WorldWideScience

Sample records for alpha tagged x-ray

  1. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  2. X-rays from Alpha Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, J.; Garmire, G.

    1978-01-01

    HEAO 1 observations of soft X-ray emission from a point source in the vicinity of Alpha Cen are reported. The source, designated H1437-61, is tentatively identified with Alpha Cen, and an X-ray luminosity comparable to that of the sun in an active state is estimated. A temperature of about 500,000 K and an emission integral of 5 x 10 to the 50th per cu cm are obtained. Coronal emission is suggested as the X-ray-producing mechanism.

  3. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The expected flux of K alpha line emission from sulfur, argon, calcium, and iron is calculated during both thermal and nonthermal solar X-ray events. Such emission is shown to be weak during the course of most of the nonthermal hard X-ray bursts that Kane and Anderson (1970) have observed. If Compton backscattering is significant at high energies, the flux is reduced still further for disk flares, but it is noted that the strong, near-limb burst of June 26 would have produced about 100 photons /sq cm/sec of sulfur and iron K alpha emission. The impulsive hard X-ray bursts may in general be too short-lived for much K alpha emission. It may be noted that sulfur K alpha emission in particular depends sensitively on the lower-energy limit of the nonthermal electron spectrum, assuming such a sharply defined boundary exists. During soft X-ray bursts, when temperatures of a few 10 to the 7th power K are obtained, K alpha emission from certain iron ions, specifically Fe XVIII-XXIII, may be important.

  4. Detection of soft X-rays from Alpha Lyrae and Eta Bootis with an imaging X-ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topka, K.; Fabricant, D.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Gorenstein, P.; Rosner, R.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for observations of Alpha Lyr (Vega) and Eta Boo with an imaging X-ray telescope during two rocket flights. It is found that Vega and Eta Boo are soft X-ray sources with respective luminosities of approximately 3 x 10 to the 28th erg/s (0.15-0.8 keV) and 1 x 10 to the 29th erg/s (0.15-1.5 keV). Surface X-ray luminosities of about 640,000 erg/sq cm per sec for Vega and 300,000 erg/sq cm per sec for Eta Boo are estimated and shown to fall within the range of solar coronal X-ray emission. It is concluded that in view of the substantially larger surface areas of these stars, the relatively large total soft X-ray luminosity (as compared with that of the sun) can in both cases be understood as resulting from a moderately active corona, although the Vega observation is in severe conflict with simple models for X-ray emission from single main-sequence stars.

  5. The X-ray properties of the young open cluster around alpha Persei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randich, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Prosser, C. F.; Stauffer, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The observations of the 50 Myr old alpha Persei open cluster, performed by the Rosat's position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC), are discussed. The X-ray observations cover an area of about 10 sq deg. A total of 160 X-ray sources were detected. The comparison between the X-ray luminosity distribution functions of the alpha Persei sample and the Pleiades indicated that F and G-type stars in the alpha Persei are more X-ray luminous than their older counterparts in the Pleiades. No significant difference was found between the distributions of the K and M-type dwarfs in the two clusters.

  6. X-ray bumps, iron K-alpha lines, and X-ray suppression by obscuring tori in Seyfert galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolik, Julian H.; Madau, Piero; Zycki, Piotr T.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the X-ray spectral properties of unobscured type 1 and obscured type 2 Seyferts as predicted by the unified Seyfert scheme. We consider the reprocessing of X-ray photons by photoelectric absorption, iron fluorescence, and Compton downscattering in the obscuring tori surrounding these active nuclei, and compute by Monte Carlo methods the reprocessed spectra as a function of the viewing angle. Depending on the optical depth and shape of the torus, and on the viewing angle, the X-ray flux can be suppressed by substantial factors when our line of sight is obscured. We show that an immediate consequence of the existence of an obscuring thick torus is the production in the spectra of type 1 Seyfert galaxies of a bump in the continuum above 10-20 keV and an Fe K-alpha line with significant equivalent width. In those type 2 Seyferts for which the hard X-ray spectrum has been substantially suppressed, the equivalent width of the Fe K-alpha line in the transmitted spectrum can be very large.

