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Sample records for alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy

  1. Intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the benefits and harms of augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and lung disease. We searched for randomised trials comparing augmentation therapy with placebo or no treatment in PubMed and ClinicalTrials (7 January 2010). Two...

  2. Augmentation therapy with alpha1-antitrypsin: patterns of use and adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K; Fallat, Robert; Schluchter, Mark D; O'Brien, Ralph G; Connor, Jason T; Gross, Nicholas; O'Neil, Kevin; Sandhaus, Robert; Crystal, Ronald G

    2003-05-01

    To describe patterns of prescribing augmentation therapy, and types and rates of adverse events in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Registry for Individuals with Severe Deficiency of Alpha(1)-Antitrypsin. Observational cohort study with follow-up visits every 6 to 12 months for up to 7 years. The rate and dosing frequency with which Registry participants were prescribed to receive augmentation therapy by their managing physicians, and the type and frequency of adverse events, classified in two ways: severity of self-reported symptoms, and actions taken as a consequence of the symptom. Over the course of Registry follow-up, 66% (n = 747) of the participants received augmentation therapy at some time. In keeping with recommendations made in the 1989 American Thoracic Society (ATS) statement, 75% of participants with airflow obstruction at first visit (defined as FEV(1) or = 80% predicted (14%) also received augmentation therapy. Among those with COPD for whom augmentation therapy was not prescribed, financial constraints were the reported cause in 30%. Observed patterns also varied from approved practice, in that dosing frequencies other than the US Food and Drug Administration-approved, once-weekly regimen were frequently prescribed. The overall rate of reported adverse events was 0.02 per patient-month, with 83% of participants reporting no events. This overall rate was composed of 16% considered mild events, 76% moderate events, and 9% severe events. We conclude that augmentation therapy was generally well tolerated and, consistent with ATS guidelines, physicians generally did not prescribe augmentation therapy for subjects with FEV(1) > or = 80% predicted. However, the large percentage of subjects with FEV(1) <80% predicted not receiving augmentation therapy and the frequent use of 2- to 3-week or monthly dosing reflects variation of practice from suggested treatment guidelines.

  3. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Targeted Testing and Augmentation Therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Marciniuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ≤11 μmol/L who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality.

  4. Exploring the role of CT densitometry: a randomised study of augmentation therapy in alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A; Piitulainen, E; Parr, D G

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of emphysema-modifying therapy is difficult, but newer outcome measures offer advantages over traditional methods. The EXAcerbations and Computed Tomography scan as Lung End-points (EXACTLE) trial explored the use of computed tomography (CT) densitometry and exacerbations...... for the assessment of the therapeutic effect of augmentation therapy in subjects with alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT) deficiency. In total, 77 subjects (protease inhibitor type Z) were randomised to weekly infusions of 60 mg x kg(-1) human alpha(1)-AT (Prolastin) or placebo for 2-2.5 yrs. The primary end...... was unaltered by treatment, but a reduction in exacerbation severity was observed. In patients with alpha(1)-AT deficiency, CT is a more sensitive outcome measure of emphysema-modifying therapy than physiology and health status, and demonstrates a trend of treatment benefit from alpha(1)-AT augmentation....

  5. Gene therapy for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotte, Terence R; Mueller, Christian

    2011-04-15

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a common single-gene disorder among Northern Europeans and North Americans. The carrier frequency for the common missense mutation (Z-AAT) ranges from 4% in the US to nearly 25% in the Republic of Ireland. Severe AAT deficiency (plasma levels below 11 μm) is most commonly associated with an adult-onset lung disease, with pan-acinar emphysema and airway inflammation, which is thought to be primarily owing to the loss of function of AAT in neutralizing neutrophil elastase and other pro-inflammatory enzymes. In 5-10% of patients, severe liver disease may develop. This may occur at any time from infancy to adulthood, and is thought to be owing to toxicity from the Z-AAT mutant protein that folds poorly and forms insoluble polymers within the hepatocyte, which is the primary site for AAT production. Thus, gene therapy for AAT lung disease is conceived of as augmentation of serum levels (a prolonged form of protein replacement, which is currently in use), while gene therapy for liver disease presents the problem of also having to downregulate the production of Z-AAT protein. Over the years, numerous strategies have been employed for the gene therapy of both AAT-deficient lung disease and liver disease. These will be reviewed with an emphasis on modalities that have reached clinical trials recently.

  6. Exploring the optimum approach to the use of CT densitometry in a randomised placebo-controlled study of augmentation therapy in alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parr, David G; Dirksen, Asger; Piitulainen, Eeva

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computed tomography (CT) lung densitometry has been demonstrated to be the most sensitive and specific outcome measure for the assessment of emphysema-modifying therapy, but the optimum densitometric index has yet to be determined and targeted sampling may be more sensitive than whole...... lung assessment. The EXAcerbations and CT scan as Lung Endpoints (EXACTLE) trial aimed to clarify the optimum approach to the use of CT densitometry data for the assessment of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) augmentation therapy on the progression of emphysema in AAT deficiency (AATD). METHODS: Patients...... of emphysema in the apical, middle and basal regions of the lung by measurement with PD15 showed that this treatment effect was more evident when the basal third was sampled (1.722 g/L, p = 0.040). A comparison between different densitometric indices indicated that the influence of inspiratory variability...

  7. Gene-based therapy for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian; Flotte, Terence R

    2013-03-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin Deficiency (AATD) has been an attractive target for the development of gene therapy because it is a common single gene disorder, for which there would appear to be significant benefit to be gained for lung disease patients by augmentation of plasma levels of wild-type (M) alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT). While a significant proportion of patients also have liver disease, which is unlikely to be benefitted by augmentation, the potential to treat or prevent lung disease by replacement of plasma levels to at least 11 microMolar (571 mcg/ml) is the basis upon which several protein replacement therapies have been licensed for human use. Further enhancing the likelihood of success of gene therapy is the fact that the AAT coding sequence is relatively short and the protein appears to function primarily in the plasma and extracellular space. This means that AAT production from any cell or tissue capable of secreting it could be useful therapeutically for augmentation. Based on these considerations, attempts have been made to develop AAT therapies using nonviral gene transfer, gammaretrovirus, recombinant adenovirus (rAd), and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors. These have resulted in three phase I clinical trials (one of cationic liposome, one of rAAV2, and one of rAAV1) and one phase II clinical trial (with rAAV1). The results of the latter trial, while promising, demonstrated levels were only 3 to 5% of the target range. This indicates the need to further increase the dose of the vector and/or to increase the levels to within the therapeutic range.

  8. The promise of gene therapy for the treatment of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Pedro E; Mueller, Christian; Flotte, Terence R

    2007-09-01

    In the last 13 years, three gene therapy trials for the treatment of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency have been conducted. The first trial delivered plasmid encoding the alpha-1 antitrypsin cDNA to the nasal epithelium using cationic liposomes. The last two trials delivered recombinant adeno-associated vectors encoding the alpha-1 antitrypsin cDNA by intramuscular injection. In this review, the progress of ongoing clinical trials and new gene therapy technologies is discussed.

  9. Therapeutics: Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntman, Alisha M; Flotte, Terence R

    2017-01-01

    This review seeks to give an overview of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including the different disease phenotypes that it encompasses. We then describe the different therapeutic endeavors that have been undertaken to address these different phenotypes. Lastly we discuss future potential therapeutics, such as genome editing, and how they may play a role in treating alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

  10. Progress with Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors for Gene Therapy of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntman, Alisha M; Flotte, Terence R

    2015-06-01

    The pathway to a clinical gene therapy product often involves many changes of course and strategy before obtaining successful results. Here we outline the methodologies, both clinical and preclinical, that went into developing a gene therapy approach to the treatment of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency lung disease using muscle-targeted recombinant adeno-associated virus. From initial gene construct development in mouse models through multiple rounds of safety and biodistribution studies in rodents, rabbits, and nonhuman primates to ultimate human trials, this review seeks to provide insight into what clinical translation entails and could thereby inform the process for future investigators.

  11. 5 Year Expression and Neutrophil Defect Repair after Gene Therapy in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian; Gernoux, Gwladys; Gruntman, Alisha M; Borel, Florie; Reeves, Emer P; Calcedo, Roberto; Rouhani, Farshid N; Yachnis, Anthony; Humphries, Margaret; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Messina, Louis; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Trapnell, Bruce; Wilson, James M; McElvaney, Noel G; Flotte, Terence R

    2017-06-07

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a monogenic disorder resulting in emphysema due principally to the unopposed effects of neutrophil elastase. We previously reported achieving plasma wild-type alpha-1 antitrypsin concentrations at 2.5%-3.8% of the purported therapeutic level at 1 year after a single intramuscular administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 1 alpha-1 antitrypsin vector in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient patients. We analyzed blood and muscle for alpha-1 antitrypsin expression and immune cell response. We also assayed previously reported markers of neutrophil function known to be altered in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient patients. Here, we report sustained expression at 2.0%-2.5% of the target level from years 1-5 in these same patients without any additional recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-1 alpha-1 antitrypsin vector administration. In addition, we observed partial correction of disease-associated neutrophil defects, including neutrophil elastase inhibition, markers of degranulation, and membrane-bound anti-neutrophil antibodies. There was also evidence of an active T regulatory cell response (similar to the 1 year data) and an exhausted cytotoxic T cell response to adeno-associated virus serotype-1 capsid. These findings suggest that muscle-based alpha-1 antitrypsin gene replacement is tolerogenic and that stable levels of M-AAT may exert beneficial neutrophil effects at lower concentrations than previously anticipated. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prognosis of patients with alpha1-antitrypsine deficiency on long-term oxygen therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas J; Seersholm, Niels; Perch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    : Compared with COPD without AATD, AATD patients are younger, more often males, have a lower prevalence of cardio-vascular diseases and diabetes mellitus, and higher prevalence of osteoporosis. Moreover, they have better prognosis, partly due to greater chance of receiving a lung transplantation....... on average about 17 years younger than patients without AATD. Cardio-vascular diseases and diabetes mellitus were significantly less prevalent among patients with AATD (60.4% versus 70.3% (P ...INTRODUCTION: Data on patients with alpha1-antitrypsine deficiency (AATD) on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is sparse. The aim of this study was to present the incidence of patients with AATD on LTOT, and compare their characteristics, comorbidities and prognosis (lung transplantation, termination...

  13. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  14. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Gene Therapy Ameliorates Bone Loss in Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Mohammad Ahsanul; Cao, Jay J; Lu, Yuanqing; Nardo, David; Chen, Mong-Jen; Elshikha, Ahmed S; Ahamed, Rubina; Brantly, Mark; Holliday, L Shannon; Song, Sihong

    2016-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at menopause. Therefore, anti-inflammatory strategies hold a great potential for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of gene therapy of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT), a multifunctional protein that has anti-inflammatory property, on bone loss in an ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis mouse model. Adult ovariectomized (OVX) mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with hAAT (protein therapy), rAAV8-CB-hAAT (gene therapy), or phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Age-matched and sham-operated animals were used as controls. Eight weeks after the treatment, animals were sacrificed and bone-related biomarkers and vertebral bone structure were evaluated. Results showed that hAAT gene therapy significantly decreased serum IL-6 level and receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) gene expression in bone. Importantly, hAAT gene therapy increased bone volume/total volume and decreased structure model index (SMI) compared to PBS injection in OVX mice. These results demonstrate that hAAT gene therapy by rAAV vector efficiently mitigates bone loss possibly through inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and RANK gene expression. Considering the safety profile of hAAT and rAAV vector in humans, our results provide a new alternative for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  15. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disorder associated with the development of liver and lung disease. AAT is a 52-kD glycoprotein, produced mainly by hepatocytes and secreted into the blood. Agglomeration of the AAT-protein in hepatocytes can result in liver disease. Exposure to smoke is the major risk factor for the development of lung disease characterised as early chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). Diagnosis is based on the analysis of the AAT genotype and phenotype. The measurement of the AAT serum level is useful as screening test. Liver biopsy is not necessary to establish the diagnosis. Therapy for AAT-related liver disease is supportive, a specific therapy is not available. AATD is a rare condition (1:5000-10000) and, as a consequence, data and information on diagnosis and treatment are not easily accessible. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview on AATD, covering basic biology, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha One International Registry (AIR), a multinational research program focused on alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, was formed in response to a World Health Organization recommendation. Each of the nearly 20 participating countries maintains a national registry of patients with AAT defic...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  17. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Cough How the Lungs Work Lung Transplant Oxygen Therapy Pulmonary Function Tests Pulmonary Rehabilitation Other Resources Non- ...

  18. Human Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (hAAT) therapy reduces renal dysfunction and acute tubular necrosis in a murine model of bilateral kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maicas, Nuria; van der Vlag, Johan; Bublitz, Janin; Florquin, Sandrine; Bakker-van Bebber, Marinka; Dinarello, Charles A; Verweij, Vivienne; Masereeuw, Roos|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/155644033; Joosten, Leo A; Hilbrands, Luuk B

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), the major serum serine protease inhibitor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of human AAT (hAAT) monotherapy during the early and recovery phase of

  19. Liver replacement for alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Charles W.; Porter, Kendrick A.; Peters, Robert L.; Ashcavai, Mary; Redeker, Allan G.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl with advanced cirrhosis and severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency of the homozygous PiZZ phenotype was treated by orthotopic liver transplantation. After replacement of the liver with a homograft from a donor with the normal PiMM phenotype, the alpha1-antitrypsin concentration in the recipient’s serum rose to normal; it had the PiMM phenotype. Two and a third years later, chronic rejection necessitated retransplantation. Insertion of a homograft from a heterozygous PiMZ donar was followed by the identification of that phenotype in the recipient’s serum. Neither liver graft developed the alpha1-antitrypsin glycoprotein deposits seen with the deficiency state. These observations confirm that this hepatic- based inborn error metabolism is metabolically cured by liver replacement. PMID:320694

  20. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Inherited Emphysema)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antitrypsin inactivates elastase once it has finished its job. Without alpha 1 antitrypsin, elastase can destroy the air sacs of the lung. How is the diagnosis made? Because Alpha-1 related disease is COPD, the diagnosis is made by the same methods. Your doctor may have you do a number ...

  1. Cardiovascular risk in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähndrich, Sebastian; Biertz, Frank; Karch, Annika; Kleibrink, Björn; Koch, Armin; Teschler, Helmut; Welte, Tobias; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Jörres, Rudolf A; Greulich, Timm; Vogelmeier, Claus F; Bals, Robert

    2017-09-15

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare inherited condition caused by mutations of the SERPINA1 gene that is associated with the development of a COPD like lung disease. The comorbidities in patients with AATD-related lung diseases are not well defined. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical phenotype of AATD patients within the German COPD cohort study COSYCONET ("COPD and SYstemic consequences-COmorbidities NETwork") cohort focusing on the distribution of comorbidities. The data from 2645 COSYCONET patients, including 139 AATD patients (110 with and 29 without augmentation therapy), were analyzed by descriptive statistics and regression analyses. We found significantly lower prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities in AATD patients as compared to non-AATD COPD patients. After correction for age, pack years, body mass index, and sex, the differences were still significant for coronary artery disease (p = 0.002) and the prevalence of peripheral artery disease as determined by an ankle-brachial-index <= 0.9 (p = 0.035). Also the distribution of other comorbidities such as bronchiectasis differed between AATD and non-deficient COPD. AATD is associated with a lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease, the underlying mechanisms need further investigation.

  2. Association of polymorphism in the alpha-1-antitrypsin gene with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sahand Rayaneh

    2014-06-11

    Jun 11, 2014 ... Association of polymorphism in the alpha-1-antitrypsin gene with milk production traits in ... Abstract. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) as a strong protease inhibitor plays a major role in the protection of tissues ..... populations over generations; iii) Different statistical models used to analyse the data. For the traits ...

  3. Fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin in COPD exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls; Marott, J. L.; Rode, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background We tested the hypotheses that fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin are observationally and genetically associated with exacerbations in COPD. Methods We studied 13 591 individuals with COPD from the Copenhagen General Population Study (2003-2013), of whom 6857 were genotyped for FGB -455...... and exacerbations in instrumental variable analyses. Results Elevated fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin levels were associated with increased risk of exacerbations in COPD, HR=1.14 (1.07 to 1.22, p...

  4. Treatment of lung disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar RG

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ross G Edgar,1,2 Mitesh Patel,3 Susan Bayliss,4 Diana Crossley,2,5 Elizabeth Sapey,2,5 Alice M Turner4,6 1Therapy Services, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK; 2Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; 3Division of Primary Care, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; 4Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK; 6Department of Respiratory Medicine, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK Background: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is a rare genetic condition predisposing individuals to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The treatment is generally extrapolated from COPD unrelated to AATD; however, most COPD trials exclude AATD patients; thus, this study sought to systematically review AATD-specific literature to assist evidence-based patient management.Methods: Standard review methodology was used with meta-analysis and narrative synthesis (PROSPERO-CRD42015019354. Eligible studies were those of any treatment used in severe AATD. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs were the primary focus; however, case series and uncontrolled studies were eligible. All studies had ≥10 participants receiving treatment or usual care, with baseline and follow-up data (>3 months. Risk of bias was assessed appropriately according to study methodology.Results: In all, 7,296 studies were retrieved from searches; 52 trials with 5,632 participants met the inclusion criteria, of which 26 studies involved alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation and 17 concerned surgical treatments (largely transplantation. Studies were grouped into four management themes: COPD medical, COPD surgical, AATD specific, and other treatments. Computed tomography (CT density, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide

  5. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  6. Association of polymorphism in the alpha-1-antitrypsin gene with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) as a strong protease inhibitor plays a major role in the protection of tissues against proteolytic destruction by neutrophil elastase. Existence of this protein in the mammary gland may increase the survival of milk proteins such as lactoferrin and lysozyme. The biological role of A1AT in tissues such ...

  7. Diagnosing alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: the first step in precision medicine [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig P. Hersh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Severe alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency is one of the most common serious genetic diseases in adults of European descent. Individuals with AAT deficiency have a greatly increased risk for emphysema and liver disease. Other manifestations include bronchiectasis, necrotizing panniculitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Despite the frequency and potential severity, AAT deficiency remains under-recognized, and there is often a delay in diagnosis. This review will focus on three recent updates that should serve to encourage testing and diagnosis of AAT deficiency: first, the publication of a randomized clinical trial demonstrating the efficacy of intravenous augmentation therapy in slowing the progression of emphysema in AAT deficiency; second, the mounting evidence showing an increased risk of lung disease in heterozygous PI MZ genotype carriers; last, the recent publication of a clinical practice guideline, outlining diagnosis and management. Though it has been recognized for more than fifty years, AAT deficiency exemplifies the modern paradigm of precision medicine, with a diagnostic test that identifies a genetic subtype of a heterogeneous disease, leading to a targeted treatment.

  8. The prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Morris Valerie B; Dimitrov Borislav D; O'Brien Geraldine; Kelleher Dermot P; McPartlin Joseph; Floyd Olwen; O'Connor Catherine A; Carroll Tomás P; Taggart Clifford C; McElvaney Noel G

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED Background: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and classically presents with early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common mutation presenting with clinical evidence is the Z mutation, while the S mutation is associated with a milder plasma deficiency. AATD is an under-diagnosed condition and the World Health Organisation recommends targeted detection programmes for AATD in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disea...

  9. Alpha-1-antitrypsin studies: canine serum and canine surfactant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, W.C.; Slauson, D.O.; Dahlstrom, M.; Gorman, C.

    1974-01-01

    Canine serum alpha-1-antitrypsin was isolated by gel filtration and affinity chromatography and characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis. Measurement of the trypsin inhibitory capacity of the separated protein indicated a ninefold concentration of functional trypsin inhibitor during the isolation procedure. Electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of a single protein with alpha-globulin mobility and a molecular weight near that of human alpha-1-antitrypsin. The trypsin inhibitory capacity of pulmonary surfactant protein from five Beagle dogs was measured, related to total surfactant protein concentration, and compared with similar measurements on whole serum from the same animals. Results indicated a variable concentration of trypsin inhibitor in the canine pulmonary surfactant protein. However, the concentration in the surfactant protein was always significantly higher than that in the corresponding serum sample. Preliminary experiments designed to separate the trypsin inhibitory fraction(s) from the other surfactant proteins by gel filtration chromatography indicated that the trypsin inhibitor was probably a single protein with a molecular weight near that of alpha-1-antitrypsin. (U.S.)

  10. Clinical utility of alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in the management of adult patients with severe alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a review of the current literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parr DG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available David G Parr, Beatriz Lara Department of Respiratory Medicine, Cardio-Respiratory Division, University Hospital Coventry, Coventry, UK Abstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and its deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The putative protective serum concentration is generally considered to be above a threshold of 11 µM/L, and therapeutic augmentation of AAT above this value is believed to retard the progression of emphysema. Several AAT preparations, all derived from human donor plasma, have been commercialized since approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 1987. Biochemical efficacy has been demonstrated by augmentation of pulmonary antiprotease activity, but demonstration of clinical efficacy in randomized, placebo-controlled trials has been hampered by the practical difficulties of performing conventional studies in a rare disease with a relatively long natural history. Computed tomography has been applied to measure lung density as a more specific and sensitive surrogate outcome measure of emphysema than physiologic indices, such as forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and studies consistently show a therapeutic reduction in the rate of lung density decline. However, convincing evidence of benefit using traditional clinical measures remains elusive. Intravenous administration of AAT at a dose of 60 mg/kg/week is the commonest regime in use and has well-documented safety and tolerability. International and national guidelines on the management of AAT deficiency recommend intravenous augmentation therapy to supplement optimized usual COPD treatment in patients with severe deficiency and evidence of lung function impairment. Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, augmentation or replacement therapy, computed tomography, emphysema, COPD

  11. Origins and spreads of Alpha 1 antitrypsin variants in world human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) represents a common hereditary disorder that mainly manifests as obstructive lung diseases and less common liver ... Anthropological history of Alpha 1 antitrypsin variants / Denden et al. ..... PIZ allele to be 2000 years or 66 generations, by analyzing STR and RFLP markers on.

  12. Quantification of Total Human Alpha-1 Antitrypsin by Sandwich ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiushi; Gruntman, Alisha M; Flotte, Terence R

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we describe an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to quantitatively measure human alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protein levels in serum, other body fluids or liquid media. This assay can be used to measure the expression of the human AAT (hAAT) gene in a variety of gene transfer or gene downregulation experiments.A hAAT-specific capture antibody and a HRP-conjugated anti-AAT detection antibody are used in this assay. The conjugated anti-AAT used in this protocol, instead of the typical sandwich which employs an unconjugated antibody followed by a specifically conjugated IgG, makes the assay simpler and decreases variability. This provides a useful tool to evaluate the AAT levels in clinical and research samples and can allow fairly rapid testing of a large number of samples.

  13. Diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency by DNA analysis of children with liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De TOMMASO Adriana Maria Alves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic disorder which is transmitted in a co-dominant, autosomal form. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency affects mainly the lungs and the liver leading, in the latter case, to neonatal cholestasis, chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis. A precise diagnosis of Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency may be obtained by biochemical or molecular analysis. Objective - The purpose of this study was to use DNA analysis to examine the presence of an alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in 12 children suspected of having this deficiency and who showed laboratory and clinical characteristics of the disease. Patients and Methods - Twelve patients, aged 3 months to 19 years, who had serum alpha-1-antitrypsin levels lower than normal and/or had hepatic disease of undefined etiology were studied. The mutant alleles S and Z of the alpha-1-antitrypsin gene were investigated in the 12 children. Alpha-1-antitrypsin gene organization was analyzed by amplification of genoma through the polymerase chain reaction and digestion with the restriction enzymes Xmnl (S allele and Taq 1 (Z allele. Results - Seven of the 12 patients had chronic liver disease of undefined etiology and the other five patients had low serum levels of alpha-1-antitrypsin as well as a diagnosis of neonatal cholestasis and/or chronic liver disease of undefined etiology. Five of the 12 patients were homozygous for the Z allele (ZZ and two had the S allele with another allele (*S different from Z. Conclusion - These results show that alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is relatively frequent in children with chronic hepatic disease of undefined etiology and/or low alpha-1-antitrypsin levels (41.6%. A correct diagnosis is important for effective clinical follow-up and for genetic counseling.

  14. Blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular and ischemic heart disease, and longevity in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Sillesen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Because elastase in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency may attack elastin in the arterial wall, we tested whether alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency is associated with reduced blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular (ICVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), and longevity.......Because elastase in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency may attack elastin in the arterial wall, we tested whether alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency is associated with reduced blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular (ICVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), and longevity....

  15. Gene targeted therapeutics for liver disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitriona McLean

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Caitriona McLean*, Catherine M Greene*, Noel G McElvaneyRespiratory Research Division, Dept. Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland; *Each of these authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT is a 52 kDa serine protease inhibitor that is synthesized in and secreted from the liver. Although it is present in all tissues in the body the present consensus is that its main role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. A1AT deficiency occurs due to mutations of the A1AT gene that reduce serum A1AT levels to <35% of normal. The most clinically significant form of A1AT deficiency is caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys. ZA1AT polymerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and the resulting accumulation of the mutant protein can lead to liver disease, while the reduction in circulating A1AT can result in lung disease including early onset emphysema. There is currently no available treatment for the liver disease other than transplantation and therapies for the lung manifestations of the disease remain limited. Gene therapy is an evolving field which may be of use as a treatment for A1AT deficiency. As the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency may represent a gain of function possible gene therapies for this condition include the use of ribozymes, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs and RNA interference (RNAi, which by decreasing the amount of aberrant protein in cells may impact on the pathogenesis of the condition.Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, siRNA, peptide nucleic acid, ribozymes

  16. Alpha-1 antitrypsin: a potent anti-inflammatory and potential novel therapeutic agent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2012-04-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) has long been thought of as an important anti-protease in the lung where it is known to decrease the destructive effects of major proteases such as neutrophil elastase. In recent years, the perception of this protein in this simple one dimensional capacity as an anti-protease has evolved and it is now recognised that AAT has significant anti-inflammatory properties affecting a wide range of inflammatory cells, leading to its potential therapeutic use in a number of important diseases. This present review aims to discuss the described anti-inflammatory actions of AAT in modulating key immune cell functions, delineate known signalling pathways and specifically to identify the models of disease in which AAT has been shown to be effective as a therapy.

  17. Environmental arsenic exposure, selenium and sputum alpha-1 antitrypsin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Jefferey L; Kurzius-Spencer, Margaret; Poplin, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased respiratory disease. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protects the lung against tissue destruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether arsenic exposure is associated with changes in airway AAT concentration and whether...... this relationship is modified by selenium. A total of 55 subjects were evaluated in Ajo and Tucson, Arizona. Tap water and first morning void urine were analyzed for arsenic species, induced sputum for AAT and toenails for selenium and arsenic. Household tap-water arsenic, toenail arsenic and urinary inorganic...... arsenic and metabolites were significantly higher in Ajo (20.6±3.5 μg/l, 0.54±0.77 μg/g and 27.7±21.2 μg/l, respectively) than in Tucson (3.9±2.5 μg/l, 0.16±0.20 μg/g and 13.0±13.8 μg/l, respectively). In multivariable models, urinary monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) was negatively, and toenail selenium...

  18. Active trafficking of alpha 1 antitrypsin across the lung endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelia D Lockett

    Full Text Available The homeostatic lung protective effects of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT may require the transport of circulating proteinase inhibitor across an intact lung endothelial barrier. We hypothesized that uninjured pulmonary endothelial cells transport A1AT to lung epithelial cells. Purified human A1AT was rapidly taken up by confluent primary rat pulmonary endothelial cell monolayers, was secreted extracellularly, both apically and basolaterally, and was taken up by adjacent rat lung epithelial cells co-cultured on polarized transwells. Similarly, polarized primary human lung epithelial cells took up basolaterally-, but not apically-supplied A1AT, followed by apical secretion. Evidence of A1AT transcytosis across lung microcirculation was confirmed in vivo by two-photon intravital microscopy in mice. Time-lapse confocal microscopy indicated that A1AT co-localized with Golgi in the endothelium whilst inhibition of the classical secretory pathway with tunicamycin significantly increased intracellular retention of A1AT. However, inhibition of Golgi secretion promoted non-classical A1AT secretion, associated with microparticle release. Polymerized A1AT or A1AT supplied to endothelial cells exposed to soluble cigarette smoke extract had decreased transcytosis. These results suggest previously unappreciated pathways of A1AT bidirectional uptake and secretion from lung endothelial cells towards the alveolar epithelium and airspaces. A1AT trafficking may determine its functional bioavailablity in the lung, which could be impaired in individuals exposed to smoking or in those with A1AT deficiency.

  19. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a potential biomarker for hepatitis B

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    Chen Zhi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Function exertion of specific proteins are key factors in disease progression, thus the systematical identification of those specific proteins is a prerequisite to understand various diseases. Though many proteins have been verified to impact on hepatitis, no systematical protein screening has been documented to hepatitis B virus (HBV induced hepatitis, hindering the comprehensive understanding to this severe disease. Aim To identify the major proteins in the progression of HBV infection from mild stage to severe stage. Methods We performed an integrated strategy by combining two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE, peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF analysis, and tissue microarray techniques to screen the functional proteins and detect the localization of those proteins. Results Interestingly, MS/MS identification revealed the expression level of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT was significantly elevated in serum samples from patients with severe chronic hepatitis. Immunoblotting with a specific AAT antibody confirmed that AAT is highly expressed in serum samples from patients with hepatic carcinoma and severe chronic hepatitis. Furthermore, we observed that AAT is with highest expression in normal tissue and cells, but lowest in hepatic carcinoma and severe chronic hepatitis tissues and cells, suggesting the specific secretion of AAT from tissues and cells to serum. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of AAT as a potential biomarker for hepatitis B in diagnosis.

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in alpha1-antitrypsin PI MZ heterozygotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Dahl, Morten; Ly, N P

    2004-01-01

    Severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency, usually related to homozygosity for the protease inhibitor (PI) Z allele, is a proven genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The risk of COPD in PI MZ heterozygous individuals is controversial.......Severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency, usually related to homozygosity for the protease inhibitor (PI) Z allele, is a proven genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The risk of COPD in PI MZ heterozygous individuals is controversial....

  1. Deficiency Mutations of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin. Effects on Folding, Function, and Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Imran; Irving, James A; Saleh, Aarash D; Dron, Louis; Regan-Mochrie, Gemma L; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Hurst, John R; Gooptu, Bibek; Lomas, David A

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding, polymerization, and defective secretion of functional alpha-1 antitrypsin underlies the predisposition to severe liver and lung disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. We have identified a novel (Ala336Pro, Baghdad) deficiency variant and characterized it relative to the wild-type (M) and Glu342Lys (Z) alleles. The index case is a homozygous individual of consanguineous parentage, with levels of circulating alpha-1 antitrypsin in the moderate deficiency range, but is a biochemical phenotype that could not be classified by standard methods. The majority of the protein was present as functionally inactive polymer, and the remaining monomer was 37% active relative to the wild-type protein. These factors combined indicate an 85 to 95% functional deficiency, similar to that seen with ZZ homozygotes. Biochemical, biophysical, and computational studies further defined the molecular basis of this deficiency. These studies demonstrated that native Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin could populate the polymerogenic intermediate-and therefore polymerize-more readily than either wild-type alpha-1 antitrypsin or the Z variant. In contrast, folding was far less impaired in Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin than in the Z variant. The data are consistent with a disparate contribution by the "breach" region and "shutter" region of strand 5A to folding and polymerization mechanisms. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that, in these variants, folding efficiency does not correlate directly with the tendency to polymerize in vitro or in vivo. They therefore differentiate generalized misfolding from polymerization tendencies in missense variants of alpha-1 antitrypsin. Clinically, they further support the need to quantify loss-of-function in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency to individualize patient care.

  2. The prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and classically presents with early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common mutation presenting with clinical evidence is the Z mutation, while the S mutation is associated with a milder plasma deficiency. AATD is an under-diagnosed condition and the World Health Organisation recommends targeted detection programmes for AATD in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), non-responsive asthma, cryptogenic liver disease and first degree relatives of known AATD patients. METHODS: We present data from the first 3,000 individuals screened following ATS\\/ERS guidelines as part of the Irish National Targeted Detection Programme (INTDP). We also investigated a DNA collection of 1,100 individuals randomly sampled from the general population. Serum and DNA was collected from both groups and mutations in the SERPINA1 gene detected by phenotyping or genotyping. RESULTS: The Irish National Targeted Detection Programme identified 42 ZZ, 44 SZ, 14 SS, 430 MZ, 263 MS, 20 IX and 2 rare mutations. Analysis of 1,100 randomly selected individuals identified 113 MS, 46 MZ, 2 SS and 2 SZ genotypes. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that AATD in Ireland is more prevalent than previously estimated with Z and S allele frequencies among the highest in the world. Furthermore, our targeted detection programme enriched the population of those carrying the Z but not the S allele, suggesting the Z allele is more important in the pathogenesis of those conditions targeted by the detection programme.

  3. The prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2011-07-13

    Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and classically presents with early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common mutation presenting with clinical evidence is the Z mutation, while the S mutation is associated with a milder plasma deficiency. AATD is an under-diagnosed condition and the World Health Organisation recommends targeted detection programmes for AATD in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), non-responsive asthma, cryptogenic liver disease and first degree relatives of known AATD patients. Methods We present data from the first 3,000 individuals screened following ATS\\/ERS guidelines as part of the Irish National Targeted Detection Programme (INTDP). We also investigated a DNA collection of 1,100 individuals randomly sampled from the general population. Serum and DNA was collected from both groups and mutations in the SERPINA1 gene detected by phenotyping or genotyping. Results The Irish National Targeted Detection Programme identified 42 ZZ, 44 SZ, 14 SS, 430 MZ, 263 MS, 20 IX and 2 rare mutations. Analysis of 1,100 randomly selected individuals identified 113 MS, 46 MZ, 2 SS and 2 SZ genotypes. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that AATD in Ireland is more prevalent than previously estimated with Z and S allele frequencies among the highest in the world. Furthermore, our targeted detection programme enriched the population of those carrying the Z but not the S allele, suggesting the Z allele is more important in the pathogenesis of those conditions targeted by the detection programme.

  4. Gene targeted therapeutics for liver disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLean, Caitriona

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is a 52 kDa serine protease inhibitor that is synthesized in and secreted from the liver. Although it is present in all tissues in the body the present consensus is that its main role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. A1AT deficiency occurs due to mutations of the A1AT gene that reduce serum A1AT levels to <35% of normal. The most clinically significant form of A1AT deficiency is caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys). ZA1AT polymerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and the resulting accumulation of the mutant protein can lead to liver disease, while the reduction in circulating A1AT can result in lung disease including early onset emphysema. There is currently no available treatment for the liver disease other than transplantation and therapies for the lung manifestations of the disease remain limited. Gene therapy is an evolving field which may be of use as a treatment for A1AT deficiency. As the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency may represent a gain of function possible gene therapies for this condition include the use of ribozymes, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and RNA interference (RNAi), which by decreasing the amount of aberrant protein in cells may impact on the pathogenesis of the condition.

  5. In vivo genome editing partially restores alpha1-antitrypsin in a murine model of AAT deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chun-Qing; Wang, Dan; Jiang, Tingting; O'Connor, Kevin; Tang, Qiushi; Cai, Lingling; Li, Xiangrui; Weng, Zhiping; Yin, Hao; Gao, Guangping; Mueller, Christian; Flotte, Terence R; Xue, Wen

    2018-03-29

    CRISPR genome editing holds promise in the treatment of genetic diseases that currently lack effective long-term therapies. Patients with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency develop progressive lung disease due to the loss of AAT's antiprotease function and liver disease due to a toxic gain of function of the common mutant allele. However, it remains unknown whether CRISPR-mediated AAT correction in the liver, where AAT is primarily expressed, can correct either or both defects. Here we show that AAV delivery of CRISPR can effectively correct Z-AAT mutation in the liver of a transgenic mouse model. Specifically, we co-injected two AAV: one expressing Cas9 and another encoding an AAT guide RNA and homology-dependent repair template. In both neonate and adult mice, this treatment partially restored M-AAT in the serum. Furthermore, deep sequencing confirmed both indel mutations and precise gene correction in the liver, permitting careful analysis of gene editing events in vivo. This study demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to correct AAT mutations in vivo and validates continued exploration of this approach for the treatment of patients with AAT deficiency.

  6. Alpha-1 antitrypsin prevents the development of preeclampsia through suppression of oxidative stress

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    Yaling eFeng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE and its complications have become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the world. And the development of PE is still barely predictable and thus challenging to prevent and manage clinically. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of the disease. Our previous study demonstrated that exogenous Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT played a cytoprotective role in vascular endothelial cell by suppressing oxidative stress. In this study, we aim to investigate whether AAT contributes to the development of PE, and to identify the mechanism behind these effects. We found that AAT levels were significantly decreased in placenta tissues from women with PE compared that of healthy women. Notably, we demonstrate that AAT injection is able to relieve the high blood pressure and reduce urine protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in PE mice. In addition, our results showed that AAT injection exhibited an anti-oxidative stress role by significantly reducing PE mediated-upregulation of ROS, MMP9 and MDA, and increasing the levels of SOD, eNOS and GPx with increased dosage of AAT. Furthermore, we found that AAT injection inactivated PE mediated activation of PAK/STAT1/p38 signaling. These findings were confirmed in human samples. In conclusion, our study suggests that exogenous AAT injection increases the antioxidants and suppresses oxidative stress, and subsequent prevention of PE development through inactivation of STAT1/p38 signaling. Thus, AAT would become a potential strategy for PE therapy.

  7. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Prevents the Development of Preeclampsia Through Suppression of Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yaling; Xu, Jianjuan; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Rong; Liu, Nin; Wu, Yanqun; Yuan, Hua; Che, Haisha

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) and its complications have become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the world. And the development of PE is still barely predictable and thus challenging to prevent and manage clinically. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of the disease. Our previous study demonstrated that exogenous Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) played a cytoprotective role in vascular endothelial cell by suppressing oxidative stress. In this study, we aim to investigate whether AAT contributes to the development of PE, and to identify the mechanism behind these effects. We found that AAT levels were significantly decreased in placenta tissues from women with PE compared that of healthy women. Notably, we demonstrate that AAT injection is able to relieve the high blood pressure and reduce urine protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in PE mice. In addition, our results showed that AAT injection exhibited an anti-oxidative stress role by significantly reducing PE mediated-upregulation of ROS, MMP9 and MDA, and increasing the levels of SOD, eNOS, and GPx with increased dosage of AAT. Furthermore, we found that AAT injection inactivated PE mediated activation of PAK/STAT1/p38 signaling. These findings were confirmed in human samples. In conclusion, our study suggests that exogenous AAT injection increases the antioxidants and suppresses oxidative stress, and subsequent prevention of PE development through inactivation of STAT1/p38 signaling. Thus, AAT would become a potential strategy for PE therapy.

  8. Antigen-specific tolerance of human alpha1-antitrypsin induced by helper-dependent adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, V; McCormack, W; Seiler, M; Mane, V; Cela, R; Clarke, C; Rodgers, J R; Lee, B

    2007-12-01

    As efficient and less toxic virus-derived gene therapy vectors are developed, a pressing problem is to avoid immune response to the therapeutic gene product. Secreted therapeutic proteins potentially represent a special problem, as they are readily available to professional antigen-presenting cells throughout the body. Some studies suggest that immunity to serum proteins can be avoided in some mouse strains by using tissue-specific promoters. Here we show that expression of human alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) was nonimmunogenic in the immune-responsive strain C3H/HeJ, when expressed from helper-dependent (HD) vectors using ubiquitous as well as tissue-specific promoters. Coadministration of less immunogenic HD vectors with an immunogenic first-generation vector failed to immunize, suggesting immune suppression rather than immune stealth. Indeed, mice primed with HD vectors were tolerant to immune challenge with hAAT emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant. Such animals developed high-titer antibodies to coemulsified human serum albumin, showing that tolerance was antigen specific. AAT-specific T cell responses were depressed in tolerized animals, suggesting that tolerance affects both T and B cells. These results are consistent with models of high-dose tolerance of B cells and certain other suppressive mechanisms, and suggest that a high level of expression from HD vectors can be sufficient to induce specific immune tolerance to serum proteins.

  9. Change in lung function and morbidity from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in alpha1-antitrypsin MZ heterozygotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    A deteriorating effect of severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency (ZZ genotype) on lung function is well known, whereas the role of intermediate deficiency (MZ genotype) remains uncertain.......A deteriorating effect of severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency (ZZ genotype) on lung function is well known, whereas the role of intermediate deficiency (MZ genotype) remains uncertain....

  10. Alpha-1 antitrypsin reduces ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha-1antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional protein with proteinase inhibitor and anti-inflammatory activities. Recent studies showed that AAT has therapeutic effect for diseases associated with inflammation, such as type 1 diabetes and arthritis. Proinflammatory cytokines are primary mediators of...

  11. Hepatic-targeted RNA interference provides persistent knockdown of alpha-1 antitrypsin levels in ZZ patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Alice M; Stolk, Jan; Bals, Robert; Lickliter, Jason; Hamilton, James; Christianson, Dawn R; Given, Bruce D; Burdon, Jonathan G; Loomba, Rohit; Stoller, James K; Teckman, Jeffery H

    2018-03-20

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a genetic disorder causing pulmonary and liver disease. The PiZ mutation results in mis-folded alpha-1 antitrypsin protein (Z-AAT) leading to hepatocyte accumulation, fibrosis and cirrhosis. RNAi-based therapeutics silencing production of hepatic Z-AAT might benefit patients with AATD-associated liver disease. This study evaluated an RNAi therapeutic to silence production of alpha-1 antitrypsin. Part A of this double-blind first-in-human study randomized 54 healthy volunteers (HVs) into single dose cohorts (2 placebo: 4 active), receiving escalating doses of the investigational agent ARC-AAT from 0.38 to 8.0 mg/kg or placebo. Part B randomized 11 PiZZ genotype AATD patients who received up to 4.0 mg/kg or placebo. Patients with baseline FibroScan® >11 kPa or FEV 1 (forced expiratory volume in one second) < 60% were excluded. Assessments included safety, pharmacokinetics, and change in serum alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) concentrations. 36 healthy volunteers received ARC-AAT and 18 received placebo (Part A). Seven PiZZ individuals received ARC-AAT and 4 received placebo (Part B). A dose-response in serum AAT reduction was observed at doses ≥ 4 mg/kg with similar relative reductions in PiZZ patients and HVs at 4 mg/kg and a maximum reduction of 76.1% (HVs) vs. 78.8% (PiZZ) at this dose. Time for serum AAT return to baseline was similar for HV and PiZZ. There were no notable differences between HV and PiZZ safety parameters. The study was terminated early due to toxicity findings related to the delivery vehicle (ARC-EX1) seen in a non-human primate study. PiZZ and HV responded similarly to ARC-AAT. Deep and durable knockdown of hepatic AAT production based on observed reduction in serum AAT concentrations was demonstrated. Accumulation of abnormal proteins in the livers of patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency may lead to decreased liver function and potentially liver failure. Therapeutics targeting the production of

  12. Muramidase, alpha-1 antitrypsin, alpha-1 antichymotrypsin, and S-100 protein immunoreactivity in giant cell lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Zarbo, R J; Lloyd, R V

    1987-01-01

    A spectrum of giant cell lesions was evaluated for muramidase, alpha-1 antitrypsin, alpha-1 antichymotrypsin, and S-100 protein immunoreactivity using an avidin-biotin-complex immunoperoxidase method. Peripheral giant cell granuloma, central giant cell granuloma, giant cell tumor, osteitis fibrosa cystica, cherubism, and giant cell tumor of tendon sheath showed similar patterns of reactivity. Granulomatous inflammatory lesions stained more intensely for muramidase than did noninflammatory lesions. Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin was a slightly better marker of giant cell lesions than was alpha-1-antitrypsin. Positive S-100 protein staining in half the lesions was thought to be due to the presence of Langerhans cells. The results supported the belief that giant cell lesions of bone and tendon sheath are differentiated toward cells of the mononuclear-phagocyte system and that multinucleated giant cells are derived from macrophages.

  13. Deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina: diagnóstico e tratamento Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquiles A Camelier

    2008-07-01

    implications. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is mainly produced in the liver and acts as an antiprotease. Its principal function is to inactivate neutrophil elastase, preventing tissue damage. The mutation most commonly associated with the clinical disease is the Z allele, which causes polymerization and accumulation within hepatocytes. The accumulation of and the consequent reduction in the serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin cause, respectively, liver and lung disease, the latter occurring mainly as early emphysema, predominantly in the lung bases. Diagnosis involves detection of low serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin as well as phenotypic confirmation. In addition to the standard treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, specific therapy consisting of infusion of purified alpha-1 antitrypsin is currently available. The clinical efficacy of this therapy, which appears to be safe, has yet to be definitively established, and its cost-effectiveness is also a controversial issue that is rarely addressed. Despite its importance, in Brazil, there are no epidemiological data on the prevalence of the disease or the frequency of occurrence of deficiency alleles. Underdiagnosis has also been a significant limitation to the study of the disease as well as to appropriate treatment of patients. It is hoped that the creation of the Alpha One International Registry will resolve these and other important issues.

  14. Prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and allele frequency in patients with COPD in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Rodrigo; Zillmer, Laura Russo; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Manzano, Beatriz; Ivanaga, Ivan Teruaki; Fritscher, Leandro; Lundgren, Fernando; Miravitlles, Marc; Gondim, Heicilainy Del Carlos; Santos Junior, Gildo; Alves, Marcela Amorim; Oliveira, Maria Vera; Souza, Altay Alves Lino de; Sales, Maria Penha Uchoa; Jardim, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the prevalence of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD), as well as allele frequency, in COPD patients in Brazil. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 926 COPD patients 40 years of age or older, from five Brazilian states. All patients underwent determination of AAT levels in dried blood spot (DBS) samples by nephelometry. Those with DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL underwent determination of serum AAT levels. Those with serum AAT levels of <...

  15. Recombinant AAV serotype and capsid mutant comparison for pulmonary gene transfer of alpha-1-antitrypsin using invasive and noninvasive delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liqun Wang, Rejean; McLaughlin, Thomas; Cossette, Travis; Tang, Qiushi; Foust, Kevin; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Martino, Ashley; Cruz, Pedro; Loiler, Scott; Mueller, Christian; Flotte, Terence R

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have been widely used in pulmonary gene therapy research. In this study, we evaluated the transduction and expression efficiencies of several AAV serotypes and AAV2 capsid mutants with specific pulmonary targeting ligands in the mouse lung. The noninvasive intranasal delivery was compared with the traditional intratracheal lung delivery. The rAAV8 was the most efficient serotype at expressing alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the lung among all the tested serotypes and mutants. A dose of 1 x 10(10) vg of rAAV8-CB-AAT transduced a high percentage of cells in the lung when delivered intratrachealy. The serum and the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) levels of human AAT (hAAT) were about 6- and 2.5-fold higher, respectively, than those of rAAV5 group. Among the rAAV2 capsid mutants, the rAAV2 capsid mutants that display a peptide sequence from hAAT ("long serpin") indicated a twofold increase in transgene expression. For most vectors, the serum hAAT levels achieved after intranasal delivery were 1/2 to 1/3 of those with the intratracheal method. Overall, rAAV8 was the most promising vector for the future application in gene therapy of pulmonary diseases such as AAT deficiency-related emphysema.

  16. Alpha-1 antitrypsin Pi*SZ genotype: estimated prevalence and number of SZ subjects worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco I

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Blanco,1 Patricia Bueno,2 Isidro Diego,3 Sergio Pérez-Holanda,4 Beatriz Lara,5 Francisco Casas-Maldonado,6 Cristina Esquinas,7 Marc Miravitlles7,8 1Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Spanish Registry (REDAAT, Lung Foundation Breathe, Spanish Society of Pneumology (SEPAR, Barcelona, Spain; 2Internal Medicine Department, County Hospital of Jarrio, Principality of Asturias, Spain; 3Materials and Energy Department, School of Mining Engineering, Oviedo University, Principality of Asturias, Spain; 4Surgical Department, University Central Hospital of Asturias, Oviedo, Spain; 5Respiratory Medicine Department, Coventry and Warwickshire University Hospital, Coventry, UK; 6Pneumology Department, University Hospital San Cecilio, Granada, Spain; 7Pneumology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain; 8CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: The alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT haplotype Pi*S, when inherited along with the Pi*Z haplotype to form a Pi*SZ genotype, can be associated with pulmonary emphysema in regular smokers, and less frequently with liver disease, panniculitis, and systemic vasculitis in a small percentage of people, but this connection is less well established. Since the detection of cases can allow the application of preventive measures in patients and relatives with this congenital disorder, the objective of this study was to update the prevalence of the SZ genotype to achieve accurate estimates of the number of Pi*SZ subjects worldwide, based on studies performed according to the following criteria: 1 samples representative of the general population, 2 AAT phenotyping characterized by adequate methods, and 3 selection of studies with reliable results assessed with a coefficient of variation calculated from the sample size and 95% confidence intervals. Studies fulfilling these criteria were used to develop tables and maps with an inverse distance-weighted (IDW interpolation method, to

  17. Bioequivalence of a Liquid Formulation of Alpha1-Proteinase Inhibitor Compared with Prolastin®-C (Lyophilized Alpha1-PI) in Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Alan F; Campos, Michael A; Brantly, Mark L; Stocks, James M; Sandhaus, Robert A; Lee, Douglas; Steinmann, Kimberly; Lin, Jiang; Sorrells, Susan

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluated the bioequivalence, safety, and immunogenicity of a new liquid formulation of human plasma-derived alpha 1 -proteinase inhibitor, Liquid Alpha 1 -PI, compared with the Lyophilized Alpha 1 -PI formulation (Prolastin®-C), for augmentation therapy in patients with alpha 1 -antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). In this double-blind, randomized, 20-week crossover study, 32 subjects with AATD were randomized to receive 8 weekly infusions of 60 mg/kg of Liquid Alpha 1 -PI or Lyophilized Alpha 1 -PI. Serial blood samples were drawn for 7 days after the last dose followed by 8 weeks of the alternative treatment. The primary endpoint was bioequivalence at steady state, as measured by area under the concentration versus time curve from 0 to 7 days (AUC 0-7 days ) postdose using an antigenic content assay. Bioequivalence was defined as 90% confidence interval (CI) for the ratio of the geometric least squares (LS) mean of AUC 0-7 days for both products within the limits of 0.80 and 1.25. Safety and immunogenicity were assessed. Mean alpha 1 -PI concentration versus time curves for both formulations were superimposable. Mean AUC 0-7 days was 20 320 versus 19 838 mg × h/dl for Liquid Alpha 1 -PI and Lyophilized Alpha 1 -PI, respectively. The LS mean ratio of AUC 0-7 days (90% CI) for Liquid Alpha 1 -PI versus Lyophilized Alpha 1 -PI was 1.05 (1.03-1.08), indicating bioequivalence. Liquid Alpha 1 -PI was well tolerated and adverse events were consistent with Lyophilized Alpha 1 -PI. Immunogenicity to either product was not detected. In conclusion, Liquid Alpha 1 -PI is bioequivalent to Lyophilized Alpha 1 -PI, with a similar safety profile. The liquid formulation would eliminate the need for reconstitution and shorten preparation time for patients receiving augmentation therapy for AATD.

  18. Causal and Synthetic Associations of Variants in the SERPINA Gene Cluster with Alpha1-antitrypsin Serum Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thun, Gian Andri; Imboden, Medea; Ferrarotti, Ilaria

    2013-01-01

    Several infrequent genetic polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 gene are known to substantially reduce concentration of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the blood. Since low AAT serum levels fail to protect pulmonary tissue from enzymatic degradation, these polymorphisms also increase the risk for early onse...

  19. Inhibition of activated protein C by recombinant alpha 1-antitrypsin variants with substitution of arginine or leucine for methionine358

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeb, M.J.; Bischoff, Rainer; Courtney, M.; Griffin, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) was recently identified as a major physiologic plasma inhibitor of activated protein C. The reaction with activated protein C of recombinant alpha 1-AT containing amino acid substitutions at the reactive center was studied. The substitution of Arg358 for Met, as

  20. alpha-1-Antitrypsin (AAT)-modified donor cells suppress GVHD but enhance the GVL effect: a role for mitochondrial bioenergetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcondes, A.M.; Karoopongse, E.; Lesnikova, M.; Margineantu, D.; Welte, T.; Dinarello, C.A.; Hockenbery, D.; Janciauskiene, S.; Deeg, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is curative in many patients. However, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), triggered by alloreactive donor cells, has remained a major complication. Here, we show an inverse correlation between plasma alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) levels in human donors and the

  1. Alpha-1 antitrypsin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as serum biomarkers of disease severity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict

    2015-01-01

    -stimulating factor produced a predictive model with an AUC of 0.72 when differentiating mild and moderate UC, and an AUC of 0.96 when differentiating moderate and severe UC, the latter being as reliable as CRP. CONCLUSIONS: Alpha-1 antitrypsin is identified as a potential serum biomarker of mild-to-moderate disease...

  2. Rationale and Design of the Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) Study. Sarcoidosis Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, David R; Koth, Laura L; Maier, Lisa A; Morris, Alison; Drake, Wonder; Rossman, Milton; Leader, Joseph K; Collman, Ronald G; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Sweiss, Nadera J; Zhang, Yingze; O'Neal, Scott; Senior, Robert M; Becich, Michael; Hochheiser, Harry S; Kaminski, Naftali; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Gibson, Kevin F

    2015-10-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease characterized by noncaseating granulomatous inflammation with tremendous clinical heterogeneity and uncertain pathobiology and lacking in clinically useful biomarkers. The Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) study is an observational cohort study designed to explore the role of the lung microbiome and genome in these two diseases. This article describes the design and rationale for the GRADS study sarcoidosis protocol. The study addresses the hypothesis that distinct patterns in the lung microbiome are characteristic of sarcoidosis phenotypes and are reflected in changes in systemic inflammatory responses as measured by peripheral blood changes in gene transcription. The goal is to enroll 400 participants, with a minimum of 35 in each of 9 clinical phenotype subgroups prioritized by their clinical relevance to understanding of the pathobiology and clinical heterogeneity of sarcoidosis. Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of sarcoidosis undergo a baseline visit with self-administered questionnaires, chest computed tomography, pulmonary function tests, and blood and urine testing. A research or clinical bronchoscopy with a research bronchoalveolar lavage will be performed to obtain samples for genomic and microbiome analyses. Comparisons will be made by blood genomic analysis and with clinical phenotypic variables. A 6-month follow-up visit is planned to assess each participant's clinical course. By the use of an integrative approach to the analysis of the microbiome and genome in selected clinical phenotypes, the GRADS study is powerfully positioned to inform and direct studies on the pathobiology of sarcoidosis, identify diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, and provide novel molecular phenotypes that could lead to improved personalized approaches to therapy for sarcoidosis.

  3. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in Madeira (Portugal): the highest prevalence in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spínola, Carla; Bruges-Armas, Jácome; Pereira, Conceição; Brehm, António; Spínola, Hélder

    2009-10-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a common genetic disease which affects both lung and liver. Early diagnosis can help asymptomatic patients to adjust their lifestyle choices in order to reduce the risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The determination of this genetic deficiency prevalence in Madeira Island (Portugal) population is important to clarify susceptibility and define the relevance of performing genetic tests for AAT on individuals at risk for COPD. Two hundred samples of unrelated individuals from Madeira Island were genotyped for the two most common AAT deficiency alleles, PI*S and PI*Z, using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Mediated Site-Directed Mutagenesis. Our results show one of the highest frequencies for both mutations when compared to any already studied population in the world. In fact, PI*S mutation has the highest prevalence (18%), and PI*Z mutation (2.5%) was the third highest worldwide. The frequency of AAT deficiency genotypes in Madeira (PI*ZZ, PI*SS, and PI*SZ) is estimated to be the highest in the world: 41 per 1000. This high prevalence of AAT deficiency on Madeira Island reveals an increased genetic susceptibility to COPD and suggests a routine genetic testing for individuals at risk.

