well as hormonal level to confirm the diagnosis of Klinefelter's syndrome. Chromosomal analysis of the peripheral blood lymphocytes demonstrated the constitutional karyotype of 47, XXY. Using karyotype the presence of extra X chromosome was confirmed, supporting the cytogenetic finding. The 47, XXY syndrome is relatively uncommon and can be missed clinically because of its variable clinical presentations. Accurate diagnosis of this constitutional karyotype provides a valuable aid in the counselling and early management of the patients who undertake fertility evaluation.

  12. Semen analysis of infertile Igbo males in Enugu, Eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwafia, W C; Igweh, J C; Udebuani, I N

    2006-01-01

    The semen samples of 1,110 (one thousand, one hundred and ten) Igbo males attending infertility clinic, aged between 30-50 years were collected and analyzed. The specimens were collected and analysed in the microbiology laboratory of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) Enugu, Eastern Nigeria. The standard method of masturbation after 3-5 days of prior abstinence from sex before sample collection was applied. The samples were examined for semen volume and microscopically as a wet preparation for sperm motility, morphology and count. The semen volume result showed that 91.07 % were normal. 6.3% sperm samples were motile. In the sperm count, only 7.3% had normal cells, 62.0% showed abnormal morphology. The aetiology of male infertility in the population studied seems to be related to the sperm count, motility and morphology but not volume. Racial factor seems to play no role and it is important to abstain from sexual intercourse some days before collection of semen for analysis. PMID:17242721

  13. Proteomic signatures of infertile men with clinical varicocele and their validation studies reveal mitochondrial dysfunction leading to infertility

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    Ashok Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the major differences in the distribution of spermatozoa proteins in infertile men with varicocele by comparative proteomics and validation of their level of expression. The study-specific estimates for each varicocele outcome were combined to identify the proteins involved in varicocele-associated infertility in men irrespective of stage and laterality of their clinical varicocele. Expression levels of 5 key proteins (PKAR1A, AK7, CCT6B, HSPA2, and ODF2 involved in stress response and sperm function including molecular chaperones were validated by Western blotting. Ninety-nine proteins were differentially expressed in the varicocele group. Over 87% of the DEP involved in major energy metabolism and key sperm functions were underexpressed in the varicocele group. Key protein functions affected in the varicocele group were spermatogenesis, sperm motility, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which were further validated by Western blotting, corroborating the proteomics analysis. Varicocele is essentially a state of energy deprivation, hypoxia, and hyperthermia due to impaired blood supply, which is corroborated by down-regulation of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial electron transport chain, and Krebs cycle enzymes. To corroborate the proteomic analysis, expression of the 5 identified proteins of interest was validated by Western blotting. This study contributes toward establishing a biomarker "fingerprint" to assess sperm quality on the basis of molecular parameters.

  14. Complete evaluation of anatomy and morphology of the infertile patient in a single visit; the modern infertility pelvic ultrasound examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groszmann, Yvette S; Benacerraf, Beryl R

    2016-06-01

    The comprehensive "one-stop shop" ultrasound evaluation of an infertile woman, performed around cycle days 5 to 9, will reveal abundant information about the anatomy and morphology of the pelvic organs and thereby avoid costly radiation and iodinated contrast exposure. We propose a two-dimensional and three-dimensional ultrasound to examine the appearance and shape of the endometrium, endometrial cavity, myometrium, and junctional zone, to assess for müllerian duct anomalies fibroids, adenomyosis, and polyps. We then evaluate the adnexa with grayscale ultrasound and Doppler, looking for ovarian masses or cysts, and signs of tubal disease. The cul-de-sac is imaged to look for masses, endometriosis, and free fluid. We then push gently on the uterus and ovaries to assess mobility. Lack of free movement of the organs would suggest adhesions or endometriosis. The sonohysterogram then allows for more detailed evaluation of the endometrial cavity, endometrial lining, and any intracavitary lesions. Tubal patency is then assessed during the sonohysterogram in real time by introducing air and saline or contrast and imaging the tubes (HyCoSy). With this single comprehensive ultrasound examination, patients can obtain a reliable, time-efficient, minimally invasive infertility evaluation in their own clinician's office at significantly less cost and without radiation. PMID:27054310

  15. Proteomic signatures of infertile men with clinical varicocele and their validation studies reveal mitochondrial dysfunction leading to infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh; Samanta, Luna; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    To study the major differences in the distribution of spermatozoa proteins in infertile men with varicocele by comparative proteomics and validation of their level of expression. The study-specific estimates for each varicocele outcome were combined to identify the proteins involved in varicocele-associated infertility in men irrespective of stage and laterality of their clinical varicocele. Expression levels of 5 key proteins (PKAR1A, AK7, CCT6B, HSPA2, and ODF2) involved in stress response and sperm function including molecular chaperones were validated by Western blotting. Ninety-nine proteins were differentially expressed in the varicocele group. Over 87% of the DEP involved in major energy metabolism and key sperm functions were underexpressed in the varicocele group. Key protein functions affected in the varicocele group were spermatogenesis, sperm motility, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which were further validated by Western blotting, corroborating the proteomics analysis. Varicocele is essentially a state of energy deprivation, hypoxia, and hyperthermia due to impaired blood supply, which is corroborated by down-regulation of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial electron transport chain, and Krebs cycle enzymes. To corroborate the proteomic analysis, expression of the 5 identified proteins of interest was validated by Western blotting. This study contributes toward establishing a biomarker "fingerprint" to assess sperm quality on the basis of molecular parameters. PMID:26732106

  16. RISK OF INFERTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: a meta-analysis of observational studies

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    Juan Sebastian LASA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with several extra-intestinal features, such as reproductive disorders. The relationship between celiac disease and infertility has been previously assessed, with conflicting results. Objectives We seek to determine the relationship between celiac disease and infertility. Methods Data was extracted from case-control or cohort design studies from 1966 to December 2013 using the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Library databases. We analyzed two kinds of trials: those assessing the risk of infertility in subjects with already diagnosed celiac disease, and those evaluating the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease in subjects with a diagnosis of infertility. Results The search yielded 413 potentially relevant studies for revision, 12 of which were finally included for analysis. A significant association was found between women with a diagnosis of infertility and undiagnosed celiac disease [OR 3.09 (95% CI 1.74-5.49]. When considering those studies assessing the occurrence of infertility in subjects with already-diagnosed celiac disease, no difference was found between celiac disease patients and control subjects [OR 0.99 (0.86-1.13]. Conclusions Undiagnosed celiac disease is a risk factor for infertility. Women seeking medical advice for this particular condition should be screened for celiac disease. Adoption of a gluten-free diet could have a positive impact on fertility in this group of patients.

  17. Genetic variants in TP53 and MDM2 associated with male infertility in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Huang; Wei Liu; Gui-Xiang Ji; Ai-Hua Gu; Jian-Hua Qu; Ling Song; Xin-Ru Wang

    2012-01-01

    The TP53,a transcriptional regulator and tumor suppressor,is functionally important in spermatogenesis.MDM2 is a key regulator of the p53 pathway and modulates p53 activity.Both proteins have been functionally linked to germ cell apoptosis,which may affect human infertility,but very little is known on how common polymorphisms in these genes may influence germ cell apoptosis and the risk of male infertility.Thus,this study was designed to test whether three previously described polymorphisms 72Arg>Pro (rs1042522) and the Ex2+ 19C>T (rs2287498) in TP53,and the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) 309T>G (rs937283) in MDM2,are associated with idiopathic male infertility in a Chinese population.The three polymorphisms were genotyped using OpenArray assay in a hospital-based case-control study,including 580 infertile patients and 580 fertile controls.Our analyses revealed that TP53 Ex2+ 19C>T and MDM2309T>G polymorphisms are associated with mate infertility.Furthermore,we detected a nearly statistically significant additive interaction between TP53 rs2287498 and MDM2 rs937283 for the development of male.infertility (Pinteraction=0.055).In summary,this study found preliminary evidence,demonstrating that genetic variants in genes of the TP53 pathway are risk factors for male infertility.