  7. K-alpha conversion efficiency measurments for x-ray scattering in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Urry, M K; Robey, H; Niemann, C; Landen, O L; Morse, E; Glenzer, S H

    2006-11-21

    The conversion efficiency of ultra short-pulse laser radiation to K-{alpha} x-rays has been measured for various chlorine-containing targets to be used as x-ray scattering probes of dense plasmas. The spectral and temporal properties of these sources will allow spectrally-resolved x-ray scattering probing with picosecond temporal resolution required for measuring the plasma conditions in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Simulations of x-ray scattering spectra from these plasmas show that fuel capsule density, capsule ablator density, and shock timing information may be inferred.

  8. An alpha particle instrument with alpha, proton, and X-ray modes for planetary chemical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with matter is employed in a compact instrument that could provide rather complete in-situ chemical analyses of surfaces and thin atmospheres of extraterrestrial bodies. The instrument is a miniaturized and improved version of the Surveyor lunar instrument. The backscattering of alpha particles and (alpha, p) reactions provide analytical data on the light elements (carbon-iron). An X-ray mode that detects the photons produced by the alpha sources provides sensitivity and resolution for the chemical elements heavier than about silicon. The X-rays are detected by semiconductor detectors having a resolution between 150 and 250 eV at 5.9 keV. Such an instrument can identify and determine with good accuracy 99 percent of the atoms (except hydrogen) in rocks. For many trace elements, the detecting sensitivity is a few ppm. Auxiliary sources could be used to enhance the sensitivities for elements of special interest. The instrument could probably withstand the acceleration involved in semi-hard landings.

  9. X-ray structures associated with disappearing H-alpha filaments in active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the relationship between active region disappearing H-alpha filaments and the associated coronal X-ray structures observed both before the disappearance event and afterwards. The events chosen for the study were selected from a list of active region X-ray transients observed in the images from the X-ray telescope on Skylab and from a list compiled by Webb (1976) of sudden disappearances of filaments during the Skylab period. Results indicate no distinction between the disappearing and the remaining active region filaments in terms of their pre-event associated X-ray emission features. However, X-ray brightenings were associated in a nearly one-to-one correspondence with disappearing portions of the filaments.

  10. H-alpha and hard X-ray development in two-ribbon flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, B. N.; Hudson, H. S.; Kane, S. R.; Svestka, Z.

    1984-01-01

    Morphological features of two-ribbon flares have been studied, using simultaneous ISEE-3 hard X-ray records and high-resolution Big Bear H-alpha movies for more than 20 events. Long-lasting and complex hard X-ray bursts are almost invariably found associated with flares of the two-ribbon type. At least three events are found, namely March 31, 1979, April 10, 1980, and July 1, 1980, where the occurrence of individual spikes in hard X-ray radiation coincides with suddenly enhanced H-alpha emission covering the sunspot penumbra. There definitely exist important (greater than or equal to 1 B) two-ribbon flares without significant hard X-ray emission.

  11. Coordinated soft X-ray and H-alpha observation of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarro, D. M.; Canfield, R. C.; Metcalf, T. R.; Lemen, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Soft X-ray, Ca XIX, and H-alpha observations obtained for a set of four solar flares in the impulsive phase are analyzed. A blue asymmetry was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft-Xray rise phase in all of the events. A red asymmetry was observed simultaneously in chromospheric H-alpha at spatial locations associated with enhanced flare heating. It is shown that the impulsive phase momentum of upflowing soft X-ray plasma equalled that of the downflowing H-alpha plasma to within an order of magnitude. This supports the explosive chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares.

  12. Empirical studies of solar flares: Comparison of X-ray and H alpha filtergrams and analysis of the energy balance of the X-ray plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The physics of solar flares was investigated through a combined analysis of X-ray filtergrams of the high temperature coronal component of flares and H alpha filtergrams of the low temperature chromospheric component. The data were used to study the magnetic field configuration and its changes in solar flares, and to examine the chromospheric location and structure of X-ray bright points (XPB) and XPB flares. Each topic and the germane data are discussed. The energy balance of the thermal X-ray plasma in flares, while not studied, is addressed.

  13. Resonant Auger Destruction and Iron K-Alpha Spectra in Compact X-ray Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Liedahl, Duane A.