  4. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus.

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    Ahmed S Elshikha

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist and CpG (TLR9 agonist -induced bone-marrow (BM-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans.

  5. Evidence for unfolded protein response activation in monocytes from individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2010-04-15

    The hereditary disorder alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and presents with emphysema in young adults and liver disease in childhood. The most common form of AAT deficiency occurs because of the Z mutation, causing the protein to fold aberrantly and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This leads to ER stress and contributes significantly to the liver disease associated with the condition. In addition to hepatocytes, AAT is also synthesized by monocytes, neutrophils, and epithelial cells. In this study we show for the first time that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in quiescent monocytes from ZZ individuals. Activating transcription factor 4, X-box binding protein 1, and a subset of genes involved in the UPR are increased in monocytes from ZZ compared with MM individuals. This contributes to an inflammatory phenotype with ZZ monocytes exhibiting enhanced cytokine production and activation of the NF-kappaB pathway when compared with MM monocytes. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular accumulation of AAT within the ER of ZZ monocytes. These are the first data showing that Z AAT protein accumulation induces UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. These findings change the current paradigm regarding lung inflammation in AAT deficiency, which up until now was derived from the protease-anti-protease hypothesis, but which now must include the exaggerated inflammatory response generated by accumulated aberrantly folded AAT in circulating blood cells.

  6. Diabetic retinopathy: could the alpha-1 antitrypsin be a therapeutic option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ortiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most important causes of blindness. The underlying mechanisms of this disease include inflammatory changes and remodeling processes of the extracellular-matrix (ECM leading to pericyte and vascular endothelial cell damage that affects the retinal circulation. In turn, this causes hypoxia leading to release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF to induce the angiogenesis process. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is the most important circulating inhibitor of serine proteases (SERPIN. Its targets include elastase, plasmin, thrombin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, proteinase 3 (PR-3 and plasminogen activator (PAI. AAT modulates the effect of protease-activated receptors (PARs during inflammatory responses. Plasma levels of AAT can increase 4-fold during acute inflammation then is so-called acute phase protein (APPs. Individuals with low serum levels of AAT could develop disease in lung, liver and pancreas. AAT is involved in extracellular matrix remodeling and inflammation, particularly migration and chemotaxis of neutrophils. It can also suppress nitric oxide (NO by nitric oxide sintase (NOS inhibition. AAT binds their targets in an irreversible way resulting in product degradation. The aim of this review is to focus on the points of contact between multiple factors involved in diabetic retinopathy and AAT resembling pleiotropic effects that might be beneficial.

  7. Functional unfolding of alpha1-antitrypsin probed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Je-Hyun; Yang, Won Suk; Lee, Cheolju; Yu, Myeong-Hee

    2009-05-01

    The native state of alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)AT), a member of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) family, is considered a kinetically trapped folding intermediate that converts to a more stable form upon complex formation with a target protease. Although previous structural and mutational studies of alpha(1)AT revealed the structural basis of the native strain and the kinetic trap, the mechanism of how the native molecule overcomes the kinetic barrier to reach the final stable conformation during complex formation remains unknown. We hypothesized that during complex formation, a substantial portion of the molecule undergoes unfolding, which we dubbed functional unfolding. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with ESI-MS was used to analyze this serpin in three forms: native, complexing, and complexed with bovine beta-trypsin. Comparing the deuterium content at the corresponding regions of these three samples, we probed the unfolding of alpha(1)AT during complex formation. A substantial portion of the alpha(1)AT molecule unfolded transiently during complex formation, including not only the regions expected from previous structural studies, such as the reactive site loop, helix F, and the following loop, but also regions not predicted previously, such as helix A, strand 6 of beta-sheet B, and the N terminus. Such unfolding of the native interactions may elevate the free energy level of the kinetically trapped native serpin sufficiently to cross the transition state during complex formation. In the current study, we provide evidence that protein unfolding has to accompany functional execution of the protein molecule.

  8. Endothelial alpha-1-antitrypsin attenuates cigarette smoke induced apoptosis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldonyte, Ruta; Hutchinson, Tarun Edgar; Hutchinson, Edgar Tarun; Jin, Bilian; Brantly, Mark; Block, Edward; Patel, Jawaharlal; Zhang, Jianliang

    2008-06-01

    Deficiency of the antiprotease alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) and exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) contribute to the development of early onset emphysema. CS-induced apoptosis of alveolar cells including endothelial cells plays critical role in the lung destruction. AAT deficiency is associated with increased lung tissue destruction as well. We hypothesize that AAT protects lung alveoli from noxious environmental stimuli such as CS-induced apoptosis. Porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) were exposed to CS in the presence or absence of AAT (20 microM). AAT internalization and markers for apoptosis were assessed by confocal microscopy. Flow cytometry was performed in parallel to quantify the number of AAT-loaded and apoptotic cells. We demonstrated that exogenous AAT accumulated in PAEC and protected cells from CS-induced apoptosis. AAT-loaded CS-exposed cells exhibited increased amounts of chaperone HSP-70 in their cytosol and less apoptosis inducing factor in their nuclei compared to AAT-untreated, CS-exposed cells. Our results suggest that AAT is taken up by endothelial cells via two mechanisms and that intracellular AAT may have a protective role in CS-induced endothelial apoptosis. This may open new insights into the field of endothelial serpins as agents capable of protecting the vasculature from environment-derived noxious substances.

  9. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene polymorphism in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Denden

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT plays an important role in the pathogenesis of emphysema, the pathological lesion underlying the majority of the manifestations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. In this study we tested the hypothesis that common AAT polymorphisms influence the risk of developing COPDs. We investigated PiM1 (Ala213Val, PiM2 (Arg101His, PiM3 (Glu376Asp, PiS (Glu264Val and PiZ (Glu342Lys SERPINA1 alleles in 100 COPD patients and 200 healthy controls. No significant differences were observed in allele frequencies between COPD patients and controls, neither did haplotype analysis show significant differences between the two groups. A cross-sectional study revealed no significant relationship between common SERPINA1 polymorphisms (PiM1, PiM2, PiM3 and the emphysematous type of COPD. In addition, FEV1 annual decline, determined during a two-year follow up period, revealed no difference among carriers of the tested polymorphisms.

  10. SVIP regulates Z variant alpha-1 antitrypsin retro-translocation by inhibiting ubiquitin ligase gp78.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazli Khodayari

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is an inherited disorder characterized by early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common disease-causing mutation is a single amino acid substitution (Glu/Lys at amino acid 342 of the mature protein, resulting in disruption of the 290-342 salt bridge (an electrophoretic abnormality defining the mutation [Z allele, or ZAAT], protein misfolding, polymerization, and accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and monocytes. The Z allele causes a toxic gain of function, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase gp78 promotes degradation and increased solubility of endogenous ZAAT. We hypothesized that the accumulation of ZAAT is influenced by modulation of gp78 E3 ligase and SVIP (small VCP-interacting protein interaction with p97/VCP in ZAAT-expressing hepatocytes. We showed that the SVIP inhibitory effect on ERAD due to overexpression causes the accumulation of ZAAT in a human Z hepatocyte-like cell line (AT01. Overexpression of gp78, as well as SVIP suppression, induces gp78-VCP/p97 interaction in AT01 cells. This interaction leads to retro-translocation of ZAAT and reduction of the SVIP inhibitory role in ERAD. In this context, overexpression of gp78 or SVIP suppression may eliminate the toxic gain of function associated with polymerization of ZAAT, thus providing a potential new therapeutic approach to the treatment of AATD.

  11. Selenoprotein S/SEPS1 modifies endoplasmic reticulum stress in Z variant alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-06-19

    Z alpha(1)-antitrypsin (ZAAT) deficiency is a disease associated with emphysematous lung disease and also with liver disease. The liver disease of AAT deficiency is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. SEPS1 is a selenoprotein that, through a chaperone activity, decreases ER stress. To determine the effect of SEPS1 on ER stress in ZAAT deficiency, we measured activity of the grp78 promoter and levels of active ATF6 as markers of the unfolded protein response in HepG2 cells transfected with the mutant form of AAT, a ZAAT transgene. We evaluated levels of NFkappaB activity as a marker of the ER overload response. To determine the effect of selenium supplementation on the function of SEPS1, we investigated glutathione peroxidase activity, grp78 promoter activity, and NFkappaB activity in the presence or absence of selenium. SEPS1 reduced levels of active ATF6. Overexpression of SEPS1 also inhibited grp78 promoter and NFkappaB activity, and this effect was enhanced in the presence of selenium supplementation. This finding demonstrates a role for SEPS1 in ZAAT deficiency and suggests a possible therapeutic potential for selenium supplementation.

  12. Sex differences in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency lung disease-analysis from the German registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähndrich, Sebastian; Herr, Christian; Greulich, Timm; Seibert, Martina; Lepper, Philipp M; Bernhard, Nikolas; Lützow, Cindy; Vogelmeier, Claus; Bals, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare condition with clinical manifestations of the lung and the liver. There is evidence that the gender affects the clinical presentation of non-AATD chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to analyze gender-dependent disease pattern in AATD-based COPD. Data from 1066 individuals from the German AATD registry were analyzed by descriptive and analytical statistics. The AAT genotypes comprised 820 individuals with PiZZ (male 56%, female 45%), 109 with PI SZ (male 55%; female 45%), and others (n = 137). A subgroup of 422 patients with available post-bronchodilator FEV1% predicted was analyzed in detail after stratification in spirometric GOLD stages I-IV. The age of the registered individuals is 52.2 ± 13.4 years (male: 51.91 ± 13.86 years; female: 52.76 ± 13.39 years). Female patients with GOLD I-IV showed lower numbers of pack-years and lower BMI. The time between the first symptom and the establishment of the correct diagnosis was significantly longer in female (14.47 ± 16.46 years) as compared to male individuals (12.39 ± - 14.38 years, p = 0.04). In conclusion, the data of the registry allow to characterize the natural course of the disease and highlight differences in the clinical presentation of patients with AATD-dependent COPD.

  13. Circulating alpha1-antitrypsin in the general population: Determinants and association with lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency associated with low AAT blood concentrations is an established genetic COPD risk factor. Less is known about the respiratory health impact of variation in AAT serum concentrations in the general population. We cross-sectionally investigated correlates of circulating AAT concentrations and its association with FEV1. Methods In 5187 adults (2669 females with high-sensitive c-reactive protein (CRP levels ≤ 10 mg/l from the population-based Swiss SAPALDIA cohort, blood was collected at the time of follow-up examination for measuring serum AAT and CRP. Results Female gender, hormone intake, systolic blood pressure, age in men and in postmenopausal women, as well as active and passive smoking were positively, whereas alcohol intake and BMI inversely correlated with serum AAT levels, independent of CRP adjustment. We observed an inverse association of AAT with FEV1 in the total study population (p Conclusion The results of this population-based study reflect a complex interrelationship between tobacco exposure, gender related factors, circulating AAT, systemic inflammatory status and lung function.

  14. Anti-apoptotic effects of Z alpha1-antitrypsin in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, C M

    2010-05-01

    alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT) deficiency is a genetic disease which manifests as early-onset emphysema or liver disease. Although the majority of alpha(1)-AT is produced by the liver, it is also produced by bronchial epithelial cells, amongst others, in the lung. Herein, we investigate the effects of mutant Z alpha(1)-AT (ZAAT) expression on apoptosis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) and delineate the mechanisms involved. Control, M variant alpha(1)-AT (MAAT)- or ZAAT-expressing cells were assessed for apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, phosphorylation of Bad, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and induced expression of a selection of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Expression of ZAAT in 16HBE14o- cells, like MAAT, inhibited basal and agonist-induced apoptosis. ZAAT expression also inhibited caspase-3 activity by 57% compared with control cells (p = 0.05) and was a more potent inhibitor than MAAT. Whilst ZAAT had no effect on the activity of Bad, its expression activated NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression above control or MAAT-expressing cells. In 16HBE14o- cells but not HEK293 cells, ZAAT upregulated expression of cIAP-1, an upstream regulator of NF-kappaB. cIAP1 expression was increased in ZAAT versus MAAT bronchial biopsies. The data suggest a novel mechanism by which ZAAT may promote human bronchial epithelial cell survival.

  15. The Influence of Cigarette Smoking on Gingival Bleeding and Serum Concentrations of Haptoglobin and Alpha 1-Antitrypsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad H. Al-Bayaty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP, and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at α≤0.05. Linear regression analyses were performed. The mean cigarette consumption per day was 13.39±5.75 cigarettes; the mean duration was 16.03±8.78 years. Relatively low BOP values (26.05±1.48 and moderate plaque indexes (51.35±11.27 were found. The levels of serum cotinine (106.9±30.71 ng/dL, haptoglobin (76.04±52.48 mg/dL, and alpha 1-antitrypsin (141.90±18.40 mg/dL were significantly higher in smokers compared to non-smokers. Multiple logistic regression models for all variables and smokers demonstrated observed differences between BOP, the number of cigarettes per day, and duration of smoking, while serum cotinine, haptoglobin and alpha-1 antitrypsin levels showed no significant differences. Duration of smoking (years and the cotinine level in serum showed a significant correlation with plaque index. The present analysis demonstrated that the duration of smoking in years, but not the number of cigarettes smoked per day, was associated with reduced gingival bleeding in smokers.

  16. Serum Proteins Associated with Emphysema Progression in Severe Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiko, Tatsiana; Janech, Michael G; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Atkinson, Carl; Coxson, Harvey O; Barth, Jeremy L; Stephenson, Sarah E; Wilson, Carole L; Schnapp, Lynn M; Barker, Alan; Brantly, Mark; Sandhaus, Robert A; Silverman, Edwin K; Stoller, James K; Trapnell, Bruce; Charlie, Strange

    2017-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) lung density is an accepted biomarker for emphysema in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), although concerns for radiation exposure limit its longitudinal use. Serum proteins associated with emphysema, particularly in early disease, may provide additional pathogenic insights. We investigated whether distinct proteomic signatures characterize the presence and progression of emphysema in individuals with severe AATD and normal forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ). QUANT itative lung CT U n M asking emphysema progression in AATD (QUANTUM-1) is a multicenter, prospective 3-year study of 49 adults with severe AATD and FEV 1 post-bronchodilator values (Post-BD) ≥ 80% predicted. All participants received chest CT, serial spirometry, and contributed to the serum biobank. Volumetric imaging display and analysis (VIDA) software defined the baseline 15 th percentile density (PD15) which was indexed to CT-derived total lung capacity (TLC). We measured 317 proteins using a multiplexed immunoassay (Myriad Discovery MAP ® panel) in 31 individuals with a complete dataset. We analyzed associations between initial PD15/TLC, PD15/TLC annual decline, body mass index (BMI), and protein levels using Pearson's product moment correlation. C-reactive protein (CRP), adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AFBP), leptin, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) were found to be associated with baseline emphysema and all but leptin were associated with emphysema progression after adjustments were made for age and sex. All 4 proteins were associated with BMI after further adjustment for multiple comparisons was made. The relationship between these proteins and BMI, and further validation of these findings in replicative cohorts require additional studies.

  17. Rapid renal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene induction in experimental and clinical acute kidney injury.

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    Richard A Zager

    Full Text Available Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT is a hepatic stress protein with protease inhibitor activity. Recent evidence indicates that ischemic or toxic injury can evoke selective changes within kidney that resemble a hepatic phenotype. Hence, we tested the following: i Does acute kidney injury (AKI up-regulate the normally renal silent AAT gene? ii Does rapid urinary AAT excretion result? And iii Can AAT's anti-protease/anti-neutrophil elastase (NE activity protect injured proximal tubule cells? CD-1 mice were subjected to ischemic or nephrotoxic (glycerol, maleate, cisplatin AKI. Renal functional and biochemical assessments were made 4-72 hrs later. Rapidly following injury, 5-10 fold renal cortical and isolated proximal tubule AAT mRNA and protein increases occurred. These were paralleled by rapid (>100 fold increases in urinary AAT excretion. AKI also induced marked increases in renal cortical/isolated proximal tubule NE mRNA. However, sharp NE protein levels declines resulted, which strikingly correlated (r, -0.94 with rising AAT protein levels (reflecting NE complexing by AAT/destruction. NE addition to HK-2 cells evoked ∼95% cell death. AAT completely blocked this NE toxicity, as well as Fe induced oxidant HK-2 cell attack. Translational relevance of experimental AAT gene induction was indicated by ∼100-1000 fold urinary AAT increases in 22 AKI patients (matching urine NGAL increases. We conclude: i AKI rapidly up-regulates the renal cortical/proximal tubule AAT gene; ii NE gene induction also results; iii AAT can confer cytoprotection, potentially by blocking/reducing cytotoxic NE accumulation; and iv marked increases in urinary AAT excretion in AKI patients implies clinical relevance of the AKI- AAT induction pathway.

  18. Alpha-1-antitrypsin is an endogenous inhibitor of proinflammatory cytokine production in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Gregory B; Chan, Edward D; Dinarello, Charles A; Shapiro, Leland

    2009-05-01

    Several observations suggest endogenous suppressors of inflammatory mediators are present in human blood. alpha-1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is the most abundant serine protease inhibitor in blood, and AAT possesses anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that in vitro stimulation of whole blood from persons with a genetic AAT deficiency resulted in enhanced cytokine production compared with blood from healthy subjects. Using whole blood from healthy subjects, dilution of blood with RPMI tissue-culture medium, followed by incubation for 18 h, increased spontaneous production of IL-8, TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra) significantly, compared with undiluted blood. Dilution-induced cytokine production suggested the presence of one or more circulating inhibitors of cytokine synthesis present in blood. Serially diluting blood with tissue-culture medium in the presence of cytokine stimulation with heat-killed Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epi) resulted in 1.2- to 55-fold increases in cytokine production compared with S. epi stimulation alone. Diluting blood with autologous plasma did not increase the production of IL-8, TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, or IL-1Ra, suggesting that the endogenous, inhibitory activity of blood resided in plasma. In whole blood, diluted and stimulated with S. epi, exogenous AAT inhibited IL-8, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 beta significantly but did not suppress induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1Ra and IL-10. These ex vivo and in vitro observations suggest that endogenous AAT in blood contributes to the suppression of proinflammatory cytokine synthesis.

  19. Prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and allele frequency in patients with COPD in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Rodrigo; Zillmer, Laura Russo; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Manzano, Beatriz; Ivanaga, Ivan Teruaki; Fritscher, Leandro; Lundgren, Fernando; Miravitlles, Marc; Gondim, Heicilainy Del Carlos; Santos, Gildo; Alves, Marcela Amorim; Oliveira, Maria Vera; Souza, Altay Alves Lino de; Sales, Maria Penha Uchoa; Jardim, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD), as well as allele frequency, in COPD patients in Brazil. This was a cross-sectional study involving 926 COPD patients 40 years of age or older, from five Brazilian states. All patients underwent determination of AAT levels in dried blood spot (DBS) samples by nephelometry. Those with DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL underwent determination of serum AAT levels. Those with serum AAT levels of sangue seco por meio de nefelometria. Aqueles em que a concentração de AAT no sangue seco foi ≤ 2,64 mg/dl foram submetidos a dosagem sérica de AAT. Aqueles em que a concentração sérica de AAT foi sangue seco ≤ 2,64 mg/dl, e 24 (2,6% da amostra) apresentaram concentração sérica de AAT < 113 mg/dl. A distribuição genotípica nesse subgrupo de 24 pacientes foi a seguinte: PI*MS, em 3 (12,5%); PI*MZ, em 13 (54,2%); PI*SZ, em 1 (4,2%); PI*SS, em 1 (4,2%); e PI*ZZ, em 6 (25,0%). Na amostra estudada, a prevalência global da deficiência de AAT foi de 2,8% e a prevalência do genótipo PI*ZZ (deficiência grave de AAT) foi de 0,8%. A prevalência da deficiência de AAT em pacientes com DPOC no Brasil é semelhante àquela encontrada na maioria dos países e reforça a recomendação de que se deve medir a concentração de AAT em todos pacientes com DPOC.

  20. Prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and allele frequency in patients with COPD in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Rodrigo; Zillmer, Laura Russo; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Manzano, Beatriz; Ivanaga, Ivan Teruaki; Fritscher, Leandro; Lundgren, Fernando; Miravitlles, Marc; Gondim, Heicilainy Del Carlos; Santos, Gildo; Alves, Marcela Amorim; Oliveira, Maria Vera; de Souza, Altay Alves Lino; Sales, Maria Penha Uchoa; Jardim, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the prevalence of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD), as well as allele frequency, in COPD patients in Brazil. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 926 COPD patients 40 years of age or older, from five Brazilian states. All patients underwent determination of AAT levels in dried blood spot (DBS) samples by nephelometry. Those with DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL underwent determination of serum AAT levels. Those with serum AAT levels of < 113 mg/dL underwent genotyping. In case of conflicting results, SERPINA1 gene sequencing was performed. Results: Of the 926 COPD patients studied, 85 had DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL, and 24 (2.6% of the study sample) had serum AAT levels of < 113 mg/dL. Genotype distribution in this subset of 24 patients was as follows: PI*MS, in 3 (12.5%); PI*MZ, in 13 (54.2%); PI*SZ, in 1 (4.2%); PI*SS, in 1 (4.2%); and PI*ZZ, in 6 (25.0%). In the sample as a whole, the overall prevalence of AATD was 2.8% and the prevalence of the PI*ZZ genotype (severe AATD) was 0.8% Conclusions: The prevalence of AATD in COPD patients in Brazil is similar to that found in most countries and reinforces the recommendation that AAT levels be measured in all COPD patients. PMID:27812629

  1. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is elevated in exhaled breath condensate and serum in exacerbated COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczulla, A Rembert; Noeske, Sarah; Herr, Christian; Koepke, Janine; Jörres, Rudolf A; Nell, Christoph; Schmid, Severin; Vogelmeier, Claus; Bals, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) significantly contribute to COPD-related morbidity. Diagnosis of COPD exacerbations may be improved by analyzing biomarkers such as alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT). AAT is an acute-phase protein and inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. Deficiency of AAT may result in early-onset respiratory symptoms. Measurement of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a noninvasive method to investigate biomarkers present in the epithelial lining fluid, such as AAT. To investigate whether AAT can be detected and quantified in EBC and to compare AAT levels in the EBC of healthy controls, patients with COPD, and during exacerbations of COPD. EBC from 10 healthy controls, 17 subjects with COPD, and 18 subjects with exacerbations of COPD was collected with the RTube™ device. AAT from EBC and serum were quantified by ELISA. AAT in EBC was detectable in every individual. Patients with exacerbations of COPD had significantly increased AAT values (mean, 514.33 pg/mL, [SD 279.41 ]) compared with healthy controls (mean, 251.32 pg/mL, [SD 44.71]) and stable COPD patients (mean, 242.01 pg/mL [SD 65.74]) (P=0.0003; P=0.00003). EBC AAT showed only a correlation trend with serum AAT (r=0.3, P=0.054). AAT in EBC was detectable and quantifiable. AAT measured in EBC was significantly increased during exacerbations of COPD and can potentially be used as a biomarker in exacerbations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Alpha-1-antitrypsin is produced by human neutrophil granulocytes and their precursors and liberated during granule exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Jacobsen, Lars C; Rørvig, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is an important inhibitor of neutrophil proteases including elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase 3. Transcription profiling data suggest that A1AT is expressed by human neutrophil granulocytes during all developmental stages. A1AT has hitherto only been found associated....... Neutrophils from patients with A1AT-deficiency carrying the (PI)ZZ mutation in the A1AT gene appeared structurally and functionally normal, but A1AT produced in leukocytes of these patients lacked the ability to bind proteases efficiently. We conclude that A1AT generation and release from neutrophils add...

  3. Massive ascites and the heterozygous alpha 1 antitrypsin (α1AT) living related donor liver in the homozygous child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorsandi, Shirin E; Thompson, Richard; Vilca-Melendez, Hector; Dhawan, Anil; Heaton, Nigel

    2018-02-01

    The following is a short report on the use of a heterozygous (PiMZ) alpha 1 antitrypsin (α1AT) living related donor liver in a homozygous (PiZ) child that was complicated by massive ascites early after transplant. This clinical report is then followed by a brief summary of present knowledge on the α 1 AT protein and management of massive ascites in the pediatric liver transplant recipient. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Emergence of a Stage-Dependent Human Liver Disease Signature with Directed Differentiation of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin-Deficient iPS Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Wilson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide an inexhaustible source of cells for modeling disease and testing drugs. Here we develop a bioinformatic approach to detect differences between the genomic programs of iPSCs derived from diseased versus normal human cohorts as they emerge during in vitro directed differentiation. Using iPSCs generated from a cohort carrying mutations (PiZZ in the gene responsible for alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency, we find that the global transcriptomes of PiZZ iPSCs diverge from normal controls upon differentiation to hepatic cells. Expression of 135 genes distinguishes PiZZ iPSC-hepatic cells, providing potential clues to liver disease pathogenesis. The disease-specific cells display intracellular accumulation of mutant AAT protein, resulting in increased autophagic flux. Furthermore, we detect beneficial responses to the drug carbamazepine, which further augments autophagic flux, but adverse responses to known hepatotoxic drugs. Our findings support the utility of iPSCs as tools for drug development or prediction of toxicity.

  5. Gastric clearance of alpha-1-antitrypsin under cimetidine perfusion. New test to detect protein-losing gastropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florent, C.; Vidon, N.; Flourie, B.; Carmantrand, A.; Zerbani, A.; Maurel, M.; Bernier, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Gastric losses of plasma are usually measured with radiolabeled macromolecules. This method is expensive and cumbersome. Direct measurement of exudated plasma proteins are ineffective since proteins are denaturated by acidic gastric juice and pepsin. It was recently shown that albumin measurement after immediate neutralization allowed detection of gastric protein losses, but this method is quite complex and time consuming. We studied alpha 1-antitrypsin and 51Cr-labeled protein clearance in gastric juice during normal saline and cimetidine (1.5 mg/kg/hr) infusion in six healthy volunteers and six patients with exudative gastropathy. alpha 1-Antitrypsin was measurable in all samples during cimetidine infusion: alpha 1-AT and 51Cr losses were significantly correlated (P less than 0.001). The upper limit of gastric alpha 1-AT clearance in controls was 0.86 ml/hr (mean + 2 SD). Using this value, there was no overlapping between patients and controls. The upper limit of 51Cr test was 1.87 ml/hr (mean + 2 SD) in controls but gastric clearance of 51Cr was below this value in one patient. This suggests that the measurement of alpha 1-AT gastric clearance during cimetidine perfusion is a good test to detect an exudative gastropathy. This test is inexpensive and lasts only 3 hr

  6. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics of Chronic Renal Failure Rats after FuShengong Decoction Treatment Reveals Haptoglobin and Alpha-1-Antitrypsin as Potential Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic renal failure (CRF has become a global health problem and bears a huge economic burden. FuShengong Decoction (FSGD as traditional Chinese medicine has multiple pharmacological effects. Objectives. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism and signaling pathway involved in the FSGD treatment of CRF and screen differentially expressed proteins in rats with CRF treated with FSGD. Methods. Thirty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control group, CRF group, and FSGD group. Differentially expressed proteins were screened by iTRAQ coupled with nanoLC-MS/MS, and these identified proteins were later analyzed by GO, KEGG, and STRING. Additionally, haptoglobin (HP and alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT were finally verified by ELISA, Western blot, and real time PCR. Results. A total of 417 proteins were identified. Nineteen differentially expressed proteins were identified in the FSGD group compared with the model group, of which 3 proteins were upregulated and 16 proteins were downregulated. Cluster analysis indicated that inflammatory response was associated with these proteins and complement and coagulation cascade pathways were predominantly involved. The validation methods further confirmed that the levels of HP and AAT were significantly increased. Conclusions. HP and AAT may be the important biomarkers in the pathogenesis of CRF and FSGD therapy.

  7. Long-term evolution of lung function in individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency from the Spanish registry (REDAAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esquinas C

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Esquinas,1,2,* Sonia Serreri,3,* Miriam Barrecheguren,1 Esther Rodriguez,1 Alexa Nuñez,1 Francisco Casas-Maldonado,4 Ignacio Blanco,5 Pietro Pirina,3 Beatriz Lara,6 Marc Miravitlles1,7 1Pneumology Department, University Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain; 2Public Health, Mental, Maternal and Child Health Nursing Department, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 3Università di Sassari, Sassari, Italy; 4Pneumology Department, University Hospital San Cecilio, Granada, Spain; 5Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Spanish Registry (REDAAT, Spanish Society of Pneumology (SEPAR, Barcelona, Spain; 6Coventry and Warwickshire University Hospital, Coventry, UK; 7CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, Spain *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The clinical course of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is very heterogeneous. It is estimated that 60% of individuals with severe AATD (Pi*ZZ develop emphysema. The main objective of this study was to describe the outcomes of long-term lung function in individuals with AATD-associated emphysema after at least 8 years of follow-up. Materials and methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of longitudinal follow-up data of AATD PiZZ patients from the Spanish registry (AATD Spanish Registry [REDAAT]. The main follow-up outcome was the annual rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 calculated using the FEV1 values at baseline and in the last post-bronchodilator spirometry available. Results: One hundred and twenty-two AATD PiZZ patients were analyzed. The median follow-up was 11 years (interquartile range =9–14. The mean FEV1 decline was 28 mL/year (SD=54, with a median of 33 mL/year. Tobacco consumption (β=19.8, p<0.001, previous pneumonia (β=27.8, p=0.026 and higher baseline FEV1% (β=0.798, p=0.016 were independently related to a faster FEV1 decline. Conclusion: In this large cohort with a long

  8. Alpha-1-Antitrypsin Antagonizes Cisplatin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Prostate Cancer (PC3) and Melanoma Cancer (A375) Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljujic, Mila; Mijatovic, Sanja; Bulatovic, Mirna Z; Mojic, Marija; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Radojkovic, Dragica; Topic, Aleksandra

    2017-04-01

    Increased circulating alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) correlates with cancer stage/aggressiveness, but its role in cancer biology is unclear. We revealed antagonistic effect of AAT to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in prostate (PC3) and melanoma (A375) cancer cell lines. Moreover, AAT abrogated cytotoxicity of MEK inhibitor U0126 in PC3 cell line. Weaker antagonistic effect of AAT on cytotoxicity of PI3/Akt and NF-kB inhibitors was also observed. In addition, cisplatin increased AAT gene expression in transfected PC3 cells. However, AAT derived from transfected PC3 cells did not antagonize cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, these results suggest possible association between high circulating AAT and cisplatin resistance.

  9. Effect of Recombinant alpha1-Antitrypsin Fc-Fused (AAT-Fc)Protein on the Inhibition of Inflammatory Cytokine Production and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.; Lee, Y.; Hong, K.; Hong, J.; Bae, S.; Choi, J.; Jhun, H.; Kwak, A.; Kim, E.; Jo, S.; Dinarello, C.A.; Kim, S.

    2013-01-01

    alpha1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor family that impedes the enzymatic activity of serine proteinases, including human neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and neutrophil proteinase 3. Here, we expressed recombinant AAT by fusing the intact AAT gene to the constant

  10. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevented bone loss in ovariectomy induced osteoporosis mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at meno...

  11. Improving adherence to alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency screening guidelines using the pulmonary function laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna Diaz LV

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Landy V Luna Diaz,1 Isabella Iupe,1 Bruno Zavala,1 Kira C Balestrini,1 Andrea Guerrero,1 Gregory Holt,1,2 Rafael Calderon-Candelario,1,2 Mehdi Mirsaeidi,1,2 Michael Campos1,21Miami Veterans Administration Medical Center, Miami, FL, 2Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USAAlpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is the only well-recognized genetic disorder associated with an increased risk of emphysema and COPD.1 Identifying AATD allows genetic counseling and the chance to offer specific augmentation therapy to slow emphysema progression. Despite specific recommendations from the World Health Organization, American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society to screen all patients with COPD and other at-risk conditions,2–4 testing rates are low (<15%.5We conducted a project to improve AATD screening at the Miami VA Medical Center using the pulmonary function test (PFT laboratory. We instructed the PFT personnel to perform reflex testing on all patients with pre-bronchodilator airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity <70% and then evaluated if the screening was appropriate according to guidelines. Trained PFT personnel explained AATD disease to patients and provided them with an informational brochure. After obtaining verbal consent, AATD screening was performed using dried blood spot kits provided by the Alpha-1 Foundation as part of the Florida Screening Program (noncommercial.6 The PFT lab director was the responsible physician of record, in charge of discussing positive results to patients and documenting results in the electronic medical record. The Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center Institutional Review Board approved the protocol as a quality improvement project.

  12. In vivo post-transcriptional gene silencing of alpha-1 antitrypsin by adeno-associated virus vectors expressing siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Pedro E; Mueller, Christian; Cossette, Travis L; Golant, Alexandra; Tang, Qiushi; Beattie, Stuart G; Brantly, Mark; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Blomenkamp, Keith S; Teckman, Jeffrey H; Flotte, Terence R

    2007-09-01

    alpha-1 Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is one of the most common genetic diseases in North America, with a carrier frequency of approximately 4% in the US population. Homozygosity for the most common mutation (Glu342Lys, PI(*)Z) leads to the synthesis of a mutant protein, which accumulates and polymerizes within hepatocytes rather than being efficiently secreted. This lack of secretion causes severe serum deficiency predisposing to chronic lung disease. Twelve to fifteen percent of patients with PI(*)ZZ also develop liver disease, which can be severe, even in infancy. This is thought to be due to toxic effects of the accumulated mutant Z-AAT within the hepatocyte. Thus, an approach to reduce AAT-deficient liver disease will likely require some mechanism to decrease the amount of Z-AAT within hepatocytes. In this report, we describe studies of small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) designed to downregulate endogenous AAT within hepatocytes. Three different siRNA sequences were identified and cloned into a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) backbone, either singly or as a trifunctional (3X) construct. Each had activity independently, but the levels of AAT expression in cell culture models showed the greatest decrease with the 3X construct, resulting in levels that were five-fold lower than controls. The rAAV-3X-siRNA was then packaged into AAV8 capsids and used in vivo to transduce the livers of human Z-AAT overexpressing transgenic mice. Those studies showed a decrease in total human AAT, a clearing of Z-AAT accumulation by immunohistochemistry, and a decrease in monomer Z-AAT within the liver within 3 weeks after vector injection. The rAAV8-3X-siRNA vector may hold promise as a potential therapy for patients with AAT liver disease.

  13. Preclinical evaluation of a recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing human alpha-1 antitrypsin made using a recombinant herpes simplex virus production method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulay, Jeffrey D; Ye, Guo-Jie; Thomas, Darby L; Knop, David R; Benson, Janet M; Hutt, Julie A; Wang, Gensheng; Humphries, Margaret; Flotte, Terence R

    2011-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors offer promise for gene therapy of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. A toxicology study in mice evaluated intramuscular injection of an rAAV vector expressing human AAT (rAAV-CB-hAAT) produced using a herpes simplex virus (HSV) complementation system or a plasmid transfection (TFX) method at doses of 3 × 10(11) vg (1.2 × 10(13) vg/kg) for both vectors and 2 × 10(12) vg (8 × 10(13) vg/kg) for the HSV-produced vector. The HSV-produced vector had favorable in vitro characteristics in terms of purity, efficiency of transduction, and hAAT expression. There were no significant differences in clinical findings or hematology and clinical chemistry values between test article and control groups and no gross pathology findings. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal to mild changes in skeletal muscle at the injection site, consisting of focal chronic interstitial inflammation and muscle degeneration, regeneration, and vacuolization, in vector-injected animals. At the 3 × 10(11) vg dose, serum hAAT levels were higher with the HSV-produced vector than with the TFX-produced vector. With the higher dose of HSV-produced vector, the increase in serum hAAT levels was dose-proportional in females and greater than dose-proportional in males. Vector copy numbers in blood were highest 24 hr after dosing and declined thereafter, with no detectable copies present 90 days after dosing. Antibodies to hAAT were detected in almost all vector-treated animals, and antibodies to HSV were detected in most animals that received the highest vector dose. These results support continued development of rAAV-CB-hAAT for treatment of AAT deficiency.

  14. Three new alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency variants help to define a C-terminal region regulating conformational change and polymerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Fra

    Full Text Available Alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency is a hereditary disorder associated with reduced AAT plasma levels, predisposing adults to pulmonary emphysema. The most common genetic AAT variants found in patients are the mildly deficient S and the severely deficient Z alleles, but several other pathogenic rare alleles have been reported. While the plasma AAT deficiency is a common trait of the disease, only a few AAT variants, including the prototypic Z AAT and some rare variants, form cytotoxic polymers in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and predispose to liver disease. Here we report the identification of three new rare AAT variants associated to reduced plasma levels and characterize their molecular behaviour in cellular models. The variants, called Mpisa (Lys259Ile, Etaurisano (Lys368Glu and Yorzinuovi (Pro391His, showed reduced secretion compared to control M AAT, and accumulated to different extents in the cells as ordered polymeric structures resembling those formed by the Z variant. Structural analysis of the mutations showed that they may facilitate polymerization both by loosening 'latch' interactions constraining the AAT reactive loop and through effects on core packing. In conclusion, the new AAT deficiency variants, besides increasing the risk of lung disease, may predispose to liver disease, particularly if associated with the common Z variant. The new mutations cluster structurally, thus defining a region of the AAT molecule critical for regulating its conformational state.

  15. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency caused by a novel mutation (p.Leu263Pro: Pi*ZQ0gaia – Q0gaia allele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Oliveira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Severe alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is generally associated with PI*ZZ genotype and less often with combinations of PI*Z, PI*S, and other rarer deficiency or null (Q0 alleles. Severe AATD predisposes patients to various diseases, including pulmonary emphysema. Presented here is a case report of a young man with COPD and AATD. The investigation of the AATD showed a novel mutation p.Leu263Pro (c.860T>C, which was named Q0gaia (Pi*ZQ0gaia. Q0gaia is associated with very low or no detectable serum concentrations of AAT. Keywords: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, Null allele, COPD

  16. Sustained secretion of human alpha-1-antitrypsin from murine muscle transduced with adeno-associated virus vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sihong; Morgan, Michael; Ellis, Tamir; Poirier, Amy; Chesnut, Kye; Wang, Jianming; Brantly, Mark; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Byrne, Barry J.; Atkinson, Mark; Flotte, Terence R.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been used to transduce murine skeletal muscle as a platform for secretion of therapeutic proteins. The utility of this approach for treating alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency was tested in murine myocytes in vitro and in vivo. AAV vectors expressing the human AAT gene from either the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (AAV-C-AT) or the human elongation factor 1-α promoter (AAV-E-AT) were examined. In vitro in C2C12 murine myoblasts, the expression levels in transient transfections were similar between the two vectors. One month after transduction, however, the human elongation factor 1 promoter mediated 10-fold higher stable human AAT expression than the CMV promoter. In vivo transduction was performed by injecting doses of up to 1.4 × 1013 particles into skeletal muscles of several mouse strains (C57BL/6, BALB/c, and SCID). In vivo, the CMV vector mediated higher levels of expression, with sustained serum levels over 800 μg/ml in SCID and over 400 μg/ml in C57BL/6 mice. These serum concentrations are 100,000-fold higher than those previously observed with AAV vectors in muscle and are at levels which would be therapeutic if achieved in humans. High level expression was delayed for several weeks but was sustained for over 15 wk. Immune responses were dependent upon the mouse strain and the vector dosage. These data suggest that recombinant AAV vector transduction of skeletal muscle could provide a means for replacing AAT or other essential serum proteins but that immune responses may be elicited under certain conditions. PMID:9826709

  17. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and alpha-1 antitrypsin gene variants in Serbian pediatric arterial ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS in children is complex, and different from that in adults. Although rare, stroke in children is an important cause of mortality and morbidity. There is increasing evidence that genetic factors, including inflammation mediators, have a role in occurrence and outcome of stroke. We have chosen to assess the role of polymorphism -308G/A in the promoter of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα gene and S and Z mutations in alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT gene in the etiology of stroke in children. TNFα polymorphism affects plasma levels of this proinflamatory cytokine, and this could contribute to stroke pathology. It has been shown that increased AAT concentration may present a risk for AIS in children. Since S and Z mutations in AAT gene reduce its levels in plasma they could have a protective role in pediatric stroke. In this study twenty six children with AIS and 100 unrelated individuals from Serbian general population were investigated by PCR/RFLP for these gene variations. No statistically significant difference was observed between patients and general population in distribution of genotypes for -308G/A TNFα polymorphism, so its contributory role in the etiology of stroke was not evident in our group of patients. None of the tested AAT gene mutations were found in patients, which is in concordance with the proposed protective role of deficient AAT variants. AIS is a multifactorial disease, with many genes having a modest role in its pathophysiology, so further analyses of their combined effect are needed to elucidate genetic risk factors in the etiology and outcome of stroke in pediatric patients.

  18. Characteristics of candidates for lung transplantation due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoboni, Daniela; Barrecheguren, Miriam; Esquinas, Cristina; Rodríguez, Esther; Berastegui, Cristina; López-Meseguer, Manuel; Monforte, Víctor; Bravo, Carlos; Pirina, Pietro; Miravitlles, Marc; Román, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    COPD and emphysema due to alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) are the first and fourth indications for lung transplantation worldwide, respectively. Despite this, there is little information regarding the health status of these patients at the time of transplantation. Patients who received a lung transplant in the Hospital Vall d'Hebron between July 1993 and August 2013 were identified and data from the evaluation prior to the transplant were collected. A total of 217 patients who received a lung transplant for COPD and 19 in whom the indication was AATD were included. These patients were severely impaired at the time of the evaluation for lung transplantation, although the trend in recent years has been to evaluate patients at earlier stages of the disease. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups except that patients with AATD were younger [43 (7.7) vs. 53.6 (6.1) years old, P<.001], with less exposure to tobacco [23.9 (15) vs. 50 (29) packs-year, P<002] and lower PCO2 [41.7 (7.6) vs. 47.9 (9.7) mmHg, P<.004]. The number of patients receiving a lung transplant for COPD has progressively increased and the tendency is to perform the evaluation in earlier stages of the disease. Patients receiving transplants for COPD and AATD had similar characteristics at the time of the evaluation, although AATD patients were younger and had less exposure to tobacco and lower PCO2. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) Jaundice In Newborns ...

  20. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Culture Blood Gases Blood Ketones Blood Smear Blood Typing Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) BNP and NT-proBNP ... Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Lyme Disease Tests Magnesium Maternal Serum Screening, Second Trimester Measles and Mumps Tests Mercury ...

  1. Culture of Impure Human Islet Fractions in the Presence of Alpha-1-Antitrypsin Prevents Insulin Cleavage and Improves Islet Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, G.; Dawra, R.K.; Pugazhenthi, S.; Wiseman, A.C.; Sanders, M.A.; Saluja, A.K.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Hering, B.J.; Balamurugan, A.N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Exocrine tissue is commonly cotransplanted with islets in autografting and allotransplantation of impure preparations. Proteases and insulin are released by acinar cells and islets, respectively, during pretransplantation culture and also systemically after transplantation. We hypothesized that released proteases could cleave insulin molecules and that addition of alpha 1 antitrypsin (A1AT) to impure islet cultures would block this cleavage, improving islet recovery and function. Methods Trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase (TCE) activity and insulin levels were measured in culture supernates of pure (n = 5) and impure (n = 5) islet fractions, which were isolated from deceased donors. SDS-PAGE was used to detect insulin after incubation with proteases. We assessed the effects of A1AT supplementation (0.5 mg/mL; n = 4] on TCE activity, insulin levels, culture recovery, and islet quality. The ultrastructure of islets exposed to TCE versus control medium was examined using electron microscopy (EM). Results Protease (TCE) activity in culture supernates was directly proportional to the percentage purity of islets: pure, impure, or highly impure. Increasingly lower levels of insulin were detected in culture supernates with higher protease activity levels. Insulin levels measured in supernates of 2000 IE aliquots of impure and highly impure islet preparations were 61 ± 23.7% and 34 ± 33% of that in pure preparations, respectively. Incubation with commercially available proteases (TCE) or exocrine acinar cell supernates cleaved insulin molecules as assessed using SDS-PAGE. Addition of A1AT to impure islet preparations reduced protease activity and restored normal insulin levels as detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and SDS-PAGE of culture supernates. A1AT improved insulin levels to 98% ± 1.3% in impure and 78% ± 34.2% in highly impure fractions compared with pure islet fractions. A1AT supplementation improved postculture recovery of

  2. Encapsulation of Alpha-1 antitrypsin in PLGA nanoparticles: In Vitro characterization as an effective aerosol formulation in pulmonary diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirooznia Nazanin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha 1- antitrypsin (α1AT belongs to the superfamily of serpins and inhibits different proteases. α1AT protects the lung from cellular inflammatory enzymes. In the absence of α1AT, the degradation of lung tissue results to pulmonary complications. The pulmonary route is a potent noninvasive route for systemic and local delivery. The aerosolized α1AT not only affects locally its main site of action but also avoids remaining in circulation for a long period of time in peripheral blood. Poly (D, L lactide-co glycolide (PLGA is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer approved for sustained controlled release of peptides and proteins. The aim of this work was to prepare a wide range of particle size as a carrier of protein-loaded nanoparticles to deposit in different parts of the respiratory system especially in the deep lung. Various lactide to glycolide ratio of the copolymer was used to obtain different release profile of the drug which covers extended and rapid drug release in one formulation. Results Nonaqueous and double emulsion techniques were applied for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of surface morphology, size distribution, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, FTIR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. To evaluate the nanoparticles cytotoxicity, cell cytotoxicity test was carried out on the Cor L105 human epithelial lung cancer cell line. Nanoparticles were spherical with an average size in the range of 100 nm to 1μ. The encapsulation efficiency was found to be higher when the double emulsion technique was applied. XRD and DSC results indicated that α1AT encapsulated in the nanoparticles existed in an amorphous or disordered-crystalline status in the polymer matrix. The lactic acid to glycolic acid ratio affects the release profile of α1AT. Hence, PLGA with a 50:50 ratios exhibited the ability to release

  3. Extinction of alpha1-antitrypsin expression in cell hybrids is independent of HNF1alpha and HNF4 and involves both promoter and internal DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Bulla, G A

    1999-01-01

    In rat hepatoma x fibroblast somatic cell hybrids, extinction of rat alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) gene expression is accompanied by the loss of liver-enriched transcription factors hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1alpha) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4). Previous analysis showed that forced expression of functional HNF1alpha failed to prevent extinction of the rat alpha1AT locus in cell hybrids. Here I show that ectopic co-expression of HNF1alpha plus HNF4 fails to prevent extinction o...

  4. Synthetic Cannabinoid Abuse and a Rare Alpha-1-Antitrypsin Mutant Causing Acute Fulminant Hepatitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt J. Knowles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs abuse is on the rise because they are easily obtained over the counter; they are potent psychoactive compounds and routine drug testing does not detect them. As their abuse is on the rise, so are their detrimental side effects; however, the occurrence of acute hepatitis due to SCs abuse has been reported only once before. In this case, testing revealed that the patient was also heterozygous for alpha-1-antitrypsin (A-1-AT with the phenotype of PI⁎EM. This mutant phenotype has never been reported as a cause of A-1-AT disease and the abuse of SCs in a patient with this phenotype has also never been reported. This case illustrates the possible need to expand routine drug testing for SCs and consider A-1-AT phenotyping in certain clinical scenarios.

  5. Identification of a novel SERPINA-1 mutation causing alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in a patient with severe bronchiectasis and pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milger K

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Katrin Milger,1 Lesca Miriam Holdt,2 Daniel Teupser,2 Rudolf Maria Huber,1 Jürgen Behr,1 Nikolaus Kneidinger1 1Department of Internal Medicine V, University of Munich, Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, 2Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Munich, Munich, Germany Abstract: Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT, is known to cause emphysema and liver disease. Other manifestations, including airway disease or skin disorders, have also been described. A 44-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with dyspnea and respiratory insufficiency. She had never smoked, and had been diagnosed with COPD 9 years earlier. Three months previously, she had suffered a pulmonary embolism. Chest computed tomography scan revealed severe cystic bronchiectasis with destruction of the lung parenchyma. The sweat test was normal and there was no evidence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mutation. Capillary zone electrophoresis showed a decrease of alpha-1 globin band and AAT levels were below the quantification limit (<25 mg/dL. No S or Z mutation was identified, but sequencing analysis found a homozygous cytosine and adenine (CA insertion in exon 2 of the SERPINA-1 gene, probably leading to a dysfunctional protein (PI Null/Null. This mutation has not been previously identified. The atypical presentation of the patient, with severe cystic bronchiectasis, highlights AAT deficiency as a differential diagnosis in bronchiectasis. Further, awareness should be raised regarding a possible increased risk of thromboembolism associated with AAT deficiency. Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, bronchiectasis, SERPINA-1 mutation, pulmonary embolism

  6. Intensive smoking diminishes the differences in quality of life and exacerbation frequency between the alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency genotypes PiZZ and PiSZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Nikolas; Lepper, Philipp M; Vogelmeier, Claus; Seibert, Martina; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian

    2017-09-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disorder that is associated with low levels of circulating alpha-1-antitrypsin in serum. In comparison to the genotype PiZZ, PiSZ usually leads to lower risk of emphysema, better lung function and better survival. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between cigarette smoking (packyears) and the AATD genotypes (PiZZ and PiSZ) concerning quality of life (SGRQ), transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 ) and exacerbation rate. We compared PiZZ and PiSZ individuals from the German registry for individuals with AATD (AATDR) in univariate analysis and multivariate linear regression models. All subjects were stratified into three groups according to their cumulative nicotine consumption (0 py; 0 < py < 30; ?30 py). 868 PiZZ individuals (mean age 52.6 ± 12.8 years (43.5% female)) and 114 PiSZ individuals (mean age 50.3 ± 17.4 years (46.5% female)) were compared. In contrast to never- and intensive (ex-) smokers, moderate (ex-) smoking PiSZ individuals had a significantly better SGRQ total score (B = ?8.148; p = 0.020) and less exacerbations (B = ?0.354; p = 0.037) than individuals with PiZZ in multivariate analysis. The differences in quality of life and exacerbation frequency between PiZZ and PiSZ individuals diminish by intensive (ex-) smoking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exacerbations and duration of smoking abstinence are associated with the annual loss of FEV1 in individuals with PiZZ alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähndrich, Sebastian; Bernhard, Nikolas; Lepper, Philipp M; Vogelmeier, Claus; Seibert, Martina; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Bals, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a genetic disorder that is associated with a higher risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema. The annual declines in lung function (FEV 1 ) and transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO) predict all-cause mortality. We investigated the longitudinal follow-up data over 11 years (mean follow-up period of 4.89 years) from the German AATD registry and analyzed the relationship between annual loss of FEV 1 and TLCO and sex, age, body mass index (BMI), nicotine consumption, occupational dust exposure, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, baseline FEV 1 or TLCO, alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) serum level, exacerbation frequency and the duration of smoking abstinence by multiple linear generalized estimating equations models (GEE-models). We evaluated the data of 100 individuals with post-bronchodilator FEV 1 measurements and from 116 individuals with TLCO measurements. The mean overall decline was -54.06 ± 164.62 ml/year in FEV 1 and -0.17 ± 0.70 mmol/min/kPa/year in TLCO. Accelerated deterioration of FEV 1 was associated with occupational dust exposure (p = 0.026), shorter duration of smoking abstinence (p = 0.008), higher baseline FEV 1 (p = 0.003), higher annual exacerbation frequency (p = 0.003) and higher frequency of glucocorticoids intake (p = 0.004). Furthermore, patients with an elevated decline in TLCO showed significant impaired health-related quality of life at baseline (p = 0.039) and lower AAT serum levels (p < 0.001) in multivariate analysis. Annual decline in FEV 1 is related to the exacerbation rate, occupational dust exposure and the duration of smoking abstinence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Progression of emphysema evaluated by MRI using hyperpolarized (3)He (HP (3)He) measurements in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency compared with CT and lung function tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stavngaard, T; Søgaard, L Vejby; Batz, M

    2009-01-01

    as compared to yearly decline. PURPOSE: To investigate the progression of emphysema over a period of 2 years using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (HP) (3)He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine patients with severe A1AT...

  9. Effects of Prolastin C (Plasma-Derived Alpha-1 Antitrypsin) on the acute inflammatory response in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (from the VCU-alpha 1-RT pilot study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbate, A.; Tassell, B.W. Van; Christopher, S.; Abouzaki, N.A.; Sonnino, C.; Oddi, C.; Carbone, S.; Melchior, R.D.; Gambill, M.L.; Roberts, C.S.; Kontos, M.C.; Peberdy, M.A.; Toldo, S.; Vetrovec, G.W.; Biondi-Zoccai, G.; Dinarello, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) has broad anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties in addition to inhibiting serine proteases. Administration of human plasma-derived AAT is protective in models of acute myocardial infarction in mice. The objective of this study was to determine the safety and

  10. Health status and lung function in the Swedish alpha 1-antitrypsin deficient cohort, identified by neonatal screening, at the age of 37-40 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piitulainen E

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Eeva Piitulainen, Behrouz Mostafavi, Hanan A Tanash Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden Background: Severe alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency (genotype PiZZ is a well-known risk factor for COPD. A cohort of PiZZ and PiSZ individuals was identified by the Swedish national neonatal AAT screening program in 1972–1974 and followed up regularly since birth. Our aim was to study the lung function, respiratory symptoms and health status at the age of 38 years in comparison with a random sample of control subjects selected from the population registry.Methods: The study group included 120 PiZZ, 46 PiSZ and 164 control subjects (PiMM, who answered a questionnaire on smoking habits and symptoms and the Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ on quality of life. A total of 89 PiZZ, 33 PiSZ and 92 PiMM subjects underwent spirometry.Results: Four percent of the PiZZ, 2% of the PiSZ and 12% of the control subjects were current smokers (P=0.008, and 17% of the PiZZ, 9% of the PiSZ and 21% of the control subjects had stopped smoking. The PiZZ current smokers had a significantly higher (ie, poorer median activity score according to the SGRQ than the PiZZ never-smokers (P=0.032. The PiMM current smokers had significantly higher activity score (P<0.001, symptom score (P<0.001, and total score (P=0.001 according to the SGRQ than the PiMM never-smokers. The PiZZ current smokers had a significantly lower postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1% of predicted value (P=0.019 and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC ratio (P=0.032 than the PiZZ never-smokers. The proportion of subjects with a FEV1/FVC ratio of <0.70, indicating COPD, was significantly higher in the PiZZ current smokers than in the PiZZ never-smokers (P=0.001. Among the PiSZ and PiMM subjects, the differences in lung function between the smoking subgroups were insignificant.Conclusion: PiZZ current

  11. TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE 1, MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 9, ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN, METALLOTHIONEIN AND UROKINASE TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors have been described to play a role in autoimmune skin blistering diseases. We studied skin lesional biopsies from patients affected by several autoimmune skin blistering diseases for proteinases and proteinase inhibitors. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry to evaluate biopsies for alpha-1-antitrypsin, human matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1, metallothionein and urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH. Results: Contrary to findings in the current literature, most autoimmune skin blistering disease biopsies were negative for uPAR and MMP9. Only some chronic patients with El Bagre-EPF were positive to MMP9 in the dermis, in proximity to telocytes. TIMP-1 and metallothionein were positive in half of the biopsies from BP patients at the basement membrane of the skin, within several skin appendices, in areas of dermal blood vessel inflammation and within dermal mesenchymal-epithelial cell junctions.