  18. Analysis of Infertility Rate among Firstly Married Chinese Women During 1976-1985

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方可娟; 邓新清; 高尔生

    1993-01-01

    Data of “China Two-per-thousand Fertility and Contraception Survey', a project organized by the State Family Planning Commission in 1988, were applied to analyze the infertility rates in Chinese married women and its probable affectingfactors,The average infertility rate in firstly married Chinese women in 1976-1985 was 6.89%.The rates were gradually declining while calendar years in which Chinese women got married were close to 1985. Approximately 11.32percent of the women who were married in 1976 experienced infertility, whereas 3.89 percent of those did in 1985. The infertility rates in the women whose age of getting married were youhger than 20 years or elder than 29 years were apparently higher than those of the 20s. The rates were gradually going up while the age at women's menarche was increasing. The infertility rates were relatively lower in the developed economic regions of the eastern provinces and the metropolises in contrast to the western mountainous regions. The married women in rural area had slightly higher infertility rate than those in urban area. The infertility rates in women who used contraceptives before or immediately after their marriage showed no significant difference to those of nonuser.

  19. Understanding the patterns of adjustment to infertility of IVF users using narrative and autobiographical timeline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geok Ling Lee; Eric Douglas Blyth; Cecilia Lai-Wan Chan

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To examine how Hong Kong Chinese women and men coped with and adjusted to the infertility problem over time.Methods:Using purposive sampling and theoretical sampling, nine heterosexual couples and ten women who had completed IVF were recruited. Data were collected using a narrative interviewing technique and autobiographical timeline, based on a grounded theory approach.Results:Regardless of the outcome of IVF, coping with infertility and treatment was emotionally taxing. Four themes relating to the coping experiences were identified and captured innovatively in pictorial and narrative forms. They were:‘one of the many’, resilience, recovery and prolonged grief. The findings concurred with the existing literature - coping with infertility is emotionally taxing, and variability exists in the degree of adjustment to infertility, which in turn influences well-being. The study also demonstrated the advantages of creative use of clinical-interview methods in research on couples subjective and lived experience of infertility.Conclusion:The findings suggest that the participants varied in their coping and adjustment to the experience of infertility, with most of them demonstrated positive meanings and resiliency over time. The combined use of both clinical-interview methods helped to facilitate exploration and articulation of the lived experiences of infertility among participants, allowing both in-depth understanding of the phenomenon and adherence to methodological rigor. The clinical-interview research methods can also promote evidence-based reflective practice for researchers and an empowering experience for participants.

  20. Prevalence of Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma in Infertile Men in Van Region and Effects to Semen Parameters

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    Kerem Taken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU and Mycoplasma hominis (MH in semen cultures of cases with primary infertility in the Van Province, and also to determine the effect of therapy on sperm parameters. Material and Method: The study included 106 individuals divided into three groups: The infertile group (41 cases, the group with lower urinary tract symptoms (33 cases, and the control group (32 cases. The patients in the infertile group had no history of varicocele, testicular torsion, hydrocele, undescended testis, and hormonal disorders. The control group included cases without infertility and lower urinary tract symptoms. The parameters of culture-positive cases in the infertile group were determined before and after therapy. The identification of Mycoplasma species was made using the Biomerieux® Mycoplasma IST 2 (RCS Lyon-France kit. The sperm count was carried out with the Makler counting chamber (Self Medical Industries, Haifa, Israel. Results: In the infertile group, UU was isolated from 17 and MH was isolated from 3 cases. In the group with lower urinary tract symptoms, UU was isolated from 15 (45.5% and MH was isolated from 6 (18.8% cases. In the control group, UU was isolated from 6 (18.8% cases, but MH was isolated from none of the cases. In the infertile group, the sperm counts in 3 culture-positive cases (15% and in 10 culture-negative cases (50% were

  1. Comparison of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment strategies in promotion of infertility self-efficacy scale in infertile women: A randomized controlled trial

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    Hajar Pasha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The infertility is associated with psychological consequence including depression, and lack of self-efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacological and no pharmacological strategies in promotion of self-efficacy of infertile women. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 89 infertile women who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center and were randomized into three groups; cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, antidepressant therapy with flouxetine 20 mg daily for 3 month, and a control group. All participants completed Infertility Self-efficacy Inventory (ISE and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI at the beginning and end of the study. Results: The means ISE scores among the CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were 6.1±1.6 vs. 7.2±0.9, 6.4±1.4 vs. 6.9±1.3 and 6.1±1.1 vs. 5.9±1.4 respectively. Both CBT and fluoxetine increased the mean of ISE scores more than control group after intervention (p<0.0001, p=0.033; respectively, but increase in the CBT group was significantly greater than flouxetine group. Finally, there was evidence of high infertility self-efficacy for women exposed to the intervention compared with those in the control group. Also, there was an improvement in depression. Both fluoxetine and CBT decreased significantly the mean of BDI scores more than the control group; decrease in the CBT group was significantly more than that in the fluoxetine group. Conclusion: CBT can serve as an effective psychosocial intervention for promoting self-efficacy of infertile women

  2. Comparison of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment strategies in promotion of infertility self-efficacy scale in infertile women: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Hajar; Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Esmailzadeh, Seddigheh; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Salmalian, Hajar

    2013-01-01

    Background: The infertility is associated with psychological consequence including depression, and lack of self-efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacological and no pharmacological strategies in promotion of self-efficacy of infertile women. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 89 infertile women who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center and were randomized into three groups; cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), antidepressant therapy with flouxetine 20 mg daily for 3 month, and a control group. All participants completed Infertility Self-efficacy Inventory (ISE) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at the beginning and end of the study. Results: The means ISE scores among the CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were 6.1±1.6 vs. 7.2±0.9, 6.4±1.4 vs. 6.9±1.3 and 6.1±1.1 vs. 5.9±1.4 respectively. Both CBT and fluoxetine increased the mean of ISE scores more than control group after intervention (p<0.0001, p=0.033; respectively), but increase in the CBT group was significantly greater than flouxetine group. Finally, there was evidence of high infertility self-efficacy for women exposed to the intervention compared with those in the control group. Also, there was an improvement in depression. Both fluoxetine and CBT decreased significantly the mean of BDI scores more than the control group; decrease in the CBT group was significantly more than that in the fluoxetine group. Conclusion: CBT can serve as an effective psychosocial intervention for promoting self-efficacy of infertile women. Registration ID in IRCT: IRCT2012061710048N1 PMID:24639784

  3. Acceptability of artificial donor insemination among infertile couples in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria

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    Ugwu EO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuel O Ugwu,1 Godwin U Odoh,1 Samuel N Obi,1 Frank O Ezugwu2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Parklane, Enugu, Nigeria Background: Male factor infertility presents one of the greatest challenges with respect to infertility treatment in Africa. Artificial insemination by donor semen (AID is a cost-effective option for infertile couples, but its practice may be influenced by sociocultural considerations. The purpose of this study was to determine the awareness and acceptability of AID among infertile couples in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, and identify the sociocultural factors associated with its practices. Methods: Questionnaires were administered to a cross-section of 200 consecutive infertile couples accessing care at the infertility clinics of two tertiary health institutions in Enugu, Nigeria, between April 1, 2012 and January 31, 2013. Results: Among the 384 respondents, the level of awareness and acceptability of AID were 46.6% (179/384 and 43% (77/179, respectively. The acceptability rate was significantly higher among female respondents, women with primary infertility, and those whose infertility had lasted for 5 years and beyond (P<0.05. The major reasons for nonacceptance of AID were religious conviction (34.7%, n=33, cultural concern (17.9%, n=17, fear of contracting an infection (17.9%, n=17, and fear of possibility of failure of the procedure (12.6%, n=12. Conclusion: Health education and public enlightenment are advocated to increase awareness and dispel the current misconceptions about AID in our environment. Keywords: acceptability, artificial insemination, donor semen, infertile couples, Nigeria

  4. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

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    Aygül Akyüz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level.