    2005-01-01

    We examine the effects of resonant Auger destruction in modifying the intensities and flux distributions of K-alpha spectra from iron L-shell ions. Applications include X-ray irradiated stellar winds in X-ray binaries and accretion disk atmospheres. Using detailed atomic models, we find that resonant Auger destruction is selective, in that only a subset of the emitted K-alpha lines is highly attenuated. We also show that that the local excitation conditions can have a dramatic effect on the K...

  14. H-alpha macrospicules - Identification with EUV macrospicules and with flares in X-ray bright points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Tang, F.; Bohlin, J. D.; Golub, L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents observational evidence that two newly observed transient solar phenomena, EUV macrospicules and X-ray bright-point flares, are closely related. Time-lapse H-alpha filtergram observations of the limb in quiet regions show small surgelike eruptions called H-alpha macrospicules. From the similarity of H-alpha macrospicules and EUV macrospicules, and from comparison of simultaneous H-alpha and He II 304 A observations, we conclude that H-alpha macrospicules are EUV macrospicules viewed in H-alpha, although most EUV macrospicules are too faint in H-alpha to appear on H-alpha filtergrams of normal exposure. From comparison of simultaneous X-ray and H-alpha observations of flares in X-ray bright points situated on the limb, we show that flares in X-ray bright points often produce H-alpha macrospicules.

  15. Apollo lunar orbital sciences program alpha and X-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The development of the alpha and X-ray spectrometers which were used on the Apollo 15 and 16 flights is discussed. Specific subjects presented are: (1) lunar program management, (2) scientific and technical approach, (3) major test programs, (4) reliability, quality assurance, and safety, and (5) subcontract management.

  16. Coronal X-ray enhancements associated with H-alpha filament disappearances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, D. F.; Krieger, A. S.; Rust, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The X-ray telescope experiment aboard the Skylab/ATM mission provided high-resolution soft X-ray images of the lower corona away from active regions, revealing frequent large-scale transient X-ray enhancements which could often be associated with the disappearance of H-alpha filaments. The X-ray emitting structures featured peak brightnesses similar to those of nonflaring active region structures, durations from 3 to 40 hours, shapes that in general outlined the preexisting H-alpha filaments to as large as 400,000 km, apparent expansion velocities of the order of tens of km/sec, and observed peak temperatures of the order of a few million degrees. One such event is described and analyzed in detail. Two explanations of the events are discussed: (1) excess cool material is present in the filament cavity, contributing to the X-ray enhancement, and (2) the enhancement is due to the compression of preexisting material by a changing magnetic field.

  17. Results of the Alpha-Particle-X-Ray Spectrometer on Board of the Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, R.; Zipfel, J.; Brueckner, J.; Dreibus, G.; Lugmair, G.; Rieder, R.; Waenke, H.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity landed at Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is part of the instrument suite on both rovers. It is equipped with six 244Cm sources which provide x-ray excitation with alpha-particles (PIXE) and x-ray radiation (XRF). This combination allows x-ray spectroscopy of elements from Na to Br in the energy range of 0.9 to 16 keV. X-ray detectors with a high energy resolution of 160 eV at Fe K allow us to separate even closely spaced energy peaks, such as Na, Mg, Al and Si. The APXS is attached to the rover s arm and provides in-situ measurements of the chemical composition of soils, surfaces of rocks and outcrops and their abraded surfaces. This abstract gives an overview of APXS results obtained during the first year of operation on both landing sites.

  18. Coherent X-ray and laser spectroscopy measurements of diffusion in concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, V. N. C.