  12. Ni(ii) ions cleave and inactivate human alpha-1 antitrypsin hydrolytically, implicating nickel exposure as a contributing factor in pathologies related to antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezynfeld, Nina Ewa; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bal, Wojciech; Frączyk, Tomasz

    2015-04-01

    Human alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is an abundant serum protein present at a concentration of 1.0-1.5 g L(-1). AAT deficiency is a genetic disease that manifests with emphysema and liver cirrhosis due to the accumulation of a misfolded AAT mutant in hepatocytes. Lung AAT amount is inversely correlated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a serious and often deadly condition, with increasing frequency in the aging population. Exposure to cigarette smoke and products of fossil fuel combustion aggravates AAT deficiency and COPD according to mechanisms that are not fully understood. Taking into account that these fumes contain particles that can release nickel to human airways and skin, we decided to investigate interactions of AAT with Ni(ii) ions within the paradigm of Ni(ii)-dependent peptide bond hydrolysis. We studied AAT protein derived from human blood using HPLC, SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry. These studies were aided by spectroscopic experiments on model peptides. As a result, we identified three hydrolysis sites in AAT. Two of them are present in the N-terminal part of the molecule next to each other (before Thr-13 and Ser-14 residues) and effectively form one N-terminal cleavage site. The single C-terminal cleavage site is located before Ser-285. The N-terminal hydrolysis was more efficient than the C-terminal one, but both abolished the ability of AAT to inhibit trypsin in an additive manner. Nickel ions bound to hydrolysis products demonstrated an ability to generate ROS. These results implicate Ni(ii) exposure as a contributing factor in AAT-related pathologies.

  13. The impact of smoke exposure on the clinical phenotype of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland: exploiting a national registry to understand a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, M Emmet; Pennycooke, Kevin; Carroll, Tomás P; Shum, Jonathan; Fee, Laura T; O'Connor, Catherine; Logan, P Mark; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) have mutations in the SERPINA1 gene causing genetic susceptibility to early onset lung and liver disease that may result in premature death. Environmental interactions have a significant impact in determining the disease phenotype and outcome in AATD. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of smoke exposure on the clinical phenotype of AATD in Ireland. Clinical demographics and available thoracic computerised tomography (CT) imaging were detected from 139 PiZZ individuals identified from the Irish National AATD Registry. Clinical information was collected by questionnaire. Data was analysed to assess AATD disease severity and evaluate predictors of clinical phenotype. Questionnaires were collected from 107/139 (77%) and thoracic CT evaluation was available in 72/107 (67.2%). 74% of respondents had severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) (GOLD stage C or D). Cigarette smoking was the greatest predictor of impairment in FEV1 and DLCO (%predicted) and the extent of emphysema correlated most significantly with DLCO. Interestingly the rate of FEV1 decline was similar in ex-smokers when compared to never-smokers. Passive smoke exposure in childhood resulted in a greater total pack-year smoking history. Radiological evidence of bronchiectasis was a common finding and associated with increasing age. The Irish National AATD Registry facilitates clinical and basic science research of this condition in Ireland. This study illustrates the detrimental effect of smoke exposure on the clinical phenotype of AATD in Ireland and the benefit of immediate smoking cessation at any stage of lung disease.

  14. Urinary alpha-1 antitrypsin and CD59 glycoprotein predict albuminuria development in hypertensive patients under chronic renin-angiotensin system suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Maroto, Aroa S; Baldan-Martin, Montserrat; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Pulido-Olmo, Helena; Segura, Julian; Barderas, Maria G; Ruilope, Luis M; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2016-01-16

    Hypertension is a multi-factorial disease of increasing prevalence and a major risk factor for cardiovascular mortality even in the presence of adequate treatment. Progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) occurs frequently during chronic renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) suppression, and albuminuria is a marker of CV risk. High prevalence of albuminuria in treated hypertensive patients has been demonstrated, but there are no available markers able to predict evolution. The aim of this study was the identification of novel indicators of albuminuria progression measurable in urine of diabetic and non-diabetic patients. 1143 hypertensive patients under chronic treatment were followed for a minimum period of 3 years. Among them, 105 diabetic and non-diabetic patients were selected and classified in three groups according to albuminuria development during follow-up: (a) patients with persistent normoalbuminuria; (b) patients developing de novo albuminuria; (c) patients with maintained albuminuria. Differential urine analysis was performed by 2D gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and further confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Non-parametric statistical tests were applied. CD59 glycoprotein and alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) resulted already altered in patients developing albuminuria de novo, with a similar response in those with maintained albuminuria. A prospective study in a sub-group of normoalbuminuric patients who were clinically followed up for at least 1 year from urine sampling, revealed CD59 and AAT proteins significantly varied in the urine collected from normoalbuminurics who will negatively progress, serving as predictors of future albuminuria development. CD59 and AAT proteins are significantly altered in hypertensive patients developing albuminuria. Interestingly, CD59 and AAT are able to predict, in normoalbuminuric individuals, who will develop albuminuria in the future, being potential predictors of vascular damage and CV risk. These findings

  15. Health status and lung function in the Swedish alpha 1-antitrypsin deficient cohort, identified by neonatal screening, at the age of 37-40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piitulainen, Eeva; Mostafavi, Behrouz; Tanash, Hanan A

    2017-01-01

    Severe alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (genotype PiZZ) is a well-known risk factor for COPD. A cohort of PiZZ and PiSZ individuals was identified by the Swedish national neonatal AAT screening program in 1972-1974 and followed up regularly since birth. Our aim was to study the lung function, respiratory symptoms and health status at the age of 38 years in comparison with a random sample of control subjects selected from the population registry. The study group included 120 PiZZ, 46 PiSZ and 164 control subjects (PiMM), who answered a questionnaire on smoking habits and symptoms and the Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) on quality of life. A total of 89 PiZZ, 33 PiSZ and 92 PiMM subjects underwent spirometry. Four percent of the PiZZ, 2% of the PiSZ and 12% of the control subjects were current smokers ( P =0.008), and 17% of the PiZZ, 9% of the PiSZ and 21% of the control subjects had stopped smoking. The PiZZ current smokers had a significantly higher (ie, poorer) median activity score according to the SGRQ than the PiZZ never-smokers ( P =0.032). The PiMM current smokers had significantly higher activity score ( P <0.001), symptom score ( P <0.001), and total score ( P =0.001) according to the SGRQ than the PiMM never-smokers. The PiZZ current smokers had a significantly lower postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 )% of predicted value ( P =0.019) and FEV 1 /forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio ( P =0.032) than the PiZZ never-smokers. The proportion of subjects with a FEV 1 /FVC ratio of <0.70, indicating COPD, was significantly higher in the PiZZ current smokers than in the PiZZ never-smokers ( P =0.001). Among the PiSZ and PiMM subjects, the differences in lung function between the smoking subgroups were insignificant. PiZZ current smokers were found to have signs of COPD before 40 years of age. Smoking is less common among the AAT-deficient subjects identified by neonatal screening than among their peers in the general

  16. Learning about Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (AATD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight loss. Some Individuals with AATD have advanced lung disease and have emphysema, in which the small air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs are damaged. Symptoms of emphysema include difficulty breathing, ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rapid heartbeat upon standing. Affected individuals often develop emphysema, which is a lung disease caused by damage to the small air ... exposure to tobacco smoke accelerates the appearance of emphysema symptoms and damage to the lungs. About 10 percent of infants with alpha-1 ...

  18. Cell and gene therapy for genetic diseases: inherited disorders affecting the lung and those mimicking sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Allison M; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-06-01

    Some of the first human gene therapy trials targeted diseases of the lung and provided important information that will continue to help shape future trials. Here we describe both cell and gene therapies for lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin disorder as well as fatty acid oxidation disorders that mimic sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Human clinical gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin have been performed using a variety of vectors including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and nonviral vectors. No human clinical gene therapy trials have been performed for disorders of fatty acid oxidation; however, important proof-of-principle studies have been completed for multiple fatty acid oxidation disorders. Important achievements have been made and have yet to come for cell and gene therapies for disorders of the lung and those mimicking SIDS.

  19. Routine sensor-augmented pump therapy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Scaramuzza, Andrea; Bratina, Natasa

    2013-01-01

    Sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy can improve glycemic control, compared with multiple daily insulin injections or with insulin pump therapy alone, without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia.......Sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy can improve glycemic control, compared with multiple daily insulin injections or with insulin pump therapy alone, without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia....

  20. Sensor-augmented pump therapy at 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    This follow-up study investigates the metabolic and psychosocial effects of sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy in adults with type 1 diabetes 36 months after therapy start.......This follow-up study investigates the metabolic and psychosocial effects of sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy in adults with type 1 diabetes 36 months after therapy start....

  1. Association of polymorphism of the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to determine the relationship between the polymorphisms of the AAT gene and milk production traits and SCS, the General Linear Model (GLM) procedure from the Statistical Analysis Software was used. SNP5504 affected milk fat percentage, SNP8178 affected milk protein percentage and SNP5609 and SNP5624 ...

  2. Alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotypes in patients with Klinefelter's syndrome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) is the most common human sex chromosome disorder, with a prevalence of 1 in 660 men. The phenotype is variable, but the most constant findings are small and firm testes, decreased testosterone level, infertility, eunuchoid body proportion, increased height, and learning disabilities, due to the ...

  3. Alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotypes in patients with Klinefelter's syndrome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Human Biology and Genetics, Institute of General and Molecular Pathology,. University of Tartu, Ravila Street 19, Tartu 50411, Estonia. 2Centre of Andrology, Tartu University Hospital, Puusepa Street 1a, Tartu 50406, Estonia. Introduction. Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) is the most common human sex.

  4. Association of polymorphism of alpha 1-antitrypsin gene with milk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    number of human diseases (Majamaa et al., 2001; Lisowska-Myjak & Pachecka, 2007). Based on the role played by the AAT gene in humans, the aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between variants of the gene and milk production traits as well as SCS in Chinese Holstein dairy cattle. Materials and ...

  5. Sustained transgene expression despite T lymphocyte responses in a clinical trial of rAAV1-AAT gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantly, Mark L; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Wang, Lili; Mueller, Christian; Humphries, Margaret; Spencer, L Terry; Rouhani, Farshid; Conlon, Thomas J; Calcedo, Roberto; Betts, Michael R; Spencer, Carolyn; Byrne, Barry J; Wilson, James M; Flotte, Terence R

    2009-09-22

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is well-suited as a target for human gene transfer. We performed a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation clinical trial of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing normal (M) AAT packaged into serotype 1 AAV capsids delivered by i.m. injection. Nine AAT-deficient subjects were enrolled sequentially in cohorts of 3 each at doses of 6.9 x 10(12), 2.2 x 10(13), and 6.0 x 10(13) vector genome particles per patient. Four subjects receiving AAT protein augmentation discontinued therapy 28 or 56 days before vector administration. Vector administration was well tolerated, with only mild local reactions and 1 unrelated serious adverse event (bacterial epididymitis). There were no changes in hematology or clinical chemistry parameters. M-specific AAT was expressed above background in all subjects in cohorts 2 and 3 and was sustained at levels 0.1% of normal for at least 1 year in the highest dosage level cohort, despite development of neutralizing antibody and IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot responses to AAV1 capsid at day 14 in all subjects. These findings suggest that immune responses to AAV capsid that develop after i.m. injection of a serotype 1 rAAV vector expressing AAT do not completely eliminate transduced cells in this context.

  6. Glucocorticoid augmentation of prolonged exposure therapy: rationale and case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pratchett

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Prolonged exposure (PE therapy has been found to reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; however, it is difficult for many patients to engage fully in the obligatory retelling of their traumatic experiences. This problem is compounded by the fact that habituation and cognitive restructuring – the main mechanisms through which PE is hypothesized to work – are not instantaneous processes, and often require several weeks before the distress associated with imaginal exposure abates. Case reports: Two cases are described that respectively illustrate the use of hydrocortisone and placebo, in combination with PE, for the treatment of combat-related PTSD. Based on known effects of glucocorticoids on learning and memory performance, we hypothesized that augmentation with hydrocortisone would improve the therapeutic effects of PE by hastening “new” learning and facilitating decreases in the emotional impact of fear memories during the course of treatment. The veteran receiving hydrocortisone augmentation of PE displayed an accelerated and ultimately greater decline in PTSD symptoms than the veteran receiving placebo. Conclusions: While no general conclusion can be derived from comparison of two patients, the findings are consistent with the rationale for augmentation. These case reports support the potential for an appropriately designed and powered clinical trial to examine the efficacy of glucocorticoids in augmenting the effects of psychotherapy for PTSD.

  7. Outcome in hyperglycemic stroke with ultrasound-augmented thrombolytic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, S R; Hill, M D; Alexandrov, A V; Molina, C A; Kent, T A

    2006-08-22

    Hyperglycemia independently predicts poor outcome after acute ischemic stroke. CLOTBUST (Combined Lysis Of Thrombus in Brain ischemia using transcranial Ultrasound and Systemic tPA) demonstrated that ultrasound-augmented thrombolysis improves recanalization and 24-hour outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that ultrasound would preferentially benefit hyperglycemic patients, and reviewed CLOTBUST with respect to admission glucose and good outcome. We found that ultrasound's benefit on 90-day outcome was primarily apparent at higher glucose levels, suggesting that ultrasound therapy may improve outcome following hyperglycemic stroke.

  8. Atypical antipsychotics as augmentation therapy in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Enrica; Desedime, Nadia; Giovannone, Cristina; Amianto, Federico; Fassino, Secondo; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a life-threatening and difficult to treat mental illness with the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder. We aimed to garner preliminary data on the real-world use of olanzapine and aripiprazole as augmentation agents of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) in adult inpatients affected by AN. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical charts of patients who were hospitalized between 2012 and 2014. Patients were evaluated upon admission and discharge. We investigated eating symptomatology, and both general and eating psychopathology using: Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorders Scale. The charts of 75 patients were included in this study. The sample resulted equally distributed among those receiving SSRIs and either aripiprazole or olanzapine in addition to SSRIs. Notwithstanding a few baseline clinical differences, upon discharge all groups were significantly improved on all measures. Interestingly, aripiprazole showed the greatest effectiveness in reducing eating-related preoccupations and rituals with a large effect size. The body of evidence on medication management in AN is in dismal condition. Augmentation therapy is a well-established approach to a variety of mental disorders and it is often used in every-day clinical practice with patients affected by AN as well. Nevertheless, to date very little data is available on this topic. Results from our sample yielded promising results on the effectiveness of aripiprazole augmentation in reducing eating-related obsessions and compulsions. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these encouraging findings.

  9. Atypical antipsychotics as augmentation therapy in anorexia nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Marzola

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is a life-threatening and difficult to treat mental illness with the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder. We aimed to garner preliminary data on the real-world use of olanzapine and aripiprazole as augmentation agents of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs in adult inpatients affected by AN. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical charts of patients who were hospitalized between 2012 and 2014. Patients were evaluated upon admission and discharge. We investigated eating symptomatology, and both general and eating psychopathology using: Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorders Scale. The charts of 75 patients were included in this study. The sample resulted equally distributed among those receiving SSRIs and either aripiprazole or olanzapine in addition to SSRIs. Notwithstanding a few baseline clinical differences, upon discharge all groups were significantly improved on all measures. Interestingly, aripiprazole showed the greatest effectiveness in reducing eating-related preoccupations and rituals with a large effect size. The body of evidence on medication management in AN is in dismal condition. Augmentation therapy is a well-established approach to a variety of mental disorders and it is often used in every-day clinical practice with patients affected by AN as well. Nevertheless, to date very little data is available on this topic. Results from our sample yielded promising results on the effectiveness of aripiprazole augmentation in reducing eating-related obsessions and compulsions. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these encouraging findings.

  10. Moving from Virtual Reality Exposure-Based Therapy to Augmented Reality Exposure-Based Therapy: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Baus, Oliver; Bouchard, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET). Unlike virtual reality (VR), which entails a complete virtual environment (VE), augmented reality (AR) limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although, the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the twentieth centur...

  11. Avaliação da concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina e da presença dos alelos S e Z em uma população de indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos Determination of alpha 1-antitrypsin levels and of the presence of S and Z alleles in a population of patients with chronic respiratory symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliane Guerra Serra

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina (AAT e a prevalência dos alelos S e Z em indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos. MÉTODOS: Pacientes com tosse crônica e dispnéia foram submetidos à avaliação clínica, espirometria, tomografia computadorizada de tórax, dosagem de AAT por nefelometria e pesquisa das mutações S e Z por reação em cadeia da polimerase. Foram consideradas como variáveis dependentes a concentração de AAT e o tabagismo. RESULTADOS: Dos 89 pacientes incluídos no estudo (44 mulheres; idade média, 51,3 ± 18,2 anos, os alelos S e Z foram detectados em 33,3% e 5,7%, respectivamente, com freqüência gênica dos alelos S e Z de 0,16 e 0,028. Dois pacientes tinham genótipo SZ (AAT 141 mg/dL (normal, Grupo 2, n = 57. A freqüência de fumantes foi igual nos dois grupos, com carga tabágica maior no Grupo 2. O alelo S estava presente em 13 e 14 pacientes dos Grupos 1 e 2, respectivamente, enquanto que o alelo Z estava presente em 2 e 1 paciente dos mesmos grupos. Não houve diferença nos testes de função pulmonar, nem na freqüência de bronquiectasias ou enfisema entre os dois grupos. Os valores espirométricos e as concentrações de AAT foram similares entre fumantes e não-fumantes. Bronquiectasias foram mais freqüentes entre os não fumantes, e enfisema foi mais freqüente entre os fumantes. CONCLUSÕES: Trinta pacientes apresentaram níveis de AAT abaixo da média esperada para os genótipos MM e MS, e este fato não pode ser explicado por uma freqüência maior dos alelos S e Z.OBJECTIVE: To determine the levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT and the presence of S and Z alleles in patients with chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: Patients with chronic cough and dyspnea were submitted to clinical evaluation, pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography, nephelometric determination of AAT and determination of S and Z alleles by polymerase chain reaction. Smoking

  12. Fluphenazine reduces proteotoxicity in C. elegans and mammalian models of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    Full Text Available The classical form of α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD is associated with hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. It is caused by the proteotoxic effect of a mutant secretory protein that aberrantly accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells. Recently we developed a model of this deficiency in C. elegans and adapted it for high-content drug screening using an automated, image-based array scanning. Screening of the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds identified fluphenazine (Flu among several other compounds as a drug which reduced intracellular accumulation of mutant α1-antitrypsin Z (ATZ. Because it is representative of the phenothiazine drug class that appears to have autophagy enhancer properties in addition to mood stabilizing activity, and can be relatively easily re-purposed, we further investigated its effects on mutant ATZ. The results indicate that Flu reverses the phenotypic effects of ATZ accumulation in the C. elegans model of ATD at doses which increase the number of autophagosomes in vivo. Furthermore, in nanomolar concentrations, Flu enhances the rate of intracellular degradation of ATZ and reduces the cellular ATZ load in mammalian cell line models. In the PiZ mouse model Flu reduces the accumulation of ATZ in the liver and mediates a decrease in hepatic fibrosis. These results show that Flu can reduce the proteotoxicity of ATZ accumulation in vivo and, because it has been used safely in humans, this drug can be moved rapidly into trials for liver disease due to ATD. The results also provide further validation for drug discovery using C. elegans models that can be adapted to high-content drug screening platforms and used together with mammalian cell line and animal models.

  13. A novel SERPINA1 mutation causing serum alpha(1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren N Saunders

    Full Text Available Mutations in the SERPINA1 gene can cause deficiency in the circulating serine protease inhibitor α(1-Antitrypsin (α(1AT. α(1AT deficiency is the major contributor to pulmonary emphysema and liver disease in persons of European ancestry, with a prevalence of 1 in 2500 in the USA. We present the discovery and characterization of a novel SERPINA1 mutant from an asymptomatic Middle Eastern male with circulating α(1AT deficiency. This 49 base pair deletion mutation (T379Δ, originally mistyped by IEF, causes a frame-shift replacement of the last sixteen α(1AT residues and adds an extra twenty-four residues. Functional analysis showed that the mutant protein is not secreted and prone to intracellular aggregation.

  14. Alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotypes in patients with lung, prostate and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Akawi, Zeyad J.; Al-Hindawi, Fatin K.

    2004-01-01

    Determination of Alpha1-antitryspin (AT) phenotypes in Jordanian patients with lung, prostate and breast cancerto find a prevalent phenotype that could be recommended for the diagnosis of cancer. This study was conducted at Jordan University of Science and Technology, School of Medicine Jordan during the period May 2001 to May 2002. Alpha1-antitryspin (AT) phenotypes for 83 Jordanian cancer patients distributed as follows, 25 lung cancer, 25 prostate cancer and 33 with breast cancer were tested using isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis and immunofluxation techniques. Isoelectric focusing results demonstrated that 96% of lung cancer patients were of PiMM phenotype and 4% of PiFM phenotype. All prostate cancer patients (100%) were found to be of PiMM and 3% PiMS. These findings demonstrated that there was no significant differences in the distribution of AT phenotypes among Jordanian patients with lung, prostae and breast cancerand they matched those reported for healthy individuals. Thus, we can nor recommand a given AT phentype for early diagnosis of the above mentioned types of cancer. (author)

  15. Escitalopram tolerability as mono- versus augmentative therapy in patients with affective disorders: a naturalistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell'Osso B

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Dell’Osso, Chiara Arici, Cristina Dobrea, Giulia Camuri, Beatrice Benatti, A Carlo AltamuraUniversity of Milan, Department of Psychiatry, Fondazione IRCSS Ca’ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, ItalyBackground: Escitalopram is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, widely used in the treatment of affective disorders. The purpose of this study was to examine its safety and tolerability, as mono- versus augmentative therapy, in a group of patients with affective disorders.Materials and methods: The sample consisted of 131 patients suffering from different affective disorders, including major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder, who received escitalopram for at least 4 weeks. Data were analyzed on the basis of mono- versus augmentative therapy, as well as age, gender, mean daily dosage, and patterns of combination therapy.Results: Sixty-seven (51.1% patients were treated with monotherapy (mean dose of 11.76 mg/day and 64 (48.9% with augmentative escitalopram (mean dose of 12.81 mg/day. The mean duration of escitalopram treatment was 14 months. The most frequently combined compounds were: other antidepressants (36.5%, mood stabilizers (33.4%, and atypical antipsychotics (30.1%. Side effects were reported in 5.3% of the total sample and the most common were insomnia (2.3%, nausea (2.3%, and dizziness (0.8%. No significant difference, in terms of tolerability, in mono- versus augmentative therapy groups was found. In addition, neither age nor gender was significantly correlated with a greater presence of side effects. Finally, no significant correlation between dosage and side effects was observed.Conclusion: Over a 14-month observation period, escitalopram, either as monotherapy or an augmentative treatment, was found to be well tolerated in a large sample of patients with affective disorders, with an overall low rate of side effects.Keywords: affective disorders, escitalopram

  16. Behavior therapy augments response of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder responding to drug treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenneij, Nienke H.; van Megen, Harold J. G. M.; Denys, Damiaan A. J. P.; Westenberg, Herman G. M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In many patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), residual symptoms persist despite a clinically meaningful response. The objective of this study was to examine whether addition of behavior therapy would augment treatment outcome in these patients. METHOD: Ninety-six patients

  17. Dose-remission of pulsating electromagnetic fields as augmentation in therapy-resistant depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straasø, Birgit; Lauritzen, Lise; Lunde, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate to what extent a twice daily dose of Transcranial Pulsating ElectroMagnetic Fields (T-PEMF) was superior to once daily in patients with treatment-resistant depression as to obtaining symptom remission after 8 weeks of augmentation therapy. METHODS: A self-treatment set...

  18. Computerised mirror therapy with Augmented Reflection Technology for early stroke rehabilitation: clinical feasibility and integration as an adjunct therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoermann, Simon; Ferreira Dos Santos, Luara; Morkisch, Nadine; Jettkowski, Katrin; Sillis, Moran; Devan, Hemakumar; Kanagasabai, Parimala S; Schmidt, Henning; Krüger, Jörg; Dohle, Christian; Regenbrecht, Holger; Hale, Leigh; Cutfield, Nicholas J

    2017-07-01

    New rehabilitation strategies for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation employing visual stimulation show promising results, however, cost-efficient and clinically feasible ways to provide these interventions are still lacking. An integral step is to translate recent technological advances, such as in virtual and augmented reality, into therapeutic practice to improve outcomes for patients. This requires research on the adaptation of the technology for clinical use as well as on the appropriate guidelines and protocols for sustainable integration into therapeutic routines. Here, we present and evaluate a novel and affordable augmented reality system (Augmented Reflection Technology, ART) in combination with a validated mirror therapy protocol for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke. We evaluated components of the therapeutic intervention, from the patients' and the therapists' points of view in a clinical feasibility study at a rehabilitation centre. We also assessed the integration of ART as an adjunct therapy for the clinical rehabilitation of subacute patients at two different hospitals. The results showed that the combination and application of the Berlin Protocol for Mirror Therapy together with ART was feasible for clinical use. This combination was integrated into the therapeutic plan of subacute stroke patients at the two clinical locations where the second part of this research was conducted. Our findings pave the way for using technology to provide mirror therapy in clinical settings and show potential for the more effective use of inpatient time and enhanced recoveries for patients. Implications for Rehabilitation Computerised Mirror Therapy is feasible for clinical use Augmented Reflection Technology can be integrated as an adjunctive therapeutic intervention for subacute stroke patients in an inpatient setting Virtual Rehabilitation devices such as Augmented Reflection Technology have considerable potential to enhance stroke rehabilitation.

  19. Microsponges based novel drug delivery system for augmented arthritis therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Osmani, Riyaz Ali M.; Aloorkar, Nagesh H.; Ingale, Dipti J.; Kulkarni, Parthasarathi K.; Hani, Umme; Bhosale, Rohit R.; Jayachandra Dev, Dandasi

    2015-01-01

    The motive behind present work was to formulate and evaluate gel containing microsponges of diclofenac diethylamine to provide prolonged release for proficient arthritis therapy. Quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method was implied using Eudragit RS-100 and microsponges with varied drug–polymer ratios were prepared. For the sake of optimization, diverse factors affecting microparticles physical properties were too investigated. Microsponges were characterized by SEM, DSC, FT-IR, XRPD and parti...

  20. Model-based sensor-augmented pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosman, Benyamin; Voskanyan, Gayane; Loutseiko, Mikhail; Roy, Anirban; Mehta, Aloke; Kurtz, Natalie; Parikh, Neha; Kaufman, Francine R; Mastrototaro, John J; Keenan, Barry

    2013-03-01

    In insulin pump therapy, optimization of bolus and basal insulin dose settings is a challenge. We introduce a new algorithm that provides individualized basal rates and new carbohydrate ratio and correction factor recommendations. The algorithm utilizes a mathematical model of blood glucose (BG) as a function of carbohydrate intake and delivered insulin, which includes individualized parameters derived from sensor BG and insulin delivery data downloaded from a patient's pump. A mathematical model of BG as a function of carbohydrate intake and delivered insulin was developed. The model includes fixed parameters and several individualized parameters derived from the subject's BG measurements and pump data. Performance of the new algorithm was assessed using n = 4 diabetic canine experiments over a 32 h duration. In addition, 10 in silico adults from the University of Virginia/Padova type 1 diabetes mellitus metabolic simulator were tested. The percentage of time in glucose range 80-180 mg/dl was 86%, 85%, 61%, and 30% using model-based therapy and [78%, 100%] (brackets denote multiple experiments conducted under the same therapy and animal model), [75%, 67%], 47%, and 86% for the control experiments for dogs 1 to 4, respectively. The BG measurements obtained in the simulation using our individualized algorithm were in 61-231 mg/dl min-max envelope, whereas use of the simulator's default treatment resulted in BG measurements 90-210 mg/dl min-max envelope. The study results demonstrate the potential of this method, which could serve as a platform for improving, facilitating, and standardizing insulin pump therapy based on a single download of data. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  1. Radiation therapy after breast augmentation or reconstruction in early or recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, J.; Yahalom, J.; Shank, B.; Chaglassian, T.A.; McCormick, B.

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen patients whose augmented or reconstructed breasts were treated with radiation therapy were analyzed. Silicone gel implants were used in 13 patients and free-injected silicone in one patient. The total radiation dose ranged from 4400 to 6200 cGy using tangential photon fields or an en face electron field by megavoltage equipment. In several cases, electron boost radiation was added to the tumor bed. The majority of the patients tolerated therapy well with minimal transient skin reactions; only three patients required a treatment break secondary to moist desquamation. Three patients developed documented implant encapsulation, although the majority retained good to excellent cosmesis. In summary, when breast carcinoma arises in the augmented or reconstructed breast, conservative management (i.e., limited surgery and definitive irradiation) is feasible without compromising the therapy or the cosmetic result. Thus, conservative management should be offered as an option to patients who are interested in breast prosthesis conservation

  2. D-cycloserine augmentation in behavioral therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia J

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jing Xia,1 Yanqiu Du,2 Jiyang Han,1 Guo Liu,1 Xumei Wang11Department of Psychiatry, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Heping District Shenyang, Liaoning, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Medicine, Shenyang Ninth People’s Hospital, Tiexi District, Shenyang, Liaoning, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: To evaluate the overall effect of D-cycloserine (DCS augmentation on exposure and response prevention (ERP therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD.Methods: Clinical studies on the effect of DCS augmentation on ERP therapy for OCD compared to placebo were included for meta analysis. The primary outcome was the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS. Meta-analyses were performed with a random-effect model or a fixed-effect model using the Cochrane Review Manager (RevMan, version 5.2 to calculate the odds ratio and the mean difference, with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals.Results: A total of six studies was included in the current meta-analyses, and their data were extracted. Among them, four were for analyses of DCS and Y-BOCS at midtreatment, six for analysis at posttreatment, and four at 3-month follow-up. Besides, three of the six eligible studies were included in the meta-analysis of the DCS and Clinical Global Impression – Severity Scale at posttreatment, and three in the meta-analysis of DCS and proportions of treatment responders and of subjects attaining clinical remission status criteria at posttreatment. Our meta-analyses do not reveal a significant effect of DCS augmentation in ERP therapy for OCD patients, except when measured at midtreatment. Compared to the placebo group, DCS augmentation did show a trend toward significantly lower/decreased Y-BOCS; when measured at posttreatment and in the subpopulation of DCS taken before some of the ERP sessions, DCS augmentation showed a trend toward significantly lower/decreased Y-BOCS.Conclusion: Our result suggested that with the careful

  3. Microsponges based novel drug delivery system for augmented arthritis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmani, Riyaz Ali M; Aloorkar, Nagesh H; Ingale, Dipti J; Kulkarni, Parthasarathi K; Hani, Umme; Bhosale, Rohit R; Jayachandra Dev, Dandasi

    2015-10-01

    The motive behind present work was to formulate and evaluate gel containing microsponges of diclofenac diethylamine to provide prolonged release for proficient arthritis therapy. Quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method was implied using Eudragit RS-100 and microsponges with varied drug-polymer ratios were prepared. For the sake of optimization, diverse factors affecting microparticles physical properties were too investigated. Microsponges were characterized by SEM, DSC, FT-IR, XRPD and particle size analysis, and evaluated for morphology, drug loading, in vitro drug release and ex vivo diffusion as well. There were no chemical interactions between drug and polymers used as revealed by compatibility studies outcomes. The drug polymer ratio reflected notable effect on drug content, encapsulation efficiency and particle size. SEM results revealed spherical microsponges with porous surface, and had 7.21 μm mean particle size. The microsponges were then incorporated in gel; which exhibited viscous modulus along with pseudoplastic behavior. In vitro drug release results depicted that microsponges with 1:2 drug-polymer ratio were more efficient to give extended drug release of 75.88% at the end of 8 h; while conventional formulation get exhausted incredibly earlier by releasing 81.11% drug at the end of 4 h only. Thus the formulated microsponge-based gel of diclofenac diethylamine would be a promising alternative to conventional therapy for safer and efficient treatment of arthritis and musculoskeletal disorders.

  4. Adeno-associated virus-based gene therapy for inherited disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotte, Terence R

    2005-12-01

    Adeno-associated virus vectors are capable of long-term gene transfer without obvious adverse effects in a number of animal models. Over the last two decades, preclinical and early phase clinical trials in cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency were undertaken to test the feasibility of this approach. The results of those studies have been important since they have indicated that in vivo gene transfer is feasible and relatively safe. In addition, a number of key limitations to the current generation of AAV2 gene therapy vectors have been defined. The information about these limitations has been used to develop newer AAV vector approaches, based on new mutant and alternative serotype capsids and enhanced promoter systems. The evaluation of safety and efficacy of these newer agents is ongoing.

  5. The effects of weekly augmentation therapy in patients with PiZZ α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid ST

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available ST Schmid,1 J Koepke,1 M Dresel,1 A Hattesohl,1 E Frenzel,2 J Perez,3 DA Lomas,4 E Miranda,5 T Greulich,1 S Noeske,1 M Wencker,6 H Teschler,6 C Vogelmeier,1 S Janciauskiene,2,* AR Koczulla1,*1Department of Internal Medicine, Division for Pulmonary Diseases, University Hospital Marburg, Marburg, Germany; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department of Cellular Biology, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain; 4Department of Medicine, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 5Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Istituto Pasteur – Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 6Department of Pneumology, West German Lung Clinic, Essen University Hospital, Essen, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The major concept behind augmentation therapy with human α1-antitrypsin (AAT is to raise the levels of AAT in patients with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ (Glu342Lys-inherited AAT deficiency and to protect lung tissues from proteolysis and progression of emphysema.Objective: To evaluate the short-term effects of augmentation therapy (Prolastin® on plasma levels of AAT, C-reactive protein, and chemokines/cytokines.Materials and methods: Serum and exhaled breath condensate were collected from individuals with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ AAT deficiency-related emphysema (n = 12 on the first, third, and seventh day after the infusion of intravenous Prolastin. Concentrations of total and polymeric AAT, interleukin-8 (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and C-reactive protein were determined. Blood neutrophils and primary epithelial cells were also exposed to Prolastin (1 mg/mL.Results: There were significant fluctuations in serum (but not in exhaled breath condensate levels of AAT polymers, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL

  6. Is electroconvulsive therapy effective as augmentation in clozapine-resistant schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittsteiner Manubens, Lucas; Lobos Urbina, Diego; Aceituno, David

    2016-10-14

    Clozapine is considered to be the most effective antipsychotic drug for patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia, but up to a third of the patients do not respond to this treatment. Various strategies have been tried to augment the effect of clozapine in non-responders, one of these strategies being electroconvulsive therapy. However, its efficacy and safety are not yet clear. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 55 studies, among them six randomized controlled trials addressing clozapine-resistant schizophrenia. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded electroconvulsive therapy probably augments response to clozapine in patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia, but it is not possible to determine if it leads to cognitive adverse effects because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  7. Recent advances in understanding and treating COPD related to α1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao, Maria Paula; Craig, Timothy J

    2016-12-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is an orphan disease that predisposes individuals to COPD and liver disease. The following is a comprehensive review of AATD from epidemiology to treatment for physicians who treat COPD or asthma. Areas covered: In this comprehensive review of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, we describe the historical perspective, genetics, epidemiology, clinical presentation and symptoms, screening and diagnosis, and treatments of the condition. Expert commentary: The two most important directions for advancing the understanding of AATD involve improving detection of the condition, especially in asymptomatic patients, and advancing knowledge of treatments directed specifically at AATD-related conditions. With regard to treatment for AATD-related conditions, research must continue to explore the implications and importance of augmentation therapy as well as consider new implementations that may prove more successful taking into consideration not only factors of pulmonary function and liver health, but also product availability and financial viability.

  8. Use of physical therapy to augment dilator treatment for vaginal agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVearry, Mary E; Warner, William B

    2011-05-01

    : Dilator therapy has been used successfully for many years to treat vaginal agenesis. Our objective was to show how established physical therapy techniques can be used to augment dilator therapy. : A 36-year-old woman desiring nonsurgical management of vaginal agenesis was instructed in the use of vaginal dilators by a pelvic-floor physical therapist. Manual stretching of the vaginal tissues was performed during office visits after application of heat and therapeutic ultrasound to the perineum. In addition, the patient's husband was taught how to perform the vaginal stretching at home in conjunction with dilator therapy. : The patient was able to attempt intercourse after 6 weeks of treatment and achieved full penetration by 9 weeks. At the completion of treatment, she scored 31.9 on the Female Sexual Function Index. The patient and her husband were very satisfied with the treatment approach, especially the encouragement and guidance received in physical therapy. : By using established physical therapy techniques in conjunction with dilator therapy, a faster time to intercourse may be achieved with high patient and spouse satisfaction. We recommend the involvement of a physical therapist specializing in the pelvic floor as an adjunct to standard dilator therapy in the treatment of vaginal agenesis.

  9. Sensor-augmented pump therapy lowers HbA(1c) in suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes; a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermanides, J; Nørgaard, K; Bruttomesso, D

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs. multiple daily injection therapy in patients with suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes.......To investigate the efficacy of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs. multiple daily injection therapy in patients with suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes....

  10. Pathophysiology and therapy of irinotecan-induced delayed-onset diarrhea in patients with advanced colorectal cancer: a prospective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, F; Hagipantelli, R; Misset, J L; Bastian, G; Vassal, G; Bonnay, M; Herait, P; Cote, C; Mahjoubi, M; Mignard, D; Cvitkovic, E

    1998-08-01

    Irinotecan (CPT-11), a camptothecin derivative, has shown efficacy against colorectal cancer. Delayed-onset diarrhea is its main limiting toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine the pathophysiology of CPT-11-induced delayed-onset diarrhea and assess the efficacy of combined antidiarrheal medication in a phase II, prospective, successive-cohorts, open study. Twenty-eight patients with advanced colorectal cancer refractory to fluorouracil (5-FU) therapy received CPT-11 350 mg/m2 every 3 weeks. The first cohort of 14 consecutive patients explored for the mechanism of diarrhea received acetorphan (a new enkephalinase inhibitor) 100 mg three times daily; the second 14-patient cohort received, in addition to acetorphan, loperamide 4 mg three times daily. Before treatment, and if late diarrhea occurred, patients underwent colon mucosal biopsies for CPT-11 and topoisomerase I levels; intestinal transit time; fecalogram; fat and protein excretion; alpha1-antitrypsin clearance; D-xylose test; blood levels for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, glucagon, gastrin, somatostatin, prostaglandin E2, and carboxylesterase; CPT-11/SN-38 and SN-38 glucuronide pharmacokinetics; and stool cultures. Delayed-onset diarrhea occurred during the first three treatment cycles in 23 patients (82%). Electrolyte fecal measurements showed a negative or small osmotic gap in nine of nine patients and an increased alpha1-antitrypsin clearance in six of six patients. There were no modifications in stool cultures or hormonal dysfunction. Four of 11 patients (36%) with delayed-onset diarrhea in the first cohort responded to acetorphan, whereas nine of 10 patients (90%) responded to the combination of acetorphan and loperamide (P diarrhea is caused by a secretory mechanism with an exudative component. Early combined treatment with loperamide and acetorphan seems effective in controlling the diarrheal episodes.

  11. Augmentation of exposure therapy with D-cycloserine for social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Stefan G; Meuret, Alicia E; Smits, Jasper A J; Simon, Naomi M; Pollack, Mark H; Eisenmenger, Katherine; Shiekh, Michael; Otto, Michael W

    2006-03-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is common and debilitating. Although exposure therapy is one of the most effective forms of psychotherapy for this disorder, many patients remain symptomatic. Fear reduction in exposure therapy is similar to extinction learning, and early clinical data with specific phobias suggest that the treatment effects of exposure therapy for SAD may be enhanced with d-cycloserine, an agonist at the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. To determine whether short-term treatment with 50 mg of d-cycloserine enhances the efficacy of exposure therapy for SAD. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled augmentation trial examining the combination of d-cycloserine or pill placebo with exposure therapy for SAD. Patients were self-referred from the general community to 1 of 3 research clinics. Twenty-seven participants meeting DSM-IV criteria for SAD with significant public speaking anxiety. Following a diagnostic interview and pretreatment assessment, participants received 5 therapy sessions delivered in either an individual or group therapy format. The first session provided an introduction to the treatment model and was followed by 4 sessions emphasizing exposure to increasingly challenging public speech situations with videotaped feedback of performances. One hour prior to each session, participants received single doses of d-cycloserine or placebo. Symptoms were assessed by patient self-report and by clinicians blind to the randomization condition before treatment, after treatment, and 1 month after the last session. Participants receiving d-cycloserine in addition to exposure therapy reported significantly less social anxiety compared with patients receiving exposure therapy plus placebo. Controlled effect sizes were in the medium to large range. The pilot data provide preliminary support for the use of short-term dosing of d-cycloserine as an adjunctive intervention to exposure therapy for SAD.

  12. Moving from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baus, Oliver; Bouchard, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET). Unlike virtual reality (VR), which entails a complete virtual environment (VE), augmented reality (AR) limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although, the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the twentieth century. Since, then, technological developments have enabled an ever increasing level of seamless integration of virtual and physical elements into one view. Like VR, AR allows the exposure to stimuli which, due to various reasons, may not be suitable for real-life scenarios. As such, AR has proven itself to be a medium through which individuals suffering from specific phobia can be exposed "safely" to the object(s) of their fear, without the costs associated with programing complete VEs. Thus, ARET can offer an efficacious alternative to some less advantageous exposure-based therapies. Above and beyond presenting what has been accomplished in ARET, this paper covers some less well-known aspects of the history of AR, raises some ARET related issues, and proposes potential avenues to be followed. These include the type of measures to be used to qualify the user's experience in an augmented reality environment, the exclusion of certain AR-type functionalities from the definition of AR, as well as the potential use of ARET to treat non-small animal phobias, such as social phobia.

  13. Moving from Virtual Reality Exposure-Based Therapy to Augmented Reality Exposure-Based Therapy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baus, Oliver; Bouchard, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET). Unlike virtual reality (VR), which entails a complete virtual environment (VE), augmented reality (AR) limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although, the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the twentieth century. Since, then, technological developments have enabled an ever increasing level of seamless integration of virtual and physical elements into one view. Like VR, AR allows the exposure to stimuli which, due to various reasons, may not be suitable for real-life scenarios. As such, AR has proven itself to be a medium through which individuals suffering from specific phobia can be exposed “safely” to the object(s) of their fear, without the costs associated with programing complete VEs. Thus, ARET can offer an efficacious alternative to some less advantageous exposure-based therapies. Above and beyond presenting what has been accomplished in ARET, this paper covers some less well-known aspects of the history of AR, raises some ARET related issues, and proposes potential avenues to be followed. These include the type of measures to be used to qualify the user’s experience in an augmented reality environment, the exclusion of certain AR-type functionalities from the definition of AR, as well as the potential use of ARET to treat non-small animal phobias, such as social phobia. PMID:24624073

  14. Moving from Virtual Reality Exposure-Based Therapy (VRET to Augmented Reality Exposure-Based Therapy (ARET: A review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eBaus

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy (VRET to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET. Unlike virtual reality (VR, which entails a complete virtual environment (VE, augmented reality (AR limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the 20th century. Since, then, technological developments have enabled an ever increasing level of seamless integration of virtual and physical elements into one view. Like VR, AR allows the exposure to stimuli which, due to various reasons, may not be suitable for real-life scenarios. As such, AR has proven itself to be a medium through which individuals suffering from specific phobia can be exposed safely to the object(s of their fear, without the costs associated with programming complete virtual environments. Thus, ARET can offer an efficacious alternative to some less advantageous exposure-based therapies. Above and beyond presenting what has been accomplished in ARET, this paper also raises some ARET related issues, and proposes potential avenues to be followed. These include the definition of an AR related term, the type of measures to be used to qualify the user’s experience in an augmented reality environment (ARE, the development of alternative geospatial referencing systems, as well as the potential use of ARET to treat social phobia. Overall, it may be said that the use of ARET, although promising, is still in its infancy but that, given a continued cooperation between clinical and technical teams, ARET has the potential of going well beyond the treatment of small animal phobia.

  15. Exposure therapy augmentation: A review and extension of techniques informed by an inhibitory learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Jaclyn S; Rodebaugh, Thomas L

    2018-02-01

    Although exposure therapy is often considered a gold standard behavioral intervention for pathological anxiety, questions remain surrounding the mechanisms underlying exposure interventions, and some individuals are characterized by suboptimal treatment outcomes. Recently, a formulation known as the inhibitory learning theory, which is grounded in basic science principles of extinction learning and memory, has been proposed to provide a more parsimonious mechanistic explanation for the effects of exposure than previous, habituation-based models [Craske, M.G., Kircanski, K., Zelikowsky, M., Mystkowski, J., Chowdhury, N., & Baker, A. 2008. Optimizing inhibitory learning during exposure therapy. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 46, 5-27; Craske, M.G., Treanor, M., Conway, C.C., Zbozinek, T., & Vervliet, B. 2014. Maximizing exposure therapy: An inhibitory learning approach. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 58, 10-23]. Strategies informed by this theory are proposed to maximize extinction learning by fostering the development of new, non-threat associations between stimuli in memory and enhancing the accessibility and retrieval of these safety-based associations. This comprehensive review serves as a critical examination of the empirical literature regarding major tenets of inhibitory learning theory and the potential for such techniques to augment exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. Limitations of the extant research, as well as potential future directions, are explored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy as an augmentation treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Brenda L; Rowa, Karen; Bieling, Peter; McCabe, Randi; Pawluk, Elizabeth J

    2017-09-01

    A significant number of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients continue to experience symptoms that interfere with their functioning following cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Providing an additional augmentation treatment following CBT could help reduce these residual symptoms. Mindfulness interventions that facilitate less reactivity to thoughts and feelings may be helpful for patients suffering from residual OCD symptoms. The purpose of the current randomized waitlist control trial was to evaluate the feasibility and impact of providing an 8-week mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) intervention following completion of a CBT intervention to OCD patients who continued to suffer from significant symptoms. Results indicated that compared to the waitlist control group, MBCT participants reported decreases in OCD symptoms (d = 1.38), depression symptoms (d = 1.25), anxiety symptoms (d = 1.02), and obsessive beliefs (d = 1.20) along with increases in self-compassion (d = 0.77) and mindfulness skills (d = 0.77). Additionally, participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the MBCT intervention. The results suggest that the use of MBCT for OCD as an augmentation therapy is acceptable to patients who continue to suffer from OCD symptoms after completing CBT and provides some additional relief from residual symptoms. Mindfulness interventions teach skills that facilitate disengaging from cognitive routines and accepting internal experience, and these skills may be valuable in treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), as individuals describe getting "stuck" in repetitive thoughts and consequent rituals. The results of this study suggest that teaching mindfulness skills using an 8-week mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) intervention provides an added benefit (decreases in OCD, depression, and anxiety symptoms) for patients with OCD who have completed a cognitive behavioural therapy intervention and continued to suffer from

  17. D-Cycloserine Augmentation of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Directions for Pilot Research in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Eric A.; McKay, Dean; Reid, Jeannette M.; Geller, Daniel A.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses a recent translational success in combining behavioral psychotherapy with a novel medication, d-cycloserine (DCS), to augment cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders. The literature on behavioral theory of exposure-based therapies is provided, followed by a discussion of the role of DCS in enhancing extinction…

  18. Prophylactic Leukotriene Inhibitor Therapy for the Reduction of Capsular Contracture in Primary Silicone Breast Augmentation: Experience with over 1100 Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Bresnick, Stephen D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The role of leukotriene inhibitors used immediately postoperatively to potentially influence the development of capsular contracture is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of capsular contracture among women undergoing primary smooth silicone gel breast augmentation, with or without postoperative leukotriene inhibitor therapy. Methods: Between 2007 and 2013, 1122 consecutive women undergoing primary silicone gel breast augmentation were evaluated retro...

  19. A feasibility study using interactive graphic art feedback to augment acute neurorehabilitation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen-Chaudhari, Lise; Whalen, Cara N; Swendal, Catherine; Bockbrader, Marcia; Haserodt, Sarah; Smith, Rashana; Bruce, Michael Kelly; Mysiw, W Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Interactive arts technologies, designed to augment the acute neurorehabilitation provided by expert therapists, may overcome existing barriers of access for patients with low motor and cognitive function. Develop an application prototype to present movement feedback interactively and creatively. Evaluate feasibility of use within acute neurorehabilitation. Record demographics and Functional Independent Measure™ scores among inpatients who used the technology during physical, occupational or recreational therapy. Record exercises performed with the technology, longest exercise duration performed (calculated from sensor data), user feedback, and therapist responses to a validated technology assessment questionnaire. Inpatients (n = 21) between the ages of 19 and 86 (mean 57 ± 18; 12 male/9 female) receiving treatment for motor deficits associated with neuropathology used the application in conjunction with occupational, recreational, or physical therapy during 1 to 7 sessions. Patients classified on the Functional Independence Measure™ as requiring 75%+ assistance for cognitive and motor function were able to use the interactive application. Customized interactive arts applications are appropriate for further study as a therapeutic modality. In addition to providing interactivity to individuals with low motor function, interactive arts applications might serve to augment activity-based medicine among inpatients with low problem-solving and memory function.

  20. An Explorative Study Examining Augmentative and Alternative Communication Training in the Field of Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadberry, Anita L; Sweeney, Alison

    2017-07-01

    Music therapists work with many people who require Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). As communication goals are central to music therapy practice, many music therapists would benefit from training in AAC. The purpose of this survey study was to determine the state of AAC education for music therapists at the university level, how AAC is being used in music therapy sessions, and how practicing music therapists are trained in AAC. Music therapy faculty and credentialed music therapists in North America and Europe were invited to complete an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze survey data from each group of respondents. With regard to training in AAC at the university level, results indicate that almost half of music therapy faculty (44.66%) provided some training. The primary reason given for not providing training was a lack of educator knowledge in this area. Results indicate that a majority (81.77%) of music therapy clinicians are familiar with AAC and slightly over half (55.08%) reported that they work with clients who use AAC. Sixty-two percent of music therapists reported using AAC to promote expressive language, and 49% to increase receptive language. Over 80% of clinicians stated they would benefit from additional AAC training. Although a majority of music therapists are familiar with ACC, results indicate that ACC competency could be enhanced through university-level instruction and continuing professional development courses.

  1. DJINNI: A Novel Technology Supported Exposure Therapy Paradigm for SAD Combining Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Moussa, Maher; Rubo, Marius; Debracque, Coralie; Lange, Wolf-Gero

    2017-01-01

    The present paper explores the benefits and the capabilities of various emerging state-of-the-art interactive 3D and Internet of Things technologies and investigates how these technologies can be exploited to develop a more effective technology supported exposure therapy solution for social anxiety disorder. “DJINNI” is a conceptual design of an in vivo augmented reality (AR) exposure therapy mobile support system that exploits several capturing technologies and integrates the patient’s state and situation by vision-based, audio-based, and physiology-based analysis as well as by indoor/outdoor localization techniques. DJINNI also comprises an innovative virtual reality exposure therapy system that is adaptive and customizable to the demands of the in vivo experience and therapeutic progress. DJINNI follows a gamification approach where rewards and achievements are utilized to motivate the patient to progress in her/his treatment. The current paper reviews the state of the art of technologies needed for such a solution and recommends how these technologies could be integrated in the development of an individually tailored and yet feasible and effective AR/virtual reality-based exposure therapy. Finally, the paper outlines how DJINNI could be part of classical cognitive behavioral treatment and how to validate such a setup. PMID:28503155

  2. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: description of a treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kootker, Joyce A; Rasquin, Sascha M C; Smits, Peter; Geurts, Alexander C; van Heugten, Caroline M; Fasotti, Luciano

    2015-09-01

    Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was shown feasible in a pilot study. In order to meet the specific needs of stroke patients (concerning both sensori-motor, cognitive, and behavioural problems), we incorporated motivational interviewing, grief resolution, and psycho-education. We emphasised for each session to take into account the cognitive deficits of the patients (i.e. be concrete, accessible, structured, specific, and repeat information). Moreover, we augmented the psychologist-administered therapy with the contribution of an occupational or movement therapist aimed at facilitating patients' goal-setting and attainment. The intervention consisted of 12 one-hour sessions with a psychologist and three or four one-hour sessions with an occupational or movement therapist. Currently, the effectiveness of the intervention is evaluated in a randomised controlled trial. The proposed psychological treatment protocol is innovative, as it applies cognitive behavioural therapy in a stroke-specific manner; moreover, it supports goal attainment by incorporating occupational or movement therapy sessions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. DJINNI: A Novel Technology Supported Exposure Therapy Paradigm for SAD Combining Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Ben-Moussa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores the benefits and the capabilities of various emerging state-of-the-art interactive 3D and Internet of Things technologies and investigates how these technologies can be exploited to develop a more effective technology supported exposure therapy solution for social anxiety disorder. “DJINNI” is a conceptual design of an in vivo augmented reality (AR exposure therapy mobile support system that exploits several capturing technologies and integrates the patient’s state and situation by vision-based, audio-based, and physiology-based analysis as well as by indoor/outdoor localization techniques. DJINNI also comprises an innovative virtual reality exposure therapy system that is adaptive and customizable to the demands of the in vivo experience and therapeutic progress. DJINNI follows a gamification approach where rewards and achievements are utilized to motivate the patient to progress in her/his treatment. The current paper reviews the state of the art of technologies needed for such a solution and recommends how these technologies could be integrated in the development of an individually tailored and yet feasible and effective AR/virtual reality-based exposure therapy. Finally, the paper outlines how DJINNI could be part of classical cognitive behavioral treatment and how to validate such a setup.

  4. DJINNI: A Novel Technology Supported Exposure Therapy Paradigm for SAD Combining Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Moussa, Maher; Rubo, Marius; Debracque, Coralie; Lange, Wolf-Gero

    2017-01-01

    The present paper explores the benefits and the capabilities of various emerging state-of-the-art interactive 3D and Internet of Things technologies and investigates how these technologies can be exploited to develop a more effective technology supported exposure therapy solution for social anxiety disorder. "DJINNI" is a conceptual design of an in vivo augmented reality (AR) exposure therapy mobile support system that exploits several capturing technologies and integrates the patient's state and situation by vision-based, audio-based, and physiology-based analysis as well as by indoor/outdoor localization techniques. DJINNI also comprises an innovative virtual reality exposure therapy system that is adaptive and customizable to the demands of the in vivo experience and therapeutic progress. DJINNI follows a gamification approach where rewards and achievements are utilized to motivate the patient to progress in her/his treatment. The current paper reviews the state of the art of technologies needed for such a solution and recommends how these technologies could be integrated in the development of an individually tailored and yet feasible and effective AR/virtual reality-based exposure therapy. Finally, the paper outlines how DJINNI could be part of classical cognitive behavioral treatment and how to validate such a setup.

  5. An augmented model of brief psychodynamic interpersonal therapy for patients with nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Stephanie; Reuber, Markus

    2009-03-01

    Nonepileptic seizures (NES) are one of the most common functional (medically unexplained) symptoms seen by neurologists. Although most experts consider psychotherapy the treatment of choice, few therapeutic approaches have been described in detail. Given that NES occur in the context of many different psychopathologies, it remains uncertain whether there is 1 intervention that can benefit all comers or whether it is necessary to offer individualized psychotherapy. This article describes an approach grounded in psychodynamic interpersonal therapy but augmented with elements of cognitive-behavioral therapy, somatic trauma therapy, and the involvement of caregivers and family members. The approach was developed in the setting of a specialist psychotherapy service for patients with functional neurological disorders presenting to British hospital-based neurologists. The authors have previously shown that it is associated with significant improvements in psychological functioning, health-related functioning, and a symptom count. Three case reports illustrate how the treatment can be adapted to meet different patients' needs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Augmenting Antidepressant Medication Treatment of Depressed Women with Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples: A Randomized Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Wayne H.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.; Golden, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to evaluate adding emotionally focused therapy for couples (EFT) to antidepressant medication in the treatment of women with major depressive disorder and comorbid relationship discord. Twenty-four women and their male partners were randomized to 6 months of medication management alone (MM) or MM augmented with EFT (MM +…

  7. Design and Implementation of Markerless Augmented Reality Application for Cockroach Phobia Therapy Using Adaptive Threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiandra Fatharany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality (AR technology is useful for treating several psychological problems, including phobias such as fear of flying, agoraphobia, claustrophobia, and phobia to insects and small animals. However, the currently existing applications for therapy of cockroach phobia that uses AR technology are still very dependent towards the presence of markers, which might lessen the feeling of being in an actual scenario from everyday lives. In this paper, we created a system that is able to use everyday things as a replacement for markers for phobia therapy for cockroach. There are five main processes: getting the live streaming feed from camera, preprocessing, extracting the center point of the objects, tracking the marker-substitute objects, and lastly, instantiating cockroaches randomly after user lifts the objects according to the number and mode of the cockroaches, whether it is moving or not, that are predetermined by the user. The evaluation in this paper includes eight participants that are carefully selected based on their Fear of Spiders Questionnaire (FSQ score that is translated into Indonesian and modified to accommodate cockroaches instead of spiders. The results is that the system can induce anxiety level on participants with the highest score of 10, which is the highest score in Standard Unit of Discomfort scale (SUDs. While the presence and reality judgment of this paper has the highest score of 7 which is also the highest score in Slater-Usoh-Steed Questionnaire (SUS.