  5. Serum Levels of Melatonin and Oxidative Stress Markers and Correlation between Them in Infertile Men

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    Sara Soleimani Rad

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infertility is the problem of 15% of young couples in different societies. One of the factors that could affect fertility is oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the level of Melatonin, a free radical scavenger, and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in infertile men. Methods:For this purpose, fertile and infertile men in 2 groups, 30 people in each group, were studied. The fertile men were selected from husbands of patients admitted to Alzahra obstetric and gynecology hospital, according to WHO standards. The infertile men were selected from patients referred to infertility ward. Blood sampling from the participants carried out at a specific time, sera collected and the levels of malondialdehyde, total antioxidant capacity and Melatonin were detected in the sera. The data were analyzed using t-test and Sperman's correlation method. Results: Melatonin level in the sera from fertile men were 522 (39.32 ng/L and in infertile men were 511.78 (34.6 ng/L. MDA level in fertile and infertile men were 2.26 (0.34 vs 2.99 (0.44 nmol/ml which was significantly different. The level of TAC in the sera from fertile men were significantly higher than in infertile men. The result obtained for correlation coefficient Spearman's test revealed a significant, strong and direct correlation between Melatonin and TAC and a significant and reverse correlation between melatonin and MDA.Conclusion: It is concluded that melatonin could be involved in infertility. In other word, melatonin treatment and antioxidant-rich nutrition could help fertility by combating oxidative stress.

  6. ROLE OF LAPAROSCOPY IN INVESTIGATION OF FEMALE INFERTILITY: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 50 CASES

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    Sailatha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available : Infertility is not only a medical, but a serious social problem as well, especially in our country. Use of diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy in infertility has been a focus of attention in recent years and is found to be very effective method in evaluating these cases. Traditional way to assess the uterine cavity, tubal structures and tubal patency was hysterosalpingography, but it has now largely been superseded by hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. It is concluded that laparoscopy is useful in diagnosing cases with endometriosis, tubal factor infertility and exclusion of bilateral anatomical tubal pathology by diagnostic laparoscopy could avoid IVF treatment in these cases.

  7. Hysterosalpingographic picture encountered during the investigation of female infertility clinic has Lemba of Saint Raphael

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cross-sectional study was conducted at the St Raphael Lemba Clinic on a sample of 115 patients suspected of infertility during the period from june 1 1997 in 1 march 2003 (6 years). The technique of hysterosalpingography has allowed the identification of female infertility presents images that can diagnose one or more causes utero-tubal. Men also carry a significant responsibility in the genesis of the sterility of the couple: thus, they must also undergo exploration. Hormonal factors also have an important contribution in the investigation of infertility in women and must be taken in addition to hysterosalpingography

  8. Male infertility: lifestyle factors and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, David F; Mills, Jesse N

    2016-01-01

    While we may be comfortable with an allopathic approach to male infertility, we are also responsible for knowledge about lifestyle modifications and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies that are used by many of our patients. This paper provides an evidence-based review separating fact from fiction for several of these therapies. There is sufficient literature to support weight reduction by diet and exercise, smoking cessation, and alcohol moderation. Supplements that have demonstrated positive effects on male fertility on small randomized controlled trial (RCT) include aescin, coenzyme Q10, glutathione, Korean red ginseng, L-carnitine, nigella sativa, omega-3, selenium, a combination of zinc and folate, and the Menevit antioxidant. There is no support for the use of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, or saffron. The data for Chinese herbal medications, acupuncture, mind-body practice, scrotal cooling, and faith-based healing are sparse or inconclusive. PMID:26952957

  9. Male infertility: lifestyle factors and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While we may be comfortable with an allopathic approach to male infertility, we are also responsible for knowledge about lifestyle modifications and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies that are used by many of our patients. This paper provides an evidence-based review separating fact from fiction for several of these therapies. There is sufficient literature to support weight reduction by diet and exercise, smoking cessation, and alcohol moderation. Supplements that have demonstrated positive effects on male fertility on small randomized controlled trial (RCT include aescin, coenzyme Q 10 , glutathione, Korean red ginseng, L-carnitine, nigella sativa, omega-3, selenium, a combination of zinc and folate, and the Menevit antioxidant. There is no support for the use of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, or saffron. The data for Chinese herbal medications, acupuncture, mind-body practice, scrotal cooling, and faith-based healing are sparse or inconclusive.

  10. Male infertility: lifestyle factors and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, David F; Mills, Jesse N

    2016-01-01

    While we may be comfortable with an allopathic approach to male infertility, we are also responsible for knowledge about lifestyle modifications and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies that are used by many of our patients. This paper provides an evidence-based review separating fact from fiction for several of these therapies. There is sufficient literature to support weight reduction by diet and exercise, smoking cessation, and alcohol moderation. Supplements that have demonstrated positive effects on male fertility on small randomized controlled trial (RCT) include aescin, coenzyme Q 10 , glutathione, Korean red ginseng, L-carnitine, nigella sativa, omega-3, selenium, a combination of zinc and folate, and the Menevit antioxidant. There is no support for the use of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, or saffron. The data for Chinese herbal medications, acupuncture, mind-body practice, scrotal cooling, and faith-based healing are sparse or inconclusive. PMID:26952957

  11. Outdoor air pollution and human infertility: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa Vizcaíno, Miguel A; González-Comadran, Mireia; Jacquemin, Benedicte

    2016-09-15

    Air pollution is a current research priority because of its adverse effects on human health, including on fertility. However, the mechanisms through which air pollution impairs fertility remain unclear. In this article, we perform a systematic review to evaluate currently available evidence on the impact of air pollution on fertility in humans. Several studies have assessed the impact of air pollutants on the general population, and have found reduced fertility rates and increased risk of miscarriage. In subfertile patients, women exposed to higher concentrations of air pollutants while undergoing IVF showed lower live birth rates and higher rates of miscarriage. After exposure to similar levels of air pollutants, comparable results have been found regardless of the mode of conception (IVF versus spontaneous conception), suggesting that infertile women are not more susceptible to the effects of pollutants than the general population. In addition, previous studies have not observed impaired embryo quality after exposure to air pollution, although evidence for this question is sparse.

  12. STANDARDIZATION OF DHANVANTARI TAILA: MEDICATED OIL FOR FEMALE INFERTILITY

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    Kamidi Vijaya Kumari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dhanvantari Taila is an Ayurvedic Herbal Oil prepared from the drugs Balamoola, Dasamoola, Yava, Devadaru, Manjista, Chandana, Sariba, Shilajit, Vacha, Agaru, Punarnava, Aswagandha, Satavari, Yasti, Triphala, Tila Taila and Cow milk etc.The drugs of Dhanvantari Taila are indicated in all vatarogas in various classical Ayurvedic Literatures. This drug acts like Lekhana, Brimhana, Srotoavarodha, Vedanastapana, Sothahara, Vranaropana etc. Based on these properties, oil was prepared with this group of drugs using Tila Taila as base. This Dhanvantari Taila was selected to study through Uttaravasthi, into uterine cavity on infertility patients including tubal block, Anovulation and Gynecological problems. Before conducting the clinical trails this oil was subjected to certain chemical studies to find out the iodine value, Saponification value, acid value, total fat, weight for ml and HPTLC finger printing for standardization of the drug.