    The mammalian eye lens is composed of a concentrated solution of water soluble proteins called crystallins. Alpha-crystallin, the most abundant protein found in the lens, plays a crucial role in maintaining lens transparency and lens accommodation. However, alpha-crystallins along with other ocular proteins suffer from irreversible processes such as oxidation. One cause of oxidation is radiation-induced radical formation which alters the inter-molecular interactions, thereby degrading the normal function of ocular proteins. The main goal of this thesis is to quantify molecular scale dynamics of concentrated solutions of alpha-crystallins using coherent X-rays and visible laser light. I believe a detailed analysis of the dynamics pertaining to alpha-crystallin will provide the foundation to understand molecular scale mechanisms that lead to conditions like cataract and presbyopia. I explore the dynamics of concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions by measuring diffusive motion over a range of length scales using Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). To a certain extent, the dynamical properties of crystallins obtained in this manner are consistent with established theories in colloidal physics. However, there are some deviations, which I will address in this thesis. In terms of X-ray data, I employed a new, efficient photon correlation technique to obtain the best possible signal, furthermore this technique is embedded in a stand-alone software program that has the ability to provide real time results, quickly and efficiently with the help of high performance computing resources available at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The technique has potential to be used by the coherent X-ray spectroscopy community in the future. In addition, by using X-ray scattering data, I probe potential modifications and or damage effects on alpha-crystallins due to radiation exposure. The damage analysis methodology described in this thesis

  19. On Detecting the X-ray Silhouette of a Damped Lyman alpha System

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstra, M; Schärf, C; Dijkstra, Mark; Haiman, Zoltan; Scharf, Caleb

    2004-01-01

    We explore the possibility of resolving an image of a damped Lyman alpha (DLA) system in absorption against an extended, diffuse background X-ray source. Typical columns of neutral hydrogen in DLAs are high enough to block out up to ~30% of the soft X-ray flux at an observed photon energy of 0.5 keV, and we find that ~ 1% of the area of extended X-ray sources at z > 1 have their 0.5 keV flux reduced by at least 20%. We discuss the observability of such absorption and find that 300 photons per angular resolution element are required in the 0.3-8 keV band for its detection, and in order to distinguish it from intrinsic surface brightness fluctuations. For the surface brightness of the currently known high-redshift extended X-ray sources, this requires an integration time of a few Msec on Chandra. The detection will be within the reach of a routine observation with a next generation X-ray telescope such as XEUS or Generation X.

  20. K-alpha X-rays from cosmic-ray oxygen. [subrelativistic interstellar oxygen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Boldt, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Equilibrium charge fractions are calculated for subrelativistic cosmic-ray oxygen ions in the interstellar medium. These are used to determine the expected flux of K-alpha rays arising from atomic processes for a number of different postulated interstellar oxygen spectra. Relation of these results to the diffuse X-ray background measured at the appropriate energy (about 0.6 keV) suggests an observable broadened line feature.

  1. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, Christopher G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction data of alpha-galactosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Leiro, Rafael; Pereira-Rodríguez, Angel; Cerdán, M Esperanza; Becerra, Manuel; Sanz-Aparicio, Juliana

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-galactosidase is a highly glycosylated extracellular protein that catalyzes the hydrolysis of alpha-galactosidic linkages in various glucids. Its enzymatic activity is of interest in many food-related industries and has biotechnological applications. Glycosylated and in vitro deglycosylated protein samples were both assayed for crystallization, but only the latter gave good-quality crystals that were suitable for X-ray crystallography. The crystals belonged to space group P42(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.24, c = 111.52 A. A complete diffraction data set was collected to 1.95 A resolution using a synchrotron source.

  3. Tensile behavior of orthorhombic alpha ''-titanium alloy studied by in situ X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X.D.; Lou, H.B.; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    The tensile behavior of a Ti-11%Zr-14%Nb-10%Sn alloy with pure orthorhombic alpha '' phase was studied by in situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. It is found that no phase transformation happens during the whole tensile process. The "double-yielding" platforms of this alloy......, and b and c elongated, and the formation of texture. The similar texture can also be produced upon cold rolling by which the yield strength of the alpha '' phase is largely improved to be over 900 MPa....

  4. Einstein detection of X-rays from the Alpha Centauri system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, L.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Pallavicini, R.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Detection of quiescent X-ray emission from the stellar components of the Alpha Cen system: Alpha Cen A (G2 V) and Alpha Cen B (K1 V) is reported. Contrary to previous theoretical expectations, both stars are found to be X-ray emitters and at about the same level: L sub x = 1.2 x 10 to the 27th and 2.8 x 10 to the 27th ergs/s for A and B, respectively; the sum of these values is in agreement with the emission level previously reported for Alpha Cen by Nugent and Garmire (1978). Comparison with previous chromospheric and transition region measurements suggests that Alpha Cen A and B may have changed in relative strength in recent years. The coronal temperature of the combined Cen AB source, which is dominated (approximately 2/3 of the total) by the K star is (2.1 + or - 0.4) x 10 to the 6th K, similar to that of the average solar corona; it is noted that this value is not consistent with the estimate of 5 x 10 to the 5th K quoted by Nugent and Garmire.