  8. Metabolic control after years of completing a clinical trial on sensor-augmented pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Carmen; Giménez, Marga; Orois, Aida; Conget, Ignacio

    2015-11-01

    Sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy has been shown to be effective and safe for improving metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in a number of trials. Our objective was to assess glycemic control in a group of T1DM patients on insulin pump or SAP therapy after years of participating in the SWITCH (Sensing With Insulin pump Therapy To Control HbA1c) trial and their return to routine medical monitoring. A retrospective, observational study of 20 patients who participated in the SWITCH trial at our hospital from 2008 to 2010. HbA1c values were compared at the start, during (at the end of the periods with/without SAP use - Sensor On/Sensor Off period respectively - of the cross-over design), and 3 years after study completion. HbA1c values of patients who continued SAP therapy (n=6) or only used insulin pump (n=14) were also compared. Twenty patients with T1DM (44.4±9.3 years, 60% women, baseline HbA1c level 8.43±0.55%) were enrolled into the SWITCH study). Three years after study completion, HbA1c level was 7.79±0.77 in patients on pump alone, with no significant change from the value at the end of the Off period of the study (7.85±0.57%; p=0.961). As compared to the end of the On period, HbA1c worsened less in patients who remained on SAP than in those on pump alone (0.18±0.42 vs. 0.55±0.71%; p=0.171), despite the fact that levels were similar at study start (8.41±0.60 vs. 8.47±0.45; p=0.831) and at the end of the On period (7.24±0.48 vs. 7.38±0.61; p=0.566). Frequency of CGM use in patients who continued SAP therapy was high (61.2% of the time in the last 3 months). Our study suggests that the additional benefit of SAP therapy achieved in a clinical trial may persist in the long term in routine clinical care of patients with T1DM. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in Emotion Processing following Brief Augmented Psychodynamic Interpersonal Therapy for Functional Neurological Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Isobel Anne; Howlett, Stephanie; Levita, Liat; Reuber, Markus

    2018-01-25

    Functional neurological symptoms (FNS) are considered non-volitional and often very disabling, but are not explainable by neurological disease or structural abnormalities. Brief Augmented Psychodynamic Interpersonal Therapy (BAPIT) was adapted to treat the putative emotion processing deficits thought to be central to FNS aetiology and maintenance. BAPIT for FNS has previously been shown to improve levels of distress and functioning, but it is unknown whether improvements on such measures correlate with changes in emotion processing ‒ which this treatment focuses on. To determine (a) whether the recently developed Emotional Processing Scale-25 can be used to demonstrate BAPIT-associated changes in patients with FNS, and (b) whether changes in the EPS-25 are associated with changes in previously validated outcome measures. 44 patients with FNS completed questionnaires including the EPS-25 and measures of clinical symptomology (health-related quality of life (SF-36), somatic symptoms (PHQ-15), psychological distress (CORE-10) and illness understanding (BIPQ)) pre- and post-therapy. At group level, emotion processing improved following therapy (p = .049). Some measures of clinical symptomology also improved, namely health-related quality of life (p = .02) and illness understanding (p = .01). Improvements in the EPS-25 correlated with improvements in mental health-related quality of life and psychological distress. Emotion processing and some measures of clinical symptomology improved in patients with FNS following BAPIT. The EPS-25 demonstrated changes that correlated with previously validated outcome measures. The EPS-25 is a suitable measure of psychotherapy-associated change in the FNS patient population.

  10. Restless legs syndrome augmentation among Japanese patients receiving pramipexole therapy: Rate and risk factors in a retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Takahashi

    Full Text Available To investigate the rate of and risk factors for restless legs syndrome (RLS augmentation in Japanese patients receiving pramipexole (PPX treatment. Records of 231 consecutive patients with idiopathic RLS who received PPX therapy for more than one month in a single sleep disorder center were analyzed retrospectively. Augmentation was diagnosed based on the Max Planck Institute criteria; associated factors were identified by logistic regression analysis. Mean age at PPX initiation was 60.6 ± 14.9 years and mean treatment duration was 48.5 ± 26.4 months. Augmentation was diagnosed in 21 patients (9.1%. Daily PPX dose and treatment duration were significantly associated with augmentation. By analyzing the receiver operating characteristic curve, a PPX dose of 0.375 mg/day was found to be the optimal cut-off value for predicting augmentation. After stratifying patients according to PPX treatment duration, at median treatment duration of 46 months, optimal cut-off values for daily doses were 0.375 and 0.500 mg/day for <46 months and ≥46 months of treatment, respectively. The RLS augmentation with PPX treatment in Japanese patients was occurred at rate of 9.1%, being quite compatible with previously reported rates in Caucasian patients. The symptom could appear within a relatively short period after starting the treatment in possibly vulnerable cases even with a smaller drug dose. Our results support the importance of keeping doses of PPX low throughout the RLS treatment course to prevent augmentation.

  11. SP-A binds alpha1-antitrypsin in vitro and reduces the association rate constant for neutrophil elastase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrabino Natalia

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background α1-antitrypsin and surfactant protein-A (SP-A are major lung defense proteins. With the hypothesis that SP-A could bind α1-antitrypsin, we designed a series of in vitro experiments aimed at investigating the nature and consequences of such an interaction. Methods and results At an α1-antitrypsin:SP-A molar ratio of 1:1, the interaction resulted in a calcium-dependent decrease of 84.6% in the association rate constant of α1-antitrypsin for neutrophil elastase. The findings were similar when SP-A was coupled with the Z variant of α1-antitrypsin. The carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-A appeared to be a major determinant of the interaction, by recognizing α1-antitrypsin carbohydrate chains. However, binding of SP-A carbohydrate chains to the α1-antitrypsin amino acid backbone and interaction between carbohydrates of both proteins are also possible. Gel filtration chromatography and turnover per inactivation experiments indicated that one part of SP-A binds several molar parts of α1-antitrypsin. Conclusion We conclude that the binding of SP-A to α1-antitrypsin results in a decrease of the inhibition of neutrophil elastase. This interaction could have potential implications in the physiologic regulation of α1-antitrypsin activity, in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, and in the defense against infectious agents.

  12. Reactivity of alpha 1-antitrypsin mutants against proteolytic enzymes of the kallikrein-kinin, complement, and fibrinolytic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patston, P.A.; Roodi, N.; Schifferli, J.A.; Bischoff, Rainer; Courtney, M.; Schapira, M.

    1990-01-01

    Increased extracellular proteolysis because of unregulated activation of blood coagulation, complement, and fibrinolysis is observed in thrombosis, shock, and inflammation. In the present study, we have examined whether the plasma kallikrein-kinin system, the classical pathway of complement, and the

  13. A retrospective study of predictive factors for effective aripiprazole augmentation of antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara H

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hiroko Sugawara,1,2 Kaoru Sakamoto,1 Tsuyoto Harada,3 Satoru Shimizu,4 Jun Ishigooka1 1Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, 2Support Center for Women Health Care Professionals and Researchers, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, 3Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Women’s Medical University Medical Center East, Arakawa-ku, 4Department of Research, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan Background: Several studies have evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of aripiprazole for augmentation of antidepressant therapy for treatment-resistant depression (TRD. Here, we investigated the efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation for TRD including both major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder and the clinical predictors of treatment efficacy in a Japanese population.  Methods: Eighty-five depressed Japanese patients who underwent aripiprazole augmentation therapy after failing to respond satisfactorily to antidepressant monotherapy were included in the study. Treatment responses were evaluated based on Clinical Global Impression Improvement scores assessed 8 weeks after initiation of aripiprazole administration. We compared demographic and diagnostic variables, psychiatric medication variables, and clinical variables between remission and nonremission groups.  Results: The aripiprazole augmentation remission rate was 36.5%. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that aripiprazole augmentation was significantly more effective for bipolar depression than for major depressive disorder, and both absence of comorbid anxiety disorders and current episode duration >3 months were significantly associated with the efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation.  Conclusion: Polarity of depression, comorbidity of anxiety disorders, and current episode duration may predict the efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation for TRD including both major depressive disorder and

  14. Attention bias modification augments cognitive-behavioral group therapy for social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarov, Amit; Marom, Sofi; Yahalom, Naomi; Pine, Daniel S; Hermesh, Haggai; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2017-12-20

    Cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT) is a first-line treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, since many patients remain symptomatic post-treatment, there is a need for augmenting procedures. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) examined the potential augmentation effect of attention bias modification (ABM) for CBGT. Fifty patients with SAD from three therapy groups were randomized to receive an 18-week standard CBGT with either ABM designed to shift attention away from threat (CBGT + ABM), or a placebo protocol not designed to modify threat-related attention (CBGT + placebo). Therapy groups took place in a large mental health center. Clinician and self-report measures of social anxiety and depression were acquired pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Attention bias was assessed at pre- and post-treatment. Patients randomized to the CBGT + ABM group, relative to those randomized to the CBGT + placebo group, showed greater reductions in clinician-rated SAD symptoms post-treatment, with effects maintained at 3-month follow-up. Group differences were not evident for self-report or attention-bias measures, with similar reductions in both groups. Finally, reduction in attention bias did not mediate the association between group and reduction in Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Structured Interview (LSAS) scores. This is the first RCT to examine the possible augmenting effect of ABM added to group-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for adult SAD. Training patients' attention away from threat might augment the treatment response to standard CBGT in SAD, a possibility that could be further evaluated in large-scale RCTs.

  15. A Preliminary Study of D-Cycloserine Augmentation of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Geffken, Gary R.; Lewin, Adam B.; Henin, Aude; Micco, Jamie A.; Sprich, Susan; Wilhelm, Sabine; Bengtson, Michael; Geller, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Research on the neural circuitry underlying fear extinction has led to the examination of d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist at the NMDA receptor in the amygdala, as a method of enhancing exposure therapy outcome. Preliminary results have supported the use of DCS to augment exposure therapy in adult anxiety disorders; however, no data have been reported in any childhood anxiety disorder. Thus, we sought to preliminarily examine if weight-adjusted DCS doses (25 or 50mg) enhanced the overall efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method Participants were 30 youth (ages 8–17) with a primary diagnosis of OCD. The study design was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled augmentation trial examining CBT+DCS versus CBT+Placebo (15 youth per group). All patients received 7 E/RP sessions paired with DCS or placebo taken 1 hour prior to sessions. Results Although not significantly different, compared to the CBT+Placebo group, youth in the CBT+DCS arm showed small-to-moderate treatment effects (d=.31 to .47 on primary outcomes). No adverse events were recorded. Conclusions The present results complement findings in adult OCD and non-OCD anxiety disorders and provide initial support for a more extensive study of DCS augmentation of CBT among youth with OCD. PMID:20817153

  16. A cost-effectiveness analysis of sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy and automated insulin suspension versus standard pump therapy for hypoglycemic unaware patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Trang T; Brnabic, Alan J M; Eggleston, Andrew; Kolivos, Athena; McBride, Margaret E; Schrover, Rudolf; Jones, Timothy W

    2014-07-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy with "Low Glucose Suspend" (LGS) functionality versus standard pump therapy with self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with type 1 diabetes who have impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. A clinical trial-based economic evaluation was performed in which the net costs and effectiveness of the two treatment modalities were calculated and expressed as an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). The clinical outcome of interest for the evaluation was the rate of severe hypoglycemia in each arm of the LGS study. Quality-of-life utility scores were calculated using the three-level EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire. Resource use costs were estimated using public sources. After 6 months, the use of sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy with LGS significantly reduced the incidence of severe hypoglycemia compared with standard pump therapy (incident rate difference 1.85 [0.17-3.53]; P = 0.037). Based on a primary randomized study, the ICER per severe hypoglycemic event avoided was $18,257 for all patients and $14,944 for those aged 12 years and older. Including all major medical resource costs (e.g., hospital admissions), the ICERs were $17,602 and $14,289, respectively. Over the 6-month period, the cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained was $40,803 for patients aged 12 years and older. Based on the Australian experience evaluating new interventions across a broad range of therapeutic areas, sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy with LGS may be considered a cost-effective alternative to standard pump therapy with self-monitoring of blood glucose in hypoglycemia unaware patients with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Combination therapy with lercanidipine and enalapril reduced central blood pressure augmentation in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Bruno, Rosa Maria; Cartoni, Giulia; Stea, Francesco; Magagna, Armando; Virdis, Agostino; Grassi, Davide; Ferri, Claudio; Taddei, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    Arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) augmentation are independent predictors of cardiovascular events. In a randomized, open, parallel group study we compared the effect on these parameters of combination therapy with an ACE-inhibitor plus calcium channel blocker or thiazide diuretic in 76 hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome uncontrolled by ACE-inhibitor monotherapy. After 4weeks run-in with enalapril (ENA, 20mg), patients were randomized to a combination therapy with lercanidipine (LER, 10-20mg) or hydrochlorothiazide (HCT, 12.5-25mg) for 24weeks. Aortic stiffness (carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity, PWV), central BP values and augmentation (augmentation index, AIx) were measured by applanation tonometry. The two groups showed similar office and central BP after run-in. Office (ENA/LER: from 149.1±4.9/94.5±1.5 to 131.7±8.1/82.2±5.3; ENA/HCT: from 150.3±4.7/94.7±2.1 to 133.1±7.1/82.8±5.3mmHg) and central BP (ENA/LER 127.4±17.1/85.2±12.1 to 120.5±13.5/80.0±9.5mmHg; ENA/HCT 121.6±13.4/79.3±9.5mmHg) were similarly reduced after 24weeks. PWV was comparable after run-in and not differently reduced by the two treatments (ENA/LER from 8.6±1.5 to 8.1±1.3m/s, pmetabolic syndrome not controlled by ENA alone. These results indicate a positive effect of the combination of ENA/LER on central BP augmentation, suggesting a potential additive role for cardiovascular protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Time to reconsider nonsurgical therapy of benign nontoxic multinodular goitre. Focus on recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) augmented radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Søren; Nielsen, Viveque; Bonnema, Steen

    2009-01-01

    alternatives are needed. Until recently, levothyroxine therapy was the preferred non-surgical alternative, but due to low efficacy and potential side-effects, it is not recommended for routine use in recent international guidelines. Conventional radioiodine (131I)-therapy has been used for two decades......, which makes 131I-therapy less feasible. Another challenge is the negative correlation between initial goitre size and goitre volume reduction (GVR). With its ability to more than double the thyroid 131I-uptake, recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) increases the absorbed radiation dose and thus enhances the GVR...... efficacy. Thus, although in its infancy, and still experimental, rhTSH-augmented 131I-therapy may profoundly alter the nonsurgical treatment of benign non-toxic MNG....

  19. Sensor-augmented pump therapy lowers HbA(1c) in suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes; a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, J.; Nørgaard, K.; Bruttomesso, D.; Mathieu, C.; Frid, A.; Dayan, C. M.; Diem, P.; Fermon, C.; Wentholt, I. M. E.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; DeVries, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs. multiple daily injection therapy in patients with suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes. In this investigator-initiated multi-centre trial (the Eurythmics Trial) in eight outpatient centres in Europe, we randomized 83 patients with

  20. Remission of classic rapid cycling bipolar disorder with levothyroxine augmentation therapy in a male patient having clinical hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen PH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pao-Huan Chen, Yu-Jui Huang Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: The literature suggests that patients with bipolar disorder, particularly females, have greater vulnerability to rapid cycling features. Levothyroxine therapy might be potentially useful to attenuate mood instability in this patient group. In contrast, reports on male patients remain limited and controversial. Herein, we report a 32-year-old male patient who had bipolar 1 disorder for 12 years who developed a breakthrough rapid cycling course and first-onset clinical hypothyroidism at the age of 31 years during lithium therapy. After levothyroxine augmentation therapy was introduced, the patient had remission from the rapid cycling illness course along with normalization of serum levels of free T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone in the subsequent year. This observation suggested that investigation of both levothyroxine pharmacology and thyroid pathology in male patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorder might be of much value. Keywords: mood disorder, therapy, thyroid hormone

  1. Dose timing of D-cycloserine to augment cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety: Study design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Stefan G; Carpenter, Joseph K; Otto, Michael W; Rosenfield, David; Smits, Jasper A J; Pollack, Mark H

    2015-07-01

    The use of D-cycloserine (DCS) as a cognitive enhancer to augment exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) represents a promising new translational research direction with the goal to accelerate and optimize treatment response for anxiety disorders. Some studies suggest that DCS may not only augment extinction learning but could also facilitate fear memory reconsolidation. Therefore, the effect of DCS may depend on fear levels reported at the end of exposure sessions. This paper presents the rationale and design for a randomized controlled trial examining the relative efficacy of tailoring DCS administration based on exposure success (i.e. end fear levels) during a 5-session group CBT protocol for social anxiety disorder (n = 156). Specifically, tailored post-session DCS administration will be compared against untailored post-session DCS, untailored pre-session DCS, and pill placebo in terms of reduction in social anxiety symptoms and responder status. In addition, a subset of participants (n = 96) will undergo a fear extinction retention experiment prior to the clinical trial in which they will be randomly assigned to receive either DCS or placebo prior to extinguishing a conditioned fear. The results from this experimental paradigm will clarify the mechanism of the effects of DCS on exposure procedures. This study aims to serve as the first step toward developing an algorithm for the personalized use of DCS during CBT for social anxiety disorder, with the ultimate goal of optimizing treatment outcome for anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Augmentation effect of combination therapy of aripiprazole and antidepressants on forced swimming test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourin, Michel; Chenu, Franck; Prica, Corina; Hascoët, Martine

    2009-09-01

    A deficiency in brain monoamine systems (serotonin, dopamine, and/or norepinephrine) have long been hypothesized for the pathogenesis of depression. Drugs enhancing neurotransmission of those monoamines have been proven to have antidepressant effects. We hypothesized that aripiprazole, a partial D(2) agonist, could increase the activity of various antidepressants in the mice forced swimming test (FST), an animal model of depression. The scope of this study was to investigate the antidepressant-like effect of aripiprazole, when combined with conventional antidepressants drugs. This study assessed the effects of co-administration of aripiprazole with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; sertraline, paroxetine, and citalopram), selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs; venlafaxine and minalcipran), selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI; desipramine), and the dual dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (bupropion), using the FST in mice. Subactive doses of aripiprazole and antidepressants sertraline, paroxetine, citalopram, venlafaxine, minalcipran, bupropion (4 and 8 mg/kg), and desipramine (2 and 4 mg/kg) were given i.p. 30 and 45 min, respectively, before the test. Aripiprazole (0.03 and 0.06 mg/kg) combined with inactive doses of antidepressants, increased the activity of all antidepressants with the exception of bupropion and desipramine. The augmentation effects of aripiprazole, in the present study, are in agreement with clinical evidence suggesting that aripiprazole may enhance the efficacy of therapeutic effect of SSRIs and SNRIs but not of NRI. These results suggest that augmentation effect of aripiprazole only appears when 5-HT system is activated and might implicate complex regulation between dopamine and 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors.

  3. Augmented cognitive behavioral therapy for poststroke depressive symptoms: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.C.; Lem, F.C.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of individually tailored cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for reducing depressive symptoms with or without anxiety poststroke. DESIGN: Multicenter, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Ambulatory rehabilitation setting. PARTICIPANTS:

  4. Modafinil augmentation therapy in unipolar and bipolar depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Alexander J; Kaser, Muzaffer; Costafreda, Sergi G; Sahakian, Barbara J; Fu, Cynthia H Y

    2013-11-01

    Current pharmacologic treatments for a depressive episode in unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar depression are limited by low rates of remission. Residual symptoms include a persistent low mood and neurovegetative symptoms such as fatigue. The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy and tolerability of augmentation of first-line therapies with the novel stimulant-like agent modafinil in MDD and bipolar depression. MEDLINE/PubMed, PsycINFO, 1980-April 2013 were searched using the following terms: (modafinil or armodafinil) and (depressi* or depressed or major depressive disorder or major depression or unipolar or bipolar or dysthymi*). Inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, sample comprising adult patients (18-65 years) with unipolar or bipolar depression, diagnosis according to DSM-IV, ICD-10, or other well-recognized criteria, modafinil or armodafinil given as augmentation therapy in at least 1 arm of the trial, and publication in English in a peer-reviewed journal. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials of adjunctive treatment with modafinil or armodafinil of standard treatment for depressive episodes in MDD and bipolar depression were selected. Two independent appraisers assessed the eligibility of the trials. A random-effects meta-analysis with DerSimonian-Laird method was used. Moderator effects were evaluated by meta-regression. Data from 6 RCTs, with a total of 910 patients with MDD or bipolar depression, consisting of 4 MDD RCTs (n = 568) and 2 bipolar depression RCTs (n = 342) were analyzed. The meta-analysis revealed significant effects of modafinil on improvements in overall depression scores (point estimate = -0.35; 95% CI, -0.61 to -0.10) and remission rates (odds ratio = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.49). The treatment effects were evident in both MDD and bipolar depression, with no difference between disorders. Modafinil showed a significant positive effect on

  5. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  6. "Combined Occlusion and Atropine Therapy" Versus "Augmented Part-Time Patching" in Children with Refractory/Residual Amblyopia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Virender; Mittal, Vaibhev; Gupta, Varun; Gunturu, Rekha; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Chandrasekharan, Anjali; Chabblani, Preeti Patil; Rao, Harsha L

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of combined occlusion and atropine therapy (COAT) and augmented part-time patching for the treatment of unilateral refractory/residual amblyopia. This retrospective study evaluated children between 4 and 11 years with refractory/residual amblyopia who were treated with either additional atropine (COAT group) or increased hours of patching (augmented group). Data were collected on improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA; logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR] units) at each follow-up visit. There were 19 children in the COAT group and 17 children in the augmented group. The baseline BCVA of the amblyopic eye was 0.79 ± 0.36 logMAR in the COAT group and 0.72 ± 0.26 logMAR in augmented group. Children were statistically significantly younger in the COAT group (6.4 ± 2.2 years) compared to the augmented group (8.6 ± 3.3 years, P = 0.02). The mean duration of follow-up was statistically significantly longer in the augmented group (20.2 COAT group; 13.9 months augmented group) (P = 0.03). Compliance was similar in both groups. LogMAR BCVA (adjusted for difference in age and baseline BCVA) was statistically significantly better in the COAT group (0.56 ± 0.04) compared to the augmented group (0.80 ± 0.04) at 3 months (P = 0.000); 6 months (COAT group, 0.50 ± 0.04 vs. augmented group, 0.74 ± 0.04; P = 0.04) and at 1 year (COAT group, 0.42 ± 0.04 vs. augmented group, 0.67 ± 0.04, P = 0.000). There was statistically significantly greater improvement in logMAR BCVA at 6 months in COAT group (0.26 ± 0.15) compared to the augmented group (0.02 ± 0.14), (P = 0.0002). Age, gender, pretreatment BCVA, duration of follow-up, or compliance to patching did not affect improvement in BCVA. COAT may result in greater improvement in BCVA than augmented part-time patching in children with unilateral residual/refractory amblyopia.

  7. The use of virtual reality-based therapy to augment poststroke upper limb recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Geoffrey S; Choo, Min; Chan, Wai Yin; Kok, Stanley; Ng, Yee Sien

    2015-07-01

    Stroke remains one of the major causes of disability worldwide. This case report illustrates the complementary use of biomechanical and kinematic in-game markers, in addition to standard clinical outcomes, to comprehensively assess and track a patient's disabilities. A 65-year-old patient was admitted for right-sided weakness and clinically diagnosed with acute ischaemic stroke. She participated in a short trial of standard stroke occupational therapy and physiotherapy with additional daily virtual reality (VR)-based therapy. Outcomes were tracked using kinematic data and conventional clinical assessments. Her Functional Independence Measure score improved from 87 to 113 and Fugl-Meyer motor score improved from 56 to 62, denoting clinically significant improvement. Corresponding kinematic analysis revealed improved hand path ratios and a decrease in velocity peaks. Further research is being undertaken to elucidate the optimal type, timing, setting and duration of VR-based therapy, as well as the use of neuropharmacological adjuncts.

  8. DJINNI: A novel technology supported exposure therapy paradigm for SAD combining virtual reality and augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben-Moussa, M.; Rubo, M.; Debracque, C.; Lange, W.G.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper explores the benefits and the capabilities of various emerging state-of-the-art interactive 3D and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies and investigates how these technologies can be exploited to develop a more effective technology supported exposure therapy solution for Social

  9. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: description of a treatment protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.C.; Smits, P.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. Method of protocol development This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was

  10. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: description of a treatment protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.; Smits, P; Geurts, A.C.H.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. METHOD OF PROTOCOL DEVELOPMENT: This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was

  11. Biomechanical and histological effects of augmented soft tissue mobilization therapy on achilles tendinopathy in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kan; Ikoma, Kazuya; Chen, Qingshan; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Gay, Ralph E

    2015-02-01

    Augmented soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) has been used to treat Achilles tendinopathy and is thought to promote collagen fiber realignment and hasten tendon regeneration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical and histological effects of ASTM therapy on rabbit Achilles tendons after enzymatically induced injury. This study was a non-human bench controlled research study using a rabbit model. Both Achilles tendons of 12 rabbits were injected with collagenase to produce tendon injury simulating Achilles tendinopathy. One side was then randomly allocated to receive ASTM, while the other received no treatment (control). ASTM was performed on the Achilles tendon on postoperative days 21, 24, 28, 31, 35, and 38. Tendons were harvested 10 days after treatment and examined with dynamic viscoelasticity and light microscopy. Cross-sectional area in the treated tendons was significantly greater than in controls. Storage modulus tended to be lower in the treated tendons but elasticity was not significantly increased. Loss modulus was significantly lower in the treated tendons. There was no significant difference found in tangent delta (loss modulus/storage modulus). Microscopy of control tendons showed that the tendon fibers were wavy and type III collagen was well stained. The tendon fibers of the augmented soft tissue mobilization treated tendons were not wavy and type III collagen was not prevalent. Biomechanical and histological findings showed that the Achilles tendons treated with ASTM had better recovery of biomechanical function than did control tendons. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Substrate reduction augments the efficacy of enzyme therapy in a mouse model of Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Marshall

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked glycosphingolipid storage disorder caused by a deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal hydrolase α-galactosidase A (α-gal. This deficiency results in accumulation of the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (GL-3 in lysosomes. Endothelial cell storage of GL-3 frequently leads to kidney dysfunction, cardiac and cerebrovascular disease. The current treatment for Fabry disease is through infusions of recombinant α-gal (enzyme-replacement therapy; ERT. Although ERT can markedly reduce the lysosomal burden of GL-3 in endothelial cells, variability is seen in the clearance from several other cell types. This suggests that alternative and adjuvant therapies may be desirable. Use of glucosylceramide synthase inhibitors to abate the biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids (substrate reduction therapy, SRT has been shown to be effective at reducing substrate levels in the related glycosphingolipidosis, Gaucher disease. Here, we show that such an inhibitor (eliglustat tartrate, Genz-112638 was effective at lowering GL-3 accumulation in a mouse model of Fabry disease. Relative efficacy of SRT and ERT at reducing GL-3 levels in Fabry mouse tissues differed with SRT being more effective in the kidney, and ERT more efficacious in the heart and liver. Combination therapy with ERT and SRT provided the most complete clearance of GL-3 from all the tissues. Furthermore, treatment normalized urine volume and uromodulin levels and significantly delayed the loss of a nociceptive response. The differential efficacies of SRT and ERT in the different tissues indicate that the combination approach is both additive and complementary suggesting the possibility of an improved therapeutic paradigm in the management of Fabry disease.

  13. Stereotactic radiation therapy combined with immunotherapy: augmenting the role of radiation in local and systemic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Andrew B; Tran, Phuoc T; Lim, Michael; Drake, Charles G; Deweese, Theodore L

    2015-05-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy are two contemporary radiation modalities that can treat tumors in any area of the body using highly focused radiation. Recently, immunotherapy has established itself as a viable and powerful anticancer treatment. In this review we detail the rationale supporting a combination of immunotherapy and stereotactic radiation. Additionally, we discuss the evidence for the immune stimulatory effects of focused radiation and the role that radiation may play in enhancing the systemic treatment effects of immunotherapy.

  14. Long-term safety and tolerability of open-label aripiprazole augmentation of antidepressant therapy in major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Robert M; Thase, Michael E; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Hazel, James A; Marler, Sabrina Vogel; McQuade, Robert D; Carson, William; Baker, Ross A; Marcus, Ronald N

    2011-01-01

    Background: Effective management of major depressive disorder often includes the long-term use of multiple medications, and the longer-term utility and safety of adjunctive aripiprazole has not been evaluated in a controlled setting. Patients and methods: Patients (n = 706) completing one of two 14-week double-blind studies of aripiprazole augmentation, as well as de novo patients (n = 296) nonresponsive to current antidepressant therapy, were enrolled in this open-label study. Patients received open-label aripiprazole for up to 52 weeks. Results: Open-label treatment was completed by 323 patients (32.2%). At endpoint (n = 987), the mean dose of aripiprazole was 10.1 mg/day. Common (>15% of patients) spontaneously reported adverse events were akathisia (26.2%), fatigue (18.0%), and weight gain (17.1%). The incidence of serious adverse events was 4.0%. Four spontaneous reports of possible tardive dyskinesia were submitted (0.4%); all resolved within 45 days of drug discontinuation. Mean weight change was 4.4 kg; 36.6% experienced ≥7% increase in weight from baseline (observed case analysis, n = 303). No clinically relevant changes in other metabolic parameters were seen. At the end of open-label treatment, 221 patients (69.7%) had a Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness score of 1 (not at all ill) or 2 (borderline ill). Conclusion: Long-term adjunctive aripiprazole therapy was well tolerated with an acceptable long-term safety and tolerability profile in patients with major depressive disorder who had not responded to treatment with one or more antidepressant therapies. Clinically significant weight gain was observed in about one-third of patients. Overall, the adverse event profile was consistent with that reported in the short-term trials and readily managed clinically. PMID:21655344

  15. Effect of exercise augmentation of cognitive behavioural therapy for the treatment of suicidal ideation and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Abbas; LeBouthillier, Daniel M; Najafi, Mahmoud; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Hosseinian, Simin; Shahidi, Shahriar; Carlbring, Per; Kalhori, Atefeh; Sadeghi, Hassan; Jalili, Marzieh

    2017-09-01

    Suicidal ideation and depression are prevalent and costly conditions that reduce quality of life. This study was designed to determine the efficacy of exercise as an adjunct to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for suicidal ideation and depression among depressed individuals. In a randomized clinical trial, 54 mildly to moderately depressed patients (54% female, mean age=48.25) were assigned to a combined CBT and exercise group or to a CBT only group. Both groups received one weekly session of therapy for 12 weeks, while the combined group also completed exercise three times weekly over the same period. Self-reported suicidal ideation, depression, and activities of daily living were measured at the beginning and the end of treatment. Multilevel modelling revealed greater improvements in suicidal ideation, depression, and activities of daily living in the combined CBT and exercise group, compared to the CBT only group. No follow-up data were collected, so the long-term effects (i.e., maintenance of gains) is unclear. The findings revealed that exercise adjunct to CBT effectively decreases both depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in mildly to moderately depressed individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. EFFECTS OF HOMEWORK COMPLIANCE ON COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY WITH D-CYCLOSERINE AUGMENTATION FOR CHILDREN WITH OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Rosenfield, David; Monzani, Benedetta; Krebs, Georgina; Heyman, Isobel; Turner, Cynthia; Isomura, Kayoko; Mataix-Cols, David

    2015-12-01

    The present study examined the effects of homework compliance on outcome from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and the extent to which these effects differ as a function of augmentation of CBT with D-cycloserine (DCS). Twenty-seven youth with OCD were randomized to either 50 mg DCS or placebo (PBO) administered immediately after each of 10 CBT sessions, primarily consisting of exposure and ritual prevention (ERP). Independent evaluators assessed OCD severity using the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) at the start of each session. Compliance with between-session ERP assignments was also assessed at the start of each session using the Patient ERP Adherence Scale (PEAS). Greater homework compliance between the previous session and the current session was related to lower CY-BOCS at the current session. However, the relation between homework compliance and CY-BOCS varied by treatment condition. Higher homework compliance was related to lower CY-BOCS for participants in the DCS condition, but not for participants in the PBO condition. Furthermore, participants receiving DCS were estimated to have significantly lower CY-BOCS than those given PBO among those with the highest levels of homework compliance. DCS may more effectively facilitate the effects of CBT for youth with OCD when patients are compliant with prescribed homework. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Combinatorial treatment with oncolytic adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus augments adenoviral cancer gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenoviruses (Onc.Ads produce significant antitumor effects but as single agents they rarely eliminate tumors. Investigators have therefore incorporated sequences into these vectors that encode immunomodulatory molecules to enhance antitumor immunity. Successful implementation of this strategy requires multiple tumor immune inhibitory mechanisms to be overcome, and insertion of the corresponding multiple functional genes reduces the titer and replication of Onc.Ads, compromising their direct ant-tumor effects. By contrast, helper-dependent (HD Ads are devoid of viral coding sequences, allowing inclusion of multiple transgenes. HDAds, however, lack replicative capacity. Since HDAds encode the adenoviral packaging signal, we hypothesized that the coadministration of Onc.Ad with HDAd would allow to be amplified and packaged during replication of Onc.Ad in transduced cancer cells. This combination could provide immunostimulation without losing oncolytic activity. We now show that coinfection of Onc.Ad with HDAd subsequently replicates HDAd vector DNA in trans in human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, amplifying the transgenes the HDAd encode. This combinatorial treatment significantly suppresses the tumor growth compared to treatment with a single agent in an immunocompetent mouse model. Hence, combinatorial treatment of Onc.Ad with HDAd should overcome the inherent limitations of each agent and provide a highly immunogenic oncolytic therapy.

  18. Can pill placebo augment cognitive-behavior therapy for panic disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churchill Rachel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a number of drug and psychotherapy comparative trials, psychotherapy-placebo combination has been assumed to represent psychotherapy. Whether psychotherapy plus pill placebo is the same as psychotherapy alone is an empirical question which however has to date never been examined systematically. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs that directly compared cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT alone against CBT plus pill placebo in the treatment of panic disorder. Results Extensive literature search was able to identify three relevant RCTs. At the end of the acute phase treatment, patients who received CBT plus placebo had 26% (95%CI: 2 to 55% increased chances of responding than those who received CBT alone. At follow-up the difference was no longer statistically significant (22%, 95%CI: -10% to 64%. Conclusion The act of taking a pill placebo may enhance the placebo effect already contained in the effective psychotherapeutic intervention during the acute phase treatment. Theoretically this is an argument against the recently claimed null hypothesis of placebo effect in general and clinically it may point to some further room for enhancing the psychotherapeutic approach for panic disorder.

  19. Augmented Feedback System to Support Physical Therapy of Non-specific Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodbeck, Dominique; Degen, Markus; Stanimirov, Michael; Kool, Jan; Scheermesser, Mandy; Oesch, Peter; Neuhaus, Cornelia

    Low back pain is an important problem in industrialized countries. Two key factors limit the effectiveness of physiotherapy: low compliance of patients with repetitive movement exercises, and inadequate awareness of patients of their own posture. The Backtrainer system addresses these problems by real-time monitoring of the spine position, by providing a framework for most common physiotherapy exercises for the low back, and by providing feedback to patients in a motivating way. A minimal sensor configuration was identified as two inertial sensors that measure the orientation of the lower back at two points with three degrees of freedom. The software was designed as a flexible platform to experiment with different hardware, and with various feedback modalities. Basic exercises for two types of movements are provided: mobilizing and stabilizing. We developed visual feedback - abstract as well as in the form of a virtual reality game - and complemented the on-screen graphics with an ambient feedback device. The system was evaluated during five weeks in a rehabilitation clinic with 26 patients and 15 physiotherapists. Subjective satisfaction of subjects was good, and we interpret the results as encouraging indication for the adoption of such a therapy support system by both patients and therapists.

  20. Running for extinction? Aerobic exercise as an augmentation of exposure therapy in panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Sophie; Wieder, Gesine; Einsle, Franziska; Petzold, Moritz B; Janßen, Christiane; Mumm, Jennifer L M; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Fydrich, Thomas; Plag, Jens; Ströhle, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    Exposure-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (eb-CBT) represents the most evidence-based psychotherapeutic approach in anxiety disorders. However, its efficacy may be limited by a delay in onset of action and a substantial number of patients does not respond sufficiently to treatment. In this context, aerobic exercise was found to be effective in reducing clinical anxiety as well as to improve (elements of) disorder-specific CBT in some mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effect of aerobic exercise supplementary to an eb-CBT in panic disorder and agoraphobia (PD/AG). 77 patients with PD/AG performed a 30 min treadmill task with moderate or low intensity (70% or 30% of the maximal oxygen uptake [VO 2max ]) prior to five exposure sessions within a standardized seven-week CBT. At baseline, after completing the treatment period (post) and six month after post (follow-up), several measures of (un)specific psychopathology (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale [Ham-A], Mobility Inventory [MI], Panic and Agoraphobia Scale [PAS], Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire [ACQ], Body Sensations Questionnaire [BSQ]) were established to assess for clinical changes. All patients experienced a significant improvement of symptoms from baseline to post (for all measures p < .001) but repeated-measures analyses of variance found a trend towards a significant time × group interaction in the Ham-A in favor for the moderate intense exercise group (f[1, 74] = 4.15, p = .045, α=.025). This trend, however, disappeared at follow-up since the low-intense exercise group further improved significantly in Ham-A after post. Our findings therefore might point to an accelerating effect of moderate-intense exercise within an exposure-based CBT for AG/PD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Augmented postcard

    OpenAIRE

    Bernik , Aleš

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the examination of augmented reality technology, which allows us mixing real and virtual elements. Augmented reality is a relatively new technology which is becoming more widespread, thanks to a fairly reasonable price of smart phones. Here we presents the types of augmented reality, the necessary technology and their advantages and disadvantages, its current use in applications, and software for building augmented reality applications. The thesis is mainly focuse...

  2. Cost-effectiveness of sensor-augmented pump therapy versus standard insulin pump therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze, S; de Portu, S; Smith-Palmer, J; Delbaere, A; Valentine, W; Ridderstråle, M

    2017-06-01

    The use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in type 1 diabetes (T1D) has increased in recent years. Sensor-augmented pump therapy (SAP) with low glucose suspend (LGS) (allowing temporary suspension of insulin delivery if blood glucose level falls below a pre-defined threshold level) provides additional benefits over CSII alone, but is associated with higher acquisition costs. Therefore, a cost-effectiveness analysis of SAP+LGS versus CSII in patients with T1D was performed. Analyses were performed using the CORE Diabetes Model in two different patient cohorts in Denmark, one with hyperglycemia at baseline and one with increased risk for hypoglycemic events. Clinical input data were sourced from published literature. The analysis was performed over a lifetime time horizon from a societal perspective. Future costs and clinical outcomes were discounted at 3% per annum. In patients who were hyperglycemic at baseline the use of SAP+LGS versus CSII resulted in improved quality-adjusted life expectancy (12.44 versus 10.99 quality-adjusted life years [QALYs]) but higher mean lifetime costs (DKK 2,027,316 versus DKK 1,801,293) leading to an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of DKK 156,082 per QALY gained. For patients at increased risk for hypoglycemic events the ICER for SAP+LGS versus CSII was DKK 89,868 per QALY gained. The ICER for SAP+LGS versus CSII falls below commonly cited willingness-to-pay thresholds. Therefore, in Denmark, the use of SAP+LGS is likely to be considered cost-effective relative to CSII for patients with T1D who are either hyperglycemic, despite CSII use, or who experience frequent severe hypoglycemic events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A pilot study for augmenting atomoxetine with methylphenidate: safety of concomitant therapy in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball Susan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined augmenting atomoxetine with extended-release methylphenidate in children whose attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD previously failed to respond adequately to stimulant medication. Methods Children with ADHD and prior stimulant treatment (N = 25 received atomoxetine (1.2 mg/kg/day plus placebo. After 4 weeks, patients who were responders (n = 4 were continued on atomoxetine/placebo while remaining patients were randomly assigned to either methylphenidate (ATX/MPH (1.1 mg/kg/day or placebo augmentation (ATX/PB for another 6 weeks. Patients and sites were blind to timing of active augmentation. Safety measures included vital signs, weight, and adverse events. Efficacy was assessed by ADHD rating scales. Results Categorical increases in vital signs occurred for 5 patients (3 patients in ATX/MPH, 2 patients in ATX/PBO. Sixteen percent discontinued the study due to AE, but no difference between augmentation groups. Atomoxetine treatment was efficacious on outcome measures (P ≤ .001, but methylphenidate did not enhance response. Conclusion Methylphenidate appears to be safely combined with atomoxetine, but conclusions limited by small sample. With atomoxetine treatment, 43% of patients achieved normalization on ADHD ratings.

  4. Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher; Kjeldsen, Lars Peter Bech; Rahn, Annette

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of iPad-facilitated application of augmented reality in the teaching of highly complex anatomical and physiological subjects in the training of nurses at undergraduate level. The general aim of the project is to investigate the potentials of this application in terms...... of augmented reality are discussed....

  5. AUGMENTED REALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Kirsten; Bahn, Anne Louise

    2017-01-01

    Projektets grundlæggende idé er udvikling af visuel, æstetisk læring med Augmented Reality, hvor intentionen er at bidrage med konkrete undersøgelser og udforskning af begrebet Augmented Reality – herunder koblingen mellem det analoge og digitale i forhold til læring, multimodalitet og it...

  6. Breast Augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... augmentation About Doctors & Departments Care at Mayo Clinic Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  7. Physical Therapy Intervention to Augment Outcomes Of Lymph Node Transfer Surgery for a Breast Cancer Survivor with Secondary Upper Extremity Lymphedema: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKey, Katelyn P; Alappattu, Meryl J

    Lymphedema is an incurable complication of breast cancer treatment that affects roughly 20 percent of women. It is often managed via complete decongestive therapy, which includes manual lymph drainage, therapeutic compression, skin care, and exercise. Lymph node transfer is a new and expensive surgical intervention that uses one's own lymph nodes and implants them in the affected upper extremity. Previous research has investigated augmenting lymph node transfer surgery with complete decongestive therapy, but there is a lack of evidence regarding the success of focusing lymph drainage against the normal pressure gradient toward a surgical flap located on the wrist. The patient's main motivation for the surgical intervention was to alleviate her daily burden of complete decongestive therapy. The purpose of this case report was to compare the methods and results of pre-surgical complete decongestive physical therapy to a post-operation modified approach that directed lymph fluid away from the major lymphatic ducts and instead toward a surgical flap on the wrist of a patient with lymphedema. A 65-year-old female presented with secondary upper extremity lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. Her circumferential measurements and L-Dex score corroborated this diagnosis, and she had functional deficits in upper extremity range of motion. She was seen for 10 visits of traditional complete decongestive therapy prior to her lymph node transfer surgery and 24 treatments of modified complete decongestive therapy over the course of six months following surgery. At six months, the patient had minor improvements in the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, range of motion, and upper extremity strength. However, her circumferential measurements and L-Dex scores showed a meaningful increase in limb girth. The patient's smallest upper extremity volumes were documented before the operation after two

  8. Augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Pucer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Today we can obtain in a simple and rapid way most of the information that we need. Devices, such as personal computers and mobile phones, enable access to information in different formats (written, pictorial, audio or video whenever and wherever. Daily we use and encounter information that can be seen as virtual objects or objects that are part of the virtual world of computers. Everyone, at least once, wanted to bring these virtual objects from the virtual world of computers into real environments and thus mix virtual and real worlds. In such a mixed reality, real and virtual objects coexist in the same environment. The reality, where users watch and use the real environment upgraded with virtual objects is called augmented reality. In this article we describe the main properties of augmented reality. In addition to the basic properties that define a reality as augmented reality, we present the various building elements (possible hardware and software that provide an insight into such a reality and practical applications of augmented reality. The applications are divided into three groups depending on the information and functions that augmented reality offers, such as help, guide and simulator.

  9. Lip Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJoseph, Louis M; Agarwal, Anurag; Greco, Timothy M

    2018-05-01

    This article examines 6 questions about lip augmentation answered by 3 experts in their field of facial plastic surgery. The topics covered include high-yield areas such as injection, surgical enhancement, rhytid resurfacing, implants, complications, and technique changes over the years. All the authors answered these questions in a "How I do it" manner to provide the reader with a true understanding of their thoughts and techniques. This article provides a practical resource to all physicians and practitioners performing lip augmentation on some of the most common questions and issues. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dose-remission of pulsating electromagnetic fields as augmentation in therapy-resistant depression: a randomized, double-blind controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straasø, Birgit; Lauritzen, Lise; Lunde, Marianne; Vinberg, Maj; Lindberg, Lone; Larsen, Erik Roj; Dissing, Steen; Bech, Per

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate to what extent a twice daily dose of Transcranial Pulsating ElectroMagnetic Fields (T-PEMF) was superior to once daily in patients with treatment-resistant depression as to obtaining symptom remission after 8 weeks of augmentation therapy. A self-treatment set-up of the T-PEMF device was used allowing self-administration by patients in own homes. All patients were treated for 30 min per T-PEMF session. The antidepressant medication the patients were receiving at baseline remained unchanged during the trial. The patients were randomised to either one T-PEMF dose (active dose in the morning and sham in the afternoon) or two T-PEMF doses (active dose both morning and afternoon) in a double-blind procedure. A score of 7 or less on the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) was the criterion of remission. In total 34 patients received active T-PEMF once a day and 31 patients twice daily. After 5 weeks of therapy remission was obtained in 26.5% and 32.3% on one dose and two doses of T-PEMF, respectively. After 8 weeks the rate of remission was 73.5% and 67.7%, respectively. The side effects as measured by the Udvalget for Kliniske Undersøgelser scale showed a better toleration of the antidepresssive medication in both treatment groups, which was reflected by the WHO-5 well-being scale with increased scores in both groups of patients. The high remission rate obtained by the T-PEMF augmentation was not a dose effect (one versus two daily T-PEMF sessions) but was explained by the extension of the treatment period from 5 to 8 weeks.

  11. Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Brandt, Harald; Radmer, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer resultater fra pilotafprøvning i 7.-klasses fysik/kemi og biologi af to Augmented Reality (AR)-apps til naturfagsundervisning. Muligheder og udfordringer ved lærerens stilladsering af elevernes undersøgende samtale og modelleringskompetence er undersøgt med interview...

  12. Breast Augmentation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-13

    Apr 13, 1974 ... Previous articles'·3 detailed the technique and the indi- cations for breast augmentation. This article deals ... or subcutaneous mastectomy are excluded. In this series, a Dow-Corning, Dacron-backed, ..... is not considered a major procedure, or in any way difficult to perform, judgement is all-important, and ...

  13. Adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy augments cure and long-term cancer control in men with poor prognosis, nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleshner, N.; Keane, T.E.; Lawton, C.A.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Payne, H.; Taneja, S.S.; Morris, T.

    2008-01-01

    Historically, adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy has been viewed as a palliative treatment option for patients with poor-prognosis non-metastatic prostate cancer. In addition, guidelines from bodies such as the European Association of Urology and American Society for Clinical Oncology do not

  14. Nicotine Augments the Beneficial Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-based Therapy in Rat Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khezri, Shiva; Abtahi Froushani, Seyyed Meysam; Shahmoradi, Mozhgan

    2018-02-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats through immunization with guinea pig spinal cord homogenate (GPSCH) produces a chronic disease with a relapsing pattern such as multiple sclerosis (MS) in humans. In previous studies, the immunomodulatory benefits of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and nicotine have already been determined. Thus, this research was conducted to assess the additional benefits of the combination therapy of MSCs and nicotine in a rat model of MS. EAE was induced by GPSCH and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in female Wistar rats. The therapies were initiated at day 12 post-immunization (p.i.), when the rats developed a neurological disability score. The symptoms were recorded daily until day 33, when the rats were sacrificed. Finally, the splenocytes were evaluated by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cytokine production. The therapeutic treatment in the EAE rats with a combination of MSCs and nicotine exhibited a more desirable outcome, causing the regression of the average mean clinical score and neuropathological features to be more favorable than the treatment with either therapy alone. The combination therapy led to a significant reduction in the cumulative disease disability from day 21. For the EAE rats treated with nicotine and MSCs, this period was started from day 22 and 28 p.i., respectively. Besides the increase in the levels of IL-10, the combined therapy significantly reduced the splenocytes production of pro-inflammatory IL-17 as well as TNF-α more profoundly than either of the medications alone. In conclusion, the combination of MSCs and nicotine can be suggested as a promising strategy for further MS therapeutics improvement.

  15. Clinical Outcomes After 1 Year of Augmented Insulin Pump Therapy in Patients with Diabetes in a Specialized Diabetes Center in Medellín, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Rincon, Alex; Hincapie-García, Jaime; Arango, Claudia Monsalve; Aristizabal, Natalia; Castillo, Estefany; Hincapie, Gloria; Zapata, Eliana; Cuesta, Diana Paola; Delgado, Maria; Abad, Veronica; Torres, Jose Luis; Palacio, Andres; Botero, José Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes can be difficult to control. Augmented pump therapy (CSII-rtCGM) has become an important tool for controlling blood glucose and decreasing hypoglycemia. Describe the results 1 year after starting CSII-rtCGM in patients with diabetes in Medellín, Colombia. This is an observational, retrospective study. Patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes started on CSII-rtCGM between January 2008 and June 2015 were included. Qualitative variables were analyzed as absolute or relative frequencies. Quantitative variables were obtained through central tendency and dispersion according to the normal distribution of the analyzed variable using Kolmogorov-Smirnov. SPSS 19 from IBM was used. Two hundred forty-seven patients were identified, of those 183 were included. The starting HbA1C was 8.7% ± 1.7% and 7.4% ± 0.8% (P < 0.05) 1 year later. 16.5% of patients had been admitted to the hospital before starting CSII-rtCGM, after 1 year the admission rate was 6.0% (P < 0.05). The incidence of severe hypoglycemia at the beginning was 32%, 1 year later it was 7.1%. CSII-rtCGM therapy improves glucose control and decreases severe hypoglycemic events and hospital admission rate.

  16. Chin augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, K S; Stucki-McCormick, S U

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of facial aesthetic surgery is to restore, enhance, and rejuvenate the aging face to a more youthful appearance, achieving balance and harmony. The mental area must be addressed in order to have a complete synthesis of the face. The concept of augmenting the mental area with implants has evolved so significantly that it now stands by itself as an important procedure. Various autogenous implants for chin augmentation have been in use for over 100 years but have complications. The advent of synthetic materials has given rise to various types of alloplastic implants: Gore-Tex, Medpor, Supramid, Silastic, and Mersilene. No one implant is perfect for every face. This article overviews several alloplastic implants--their advantages, disadvantages, and complications, in addition to the different techniques of preparing and delivering the implants.

  17. Augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    Jecha, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is focused on a technology called Augmented reality, especially on its use in marketing. The main objective of the thesis is to define why this technology is a suitable tool for marketing and to assess its use in real conditions. This is achieved by defining specific devices and use cases of this technology in practice, whereas evaluation of its use in real enviroment is based on statistics. The contribution of the thesis is objective evaluation of this technology and provision of...

  18. Integrin αvβ3-targeted gold nanoshells augment tumor vasculature-specific imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Xie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Huan Xie1, Parmeswaran Diagaradjane2, Amit A Deorukhkar2, Beth Goins3, Ande Bao3, William T Phillips3, Zheng Wang4, Jon Schwartz5, Sunil Krishnan21Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Radiology, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSC-San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; 4MPI Research, Inc., Mattawan, MI, USA; 5Nanospectra Biosciences, Inc., Houston, TX, USAPurpose: Gold nanoshells (NSs have already shown great promise as photothermal actuators for cancer therapy. Integrin αvβ3 is a marker that is specifically and preferentially overexpressed on multiple tumor types and on angiogenic tumor neovasculature. Active targeting of NSs to integrin αvβ3 offers the potential to increase accumulation preferentially in tumors and thereby enhance therapy efficacy.Methods: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and cell binding assay were used to study the in vitro binding affinities of the targeted nanoconjugate NS–RGDfK. In vivo biodistribution and tumor specificity were analyzed using 64Cu-radiolabeled untargeted and targeted NSs in live nude rats bearing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC xenografts. The potential thermal therapy applications of NS–RGDfK were evaluated by subablative thermal therapy of tumor xenografts using untargeted and targeted NSs.Results: ELISA and cell binding assay confirmed the binding affinity of NS–RGDfK to integrin αvβ3. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging suggested that tumor targeting is improved by conjugation of NSs to cyclo(RGDfK and peaks at ~20 hours postinjection. In the subablative thermal therapy study, greater biological effectiveness of targeted NSs was implied by the greater degree of tumor necrosis

  19. [Can the efficacy of behavioral and cognitive therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder be augmented by innovative computerized adjuvant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgiève, M; N'Diaye, K; Clair, A-H; Pelissolo, A; Mallet, L

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is recognized as an effective treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). To maximize its effectiveness, we designed an "experimental" CBT defined by the addition of a computerized psychoeducative tool. In a participative process involving patients through meetings of the French OCD association (AFTOC) and therapists through methodological workshops, we built a therapeutic tool from an experimental checking task. This task, which had been published in an earlier work, was adapted for its psychoeducative dimension. We here report on a randomized double-blind trial which included 35 patients with a moderate to severe OCD (Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive scale, YBOCS between 16 and 25) predominant checking symptoms, no comorbidities, and 2-month stabilized or no treatment. Patients were randomly assigned to either "standard" versus "experimental" CBT. Both therapies were conducted by four CBT-experienced therapists specialized in OCD through weekly individualized sessions over 3 months. Therapy sessions of the experimental CBT were conducted as the standard CBT except for a short exercise with the computerized psychoeducative tool performed by the patient and debriefed with the therapist at the end of the sessions. Patients were assessed before, during, after therapy and again 6 months later using standard clinical tools and a neurobehavioral assessment based on an original symptom-provocation task with anxiety ratings including three types of photographs: neutral, generic inducing obsessions (e.g., doorknobs, electric wires…) and personalized (taken by the patients in their own environment). Clinically, "standard" and "experimental" CBT resulted in a significant but equivalent improvement (48% vs 45% reduction of the Y-BOCS score; P=0.36; d=0.12). Therapists were satisfied with the psychoeducative dimension of the computerized psychoeducative tool but reported variable acceptance across patients. Patients appreciated its

  20. "Let the Algorithm Do the Work": Reduction of Hypoglycemia Using Sensor-Augmented Pump Therapy with Predictive Insulin Suspension (SmartGuard) in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biester, Torben; Kordonouri, Olga; Holder, Martin; Remus, Kerstin; Kieninger-Baum, Dorothee; Wadien, Tanja; Danne, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    A sensor-augmented insulin pump (SAP) using the MiniMed ® 640G system with SmartGuard™ technology allows an automatic stop of insulin delivery based on prediction of low glucose levels. Since pediatric patients are particularly prone to hypoglycemia, this device may offer additional protection beyond conventional sensor-augmented therapy. This prospective, pediatric multicenter user evaluation assessed 6 weeks of SAP with SmartGuard (threshold setting for hypoglycemia: 70 mg/dL) compared to a preceding period of 2 weeks with SAP only. The primary outcome was the potential reduction in the frequency of hypoglycemic episodes and hypoglycemic intensity (area under the curve [AUC] and time insulin pump use (average age: 11.6 ± 5.1 years, 15 female, average type 1 diabetes duration: 7.5 ± 4.2 years, mean ± SD) who had on average 3.2 ± 1.0 predictive suspensions/patient/day. The mean sensor glucose minimum during suspension was 78 ± 6 mg/dL and the average suspension time was 155 ± 47 min/day. Use of SmartGuard in patients treated as per the protocol (n = 18) reduced the number of instances in which the glucose level was insulin delivery followed by carbohydrate intake resulted in significantly higher glucose levels 1 h after suspension compared to SmartGuard suspensions with automatic resume (190.8 ± 26.5 vs. 138.7 ± 10.3 mg/dL; P insulin suspension technology, extra carbohydrate intake in response to an alarm combined with manual resumption is likely to cause rebound hyperglycemia. The best results were achieved when the user did not interfere with pump operation.