  13. Infertility, obstetric and gynaecological problems in coeliac sprue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, K S; Jayanthi, V; Probert, C S; Stewart, C R; Mayberry, J F

    1994-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that coeliac sprue is associated with infertility both in men and women. In women it can also lead to delayed menarche, amenorrhoea, early menopause, recurrent abortions, and a reduced pregnancy rate. In men it can cause hypogonadism, immature secondary sex characteristics and reduce semen quality. The real mechanism by which coeliac sprue produces these changes is unclear, but factors such as malnutrition, iron, folate and zinc deficiencies have all been implicated. In addition in men gonadal dysfunction is believed to be due to reduced conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone caused by low levels of 5 alpha-reductase in coeliac sprue. This leads to derangement of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Hyperprolactinaemia is seen in 25% of coeliac patients, which causes impotence and loss of libido. Gluten withdrawal and correction of deficient dietary elements can lead to a return of fertility both in men and women. PMID:7988065

  14. Infertility of the breeding bull in insemination technology

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    Predojević Mirko R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of very strict breeding bull selection, especialy for A.I programes their infertility is a very serius problem in everyday practice. Especially bull semen has been marked as the main factor for unsatisfied cow fertility in the A.I.programme. The reason could be the bull semen which really may play as the spreading factor of the specific or non-specific reproductive infective disoders – IBR, IPV, BVD, Campylobacter-Vibrio fetus, brucellosis leptospirosis, tuberculosis and other reproductive diseases. Secondarily, the percentage of vitality, motility, penetration abilities, and immonological properties of bull spermatozoa also have an important role in unsuccessful bovine fecundation. That is, why it is necessary to secure professional health care for breedig bull in AI centres, becase only healthy bulls can ensure good bovine genetic transmission and progress in cattle production for today's growing population.

  15. Metabolic syndrome among infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim A Abdelazim; Walid Farok Elsawah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To detect the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) among infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods: Two hundred and twenty infertile PCOS women were included in this prospective cross section study. Diagnosis of PCOS was based on at least two of ESHRE/ASRM criteria and diagnosis of MS was based on at least three of NCEP ATP III criteria. A standard questionnaire was used to document length of menstrual cycles, personal and family history of medical disorders. Signs of androgen excess and insulin resistance were noted in the physical examination. Anthropometric measurements were done to measure waist circumference, hip circumference and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Overnight fasting blood sample and a 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test, TSH, prolactin, total testosterone, SHBG and lipid profile levels were evaluated in all studied PCOS women. Trans-vaginal ultrasound was also done to measure;ovarian volume and number of follicles in both ovaries. Results: The prevalence of MS in studied PCOS women was 30.5% (67/220). There is strong positive correlation between prevalence of MS and both age and BMI of the studied PCOS women. Logistic regression analysis showed that;the age>25 and waist-hip ratio≥0.85 were powerful predictors for the prevalence of MS in PCOS women. Conclusion:The prevalence of MS was 30.5%in the studied PCOS women. The age above 25 years and waist-hip ratio≥0.85 were powerful predictors for prevalence of MS in PCOS women.

  16. Novel methods of treating ovarian infertility in older and POF women, testicular infertility, and other human functional diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovsky, Antonin

    2015-02-25

    In vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) technologies are facing with growing demands of older women to conceive. Although ovarian stem cells (OSCs) of older women are capable of producing in vitro fresh oocyte-like cells (OLCs), such cells cannot respond to IVM and IVF due to the lack of granulosa cells required for their maturation. Follicular renewal is also dependent on support of circulating blood mononuclear cells. They induce intermediary stages of meiosis (metaphase I chromosomal duplication and crossover, anaphase, telophase, and cytokinesis) in newly emerging ovarian germ cells, as for the first time demonstrated here, induce formation of granulosa cells, and stimulate follicular growth and development. A pretreatment of OSC culture with mononuclear cells collected from blood of a young healthy fertile woman may cause differentiation of bipotential OSCs into both developing germ and granulosa cells. A small blood volume replacement may enable treatment of ovarian infertility in vivo. The transferred mononuclear cells may temporarily rejuvenate virtually all tissues, including improvement of the function of endocrine tissues. Formation of new follicles and their development may be sufficient for IVM and IVF. The novel proposed in vitro approaches may be used as a second possibility. Infertility of human males affects almost a half of the infertility cases worldwide. Small blood volume replacement from young healthy fertile men may also be easy approach for the improvement of sperm quality in older or other affected men. In addition, body rejuvenation by small blood volume replacement from young healthy individuals of the same sex could represent a decline of in vitro methodology in favor of in vivo treatment for human functional diseases. Here we propose for the first time that blood mononuclear cells are essential for rejuvenation of those tissues, where immune system components participate in an appropriate division and differentiation

  17. Genetic risk factors in infertile men with severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Dohle (Gert); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); J.O. van Hemel; A.M. van den Ouwel; M.H. Pieters; R.F.A. Weber (Robert); L.C. Govaerts (Lutgarde)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Male infertility due to severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia has been associated with a number of genetic risk factors. METHODS: In this study 150 men from couples requesting ICSI were investigated for genetic abnormalities, such as constitutive chromosome

  18. High singleton live birth rate following classical ovulation induction in normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility (WHO 2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); B. Imani (Babak); A.G.M.G.J. Mulders (Annemarie); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Medical induction of ovulation using clomiphene citrate (CC) as first line and exogenous gonadotrophins as second line forms the classical treatment algorithm in normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility. Because the chances of success following classical o

  19. [Professor LAI Xinsheng's treatment experience of infertility by Tongyuan needling technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuemei; Meng, Zhenzhen; Wang, Ranran

    2015-03-01

    Professor LAI Xinsheng's treatment experience of infertility mainly by Tongyuan needling technique for both females and males is summarized. Tongyuan needling technique is a treatment method of leading qi to its primordial location mainly through viscera back-shu points that can dredge the governor vessel and tonify the spirit and conception vessel points in abdomen and abdominal front-mu points, and according to state of illness acupoints for opening the 4 gates or five shu points are combined; reinforcing and reducing manipulations of acupuncture are applied for reference. With the method of listing cases, professor LAI Xinsheng's Tongyuan needling technique is detailedly introduced in different aspects, such as the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome infertility and male infertility and improving the success rate of test-tube baby, and the manipulation of Tongyuan needling technique is summarized, indicating that Tongyuan needling technique is worth vigorously prompting in clinical treatment of infertility. PMID:26062206

  20. Association of polymorphism in cell death pathway gene FASLG withhuman male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepika Jaiswal; Sameer Trivedi; Neeraj K Agrawal; Kiran Singh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate –844C>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) present in the promoter of cell death pathway gene FASLG with male infertile phenotype. Methods:Genotyping for SNP FASLG (rs763110) was done by polymerase chain reaction followed by analysis with specific endonuclease (PCR-RFLP). DNA sequencing was used to ascertain PCR-RFLP results. Results: FASLG –844C>T polymorphism, allele and genotype distribution did not differ significantly between patients and controls (OR: 1.03, 95% CI= 0.7638 to 1.3952, P=0.83). Thus SNP-844C>T of the FASLG gene is not associated with male infertility risk in the analyzed patients. Conclusion: Human male infertility is a complex disorder and thus other genetic or environmental factors may be contributing to the complex etiology, and further study in other region of Indian populations will verify whether it is associated with male infertility risk.

  1. Cytogenetic abnormalities in 222 infertile men with azoospermia and oligospermia in Iran: Report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad T Akbari

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Comparison of our results with the review of the literature shows a higher incidence (4- fold of gonosomal, in particular, numerical gonosomal, chromosomal anomalies. Cytogenetic analysis is strongly suggested for infertile men, particularly in those who suffer from azoospermia.

  2. Differential protein expression in seminal plasma from fertile and infertile males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid J, Angela P.; Alvarez, Angela; Markert, Udo R.; Maya, Walter Cardona

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to analyze human seminal plasma proteins in association with male fertility status using the proteomic mass spectrometry technology Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (SELDI-TOF-MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Semen analysis was performed using conventional methods. Protein profiles of the seminal plasma were obtained by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry over a strong anion exchanger, ProteinChip® Q10 array. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: We found statistically significant differences in motility and sperm count between fertile and infertile men. In addition, we observed ten seminal proteins that are significantly up-regulated in the infertile group. In conclusion, comparison of seminal plasma proteome in fertile and infertile men provides new aspects in the physiology of male fertility and might help in identifying novel markers of male infertility. PMID:25395747

  3. An overview of the role of bacterial infection in male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Fanaei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An important cause of male infertility is the bacterial infections of the genitourinary tract. These infections affect sperm cell function and whole spermatogenesis and also cause deterioration in spermatogenesis, obstruction of the seminal tract, and impairment of spermatozoa function. The most important bacteria associated with genitourinary tract infections include chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and genital mycoplasma species. Inappropriate or delayed therapy of the bacterial infections of the genitourinary tract will lead to reduced fertility and, subsequently in severe cases, infertility. In other words, a good understanding of the interaction between bacterial infections and the reproductive system plays an important role in the treatment of infertile men. In this review article, we will discuss clinical and laboratory findings related to the bacterial infection of the genitourinary tract and its effects on male infertility.