  5. Use of mercuric iodide X-ray detectors with alpha backscattering spectrometers for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Wang, Y. J.; Dorri, N.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Economou, T. E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra of different extraterrestrial samples taken with a mercuric iodide (HgI2) spectrometer inserted into an alpha backscattering instrument identical to that used in the Soviet Phobos mission. The results obtained with the HgI2 ambient temperature detector are compared with those obtained using an Si(Li) cryogenically cooled detector. Efforts to design an optimized instrument for space application are also described. The results presented indicate that the energy resolution and sensitivity of HgI2 detectors are adequate to meet the performance needs of a number of proposed space applications, particularly those in which cooled silicon X-ray detectors are impractical or even not usable, such as for the target science programs on geoscience opportunities for lunar surface, Mars surface, and other comet and planetary missions being planned by NASA and ESA.

  6. Revisit of alpha-chitin crystal structure using high resolution X-ray diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Pawel; Hori, Ritsuko; Wada, Masahisa

    2009-05-11

    High resolution synchrotron X-ray fiber diffraction data recorded from crab tendon chitin have been used to describe the crystal structure of alpha-chitin. Crystal structures at 100 and 300 K have been solved using restrained crystallographic refinement against diffraction intensities measured from the fiber diffraction patterns. The unit cell contains two polymer chains in a 2(1) helix conformation and in the antiparallel orientation. The best agreement between predicated and observed X-ray diffraction intensities is obtained for a model that includes two distinctive conformations of C6-O6 hydroxymethl group. Those conformations are different from what is proposed in the generally accepted alpha-chitin crystal structure (J. Mol. Biol. 1978, 120, 167-181). Based on refined positions of the O6 atoms, a network of hydrogen bonds involving O6 is proposed. This network of hydrogen bonds can explain the main features of the polarized FTIR spectra of alpha-chitin and sheds some light on the origin of splitting of the amide I band observed on alpha-chitin IR spectra.

  7. X-ray emission on hybird stars: ROSAT observations of alpha Trianguli Australis and iota Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, V.; Rosner, R.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.

    1994-01-01

    We report on deep ROSAT observations of two Hybrid atmosphere stars, alpha TrA and iota Aur, and our analysis of these observations. We detect high-energy transient phenomena on alpha TrA and consider the implications of this discovery to the atmospheres of Hybrid stars. We detect iota Aur in the high-energy passband of ROSAT, implying the existence of multimillion degree plasma on the star. Our major results include the following: discovery of two large flare events, detected during pointed observations of alpha TrA; the demonstration that the flare emission most likely comes from the giant itself, rather than from a previously unseen low-mass companion star; the demonstration that the plasma characteristics associated with the flares and with the 'quiescent' component are essentially indistinguishable; and that the geometric dimensions of the emitting plasma are considerably smaller than the critical dimension characterizing stable 'hot' coronal loop structures. Our results suggest that alpha TrA does not have any steady X-ray emission consistent with theoretical expectations, and support the argument that Hybrid stars constitute a transitional type of object in which large-scale magnetic dynamo activity ceases, and the dominant spatial scales characterizing coronal structure rapidly decline as such stars evolve across the X-ray 'Dividing Line' in the H-R diagram.

  8. X-ray resonant photoexcitation: line widths and energies of K{\\alpha} transitions in highly charged Fe ions

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, J K; Epp, S W; Steinbrügge, R; Beilmann, C; Brown, G V; Eberle, S; Graf, A; Harman, Z; Hell, N; Leutenegger, M; Müller, A; Schlage, K; Wille, H -C; Yavas, H; Ullrich, J; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo

    2013-01-01

    Photoabsorption by and fluorescence of the K{\\alpha} transitions in highly charged iron ions are essential mechanisms for X-ray radiation transfer in astrophysical environments. We study photoabsorption due to the main K{\\alpha} transitions in highly charged iron ions from heliumlike to fluorinelike (Fe 24+...17+) using monochromatic X-rays around 6.6 keV at the PETRA III synchrotron photon source. Natural linewidths were determined with hitherto unattained accuracy. The observed transitions are of particular interest for the understanding of photoexcited plasmas found in X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei.