  1. Effect of sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy and automated insulin suspension vs standard insulin pump therapy on hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Trang T; Nicholas, Jennifer A; Retterath, Adam; Lim, Ee Mun; Davis, Elizabeth A; Jones, Timothy W

    2013-09-25

    Hypoglycemia is a critical obstacle to the care of patients with type 1 diabetes. Sensor-augmented insulin pump with automated low-glucose insulin suspension has the potential to reduce the incidence of major hypoglycemic events. To determine the incidence of severe and moderate hypoglycemia with sensor-augmented pump with low-glucose suspension compared with standard insulin pump therapy. A randomized clinical trial involving 95 patients with type 1 diabetes, recruited from December 2009 to January 2012 in Australia. Patients were randomized to insulin pump only or automated insulin suspension for 6 months. The primary outcome was the combined incidence of severe (hypoglycemic seizure or coma) and moderate hypoglycemia (an event requiring assistance for treatment). In a subgroup, counterregulatory hormone responses to hypoglycemia were assessed using the hypoglycemic clamp technique. Of the 95 patients randomized, 49 were assigned to the standard-pump (pump-only) therapy and 46 to the low-glucose suspension group. The mean (SD) age was 18.6 (11.8) years; duration of diabetes, 11.0 (8.9) years; and duration of pump therapy, 4.1 (3.4) years. The baseline rate of severe and moderate hypoglycemic events in the pump-only group was 20.7 vs 129.6 events per 100 patient months in the low-glucose suspension group. After 6 months of treatment, the event rates decreased from 28 to 16 in the pump-only group vs 175 to 35 in the low-glucose suspension group. The adjusted incidence rate per 100 patient-months was 34.2 (95% CI, 22.0-53.3) for the pump-only group vs 9.5 (95% CI, 5.2-17.4) for the low-glucose suspension group. The incidence rate ratio was 3.6 (95% CI, 1.7-7.5; P pump-only group vs mean, 7.6 (95%, CI, 7.4-7.9) to 7.5 (95% CI, 7.3-7.7) in the low-glucose suspension group. Counterregulatory hormone responses to hypoglycemia were not changed. There were no episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperglycemia with ketosis. Sensor-augmented pump therapy with automated

  2. Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Sensor Augmented Insulin Pump Therapy with Low-Glucose Suspend Feature in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Ana María; Marín Carrillo, Lisseth Fernanda; Muñoz Velandia, Oscar Mauricio; Rondón Sepúlveda, Martín Alonso; Arévalo Correa, Carol M; Mora Garzón, Edwin; Cuervo Diaz, Maria Camila; Henao Carrillo, Diana Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Literature supports short-term efficacy and safety of Sensor Augmented Insulin Pump (SAP) therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, no data are available showing long-term outcomes. Our study describes the long-term outcomes of SAP therapy with low-glucose suspend feature (SAP+LGS) in hypoglycemia in a Colombian population with T1D and hypoglycemia. A cohort study was conducted with T1D patients receiving SAP+LGS therapy who initiated this therapy because of hypoglycemia at San Ignacio University Hospital diabetes center in Bogotá, Colombia. Glycated hemoglobin (A1c) was assessed at least every 6 months, severe hypoglycemia (SH) and hypoglycemia unawareness (HU) incidence yearly. Adherence to therapy was also evaluated. One hundred eleven patients were included in the analysis. Total daily insulin dose was reduced during follow-up (mean difference -0.22 U/kg; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.18 to -0.26; P < 0.001). A1c levels were reduced from a baseline value of 8.8% ± 1.9% to 7.5% ± 1.0% at 5 months (mean difference -1.3%; 95% CI -1.09 to -1.50; P < 0.001) and 7.1% ± 0.8% (mean difference -1.7%; 95% CI -1.59 to -1.90; P < 0.001) at the end of follow-up (47 months on average). The incidence of SH and HU episodes decreased significantly since the first year, and this effect was maintained over time (P < 0.001). SAP+LGS therapy in T1D patients with hypoglycemia led to a significant and sustained decrease in A1c during long periods of follow-up, as well as a significant reduction in SH and HU. Future randomized clinical trials are desired.

  3. [Value of determination of haptoglobin and α1-antitrypsin in predicting response to glucocorticoid therapy in children with primary nephrotic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Zhang, Bi-Li

    2015-03-01

    To study the value of the determination of serum and urine haptoglobin (HP) and alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) in predicting the response to glucocorticoid therapy in children with primary nephrotic syndrome (PNS). A total of 84 children with PNS were classified to steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) (n=58) and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) groups (n=26). Forty healthy children were randomly selected for the control group. HP and AAT levels in blood and urinary samples were determined using ELISA. The efficiency of HP and AAT in predicting the response to glucocorticoid treatment of PNS was evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Compared with the control group, both the SSNS and SRNS groups had significantly higher serum HP concentrations and urine AAT/Cr ratio before treatment (Pratio before treatment and after one week and four weeks of treatment (Phighest efficiency in predicting the response to glucocorticoid treatment of PNS at the concentration of 37.935 mg/mL, with the sensitivity and specificity being 92.3% and 86.2% respectively. Urine AAT/Cr ratio had the highest prediction efficiency at 0.0696, with the sensitivity and specificity being 100% and 79.3% respectively. ROC curve analysis of serum HP combined with urine AAT/Cr ratio showed a better prediction efficiency, with the sensitivity and specificity being 92.3% and 96.6% respectively. The increase in serum HP level or urine AAT/Cr ratio may indicate glucocorticoid resistance in the early stage of PNS. A combination of the two can achieve better efficiency in the prediction of SRNS.

  4. Mobile Collaborative Augmented Reality: The Augmented Stroll

    OpenAIRE

    Renevier , Philippe; Nigay , Laurence

    2001-01-01

    International audience; The paper focuses on Augmented Reality systems in which interaction with the real world is augmented by the computer, the task being performed in the real world. We first define what mobile AR systems, collaborative AR systems and finally mobile and collaborative AR systems are. We then present the augmented stroll and its software design as one example of a mobile and collaborative AR system. The augmented stroll is applied to Archaeology in the MAGIC (Mobile Augmente...

  5. A Multifunctional Role for Adjuvant Anti-4-1BB Therapy in Augmenting Antitumor Response by Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardiana, Sherly; John, Liza B; Henderson, Melissa A; Slaney, Clare Y; von Scheidt, Bianca; Giuffrida, Lauren; Davenport, Alexander J; Trapani, Joseph A; Neeson, Paul J; Loi, Sherene; Haynes, Nicole M; Kershaw, Michael H; Beavis, Paul A; Darcy, Phillip K

    2017-03-15

    Adoptive immunotherapy utilizing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells has demonstrated high success rates in hematologic cancers, but results against solid malignancies have been limited to date, due in part to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Activation of the 4-1BB (CD137) pathway using an agonistic α-4-1BB antibody is known to provide strong costimulatory signals for augmenting and diversifying T-cell responses. We therefore hypothesized that a combination of α-4-1BB and CAR T-cell therapy would result in improved antitumor responses. Using a human-Her2 self-antigen mouse model, we report here that α-4-1BB significantly enhanced CAR T-cell efficacy directed against the Her2 antigen in two different established solid tumor settings. Treatment also increased the expression of IFNγ and the proliferation marker Ki67 in tumor-infiltrating CAR T cells when combined with α-4-1BB. Strikingly, α-4-1BB significantly reduced host immunosuppressive cells at the tumor site, including regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, correlating with an increased therapeutic response. We conclude that α-4-1BB has a multifunctional role for enhancing CAR T-cell responses and that this combination therapy has high translational potential, given current phase I/II clinical trials with α-4-1BB against various types of cancer. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1296-309. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Augmenting Melodic Intonation Therapy with non-invasive brain stimulation to treat impaired left-hemisphere function: two case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahd eAl-Janabi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not the right hemisphere can be engaged using Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT and excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to improve language function in people with aphasia. The two participants in this study (GOE and AMC have chronic non-fluent aphasia. A functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI task was used to localize the right Broca’s homologue area in the inferior frontal gyrus for rTMS coil placement. The treatment protocol included an rTMS phase, which consisted of 3 treatment sessions that used an excitatory stimulation method known as intermittent theta burst stimulation, and a sham-rTMS phase, which consisted of 3 treatment sessions that used a sham coil. Each treatment session was followed by 40 minutes of MIT. A linguistic battery was administered after each session. Our findings show that one participant, GOE, improved in verbal fluency and the repetition of phrases treated with MIT in combination with TMS. However, AMC showed no evidence of behavioural benefit from this brief treatment trial. Post-treatment neural activity changes were observed for both participants in the left Broca’s area and right Broca’s homologue. These case studies indicate that a combination of rTMS applied to the right Broca’s homologue and MIT has the potential to improve speech and language outcomes for at least some people with post-stroke aphasia.

  7. Augmenting melodic intonation therapy with non-invasive brain stimulation to treat impaired left-hemisphere function: two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Shahd; Nickels, Lyndsey A; Sowman, Paul F; Burianová, Hana; Merrett, Dawn L; Thompson, William F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not the right hemisphere can be engaged using Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) and excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to improve language function in people with aphasia. The two participants in this study (GOE and AMC) have chronic non-fluent aphasia. A functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) task was used to localize the right Broca's homolog area in the inferior frontal gyrus for rTMS coil placement. The treatment protocol included an rTMS phase, which consisted of 3 treatment sessions that used an excitatory stimulation method known as intermittent theta burst stimulation, and a sham-rTMS phase, which consisted of 3 treatment sessions that used a sham coil. Each treatment session was followed by 40 min of MIT. A linguistic battery was administered after each session. Our findings show that one participant, GOE, improved in verbal fluency and the repetition of phrases when treated with MIT in combination with TMS. However, AMC showed no evidence of behavioral benefit from this brief treatment trial. Post-treatment neural activity changes were observed for both participants in the left Broca's area and right Broca's homolog. These case studies indicate that a combination of MIT and rTMS applied to the right Broca's homolog has the potential to improve speech and language outcomes for at least some people with post-stroke aphasia.

  8. Simultaneous splenectomy during liver transplantation augments anti-viral therapy in patients infected with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Heng-Cheng; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Hsu, Kuo-Feng; Fan, Hsiu-Lung; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Chen, Teng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous splenectomy in liver transplantation (LT) is selectively indicated because of splenoportal venous thromboses and increased sepsis. Therefore, its impact should be further investigated. Of the 160 liver transplant patients, only 40 underwent simultaneous splenectomy. Clinicopathologic characteristics and outcomes were compared between the splenectomy and non-splenectomy group using retrospective analysis. Although the groups were similar and had no significant difference in the intra- and postoperative data, non-splenectomy group had more male patients. However, splenectomy group showed significantly higher platelet and leukocyte counts at 1 month and 6 months after the transplantation and higher hepatitis C virus anti-viral therapy completion. Furthermore, 3 patients developed portal or splenic vein thrombosis during the postoperative follow-up, but the overall survival rate did not significantly differ between these groups. Simultaneous splenectomy in LT can be safely performed, particularly in patients with hepatitis C virus cirrhosis, small-for-size grafts, hypersplenism, and ABO blood group incompatible (ABO - incompatible) LT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Iliac Vein Interrogation Augments Venous Ulcer Healing in Patients Who Have Failed Standard Compression Therapy along with Pathological Venous Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Albeir Y; Broce, Mike; Yacoub, Michael; AbuRahma, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of venous ulcers is demanding for patients, as well as clinicians, and the investigation of underlying venous hypertension is the cornerstone of therapy. We propose that occult iliac vein stenosis should be ruled out by iliac vein interrogation (IVI) in patients with advanced venous stasis. We conducted a systematic retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients who presented with CEAP (clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathophysiological) 6 venous disease. All patients had great saphenous vein ablation, compressive treatment, wound care (including Unna boot compression), and perforator closure using ablation therapy. Iliac vein stenosis was defined as ≥50% stenosis in cross-sectional surface area on intravascular ultrasound. Primary outcomes include time of venous ulcer healing and/or measurable change in the Venous Clinical Severity Score. Twenty-two patients with CEAP 6 venous disease met the inclusion criteria (active ulcers >1.5 cm in diameter). The average age and body mass index were 62.2 ± 9.2 years and 41.7 ± 16.7, respectively. The majority were female (72.7%) with common comorbidities, such as hyperlipidemia (54.5%), hypertension (36.4%), and diabetes mellitus (27.3%). Twenty-nine ulcers with an average diameter of 3.4 ± 1.9 cm and a depth of 2.2 ± 0.5 mm were treated. The majority of the ulcers occurred on the left limb (n = 17, 58.6%). Average perforator venous reflux was 3.6 ± 0.8 sec, while common femoral reflux was 1.8 ± 1.6. The majority (n = 19, 64.5%) of the perforator veins were located at the base of the ulcer, while the remainder (n = 10, 34.5%) were within 2 cm from the base. Of the 13 patients who underwent IVI, 8 patients (61.5%) had stenosis >50% that was corrected with iliac vein angioplasty and stenting (IVAS). There was a strong trend toward shorter healing time in the IVI group (7.9 ± 9.5 weeks) than for patients in the no iliac vein interrogation (NIVI) group (20.2 ± 15

  10. Repetitive TMS to augment cognitive processing therapy in combat veterans of recent conflicts with PTSD: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, F Andrew; Motes, Michael A; Didehbani, Nyaz; DeLaRosa, Bambi; Bass, Christina; Schraufnagel, Caitlin D; Jones, Penelope; Morgan, Cassie Rae; Spence, Jeffrey S; Kraut, Michael A; Hart, John

    2018-03-15

    The objective was to test whether repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) just prior to Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) would significantly improve the clinical outcome compared to sham rTMS prior to CPT in veterans with PTSD. Veterans 18-60 years of age with current combat-related PTSD symptoms were randomized, using a 1:1 ratio in a parallel design, to active (rTMS+CPT) versus sham (sham+CPT) rTMS just prior to weekly CPT for 12-15 sessions. Blinded raters evaluated veterans at baseline, after the 5th and 9th treatments, and at 1, 3, and 6 months post-treatment. Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) was the primary outcome measure with the PTSD Checklist (PCL) as a secondary outcome measure. The TMS coil (active or sham) was positioned over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (110% MT, 1Hz continuously for 30min, 1800 pulses/treatment). Of the 515 individuals screened for the study, 103 participants were randomized to either active (n = 54) or sham rTMS (n = 49). Sixty-two participants (60%) completed treatment and 59 (57%) completed the 6-month assessment. The rTMS+CPT group showed greater symptom reductions from baseline on both CAPS and PCL across CPT sessions and follow-up assessments, t(df ≥ 325) ≤ -2.01, p ≤ 0.023, one-tailed and t(df ≥ 303) ≤ -2.14, p ≤ 0.017, one-tailed, respectively. Participants were predominantly male and limited to one era of conflicts as well as those who could safely undergo rTMS. The addition of rTMS to CPT compared to sham with CPT produced significantly greater PTSD symptom reduction early in treatment and was sustained up to six months post-treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Administration of C1 inhibitor reduces neutrophil activation in patients with sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Caliezi, Christoph; van Mierlo, Gerard; Eerenberg-Belmer, Anke; Sulzer, Irmela; Hack, C. Erik; Wuillemin, Walter A.

    2003-01-01

    Forty patients with severe sepsis or septic shock recently received C1 inhibitor. In the present study we studied the effect of C1 inhibitor therapy on circulating elastase-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complex (EA) and lactoferrin (LF) levels in these patients to gain further insight about agonists involved

  12. Efficacy of Augmentation of Cognitive Behavior Therapy With Weight-Adjusted d-Cycloserine vs Placebo in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Eric A; Wilhelm, Sabine; Sprich, Susan; Henin, Aude; Micco, Jamie; Small, Brent J; McGuire, Joseph; Mutch, P Jane; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K; Geller, Daniel A

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) among youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is effective, but many patients remain symptomatic after intervention. d-cycloserine, a partial agonist at the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor in the amygdala, has been associated with enhanced CBT outcome for OCD among adults but requires evaluation among youth. To examine the relative efficacy of weight-adjusted d-cycloserine (25 or 50 mg) vs placebo augmentation of CBT for youth with OCD and to assess if concomitant antidepressant medication moderated effects. In a placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial, 142 youths (age range, 7-17 years) enrolled between June 1, 2011, and January 30, 2015, at 2 academic health science centers (University of South Florida and Massachusetts General Hospital) with a primary diagnosis of OCD were randomized in a double-blind fashion to d-cycloserine plus CBT or placebo plus CBT. Intent-to-treat analysis was performed. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either 10 sessions of d-cycloserine plus CBT or placebo plus CBT. d-cycloserine (25 or 50 mg) or placebo was taken 1 hour before sessions 4 through 10. Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale at randomization, biweekly, midtreatment, and posttreatment. Secondary outcomes included the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity or Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement, remission status, Children's Depression Rating Scale, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, and Children's Obsessive-Compulsive Impact Scale-Parent Version. The study cohort comprised 142 participants. Their mean (SD) age was 12.7 (2.9) years, and 53.5% (76 of 142) were female. A mixed-effects model using all available data indicated significant declines in the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale total score and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity. No significant interaction between treatment group and changes in the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and Clinical Global

  13. Efficacy of Augmentation of Cognitive Behavior Therapy With Weight-Adjusted D-Cycloserine vs Placebo in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Eric A.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Sprich, Susan; Henin, Aude; Micco, Jamie; Small, Brent J.; McGuire, Joseph; Mutch, P. Jane; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Geller, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) among youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is effective, but many patients remain symptomatic after intervention. D-cycloserine, a partial agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in the amygdala, has been associated with enhanced CBT outcome for OCD among adults but requires evaluation among youth. OBJECTIVES To examine the relative efficacy of weight-adjusted D-cycloserine (25 or 50 mg) vs placebo augmentation of CBT for youth with OCD and to assess if concomitant antidepressant medication moderated effects. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial, 142 youths (age range, 7-17 years) enrolled between June 1, 2011, and January 30, 2015, at 2 academic health science centers (University of South Florida and Massachusetts General Hospital) with a primary diagnosis of OCD were randomized in a double-blind fashion to D-cycloserine plus CBT or placebo plus CBT. Intent-to-treat analysis was performed. INTERVENTIONS Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either 10 sessions of D-cycloserine plus CBT or placebo plus CBT. D-cycloserine (25 or 50 mg) or placebo was taken 1 hour before sessions 4 through 10. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale at randomization, biweekly, midtreatment, and posttreatment. Secondary outcomes included the Clinical Global Impressions–Severity or Clinical Global Impressions–Improvement, remission status, Children’s Depression Rating Scale, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, and Children’s Obsessive-Compulsive Impact Scale–Parent Version. RESULTS The study cohort comprised 142 participants. Their mean (SD) age was 12.7 (2.9) years, and 53.5% (76 of 142) were female. A mixed-effects model using all available data indicated significant declines in the Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale total score and Clinical Global Impressions–Severity. No significant

  14. ARLearn: augmented reality meets augmented virtuality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland; Kalz, Marco; Van Ulzen, Patricia; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., Klemke, R., Kalz, M., Van Ulzen, P., & Specht, M. (2012). ARLearn: augmented reality meets augmented virtuality [Special issue]. Journal of Universal Computer Science - Technology for learning across physical and virtual spaces, 18(15), 2143-2164.

  15. The effects of lowering nighttime and breakfast glucose levels with sensor-augmented pump therapy on hemoglobin A1c levels in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maahs, David M; Chase, H Peter; Westfall, Emily; Slover, Robert; Huang, Suiying; Shin, John J; Kaufman, Francine R; Pyle, Laura; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2014-05-01

    This study determined the association of continuous glucose monitoring glucose (CGM-glucose) levels at different times of the day with improvement in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. The potential application of these data is to focus effort to improve glucose control in patients with type 1 diabetes. Data were analyzed from 196 patients with type 1 diabetes who were randomized to receive sensor-augmented pump therapy in the 1-year STAR 3 trial. CGM-glucose values and HbA1c levels from baseline and after 1 year were evaluated to determine associations of improvement in CGM-glucose at different times of the day with longitudinal improvement in HbA1c. Improvement in HbA1c levels after 1 year was related to improvement in mean CGM-glucose levels in daytime (6 a.m.-midnight), overnight (midnight-6 a.m.), and each mealtime period (Pbreakfast meal period was associated with improvement in HbA1c after 1 year, explaining 59% of the HbA1c improvement using the partial R(2) test. Moreover, among those patients who only improved CGM-glucose in the overnight period there was an associated improvement in breakfast meal period CGM-glucose of 26 ± 22 mg/dL (PBreakfast period glucose improvement had the greatest effect on lowering HbA1c levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. Improving glucose control overnight resulted in subsequent improvement in the breakfast period. Although glucose control should be improved at all times, methods to improve overnight and post-breakfast glucose levels may be of primary importance in improving glucose control in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  16. Long-term health economic benefits of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion alone in type 1 diabetes: a U.K. perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze, Stéphane; Smith-Palmer, Jayne; Valentine, William J; Cook, Mark; Jethwa, Manisha; de Portu, Simona; Pickup, John C

    2016-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is an important treatment option for type 1 diabetes patients unable to achieve adequate glycemic control with multiple daily injections (MDI). Combining CSII with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in sensor-augmented pump therapy (SAP) with a low glucose-suspend (LGS) feature may further improve glycemic control and reduce the frequency of hypoglycemia. A cost-effectiveness analysis of SAP + LGS vs. CSII plus self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) was performed to determine the health economic benefits of SAP + LGS in type 1 diabetes patients using CSII in the U.K. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using the CORE diabetes model. Treatment effects were sourced from the literature, where SAP + LGS was associated with a projected HbA1c reduction of -1.49% vs. -0.62% for CSII, and a reduced frequency of severe hypoglycemia. The time horizon was that of patient lifetimes; future costs and clinical outcomes were discounted at 3.5% and 1.5% per annum, respectively. Projected outcomes showed that SAP + LGS was associated with higher mean quality-adjusted life expectancy (17.9 vs. 14.9 quality-adjusted life years [QALYs], SAP + LGS vs. CSII), and higher life expectancy (23.8 vs. 21.9 years), but higher mean lifetime direct costs (GBP 125,559 vs. GBP 88,991), leading to an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of GBP 12,233 per QALY gained for SAP + LGS vs. CSII. Findings of the base-case analysis remained robust in sensitivity analyses. For UK-based type 1 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control, the use of SAP + LGS is likely to be cost-effective compared with CSII plus SMBG.

  17. Comparative study on treatment satisfaction and health perception in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus on multiple daily injection of insulin, insulin pump and sensor-augmented pump therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Hussain

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Diabetes management imposes considerable demands on patients. Treatment method used has an impact on treatment satisfaction. We aim to examine the relationship between treatment satisfaction and health perception with the method used for treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents. Subjects and method: We have interviewed patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus using questionnaires to assess treatment satisfaction and health perception. Patients were divided into three groups based on treatment used: multiple daily injection, insulin pump and sensor-augmented pump therapy. Comparison of scores was done between the groups. Results: A total of 72 patients were enrolled (36 males. Mean age (standard deviation was 11.4 (4.4 years and duration of diabetes of 4.9 (3.5 years. Mean (standard deviation HbA1c was 8.1 (1.2. Median (range duration of sensor use was 17.7 (3–30 days/month. Mean scale for treatment satisfaction and health perception questions was 25.3, 29.7 and 31.7 and 60, 79.7 and 81 for the multiple daily injection, pump and sensor-augmented pump, respectively (p = 0.00. Significant difference was seen between the multiple daily injection and both other groups. Sensor-augmented pump group scored higher than the pump group. However, the difference was not statistically significant. Duration of sensor use showed no correlation with treatment satisfaction. Conclusion: The method used for diabetes treatment has an impact on patients’ satisfaction and health perception in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Insulin pump users have a higher treatment satisfaction and better health perception than those on multiple daily injection. Augmenting pump therapy with sensor use adds value to treatment satisfaction without correlation with the duration of the sensors use.

  18. D-Cycloserine Augmentation of Exposure-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Individual Participant Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, David; Fernández de la Cruz, Lorena; Monzani, Benedetta; Rosenfield, David; Andersson, Erik; Pérez-Vigil, Ana; Frumento, Paolo; de Kleine, Rianne A; Difede, JoAnn; Dunlop, Boadie W; Farrell, Lara J; Geller, Daniel; Gerardi, Maryrose; Guastella, Adam J; Hofmann, Stefan G; Hendriks, Gert-Jan; Kushner, Matt G; Lee, Francis S; Lenze, Eric J; Levinson, Cheri A; McConnell, Harry; Otto, Michael W; Plag, Jens; Pollack, Mark H; Ressler, Kerry J; Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Scheeringa, Michael S; Siewert-Siegmund, Anja; Smits, Jasper A J; Storch, Eric A; Ströhle, Andreas; Tart, Candyce D; Tolin, David F; van Minnen, Agnes; Waters, Allison M; Weems, Carl F; Wilhelm, Sabine; Wyka, Katarzyna; Davis, Michael; Rück, Christian; Altemus, Margaret; Anderson, Page; Cukor, Judith; Finck, Claudia; Geffken, Gary R; Golfels, Fabian; Goodman, Wayne K; Gutner, Cassidy; Heyman, Isobel; Jovanovic, Tanja; Lewin, Adam B; McNamara, Joseph P; Murphy, Tanya K; Norrholm, Seth; Thuras, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Whether and under which conditions D-cycloserine (DCS) augments the effects of exposure-based cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and posttraumatic stress disorders is unclear. To clarify whether DCS is superior to placebo in augmenting the effects of cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and posttraumatic stress disorders and to evaluate whether antidepressants interact with DCS and the effect of potential moderating variables. PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched from inception to February 10, 2016. Reference lists of previous reviews and meta-analyses and reports of randomized clinical trials were also checked. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were (1) double-blind randomized clinical trials of DCS as an augmentation strategy for exposure-based cognitive behavior therapy and (2) conducted in humans diagnosed as having specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or posttraumatic stress disorder. Raw data were obtained from the authors and quality controlled. Data were ranked to ensure a consistent metric across studies (score range, 0-100). We used a 3-level multilevel model nesting repeated measures of outcomes within participants, who were nested within studies. Individual participant data were obtained for 21 of 22 eligible trials, representing 1047 of 1073 eligible participants. When controlling for antidepressant use, participants receiving DCS showed greater improvement from pretreatment to posttreatment (mean difference, -3.62; 95% CI, -0.81 to -6.43; P = .01; d = -0.25) but not from pretreatment to midtreatment (mean difference, -1.66; 95% CI, -4.92 to 1.60; P = .32; d = -0.14) or from pretreatment to follow-up (mean difference, -2.98, 95% CI, -5.99 to 0.03; P = .05; d = -0.19). Additional analyses showed that participants assigned to DCS were associated with lower symptom severity than those assigned to

  19. Breast augmentation surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care - open Images Breast lift (mastopexy) - series Breast reduction (mammoplasty) - series Breast augmentation - series References Maxwell GP, Gabriel A. Breast augmentation. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013: ...

  20. Augmented therapy of extensive Hodgkin's disease: radiation to known disease or prolongation of induction chemotherapy did not improve survival--results of a cancer and leukemia group B study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Morton; Rafla, Sameer; Propert, Kathleen J.; Glicksman, Arvin; Peterson, Bruce; Nissen, Nis; Brunner, Kurt; Holland, James F.; Anderson, James R.; Gottlieb, Arlan; Kaufman, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective randomized trial in extensive untreated Hodgkin's disease was undertaken to assess the potential benefit of augmented therapy (12 months chemotherapy or radiation to known disease) compared to standard 6 months chemotherapy. Patient and Methods: A total of 258 patients, mostly Stage IV, were randomized to four treatment regimens consisting of six cycles of CCNU, vinblastine, procarbazine, and prednisone (CVPP); 12 cycles of CVPP; six cycles of CVPP followed by 25 Gy radiotherapy; or three cycles CVPP, 25 Gy radiotherapy, and three cycles CVPP. Results: Complete remissions were achieved in 65% of all patients. A 58% overall 5-year survival rate was obtained. Relapses in irradiated areas of known disease occurred in only 6% of responding patients. There was, however, no statistical difference in response frequency, disease-free survival, or overall survival among the four regimens. Elderly patients responded less frequently. Conclusion: While radiotherapy provided control of local (known) disease, no impact on overall survival was apparent. Likewise, doubling the duration of chemotherapy did not improve response or survival. Augmentation of therapy with either radiotherapy or more chemotherapy in this study was of no benefit compared to the standard 6 months of treatment

  1. A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate as augmentation therapy in adults with residual symptoms of major depressive disorder after treatment with escitalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Madhukar H; Cutler, Andrew J; Richards, Cynthia; Lasser, Robert; Geibel, Brooke B; Gao, Joseph; Sambunaris, Angelo; Patkar, Ashwin A

    2013-08-01

    Evaluate the efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate augmentation for major depressive disorder (MDD) in escitalopram nonremitters. In this proof-of-concept study (conducted from July 2009-August 2010) with a prespecified critical α = .10, adults with nonpsychotic MDD (DSM-IV-TR criteria) and residual depressive symptoms (17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score ≥ 4) after 8 weeks of open-label escitalopram were randomized to 6 weeks of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (20-50 mg/d) or placebo augmentation. The primary endpoint, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score change in escitalopram nonremitters (MADRS total score > 10) from week 8 (augmentation baseline) to week 14/end of study, was assessed using analysis of covariance, with last observation carried forward. For nonremitters (placebo, n = 64; lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, n = 65), the least squares (LS) mean (90% CI) treatment difference for MADRS total score reduction at week 14/end of study (-2.3 [-4.5 to -0.1]; P = .0902) met the prespecified criterion for lisdexamfetamine dimesylate superiority (adjusted effect size, -0.3); the number needed to treat for MADRS remission (MADRS total score ≤ 10) was 6.7. The LS mean treatment difference in remitters was not statistically significant (1.2 [-1.6 to 4.0]; P = .4726). Among randomized participants, 49.4% (42/85) receiving placebo and 60.2% (53/88) receiving lisdexamfetamine dimesylate had ≥ 1 treatment-emergent adverse event, the most frequent with lisdexamfetamine dimesylate being dry mouth and headache (both 11.4%). Mean (SD) vital sign and electrocardiogram changes (placebo vs lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) were 0.5 (8.98) versus 2.3 (9.04) mm Hg (systolic blood pressure), -1.0 (7.19) versus 0.9 (6.61) mm Hg (diastolic blood pressure), -0.4 (7.39) versus 4.8 (8.64) beats per minute (heart rate), and -1.6 (11.23) versus -4.9 (11.84) milliseconds (Fridericia-adjusted QTc). Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate augmentation

  2. Two novel nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction-based assays of dried blood spots, genomic DNA, or whole cells for fast, reliable detection of Z and S mutations in the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Knudsen, I; Jensen, P K

    1992-01-01

    from individuals who are normal, heterozygous, or homozygous for the mutations. We show that the two assays can be performed with purified genomic DNA as well as with boiled blood spots. The new assays were validated by parallel testing with a technique in which PCR is combined with allele......-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) probes. In all cases tested the results obtained by the different techniques were in accordance. The new assays can be used for prenatal diagnostics and can be performed directly with boiled tissue samples. Because the new assays are easy to perform and reliable, we conclude...

  3. Confronting an augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    John Hedberg; Robert Fitzgerald; James Steele; Anna Wilson; Matt Bacon; Danny Munnerley

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and suggest that they be used as drivers for research into effective educational applications of augmented reality. We discuss how multi-modal, sensorial...

  4. Introdução da comunicação suplementar e alternativa na terapia com afásicos Introduction of augmentative and alternative communication in aphasia therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ferreira Marcolino Galli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sabe-se que o tratamento fonoaudiológico de pacientes com afasia severa é limitado. A ausência de fala articulada, algumas vezes, impede o diagnóstico da afasia. O paciente "grave" pode não falar devido à inabilidade de articulação, como ocorre na disartria e/ou apraxia. Essa ausência de fala não permite afirmar se a linguagem está comprometida. O uso da comunicação suplementar e alternativa tem sido um método eficaz na reabilitação desses pacientes. Esse estudo visou descrever o uso da comunicação suplementar e alternativa associada a outras modalidades de linguagem (escrita, gestos, a partir do relato de dois casos de afasia. A análise dos dados foi composta por dois blocos: a introdução da comunicação suplementar e alternativa no diálogo; e o uso da leitura e escrita associado aos símbolos. A comunicação suplementar e alternativa foi um apoio para a oralidade, leitura e escrita dos pacientes.It is known that the speech-language treatment of patients with severe aphasia is limited. Sometimes the absence of articulated speech is an obstacle to diagnose the aphasia. The patient with severe aphasia might not speak due to articulation inability, as it occurs in dysarthria and/or apraxia, and the absence of speech makes it difficult for speech-language pathologists to determine whether language is also impaired. The use of augmentative and alternative communication techniques has been an effective method for the rehabilitation of these patients. The aim of this study was to describe the use of the augmentative and alternative communication in therapy associated with other modalities of language (written language, gestures, based on the report of two cases of aphasia. Data analysis had two parts: introduction of augmentative and alternative communication in dialogue; and use of reading and writing associated with symbols. The augmentative and alternative communication supported oral language, reading and writing of the

  5. Confronting an Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munnerley, Danny; Bacon, Matt; Wilson, Anna; Steele, James; Hedberg, John; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and…

  6. Augmented Reality on Android

    OpenAIRE

    Chunghan Li; Chang-Shyh Peng; Daisy F. Sang

    2013-01-01

    Augmented Reality is an application which combines a live view of real-world environment and computer-generated images. This paper studies and demonstrates an efficient Augmented Reality development in the mobile Android environment with the native Java language and Android SDK. Major components include Barcode Reader, File Loader, Marker Detector, Transform Matrix Generator, and a cloud database.

  7. Association between augmented renal clearance and clinical outcomes in patients receiving β-lactam antibiotic therapy by continuous or intermittent infusion: a nested cohort study of the BLING-II randomised, placebo-controlled, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udy, Andrew A; Dulhunty, Joel M; Roberts, Jason A; Davis, Joshua S; Webb, Steven A R; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Gomersall, Charles; Shirwadkar, Charudatt; Eastwood, Glenn M; Myburgh, John; Paterson, David L; Starr, Therese; Paul, Sanjoy K; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Augmented renal clearance (ARC) is known to influence β-lactam antibiotic pharmacokinetics. This substudy of the BLING-II trial aimed to explore the association between ARC and patient outcomes in a large randomised clinical trial. BLING-II enrolled 432 participants with severe sepsis randomised to receive β-lactam therapy by continuous or intermittent infusion. An 8-h creatinine clearance (CL Cr ) measured on Day 1 was used to identify ARC, defined as CL Cr  ≥ 130 mL/min. Patients receiving any form of renal replacement therapy were excluded. Primary outcome was alive ICU-free days at Day 28. Secondary outcomes included 90-day mortality and clinical cure at 14 days following antibiotic cessation. A total of 254 patients were included, among which 45 (17.7%) manifested ARC [median (IQR) CL Cr 165 (144-198) mL/min]. ARC patients were younger (P antibiotics in severe sepsis, ARC was not associated with any differences in outcomes, regardless of dosing strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. C16-Ceramide Analog Combined with Pc 4 Photodynamic Therapy Evokes Enhanced Total Ceramide Accumulation, Promotion of DEVDase Activation in the Absence of Apoptosis, and Augmented Overall Cell Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duska Separovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the failure of single modality approaches, combination therapy for cancer treatment is a promising alternative. Sphingolipid analogs, with or without anticancer drugs, can improve tumor response. C16-pyridinium ceramide analog LCL30, was used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT, an anticancer treatment modality, to test the hypothesis that the combined treatment will trigger changes in the sphingolipid profile and promote cell death. Using SCCVII mouse squamous carcinoma cells, and the silicone phthalocyanine Pc 4 for PDT, we showed that combining PDT with LCL30 (PDT/LCL30 was more effective than individual treatments in raising global ceramide levels, as well as in reducing dihydrosphingosine levels. Unlike LCL30, PDT, alone or combined, increased total dihydroceramide levels. Sphingosine levels were unaffected by LCL30, but were abolished after PDT or the combination. LCL30-triggered rise in sphingosine-1-phosphate was reversed post-PDT or the combination. DEVDase activation was evoked after PDT or LCL30, and was promoted post- PDT/LCL30. Neither mitochondrial depolarization nor apoptosis were observed after any of the treatments. Notably, treatment with the combination resulted in augmented overall cell killing. Our data demonstrate that treatment with PDT/LCL30 leads to enhanced global ceramide levels and DEVDase activation in the absence of apoptosis, and promotion of total cell killing.

  9. Augmented reality: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    Augmented reality is a technology that overlays digital information on objects or places in the real world for the purpose of enhancing the user experience. It is not virtual reality, that is, the technology that creates a totally digital or computer created environment. Augmented reality, with its ability to combine reality and digital information, is being studied and implemented in medicine, marketing, museums, fashion, and numerous other areas. This article presents an overview of augmented reality, discussing what it is, how it works, its current implementations, and its potential impact on libraries.

  10. Augmented Reality, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Augmented Reality systems come with many benefits derived by co-locating information with a user's environment through the use of one or more output modalities such...

  11. Exploration Augmentation Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Exploration Augmentation Module (EAM) project goal is to design and deliver a flight module that is to be deployed to Earth-Lunar Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO)....

  12. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Bartlett, Erica L.; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placeme...

  13. Augmented Reality for Smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Butchart, Ben

    2011-01-01

    This report should help developers and content publishers who want to take advantage of the latest developments in smartphone and augmented reality (AR) technology to create novel and exciting new learning experiences. Not so long ago, augmented reality was an experimental technology that rarely left the lab and required a high level of technical expertise and knowledge to create new applications. Now, thanks to advances in smartphone hardware, AR technology is much more available and easily ...

  14. Confronting an augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hedberg

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and suggest that they be used as drivers for research into effective educational applications of augmented reality. We discuss how multi-modal, sensorial augmentation of reality links to existing theories of education and learning, focusing on ideas of cognitive dissonance and the confrontation of new realities implied by exposure to new and varied perspectives. We also discuss connections with broader debates brought on by the social and cultural changes wrought by the increased digitalisation of our lives, especially the concept of the extended mind. Rather than offer a prescription for augmentation, our intention is to throw open debate and to provoke deep thinking about what interacting with and creating an augmented reality might mean for both teacher and learner.

  15. Impact of long-term use of eHealth systems in adolescents with type 1 diabetes treated with sensor-augmented pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiaffini, R; Tagliente, I; Carducci, C; Ullmann, N; Ciampalini, P; Lorubbio, A; Cappa, M

    2016-07-01

    Telemedicine in diabetes includes telemonitoring and transmission of important data (self monitoring of blood glucose data, insulin therapy, pump setting, etc.) from the patient s home to the diabetic unit, with a real-time health feedback. Moreover, an eHealth approach is thought to facilitate diabetes management and to improve compliance to CSII/SAP treatment in adolescents, but to date, limited literature related to this topic is available and long-term studies are still lacking. The main aim of this study was to compare the long-term effect on glycometabolic control of eHealth intervention and traditional care in T1DM SAP-treated adolescents. In our study we demonstrated a favorable impact of monthly teleassistance on treatment compliance. Adolescents receiving frequent feedback provided by the medicalmultidisciplinary team, due to the telemonitoring, resulted more compliant in self-management of diabetes. In particular, the medical team feedback resulted in interventions on behavioral errors and insulin therapy adjustments, leading to an improved glycometabolic control. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Prototyping Augmented Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Mullen, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Learn to create augmented reality apps using Processing open-source programming language Augmented reality (AR) is used all over, and you may not even realize it. Smartphones overlay data onto live camera views to show homes for sale, restaurants, or historical sites. American football broadcasts use AR to show the invisible first-down line on the field to TV viewers. Nike and Budweiser, among others, have used AR in ads. Now, you can learn to create AR prototypes using 3D data, Processing open-source programming language, and other languages. This unique book is an easy-to-follow guide on how

  17. The Efficacy of Augment of D-Cycloserine and Cognitive-behavioral Therapy on Adolescent with one Type of Anxiety Disorders: A Double-blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Soroor; Soheilimehr, Ali; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigating the effect of combining D-cycloserine (DCS) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) on adolescent with at least one type of anxiety disorders. The present study was conducted as a double-blind randomized controlled trial on 36 adolescent with anxiety disorders. Patients were assessed in two groups. In addition to 4 sessions of weekly CBT in both groups; case group, received a 50-mg DCS capsules, control group, received Placebo daily for a month. Patients received DCS capsules or placebo 1 h before sessions of CBT. Age, sex, kind of anxiety disorders "screen for child anxiety related disorders (SCARED)" and "cognitive abilities test (CATS)" scores were evaluated and compared between groups. The mean age of the studied patients (29 females (80.6%) and 7 males (19.4%)) was 14.1 ± 1.8 years. The most frequent anxiety disorder among the study population was generalized social disorder (GAD) (77.7%). Age, sex and the frequency of anxiety disorders were not statistically significant between the study groups ( P > 0.05). The mean score of "SCARED" and "CATS" at before starting the treatment, after treatment and three month after the treatment were not statistically significant between groups ( P > 0.05). Also, decrease in values of "SCARED" and "CATS" during the evaluation time periods was not statistically significant between groups ( P > 0.05). Findings of this study showed that there has been no difference in symptoms improvement in adolescent with anxiety disorder who received treatment protocol including 4 sessions of CBT, weekly, together with 50 mgs of DCS compared to the patients of the control group.

  18. The Efficacy of Augment of D-Cycloserine and Cognitive-behavioral Therapy on Adolescent with one Type of Anxiety Disorders: A Double-blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor Arman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to investigating the effect of combining D-cycloserine (DCS and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT on adolescent with at least one type of anxiety disorders. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted as a double-blind randomized controlled trial on 36 adolescent with anxiety disorders. Patients were assessed in two groups. In addition to 4 sessions of weekly CBT in both groups; case group, received a 50-mg DCS capsules, control group, received Placebo daily for a month. Patients received DCS capsules or placebo 1 h before sessions of CBT. Age, sex, kind of anxiety disorders “screen for child anxiety related disorders (SCARED” and “cognitive abilities test (CATS” scores were evaluated and compared between groups. Results: The mean age of the studied patients (29 females (80.6% and 7 males (19.4% was 14.1 ± 1.8 years. The most frequent anxiety disorder among the study population was generalized social disorder (GAD (77.7%. Age, sex and the frequency of anxiety disorders were not statistically significant between the study groups (P > 0.05. The mean score of “SCARED” and “CATS” at before starting the treatment, after treatment and three month after the treatment were not statistically significant between groups (P > 0.05. Also, decrease in values of “SCARED” and “CATS” during the evaluation time periods was not statistically significant between groups (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Findings of this study showed that there has been no difference in symptoms improvement in adolescent with anxiety disorder who received treatment protocol including 4 sessions of CBT, weekly, together with 50 mgs of DCS compared to the patients of the control group.

  19. Towards Pervasive Augmented Reality: Context-Awareness in Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubert, Jens; Langlotz, Tobias; Zollmann, Stefanie; Regenbrecht, Holger

    2017-06-01

    Augmented Reality is a technique that enables users to interact with their physical environment through the overlay of digital information. While being researched for decades, more recently, Augmented Reality moved out of the research labs and into the field. While most of the applications are used sporadically and for one particular task only, current and future scenarios will provide a continuous and multi-purpose user experience. Therefore, in this paper, we present the concept of Pervasive Augmented Reality, aiming to provide such an experience by sensing the user's current context and adapting the AR system based on the changing requirements and constraints. We present a taxonomy for Pervasive Augmented Reality and context-aware Augmented Reality, which classifies context sources and context targets relevant for implementing such a context-aware, continuous Augmented Reality experience. We further summarize existing approaches that contribute towards Pervasive Augmented Reality. Based our taxonomy and survey, we identify challenges for future research directions in Pervasive Augmented Reality.

  20. Augmented Reality i naturfagsundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radmer, Ole; Surland, Mogens; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    Augmented Reality (AR) giver ny mulighed for, at elever kan lave undersøgelser i naturfag med enkel teknologi, hvor animationer og simulationer kobles med det virkelige fænomen. I workshoppen kan I afprøve AR eksempler, udviklet i et internationalt EU projekt. Der vil være noget, der direkte kan...

  1. Augmented reality som wearable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Rahn, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen omhandler design og implementering af Augmented Reality (AR) i form af en wearable i sygeplejerskeuddannelsens anatomiundervisning, mere specifikt undervisning i lungeanatomi og respiration, med fokus på potentialer for visuel læring. Projektet undersøger, hvordan en udviklet AR...

  2. Augmented Reality og kulturarv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Kirkedahl Lysholm

    2013-01-01

    Museerne står overfor at skulle omfavne den digitale kultur i håndteringen af den store mængde viden, institutionerne repræsenterer. Augmented Reality-systemer forbinder ved hjælp af moderne teknologi det virtuelle med det virkelige, og kan derfor synes som en oplagt anvendelsesmulighed i...

  3. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M.; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they

  4. Capillary Refill using Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Clausen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis in Computer science The opportunities within augmented reality is growing. Augmented reality is a combination of the real and the virtual world in real time, and large companies like Microsoft and Google is now investing heavily in the technology. This thesis presents a solution for simulating a medical test called capillary refill, by using augmented reality. The simulation is performed with an augmented reality headset called HoloLens. The HoloLens will recognise a mark...

  5. AR DOC: Augmented reality documentaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Augmented Reality Documentaries (AR DOC) er et ’lille’ Shareplay projekt (ansøgte midler augmented reality cross media løsninger, til at skabe engagerende publikumsformidling...... indenfor oplevelsesindustrien. Projektet har genereret ny viden omkring, hvordan fysisk og digital formidling kan understøttes via Augmented Reality som formidlingsformat....

  6. Fecal markers of intestinal inflammation and intestinal permeability are elevated in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiertz, Andreas; Spiegel, Jörg; Dillmann, Ulrich; Grundmann, David; Bürmann, Jan; Faßbender, Klaus; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Unger, Marcus M

    2018-02-12

    Intestinal inflammation and increased intestinal permeability (both possibly fueled by dysbiosis) have been suggested to be implicated in the multifactorial pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The objective of the current study was to investigate whether fecal markers of inflammation and impaired intestinal barrier function corroborate this pathogenic aspect of PD. In a case-control study, we quantitatively analyzed established fecal markers of intestinal inflammation (calprotectin and lactoferrin) and fecal markers of intestinal permeability (alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin) in PD patients (n = 34) and controls (n = 28, group-matched for age) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The study design controlled for potential confounding factors. Calprotectin, a fecal marker of intestinal inflammation, and two fecal markers of increased intestinal permeability (alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin) were significantly elevated in PD patients compared to age-matched controls. Lactoferrin, as a second fecal marker of intestinal inflammation, showed a non-significant trend towards elevated concentrations in PD patients. None of the four fecal markers correlated with disease severity, PD subtype, dopaminergic therapy, or presence of constipation. Fecal markers reflecting intestinal inflammation and increased intestinal permeability have been primarily investigated in inflammatory bowel disease so far. Our data indicate that calprotectin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin could be useful non-invasive markers in PD as well. Even though these markers are not disease-specific, they corroborate the hypothesis of an intestinal inflammation as contributing factor in the pathogenesis of PD. Further investigations are needed to determine whether calprotectin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin can be used to define PD subgroups and to monitor the effect of interventions in PD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Augmenting Clozapine With Sertindole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Emborg, Charlotte; Gydesen, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    . The study design was a 12-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study including patients with International Statistical Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision schizophrenia (F20.0-F20.3) and treated with clozapine for at least 6 months who had not achieved sufficient response. Patients were...... Inventory, fasting glucose, lipids, and electrocardiogram. Clozapine augmentation with sertindole was not superior to placebo regarding total score or subscale score of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinical Global Impression, World Health Organization Quality of Life Brief, or Drug Attitude...... Inventory. No increased adverse effects compared with placebo were found. Four patients randomized to sertindole experienced a significant worsening of psychosis, and 2 of them required psychiatric admission. Metabolic parameters were unchanged during the study, but augmentation of clozapine with sertindole...

  8. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H; Bartlett, Erica L; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-11-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome.

  9. Augmented reality in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaiber, Jeffrey H

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the history and current knowledge of computer-augmented reality in the field of surgery and its potential goals in education, surgeon training, and patient treatment. National Library of Medicine's database and additional library searches. Only articles suited to surgical sciences with a well-defined aim of study, methodology, and precise description of outcome were included. Augmented reality is an effective tool in executing surgical procedures requiring low-performance surgical dexterity; it remains a science determined mainly by stereotactic registration and ergonomics. Strong evidence was found that it is an effective teaching tool for training residents. Weaker evidence was found to suggest a significant influence on surgical outcome, both morbidity and mortality. No evidence of cost-effectiveness was found. Augmented reality is a new approach in executing detailed surgical operations. Although its application is in a preliminary stage, further research is needed to evaluate its long-term clinical impact on patients, surgeons, and hospital administrators. Its widespread use and the universal transfer of such technology remains limited until there is a better understanding of registration and ergonomics.

  10. Augmented reality services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Koubek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We assume that one of the key reasons is in the difference between a standalone application and a web service. Both architectures have some advantages and disadvantages. The Standalone application (e.g. Nokia/OVI Maps provides the required functionality. From the user point of view, main asset of this “offline” approach is network connectivity independence. However, this kind of applications must be upgraded manually. Moreover, it is hard to get any data about the application usage because it requires additional actions from the user – data are usually acquired through conventional ways, such as email or web forms.The online service such as Google Maps (including its mobile application can offer the same functionality as the offline application. Nevertheless, a permanent connection to provider servers is necessary. This can be taken as a drawback. On the other hand, usage data collection is easier and can be done without the user intervention. The data collection provides a valuable analysis basis of the user habits and needs. This analysis is necessary for design of a complex “user” based solutions such as Google Now.Augmented reality applications are usually based on the first mentioned approach. In this article, we describe our model of augmented reality as a service and compare its features with standalone solutions. Further, other important key aspects for large emergence of augmented reality services in a mainstream market are discussed.

  11. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Genomes Take the Form of Long-Lived, Transcriptionally Competent Episomes in Human Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepp, Bruce C.; Chulay, Jeffrey D.; Ye, Guo-Jie; Flotte, Terence R.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Johnson, Philip R.

    2016-01-01

    Gene augmentation therapy as a strategy to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has reached phase 2 clinical testing in humans. Sustained serum levels of AAT have been observed beyond one year after intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the AAT gene. In this study, sequential muscle biopsies obtained at 3 and 12 months after vector injection were examined for the presence of rAAV vector genomes. Each biopsy sample contained readily detectable vector DNA, the majority of which existed as double-stranded supercoiled and open circular episomes. Episomes persisted through 12 months, although at slightly lower levels than observed at 3 months. There was a clear dose response when comparing the low- and mid-vector-dose groups to the high-dose group. The highest absolute copy numbers were found in a high-dose subject, and serum AAT levels at 12 months confirmed that the high-dose group also had the highest sustained serum AAT levels. Sequence analysis revealed that the vast majority of episomes contained double-D inverted terminal repeats ranging from fully intact to severely deleted. Molecular clones of vector genomes derived directly from the biopsies were transcriptionally active, potentially identifying them as the source of serum AAT in the trial subjects. PMID:26650966

  12. 25 Ways to Love Your Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Liver Disease Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Autoimmune Hepatitis Benign Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia ... Related Liver Disease Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Autoimmune Hepatitis Benign Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia ...

  13. Ultrasound Augmented Thrombolysis, From Test Tubes to Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, William C.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound acceleration of thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or microbubbles has developed from bench top models to early clinical experience over the course of the last dozen years. Thrombosis of arteries and veins, especially thrombosis of cerebral arteries causing stroke, is a massive clinical problem with limited therapy associated with high complication rates. Ultrasound augmentation of thrombolysis using standard thrombolytic drugs or microbubble augmented ultrasonographic thrombolysis may prove to be the more efficacious and safer therapy of choice in the near future.

  14. PsychotherapyPlus: augmentation of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with prefrontal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in major depressive disorder-study design and methodology of a multicenter double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajbouj, Malek; Aust, Sabine; Spies, Jan; Herrera-Melendez, Ana-Lucia; Mayer, Sarah V; Peters, Maike; Plewnia, Christian; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Frase, Lukas; Normann, Claus; Behler, Nora; Wulf, Linda; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Padberg, Frank

    2017-12-06

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders worldwide. About 20-30% of patients do not respond to the standard psychopharmacological and/or psychotherapeutic interventions. Mounting evidence from neuroimaging studies in MDD patients reveal altered activation patterns in lateral prefrontal brain areas. Successful cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is associated with a recovery of these neural alterations. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is capable of influencing prefrontal cortex activity and cognitive functions such as working memory and emotion regulation. Thus, a clinical trial investigating the effects of an antidepressant intervention combining CBT with tDCS seems promising. The present study investigates the antidepressant efficacy of a combined CBT-tDCS intervention as compared to CBT with sham-tDCS or CBT alone. A total of 192 patients (age range 20-65 years) with MDD (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale Score ≥ 15, 21-item version) will be recruited at four study sites across Germany (Berlin, Munich, Tuebingen, and Freiburg) and randomly assigned to one of the following three treatment arms: (1) CBT + active tDCS; (2) CBT + sham-tDCS; and (3) CBT alone. All participants will attend a 6-week psychotherapeutic intervention comprising 12 sessions of CBT each lasting 100 min in a closed group setting. tDCS will be applied simultaneously with CBT. Active tDCS includes stimulation with an intensity of 2 mA for 30 min with the anode placed over F3 and the cathode over F4 according to the EEG 10-20 system, if assigned. The primary outcome measure is the change in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores from baseline to 6, 18, and 30 weeks after the first session. Participants also undergo pre- and post-treatment neuropsychological testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess changes in prefrontal functioning and connectivity

  15. AMI: Augmented Michelson Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furió, David; Hachet, Martin; Guillet, Jean-Paul; Bousquet, Bruno; Fleck, Stéphanie; Reuter, Patrick; Canioni, Lionel

    2015-10-01

    Experiments in optics are essential for learning and understanding physical phenomena. The problem with these experiments is that they are generally time consuming for both their construction and their maintenance, potentially dangerous through the use of laser sources, and often expensive due to high technology optical components. We propose to simulate such experiments by way of hybrid systems that exploit both spatial augmented reality and tangible interaction. In particular, we focus on one of the most popular optical experiments: the Michelson interferometer. In our approach, we target a highly interactive system where students are able to interact in real time with the Augmented Michelson Interferometer (AMI) to observe, test hypotheses and then to enhance their comprehension. Compared to a fully digital simulation, we are investigating an approach that benefits from both physical and virtual elements, and where the students experiment by manipulating 3D-printed physical replicas of optical components (e.g. lenses and mirrors). Our objective is twofold. First, we want to ensure that the students will learn with our simulator the same concepts and skills that they learn with traditional methods. Second, we hypothesis that such a system opens new opportunities to teach optics in a way that was not possible before, by manipulating concepts beyond the limits of observable physical phenomena. To reach this goal, we have built a complementary team composed of experts in the field of optics, human-computer interaction, computer graphics, sensors and actuators, and education science.

  16. Augmented Reality for Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Harald; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Georgsen, Marianne

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. So far, however, most research has looked at the technology itself – and AR has been used primarily for commercial purposes. As a learning tool, AR supports an inquiry-based approach to science education with a high level of student...... involvement. The AR-sci-project (Augmented Reality for SCIence education) addresses the issue of applying augmented reality in developing innovative science education and enhancing the quality of science teaching and learning....