  4. Evidence of increased chromosomal instability in infertile males after exposure to mitomycin C and caffeine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fotini Papachristou; Theodore Lialiaris; Stavros Touloupidis; Christos Kalaitzis; Constantinos Simopoulos; Nikolaos Sofikitis

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the genetic instability of 11 fertile and 25 infertile men. Methods: The methodology of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) was applied to cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes, and the levels of SCEss were analyzed as a quantitative index of genotoxicity, along with the values of the mitotic index (MI) and the proliferation rate index (PRI) as qualitative indices of cytotoxicity and cytostaticity, respectively. The genotoxic and antineoplastic agent, mitomycin C (MMC), and caffeine (CAF) - both well-known inhibitors of DNA repair mechanism - were used in an attempt to induce chromosomal instability in infertile men, so as to more easily detect the probable underlying damage on DNA. Results: Our experiments illustrated that infertile men, compared with fertile ones, demonstrated a statistically significant DNA instability in peripheral blood lymphocytes after being exposed simultaneously to MMC and CAF. Conclusion: The current study showed vividly that there was genetic instability in infertile men which probably contributes to the development of an impaired reproductive capacity.

  5. Seroevidence of Chlamydia Trachomatis Antibody in Infertile Women in University of Benin Teaching Hospital (Ubth Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibadin, K. O.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Chlamydia trachomatis in the pathogenesis of Pelvic inflammatory disease and majority of cases of salpinigitis are well acknowledged in women. A total of 213 sera from infertile women were tested for antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis by using an indirect solid phases enzyme Immuno absorbent commercial ELISA test. Women with confirmed Hysterosalpinographic report suggesting tubal occlusion (tubal factor infertility had 92 (43.2% followed by 63 (29.6% infertile women with infertile male partner and 58 (27.2% were having unexplained infertility. Out of the tubal factor (TF infertile women 40 (18.8% were seropositive for Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies, as against 19 (8.9% in the group of women with normal patent tubes and 10 (4.6% women with infertile male partner. In this study there was a statistical significant correlation between the infertile women with tubal factor infertility in relation to seroevidence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection with p<0.05. There was no age bias in the serodetection of Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies. The seropositivity of Chlamydia trachomatis is an indication that the organism may be an independent risk factor in the development of an inflammatory process leading to scaring of the uterine tubes in women and thereby causing infertility.

  6. Selenium–vitamin E supplementation in infertile men: effects on semen parameters and pregnancy rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad K Moslemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad K Moslemi1,2, Samaneh Tavanbakhsh31Highly Specialized Jihad Daneshgahi Infertility Center, Qom Branch (ACECR, Qom, Iran; 2Department of Urology, 3School of Medicine, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, IranObjectives: Infertility is an important medical and social problem that has an impact on well-being. A significant development in the last 10 years in the study of human infertility has been the discovery that oxidative sperm DNA damage has a critical role in the etiology of poor semen quality and male infertility. Selenium (Se is an essential element for normal testicular development, spermatogenesis, and spermatozoa motility and function. The predominant biochemical action of Se in both humans and animals is to serve as an antioxidant via the Se-dependent enzyme glutathione peroxidase and thus protect cellular membranes and organelles from peroxidative damage. We explored the efficacy of Se in combination with vitamin E for improving semen parameters and pregnancy rates in infertile men.Materials and methods: The study included 690 infertile men with idiopathic asthenoteratospermia who received supplemental daily Se (200 µg in combination with vitamin E (400 units for at least 100 days. The mean age of cases was 28.5 years (range 20–45, and the median age was 30 years. These cases had presented with male factor infertility (primary or secondary for at least 1 year. The longest and shortest duration of infertility was 10 years and 1 year, respectively. The median time of diagnosis of infertility was 1 year with a mean of 2.5 years.Results: We observed 52.6% (362 cases total improvement in sperm motility, morphology, or both, and 10.8% (75 cases spontaneous pregnancy in comparison with no treatment (95% confidence interval: 3.08 to 5.52. No response to treatment occurred in 253 cases (36.6% after 14 weeks of combination therapy. Mean difference between semen analyses of cases before and after treatment was 4.3% with a standard

  7. Investigation of Personality Traits between Infertile Women Submitted to Assisted Reproductive Technology or Surrogacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Asgarini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personality traits affect human relationships, social interactions, treatment procedures, and essentially all human activities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the personality traits -including sensation seeking, flexibility, and happiness - among a variety of infertile women who were apt to choose assisted reproductive technology (ART or surrogacy. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that was performed on 251 infertile women who visited Isfahan and Tehran Reproductive Medicine Center. These fertility clinics are located in Isfahan and Tehran, Iran. In this study, 201 infertile women who underwent treatment using ART and 50 infertile women who tended to have surrogacy were chosen by convenience sampling. Zuckerman’s Sensation Seeking Scale Form V (SSS-V, Psychological Flexibility Questionnaire (adapted from NEO Personality Inventory-Revised and Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ were used as research instruments. All participants had to complete the research instruments in order to be included in this study. Data were analyzed by descriptive-analytical statistics and statistical tests including multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and Z Fisher. Statistically significant effects were accepted for P<0.05. Results: In the sensation-seeking variable, there was a meaningful difference between under-study groups. However, the flexibility and happiness variables did not have a significant difference between under-study groups (P<0.001. Interaction between education, employment, and financial status was effective in happiness of infertile women underwent ART (P<0.05, while age, education and financial status were also effective in happiness of infertile women sought surrogacy (P<0.05. A positive meaningful relationship was seen between sensation seeking and flexibility variables in both groups (P<0.05. And a negative meaningful relationship was seen between sensation seeking and happiness in infertile

  8. AUTIFERTILITY EFFECT OF METHOXYCHLOR IN FEMALE RATS: DOSE AND TIME DEPENDENT BLOCKADE OF PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term exposure to methoxychlor (MXC) an estrogenic pesticide, produces infertility in rats, and short-term exposure blocks the decidual cell response (DCR). To address the short-term effects of MXC on fertility, the differential effects of MXC dosage and timing of administrat...

  9. A CLINICO-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF INFERTILE COUPLES AMONG THE SUBURBAN/RURAL POPULATION OF BOKAKHAT, ASSAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranabika

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system defined by the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse (WHO-ICMART. Infertility is the inability of a sexually active, non-contraception couple to achieve pregnancy in one year. Infertility affects relatively large number of couples, both globally as well as in India. There are sparse data on the prevalence of infertility in India. This study describes the correlates and prevalence of infertility among couples in Bokakhat, Assam, India. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study is a cross-sectional study done in the suburban/rural field practice area of Bokakhat Subdivisional Civil Hospital, during August 2008 to July 2009. Couples having infertility were identified using WHO definition by house to house survey and interviewed to know various epidemiological correlates including demographic characteristics, aetiology and treatment if taken for the same. RESULTS There were total of 1755 eligible couples and 167 were found to be having primary or secondary infertility. The study showed that among eligible couple’s prevalence of primary infertility was 6.4%, while secondary infertility was 3.01%. Among couples with primary infertility, male factors were responsible in 18 (15.78%, female factors in 32 (28.07%, both partners were accountable in 27 (23.68%, while 37 (32.45% couple’s cause of infertility was unexplained. CONCLUSION It was concluded that this study has provided significant information concerning the prevalence of infertility in our area and also provided information about different demographical and aetiological factors associated with infertility.