  9. Microlensing of the Fe K$\\alpha$ line and the X-ray continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Popovic, L C; Mediavilla, E; Zakharov, A F; Abajas, C; Muñoz, J A; Chartas, G

    2005-01-01

    The observed enhancement of the Fe K$\\alpha$ line in three gravitationally lensed QSOs (MG J0414+0534, QSO 2237+0305, H1413+117) is interpreted in terms of microlensing, even when equivalent X-ray continuum amplification is not observed. In order to interpret these observations, first we studied the effects of microlensing on quasars spectra, produced by straight fold caustic crossing over standard relativistic accretion disk. The disk emission was analyzed using the ray tracing method, considering Schwarzschild and Kerr metrics. When the emission is separated in two regions (an inner disk corresponding to the Fe K$\\alpha$ line and an outer annulus corresponding to the continuum, or vice-versa) we find microlensing events which enhance the Fe K$\\alpha$ line without noticeable amplification of the X-ray continuum, but only during a limited time interval. Continuum amplification is expected if a complete microlensing event is monitored. Second, we studied a more realistic case of amplification by caustic magnif...

  10. Mapping alpha-Particle X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (Map-X)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bristow, T.

    2014-01-01

    Many planetary surface processes (like physical and chemical weathering, water activity, diagenesis, low-temperature or impact metamorphism, and biogenic activity) leave traces of their actions as features in the size range 10s to 100s of micron. The Mapping alpha-particle X-ray Spectrometer ("Map-X") is intended to provide chemical imaging at 2 orders of magnitude higher spatial resolution than previously flown instruments, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks.

  11. Chemistry of Rocks and Soils in Gusev Crater from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R. C.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G. W.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater.

  12. An impulsive solar burst observed in H-alpha, microwaves, and hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, D. E.; Tang, F.

    1985-01-01

    H-alpha, microwave, and hard X-ray observations of an unusually short duration impulsive spike burst are presented. The observations are analyzed, and it is found that the single spike is in fact composed of two separate acceleration episodes. The differences found in the time profiles for the two components stress the role of the decay rate and lead to a simple explanation for the often observed delay of the microwave peak. The approximate numbers of electrons responsible for the two types of emission are derived and compared.

  13. A gas-tight Cu K alpha x-ray transparent reaction chamber for high-temperature x-ray diffraction analyses of halide gas/solid reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shian, Samuel; Sandhage, Kenneth H

    2009-11-01

    An externally heated, x-ray transparent reaction chamber has been developed to enable the dynamic high temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) analysis of a gas/solid [TiF(4)(g)/SiO(2)(s)] reaction involving a halide gas reactant formed at elevated temperatures (up to 350 degrees C) from a condensed source (TiF(4) powder) sealed within the chamber. The reaction chamber possessed x-ray transparent windows comprised of a thin (13 microm) internal layer of Al foil and a thicker (125 microm) external Kapton film. After sealing the SiO(2) specimens (diatom frustules or Stober spheres) above TiF(4) powder within the reaction chamber, the chamber was heated to a temperature in the range of 160-350 degrees C to allow for internal generation of TiF(4)(g). The TiF(4)(g) underwent a metathetic reaction with the SiO(2) specimen to yield a TiOF(2)(s) product. HTXRD analysis, using Cu K alpha x rays passed through the Kapton/Al windows of the chamber, was used to track the extent of SiO(2) consumption and/or TiOF(2) formation with time. The Al foil inner layer of the windows protected the Kapton film from chemical attack by TiF(4)(g), whereas the thicker, more transparent Kapton film provided the mechanical strength needed to contain this gas. By selecting an appropriate combination of x-ray transparent materials to endow such composite windows with the required thermal, chemical, and mechanical performance, this inexpensive reaction chamber design may be applied to the HTXRD analyses of a variety of gas/solid reactions.