  17. Virtual, augmented reality and serious games for healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi; Anderson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is a tremendous interest among researchers for the development of virtual, augmented reality and games technologies due to their widespread applications in medicine and healthcare. To date the major applications of these technologies include medical simulation, telemedicine, medical and healthcare training, pain control, visualisation aid for surgery, rehabilitation in cases such as stroke, phobia, and trauma therapies. Many recent studies have identified the benefits of using Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, or serious games in a variety of medical applications.   This research volume on Virtual, Augmented Reality and Serious Games for Healthcare 1 offers an insightful introduction to the theories, development and applications of virtual, augmented reality and digital games technologies in medical and clinical settings and healthcare in general. It is divided into six sections: section one presents a selection of applications in medical education and healthcare management; Section two relates to th...

  18. Augmented exercise biking with virtual environments for elderly users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Pedersen, Kasper Søndergaard; Serafin, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    is unfortunately a perspective that seems elude the VR community. This study explores how augmenting a manuped exercise (chair-based exercise bike), using an interactive screen-based virtual environment (VE), can change the exercise experience for retirement home residents. It is the first study in a series...... of studies, initiating an investigation into how to use VR to augment conventional exercise experiences, specifically for the retirement home resident audience. In a larger scope, the ambition is longterm to use VR technology to increase motivation with retirement home residents, to uphold a regular exercise...... routine. The results showed that a majority of subjects reported to support the VE augmentation and preferred the VE based exercise experience to the conventional exercise. This supports VR as an assisting technology for physical therapy, and suggests the potentiality VE augmented exercises, tailored...

  19. Augmented reality for personalized nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yugyung; Lee, Chi H

    As our understanding of onset and progress of diseases at the genetic and molecular level rapidly progresses, the potential of advanced technologies, such as 3D-printing, Socially-Assistive Robots (SARs) or augmented reality (AR), that are applied to personalized nanomedicines (PNMs) to alleviate pathological conditions, has become more prominent. Among advanced technologies, AR in particular has the greatest potential to address those challenges and facilitate the translation of PNMs into formidable clinical application of personalized therapy. As AR is about to adapt additional new methods, such as speech, voice recognition, eye tracing and motion tracking, to enable interaction with host response or biological systems in 3-D space, a combination of multiple approaches to accommodate varying environmental conditions, such as public noise and atmosphere brightness, will be explored to improve its therapeutic outcomes in clinical applications. For instance, AR glasses still being developed by Facebook or Microsoft will serve as new platform that can provide people with the health information they are interested in or various measures through which they can interact with medical services. This review has addressed the current progress and impact of AR on PNMs and its application to the biomedical field. Special emphasis is placed on the application of AR based PNMs to the treatment strategies against senior care, drug addiction and medication adherence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Approaching revisional surgery in augmentation and mastopexy/augmentation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Brian P; Handel, Neal

    2012-01-01

    Breast augmentation and mastopexy augmentation procedures are becoming more common. The young plastic and reconstructive surgeon is often challenged revisional surgery operations in these patients. These cases are challenging, require significant operative time, and can be associated with a high revision rate. It is important for the young surgeon to have an approach to deal with these common and difficult scenarios. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients who underwent a revision augmentation or revision mastopexy augmentation procedure between 2008 and 2010 by the authors. The most commonly encountered mitigating circumstances in the revision augmentation or revision mastopexy augmentation populations were identified and an algorithm was created on how to address these difficult problems. Between July 1, 2008 and July 1, 2010, 264 patients underwent revision augmentation or revision mastopexy augmentation procedures. The most commonly encountered patient scenarios were recurrence of ptosis, recurrent capsular contracture, implant malposition, rippling, and desiring a reduction in implant size. We encountered many mitigating circumstances that complicated the revisions. We devised a stepwise algorithmic approach to address these problems based on the following factors: (1) blood supply to the nipple-areola complex, (2) need to change implant plane, (3) patient desire to reduce or increase in breast implant volume, (4) need for total en bloc capsulectomy or capsulorrhaphy, (5) incision approach used to perform the capsulectomy, and (6) patient-related factors that need to be medically optimized or treated before, during, and after surgery. By adhering to these steps, outcomes can be accomplished more reliably and safely. Specialized preoperative planning is necessary to consistently deliver safe and aesthetic revision augmentation and revision mastopexy augmentation results. It is important for the operative surgeon to carefully consider the

  1. NASA Communications Augmentation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyar, Guy C.; Butler, Thomas E.; Laios, Straton C.

    1990-09-01

    The NASA Communications (Nascom) Division of the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD) is to undertake a major initiative to develop the Nascom Augmentation (NAUG) network to achieve its long-range service objectives for operational data transport to support the Space Station Freedom Program, the Earth Observing System (EOS), and other projects. The NAUG is the Nascom ground communications network being developed to accommodate the operational traffic of the mid-1990s and beyond. The NAUG network development will be based on the Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model (OSI-RM). This paper describes the NAUG network architecture, subsystems, topology, and services; addresses issues of internetworking the Nascom network with other elements of the Space Station Information System (SSIS); discusses the operations environment. This paper also notes the areas of related research and presents the current conception of how the network will provide broadband services in 1998.

  2. Augmented Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Real time motion tracking hardware has for the most part been cost prohibitive for research to regularly take place until recently. With the release of the Microsoft Kinect in November 2010, researchers now have access to a device that for a few hundred dollars is capable of providing redgreenblue (RGB), depth, and skeleton data. It is also capable of tracking multiple people in real time. For its original intended purposes, i.e. gaming, being used with the Xbox 360 and eventually Xbox One, it performs quite well. However, researchers soon found that although the sensor is versatile, it has limitations in real world applications. I was brought aboard this summer by William Little in the Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center to find solutions to these limitations.

  3. Augmented fish health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michak, P.; Rogers, R.; Amos, K.

    1991-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Historically, all agencies involved with fish health in the Columbia Basin were conducting various levels of fish health monitoring, pathogen screening and collection. The goals of this project were; to identify, develop and implement a standardized level of fish health methodologies, develop a common data collection and reporting format in the area of artificial production, evaluate and monitor water quality, improve communications between agencies and provide annual evaluation of fish health information for production of healthier smolts. This completion report will contain a project evaluation, review of the goals of the project, evaluation of the specific fish health analyses, an overview of highlights of the project and concluding remarks. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  4. NASA Communications Augmentation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyar, Guy C.; Butler, Thomas E.; Laios, Straton C.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Communications (Nascom) Division of the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD) is to undertake a major initiative to develop the Nascom Augmentation (NAUG) network to achieve its long-range service objectives for operational data transport to support the Space Station Freedom Program, the Earth Observing System (EOS), and other projects. The NAUG is the Nascom ground communications network being developed to accommodate the operational traffic of the mid-1990s and beyond. The NAUG network development will be based on the Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model (OSI-RM). This paper describes the NAUG network architecture, subsystems, topology, and services; addresses issues of internetworking the Nascom network with other elements of the Space Station Information System (SSIS); discusses the operations environment. This paper also notes the areas of related research and presents the current conception of how the network will provide broadband services in 1998.

  5. Augmented reality system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Liang; Su, Yu-Zheng; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Augmented Reality (AR)[1][2][3] is very popular in universities and research organizations. The AR technology has been widely used in Virtual Reality (VR) fields, such as sophisticated weapons, flight vehicle development, data model visualization, virtual training, entertainment and arts. AR has characteristics to enhance the display output as a real environment with specific user interactive functions or specific object recognitions. It can be use in medical treatment, anatomy training, precision instrument casting, warplane guidance, engineering and distance robot control. AR has a lot of vantages than VR. This system developed combines sensors, software and imaging algorithms to make users feel real, actual and existing. Imaging algorithms include gray level method, image binarization method, and white balance method in order to make accurate image recognition and overcome the effects of light.

  6. NAESA Augmentation Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, John J.

    1998-01-01

    This project was one project within the Native American Earth and Space Academy (NAESA). NAESA is a national initiative comprised of several organizations that support programs which focus on 1) enhancing the technological, scientific and pedagogical skills of K-14 teachers who instruct Native Americans, 2) enhancing the understanding and applications of science, technology, and engineering of college-bound Native Americans and teaching them general college "survival skills" (e.g., test taking, time management, study habits), 3) enhancing the scientific and pedagogical skills of the faculty of tribally-controllcd colleges and community colleges with large Native American enrollments, and 4) strengthening the critical relationships between students, their parents, tribal elders, and their communities. This Augmentation Pilot Project focused on the areas of community-school alliances and intemet technology use in teaching and learning and daily living addressing five major objectives.

  7. Maxillary sinus augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Tarun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Placing dental implants in the maxillary posterior region can be both challenging and un-nerving for a regular implant dentist who is not well versed with advanced surgical procedures. It is vital for a general dentist to understand the fundamentals of bone grafting the maxillary sinus if he/she is really committed to providing the best health care for their patients. The dental practice is seeing an increasing group of patients who are living longer, and this group of older baby boomers often has an edentulous posterior maxilla either unilateral or bilateral. When edentulous, the posterior maxilla more likely has diminished bone height, which does not allow for the placement of dental implants without creating additional bone. Through grafting the maxillary sinus, bone of ideal quality can be created (allowing for placement of dental implants, which offer many advantages over other tooth replacement modalities. The sinus graft offers the dental patient a predictable procedure of regenerating lost osseous structure in the posterior maxilla. This offers the patient many advantages for long-term success. If dentists understand these concepts, they can better educate their patients and guide them to have the procedure performed. This article outlines bone grafting of the maxillary sinus for the purpose of placing dental implants. This review will help the readers to understand the intricacies of sinus augmentation. They can relate their patient's condition with the available literature and chalk out the best treatment plan for the patient, especially by using indirect sinus augmentation procedures which are less invasive and highly successful if done using prescribed technique.

  8. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as…

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  10. Understanding augmented reality concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Alan B

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality is not a technology. Augmented reality is a medium. Likewise, a book on augmented reality that only addresses the technology that is required to support the medium of augmented reality falls far short of providing the background that is needed to produce, or critically consume augmented reality applications. One reads a book. One watches a movie. One experiences augmented reality. Understanding Augmented Reality addresses the elements that are required to create compelling augmented reality experiences. The technology that supports

  11. Novel Augmentation Strategies in Major Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    and blood was drawn for thyroid analysis. In the Chronos study saliva and 24 hour urine cortisol was collected in the patients randomised to the exercise group. Main results The main results from the Bright Light study covering the first five weeks of the study are given in the PhD thesis "Adjunctive bright......Hypothesis The hypotheses of all the four included studies share the common idea that it is possible to augment the effect of antidepressant drug treatment by applying different interventions and with each intervention attain a clinically meaningful better effect compared to a control condition...... at Mental Health Centre North Zealand. For the Bright Light study, Pindolol and PEMF study patients were also seen at a psychiatric specialist practice in Copenhagen. Biochemical measures In the Light therapy study saliva cortisol was collected at baseline before start of light therapy and sertraline...

  12. Surgical treatment of breast cancer in previously augmented patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanas, Yvonne L; Leong, Darren S; Da Lio, Andrew; Waldron, Kathleen; Watson, James P; Chang, Helena; Shaw, William W

    2003-03-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is increasing each year. Concomitantly, cosmetic breast augmentation has become the second most often performed cosmetic surgical procedure. As the augmented patient population ages, an increasing number of breast cancer cases among previously augmented women can be anticipated. The surgical treatment of these patients is controversial, with several questions remaining unanswered. Is breast conservation therapy feasible in this patient population and can these patients retain their implants? A retrospective review of all breast cancer patients with a history of previous augmentation mammaplasty who were treated at the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center between 1991 and 2001 was performed. During the study period, 58 patients were treated. Thirty patients (52 percent) were treated with a modified radical mastectomy with implant removal. Twenty-eight patients (48 percent) underwent breast conservation therapy, which consisted of lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and radiotherapy. Twenty-two of the patients who underwent breast conservation therapy initially retained their implants. Eleven of those 22 patients (50 percent) ultimately required completion mastectomies with implant removal because of implant complications (two patients), local recurrences (five patients), or the inability to obtain negative margins (four patients). Nine additional patients experienced complications resulting from their implants, including contracture, erosion, pain, and rupture. The data illustrate that breast conservation therapy with maintenance of the implant is not ideal for the majority of augmented patients. Breast conservation therapy with explantation and mastopexy might be appropriate for rare patients with large volumes of native breast tissue. Mastectomy with immediate reconstruction might be a more suitable choice for these patients.

  13. Augmented reality som wearable technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahn, Annette

    “How Augmented reality can facilitate learning in visualizing human anatomy “ At this station I demonstrate how Augmented reality can be used to visualize the human lungs in situ and as a wearable technology which establish connection between body, image and technology in education. I will show...... the potential of Augmented reality increasing students level of understanding, interaction and engagement with the object. I will demonstrate the technology and show you the human lungs in your body and the future perspectives of the technology. Organization: developed in collaboration with Mie Buhl, Professor...

  14. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as Tagwhat and Star Chart (a must for astronomy class). The yellow line marking first downs in a televised football game2 and the enhanced puck that makes televised hockey easier to follow3 both use augmented reality to do the job.

  15. Augmented Mirror: Interactive Augmented Reality System Based on Kinect

    OpenAIRE

    Vera , Lucía; Gimeno , Jesús; Coma , Inmaculada; Fernández , Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Part 1: Long and Short Papers; International audience; In this paper we present a virtual character controlled by an actor in real time, who talks with an audience through an augmented mirror. The application, which integrates video images, the avatar and other virtual objects within an Augmented Reality system, has been implemented using a mixture of technologies: two kinect systems for motion capture, depth map and real images, a gyroscope to detect head movements, and control algorithms to...

  16. Crime Scenes as Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    2010-01-01

    Using the concept of augmented reality, this article will investigate how places in various ways have become augmented by means of different mediatization strategies. Augmentation of reality implies an enhancement of the places' emotional character: a certain mood, atmosphere or narrative surplus......, physical damage: they are all readable and interpretable signs. As augmented reality the crime scene carries a narrative which at first is hidden and must be revealed. Due to the process of investigation and the detective's ability to reason and deduce, the crime scene as place is reconstructed as virtual...... to understand the concept of augmentet reality. The crime scene is an encoded place due to certain actions and events which have taken place and which have left various traces which in turn may be read and interpreted: blood, nails, hair are all (DNA) codes to be cracked as are traces of gun powder, shot holes...

  17. Mersiline mesh in premaxillary augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2005-01-01

    Premaxillary retrusion may distort the aesthetic appearance of the columella, lip, and nasal tip. This defect is characteristically seen in, but not limited to, patients with cleft lip nasal deformity. This study investigated 60 patients presenting with premaxillary deficiencies in which Mersiline mesh was used to augment the premaxilla. All the cases had surgery using the external rhinoplasty technique. Two methods of augmentation with Mersiline mesh were used: the Mersiline roll technique, for the cases with central symmetric deficiencies, and the Mersiline packing technique, for the cases with asymmetric deficiencies. Premaxillary augmentation with Mersiline mesh proved to be simple technically, easy to perform, and not associated with any complications. Periodic follow-up evaluation for a mean period of 32 months (range, 12-98 months) showed that an adequate degree of premaxillary augmentation was maintained with no clinically detectable resorption of the mesh implant.

  18. Augmented Reality for Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Harald; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Georgsen, Marianne

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. So far, however, most research has looked at the technology itself – and AR has been used primarily for commercial purposes. As a learning tool, AR supports an inquiry-based approach to science education with a high level of student i...... involvement. The AR-sci-project (Augmented Reality for SCIence education) addresses the issue of applying augmented reality in developing innovative science education and enhancing the quality of science teaching and learning.......Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. So far, however, most research has looked at the technology itself – and AR has been used primarily for commercial purposes. As a learning tool, AR supports an inquiry-based approach to science education with a high level of student...

  19. The Augmented REality Sandtable (ARES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Introduction The US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Human Sciences Campaign calls out the topic of Virtual /Mixed and Augmented Reality as one of the...type of virtual environment. In virtual reality (VR), the totality of the environment is computer generated. In AR, the real world is augmented by...tangible user interfaces; and the effectiveness of virtual sand tables and similar systems. A market survey was also done to discover the state of

  20. Nitrate augmented myocardial viability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhwa, S.; Mansberb, R.; Fernandes, V.B.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: 24 hour 201 TI reinjection imaging improves myocardial viability detection when compared to standard 3-4 hour redistribution imaging, however, it is a time-consuming approach and some images do not provide adequate quality due to high background activity on the delayed scan. We tested whether sensitivity of redistribution and same day reinjection imaging could be improved by giving short-acting nitrates immediately prior to redistribution and reinjection imaging. Eighteen patients underwent a stress test (exercise or pharmacological) and 4 hour redistribution 201 TI SPECT study. Immediately after redistribution imaging, each patient was given 600 μg of sublingual glyceryl trinitrate and reimaged 15-20 minutes later (nitrate augmented image). Immediately following nitrate augmentation imaging, each patient was reinjected with 30 MBq of 201 TI and reimaged 20 minutes later (nitrate augmented reinjection images). Each patient returned 24 hours later and was reinjected with 40 MBq of 201 TI and imaged 20 minutes later (24 hour reinjection images). In all, each patient had five SPECT images as follows: stress/redistribution/ nitrate augmented redistribution/nitrate augmented same day reinjection/ 24 hour reinjection. The myocardium was divided into 11 segments and perfusion to each segment was scored by consensus method (2 blinded assessors) on a 4 point graded scale (0 = no perfusion, 1 = minimal perfusion, 2 = moderate perfusion, 3 = normal perfusion). Perfusion scores were analysed on a segment by segment basis; as well, each patient was given an overall perfusion score equal to the sum of the perfusion score for each segment. 150 segments with reduced perfusion were identified, of these 23 (15.3%) showed improvement in the redistribution images, 60 (40%) segments improved in the nitrate augmented images, 49 (32.7%) improved in the nitrate augmented reinjection images and 52 (34.7%) improved in the 24 hour reinjection images. To assess overall cardiac

  1. Hard tissue augmentation for alveolar defects before implant placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutia Rochmawati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Often when planning implant therapy, there is a need to augment or  replace  bone  that  has  been  lost. The alveolar defects may occur as a result of tooth loss due to extraction, advanced periodontal diseases or trauma, long term use of removable appliances, dehiscence and fenestration defects, developmental defects/clefts, congenitally missing teeth and odontogenic cysts and tumors. Insufficient bone volume can be brought about by hard tissue augmentation. This techniques have led to increased predictability in reconstruction of alveolar ridge defects and functional implant placement. Purpose. To describe the methods of hard tissue augmentation which can be done with block grafts (autografts and allografts, particulate grafts (cortical and cancellous, xenografts, or synthetic materials. Review. The reconstruction of a normal alveolar housing, in height and width, is imperative to achieve a harmonious balance between biology, function, and aesthetics. Depending on the size and morphology of the defect, horizontal or vertical, various augmentation procedures can be used. Soft tissue management is a critical aspect of hard tissue augmentation procedures. Incisions, reflection, and manipulation should be designed to optimize blood supply and wound closure. The design and management of mucoperiosteal flaps must consider the increased dimensions of the ridge after augmentation as well as esthetics and approximation of the wound margins. The surgical procedure needs to be executed with utmost care to preserve the maximum vascularity to the flap and minimize tissue injury. Conclusion. Alveolar ridge defects can be classified by using Seibert’s classification or HVC System. The treatment of alveolar ridge defect before implant placement can be done with hard tissue augmentation.

  2. Bayesian Alternation During Tactile Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caspar Mathias Goeke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies suggest that the integration of multisensory signals by humans is well described by Bayesian principles. However, there are very few reports about cue combination between a native and an augmented sense. In particular, we asked the question whether adult participants are able to integrate an augmented sensory cue with existing native sensory information. Hence for the purpose of this study we build a tactile augmentation device. Consequently, we compared different hypotheses of how untrained adult participants combine information from a native and an augmented sense. In a two-interval forced choice (2 IFC task, while subjects were blindfolded and seated on a rotating platform, our sensory augmentation device translated information on whole body yaw rotation to tactile stimulation. Three conditions were realized: tactile stimulation only (augmented condition, rotation only (native condition, and both augmented and native information (bimodal condition. Participants had to choose one out of two consecutive rotations with higher angular rotation. For the analysis, we fitted the participants’ responses with a probit model and calculated the just notable difference (JND. Then we compared several models for predicting bimodal from unimodal responses. An objective Bayesian alternation model yielded a better prediction (χred2 = 1.67 than the Bayesian integration model (χred2= 4.34. Slightly higher accuracy showed a non-Bayesian winner takes all model (χred2= 1.64, which either used only native or only augmented values per subject for prediction. However the performance of the Bayesian alternation model could be substantially improved (χred2= 1.09 utilizing subjective weights obtained by a questionnaire. As a result, the subjective Bayesian alternation model predicted bimodal performance most accurately among all tested models. These results suggest that information from augmented and existing sensory modalities in

  3. Augmented reality for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancati, Alberto; Angrigiani, Claudio; Nava, Maurizio B; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Ventrice, Fernando; Dorr, Julio

    2018-02-21

    Augmented reality (AR) enables the superimposition of virtual reality reconstructions onto clinical images of a real patient, in real time. This allows visualization of internal structures through overlying tissues, thereby providing a virtual transparency vision of surgical anatomy. AR has been applied to neurosurgery, which utilizes a relatively fixed space, frames, and bony references; the application of AR facilitates the relationship between virtual and real data. Augmented Breast imaging (ABI) is described. Breast MRI studies for breast implant patients with seroma were performed using a Siemens 3T system with a body coil and a four-channel bilateral phased-array breast coil as the transmitter and receiver, respectively. The contrast agent used was (CA) gadolinium (Gd) injection (0.1 mmol/kg at 2 ml/s) by a programmable power injector. Dicom formated images data from 10 MRI cases of breast implant seroma and 10 MRI cases with T1-2 N0 M0 breast cancer, were imported and transformed into Augmented reality images. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence, 3D cursor use, and joystick fly-through. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) to the breast can improve clinical outcomes, giving an enhanced view of the structures to work on. It should be further studied to determine its utility in clinical practice.

  4. Antipsychotic agents used to augment clozapine during long-term inpatient hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, J G; Chengappa, K N R; Ivanov, E; Gandotra, G; Kahn, C E; Weber, J S; Fabian, T J

    2014-11-01

    Literature assessing effective clozapine augmentation strategies is limited. The aim of this retrospective evaluation was to examine antipsychotics used to augment clozapine and assess whether an augmentation antipsychotic would continue at discharge. Demographic, clinical and pharmacy data were collected retrospectively if patients had received clozapine plus an antipsychotic used for augmentation. The dose of the augmentation agent, length of augmentation therapy, and concomitant medications were collected. Of the 49 patients (mean age 45.3±12.1 years), 27 (55%) were male. The mean clozapine dose at discharge was 406.1±121.8 mg. When a first generation antipsychotic (FGA) was selected initially to augment clozapine there was a greater likelihood it would be continued until discharge compared to a second generation antipsychotic (SGA) (78 vs. 50%, OR=3.6, 95% CI 1.03-12.6). FGAs (3.2%) compared to SGAs (35%) were less likely to be discontinued due to a documented lack of benefit when first selected to augment clozapine (OR=16.2, 95% CI 2-131.3). Electroconvulsive therapy plus clozapine was found to be beneficial in several patients (n=14) who failed at least 1 augmentation strategy. This real world data suggests that adding an antipsychotic to clozapine is a reasonable approach to those who do not fully respond to clozapine monotherapy. While comparisons of all agents could not be conducted from this small retrospective study, these data suggest FGAs should be investigated in future studies as potential agents to successfully augment clozapine therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Augmented Reality Tower Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, Ronald J.; Brown, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Augmented Reality technology may help improve Air Traffic Control Tower efficiency and safety during low-visibility conditions. This paper presents the assessments of five off-duty controllers who shadow-controlled' with an augmented reality prototype in their own facility. Initial studies indicated unanimous agreement that this technology is potentially beneficial, though the prototype used in the study was not adequate for operational use. Some controllers agreed that augmented reality technology improved situational awareness, had potential to benefit clearance, control, and coordination tasks and duties and could be very useful for acquiring aircraft and weather information, particularly aircraft location, heading, and identification. The strongest objections to the prototype used in this study were directed at aircraft registration errors, unacceptable optical transparency, insufficient display performance in sunlight, inadequate representation of the static environment and insufficient symbology.

  6. Therapeutic options for lip augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Lorne; Ellis, David A F

    2007-11-01

    Aesthetic ideals vary with emerging fashion trends and within different cultures. However, over the past few decades, fuller lips have been considered a desirable trait. Many younger patients are presenting for lip augmentation to achieve the sought-after look commonly seen in many fashion magazines. In addition, as individuals age, they lose lip volume, with a thinning of the red lip, some effacement of the vermillion border, and elongation and flattening of the white portion of the lip. Rejuvenation of the lips plays a key role in restoring a more youthful appearance. As a result, lip augmentation appeals to a wide spectrum of patients who present with various different aesthetic goals and expectations. Numerous therapeutic options exist for aesthetic lip augmentation, ranging from temporary and permanent injectable fillers to implants and other surgical techniques.

  7. AUGMENTATION-RELATED BRAIN PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eDi Pino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, the anthropomorphism of the tools and the development of neural interfaces require reconsidering the concept of human-tools interaction in the framework of human augmentation. This review analyzes the plastic process that the brain undergoes when it comes into contact with augmenting artificial sensors and effectors and, on the other hand, the changes that the use of external augmenting devices produces in the brain.Hitherto, few studies investigated the neural correlates of augmentation, but clues on it can be borrowed from logically-related paradigms: sensorimotor training, cognitive enhancement, cross-modal plasticity, sensorimotor functional substitution, use and embodiment of tools.Augmentation modifies function and structure of a number of areas, i.e. primary sensory cortices shape their receptive fields to become sensitive to novel inputs. Motor areas adapt the neuroprosthesis representation firing-rate to refine kinematics. As for normal motor outputs, the learning process recruits motor and premotor cortices and the acquisition of proficiency decreases attentional recruitment, focuses the activity on sensorimotor areas and increases the basal ganglia drive on the cortex. Augmentation deeply relies on the frontoparietal network. In particular, premotor cortex is involved in learning the control of an external effector and owns the tool motor representation, while the intraparietal sulcus extracts its visual features. In these areas, multisensory integration neurons enlarge their receptive fields to embody supernumerary limbs. For operating an anthropomorphic neuroprosthesis, the mirror system is required to understand the meaning of the action, the cerebellum for the formation of its internal model and the insula for its interoception. In conclusion, anthropomorphic sensorized devices can provide the critical sensory afferences to evolve the exploitation of tools through their embodiment, reshaping the body representation and the

  8. Augmentation-related brain plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pino, Giovanni; Maravita, Angelo; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Today, the anthropomorphism of the tools and the development of neural interfaces require reconsidering the concept of human-tools interaction in the framework of human augmentation. This review analyses the plastic process that the brain undergoes when it comes into contact with augmenting artificial sensors and effectors and, on the other hand, the changes that the use of external augmenting devices produces in the brain. Hitherto, few studies investigated the neural correlates of augmentation, but clues on it can be borrowed from logically-related paradigms: sensorimotor training, cognitive enhancement, cross-modal plasticity, sensorimotor functional substitution, use and embodiment of tools. Augmentation modifies function and structure of a number of areas, i.e., primary sensory cortices shape their receptive fields to become sensitive to novel inputs. Motor areas adapt the neuroprosthesis representation firing-rate to refine kinematics. As for normal motor outputs, the learning process recruits motor and premotor cortices and the acquisition of proficiency decreases attentional recruitment, focuses the activity on sensorimotor areas and increases the basal ganglia drive on the cortex. Augmentation deeply relies on the frontoparietal network. In particular, premotor cortex is involved in learning the control of an external effector and owns the tool motor representation, while the intraparietal sulcus extracts its visual features. In these areas, multisensory integration neurons enlarge their receptive fields to embody supernumerary limbs. For operating an anthropomorphic neuroprosthesis, the mirror system is required to understand the meaning of the action, the cerebellum for the formation of its internal model and the insula for its interoception. In conclusion, anthropomorphic sensorized devices can provide the critical sensory afferences to evolve the exploitation of tools through their embodiment, reshaping the body representation and the sense of the self

  9. Augmented reality for anatomical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rhys Gethin; John, Nigel William; Delieu, John Michael

    2010-03-01

    The use of Virtual Environments has been widely reported as a method of teaching anatomy. Generally such environments only convey the shape of the anatomy to the student. We present the Bangor Augmented Reality Education Tool for Anatomy (BARETA), a system that combines Augmented Reality (AR) technology with models produced using Rapid Prototyping (RP) technology, to provide the student with stimulation for touch as well as sight. The principal aims of this work were to provide an interface more intuitive than a mouse and keyboard, and to evaluate such a system as a viable supplement to traditional cadaver based education.

  10. Superconducting augmented rail gun (SARG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, C.G.; Cummings, C.E.; Fowler, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Superconducting augmentation consists of a superconducting coil operating in the persistent mode closely coupled magnetically with a normally conducting rail gun. A theoretical investigation of the effect of this system on a rail gun has shown that two benefits occur. Projectile velocities and launch efficiencies increase significantly depending on the magnetic coupling between the rail and augmentation circuits. Previous work evaluated an idealized system by neglecting energy dissipation effects. In this paper, the authors extend the analysis to include the neglected terms and show improved actual launch efficiencies for the SARG configuration. In this paper, the authors discuss details of projectile design in depth and present preliminary results of rail gun performance

  11. Augmented reality social story for autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahputra, M. F.; Arisandi, D.; Lumbanbatu, A. F.; Kemit, L. F.; Nababan, E. B.; Sheta, O.

    2018-03-01

    Augmented Reality is a technique that can bring social story therapy into virtual world to increase intrinsic motivation of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder(ASD). By looking at the behaviour of ASD who will be difficult to get the focus, the lack of sensory and motor nerves in the use of loads on the hands or other organs will be very distressing children with ASD in doing the right activities, and interpret and understand the social situation in determining a response appropriately. Required method to be able to apply social story on therapy of children with ASD that is implemented with Augmented Reality. The output resulting from this method is 3D animation (three-dimensional animation) of social story by detecting marker located in special book and some simple game which done by using leap motion controller which is useful in reading hand movement in real-time.

  12. Frenotomy and keratinized tissue augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, M E

    1998-01-01

    Aberrant frenula can be an important etiological factor in progressive gingival recession. When separating or removing frenula, augmentation with keratinized tissue is the treatment of choice in most circumstances. A case is described as a mandibular labial frenotomy in combination with a free gingival graft.

  13. Indeterminacy and labor augmenting externalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Odile; Goenka, Aditya

    2002-01-01

    In this two-sector discrete time model of endogenous economic growth intersectoral effects are assumed to be "labor augmenting" We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for local indeterminacy and multiplicity of the balanced growth path in terms of factor intensities in both sectors...

  14. Aplikasi Web Augmented Reality Villa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Yudha Prema Pangestu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bali is one of the highly developed tourist destination in Indonesia. The arrival of tourists having holiday in Bali led to increase residential needs with complete amenities. The occupancy rate of hotel and villa in Bali is increase significantlly during the long vacation. The emergence of new villa and hotel occupancy raises the level of competition in business, so it needs a correct use good marketing communication strategy in marketing the product in order to attract the attention of consumers. Web Application Augmented Reality Villa can help visualize the residential villa in three-dimensional shapes that look more attractive and practical. The use of brochures as written information and the application of augmented reality technology on the Web Application Augmented Reality Villa aims to develop an application that can provide information about the villa to visitors. Web Application uses Augmented Reality Villa designed by FlarToolkit library. Based on the test results show the application can display 3-dimensional objects by scanning marker villa in a brochure which already contain marker.

  15. Data Augmentation for Plant Classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawara, Pornntiwa; Okafor, Emmanuel; Schomaker, Lambertus; Wiering, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Data augmentation plays a crucial role in increasing the number of training images, which often aids to improve classification performances of deep learning techniques for computer vision problems. In this paper, we employ the deep learning framework and determine the effects of several

  16. Augmentation treatment in major depressive disorder: focus on aripiprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Craig Nelson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available J Craig Nelson1, Andrei Pikalov2, Robert M Berman31University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; 2Otsuka Pharmaceutical Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 3Bristol-Myers Squibb, Wallingford, CT, USAAbstract: Major depressive disorder (MDD is a disabling psychiatric condition for which effective treatment remains an outstanding need. Antidepressants are currently the mainstay of treatment for depression; however, almost two-thirds of patients will fail to achieve remission with initial treatment. As a result, a range of augmentation and combination strategies have been used in order to improve outcomes for patients. Despite the popularity of these approaches, limited data from double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies are available to allow clinicians to determine which are the most effective augmentation options or which patients are most likely to respond to which options. Recently, evidence has shown that adjunctive therapy with atypical antipsychotics has the potential for beneficial antidepressant effects in the absence of psychotic symptoms. In particular, aripiprazole has shown efficacy as an augmentation option with standard antidepressant therapy in two, large, randomized, double-blind studies. Based on these efficacy and safety data, aripiprazole was recently approved by the FDA as adjunctive therapy for MDD. The availability of this new treatment option should allow more patients with MDD to achieve remission and, ultimately, long-term, successful outcomes.Keywords: major depression, antipsychotic, mood disorder, aripiprazole

  17. Augmented assessment as a means to augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Rigorous scientific assessment of educational technologies typically lags behind the availability of the technologies by years because of the lack of validated instruments and benchmarks. Even when the appropriate assessment instruments are available, they may not be applied because of time and monetary constraints. Work in augmented reality, instrumented mannequins, serious gaming, and similar promising educational technologies that haven't undergone timely, rigorous evaluation, highlights the need for assessment methodologies that address the limitations of traditional approaches. The most promising augmented assessment solutions incorporate elements of rapid prototyping used in the software industry, simulation-based assessment techniques modeled after methods used in bioinformatics, and object-oriented analysis methods borrowed from object oriented programming.

  18. Augmenting Locomotion in an Anthropomorphic System

    OpenAIRE

    Derek Wight; Eric Kubica; David Wang

    2005-01-01

    A powered orthosis has applications ranging from assisting the elderly to augmenting astronauts. An assistive control scheme is developed that uses the force from a slave actuator to augment the force of a master actuator. This can be used to augment a closed-loop control scheme applied to the master actuator. Initially, actuator augmentation is explored both theoretically and experimentally using a simple mechanical system. The control scheme is then applied to a scale model of human lower l...

  19. Use of Augmented Reality in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Jeřábek, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with phenomena of augmented reality in context of didactics. The thesis aims to define augmented reality in conceptual and content area and focuses on augmented reality in the structure of educational tools and identification of its functions and use from the didactical standpoint. The thesis characterizes augmented reality as a specific technological-perceptual concept and establishes a system of perceptual, technological and resulting aspects that reflect important paramet...

  20. New Augmented Reality Taxonomy: Technologies and Features of Augmented Environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Hugues , Olivier; Fuchs , Philippe; Nannipieri , Olivier

    2011-01-01

    978-1-4614-0063-9; This article has a dual aim: firstly to define augmented reality (AR) en- vironments and secondly, based on our definition, a new taxonomy enabling these environments to be classified. After briefly reviewing existing classifica- tions, we define AR by its purpose, ie. to enable someone to create sensory- motor and cognitive activities in a new space combining the real environment and a virtual environment. Below we present our functional taxonomy of AR environments. We div...

  1. Augmented Reality for Multi-disciplinary Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiangyu; Rui,

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents a framework for multi-disciplinary collaboration. Tangible Augmented Reality has been raised as one of suitable systems for design collaboration. Furthermore, it emphasizes the advantages of Tangible Augmented Reality to illustrate the needs for integrating the Tangible User Interfaces and Augmented Reality Systems.

  2. Aripiprazole augmentation, antidepressant combination or switching therapy in patients with major depressive disorder who are partial- or non-responsive to current antidepressants: a multi-center, naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Changsu; Wang, Sheng-Min; Seo, Ho-Jun; Lee, Boung Chul; Jeon, Hong Jin; Kim, Won; Kwak, Kyung-Phil; Pae, Chi-Un

    2014-02-01

    There has been no studies comparing the clinical benefits of aripiprazole augmentation (AT), antidepressant combination (AC), and switching to a different antidepressant (SW) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) patients partially or not responding to an initial antidepressant. AT, AC, or SW was chosen by patients. The primary efficacy measure was the proportion of patients showing an improvement in the Clinical Global Impression-Clinical Benefit (CGI-CB) score at week 8. Secondary efficacy measures included changes in CGI-CB, CGI-Severity (S) and subjective satisfaction scores. Remission and responder analysis were also employed. A total of 295 patients were enrolled. The most preferred strategy was AT (n = 156, 52.9%), followed by AC (n = 93, 31.5%) and SW (n = 46, 15.6%). The improver was significantly higher in AT (74.1%) compared with AC (48.1%; p antidepressant was ineffective in treating their depression. Among the three treatment strategies, overall AT yielded greater clinical benefit than did AC and SW. Adequately powered, well-controlled clinical trials are strongly warranted to confirm our findings due to methodological shortcomings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical outcome of alveolar ridge augmentation with individualized CAD-CAM-produced titanium mesh

    OpenAIRE

    Sagheb, K.; Schiegnitz, E.; Moergel, M.; Walter, C.; Al-Nawas, B.; Wagner, W.

    2017-01-01

    Background The augmentation of the jaw has been and continues to be a sophisticated therapy in implantology. Modern CAD-CAM technologies lead to revival of old and established augmentation techniques such as the use of titanium mesh (TM) for bone augmentation. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of an individualized CAD-CAM-produced TM based on the CT/DVT-DICOM data of the patients for the first time. Methods In 17 patients, 21 different regions were augme...

  4. Modified-Release Recombinant Human TSH (MRrhTSH) Augments the Effect of 131I Therapy in Benign Multinodular Goiter: Results from a Multicenter International, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graf, H; Fast, S; Pacini, F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) can be used to enhance (131)I therapy for shrinkage of multinodular goiter (MG). Objective, Design, and Setting: The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy and safety of 0.01 and 0.03 mg modified-release (MR) rhTSH as an adjuvant to (131)I...

  5. Mechanical ventilation in mass casualty scenarios. Augmenting staff: project XTREME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Michael E; Bogdan, Gregory M

    2008-02-01

    Disaster preparedness typically includes plans that address the need for surge capacity to manage mass-casualty events. A major concern of disaster preparedness in respiratory therapy focuses on responding to a sudden increase in the volume of patients who require mechanical ventilation. Plans for such disasters must include contingencies to address surge capacity in ventilator inventories and the respiratory therapy staff who will manage the ventilators. Tactics to address these situations include efforts to lower demand by transferring patients to other institutions as well as efforts to augment staffing levels. Staff can be augmented by mobilization of deployable teams of volunteers from outside the region and through exploitation of local resources. The latter includes strategies to recruit local respiratory therapists who are currently in either non-clinical or non-hospital-based positions and policies that optimize existing respiratory therapy resources within an institution by canceling elective surgeries, altering shift structure, and postponing vacations. An alternative approach would employ non-respiratory-therapy staff to assist in the management of patients with respiratory failure. Project XTREME (Cross-Training Respiratory Extenders for Medical Emergencies) is a cross-training program developed to facilitate training of non-respiratory-therapy health professionals to assist in the management of patients who require mechanical ventilation. It includes an interactive digital video disc as well as a competency validation laboratory and is designed to be performed at the time of an emergency. Pilot testing of the program suggests it is effective.

  6. Augmented reality building operations tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2014-09-09

    A method (700) for providing an augmented reality operations tool to a mobile client (642) positioned in a building (604). The method (700) includes, with a server (660), receiving (720) from the client (642) an augmented reality request for building system equipment (612) managed by an energy management system (EMS) (620). The method (700) includes transmitting (740) a data request for the equipment (612) to the EMS (620) and receiving (750) building management data (634) for the equipment (612). The method (700) includes generating (760) an overlay (656) with an object created based on the building management data (634), which may be sensor data, diagnostic procedures, or the like. The overlay (656) is configured for concurrent display on a display screen (652) of the client (642) with a real-time image of the building equipment (612). The method (700) includes transmitting (770) the overlay (656) to the client (642).

  7. Amisulpride Augmentation in Acute Catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Manu; Banal, Rakesh; Praharaj, Samir K; Mahajan, Vivek

    Benzodiazepines are the first-line treatment of catatonia, but a substantial number of patients do not respond to them. Amisulpride is one of the atypical antipsychotic that has been effective for negative symptoms of schizophrenia. We examined the effect of augmentation of oral low doses of amisulpride with lorazepam on resolution of catatonic symptoms. Fifteen patients with catatonia were treated with a combination of oral lorazepam (2-4 mg) with amisulpride (100 mg). Catatonic symptoms were rated using the Bush Francis Catatonia Rating Scale at the baseline and daily thereafter. There was complete resolution of catatonic symptoms on the third day in all patients. There was significant reduction of the total Bush Francis Catatonia Rating Scale score over time (F = 181.38, P < 0.001) with a strong effect size (partial η = 0.96). Augmentation of lorazepam with low-dose amisulpride can be a reliable strategy for management of catatonia.

  8. Augmented Reality 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalstieg, Dieter; Langlotz, Tobias; Billinghurst, Mark

    Augmented Reality (AR) was first demonstrated in the 1960s, but only recently have technologies emerged that can be used to easily deploy AR applications to many users. Camera-equipped cell phones with significant processing power and graphics abilities provide an inexpensive and versatile platform for AR applications, while the social networking technology of Web 2.0 provides a large-scale infrastructure for collaboratively producing and distributing geo-referenced AR content. This combination of widely used mobile hardware and Web 2.0 software allows the development of a new type of AR platform that can be used on a global scale. In this paper we describe the Augmented Reality 2.0 concept and present existing work on mobile AR and web technologies that could be used to create AR 2.0 applications.

  9. Augmented reality in medical education?

    OpenAIRE

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-01-01

    Learning in the medical domain is to a large extent workplace learning and involves mastery of complex skills that require performance up to professional standards in the work environment. Since training in this real-life context is not always possible for reasons of safety, costs, or didactics, alternative ways are needed to achieve clinical excellence. Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experien...

  10. Media-Augmented Exercise Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cardio-vascular exercise has been used to mitigate the muscle and cardiac atrophy associated with adaptation to micro-gravity environments. Several hours per day may be required. In confined spaces and long duration missions this kind of exercise is inevitably repetitive and rapidly becomes uninteresting. At the same time, there are pressures to accomplish as much as possible given the cost- per-hour for humans occupying orbiting or interplanetary. Media augmentation provides a the means to overlap activities in time by supplementing the exercise with social, recreational, training or collaborative activities and thereby reducing time pressures. In addition, the machine functions as an interface to a wide range of digital environments allowing for spatial variety in an otherwise confined environment. We hypothesize that the adoption of media augmented exercise machines will have a positive effect on psycho-social well-being on long duration missions. By organizing and supplementing exercise machines, data acquisition hardware, computers and displays into an interacting system this proposal increases functionality with limited additional mass. This paper reviews preliminary work on a project to augment exercise equipment in a manner that addresses these issues and at the same time opens possibilities for additional benefits. A testbed augmented exercise machine uses a specialty built cycle trainer as both input to a virtual environment and as an output device from it using spatialized sound, and visual displays, vibration transducers and variable resistance. The resulting interactivity increases a sense of engagement in the exercise, provides a rich experience of the digital environments. Activities in the virtual environment and accompanying physiological and psychological indicators may be correlated to track and evaluate the health of the crew.

  11. Facial sculpting and tissue augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Jean D A; Carruthers, Alastair

    2005-11-01

    Until recently, deep facial sculpting was exclusively the domain of surgical interventions. Recent advances in the available array of dermal and subdermal fillers combined with an esthetic appreciation by both surgeons and nonsurgeons alike of the positive effect of filling the volume-depleted face have led to an expansion in the indications for the use of soft tissue augmenting agents. Subdermal support of the lateral two-thirds of the brow, the nasojugal fold, the malar and buccal fat pads, the lateral lip commissures, and the perioral region, including the pre-jowl sulcus, all restore youthful facial contour and harmony. An important advance in technique is the subdermal rather than the intradermal injection plane. "Instant" facial sculpting giving a brow-lift, cheek-lift, lip expansion, and perioral augmentation is possible using modern soft tissue augmenting agents. The softer, more relaxed appearance contrasts to the somewhat "pulled" appearance of subjects who have had surgical overcorrections. Treatments can be combined with botulinum toxin and other procedures if required. Newer advances in the use of fillers include the use of fillers injected in the subdermal plane for "lunchtime" facial sculpting. Using the modern esthetic filler compounds, which are biodegradable but longer lasting, subjects can have a "rehearsal" treatment or make it ongoing. Some individuals, such as those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lipoatrophy or those who desire to obtain a longer-lasting effect, may elect to use a nonbiodegradable filling agent.

  12. Bone Marrow Transplantation Augments the Effect of Brain- and Spinal Cord-Directed Adeno-Associated Virus 2/5 Gene Therapy by Altering Inflammation in the Murine Model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Adarsh S.; Kim, Joong H.; Hawkins-Salsbury, Jacqueline A.; Macauley, Shannon L.; Tracy, Elisabeth T.; Vogler, Carole A.; Han, Xialin; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Wozniak, David F.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Klein, Robyn S.; Sands, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Globoid-cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an inherited demyelinating disease caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme galactosylceramidase (GALC). A previous study in the murine model of GLD (twitcher) demonstrated a dramatic synergy between CNS-directed adeno-associated virus 2/5 (AAV2/5) gene therapy and myeloreductive bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, the mechanism by which these two disparate therapeutic approaches synergize is not clear. In addition, the therapeutic efficacy may have been limited since the CNS-directed gene therapy was restricted to the forebrain and thalamus. In the current study, intrathecal and intracerebellar injections were added to the therapeutic regimen and the mechanism of synergy between BMT and gene therapy was determined. Although AAV2/5 alone provided supraphysiological levels of GALC activity and reduced psychosine levels in both the brain and spinal cord, it significantly increased CNS inflammation. Bone marrow transplantation alone provided essentially no GALC activity to the CNS and did not reduce psychosine levels. When AAV2/5 is combined with BMT, there are sustained improvements in motor function and the median life span is increased to 123 d (range, 92–282 d) compared with 41 d in the untreated twitcher mice. Interestingly, addition of BMT virtually eliminates both the disease and AAV2/5-associated inflammatory response. These data suggest that the efficacy of AAV2/5-mediated gene therapy is limited by the associated inflammatory response and BMT synergizes with AAV2/5 by modulating inflammation. PMID:21734286

  13. Cortical excitability changes following grasping exercise augmented with electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barsi, Gergely Istvan; Popovic, Dejan B.; Tarkka, Ina M.

    2008-01-01

    Rehabilitation with augmented electrical stimulation can enhance functional recovery after stroke, and cortical plasticity may play a role in this process. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three training paradigms on cortical excitability in healthy subjects. Cortical......) functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the finger flexors and extensors, (2) voluntary movement (VOL) with sensory stimulation, and (3) therapeutic FES (TFES) where the electrical stimulation augmented voluntary activation. TFES training produced a significant increase in MEP magnitude throughout...... excitability was evaluated by analysing the input-output relationship between transcranial magnetic stimulation intensity and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the flexor muscles of the fingers. The study was performed with 25 healthy volunteers who underwent 20-min simulated therapy sessions of: (1...

  14. Robotic assisted laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Caputo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Augmentation ileocystoplasty is a common treatment in adults with low capacity bladders due to neurogenic bladder dysfunction. We describe here our technique for robotic assisted laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty in an adult with a low capacity bladder due to neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Materials and Methods: The patient is a 35 years-old man with neurogenic bladder due to a C6 spinal cord injury in 2004. Cystometrogram shows a maximum capacity of 96cc and Pdet at maximum capacity of 97cmH2O. He manages his bladder with intermittent catheterization and experiences multiple episodes of incontinence between catheterizations. He experiences severe autonomic dysreflexia symptoms with indwelling urethral catheter. He has previously failed non operative management options of his bladder dysfunction. Our surgical technique utilizes 6 trocars, of note a 12mm assistant trocar is placed 1cm superior to the pubic symphysis, and this trocar is solely used to pass a laparoscopic stapler to facilitate the excision of the ileal segment and the enteric anastomosis. Surgical steps include: development of the space of Retzius/dropping the bladder; opening the bladder from the anterior to posterior bladder neck; excision of a segment of ileum; enteric anastomosis; detubularizing the ileal segment; suturing the ileal segment to the incised bladder edge. Results: The surgery had no intraoperative complications. Operative time was 286 minutes (4.8 hours. Estimated blood loss was 50cc. Length of hospital stay was 8 days. He did experience a postoperative complication on hospital day 3 of hematemesis, which did not require blood transfusion. Cystometrogram at 22 days post operatively showed a maximum bladder capacity of 165cc with a Pdet at maximum capacity of 10cmH2O. Conclusions: As surgeon comfort and experience with robotic assisted surgery grows, robotic surgery can successfully be applied to less frequently performed procedures

  15. Augmented reality in intraventricular neuroendoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, T; Schaumann, A; Schulz, M; Thomale, Ulrich-W

    2017-06-01

    Individual planning of the entry point and the use of navigation has become more relevant in intraventricular neuroendoscopy. Navigated neuroendoscopic solutions are continuously improving. We describe experimentally measured accuracy and our first experience with augmented reality-enhanced navigated neuroendoscopy for intraventricular pathologies. Augmented reality-enhanced navigated endoscopy was tested for accuracy in an experimental setting. Therefore, a 3D-printed head model with a right parietal lesion was scanned with a thin-sliced computer tomography. Segmentation of the tumor lesion was performed using Scopis NovaPlan navigation software. An optical reference matrix is used to register the neuroendoscope's geometry and its field of view. The pre-planned ROI and trajectory are superimposed in the endoscopic image. The accuracy of the superimposed contour fitting on endoscopically visualized lesion was acquired by measuring the deviation of both midpoints to one another. The technique was subsequently used in 29 cases with CSF circulation pathologies. Navigation planning included defining the entry points, regions of interests and trajectories, superimposed as augmented reality on the endoscopic video screen during intervention. Patients were evaluated for postoperative imaging, reoperations, and possible complications. The experimental setup revealed a deviation of the ROI's midpoint from the real target by 1.2 ± 0.4 mm. The clinical study included 18 cyst fenestrations, ten biopsies, seven endoscopic third ventriculostomies, six stent placements, and two shunt implantations, being eventually combined in some patients. In cases of cyst fenestrations postoperatively, the cyst volume was significantly reduced in all patients by mean of 47%. In biopsies, the diagnostic yield was 100%. Reoperations during a follow-up period of 11.4 ± 10.2 months were necessary in two cases. Complications included one postoperative hygroma and one insufficient

  16. Webizing mobile augmented reality content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sangchul; Ko, Heedong; Yoo, Byounghyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a content structure for building mobile augmented reality (AR) applications in HTML5 to achieve a clean separation of the mobile AR content and the application logic for scaling as on the Web. We propose that the content structure contains the physical world as well as virtual assets for mobile AR applications as document object model (DOM) elements and that their behaviour and user interactions are controlled through DOM events by representing objects and places with a uniform resource identifier. Our content structure enables mobile AR applications to be seamlessly developed as normal HTML documents under the current Web eco-system.

  17. Controlling bistability by linear augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Pooja Rani; Shrimali, Manish Dev; Prasad, Awadhesh; Feudel, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    In many bistable oscillating systems only one of the attractors is desired to possessing certain system performance. We present a method to drive a bistable system to a desired target attractor by annihilating the other one. This shift from bistability to monostability is achieved by augmentation of the nonlinear oscillator with a linear control system. For a proper choice of the control function one of the attractors disappears at a critical coupling strength in an control-induced boundary crisis. This transition from bistability to monostability is demonstrated with two paradigmatic examples, the autonomous Chua oscillator and a neuronal system with a periodic input signal.

  18. Augmented Reality in Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Brandt, Harald; Swensen, Hakon

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. However, most extant studies in this field have focused on the technology itself. The poster presents findings from the first stage of the AR-sci project addressing the issue of applying AR for educational purposes. Benefits...... and challenges related to AR enhancing student learning in science in lower secondary school were identified by expert science teachers, ICT designers and science education researchers from four countries in a Delphi survey. Findings were condensed in a framework to categorize educational AR designs....

  19. Augmented reality in medical education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-09-01

    Learning in the medical domain is to a large extent workplace learning and involves mastery of complex skills that require performance up to professional standards in the work environment. Since training in this real-life context is not always possible for reasons of safety, costs, or didactics, alternative ways are needed to achieve clinical excellence. Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experience supportive of complex medical learning and transfer. AR is a technology that adds virtual content to the physical real world, thereby augmenting the perception of reality. Three examples of dedicated AR learning environments for the medical domain are described. Five types of research questions are identified that may guide empirical research into the effects of these learning environments. Up to now, empirical research mainly appears to focus on the development, usability and initial implementation of AR for learning. Limited review results reflect the motivational value of AR, its potential for training psychomotor skills and the capacity to visualize the invisible, possibly leading to enhanced conceptual understanding of complex causality.

  20. Interactive Assembly Guide using Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Andersen, Rasmus Skovgaard; Larsen, Christian Lindequist

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an Augmented Reality system for aiding a pump assembling process at Grundfos, one of the leading pump producers. Stable pose estimation of the pump is required in order to augment the graphics correctly. This is achieved by matching image edges with synthesized edges from CAD...... norm. A dynamic visualization of the augmented graphics provides the user with guidance. Usability tests show that the accuracy of the system is sufficient for assembling the pump....

  1. Augmented reality in surgical procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samset, E.; Schmalstieg, D.; Vander Sloten, J.; Freudenthal, A.; Declerck, J.; Casciaro, S.; Rideng, O.; Gersak, B.

    2008-01-01

    Minimally invasive therapy (MIT) is one of the most important trends in modern medicine. It includes a wide range of therapies in videoscopic surgery and interventional radiology and is performed through small incisions. It reduces hospital stay-time by allowing faster recovery and offers

  2. Augmented reality in dentistry: a current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ho-Beom; Park, Young-Seok; Han, Jung-Suk

    2018-02-21

    Augmentation reality technology offers virtual information in addition to that of the real environment and thus opens new possibilities in various fields. The medical applications of augmentation reality are generally concentrated on surgery types, including neurosurgery, laparoscopic surgery and plastic surgery. Augmentation reality technology is also widely used in medical education and training. In dentistry, oral and maxillofacial surgery is the primary area of use, where dental implant placement and orthognathic surgery are the most frequent applications. Recent technological advancements are enabling new applications of restorative dentistry, orthodontics and endodontics. This review briefly summarizes the history, definitions, features, and components of augmented reality technology and discusses its applications and future perspectives in dentistry.

  3. INTEGRATIVE AUGMENTATION OF STANDARDIZED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Karapetrovic

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The development, features and integrating abilities of different international standards related to management systems are discussed. A group of such standards that augment the performance of quality management systems in organizations is specifically focused on. The concept, characteristics and an illustrative example of one augmenting standard, namely ISO 10001, are addressed. Integration of standardized augmenting systems, both by themselves and within the overall management system, is examined. It is argued that, in research and practice alike, integrative augmentation represents the future of standardized quality and other management systems.

  4. Artificial Neural Networks and Concentration Residual Augmented ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artificial Neural Networks and Concentration Residual Augmented Classical Least Squares for the Simultaneous Determination of Diphenhydramine, Benzonatate, Guaifenesin and Phenylephrine in their Quaternary Mixture.

  5. Augmenting Locomotion in an Anthropomorphic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Wight

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A powered orthosis has applications ranging from assisting the elderly to augmenting astronauts. An assistive control scheme is developed that uses the force from a slave actuator to augment the force of a master actuator. This can be used to augment a closed-loop control scheme applied to the master actuator. Initially, actuator augmentation is explored both theoretically and experimentally using a simple mechanical system. The control scheme is then applied to a scale model of human lower limbs on a stationary bicycle to investigate the feasibility of a powered orthosis using pneumatic muscle actuators.