  10. Presence of HHV-6A in Endometrial Epithelial Cells from Women with Primary Unexplained Infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Marci

    Full Text Available To elucidate the roles of human herpesvirus (HHV-6 primary unexplained infertile women, a prospective randomized study was conducted on a cohort of primary unexplained infertile women and a cohort of control women, with at least one successful pregnancy. HHV-6 DNA was analyzed and the percentage and immune-phenotype of resident endometrial Natural Killer (NK cells, as the first line of defense towards viral infections, was evaluated in endometrial biopsies. Cytokine levels in uterine flushing samples were analyzed. HHV-6A DNA was found in 43% of endometrial biopsies from primary unexplained infertile women, but not in control women. On the contrary, HHV-6B DNA was absent in endometrial biopsies, but present in PBMCs of both cohorts. Endometrial NK cells presented a different distribution in infertile women with HHV6-A infection compared with infertile women without HHV6-A infection. Notably, we observed a lower percentage of endometrial specific CD56brightCD16- NK cells. We observed an enhanced HHV-6A-specific endometrial NK cell response in HHV-6A positive infertile women, with a marked increase in the number of endometrial NK cells activating towards HHV-6A infected cells. The analysis of uterine flushing samples showed an increase in IL-10 levels and a decrease of IFN-gamma concentrations in infertile women with HHV6-A infection. Our study indicates, for the first time, that HHV-6A infection might be an important factor in female unexplained infertility development, with a possible role in modifying endometrial NK cells immune profile and ability to sustain a successful pregnancy.

  11. Presence of HHV-6A in Endometrial Epithelial Cells from Women with Primary Unexplained Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marci, Roberto; Gentili, Valentina; Bortolotti, Daria; Lo Monte, Giuseppe; Caselli, Elisabetta; Bolzani, Silvia; Rotola, Antonella; Di Luca, Dario; Rizzo, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the roles of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 primary unexplained infertile women, a prospective randomized study was conducted on a cohort of primary unexplained infertile women and a cohort of control women, with at least one successful pregnancy. HHV-6 DNA was analyzed and the percentage and immune-phenotype of resident endometrial Natural Killer (NK) cells, as the first line of defense towards viral infections, was evaluated in endometrial biopsies. Cytokine levels in uterine flushing samples were analyzed. HHV-6A DNA was found in 43% of endometrial biopsies from primary unexplained infertile women, but not in control women. On the contrary, HHV-6B DNA was absent in endometrial biopsies, but present in PBMCs of both cohorts. Endometrial NK cells presented a different distribution in infertile women with HHV6-A infection compared with infertile women without HHV6-A infection. Notably, we observed a lower percentage of endometrial specific CD56brightCD16- NK cells. We observed an enhanced HHV-6A-specific endometrial NK cell response in HHV-6A positive infertile women, with a marked increase in the number of endometrial NK cells activating towards HHV-6A infected cells. The analysis of uterine flushing samples showed an increase in IL-10 levels and a decrease of IFN-gamma concentrations in infertile women with HHV6-A infection. Our study indicates, for the first time, that HHV-6A infection might be an important factor in female unexplained infertility development, with a possible role in modifying endometrial NK cells immune profile and ability to sustain a successful pregnancy. PMID:27367597

  12. Investigation of Personality Traits between Infertile Women Submitted to Assisted Reproductive Technology or Surrogacy

    OpenAIRE

    Najmeh Asgarini; Fariba Yazdkhasti; Mohammad Hossein Nasr Esfahani

    2016-01-01

    Background: Personality traits affect human relationships, social interactions, treatment procedures, and essentially all human activities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the personality traits -including sensation seeking, flexibility, and happiness - among a variety of infertile women who were apt to choose assisted reproductive technology (ART) or surrogacy. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that was performed on 251 infertile women who v...

  13. Increased incidence of infertility treatment among women working in the plastics industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, K.S.; Hannerz, H.; Feveile, H.;

    2009-01-01

    Several plastic chemicals adversely affect reproductive ability. This study examined the possible association between employment in the plastics industry and infertility. Dynamic cohorts of economically active women and men were followed for hospital contacts due to infertility in the Danish...... in female plastics workers motivates more specific studies of reproductive occupational health in the plastics industry. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...

  14. Social Skills and Perceived Maternal Acceptance-Rejection in Relation to Depression in Infertile Women

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Yazdkhasti

    2011-01-01

    Background This study examines the relationship between infertile women’s social skills and their perception of their own mothers’ acceptance or rejection, and the role this relationship plays in predicting self-reported depression. Materials and Methods This was a correlational study. 60 infertile women aged 25 to 35 years participated in a self-evaluation. A Social Skills Inventory, Parental Acceptance and Rejection Questionnaire and Beck Depression Inventory were used to measure social ski...

  15. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome presenting with infertility: Role of MRI in diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zohra Ahmad; Ankur Goyal; Das, Chandan J.; Dipika Deka; Raju Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome (HWWS), characterized by uterus didelphys, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis, is an uncommon combined Mullerian and mesonephric duct anomaly, and its presentation in adulthood is even rarer. We report here a 22-year-old female presenting with primary infertility where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested the diagnosis of HWWS with endometriosis. In a patient of infertility with endometriosis and unilateral renal agenesis, diagnosis o...

  16. Chinese Herbal Products for Female Infertility in Taiwan: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Chiang; Kao, Chao-Wei; Lin, Che-Chen; Liao, Yen-Nung; Wu, Bei-Yu; Hung, I-Ling; Hu, Wen-Long

    2016-03-01

    Female infertility and low birth rate are significant public health issues with profound social, psychological, and economic consequences. Some infertile women resort to conventional, complementary, or alternative therapies to conceive. The aim of this study was to identify the Chinese herbal products (CHPs) most commonly used for female infertility in Taiwan. The usage of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the frequency of CHP prescriptions to infertile women were determined based on a nationwide 1-million randomly sampled cohort of National Health Insurance Research Database beneficiaries. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were employed to estimate the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for TCM usage and potential risk factors. In total, 8766 women with newly diagnosed infertility were included in this study. Of those, 8430 (96.17%) had sought TCM treatment in addition to visiting the gynecologist. We noted that female infertility patients with risk factors (e.g., endometriosis, uterine fibroids, or irregular menstrual cycle) were more likely to use TCM than those without TCM medication (aOR = 1.83, 1.87, and 1.79, respectively). The most commonly used formula and single CHP were Dang-Gui-Sha-Yao-San (17.25%) and Semen Cuscutae (27.40%), respectively. CHP formula combinations (e.g., Dang-Gui-Sha-Yao-San plus Wen-Jing-Tang 3.10%) or single Chinese herbal combinations (e.g., Semen Cuscutae plus Leonurus japonicus 6.31%) were also commonly used to treat female infertility. Further well-conducted, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies will be needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these CHP combinations for female infertility. PMID:26986137

  17. A study on Irrational Beliefs and Emotions Associated with the Sexual Desire of Infertile Women

    OpenAIRE

    N Honarparvaran; Z Qudery; M Taghva; Z Zandi ghashghaee

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background & aim: The main aim of this study was to determine the irrational beliefs and emotions associated with the sexual desire of infertile women in Shiraz. Methods: one hundred infertile women were selected by simple random method and examined with Tangi’s test of self conscious affect, Jonse’s irrational beliefs, and Hulbert’s index sexual desire. Regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. Results: Results showed that there was a linear relation betwee...

  18. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

    OpenAIRE

    Aygül Akyüz; Gönül Şahiner; Memnun Seven; Bilal Bakır

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF) center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, ...

  19. Management of severe male infertility with special reference to IVF and ICSI

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenlund, Björn

    1998-01-01

    Management of severe male infertility with special reference to IVF and ICSI Björn Rosenlund Background: Until recently the treatment options for couples with severe male factor infertility have been restricted. With the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) it has now become possible to offer these couples effective treatment Materials and methods: The outcome of treatments with in vitro fertilization (IVF) and ICSI was analysed in men with ejaculation ...