  14. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS): Results from Gusev Crater and Calibration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B.; Dreibus, G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.; Waenke, H.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.; Squyres, S.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of rocks and soils on Mars analyzed during the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit Mission was determined by X-ray analyses with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). Details of the data analysis method and the instrument calibration are presented. Measurements performed on Mars to address geometry effects and background contributions are shown. Cross calibration measurements among several instrument sensors and sources are discussed. An unintentional swap of the two flight instruments is evaluated. New concentration data acquired during the first 470 sols of rover Spirit in Gusev Crater are presented. There are two geological regions, the Gusev plains and the Columbia Hills. The plains contain soils that are very similar to previous landing sites on Mars. A meteoritic component in the soil is identified. Rocks in the plains revealed thin weathering rinds. The underlying abraded rock was classified as primitive basalt. One of these rocks contained significant Br that is probably associated with vein-filling material of different composition. One of the trenches showed large subsurface enrichments of Mg, S, and Br. Disturbed soils and rocks in the Columbia Hills revealed different elemental compositions. These rocks are significantly weathered and enriched in mobile elements, such as P, S, Cl, or Br. Even abraded rock surfaces have high Br concentrations. Thus, in contrast to the rocks and soils in the Gusev Plains, the Columbia Hills material shows more significant evidence of ancient aqueous alteration.

  15. H-alpha spectra of dynamic chromospheric processes in five well-observed X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Penn, Matthew J.; Wulser, Jean-Pierre; Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous H-alpha and hard X-ray (HXR) spectra were obtained for five solar flares to determine the relationship of H-alpha profiles and the nonthermal part of the flare represented by the hard X-ray burst. All five flares exhibited impulsive-phase redshifted H-alpha in emission, which was temporarily and spatially associated with intense HXR emission and broad impulsive-phase H-alpha wings. A few small regions within two flares showed a blueshifted H-alpha emission which appeared only early in the impulsive phase and was temporally correlated with the HXR emission but not with broad H-alpha wings. Finally, there were both redshifted and blueshifted absorption spectra with properties fully consistent with those known for erupting and untwisting filaments.

  16. X-ray crystallographic analyses of pig pancreatic alpha-amylase with limit dextrin, oligosaccharide, and alpha-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steven B; Day, John S; McPherson, Alexander

    2010-04-13

    Further refinement of the model using maximum likelihood procedures and reevaluation of the native electron density map has shown that crystals of pig pancreatic alpha-amylase, whose structure we reported more than 15 years ago, in fact contain a substantial amount of carbohydrate. The carbohydrate fragments are the products of glycogen digestion carried out as an essential step of the protein's purification procedure. In particular, the substrate-binding cleft contains a limit dextrin of six glucose residues, one of which contains both alpha-(1,4) and alpha-(1,6) linkages to contiguous residues. The disaccharide in the original model, shared between two amylase molecules in the crystal lattice, but also occupying a portion of the substrate-binding cleft, is now seen to be a tetrasaccharide. There are, in addition, several other probable monosaccharide binding sites. Furthermore, we have further reviewed our X-ray diffraction analysis of alpha-amylase complexed with alpha-cyclodextrin. alpha-Amylase binds three cyclodextrin molecules. Glucose residues of two of the rings superimpose upon the limit dextrin and the tetrasaccharide. The limit dextrin superimposes in large part upon linear oligosaccharide inhibitors visualized by other investigators. By comprehensive integration of these complexes we have constructed a model for the binding of polysaccharides having the helical character known to be present in natural substrates such as starch and glycogen.