  6. Long-term efficacy of modified-release recombinant human TSH (MRrhTSH) augmented radioiodine (131I) therapy for benign multinodular goiter. Results from a multicenter international, randomized, placebo-controlled dose-selection study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Søren; Hegedus, Laszlo; Pacini, Furio

    2014-01-01

    with 131I-therapy. Methods: In this phase II, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 95 patients (57.2±9.6 years old, 85% women, 83% Caucasians) with MNG (median size 96.0 ml (31.9 - 242.2 ml)) were randomized to receive placebo (n=32), 0.01 mg MRrhTSH (n=30) or 0.03 mg MRrhTSH (n=33), 24 hours before...... a calculated 131I activity. Thyroid volume (TV) and smallest cross-sectional area of trachea (SCAT) were measured (by CT-scan) at baseline, month 6 and month 36. Thyroid function and quality of life (QoL) was evaluated at 3 month and yearly intervals, respectively. Results: At 6 months, TV reduction...... was enhanced in the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group (32.9% versus 23.1% in the placebo group, p=0.03), but not in the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH group. At month 36 the mean percent TV reduction from baseline was 44 ± 12.7% (SD) in the placebo group, 41 ± 21.0% in the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH-group and 53 ± 18.6% in the 0.03 mg MRrh...

  7. Augmenting Human Performance in Remotely Piloted Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenwald, Christina M; Middendorf, Matthew S; Hoepf, Michael R; Galster, Scott M

    2018-02-01

    An experiment in a program of research supporting the sense-assess-augment (SAA) framework is described. The objective is to use physiological measures to assess operator cognitive workload in remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) operations, and provide augmentation to assist the operator in times of high workload. In previous experiments, physiological measures were identified that demonstrate sensitivity to changes in workload. The current research solely focuses on the augmentation component of the SAA paradigm. This line of research uses a realistic RPA simulation with varying levels of workload. Recruited from the Midwest region were 12 individuals (6 women) to participate in the experiment. The subjects were trained to perform a surveillance task and a tracking task using RPAs. There was also a secondary task in which subjects were required to answer cognitive probes. A within subjects factorial design was employed with three factors per task. Subjective workload estimates were acquired using the NASA-TLX. Performance data were calculated using a composite scoring algorithm. Augmentation significantly improved performance and reduced workload in both tasks. In the surveillance task, augmentation increased performance from 573.78 to 679.04. Likewise, augmentation increased performance in the tracking task from 749.39 to 791.81. Augmentation was more beneficial in high workload conditions than low workload conditions. The increase in performance and decrease in workload associated with augmentation is an important and anticipated finding. This suggests that augmentation should only be provided when it is truly needed, especially if the augmentation requires additional assets and/or resources.Gruenwald CM, Middendorf MS, Hoepf MR, Galster SM. Augmenting human performance in remotely piloted aircraft. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(2):115-121.

  8. The severity range of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and augmentation in a prospective patient cohort: association with ferritin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauscher, Birgit; Gschliesser, Viola; Brandauer, Elisabeth; El-Demerdash, Essam; Kaneider, Matthias; Rücker, Lukas; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the study was to prospectively examine all patients with a diagnosis of RLS consulting a sleep disorders clinic and to assess RLS severity and augmentation and their associations, including ferritin levels. Patients were stratified into patients with RLS as ancillary diagnosis, RLS sufferers without current augmentation and RLS sufferers with current augmentation. Work-up included RLS severity scales and blood biochemical variables including indices of iron metabolism. In an 18-month period, 302 patients with RLS (183 women, 119 men; mean age, 59.1+/-13.7 years) were recruited. RLS was considered idiopathic in 291 patients (96.4%). Most patients (240, 79.5%) were RLS sufferers, whereas the remaining 62 (20.5%) had RLS as ancillary diagnosis. Nineteen out of 162 patients treated with dopaminergic agents (11.7%) had current augmentation. Almost one-third of all patients (31.1%) had ferritin levels RLS had higher ferritin levels than RLS sufferers without current augmentation. The lowest ferritin levels were present in RLS sufferers with current augmentation 132.8+/-98.0microg/l vs. 100.6+/-84.5microg/l vs. 55.8+/-43.6microg/l; p=0.002). Patients with augmentation did not differ from non-augmented patients regarding age, gender, RLS etiology, presence of previous augmentation, or any other documented comorbidity (p>0.05). The severity spectrum of RLS in this clinical cohort ranged from the ancillary diagnosis of RLS to augmented RLS. There was an inverse correlation between RLS severity and ferritin levels. Patients with current augmentation had the lowest ferritin levels. Our data further strengthen a putative role of low iron stores as a potential aggravator of idiopathic RLS. Moreover, low ferritin might represent a potential biomarker of RLS augmentation under dopaminergic therapy.

  9. LEARNING ANATOMY WITH AUGMENTED REALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Cita; Dyhrberg O'Neill, Lotte; Nielsen, Kurt Gammelgaard

    An Augmented Reality (AR) app for Hololens glasses was developed to help students learn the anatomy of the human body mediastinum. In this research project, we wanted to evaluate whether AR: strengthened the students’ self-efficacy and motivation, helped students to improve learning, and provided...... students with a good learning experience. During class students circulated between different learning stations of 35 minutes duration each. The students at the mediastinum station were randomly divided into three groups. One group received traditional teaching with PowerPoint presentation of CT scans......’ scores on the mediastinum questions in the exam 2 month later were collected to examine the long-term memory of content. Internal consistency was estimated for all measures. Correlations between measures were examined with a correlation matrix, and group differences were examined with one-way analysis...

  10. Augmented reality for improved safety

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, CERN experts have to operate in low visibility conditions or in the presence of possible hazards. Minimising the duration of the operation and reducing the risk of errors is therefore crucial to ensuring the safety of personnel. The EDUSAFE project integrates different technologies to create a wearable personnel safety system based on augmented reality.    The EDUSAFE integrated safety system uses a camera mounted on the helmet to monitor the working area.  In its everyday operation of machines and facilities, CERN adopts a whole set of measures and safety equipment to ensure the safety of its personnel, including personal wearable safety devices and access control systems. However, sometimes, scheduled and emergency maintenance work needs to be done in zones with potential cryogenic hazards, in the presence of radioactive equipment or simply in demanding conditions where visibility is low and moving around is difficult. The EDUSAFE Marie Curie Innovative&...

  11. Sensory augmentation for the blind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Manuela Kärcher

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Enacted theories of consciousness conjecture that perception and cognition arise from an active experience of the regular relations that are tying together the sensory stimulation of different modalities and associated motor actions. Previous experiments investigated this concept by employing the technique of sensory substitution. Building on these studies, here we test a set of hypotheses derived from this framework and investigate the utility of sensory augmentation in handicapped people. We provide a late blind subject with a new set of sensorimotor laws: A vibro-tactile belt continually signals the direction of magnetic north. The subject completed a set of behavioral tests before and after an extended training period. The tests were complemented by questionnaires and interviews. This newly supplied information improved performance on different time scales. In a pointing task we demonstrate an instant improvement of performance based on the signal provided by the device. Furthermore, the signal was helpful in relevant daily tasks, often complicated for the blind, such as keeping a direction over longer distances or taking shortcuts in familiar environments. A homing task with an additional attentional load demonstrated a significant improvement after training. The subject found the directional information highly expedient for the adjustment of his inner maps of familiar environments and describes an increase in his feeling of security when exploring unfamiliar environments with the belt. The results give evidence for a firm integration of the newly supplied signals into the behavior of this late blind subject with better navigational performance and more courageous behavior in unfamiliar environments. Most importantly, the complementary information provided by the belt lead to a positive emotional impact with enhanced feeling of security. This experimental approach demonstrates the potential of sensory augmentation devices for the help of

  12. Novel Augmentation Strategies in Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Hypothesis The hypotheses of all the four included studies share the common idea that it is possible to augment the effect of antidepressant drug treatment by applying different interventions and with each intervention attain a clinically meaningful better effect compared to a control condition, and with minor side effects, thus improving the short- and medium-term outcome in major depression. Procedures Study design The basic study design has been the double blind randomised controlled trial (RCT). In the light therapy study, all patients were treated with sertraline for the whole of the study duration. In the first five weeks of the study, patients were randomised to treatment with either 60 minutes of bright white or 30 minutes of dim red light (sham condition). In the four weeks follow-up period, patients were treated with sertraline alone. In the Pindolol study, all patients were treated with venlafaxine and randomised to augmentation with either active or placebo matching pindolol tablets. In the PEMF study patients were continued on ongoing medication and randomised to augmentation with active or inactive (sham) 30 minutes daily PEMF treatment on weekdays. In the Chronos study all patients were treated with duloxetine and randomized to either a combination of three wake therapies with daily bright light treatment and sleep time stabilisation (wake group) or to daily exercise of minimum 30 minutes as an active control intervention (exercise group). The Chronos study was divided into: (1) a one-week run-in phase where duloxetine were started (and continued for the whole 29 week study period), (2) a one-week inpatient intervention phase where patient in the wake group did three wake therapies (sleep abstinence for the whole night and the following day until evening) in combination with daily light therapy and guidance on sleep time stabilisation and patients in the exercise group started a daily exercise program, (3) a seven week continuation phase where

  13. Enhancing Education through Mobile Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author has discussed about the Mobile Augmented Reality and enhancing education through it. The aim of the present study was to give some general information about mobile augmented reality which helps to boost education. Purpose of the current study reveals the mobile networks which are used in the institution campus as well…

  14. Augmented REality Sandtables (ARESs) Impact on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    ARL-CR-0803 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Augmented REality Sandtable’s (ARES’s) Impact on Learning by Tarah N......The use of augmented reality (AR) to supplement training tools, specifically sand tables, can produce highly effective systems at relatively low

  15. Augmented Reality Interfaces for Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar; Pedersen, David Bue; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores potential use cases for using augmented reality (AR) as a tool to operate industrial machines. As a baseline we use an additive manufacturing system, more commonly known as a 3D printer. We implement novel augmented interfaces and controls using readily available open source...

  16. Aspects of User Experience in Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Boesen

    In Augmented Reality applications, the real environment is annotated or enhanced with computer-generated graphics. This is a topic that has been researched in the recent decades, but for many people this is a brand new and never heard of topic. The main focus of this thesis is investigations...... in human factors related to Augmented Reality. This is investigated partly as how Augmented Reality applications are used in unsupervised settings, and partly in specific evaluations related to user performance in supervised settings. The thesis starts by introducing Augmented Reality to the reader......, followed by a presentation of the technical areas related to the field, and different human factor areas. As a contribution to the research area, this thesis presents five separate, but sequential, papers within the area of Augmented Reality....

  17. Augmentation Quotients for Real Representation Rings of Cyclic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    29

    Augmentation Quotients for Real Representation Rings of Cyclic Groups. Article Type: Reseach Article. Keywords: cyclic group; real representation; augmentation ideal; augmentation quotient. Corresponding Author: Hang Liu, Ph.D. Shaanxi Normal University. Xi'an, Shaanxi CHINA. Corresponding Author Secondary.

  18. Augmented Reality: Simulasi Terapi Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhmi Khalida

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Saat ini telah berkembang ilmu layanan kesehatan yang dilakukan dari jarak jauh atau telemedicine. Telemedicine adalah praktek kesehatan dengan memakai komunikasi audio, visual dan data. termasuk perawatan, diagnosis, konsultasi dan pengobatan serta pertukaran data medis dan diskusi ilmiah jarak jauh dengan melibatkan dokter, pasien dan pihak-pihak lain. Augmented Reality merupakan pemodelan simulasi virtual, Augmented Reality adalah teknologi yang menggabungkan antara dunia nyata dengan virtual. Teknologi Augmented Reality dapat diterapkan pada telemedicine, Secara sederhana, telemedicine sesungguhnya telah diaplikasikan ketika terjadi simulasi model virtual pada sebuah tindakan operasi. Pada penelitian ini akan dibahas mengenai media Augmented Reality yang diterapkan pada bidang kesehatan yaitu pada penyakit low back pain dan penyembuhannya melalui terapi mandiri. Penyalit low back pain mempunyai prevalensi yang tinggi namun penyakit ini dapat sembuh dengan sendirinya. Tahapan pengerjaan dalam penelitian ini dimulai identifikasi kandidat prototype, lalu rancang bangun prototype. Tahap yang ketiga yaitu rancang bangun prototype yaitu proses pembuatan model 3D dan interface flash, proses rendering, dan integrasi antara model dan Augmented Reality. Tahap yang keempat adalah uji coba prototype yaitu Teknologi Augmented Reality yang diterapkan pada terapi low back pain. Tahap yang terakhir adalah evaluasi dan diharapkan berhasil mencapai sasaran, maka peningkatan derajat kesehatan masyarakat dapat dipercepat. Implementasi aplikasi simulasi terapi Low Back Pain dengan metode Augmented Reality menunjukan dapat digunakan oleh seluruh masyarakat karena penggunaa merasa mudah mengoperasikannya, desain aplikasi menarik, dan mudah disebar-luaskan.

  19. Augmented reality: past, present, future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzerillo, Laura

    2013-03-01

    A great opportunity has permitted to carry out a cultural, historical, architectural and social research with great impact factor on the international cultural interest. We are talking about the realization of a museum whose the main theme is the visit and the discovery of a monument of great prestige: the monumental building the "Steri" in Palermo. The museum is divided into sub themes including the one above all, that has aroused the international interest so much that it has been presented the instance to include the museum in the cultural heritage of UNESCO. It is the realization of a museum path that regards the cells of the Inquisition, which are located just inside of some buildings of the monumental building. The project, as a whole, is faced, in a total view, between the various competences implicated: historic, chemic, architectonic, topographic, drawing, representation, virtual communication, informatics. The birth of the museum will be a sum of the results of all these disciplines involved. Methodology, implementation, fruition, virtual museum, goals, 2D graphic restitution, effects on the cultural heritage and landscape environmental, augmented reality, Surveying 2D and 3D, hi-touch screen, Photogrammetric survey, Photographic survey, representation, drawing 3D and more than this has been dealt with this research.

  20. Digital Augmented Reality Audio Headset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Rämö

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality audio (ARA combines virtual sound sources with the real sonic environment of the user. An ARA system can be realized with a headset containing binaural microphones. Ideally, the ARA headset should be acoustically transparent, that is, it should not cause audible modification to the surrounding sound. A practical implementation of an ARA mixer requires a low-latency headphone reproduction system with additional equalization to compensate for the attenuation and the modified ear canal resonances caused by the headphones. This paper proposes digital IIR filters to realize the required equalization and evaluates a real-time prototype ARA system. Measurements show that the throughput latency of the digital prototype ARA system can be less than 1.4 ms, which is sufficiently small in practice. When the direct and processed sounds are combined in the ear, a comb filtering effect is brought about and appears as notches in the frequency response. The comb filter effect in speech and music signals was studied in a listening test and it was found to be inaudible when the attenuation is 20 dB. Insert ARA headphones have a sufficient attenuation at frequencies above about 1 kHz. The proposed digital ARA system enables several immersive audio applications, such as a virtual audio tourist guide and audio teleconferencing.

  1. Postauricular fascia in augmentation rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Aldo Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Ten rhinoplasty operations performed using postauricular fascia for the purpose of augmenting the radix and dorsum of the nose were analyzed retrospectively. All the operations were performed over a 1-year period, between 2005 and 2006. The fascia of the postauricular area has been used as a source of pliable soft-tissue grafts in primary and revision rhinoplasty. It may be easily accessed using a single sulcus incision that also enables harvesting of ear cartilage grafts. Deficiency in the radix is an overlooked abnormality seen in many patients undergoing primary as well as revision rhinoplasty after aggressive hump removal. Recent trends in rhinoplasty have been to avoid the overly reduced nasal skeleton and to create a more balanced nasal surgery result. This article presents the use of the postauricular fascia as a radix graft that has been found to be simple to carry out, reliable, and long lasting. In addition, the fascia graft is useful in the camouflage of various nasal deformities in the dorsum and sidewalls. The average patient follow-up for the study was 24 months.

  2. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  3. Determination of student opinions in augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Bicen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of the new technology has changed classroom teaching methods and tools in a positive way. This study investigated the classroom learning with augmented reality and the impact of student opinions. 97 volunteer undergraduate students took part in this study. Results included data in the form of frequencies, percentages and descriptive statistics. The results show that, with gamification methods, augmented reality content affected students’ opinions in a positive way. When QR codes are used in the classroom, students feel independent from classroom materials and can access various resources. Moreover, students think that, when augmented reality in the classroom is used, education is more enjoyable.

  4. Evidence-Based Medicine: Breast Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael R

    2017-07-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the key decisions in patient evaluation for cosmetic breast augmentation. 2. Cite key decisions in preoperative planning. 3. Discuss the risks and complications, and key patient education points in breast augmentation. Breast augmentation remains one of the most popular procedures in plastic surgery. The integral information necessary for proper patient selection, preoperative assessment, and surgical approaches are discussed. Current data regarding long term safety and complications are presented to guide the plastic surgeon to an evidence-based approach to the patient seeking breast enhancement to obtain optimal results.

  5. Lithium's emerging role in the treatment of refractory major depressive episodes: augmentation of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Adli, Mazda; Bschor, Tom; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Pfennig, Andrea; Sasse, Johanna; Schmid, Rita; Lewitzka, Ute

    2010-01-01

    The late onset of therapeutic response and a relatively large proportion of nonresponders to antidepressants remain major concerns in clinical practice. Therefore, there is a critical need for effective medication strategies that augment treatment with antidepressants. To review the available evidence on the use of lithium as an augmentation strategy to treat depressive episodes. More than 30 open-label studies and 10 placebo-controlled double-blind trials have demonstrated substantial efficacy of lithium augmentation in the acute treatment of depressive episodes. Most of these studies were performed in unipolar depression and included all major classes of antidepressants, however mostly tricyclics. A meta-analysis including 10 randomized placebo-controlled trials has provided evidence that lithium augmentation has a statistically significant effect on the response rate compared to placebo with an odds ratio of 3.11, which corresponds to a number-needed-to-treat of 5. The meta-analysis revealed a mean response rate of 41.2% in the lithium group and 14.4% in the placebo group. One placebo-controlled trial in the continuation treatment phase showed that responders to acute-phase lithium augmentation should be maintained on the lithium-antidepressant combination for at least 12 months to prevent early relapses. Preliminary studies to assess genetic influences on response probability to lithium augmentation have suggested a predictive role of the -50T/C single nucleotide polymorphism of the GSK3beta gene. Augmentation of antidepressants with lithium is currently the best-evidenced augmentation therapy in the treatment of depressed patients who do not respond to antidepressants. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Applied Augmented Reality for High Precision Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Clark

    Augmented Reality had a major consumer breakthrough this year with Pokemon Go. The underlying technologies that made that app a success with gamers can be applied to improve the efficiency and efficacy of workers. This session will explore some of the use cases for augmented reality in an industrial environment. In doing so, the environmental impacts and human factors that must be considered will be explored. Additionally, the sensors, algorithms, and visualization techniques used to realize augmented reality will be discussed. The benefits of augmented reality solutions in industrial environments include automated data recording, improved quality assurance, reduction in training costs and improved mean-time-to-resolution. As technology continues to follow Moore's law, more applications will become feasible as performance-per-dollar increases across all system components.

  7. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  8. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were...

  9. Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt; Klopfer, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in handheld computing, particularly its portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality, open new opportunities for immersive learning environments. This article articulates the pedagogical potential of augmented reality simulations in environmental engineering education by immersing students in…

  10. ARC Code TI: ROC Curve Code Augmentation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) curve Code Augmentation was written by Rodney Martin and John Stutz at NASA Ames Research Center and is a modification of ROC...

  11. Augmenting the Web through Open Hypermedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouvin, N.O.

    2003-01-01

    Based on an overview of Web augmentation and detailing the three basic approaches to extend the hypermedia functionality of the Web, the author presents a general open hypermedia framework (the Arakne framework) to augment the Web. The aim is to provide users with the ability to link, annotate, a......, and otherwise structure Web pages, as they see fit. The paper further discusses the possibilities of the concept through the description of various experiments performed with an implementation of the framework, the Arakne Environment......Based on an overview of Web augmentation and detailing the three basic approaches to extend the hypermedia functionality of the Web, the author presents a general open hypermedia framework (the Arakne framework) to augment the Web. The aim is to provide users with the ability to link, annotate...

  12. Augmentation Award for Surface Science Research Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sibener, Steven

    1996-01-01

    This AASERT grant provided augmentation funds that helped support US citizen graduate student research in the area of surface science as it pertains to gas-surface reactions, collisional energy transfer...

  13. Fiber Optic Augmented Reality System (FOARS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovation: Fiber Optics Augmented Reality System. This system in form of a mobile app interacts real time with the actual FOSS(Fiber Optics Sensing System) data and...

  14. Case series: Adderall augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors in childhood-onset obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owley, Thomas; Owley, Soyna; Leventhal, Bennett; Cook, Edwin H

    2002-01-01

    Current pharmacological treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder involves the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, a large proportion of patients does not respond fully to these medications despite receiving optimal doses and concomitant cognitive-behavioral therapy. Finding efficacious augmentation strategies has become an important goal of researchers and clinicians working with this population. In this case series, we describe four patients with childhood-onset obsessive compulsive disorder, and with partial or no response to SSRI treatment, who subsequently had a reduction of their symptoms with Adderall augmentation.

  15. Clinical outcome of alveolar ridge augmentation with individualized CAD-CAM-produced titanium mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagheb, K; Schiegnitz, E; Moergel, M; Walter, C; Al-Nawas, B; Wagner, W

    2017-12-01

    The augmentation of the jaw has been and continues to be a sophisticated therapy in implantology. Modern CAD-CAM technologies lead to revival of old and established augmentation techniques such as the use of titanium mesh (TM) for bone augmentation. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of an individualized CAD-CAM-produced TM based on the CT/DVT-DICOM data of the patients for the first time. In 17 patients, 21 different regions were augmented with an individualized CAD-CAM-produced TM (Yxoss CBR®, Filderstadt, Germany). For the augmentation, a mixture of autologous bone and deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) or autologous bone alone was used. Reentry with explantation of the TM and simultaneous implantation of 44 implants were performed after 6 months. Preoperative and 6-month postoperative cone beam computed tomographies (CBCT) were performed to measure the gained bone height. The success rate for the bone grafting procedure was 100%. Thirty-three percent of cases presented an exposure of the TM during the healing period. However, premature removal of these exposed meshes was not necessary. Exposure rate in augmentations performed with mid-crestal incisions was higher than in augmentations performed with a modified poncho incision (45.5 vs. 20%, p = 0.221). In addition, exposure rates in the maxilla were significantly higher than in the mandible (66.7 vs. 8.3%, p = 0.009). Gender, smoking, periodontal disease, gingiva type, used augmentation material, and used membrane had no significant influence on the exposure rate (p > 0.05). The mean vertical augmentation was 6.5 ± 1.7 mm, and the mean horizontal augmentation was 5.5 ± 1.9 mm. Implant survival rate after a mean follow-up of 12 ± 6 months after reentry was 100%. Within the limits of the retrospective character of this study, this study shows for the first time that individualized CAD-CAM TM provide a sufficient and safe augmentation technique

  16. Robotics and augmented reality for elderly assistance

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Lera, Francisco Javier; Botas Muñoz, Álvaro; García Sierra, Juan Felipe; Rodríguez, Carlos; Matellán Olivera, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a tele-assistance system based on augmented reality for elderly people that is integrated in a mobile platform. We propose the use of augmented reality for simplifying interaction with its users. The first prototype has been designed to help in medication control for ederly people. In this paper, both hardware and software architectures are described.The robotic platform is a slightly modified version of the Turtlebot platform. The software is based on ROS for the platfo...

  17. Multiple Kernel Learning with Data Augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-22

    et al., 2010; Sun et al., 2010). Particularly, Sun et al. (2010) developed an efficient method based on sequential minimal optimization (SMO). The...http://www.robots.ox.ac.uk/~vgg/data/ flowers /17/ 58 Multiple Kernel Learning with Data Augmentation Algorithm 2 MKL with Data Augmentation approach for...Maria-Elena Nilsback and Andrew Zisserman. A visual vocabulary for flower classification. In Com- puter Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2006 IEEE Computer

  18. Augmenting a guitar with its digital footprint

    OpenAIRE

    Benford, Steve; Hazzard, Adrian; Chamberlain, Alan; Xu, Liming

    2015-01-01

    We explore how to digitally augment musical instruments by connecting them to their social histories. We describe the use of Internet of Things technologies to connect an acoustic guitar to its digital footprint – a record of how it was designed, built and played. We introduce the approach of crafting interactive decorative inlay into the body of an instrument that can then be scanned using mobile devices to reveal its digital footprint. We describe the design and construction of an augmented...

  19. How to prevent complications in breast augmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Nava, Maurizio Bruno; Rancati, Alberto; Angrigiani, Claudio; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    No high-level evidences about the best technique or the best implant to use for obtaining the best outcomes in aesthetic breast augmentation, with low complications and re-interventions rates exist from available literature. In this paper we present the actual best evidence about the etiopathogenesis of main complications in aesthetic breast augmentation, identifying some basic rules to follow in order to reduce complication rates in our daily activity, minimizing re-interventions, obtaining ...

  20. Integrating Hypermedia Techniques with Augmented Reality Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Augmented Reality systems, which overlay virtual information over the real world, can benefit greatly from the techniques established by the Open Hypermedia research field. Storing information and links separately from a document can be advantageous for augmented reality applications and can enable the adaption of content to suit users’ preferences. This thesis explores how Open Hypermedia systems might be used as the information systems behind AR environments. This provides benefits to augme...

  1. Sensor Augmented Pump Therapy Use in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carolan, E

    2016-11-01

    Tight metabolic control in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) reduces incidence and delays progression of micro-vascular complications. Severe hypoglycaemia remains a significant barrier to achieving optimal diabetes control. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) systems refine insulin delivery with programmable basal rates and mealtime bolusing

  2. Augmented reality implementation methods in mainstream applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Procházka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality has became an useful tool in many areas from space exploration to military applications. Although used theoretical principles are well known for almost a decade, the augmented reality is almost exclusively used in high budget solutions with a special hardware. However, in last few years we could see rising popularity of many projects focused on deployment of the augmented reality on dif­ferent mobile devices. Our article is aimed on developers who consider development of an augmented reality application for the mainstream market. Such developers will be forced to keep the application price, therefore also the development price, at reasonable level. Usage of existing image processing software library could bring a significant cut-down of the development costs. In the theoretical part of the article is presented an overview of the augmented reality application structure. Further, an approach for selection appropriate library as well as the review of the existing software libraries focused in this area is described. The last part of the article out­lines our implementation of key parts of the augmented reality application using the OpenCV library.

  3. Empirical evaluation of augmented prototyping effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Koubek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality is a scientific field well known for more than twenty years. Although there is a huge number of projects that present promising results, the real usage of augmented reality applications for fulfilling common tasks is almost negligible. We believe that one of the principal reasons is insufficient usability of these applications. The situation is analogous to the desktop, mobile or cloud application development or even to the web pages design. The first phase of a technology adoption is the exploration of its potential. As soon as the technical problems are overcome and the technology is widely accepted, the usability is a principal issue. The usability is utmost important also from the business point of view. The cost of augmented reality implementation into the production process is substantial, therefore, the usability that is directly responsible for the implemented solution effectiveness must be appropriately tested. Consequently, the benefit of the implemented solution can be measured.This article briefly outlines common techniques used for usability evaluation. Discussed techniques were designed especially for evaluation of desktop applications, mobile solutions and web pages. In spite of this drawback, their application on augmented reality products is usually possible. Further, a review of existing augmented reality project evaluations is presented.Based on this review, a usability evaluation method for our augmented prototyping application is proposed. This method must overcome the fact that the design is a creative process. Therefore, it is not possible to take into account common criteria such as time consumption.

  4. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  5. Aripiprazole augmentation in poor insight obsessive-compulsive disorder: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinciguerra Valentina

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder is associated with a relevant impairment in social and interpersonal functioning and severe disability. This seems to be particularly true for the poor insight subtype, characterised by a lack of consciousness of illness and, consequently, compliance with treatment. Poor responsiveness to serotonergic drugs in poor insight obsessive-compulsive patients may also require an augmentation therapy with atypical antipsychotics. Methods We reviewed a case in which a patient with a long history of poor insight obsessive-compulsive disorder was treated with a high dosage of serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Results The treatment resulted in a poor outcome. This patient was therefore augmentated with aripiprazole. Conclusion Doctors should consider aripiprazole as a possible augmentation strategy for serotonergic poor responder obsessive-compulsive patients, but further research on these subjects is needed.

  6. Augmented Fotonovelas: A Visual Methodology for Community Engaged Research

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo, LeighAnna Grace

    2014-01-01

    Augmented Fotonovelas draw upon the aesthetic of traditional fotonovelas, but incorporate new technologies--such as video interviews, interactive mapping, smart phone technology, and Augmented Reality (AR). Augmented Fotonovelas also make the most of the classic form, utilizing photographs, text, and bubble captions. Through this methodology, new and old come together to produce Augmented Scholarship. I define Augmented Scholarship as knowledge production bridging the gap between communities ...

  7. Augmented “Ouch!”. : How to create intersubjective augmented objects into which we can bump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liberati, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the elements to design an intersubjective augmented reality in order to make the augmented objects part of our everyday world. This work will analyse intersubjectivity from a phenomenological point of view using the works by Husserl and Schutz. Thanks to these two

  8. Augmented reality and ubiquitous computing : The hidden potentialities of augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liberati, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to highlight the augmented reality’s potentialities, depicting its main characteristics and focusing attention on what its goal should be in order to have a new technology completely different from those that already exist. From a technological point of view, augmented

  9. ARSC: Augmented Reality Student Card--An Augmented Reality Solution for the Education Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Neven A. M.; Zayed, Hala H.; Sharawy, Mohamed I.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the technology of adding virtual objects to real scenes through enabling the addition of missing information in real life. As the lack of resources is a problem that can be solved through AR, this paper presents and explains the usage of AR technology we introduce Augmented Reality Student Card (ARSC) as an application of…

  10. Psychological considerations in cosmetic breast augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crerand, Canice E; Infield, Alison L; Sarwer, David B

    2007-01-01

    Within the past decade, the popularity of cosmetic breast augmentation has surged and, with it, the interest in the psychological aspects of the procedure. Investigations of women who seek cosmetic breast augmentation have examined both their psychosocial characteristics and their motivations for surgery. Dissatisfaction both with body image and with breast size and/or shape are thought to be primary motivators for surgery. It is common for women seeking cosmetic breast augmentation to have some body image dissatisfaction. However, a considerable minority may suffer from excessive dissatisfaction consistent with the psychiatric diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder, which is believed to contraindicate cosmetic surgery. Following breast augmentation, most women report satisfaction with the aesthetic result and improvements in body image. The impact of the procedure on other areas of functioning, such as self-esteem and quality of life, is less clear. These positive outcomes have been tempered by recent epidemiological studies that have identified a relationship between cosmetic breast implants and suicide. This article reviews this literature and provides recommendations to plastic surgical nurses regarding the psychological assessment and management of patients seeking breast augmentation.

  11. Augment-type two stage accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Mutsuo; Azuma, Kingo.

    1995-01-01

    When a flying body accelerated by a gas gun at a first stage enters into an augment rail passing through an introduction tube, an ignition capacitor for initial plasmas is turned ON to apply a voltage between the augment rails. Subsequently, the accelerating gas present behind the flying body is formed into plasmas by a laser, to flow electric current from one of the inner augment rails → plasma armature → the other of the inner augment rails, and additionally accelerate the flying body by Lorentz force formed in this case. Since the plasmas are maintained in a state of higher density than the plasmas obtained by using all of the augment rails, the ignition capacitor for initial plasmas in switched to a power source. As a result, it is possible to flow the maximum current before the plasmas expand, and a large accelerating force and a high magnetic flux density are attained, to improve acceleration performance of the flying body. (N.H.)

  12. Potential costs of breast augmentation mammaplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, William P; Eichhorn, Mitchell G; Ford, Ronald D

    2016-01-01

    Augmentation mammaplasty is one of the most common surgical procedures performed by plastic surgeons. The aim of this study was to estimate the cost of the initial procedure and its subsequent complications, as well as project the cost of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-recommended surveillance imaging. The potential costs to the individual patient and society were calculated. Local plastic surgeons provided billing data for the initial primary silicone augmentation and reoperative procedures. Complication rates used for the cost analysis were obtained from the Allergen Core study on silicone implants. Imaging surveillance costs were considered in the estimations. The average baseline initial cost of silicone augmentation mammaplasty was calculated at $6335. The average total cost of primary breast augmentation over the first decade for an individual patient, including complications requiring reoperation and other ancillary costs, was calculated at $8226. Each decade thereafter cost an additional $1891. Costs may exceed $15,000 over an averaged lifetime, and the recommended implant surveillance could cost an additional $33,750. The potential cost of a breast augmentation, which includes the costs of complications and imaging, is significantly higher than the initial cost of the procedure. Level III, economic and decision analysis study. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Augmented Reality: Daily Prayers for Preschooler Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Pradibta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Education is one of the aspects that many synthesized with technology. Yet, this is contrary to the fact that where most of the learning materials are still based on text. This research aims to develop an alternative learning media by implementing Augmented Reality Technology for Preschooler students. Augmented Reality (AR is an application that can combine the virtual object as text, pictures and animation into the real world. Development of Augmented Reality application uses Web Aurasma Based Studio, with learning materials of daily prayer for preschool student. The development of the characters and the animations were using Adobe Illustrator and Adobe After Effects. The results of the study showed that technology Augmented Reality can be used as an alternative learning media especially in the learning process in Preschool Al Furqon. This is because the content Augmented Reality in the form of animation can gives more understanding and attention for preschool student to follow the learning process

  14. Effectiveness of Risperidone Augmentation in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Experience From a Specialty Clinic in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Aditya; Kalyani, Bangalore G; Arumugham, Shyam Sundar; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Math, Suresh Bada; Reddy, Y C Janardhan

    2016-08-01

    Risperidone is the most widely used augmenting agent in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, a recent controlled study found risperidone to be no different from placebo, raising doubts about its effectiveness. In this context, we sought to examine the real-world effectiveness of risperidone from the large database of an OCD clinic in India. A total of 1314 consecutive patients who registered at the OCD clinic between 2004 and 2014 were evaluated with structured interviews and scales. Patients with OCD initiated on risperidone augmentation without concurrent cognitive behavior therapy and who were on stable and adequate doses of serotonin reuptake inhibitors for at least 12 preceding weeks were included for analysis. The primary outcome measure was all-cause discontinuation. Logistic regression was performed to identify the factors predicting improvement with risperidone augmentation. A total of 92 patients were eligible for analysis. Risperidone continued to be used in 23 patients (25%) at the time of last follow-up, and the remaining discontinued either because of ineffectiveness or intolerability. The fall in the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale scores was significantly greater in patients who continued to take risperidone when compared with those who did not (41.6% vs 3.7%, t = 6.95, P risperidone augmentation could be identified. The study demonstrated, in a real-world setting, that risperidone may be a useful augmenting agent in a proportion of patients with partial/poor response to serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  15. Cognitive Cost of Using Augmented Reality Displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, James; Ssin, Seung Youb; ElSayed, Neven A M; Dorrian, Jillian; Webb, David P; Walsh, James A; Simon, Timothy M; Irlitti, Andrew; Smith, Ross T; Kohler, Mark; Thomas, Bruce H

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the results of two cognitive load studies comparing three augmented reality display technologies: spatial augmented reality, the optical see-through Microsoft HoloLens, and the video see-through Samsung Gear VR. In particular, the two experiments focused on isolating the cognitive load cost of receiving instructions for a button-pressing procedural task. The studies employed a self-assessment cognitive load methodology, as well as an additional dual-task cognitive load methodology. The results showed that spatial augmented reality led to increased performance and reduced cognitive load. Additionally, it was discovered that a limited field of view can introduce increased cognitive load requirements. The findings suggest that some of the inherent restrictions of head-mounted displays materialize as increased user cognitive load.

  16. Pemanfaatan Augmented Reality Pada Permainan Othello

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendy Layman Aguston

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan teknologi telah mengubah cara pengerjaan suatu pekerjaan dari cara konvensional menjadi cara yang lebih praktis. Dengan hadirnya teknologi Augmented Reality, cara bermain yang menggunakan pion dan membalikkan pion musuh secara manual menjadi lebih mudah dalam memainkan permainan selain juga dapat berinteraksi langsung. Pembuatan permainan Othello menggunakan program Unity dengan framework Vuforia untuk mewujudkan Augmented Reality pada permainan Othello. Untuk menerapkan Augmented Reality dengan baik, dibutuhkan papan permainan sebagai image target yang sesuai dengan kriteria, jenis kamera yang digunakan, jarak kamera terhadap papan permainan, intensitas cahaya yang ditangkap kamera, serta tingkat sensitivitas tombol virtual. Pada permainan Othello ini tersedia fitur komputer yang menggunakan algoritma Alpha Beta Pruning dengan 3 level kedalaman yang menggunakan perhitungan fungsi evaluasi berupa mobility, potential mobility dan penguasaan corner yang menghasilkan kemenangan mencapai 73,33% dari 15 kali uji coba terhadap aplikasi Othello serupa dan 78,34% dari 37 kali uji coba terhadap user.

  17. Augmented reality-assisted skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, I; Sarrafzadeh, A; Bijlenga, P; Landis, B N; Schaller, K

    2014-12-01

    Neuronavigation is widely considered as a valuable tool during skull base surgery. Advances in neuronavigation technology, with the integration of augmented reality, present advantages over traditional point-based neuronavigation. However, this development has not yet made its way into routine surgical practice, possibly due to a lack of acquaintance with these systems. In this report, we illustrate the usefulness and easy application of augmented reality-based neuronavigation through a case example of a patient with a clivus chordoma. We also demonstrate how augmented reality can help throughout all phases of a skull base procedure, from the verification of neuronavigation accuracy to intraoperative image-guidance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel Augmentation Strategies in Major Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    open psychiatric wards. Only a few patients were re-cruited through advertisements (in the PEMF and Chronos studies). Inclusion criteria Inclusion criteria were major depression according to the DSM-IV, including a depressive episode as part of a bipolar disorder. For the PEMF study, treatment...... The results from the Pindolol study showed that pindolol did not augment the effect of venlafaxine for the whole sample. However, for those patients classified as slow metabolizers, based on their O-desmethylvenlafaxine/venlafaxine ratio (ODV/V), pindolol did augment the antidepressant effect. For patients...... classified as fast metabolizers, pindolol worsened the outcome. This interaction between ODV/V ratio and treatment group was statistically significant (p = 0.01). Results from the PEMF study The results from the PEMF Study showed that treatment with active versus sham PEMF augmented the effect of the ongoing...

  19. Handling Occlusions for Robust Augmented Reality Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maidi Madjid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Augmented Reality applications, the human perception is enhanced with computer-generated graphics. These graphics must be exactly registered to real objects in the scene and this requires an effective Augmented Reality system to track the user's viewpoint. In this paper, a robust tracking algorithm based on coded fiducials is presented. Square targets are identified and pose parameters are computed using a hybrid approach based on a direct method combined with the Kalman filter. An important factor for providing a robust Augmented Reality system is the correct handling of targets occlusions by real scene elements. To overcome tracking failure due to occlusions, we extend our method using an optical flow approach to track visible points and maintain virtual graphics overlaying when targets are not identified. Our proposed real-time algorithm is tested with different camera viewpoints under various image conditions and shows to be accurate and robust.

  20. Gluteal Augmentation Techniques: A Comprehensive Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oranges, Carlo M; Tremp, Mathias; di Summa, Pietro G; Haug, Martin; Kalbermatten, Daniel F; Harder, Yves; Schaefer, Dirk J

    2017-05-01

    Many studies of gluteal augmentation techniques have been published in recent decades, including case reports, retrospective and prospective case series, and multicenter survey reviews. However, to date, there has been no study of the overall complications or satisfaction rates associated with the broad spectrum of techniques. The authors performed a comprehensive literature review to determine outcomes and complications of gluteoplasty techniques, including patient satisfaction. A search on PubMed/Medline was performed for clinical studies involving gluteal augmentation techniques. A priori criteria were used to review the resulting articles. Fifty-two studies, published from 1969 through 2015, were included - representing 7834 treated patients. Five gluteal augmentation techniques were identified from these studies: gluteal augmentation with implants (n = 4781), autologous fat grafting (n = 2609), local flaps (n = 369), hyaluronic acid gel injection (n = 69), and local tissue rearrangement (n = 6). The overall complication rates of the most commonly utilized techniques were: 30.5% for gluteal augmentation with implants, 10.5% for autologous fat grafting, and 22% for local flaps. Patients' satisfaction was reported as consistently high for all the five techniques. Implant-based gluteal augmentation is associated with high patients' satisfaction despite a high complication rate, while autologous fat grafting is associated with the lowest complication rate yet including serious major complications such as fat embolism. Local flaps and local tissue rearrangements are the ideal procedures in case of massive weight loss patients. A paucity of data is available for hyaluronic acid gel injections, which appear to be effective but temporary and expensive.

  1. Effects for augmented reality audio headsets

    OpenAIRE

    Martí i Rabadán, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] Augmented reality is a real-time combination of real and virtual worlds. In augmented reality audio (ARA) real surrounding sounds are mixed with virtual sound sources. In this bachelor’s degree thesis a digital, real-time hear-through system (HTS) is implemented for the acoustical transparency of an ARA headset. It is achieved by adding back the sounds that have been attenuated by the isolation characteristics of the headphone itself. The surrounding sounds are recorded on both ears...

  2. MR imaging of the augmented breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huch, R.A.; Debatin, J.F.; Wiesner, W.; Krestin, G.P.; Kuenzi, W.

    1998-01-01

    Mammographic evaluation of the augmented breast is challenging, since breast implants obscure significant amount of breast tissue while diminishing the effect of compression. Posttherapeutic scarring can make mammographic interpretation even more difficult. MRI has thus evolved into the modality of choice for diagnosing implant complications as well as detection of primary or recurrent breast cancer in these patient population. The present article attemps to give an overview of the MR findings of different breast augmentation and reconstruction techniques, i. e. prosthetic breast implants, breast reconstruction with autogenous tissue, free silicone injections and fat grafts, and their complications. (orig.)

  3. Medical imaging and augmented reality. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohi, Takeyoshi; Sakuma, Ichiro; Liao, Hongen

    2008-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Medical Imaging and Augmented Reality, MIAR 2008, held in Tokyo, Japan, in August 2008. The 44 revised full papers presented together with 3 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 90 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on surgical planning and simulation, medical image computing, image analysis, shape modeling and morphometry, image-guided robotics, image-guided intervention, interventional imaging, image registration, augmented reality, and image segmentation. (orig.)

  4. Biological augmentation and tissue engineering approaches in meniscus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Cathal J; Busilacchi, Alberto; Lee, Cassandra A; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Verdonk, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate the role of biological augmentation and tissue engineering strategies in meniscus surgery. Although clinical (human), preclinical (animal), and in vitro tissue engineering studies are included here, we have placed additional focus on addressing preclinical and clinical studies reported during the 5-year period used in this review in a systematic fashion while also providing a summary review of some important in vitro tissue engineering findings in the field over the past decade. A search was performed on PubMed for original works published from 2009 to March 31, 2014 using the term "meniscus" with all the following terms: "scaffolds," "constructs," "cells," "growth factors," "implant," "tissue engineering," and "regenerative medicine." Inclusion criteria were the following: English-language articles and original clinical, preclinical (in vivo), and in vitro studies of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine application in knee meniscus lesions published from 2009 to March 31, 2014. Three clinical studies and 18 preclinical studies were identified along with 68 tissue engineering in vitro studies. These reports show the increasing promise of biological augmentation and tissue engineering strategies in meniscus surgery. The role of stem cell and growth factor therapy appears to be particularly useful. A review of in vitro tissue engineering studies found a large number of scaffold types to be of promise for meniscus replacement. Limitations include a relatively low number of clinical or preclinical in vivo studies, in addition to the fact there is as yet no report in the literature of a tissue-engineered meniscus construct used clinically. Neither does the literature provide clarity on the optimal meniscus scaffold type or biological augmentation with which meniscus repair or replacement would be best addressed in the future. There is increasing focus on the role of mechanobiology and biomechanical and

  5. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of seven augmentation agents for treatment-resistant depression: A multiple-treatments meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Bo Qi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Treatment-resistant depression (TRD is a therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Augmentation pharmacotherapy is effective for TRD, but it is still unclear which augmentation agent is most efficacious.  Objective. To assess the effects of seven augmentation agents on TRD.  Methods. We did a multiple-treatments meta-analysis, accounting for both direct and indirect comparisons. PubMed, the Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Web of Science, Embase, CBM-disc, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and relevant websites (up to August 2013 were searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs about augmentation agents. The following terms were used: ‘potentiation’, ‘augmentation’, and ‘adjunct’ paired with ‘depression’ and ‘resistant depression’. No language limitation was imposed. Results. We systematically reviewed 12 RCTs (1 936 participants, which included seven augmentation agents: lithium, tricyclic antidepressant (TCA, atypical antipsychotics (AAPs, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, buspirone, cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT and tri-iodothyronine (T3. The results revealed that T3 was more efficacious than lithium, TCA, AAPs, AEDs, buspirone and CBT with odds ratios (ORs of 1.58, 1.56, 1.51, 1.47, 1.77 and 1.25, respectively. ORs favoured CBT compared with lithium, TCA, AAPs, AEDs and buspirone. Buspirone was the least efficacious of all the other augmentation agents tested. AAPs were significantly more acceptable than lithium, and CBT more than buspirone. T3 was slightly more acceptable than lithium, and CBT more than AAPs. Conclusion. T3 as an augmentation agent should be a clinician’s first consideration instead of lithium in acute treatment for TRD. CBT might be a good augmentation agent in some communities. Buspirone should be a final option as an augmentation agent. Further research is needed, such as a well-designed, large-scale controlled trial, to support and draw definite conclusions.

  6. The Educational Possibilities of Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabero, Julio; Barroso, Julio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of emergent technologies have been acquiring a strong impulse in recent years. One of these emergent technologies is Augmented Reality (RA), which will surely have a high level of penetration into all our educational centers, including universities, in the next 3 to 5 years, as a number of different reports have already highlighted.…

  7. Determination of Student Opinions in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicen, Huseyin; Bal, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of the new technology has changed classroom teaching methods and tools in a positive way. This study investigated the classroom learning with augmented reality and the impact of student opinions. 97 volunteer undergraduate students took part in this study. Results included data in the form of frequencies, percentages and…

  8. Personalized augmented reality for anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Seelbach, Ina; Von Der Heide, Anna Maria; Euler, Ekkehard; Waschke, Jens; Navab, Nassir

    2016-05-01

    Anatomy education is a challenging but vital element in forming future medical professionals. In this work, a personalized and interactive augmented reality system is developed to facilitate education. This system behaves as a "magic mirror" which allows personalized in-situ visualization of anatomy on the user's body. Real-time volume visualization of a CT dataset creates the illusion that the user can look inside their body. The system comprises a RGB-D sensor as a real-time tracking device to detect the user moving in front of a display. In addition, the magic mirror system shows text information, medical images, and 3D models of organs that the user can interact with. Through the participation of 7 clinicians and 72 students, two user studies were designed to respectively assess the precision and acceptability of the magic mirror system for education. The results of the first study demonstrated that the average precision of the augmented reality overlay on the user body was 0.96 cm, while the results of the second study indicate 86.1% approval for the educational value of the magic mirror, and 91.7% approval for the augmented reality capability of displaying organs in three dimensions. The usefulness of this unique type of personalized augmented reality technology has been demonstrated in this paper. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Design Principles for Augmented Reality Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality is an emerging technology that utilizes mobile, context-aware devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets) that enable participants to interact with digital information embedded within the physical environment. This overview of design principles focuses on specific strategies that instructional designers can use to develop AR learning…

  10. Understanding the Conics through Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Patricia; Pulido, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the production of a digital environment to foster the learning of conics through augmented reality. The name conic refers to curves obtained by the intersection of a plane with a right circular conical surface. The environment gives students the opportunity to interact with the cone and the plane as virtual objects in real…

  11. Accurate overlaying for mobile augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W; van der Schaaf, A; Lagendijk, RL; Jansen, F.W.

    1999-01-01

    Mobile augmented reality requires accurate alignment of virtual information with objects visible in the real world. We describe a system for mobile communications to be developed to meet these strict alignment criteria using a combination of computer vision. inertial tracking and low-latency

  12. Location-Based Learning through Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Te-Lien; Chanlin, Lih-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A context-aware and mixed-reality exploring tool cannot only effectively provide an information-rich environment to users, but also allows them to quickly utilize useful resources and enhance environment awareness. This study integrates Augmented Reality (AR) technology into smartphones to create a stimulating learning experience at a university…

  13. CARE: Creating Augmented Reality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Farzana

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how Augmented Reality using mobile phones can enhance teaching and learning in education. It specifically examines its application in two cases, where it is identified that the agility of mobile devices and the ability to overlay context specific resources offers opportunities to enhance learning that would not otherwise exist.…

  14. Global Navigation Satellite System and Augmentation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 12. Global Navigation Satellite System and Augmentation ... Global availability of signal and continuous service hasmade GNSS technology popular with a large number of users.This article covers various aspects of GNSS/GPS like architecture ...

  15. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of seven augmentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative efficacy and acceptability of seven augmentation agents for treatment-resistant depression: A multiple-treatments meta-analysis. ... Web of Science, Embase, CBM-disc, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and relevant websites (up to August 2013) were searched for randomised controlled trials ...

  16. Augmentation of board games using smartphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulsinskas, Arturas; Balan, Catalin; Egede Bukdahl, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains details about research into the effect of digital augmentation on social presence in board games. A case study of the board game Tobago was performed during the project and a prototype application for smartphones was developed in order to compare the players’ social presence...

  17. Augmented reality for Android application development

    CERN Document Server

    Grubert, Jens

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step tutorial-based guide aimed at giving you hands-on practical experience to develop AR applications for Android.Augmented Reality for Android Application Development is for Android mobile application developers who are familiar with Android Development Tools and deployment, JMonkeyEngine, and the Vuforia SDK.

  18. Get Real: Augmented Reality for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; DeBay, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Kids love augmented reality (AR) simulations because they are like real-life video games. AR simulations allow students to learn content while collaborating face to face and interacting with a multimedia-enhanced version of the world around them. Although the technology may seem advanced, AR software makes it easy to develop content-based…

  19. Aloqa and layar augmented reality feeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan

    2010-01-01

    Aloqa is a service that proactively notifies the user of Point Of Interests (POIs). It runs on iPhone, blackberry and android. With this tool you can easily get directions to events, places, buildings or other places of interests. Layar builds on the same principle, but has a browser that augments

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Subfascial Calf Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelkov, Katarina; Sforza, Marcos; Husein, Rodwan; Atanasijevic, Tatjana C; Popovic, Vesna M

    2017-03-01

    Calf augmentation surgery is one of the least popular procedures among plastic surgeons; in contrast, it is by far one of the most gratifying procedures among patients. In this article, the authors present a retrospective analysis of a surgeon's extensive experience with calf implants. The authors retrospectively analyzed 134 patients having calf augmentation for cosmetic and reconstructive surgery in their practice from 2003 to 2015. All patients were divided into two groups: primary cases and patients who had previously been operated on and who were referred to our service as patients who had complications after calf augmentation surgery. The subfascial approach was the preferred approach by authors for all primary cases. The authors analyzed indications, complication rates, results, and pitfalls. Secondary cases were further divided into three groups according to the origin of the problem and some possible solutions. Subfascial calf augmentation surgery is safe and easy to reproduce, with a short recovery period and a low complication rate (surgery (e.g., bodybuilders, women, those with reconstructive problems). Therefore, treatment should be planned individually. The development of a new implant is necessary and should be based on detailed anatomical findings and in accordance with surgical techniques. The process is intriguing and rewarding. Therapeutic, V.

  1. Augmented Reality in Sports: Today and Tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer BOZYER

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapid change experienced in the field of Information Technologies makes the informati cs more tangible in daily life. Today, it became possible to encounter with the informatics applications almost all the disciplines. As a matter of course, many informatics applications are put into the practice regarding the sports discipline. Because of the condition that the power of information processing has increased and the studies on wearable technol ogies in addition to the expert system design, augmented reality (AR has become a topic which gains imp ortance in the field of sports. There are many studies that are conducted with the aim of increasing the efficiency of physical activities done in many sports branches, ensuring a more fair management of competitions and providing the opportunity for spectators to watch the competitions in a more comfortable and efficient way. In this study; the information about the current augmented reality practices th at are used in various sports branches has been given and the mobile and interactive augmented reality practices which are possible to be seen in future have been mentioned. In addition, there is an augmented reality practice which is designed with the aim of ensuring that the shoots of sports people who are interested in archery, are more stable and of ensuring that the trainings and exercises are more efficient by stating to the sports people whether he or she is in the right position for shoot which is c alled as T shape seen at the time of releasing the arrow.

  2. Percutaneous cement augmentation for osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaaly, Amer; Rizkallah, Maroun; Bachour, Falah; Atallah, Firas; Moreau, Pierre Emmanuel; Maalouf, Ghassan

    2017-06-01

    Thoracolumbar vertebral fracture incidents usually occur secondary to a high velocity trauma in young patients and to minor trauma or spontaneously in older people.Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures and affect one-fifth of the osteoporotic population.Percutaneous fixation by 'vertebroplasty' is a tempting alternative for open surgical management of these fractures.Despite discouraging initial results of early trials for vertebroplasty, cement augmentation proved its superiority for the treatment of symptomatic osteoporotic vertebral fracture when compared with optimal medical treatment.Early intervention is also gaining ground recently.Kyphoplasty has the advantage over vertebroplasty of reducing kyphosis and cement leak.Stentoplasty, a new variant of cement augmentation, is also showing promising outcomes.In this review, we describe the additional techniques of cement augmentation, stressing the important aspects for success, and recommend a thorough evaluation of thoracolumbar fractures in osteoporotic patients to select eligible patients that will benefit the most from percutaneous augmentation. A detailed treatment algorithm is then proposed. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:293-299. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160057.

  3. Supplementary household water sources to augment potable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This load reduction on piped reticulation systems could be an advantage in order to augment municipal supply, but water service planning and demand management are complicated by the introduction, and possible future decommissioning, of any household water source. The extent of both positive and negative impacts of ...

  4. Intelligent Augmented Reality Training for Motherboard Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerfield, Giles; Mitrovic, Antonija; Billinghurst, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the combination of Augmented Reality (AR) with Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) to assist with training for manual assembly tasks. Our approach combines AR graphics with adaptive guidance from the ITS to provide a more effective learning experience. We have developed a modular software framework for intelligent AR training…

  5. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were perf...

  6. Volumetric, dashboard-mounted augmented display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David; Grabowski, Christopher

    2017-11-01

    The optical design of a compact volumetric display for drivers is presented. The system displays a true volume image with realistic physical depth cues, such as focal accommodation, parallax and convergence. A large eyebox is achieved with a pupil expander. The windshield is used as the augmented reality combiner. A freeform windshield corrector is placed at the dashboard.

  7. Temporal Coherence Strategies for Augmented Reality Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Boesen; Tatzgern, Markus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal coherence of annotations is an important factor in augmented reality user interfaces and for information visualization. In this paper, we empirically evaluate four different techniques for annotation. Based on these findings, we follow up with subjective evaluations in a second experimen...

  8. Augmenting the ADDIE Paradigm for Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xiaopeng; Branch, Robert Maribe

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss topics appropriate for augmenting the ADDIE paradigm for instructional design. The topics selected are based on data from a study of working professionals who successfully completed an instructional design and technology certificate program and who identified related topics that they regarded as beneficial. The participants…

  9. Motion in Augmented Reality Games: an Engine for Creating Plausible Physical Interactions in Augmented Reality Games

    OpenAIRE

    Mac Namee, Brian; Beaney, David; Dong, Qingqing

    2010-01-01

    The next generation of Augmented Reality (AR) games will require real and virtual objects to coexist in motion in immersive game environments. This will require the illusion that real and virtual objects interact physically together in a plausible way. The Motion in Augmented Reality Games (MARG) engine described in this paper has been developed to allow these kinds of game environments. The paper describes the design and implementation of the MARG engine and presents two pr...