  20. RISK OF INFERTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Sebastian LASA; Ignacio ZUBIAURRE; Luis Oscar SOIFER

    2014-01-01

    Context Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with several extra-intestinal features, such as reproductive disorders. The relationship between celiac disease and infertility has been previously assessed, with conflicting results. Objectives We seek to determine the relationship between celiac disease and infertility. Methods Data was extracted from case-control or cohort design studies from 1966 to December 2013 using the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS...

  1. Uterine cavity evaluation in infertile patients with transvaginal sonography, saline infusion sonography and hysteroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Neena Gupta; Seema Dwivedi; G. N. Dwivedi; Bandana Sharma; Pragati Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Background: To compare diagnostic accuracy of Transvaginal sonography (TVS), Saline infusion sonography (SIS) and hysteroscopy in infertile women. Methods: In a prospective study, 250 women with complaint of infertility underwent TVS and SIS. Diagnostic and operative hysteroscopy under general anaesthesia was then performed. Results: Hysteroscopy with directed biopsy was considered as the gold standard. Endometrial polyp (n=25, 10%), submucosal fibroid (n=12, 4.8%), suspected intrauteri...

  2. Effect of antioxidants and antibiotics on levels of seminal oxidative stress in leukocytospermic infertile men

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Sunil B.; Adinath N. Suryakar; Huddedar, Anil D.; Shukla, Pramod S.

    2006-01-01

    Defective sperm function is the most common cause of infertility. A prospective study was carried out to correlate the concentration of nitrite (the stable metabolite of nitric oxide) in seminal plasma with leukocytospermia, and sperm membrane integrity. Total Fifty-seven normozoospermic subjects with and without leukocytospermia visiting the Infertility clinic at KH and MRC, Karad, were included in the present study. Semen samples were checked for sperm concentration, total sperm count, sper...

  3. Traditional Chinese medical herbs staged therapy in infertile women with endometriosis: a clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Zhaorong; Lian, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease defined as the presence of endometrioid tissue (glands and stroma) outside the uterus. About 30 to 40% patients with endometriosis are infertile. In traditional Chinese medical system, endometriosis associated infertility is mostly caused by kidney deficiency and blood stasis. The herb of reinforcing kidney and removing blood stasis is designed to treat the disease. Material and methods: All the 80 up-to-standard patients were divide...

  4. Detection of genital mycoplasmal infections among infertile females by multiplex PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Mousavi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Women reproductive system is a suitable environment for growth of various pathogen and nonpathogenic microorganisms. Mycoplasmataceae is a family of bacteria which cause oligosymptomatic genital infections. The complications caused by these bacteria may lead to infertility in women. The aim of this study was detection of genital Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasmaurealyticum and Mycoplasma genitalium among infertile females who referred to the infertility clinics.A total of 104 infertile women (in reproductive age who referred to infertility clinics in the city of Sanandaj, Kurdistan, Iran, from February to May 2013 were selected for this study. Cervical swabs were collected from all patients. The presence of genital Mycoplasmas was detected by multiplex-PCR. All data were analyzed statistically.Out of 104 patients, 39 cases (37.5% were infected with U. urealyticum. Mycuplasma. genitalium and M. homimis were detected in 3 (2.9% of the infertile women. Co-infection was seen in 3.8% of the patients. There was no statistically the infections and patient age, educational levels, literacy, situation of employment, age of first significant sexual intercourse, history of abortion, type of infertility and infertility duration (p value > 0.05.The data showed a low percentage of infection for M. genitalium and M. hominis in the studied women while the prevalence of U. urealyticum was high. Despite having no symptoms of an ongoing acute inflammation of the reproductive tract, many women may have genital mycoplasmas in the cervix. We concluded that multiplex PCR using a pair of primers is a useful and cost-effective method for diagnosis of female genital infections.

  5. Stem cell therapeutic possibilities: future therapeutic options for male-factor and female-factor infertility?

    OpenAIRE

    Easley, Charles A.; Simerly, Calvin R.; Schatten, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in assisted reproduction treatment have enabled some couples with severe infertility issues to conceive, but the methods are not successful in all cases. Notwithstanding the significant financial burden of assisted reproduction treatment, the emotional scars from an inability to conceive a child enacts a greater toll on affected couples. While methods have circumvented some root causes for male and female infertility, often the underlying causes cannot be treated, thus true cu...

  6. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC HYSTEROLAPAROSCOPY IN EVALUATION OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY INFERTILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Dhananjaya; Madhu; Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Laparoscopy is considered the gold standard for diagnosing tubal and peritoneal disease. The present study was aimed to evaluate the role of hystero-laparoscopy in the study of primary and secondary infertility so as to identify the various pathological conditions in female reproductive tract leading to primary/ secondary infertility and also to observe the complications of the procedure. METHODOLOGY: The present one year observational study was done in the Departme...

  7. Presence of HHV-6A in Endometrial Epithelial Cells from Women with Primary Unexplained Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Daria; Lo Monte, Giuseppe; Caselli, Elisabetta; Bolzani, Silvia; Rotola, Antonella; Di Luca, Dario; Rizzo, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the roles of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 primary unexplained infertile women, a prospective randomized study was conducted on a cohort of primary unexplained infertile women and a cohort of control women, with at least one successful pregnancy. HHV-6 DNA was analyzed and the percentage and immune-phenotype of resident endometrial Natural Killer (NK) cells, as the first line of defense towards viral infections, was evaluated in endometrial biopsies. Cytokine levels in uterine flushing samples were analyzed. HHV-6A DNA was found in 43% of endometrial biopsies from primary unexplained infertile women, but not in control women. On the contrary, HHV-6B DNA was absent in endometrial biopsies, but present in PBMCs of both cohorts. Endometrial NK cells presented a different distribution in infertile women with HHV6-A infection compared with infertile women without HHV6-A infection. Notably, we observed a lower percentage of endometrial specific CD56brightCD16- NK cells. We observed an enhanced HHV-6A-specific endometrial NK cell response in HHV-6A positive infertile women, with a marked increase in the number of endometrial NK cells activating towards HHV-6A infected cells. The analysis of uterine flushing samples showed an increase in IL-10 levels and a decrease of IFN-gamma concentrations in infertile women with HHV6-A infection. Our study indicates, for the first time, that HHV-6A infection might be an important factor in female unexplained infertility development, with a possible role in modifying endometrial NK cells immune profile and ability to sustain a successful pregnancy. PMID:27367597

  8. Complex mullerian duct anomaly in a young female with primary amenorrhoea, infertility, and chronic pelvic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sanyal Kumar; Bhawna Satija; Leena Wadhwa

    2012-01-01

    Mullerian duct anomalies, though rare, can be a treatable cause of pelvic pain and infertility. Various complex Mullerian duct anomalies may exist with combination of features of more than one class. Since there are no precise clinical or imaging criteria to enable specific categorisation, there is ambiguous classification of these anomalies by various radiologists and clinicians. A young female presented with complaints of chronic pelvic pain, primary amenorrhoea and infertility. The patient...

  9. Immunohistochemical localization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in endometrial tissue of women with unexplained infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Tohid Najafi; Marefat Ghaffari Novin; Jalil Pakravesh; Khadijeh Foghi; Fatemeh Fadayi; Gelareh Rahimi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule that incorporates in many physiological processes of female reproductive system. Recent studies suggested the possible role of endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) enzyme in female infertility. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in endometrial tissue of women with unexplained infertility. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study a total of 18 endometrial tissues...

  10. Analysis of the serum reproductive system related autoantibodies of infertility patients in Tianjin region of China

    OpenAIRE

    Huo, Yan; Xu, Yanying; Wang, Jianmei; Wang, Fang; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yujuan; Zhang, Bumei

    2015-01-01

    Object: Reproductive system related autoantibodies have been proposed to be associated with natural infertility. However, large scale systematic analysis of these of antibodies has not been conducted. The aim of this study is to analyze the positive rate of antisperm antibody (ASAb), anti-endometrium antibody (EMAb), anti-ovary antibody (AOAb), anti-zona pellucida antibody (AZP) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACA) in infertility patients in Tianjin region of China. Methods: 1305 male and 1711 ...