  10. [Production of human proteins in the blood of transgenic animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massoud, M.; Bischoff, Rainer; Dalemans, W.; Pointu, H.; Attal, J.; Schultz, H.; Clesse, D.; Stinnakre, M.G.; Pavirani, A.; Houdebine, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    The human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene has been microinjected into rabbit embryos. A line of transgenic rabbits has thus been established. Human alpha 1-antitrypsin was found in the blood of transgenic animals at the concentration of 1 mg/ml plasma. The human protein was active and separable from its

  11. Novel Therapeutic and Prophylactic Modalities to Protect the United States Armed Forces Against Mayor Biological Threat Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    fact that GSK-3β is a specific substrate of AKT kinase activity, that the downstream activity of GSK-3β regulating glycogenolysis by liver and...Br J Haematol 2000, 109(2):342-348. 102 Janciauskiene S, Nita I, Stevens T: Alpha1-antitrypsin, old dog , new tricks. Alpha1-antitrypsin exerts in

  12. Augmented Reality and ARToolkit for Android: the First Steps

    OpenAIRE

    Demidova Liliya

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the aspects of the augmented reality application development on the base of ARToolkit for Android. The steps consistently used for the augmented reality application development have been considered. The simplest Java-based examples of augmented reality have been discussed.

  13. Augmented Reality and ARToolkit for Android: the First Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demidova Liliya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the aspects of the augmented reality application development on the base of ARToolkit for Android. The steps consistently used for the augmented reality application development have been considered. The simplest Java-based examples of augmented reality have been discussed.

  14. Current concepts on complications associated with sinus augmentation procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    The sinus augmentation, or sinus lift procedure, is an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus, which is intended to increase the vertical bony dimension in the lateral maxilla to make the placement of dental implants possible. Complication rate associated with maxillary sinus augmentation

  15. Current Concepts on Complications Associated With Sinus Augmentation Procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    The sinus augmentation, or sinus lift procedure, is an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus, which is intended to increase the vertical bony dimension in the lateral maxilla to make the placement of dental implants possible. Complication rate associated with maxillary sinus augmentation

  16. Initial Model of Social Acceptability for Human Augmentation Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eghtebas, Chloe; Pay, Yun Suen; Väänänen, Kaisa; Pfeiffer, Ties; Meyer, Joachim; Lukosch, S.G.

    2017-01-01

    Academia and industry engage in major efforts to develop technologies for augmenting human senses and activities. Many of these technologies, such as augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) head mounted displays (HMD), haptic augmentation systems, and exoskeletons can be applied in numerous

  17. Dynamic augmentation restores anterior tibial translation in ACL suture repair: a biomechanical comparison of non-, static and dynamic augmentation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeslag, Roy A G; Brouwer, Reinoud W; Huis In 't Veld, Rianne; Stephen, Joanna M; Amis, Andrew A

    2018-02-03

    There is a lack of objective evidence investigating how previous non-augmented ACL suture repair techniques and contemporary augmentation techniques in ACL suture repair restrain anterior tibial translation (ATT) across the arc of flexion, and after cyclic loading of the knee. The purpose of this work was to test the null hypotheses that there would be no statistically significant difference in ATT after non-, static- and dynamic-augmented ACL suture repair, and they will not restore ATT to normal values across the arc of flexion of the knee after cyclic loading. Eleven human cadaveric knees were mounted in a test rig, and knee kinematics from 0° to 90° of flexion were recorded by use of an optical tracking system. Measurements were recorded without load and with 89-N tibial anterior force. The knees were tested in the following states: ACL-intact, ACL-deficient, non-augmented suture repair, static tape augmentation and dynamic augmentation after 10 and 300 loading cycles. Only static tape augmentation and dynamic augmentation restored ATT to values similar to the ACL-intact state directly postoperation, and maintained this after cyclic loading. However, contrary to dynamic augmentation, the ATT after static tape augmentation failed to remain statistically less than for the ACL-deficient state after cyclic loading. Moreover, after cyclic loading, ATT was significantly less with dynamic augmentation when compared to static tape augmentation. In contrast to non-augmented ACL suture repair and static tape augmentation, only dynamic augmentation resulted in restoration of ATT values similar to the ACL-intact knee and decreased ATT values when compared to the ACL-deficient knee immediately post-operation and also after cyclic loading, across the arc of flexion, thus allowing the null hypotheses to be rejected. This may assist healing of the ruptured ACL. Therefore, this study would support further clinical evaluation of dynamic augmentation of ACL repair.

  18. Pharmacological Augmentation of Psychosocial and Remediation Training Efforts in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D. Harvey

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological approaches to cognitive enhancement have received considerable attention but have not had considerable success in improving their cognitive and functional targets. Other intervention strategies, such as cognitive remediation therapy (CRT, have been shown to enhance cognitive performance but have not been found to improve functional outcomes without additional psychosocial interventions. Recently, several studies have attempted to enhance the effects of CRT by adding pharmacological interventions to the CRT treatments. In addition, as CRT has been shown to synergistically improve the effects of psychosocial interventions, the combination of pharmacological therapies aimed at cognition and psychosocial interventions may itself provide a promising strategy for improving functional outcomes. This review and commentary examines the current state of interventions combining CRT and psychosocial treatments with pharmacological augmentation. Our focus is on the specific level of effect of the pharmacological intervention, which could be enhancing motivation, training efficiency, or the consolidation of therapeutic gains. Different pharmacological strategies (e.g., stimulants, plasticity-inducing agents, or attentional or alertness enhancers may have the potential to lead to different types of gains when combined with CRT or psychosocial interventions. The relative potential of these different mechanisms for immediate and durable effects is considered.

  19. Control Augmentation Using Adaptive Fuzzy Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio; Wada, Yoshihisa

    Control to improve control characteristics of aircraft, CA (Control Augmentation), is used to realize the desirable motion of aircraft corresponding to pilot's control action. When the control laws using fuzzy inference were designed, trial and error was repeated for optimization of the parameter. Here, in designing control laws using fuzzy neural networks, the systematic optimization of the parameter was possible using the learning algorithm usually used in neural networks, by expressing the fuzzy inference in the form of neural networks. Here, the control laws, which learned the characteristics of the aircraft for one flight condition only, were used in all flight conditions without changing any parameter. Evaluation of the designed control laws showed good performance in all flight conditions. This proves that fuzzy neural networks are an effective and flexible method when applied to control laws for control augmentation of aircraft.

  20. Interactive learning environments in augmented reality technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Wojciechowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of creation of learning environments based on augmented reality (AR is considered. The concept of AR is presented as a tool for safe and cheap experimental learning. In AR learning environments students may acquire knowledge by personally carrying out experiments on virtual objects by manipulating real objects located in real environments. In the paper, a new approach to creation of interactive educational scenarios, called Augmented Reality Interactive Scenario Modeling (ARISM, is mentioned. In this approach, the process of building learning environments is divided into three stages, each of them performed by users with different technical and domain knowledge. The ARISM approach enables teachers who are not computer science experts to create AR learning environments adapted to the needs of their students.

  1. Survey on Urban Warfare Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong You

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban warfare has become one of the main forms of modern combat in the twenty-first century. The main reason why urban warfare results in hundreds of casualties is that the situational information of the combatant is insufficient. Accessing information via an Augmented Reality system can elevate combatants’ situational awareness to effectively improve the efficiency of decision-making and reduce the injuries. This paper begins with the concept of Urban Warfare Augmented Reality (UWAR and illuminates the objectives of developing UWAR, i.e., transparent battlefield, intuitional perception and natural interaction. Real-time outdoor registration, information presentation and natural interaction are presented as key technologies of a practical UWAR system. Then, the history and current research state of these technologies are summarized and their future developments are highlighted from three perspectives, i.e., (1 Better integration with Geographic Information System and Virtual Geographic Environment; (2 More intelligent software; (3 More powerful hardware.

  2. Submandibular fossa augmentation in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2017-01-01

    There are two limiting factors for determining the dental implant fixture length in mandibular posterior edentulous region: Inferior dental canal and submandibular fossa. Submandibular fossa augmentation is a suggested way to overcome the problem of lingual undercut beneath the mylohyoid ridge in implant dentistry. Patients with lingual posterior bony undercut that interferes with the placement of a standard implant with a length of 10 mm were enrolled in this study. This method was used for eight patients in 10 sites. Increased implant length and decreasing the chance of sublingual hematoma due to lingual cortical plate perforation are the results of this study. Submandibular fossa augmentation is a new technique to improve the maneuver of oral surgeons to increase dental implant length in the presence of deep lingual bony undercut.

  3. Perancangan Augmented Reality untuk Peta Topografi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustinna Yosanny

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Topography is the science about the earth's surface and other objects such as planets, satellites, and asteroids. Topography is studied at school and is found quite difficult to understand because it requires imagination to understand the meaning of contour maps as well as the lines. To motivate students in learning topography,we design an learning application of interactive topographic map with 3D features using Augmented reality technology. In this research we implement analysis and design method. The result achieved is a learning topographic map application based on augmented reality. The conclusion that can be drawn is the teaching and learning of topography can be more interesting with 3D features so that students can more easily recognize the meaning of contour lines in a topographic map.

  4. Intestinal adenocarcinoma in an augmented ileocystoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Filipe Alpoim; Rolim, Nidia; Rodrigues, Tiago; Canhoto, Artur

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 67-year-old patient with a history of augmentation ileocystoplasty 31 years ago following genitourinary tuberculosis. Radiological investigations performed due to asymptomatic microscopic haematuria revealed three contrast-enhancing polyps within the neobladder. The patient had enterocystoprostatectomy and histopathological examination of the neobladder revealed mucinous adenocarcinoma in all three polyps, together with a prostatic adenocarcinoma Gleason 7 (3+4). After ...

  5. Medical imaging and augmented reality. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guang-Zhong; Jiang Tianzi; Shen Dinggang; Gu Lixu; Yang Jie

    2006-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Medical Imaging and Augmented Reality, MIAR 2006, held in Shanghai, China, in August 2006. The 45 revised full papers presented together with 4 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 87 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on shape modeling and morphometry, patient specific modeling and quantification, surgical simulation and skills assessment, surgical guidance and navigation, image registration, PET image reconstruction, and image segmentation. (orig.)

  6. Retaining force augmentation of retaining walls

    OpenAIRE

    Manohar, Krishpersad; Tota-Maharaj, Kiran; Panchoo, Roshan

    2017-01-01

    Concrete blocks retaining walls are commonly used for landscaping projects in which the retaining force strength of the structure is of paramount importance in preserving the integrity of the project and safety of humans and property. The effect of augmenting the retaining force strength of concrete block retaining walls was investigated using interlocking and interlocking with a horizontal steel re-bar and compared with regular concrete block walls. The average maximum retaining force for re...

  7. Delayed Mental Nerve Neuralgia following Chin Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Wever

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of mental nerve neuralgia following a traumatic dislodgement of a chin implant ten months after surgery. Our case is unusual, both in the specific complication and the patients' atypical representation—delayed and initially without mention of trauma. To the authors' knowledge, this case has not been reported previously in the literature. We review the complications of chin augmentation and the techniques for fixation and discuss implications for the preoperative disclosure with patients.

  8. Facade Proposals for Urban Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Fond , Antoine; Berger , Marie-Odile; Simon , Gilles

    2017-01-01

    International audience; We introduce a novel object proposals method specific to building facades. We define new image cues that measure typical facadecharacteristics such as semantic, symmetry and repetitions. They are combined to generate a few facade candidates in urban environments fast. We show that our method outperforms state-of-the-art object proposals techniques for this task on the 1000 images of the Zurich Building Database. We demonstrate the interest of this procedure for augment...

  9. Lifelong Augmentation of Multimodal Streaming Autobiographical Memories

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, Maxime; Fischer, Tobias; Demiris, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Robot systems that interact with humans over extended periods of time will benefit from storing and recalling large amounts of accumulated sensorimotor and interaction data. We provide a principled framework for the cumulative organisation of streaming autobiographical data so that data can be continuously processed and augmented as the processing and reasoning abilities of the agent develop and further interactions with humans take place. As an example, we show how a kinematic structure lear...

  10. Augmented reality to training spatial skills

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Gutierrez, Jorge; Contero, Manuel; Alcañiz Raya, Mariano Luis

    2015-01-01

    La Laguna University has been offering courses for the development of spatial skills since 2004. Each year since that time spatial ability of engineering students has been measured before and after the courses to check progress after each training session. We have developed a spatial skills training course based on augmented reality and graphic engineering contents, and designed the AR_Dehaes tool, which is based on its own library the uses computer vision techniques for incorporating vis...

  11. CIRSE Guidelines on Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: gtsoumakidou@yahoo.com; Too, Chow Wei, E-mail: spyder55@gmail.com; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@gmail.com; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juliengarnon@gmail.com; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Strasbourg University Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France)

    2017-03-15

    Vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is an important cause of severe debilitating back pain, adversely affecting quality of life, physical function, psychosocial performance, mental health and survival. Different vertebral augmentation procedures (VAPs) are used in order to consolidate the VCFs, relief pain,and whenever posible achieve vertebral body height restoration. In the present review we give the indications, contraindications, safety profile and outcomes of the existing percutaneous VAPs.

  12. Basic Concepts in Augmented Reality Audio

    OpenAIRE

    Lemordant, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The basic difference between real and virtual sound environments is that virtual sounds are originating from another environment or are artificially created, whereas the real sounds are the natural existing sounds in the user's own environment. Augmented Reality Audio combines these aspects in a way where real and virtual sound scenes are mixed so that virtual sounds are perceived as an extension or a complement to the natural ones.

  13. Soft tissue augmentation in dermatology - 2009 update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Gold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of products available to dermatologists for soft tissue augmentation has grown significantly over the past several years in the US. This manuscript will review the various hyaluronic acid fillers and other Food and Drug Administration -approved products we are utilizing for our patients in the rejuvenation process. It is hoped that through this article clinicians will feel more comfortable using these products in their everyday practice of dermatology.

  14. Aesthetic Shoulder Augmentation with Silicone Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoon Jae; Jang, Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Men with narrower shoulders may appear less muscular than other men. Deltoid muscle underdevelopment or atrophy, a condition commonly linked to narrow shoulder issues, may be associated with congenital deformity, trauma, or neoplasm. For some people, regular exercise does not effectively develop the deltoid muscle region. Some people naturally have a smaller build than others. Even with developed deltoid muscles, these people still appear to be small. The authors have performed lateral shoulder augmentation with silicone implants for 4 years. Based on their experience, this procedure stands as a reliable solution for men with narrow shoulders. Lateral shoulder augmentation with silicone implants was developed and used for 81 patients between April 2009 and April 2013. None of the patients had shoulder deformities except for two patients (one patient with Poland's syndrome and one patient with Sprengel's deformity). The implants were placed through a horizontal axillary crease incision in a plane dissected between the deltoid fascia and muscle. All augmentation or correction procedures have been met with complete patient approval. Five patients had minor complications such as hematoma and implement displacement. However, all these complications were resolved to the satisfaction of the patients. When silicone implants are used to achieve purely aesthetic improvements, successful shoulder augmentation procedures are observed. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors http://www.springer.com/00266 .

  15. Developing augmented reality solutions through user involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Siltanen, Sanni

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) technology merges digital information into the real world. It is an effective visualization method; AR enhances user's spatial perception skills and helps to understand spatial dimensions and relationships. It is beneficial for many professional application areas such as assembly, maintenance and repair. AR visualization helps to concretize building and construction projects and interior design plans – also for non-technically oriented people, who might otherwise have d...

  16. Autologous Fat Injection for Augmented Mammoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Eul Sik; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Yi, Ann; Cho, Kyu Ran [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Autologous fat injection is one of the methods utilized for augmented mammoplasty methods. In this surgical procedure, the fat for transfer is obtained from the donor site of the patient's own body by liposuction and the fat is then injected into the breast. We report here cases of three patients who underwent autologous fat injection. Two of the patients had palpable masses that were present after surgery. The serial imaging findings and surgical method of autologous fat transfer are demonstrated

  17. Spinal tuberculosis of the lumbar spine after percutaneous vertebral augmentation (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ming-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Bin; Li, Jing; Lv, Guo-Hua; Deng, You-Wen

    2015-06-01

    Spinal tuberculosis occurring after percutaneous vertebral augmentation has rarely been described. To date, only two such cases have been documented in the literature. Vertebral augmentation may reactivate a quiescent tuberculous lesion and promote the infective process in elderly patients with or without immunosuppression, thereby resulting in poor outcomes. The purposes of this study were to present two cases in which spinal tuberculosis occurred after vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, to highlight the clinical features and need for early diagnosis of this pathology, and to postulate probable reasons for this association. This study is based on a clinical case series and literature review. In this report, we review the clinical histories of two old women undergoing vertebral augmentation with subsequent spinal tuberculosis. The first patient responded favorably to conservative treatment with multidrug antitubercular therapy and spinal braces. The second patient underwent surgical debridement through a posterior approach alone, without instrumentation, combined with adjuvant chemotherapy. By 1 year after treatment, both patients had experienced almost complete recovery and continued to be seen for follow-up visits. Suspicion should be high, and magnetic resonance imaging is warranted in cases with deteriorating clinical symptoms and signs of acute infection after vertebral augmentation. We propose obtaining exhaustive microbiologic and histologic evidence via needle biopsy or open surgery in a timely fashion to establish an accurate diagnosis because tubercular spondylitis occurring in such a situation may progress rapidly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Centers of Excellence Contribution to Knowledge Augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignone, O.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge management is a key need of the nuclear industry to cope with the knowledge limited augmentation and the risks of knowledge loss due to a number of reasons, such as: staff attrition, organizational changes, upgraded technologies, new projects implementation, and the nuclear power evolution in recent years (i.e., post-Fukushima upgrades). This document describes the contribution of nuclear centers of excellence to knowledge augmentation. The effective implementation of nuclear centers of excellence is a key success factor for the knowledge management programme of nuclear organizations. This document, is based on a real example of operating organization approach in launching such initiative for staff knowledge augmentation and performance improvement. Eventually, any type of organizations in the nuclear sector could apply the proposed technique to reach better knowledge usage. The nuclear centers of excellence are a key knowledge management initiative for the learning organizations that are caring about organizational intellectual capital and striving for performance improvement. The nuclear centers of excellence can be realized as a forum to exchange ideas, knowledge, information, experiences; to collect lessons learned; and to identify areas for improvement where further organizational competence building is needed. Usual realization of this initiative is going through an active staff involvement in knowledge sharing in a form of different technical communities of practice focusing on specific knowledge domains. (author

  19. Control Augmentation Using Fuzzy Logic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio; Inukai, Daisuke

    Overall control to improve the control characteristics of an aircraft, CA (Control Augmentation), is used to realize the desirable motion of the aircraft in relation to the pilot’s control action. C∗ criterion is an important factor for the pilot’s preferred longitudinal motion. The time history of C∗ corresponding to the step input is specified within the upper and lower envelope, and it is desirable to be near the center of the envelope. In this research, the control laws of control augmentation for small supersonic aircraft were designed with the use of fuzzy logic control to obtain the C∗ response near the center of the envelope. The evaluation of the designed control laws showed good performance in all flight conditions. Here the control laws were varied by only one scaling factor for dynamic pressure. This means that virtually no gain schedules by the Mach number and the angle of attack are necessary. This paper shows that fuzzy logic control is an effective and flexible method when applied to control laws for the control augmentation of aircraft.

  20. A Mobile Augmented Reality Emulator for Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Munro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality (AR provides a fusion of the real and virtual worlds by superimposing virtual objects on real world scenery. The implementation of AR on mobile devices is known as Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR. MAR is in its infancy and MAR development software is in the process of maturing. Dating back to the origin of Computer Science as an independent field, software development tools have been an integral part of the process of software creation. MAR, being a relatively new technology, is still lacking such related software development tools. With the rapid progression of mobile devices, the development of MAR applications fusing advanced Computer Vision techniques with mobile device sensors have become increasingly feasible. However, testing and debugging of MAR applications present a new challenge in that they require the developer be at the location that is being augmented at some point during the development process. In this research study, a MAR recorder application was developed as well as emulation class libraries for Android devices that allows the recording and off-site playback of video, location and motion sensor data. The research objective was to provide a software emulator which provides debugging, testing and prototyping capabilities for a MAR application including the ability to emulate the combination of computer vision with locational and motion sensors using previously recorded data. The emulator was evaluated using different mobile technologies. The results indicate that this research could assist developers of MAR applications to implement applications more rapidly, without being at the location.

  1. Labor Augmentation with Oxytocin Decreases Glutathione Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Schneid-Kofman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare oxidative stress following spontaneous vaginal delivery with that induced by Oxytocin augmented delivery. Methods. 98 women recruited prior to labor. 57 delivered spontaneously, while 41 received Oxytocin for augmentation of labor. Complicated deliveries and high-risk pregnancies were excluded. Informed consent was documented. Arterial cord blood gases, levels of Hematocrit, Hemoglobin, and Bilirubin were studied. Glutathione (GSH concentration was measured by a spectroscopic method. Plasma and red blood cell (RBC levels of Malondialdehyde indicated lipid peroxidation. RBC uptake of phenol red denoted cell penetrability. SPSS data analysis was used. Results. Cord blood GSH was significantly lower in the Oxytocin group (2.3±0.55 mM versus 2.55±0.55 mM, =.01. No differences were found in plasma or RBC levels of MDA or in uptake of Phenol red between the groups. Conclusion. Lower GSH levels following Oxytocin augmentation indicate an oxidative stress, though selected measures of oxidative stress demonstrate no cell damage.

  2. Augmented spaces, a look beyond advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Andreea Căplescu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available From billboards to urban screens and now to media facades, the augmentation of our cities has expanded, changing social behaviours and public space consumption. Smart buildings are being developed and, much like the smartphones, these hybrids are not only in sci-fi movies anymore. One of the main promoters of media facades and media architecture has been the advertising industry. But artists and designers showed the potential of different approaches, experimenting with digitally augmented spaces both indoors and outdoors. Going beyond the commercial aspect of being an advertising and branding tool, these hybrids offer a variety of uses. Questions of how and where we use them and how they can improve our life quality are discussed here emphasizing that we developed a media behaviour, adjusting our relation to the physical and information environments. I examine some of the most notable experiments outside of the advertising sphere, offering a base for future development of augmented spaces and opening the discussion over the language of new media architecture.

  3. Captopril augments acetylcholine-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions in vitro via kinin-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Naman; Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors therapy is aassociated with bothersome dry cough as an adverse effect. The mechanisms underlying this adverse effect are not clear. Therefore, influence of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions was investigated. Further, the mechanisms underlying the captopril-induced changes were also explored. In vitro contractions of rat bronchial smooth muscle to cumulative concentrations of ACh were recorded before and after exposure to captopril. Further, the involvement of kinin and inositol triphosphate (IP₃) pathways for captopril-induced alterations were explored. ACh produced concentration-dependent (5-500 µM) increase in bronchial smooth muscle contractions. Pre-treatment with captopril augmented the ACh-induced contractions at each concentration significantly. Pre-treatment with aprotinin (kinin synthesis inhibitor) or heparin (inositol triphosphate, IP₃-inhibitor), blocked the captopril-induced augmentation of bronchial smooth muscle contractions evoked by ACh. Further, captopril-induced augmentation was absent in calcium-free medium. These results suggest that captopril sensitizes bronchial smooth muscles to ACh-induced contractions. This sensitization may be responsible for dry cough associated with captopril therapy.

  4. Repeated vertebral augmentation for new vertebral compression fractures of postvertebral augmentation patients: a nationwide cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang CL

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheng-Loong Liang,1 Hao-Kwan Wang,1 Fei-Kai Syu,2 Kuo-Wei Wang,1 Kang Lu,1 Po-Chou Liliang1 1Department of Neurosurgery, E-Da Hospital, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan; 2Department of Pharmacy, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan Purpose: Postvertebral augmentation vertebral compression fractures are common; repeated vertebral augmentation is usually performed for prompt pain relief. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and risk factors of repeat vertebral augmentation.Methods: We performed a retrospective, nationwide, population-based longitudinal observation study, using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD of Taiwan. All patients who received vertebral augmentation for vertebral compression fractures were evaluated. The collected data included patient characteristics (demographics, comorbidities, and medication exposure and repeat vertebral augmentation. Kaplan–Meier and stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed for analyses.Results: The overall incidence of repeat vertebral augmentation was 11.3% during the follow-up until 2010. Patients with the following characteristics were at greater risk for repeat vertebral augmentation: female sex (AOR=1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10–2.36, advanced age (AOR=1.60; 95% CI: 1.32–2.08, diabetes mellitus (AOR=4.31; 95% CI: 4.05–5.88, cerebrovascular disease (AOR=4.09; 95% CI: 3.44–5.76, dementia (AOR=1.97; 95% CI: 1.69–2.33, blindness or low vision (AOR=3.72; 95% CI: 2.32–3.95, hypertension (AOR=2.58; 95% CI: 2.35–3.47, and hyperlipidemia (AOR=2.09; 95% CI: 1.67–2.22. Patients taking calcium/ vitamin D (AOR=2.98; 95% CI: 1.83–3.93, bisphosphonates (AOR=2.11; 95% CI: 1.26–2.61, or calcitonin (AOR=4.59; 95% CI: 3.40–5.77 were less likely to undergo repeat vertebral augmentation; however, those taking steroids (AOR=7.28; 95% CI: 6.32–8.08, acetaminophen (AOR=3.54; 95% CI: 2.75–4.83, or nonsteroidal

  5. Freegaming: Mobile, Collaborative, Adaptive and Augmented Exergaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Görgü

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressing the obesity epidemic that plagues many societies remains an outstanding public health issue. One innovative approach to addressing this problem is Exergaming. A combination of Exercise and Gaming, the objective is to motivate people participate in exercise regimes, usually in their home environment. In this article a more holistic interpretation of this exercise paradigm is proposed. Freegaming augments Exergaming in a number of key dimensions but especially through the promotion of games in outdoor mobile contexts and within a social environment. The design and implementation of a platform for Freegaming is described and illustrated through the description of a sample game.

  6. SPRINT spray intercooling augments LM6000 output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David

    1998-09-01

    By injecting water between the low pressure and high pressure compressors of an aeroderivative gas turbine, GE-IAD engineers have demonstrated that a 9 per cent increase in output accompanied by reduced life cycle costs can be achieved. Designated the SPRINT system, uprated LM 6000 units with augmented efficiency have been introduced to the market. The first two production units, both supplied to Southern Electric Power Generation in England for mid-merit independent power generation plants at Chickerell in Dorset and Burghfield in Berkshire, have each clocked in excess of 500 operating hours since start-up in early April 1998. MPS visited the Chickerell installation in late July 1998. (UK)

  7. Augmented Reality Edugame Senjata Tradisional Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endah Sudarmilah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Senjata tradisional merupakan sebuah produk yang berkaitan erat dengan budaya suatu masyarakat. Selain berfungsi sebagai senjata, senjata tradisional telah menjadi identitas suatu bangsa yang membantu memperkaya khasanah budaya nusantara. Pendidikan di Indonesia berpedoman pada kurikulum baru yang disebut kurikulum 2013. Salah satu materi kurikulum mengarahkan siswa untuk belajar tentang senjata tradisional bentuk senjata tradisional. Berdasarkan pada masalah yang timbul dari kurikulum 2013, peneliti menyiapkan metode pembelajaran dengan menggabungkan Augmented Reality (AR dengan permainan edukasi berbasis adventure game dalam menyajikan materi keanekaragaman budaya Indonesia, terutama untuk senjata tradisional sehingga siswa memiliki semangat dalam belajar tentang keanekaragaman budaya Indonesia khusunya senjata.

  8. Electromagnetic acceleration studies with augmented rails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruo, T.; Fujioka, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Okamoto, A.; Ikuta, K.; Nemoto, K.

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study of electromagnetic acceleration in the rail-type accelerators with two kinds of rail geometry was carried out experimentally. The accelerators were energized by 200kJ capacitor bank and the weight of loaded projectiles was about 1.3 grams with 10mm x 10mm square bore. The attained velocity was 4.3km/s in the augmented accelerator, while it was 3.8km/s in the classical device. In this paper these differences in attained velocity are briefly discussed. A theoretical understanding of the rail erosion is also described

  9. B-52 stability augmentation system reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, T. C.; Key, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    The B-52 SAS (Stability Augmentation System) was developed and retrofitted to nearly 300 aircraft. It actively controls B-52 structural bending, provides improved yaw and pitch damping through sensors and electronic control channels, and puts complete reliance on hydraulic control power for rudder and elevators. The system has experienced over 300,000 flight hours and has exhibited service reliability comparable to the results of the reliability test program. Development experience points out numerous lessons with potential application in the mechanization and development of advanced technology control systems of high reliability.

  10. Pulmonary Embolism with Vertebral Augmentation Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Bopparaju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the prevalence of an aging American population on the rise, osteoporotic vertebral fractures are becoming a common occurrence, resulting in an increase in vertebral augmentation procedures and associated complications such as cement leakage, vertebral compressions, and pulmonary embolism. We describe a patient who presented with respiratory distress three years following kyphoplasty of the lumbar vertebra. Computed tomography (CT angiogram of the chest confirmed the presence of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA cement in the lung fields and pulmonary vessels. We conducted a systematic review of the published literature identifying effective management strategies for the treatment of vertebroplasty-associated pulmonary embolism.

  11. Augmenting Your Own Reality: Student Authoring of Science-Based Augmented Reality Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfer, Eric; Sheldon, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) simulations superimpose a virtual overlay of data and interactions onto a real-world context. The simulation engine at the heart of this technology is built to afford elements of game play that support explorations and learning in students' natural context--their own community and surroundings. In one of the more recent…

  12. Increase of Visible Veins After Breast Augmentation A Retrospective Analysis of 78 Consecutive Breast Augmentation Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andonakis, Yuri; van der Lei, Berend

    2009-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to determine file pre- and postoperative presence of visible veins in the skin across the breast of patients seeking breast augmentation, and the impact of this phenomenon oil patient satisfaction. From a series of 97 consecutive patients who underwent cosmetic

  13. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  14. Augmented reality in bone tumour resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. K.; Gupta, S.; Yoon, C.; Han, I.; Kim, H-S.; Choi, H.; Hong, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the accuracy of augmented reality (AR)-based navigation assistance through simulation of bone tumours in a pig femur model. Methods We developed an AR-based navigation system for bone tumour resection, which could be used on a tablet PC. To simulate a bone tumour in the pig femur, a cortical window was made in the diaphysis and bone cement was inserted. A total of 133 pig femurs were used and tumour resection was simulated with AR-assisted resection (164 resection in 82 femurs, half by an orthropaedic oncology expert and half by an orthopaedic resident) and resection with the conventional method (82 resection in 41 femurs). In the conventional group, resection was performed after measuring the distance from the edge of the condyle to the expected resection margin with a ruler as per routine clinical practice. Results The mean error of 164 resections in 82 femurs in the AR group was 1.71 mm (0 to 6). The mean error of 82 resections in 41 femurs in the conventional resection group was 2.64 mm (0 to 11) (p Augmented reality in bone tumour resection: An experimental study. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:137–143. PMID:28258117

  15. Facilitation, augmentation, and potentiation of transmitter release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, K. L. [Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

    2008-06-02

    This chapter discusses facilitation, augmentation, and potentiation of transmitter release. The effect of repetitive stimulation on transmitter release has been studied to look for and characterize the processes in the nerve terminal that affect the transmitter release. During repetitive stimulation of a neuromuscular junction under conditions of low quantal content, end-plate potentials progressively increase in amplitude. This increase is due to an increase in the number of quanta of transmitter released by each nerve impulse. A kinetic analysis of the changes in transmitter release during and following repetitive stimulation suggests that, there are four processes that act to increase transmitter release: first and second components of facilitation that decay with time constants of about 50 and 30 msec, augmentation that decays with a time constant of about 7s, and potentiation that decays with a time constant, which ranges from about 30s to min. These processes are separable on the basis of their kinetic and pharmacological properties. As a result, the mechanisms of these processes are not yet known, but some possibilities are briefly discussed in terms of structural, chemical, and statistical factors.

  16. Boosting physics education through mobile augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crǎciun, Dana; Bunoiu, Mǎdǎlin

    2017-12-01

    The integration of collaborative applications, based on modern learning technologies and the Internet, of various visualization techniques and digital strategies in open, flexible modern learning environments which facilitate access to resources, represents a challenge for physics teachers in Romania in general, and for novice teachers in particular. Although large efforts have been made worldwide to invest in educational technologies, their impact on the students' learning outcomes is quite modest. In this paper, we describe and analyze various curricular and extracurricular activities specifically designed for and undertaken by pre-service physics teachers. These activities employ new educational technologies, mobile augmented reality (MAR) and are based on modern teaching and learning theories. MAR is an extension for mobile devices of augmented reality, an interactive and in real time combination, of real and virtual objects overlaid in the real environment. The obtained results show that pre-service physics teachers are confident in using MAR in their teaching and learning activities, and consider that the activities performed helped them develop the skills necessary for science teachers in a technology-based society and to reflect upon the role of technology in the current Romanian educational context.

  17. Moderate excess of pyruvate augments osteoclastogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna E. Fong

    2013-03-01

    Cell differentiation leads to adaptive changes in energy metabolism. Conversely, hyperglycemia induces malfunction of many body systems, including bone, suggesting that energy metabolism reciprocally affects cell differentiation. We investigated how the differentiation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts, large polykaryons formed through fusion and growth of cells of monocytic origin, is affected by excess of energy substrate pyruvate and how energy metabolism changes during osteoclast differentiation. Surprisingly, small increases in pyruvate (1–2 mM above basal levels augmented osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo, while larger increases were not effective in vitro. Osteoclast differentiation increased cell mitochondrial activity and ATP levels, which were further augmented in energy-rich conditions. Conversely, the inhibition of respiration significantly reduced osteoclast number and size. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor, which is inhibited in energy-rich conditions. We found that osteoclast differentiation was associated with an increase in AMPK levels and a change in AMPK isoform composition. Increased osteoclast size induced by pyruvate (1 mM above basal levels was prevented in the presence of AMPK activator 5-amino-4-imidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR. In keeping, inhibition of AMPK using dorsomorphin or siRNA to AMPKγ increased osteoclast size in control cultures to the level observed in the presence of pyruvate. Thus, we have found that a moderate excess of pyruvate enhances osteoclastogenesis, and that AMPK acts to tailor osteoclastogenesis to a cell's bioenergetics capacity.

  18. Morphine-augmented cholescintigraphy enhances duodenogastric reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Wei-Jen; Magoun, S.; Wierzbinski, B.; Ryo, U-Yun [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Medical Center; Lee, Jong-Kang

    1995-11-01

    Morphine intervention in cholescintigraphy decreases imaging time to diagnose acute cholecystitis. Not infrequently we observe duodenogastric reflux during scintigraphy with and without morphine intervention. To evaluate occurrence of duodenogastric reflux related to morphine, we reviewed 55 patients who underwent cholescintigraphy with (32) and without (23) morphine intervention. Morphine was injected when there was bowel activity with non-visualization of the gallbladder at 60 min. Duodenogastric reflux was identified by the appearance of activity in the area just below or immediately adjacent to the tip of the left hepatic lobe laterally. Among 32 patients with morphine intervention, 19 had acute cholecystitis and 13 chronic cholecystitis. Eleven of 19 (58%) with acute cholecystitis had duodenogastric reflux and 6 of 13 (46%) had duodenogastric reflux in chronic cholecystitis. The total of duodenogastric reflux in the group with morphine injection was 53%. Two patients` duodenogastric reflux occurred before morphine injection and was more apparent after morphine was given. In the without morphine group, 3 had acute cholecystitis and 20 had chronic cholecystitis; 2 (one acute and one chronic cholecystitis) of these 23 (9%) had duodenogastric reflux. Our results indicate: occurrence of duodenogastric reflux in morphine augmented cholescintigraphy is not significantly different in cholecystitis from that in chronic cholecystitis; duodenogastric reflux in morphine augmentation occurs significantly more often than without morphine intervention (p<0.001). We conclude that cholescintigraphy with morphine enhances duodenogastric reflux. The degree of duodenogastric reflux in the acute cholecystitis patients has been more severe than in the chronic cholecystitis patients. (author).

  19. The educational possibilities of Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cabero Almenara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of emergent technologies have been acquiring a strong impulse in recent years. One of these emergent technologies is Augmented Reality (RA, which will surely have a high level of penetration into all our educational centers, including universities, in the next 3 to 5 years, as a number of different reports have already highlighted. The present paper shows various elements which, in our opinion, play an essential role when it comes to the incorporation of Augmented Reality into teaching, stressing the fact that this incorporation should not entail a technological problem but an educational and didactic issue. A mention is additionally made of several studies which have been performed with regard to the didactic exploitation of this emergent technology, as well as to the potential that it offers us. Our study forms part of an R&D&I initiative undertaken within the framework of the Plan Estatal de Fomento de la Investigación Científica y Técnica de Excelencia 2013-2016 [2013-16 State (National Plan for the Promotion of Excellence Scientific and Technical Research], with reference EDU2014-57446-P.

  20. Autologous Flap Gluteal Augmentation: Purse-String Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunstad, Joseph P; Daniels, Mark A; Crantford, John C

    2018-04-01

    The ideal patient for purse-string gluteoplasty has buttock deflation and ptosis, and wishes to improve projection. Key elements of the procedure are buttock lifting combined with auto-augmentation, no undermining of auto-augmentation tissue, and use of a purse-string suture to enhance projection of auto-augmentation tissue. Purse-string gluteoplasty is a safe and effective technique to correct buttock ptosis and atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Augmented reality tools and learning practice in mobile-learning

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Mauro; Gomes, José; Gomes, Cristina; Lopes, João

    2014-01-01

    There are many augmented reality (AR) applications available that can be used to create educational contents for these mobile devices. This paper surveys the most popular augmented reality applications and we select AR eco-systems to be used in daily teaching activities which are user friendly, do not require programming skills and are free. Different augmented reality technologies are explored in this paper to create teaching activities with animations, videos and other information to be sho...

  2. Impairment-oriented training or Bobath therapy for severe arm paresis after stroke: a single-blind, multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, T; Eickhof, C; van Kaick, S; Engel, U; Pinkowski, C; Kalok, S; Pause, M

    2005-10-01

    To study the effects of augmented exercise therapy time for arm rehabilitation as either Bobath therapy or the impairment-oriented training (Arm BASIS training) in stroke patients with arm severe paresis. Single blind, multicentre randomized control trial. Three inpatient neurorehabilitation centres. Sixty-two anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients. Random assignment to three group: (A) no augmented exercise therapy time, (B) augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy and (C) augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training. Fugl-Meyer arm motor score. Secondary measure: Action Research Arm Test (ARA). Ancillary measures: Fugl-Meyer arm sensation and joint motion/pain scores and the Ashworth Scale (elbow flexors). An overall effect of augmented exercise therapy time on Fugl-Meyer scores after four weeks was not corroborated (mean and 95% confidence interval (CI) of change scores: no augmented exercise therapy time (n=20) 8.8, 5.2-12.3; augmented exercise therapy time (n=40) 9.9, 6.8-13.9; p = 0.2657). The group who received the augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training (n=20) had, however, higher gains than the group receiving the augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy (n=20) (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath 7.2, 2.6-11.8; BASIS 12.6, 8.4-16.8; p = 0.0432). Passive joint motion/pain deteriorated less in the group who received BASIS training (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath -3.2, -5.2 to -1.1; BASIS 0.1, -1.8-2.0; p = 0.0090). ARA, Fugl-Meyer arm sensation, and Ashworth Scale scores were not differentially affected. The augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training enhanced selective motor control. Type of training was more relevant for recovery of motor control than therapeutic time spent.

  3. UVA radiation augments cytotoxic activity of psoralens in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrześniok, Dorota; Beberok, Artur; Rok, Jakub; Delijewski, Marcin; Hechmann, Anna; Oprzondek, Martyna; Rzepka, Zuzanna; Bacler-Żbikowska, Barbara; Buszman, Ewa

    2017-07-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of UVA radiation and psoralens: 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) or 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) on melanoma cells viability. The amelanotic C32 and melanotic COLO829 human melanoma cell lines were exposed to increasing concentrations of psoralens (0.1-100 μM) in the presence or absence of UVA radiation. Cell viability was evaluated by the WST-1 assay. We demonstrated that 8-MOP, in contrast to 5-MOP, has no cytotoxic effect on both melanoma cell lines. Simultaneous exposure of cells to 8-MOP and UVA radiation caused significant cytotoxic response in C32 cells where the EC 50 value was estimated to be 131.0 μM (UVA dose: 1.3 J/cm 2 ) and 105.3 μM (UVA dose: 2.6 J/cm 2 ). The cytotoxicity of 5-MOP on both C32 and COLO829 cells was significantly augmented by UVA radiation - the EC 50 was estimated to be 22.7 or 7.9 μM (UVA dose: 1.3 J/cm 2 ) and 24.2 or 7.0 μM (UVA dose: 2.6 J/cm 2 ), respectively. The demonstrated high cytotoxic response after simultaneous exposure of melanoma cells to psoralens and UVA radiation in vitro suggests the usefulness of PUVA therapy to treat melanoma in vivo.

  4. Nutritional shortage augments cisplatin-effects on murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, F; Pereira, G J; Jasiulionis, M G; Bincoletto, C; Smaili, S S

    2018-02-01

    Melanoma incidence increases every year worldwide and is responsible for 80% of skin cancer deaths. Due to its metastatic potential and resistance to almost any treatments such as chemo, radio, immune and targeted-therapy, the patients still have a poor prognosis, especially at metastatic stage. Considering that, it is crucial to find new therapeutic approaches to overcome melanoma resistance. Here we investigated the effect of cisplatin (CDDP), one of the chemotherapeutic agents used for melanoma treatment, in association with nutritional deprivation in murine melanoma cell lines. Cell death and autophagy were evaluated after the treatment with cisplatin, nutritional deprivation and its association using an in vitro model of murine melanocytes malignant transformation to metastatic melanoma. Our results showed that nutritional deprivation augmented cell death induced by cisplatin in melanoma cells, especially at the metastatic subtype, with slight effects on melanocytes. Mechanistic studies revealed that although autophagy was present at high levels in basal conditions in melanoma cells, was not essential for cell death process that involved mitochondrial damage, reactive oxygen species production and possible glycolysis inhibition. In conclusion, nutritional shortage in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs as cisplatin can be a valuable new therapeutic strategy to overcome melanoma resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Intrapleural 'outside-in' gene therapy: therapeutics for organs of the chest via gene transfer to the pleura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heguy, Adriana; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-10-01

    The pleural space is an attractive site for using viral vectors to deliver gene products to the lung parenchyma, other thoracic structures and the systemic circulation. The advantages of intrapleural gene transfer using viral vectors include: (i) easy accessibility; (ii) large surface area; (iii) ability to provide high concentrations of secreted gene products to chest structures; (iv) low risk of detrimental effects of possible vector-induced inflammation compared with intravascular delivery; and (v) because it is local, lower vector doses can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to thoracic structures than less efficient systemic routes. Examples of pleural gene transfer include the use of adenovirus vectors to treat mesothelioma by transiently expressing genes that encode toxic proteins, immunomodulatory molecules or anti-angiogenesis factors. Intrapleural delivery of adeno-associated viral vectors represents an efficient strategy to treat alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, achieving high lung and systemic therapeutic levels of alpha1AT. Intrapleural delivery of gene transfer vectors holds promise for the treatment of diseases requiring transient, localized gene expression, as well as sustained expression of genes to correct hereditary disorders requiring localized or systemic expression of the therapeutic protein.

  6. Augmented reality. Fundamentals and nuclear related applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Hirotake

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Augmented Reality (AR) has attracted considerable interest from both academia and industry. Virtual Reality enables users to interact only with virtual objects in a virtual environment, but AR enables users to interact with both virtual objects and real objects in the real world. This feature supports application of AR to various fields such as education, driving, entertainment, and navigation. Especially, by application of AR to support workers in nuclear power plants, it is expected that working time and human error can be decreased. However, many problems remain unsolved to apply AR to real fields. In this lecture note, fundamental knowledge of AR is presented first including the overview of elemental technologies to realize AR. Then various AR applications to nuclear fields are described. Finally, future prospects are given. (author)

  7. Digital Facial Augmentation for Interactive Entertainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Hieda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Digital projection technology allows for effective and entertaining spatial augmented reality applications. Leveraging the capabilities of reasonably accurate object tracking using commodity cameras and/or depth sensors to determine the 3D position and pose of objects in real time, it is possible to project dynamic graphical content on arbitrary surfaces, such as a person’s face. Coupling these capabilities with a simple drawing application, participants can have the experience of "painting" on someone’s face, or even on their own, by observing the projection in a mirror. Similarly, integrating 2D rigid-body, fluid and gravity simulation, one may interact with virtual objects projected on their own face or body.

  8. Augmented Reality Applications for Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Bostancı

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an up-to-date review of the literature on the two interesting topics from the field of computer graphics. While the recent research on the broad research areas of Augmented Reality and Tracking are examined, applications related to cultural heritage were emphasized due to the reasons mentioned in the paper. Several methods and example applications were presented in a superficial but clear manner to facilitate the foundation of a new research area in our country which has a vast amount of resources for the mentioned type of application. Common problems with these methods are presented along with possible solutions. After the presentation of related research in our country, a protoype application named "Desktop History" was presented in order to consolidate the text and provide a concrete example.

  9. Out of the Cube: Augmented Rubik's Cube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriel Bergig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer gaming habits have a tendency to evolve with technology, the best being ones that immerse both our imagination and intellect. Here, we describe a new game platform, an Augmented Reality Rubik's cube. The cube acts simultaneously as both the controller and the game board. Gameplay is controlled by the cube, and game assets are rendered on top of it. Shuffling and tilting operations on the cube are mapped to game interaction. We discuss the game design decisions involved in developing a game for this platform, as well as the technological challenges in implementing it. Ultimately, we describe two games and discuss the conclusions of an informal user study based on those games.

  10. Augmented reality approach for metabolic pathways teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Vega Garzón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A glycolysis paper puzzle has been used as strategy to teach metabolic pathways, but this kind of game demands a higher number of instructors and limits the follow up of the students’ difficulties. A technology called Augmented Reality (AR was applied to enable the puzzle usage in large audiences, and to provid feedback to students and instructors. Drafted as flashcards readable by an app installed in tablets, it conveys information as molecules 3D-structure, clues for correct assembling of the metabolic pathway and results of student progression in the activity. Such technological improvement brought more autonomy to students for solving proposed exercises and an embedded performance data collection system helpful to understand,and after to unravel students’ difficulties.

  11. Bilinear modeling via augmented Lagrange multipliers (BALM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bue, Alessio; Xavier, João; Agapito, Lourdes; Paladini, Marco

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a unified approach to solve different bilinear factorization problems in computer vision in the presence of missing data in the measurements. The problem is formulated as a constrained optimization where one of the factors must lie on a specific manifold. To achieve this, we introduce an equivalent reformulation of the bilinear factorization problem that decouples the core bilinear aspect from the manifold specificity. We then tackle the resulting constrained optimization problem via Augmented Lagrange Multipliers. The strength and the novelty of our approach is that this framework can seamlessly handle different computer vision problems. The algorithm is such that only a projector onto the manifold constraint is needed. We present experiments and results for some popular factorization problems in computer vision such as rigid, non-rigid, and articulated Structure from Motion, photometric stereo, and 2D-3D non-rigid registration.

  12. The effect of therapeutic radiation on canine alveolar ridges augmented with hydroxylapatite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Kwon, P H

    1992-01-01

    on the alveolar ridge. Following 4 months of healing, 12 dogs (experimental group) underwent therapeutic radiation therapy (Co60, 4,000 rad [40 Gy]) to the head and neck region. Four dogs were not irradiated and served as controls. Four animals (three experimental and one control) were killed at 5,6,7, and 8......The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of radiation on hydroxylapatite (HA) implanted subperiosteally for alveolar ridge augmentation in dogs. All bicuspids and molars were extracted from 16 dogs. After 6 weeks, nonporous HA granules were implanted subperiosteally...

  13. Augmentative Asenapine in a Recurrent Manic Catatonic Patient with Partial Response to Clozapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Buoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a severe but treatable neuropsychiatric syndrome known since the middle of the nineteenth century. It has been considered for a long time as a subtype of schizophrenia, even though this association occurs only in 10% of cases. In contrast, it is frequently observed in bipolar patients. First-line treatment consists of benzodiazepines, while in case of resistance electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and clozapine have shown positive results. In addition, recent studies reported the efficacy of some atypical antipsychotics. The present case shows the clinical response to augmentative asenapine in a catatonic manic patient with a partial response to clozapine.

  14. Augmented reality in neurosurgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Antonio; Cutolo, Fabrizio; Carbone, Marina; Cagnazzo, Federico; Ferrari, Mauro; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    Neuronavigation has become an essential neurosurgical tool in pursuing minimal invasiveness and maximal safety, even though it has several technical limitations. Augmented reality (AR) neuronavigation is a significant advance, providing a real-time updated 3D virtual model of anatomical details, overlaid on the real surgical field. Currently, only a few AR systems have been tested in a clinical setting. The aim is to review such devices. We performed a PubMed search of reports restricted to human studies of in vivo applications of AR in any neurosurgical procedure using the search terms "Augmented reality" and "Neurosurgery." Eligibility assessment was performed independently by two reviewers in an unblinded standardized manner. The systems were qualitatively evaluated on the basis of the following: neurosurgical subspecialty of application, pathology of treated lesions and lesion locations, real data source, virtual data source, tracking modality, registration technique, visualization processing, display type, and perception location. Eighteen studies were included during the period 1996 to September 30, 2015. The AR systems were grouped by the real data source: microscope (8), hand- or head-held cameras (4), direct patient view (2), endoscope (1), and X-ray fluoroscopy (1) head-mounted display (1). A total of 195 lesions were treated: 75 (38.46 %) were neoplastic, 77 (39.48 %) neurovascular, and 1 (0.51 %) hydrocephalus, and 42 (21.53 %) were undetermined. Current literature confirms that AR is a reliable and versatile tool when performing minimally invasive approaches in a wide range of neurosurgical diseases, although prospective randomized studies are not yet available and technical improvements are needed.

  15. Augmented reality in a tumor resection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Pauline; Collins, Toby; Debize, Clement; Novais-Gameiro, Lorraine; Pereira, Bruno; Bartoli, Adrien; Canis, Michel; Bourdel, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) guidance is a technology that allows a surgeon to see sub-surface structures, by overlaying pre-operative imaging data on a live laparoscopic video. Our objectives were to evaluate a state-of-the-art AR guidance system in a tumor surgical resection model, comparing the accuracy of the resection with and without the system. Our system has three phases. Phase 1: using the MRI images, the kidney's and pseudotumor's surfaces are segmented to construct a 3D model. Phase 2: the intra-operative 3D model of the kidney is computed. Phase 3: the pre-operative and intra-operative models are registered, and the laparoscopic view is augmented with the pre-operative data. We performed a prospective experimental study on ex vivo porcine kidneys. Alginate was injected into the parenchyma to create pseudotumors measuring 4-10 mm. The kidneys were then analyzed by MRI. Next, the kidneys were placed into pelvictrainers, and the pseudotumors were laparoscopically resected. The AR guidance system allows the surgeon to see tumors and margins using classical laparoscopic instruments, and a classical screen. The resection margins were measured microscopically to evaluate the accuracy of resection. Ninety tumors were segmented: 28 were used to optimize the AR software, and 62 were used to randomly compare surgical resection: 29 tumors were resected using AR and 33 without AR. The analysis of our pathological results showed 4 failures (tumor with positive margins) (13.8%) in the AR group, and 10 (30.3%) in the Non-AR group. There was no complete miss in the AR group, while there were 4 complete misses in the non-AR group. In total, 14 (42.4%) tumors were completely missed or had a positive margin in the non-AR group. Our AR system enhances the accuracy of surgical resection, particularly for small tumors. Crucial information such as resection margins and vascularization could also be displayed.

  16. Googles Augmented-Reality-Game "Ingress"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl H. Stingeder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Das an das "Geocoaching"-Spielprinzip erinnernde Augmented-­Reality-Game "Ingress" ist auf allen mit Android-Betriebssystem ausgestatteten Smartphones spielbar. Das Alleinstellungsmerkmal des Spiels ist gleich­zeitig auch das beste Patent-Rezept für bzw. gegen notorisches "Couch-Potato-ing": Das Game-Design des "Draußenspiels" erfordert jedoch stets die physische Anwesenheit der SpielerInnen am realen Ort des Geschehens, meist touristisch attraktive Sehenswürdigkeiten und architektonisch markante Plätze. Sobald "Ingress" per App am Smart­phone gestartet wird, stehen Interaktionen und Machtverhältnisse auf dem Handy-Display im Dreh- und Angelpunkt des Geschehens. Die Spielgrafik ist auf das Wesentliche reduziert und erinnert an die Optik von Videospielen der 80er Jahre. "Ingress" im Allgemeinen sowie "Magnus13", die erste von Google organisierte Fan-Veranstaltung Österreichs mit mehreren Hundert TeilnehmerInnen und ist mit einer "digitalen Schnitzeljagd" vergleichbar: Gemeinsam ist der klassischen "Schnitzeljagd" und dem digitalen "Schere-Schein-Papier" Prinzip von "Ingress" die tragende Rolle des im Spiel entstehenden Gemeinschaftsgefühls, welche in einer hohen Langzeitmotivation mündet. Trotz aller Euphorie, ob des unkonventionellen Augmented-Reality-Spielkonzepts und des in Folge der sozialen Dynamik außergewöhnlichen Sucht­potentials, ist angesichts von Edward Snowden und vielfältiger NSA-Abhörmaßnahmen, eine gesunde Portion Skepsis angebracht: Welchen Zweck erfüllt "Ingress"? Gibt es ein verhülltes "Mittel zum Zweck"? Welche Gefahren bestehen mit einer systematischen Auswertung des umfangreichen, ortsrelevanten Daten-Sammelsuriums? "Ingress" verdeutlicht trotz aller Risiken den soziokulturellen Bedeutungswandel des digitalen Spiels: Spiele per se und das Spiel als soziale Interaktion sind aktuell dabei, alle Bereiche unseres Lebens zu erfassen.

  17. Choosing the Best Procedure to Augment the Chin: Is Anything Better than an Implant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Jonathan M; Fitzgerald, Rebecca

    2016-10-01

    The chin plays a very important role in overall facial appearance, and aesthetic procedures to augment the chin in patients with microgenia can improve overall facial balance. Many procedures exist to enhance the appearance of a small chin. Procedures include surgeries such as placement of an alloplast implant and bony osteotomy of the mentum (sliding genioplasty). The advantages and disadvantages of each surgical technique are well documented. Although surgical augmentation of the chin has been the gold standard of therapy, recent development of injectable filler products with lifting capacity has changed the way that many practitioners alter chin shape and size. Filler agents allow augmentation of the chin in horizontal (projection), vertical, and transverse dimensions. Injectable fillers are a simple, noninvasive procedure that causes minimal to no downtime, incurs minimal risks, and allows the practitioner to shape the chin in three dimensions. This procedure allows patients to enhance their chin size without requiring an operative visit. As more and varied filler products become FDA-approved, the versatility and application of these agents will increase. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Potential Use of Augmented Reality in LIS Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this article is the use of augmented reality technology in library and information science education. The aim is to determine the scope and potential uses of augmented reality in the education of information professionals. In order to determine the scope and forms of potential use of AR technology in LIS education a two-step…

  19. Augmented Reality Learning Experiences: Survey of Prototype Design and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marc Ericson C.; Chen, Angie; Taketomi, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Goshiro; Miyazaki, Jun; Kato, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) technology is mature for creating learning experiences for K-12 (pre-school, grade school, and high school) educational settings. We reviewed the applications intended to complement traditional curriculum materials for K-12. We found 87 research articles on augmented reality learning experiences (ARLEs) in the IEEE Xplore…

  20. The Local Games Lab ABQ: Homegrown Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Experiments in the use of augmented reality games formerly required extensive material resources and expertise to implement above and beyond what might be possible within the usual educational contexts. Currently, the more common availability of hardware in these contexts and the existence of easy-to-use, general purpose augmented reality design…