  11. Evaluation of factors associated with the anxiety and depression of female infertility patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa Mariko; Takamatsu Kiyoshi; Horiguchi Fumi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Because the primary aim of infertility treatment is to achieve pregnancy, mental health care during this treatment is often neglected. However, the inability to conceive children is stressful for couples throughout the world. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate factors related to the anxiety and depression of female infertility patients. Methods Participants included 83 Japanese women who initially visited the Reproduction Center of the Tokyo Dental College ...

  12. ROLE OF LAPAROSCOPY IN INVESTIGATION OF FEMALE INFERTILITY: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 50 CASES

    OpenAIRE

    Sailatha; Sathiya; Famida.; Vijayalakshmi; Renuka; Misha Pepsi

    2014-01-01

    : Infertility is not only a medical, but a serious social problem as well, especially in our country. Use of diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy in infertility has been a focus of attention in recent years and is found to be very effective method in evaluating these cases. Traditional way to assess the uterine cavity, tubal structures and tubal patency was hysterosalpingography, but it has now largely been superseded by hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. It is concluded that lap...

  13. Level of infertility in regions according to Ministry of Public Health data.

    OpenAIRE

    Tymchenko O.I.; Mykytenko D.O.; Koba O.P.; Lynchak O. V.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research: estimation of morbidity and prevalence, risks of female and male infertility among the different regions of Ukraine. Materials and methods. The Morbidity and prevalence of female and male infertility were calculated according to Ministry of Public Health official statistics (2002-2012) per 1 000 of population of reproductive age (15-44). Relative risk including 95% confidence interval was calculated for each region in comparison with whole Ukraine. Results. In Ukrain...

  14. The hidden world of anti-phospholipid antibodies and female infertility: A literature appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chighizola, Cecilia B; de Jesus, Guilherme R; Branch, D Ware

    2016-06-01

    Even though the association of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) with infertility is debated, infertile women are commonly screened for aPL. To review evidence, a systematic PubMed search was conducted to retrieve papers addressing (i) the association between aPL and infertility, (ii) the positivity rate of criteria and non-criteria aPL in women with infertility, (iii) the association between aPL and assisted reproduction technologies (ART) outcome, (iv) the efficacy of medical treatments on ART outcome, and (v) the effects of ART on thrombotic risk. A total of 46 papers were considered; several limitations emerged: (i) wide heterogeneity in study populations, (ii) non-prospective design in 90% of studies, and (iii) aPL cutoffs not conforming to international guidelines in more than 75% of studies; aPL positivity not confirmed in 89% of studies. Most studies evinced an association between infertility and anti-β2GPI antibodies and almost all non-criteria aPL. The association rate with infertility was below 50% for lupus anti-coagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL), and anti-phosphatidic acid antibodies. According to our estimates, overall positivity rates of criteria and non-criteria aPL tests are 6% and 3% among infertile women, 1% and 2% among controls, respectively. A significant difference in the positivity rate of patients versus controls emerged for aCL only. Five of 18 studies reported a detrimental effect of aPL on ART outcome. Only one of the six studies assessing the effects of treatment on ART outcome among aPL-positive infertile women reported a benefit. All relevant studies reported no increase in the rate of thrombosis among aPL-positive women undergoing ART. PMID:26827907

  15. Impact of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene mutations on male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Jlenia Elia; Rossella Mazzilli; Michele Delfino; Maria Piane; Cristina Bozzao; Vincenzo Spinosa; Luciana Chessa; Fernando Mazzilli

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of most common mutations and intron 8 5T (IVS8-5T) polymorphism of CFTR gene in Italian: a) azoospermic males; b) non azoospermic subjects, male partners of infertile couples enrolled in assisted reproductive technology (ART) programs. Material and methods. We studied 242 subjects attending our Andrology Unit (44 azoospermic subjects and 198 non azoospermic subjects, male partners of infertile couples enrolled in ART programs). S...

  16. Improving the Reporting of Clinical Trials of Infertility Treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legro, Richard S.; Wu, Xiaoke; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Farquhar, Cynthia; Fauser, Bart C.J.M.; Mol, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and result in a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which create a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant ≥20 weeks gestations) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and during the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and

  17. Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis infection among infertile women in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Kamel RM

    2013-01-01

    Remah M Kamel Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Jazan, Saudi Arabia Background: Chlamydia trachomatis infection is a worldwide-distributed sexually transmitted infection that may lead to infertility. Objectives: This study aims to report the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among infertile women in Saudi Arabia. Patients and methods: A community-based study carried out at the obstetrics and gynecology clinic at Jazan General Hospital, Sa...

  18. A survey on oocyte donation: Turkish fertile and infertile women's opinions.

    OpenAIRE

    Akyüz, Aygül; Seven, Memnun; Karaşahin, Emre; Güvenç, Gülten; Cek, Suzan

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are various treatment options for infertility, and new techniques are also being developed as it is an important healthcare problem affecting approximately 15-20% of married couples. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of information of fertile and infertile Turkish women on oocyte donation in order to understand their awareness of the legal, ethical, social and religious issues regarding this technique and to compare these two groups in terms of these variab...

  19. Looking at Infertility Treatment through The Lens of The Meaning of Life: The Effect of Group Logotherapy on Psychological Distress in Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Khodabakshi Koolee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women in particular suffer from psychological stress when diagnosed with infertility.Psychosocial interventions are known to not only prevent and lessen various mental problems,but also to play a positive role in physical health and pregnancy rates. The aim of this study isto determine the unique impact of spiritual psychotherapy on concerns about infertility and theirperceived psychological stresses.Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial. The study population includednearly 800 infertile couples who attended the Maternity and Gynecology Clinic of Jahrom Universityof Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran. We enrolled65 people who were randomly divided into twogroups, experimental (n=33and control (n=32. The experimental group received spiritual grouppsychotherapy counseling for 12 sessions, 2 hours per week for a 3 months period. The controlgroup did not receive any intervention, but due to ethical considerations, we gave a presentation (onesession about infertility treatment for this group after the research process was completed. We usedtwo questionnaires to obtain data, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ and Perceived StressScale (PSS. Data analysis was done by descriptive and analytic statistics using SPSS 16 software.Results: Psychological intervention in the treatment group significantly decreased the PSWQ(p=0.004. There were significant differences in the mean score of the PSWQ in both groups asdetermined by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA; p=0.009. Psychological intervention in thetreatment group decreased the level of perceived stress, when compared with the control group.According to ANCOVA there were significant differences between the mean PSS scores of bothgroups (p=0.01.Conclusion: Logotherapy is related to stress reduction and can decrease psychiatric symptomsof worry and perceived stress. This approach tends to improve an infertile person's ability todeal with their problem of finding the

  20. Metabolomics: a state-of-the-art technology for better understanding of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minai-Tehrani, A; Jafarzadeh, N; Gilany, K

    2016-08-01

    Male factor infertility affects approximately half of the infertile couples, in spite of many years of research on male infertility treatment and diagnosis; several outstanding questions remain to be addressed. In this regard, metabolomics as a novel field of omics has been suggested to be applied for male infertility problems. A variety of terms associated with metabolite quantity and quality have been established to demonstrate mixtures of metabolites. Despite metabolomics and metabolite analyses have been around more than decades, a limited number of studies concerning male infertility have been carried out. In this review, we summarised the latest finding in metabolomics techniques and metabolomics biomarkers correlated with male infertility. The rapid progress of a variety of metabolomics platforms, such as nonoptical and optical spectroscopy, could ease separation, recognition, classification and quantification of several metabolites and their metabolic pathways. Here, we recommend that the novel biomarkers determined in the course of metabolomics analysis may stand for potential application of treatment and future clinical practice. PMID:26608970