  17. Spin-polarized x-ray emission of 3d transition-metal ions : A comparison via K alpha and K beta detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xin; deGroot, F.M.F.; Cramer, SP

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that spin-polarized x-ray-excitation spectra can be obtained using K alpha emission as well as K beta lines. A spin-polarized analysis of K alpha x-ray emission and the excitation spectra by K alpha detection on a Ni compound is reported. A systematic analysis of the first-ro

  18. High contrast Kr gas jet K alpha x-ray source for high energy density physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugland, N L; Neumayer, P; Döppner, T; Chung, H-K; Constantin, C G; Girard, F; Glenzer, S H; Kemp, A; Niemann, C

    2008-10-01

    A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K alpha source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility using strongly clustering Kr gas jet targets. The contrast ratio (K alpha to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultrashort pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10(-5). Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K alpha and K beta x rays are emitted from a roughly 1x2 mm(2) emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e., mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K alpha to K beta. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K alpha source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  19. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Diffraction Studies of the Texture in Cold-Rolled Alpha-Beta Brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, J.; Gerward, L.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction can be used for simultaneous measurement of several pole figures and that the accuracy is sufficient for the determination of the crystallite orientation distribution. The method is applied to the study of the texture in Cu-43 wt % Zn duplex...... alpha-beta brass rolled to 80% reduction....

  20. A K-alpha x-ray source using high energy and high repetition rate laser system for phase contrast imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Serbanescu, Cristina; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Kincaid, Russell; Krol, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    K-alpha x-ray sources from laser produced plasmas provide completely new possibilities for x-ray phase-contrast imaging applications. By tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses onto a solid target K-alpha x-ray pulses are generated through the interaction of energetic electrons created in the plasma with the bulk target. In this paper, we present a continuous and efficient Mo K-alpha x-ray source produced by a femtosecond laser system operating at 100 Hz repetition rate with maximum...

  1. A study of solar flare energy transport based on coordinated H-alpha and X-ray observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Wulser, Jean-Pierre; Zarro, Dominic M.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the ratio between H-alpha to nonthermal hard X-ray emission was investigated using coordinated H-alpha and hard- and soft-X-ray observations of five solar flares (on May 7, June 23, June 24, and June 25, 1980 and on April 30, 1985). These observations were used to estimate the emitted flare energy flux F(H-alpha) in H-alpha, the flux of F(2O) energy deposited by nonthermal electrons with energies above 20 keV, and the pressure p(c) of soft X-ray-emitting plasma as functions of time during the impulsive phase of each flare. It was found that the F(H-alpha)/F(2O) ratio shows a power-law dependence on F(2O), with a slope that differs slightly from that predicted by the static thick-target model of solar transport. Results also indicate that the power-law dependence is modified by hydrostatic pressure effects.

  2. Can a variable alpha induce limit cycle behavior and exponential luminosity decay in transient soft x ray sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirellesfilho, C.; Liang, Edison P.

    1994-01-01

    There has been, recently, a revival of the stability problem of accretion disks. Much of this renewed interest is due to recent observational data on transient soft X-ray novae, which are low-mass X-ray binaries. It is widely believed that nonsteady mass transfer from the secondary onto the compact primary, through an accretion disk, is the reason for the observed spectacular events in the form of often repetitive outbursts, with recurrence times ranging from 1 to 60 yr and duration time on the scale of months. Though not having reached yet a consensus about the nature of the mechanism that regulates the mass transfer, the disk thermal instability model seems to be favored by the fact that the rise in the hard X-ray luminosity is prior to the rise in the soft X-ray luminosity, while the mass transfer instability model seems to be hindered by the fact that the luminosity during quiescence is unable to trigger the thermal instability. However, it should be stressed that, remarkably, the X-ray light curves of these X-ray novae all show overall exponential decays, a feature quite difficult to reproduce in the framework of the viscous disk model, which yields powerlike luminosity decay. Taking into account this observational constraint, we have studied the temporal evolution of perturbations in the accretion rate, under the assumption that alpha is radial and parameter dependent. The chosen dependence is such that the model can reproduce limit cycle behavior (the system is locally unstable but globally stable). However, the kind of dependence we are looking for in alpha does not allow us to use the usual Shakura and Sunyaev procedure in the sense that we no longer can obtain a linearized continuity equation without explicit dependence on the accretion rate. This is so because now we cannot eliminate the accretion rate by using the angular momentum conservation equation.

  3. On the relationship between soft X-rays and H-alpha-emitting structures during a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirin, H.; Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Kane, S.

    1981-01-01

    Based on data obtained during a solar flare on March 31, 1979, soft X-ray (SXR) and hard X-ray (HXR) bursts are analyzed and compared with other available data in order to identify structures in H-alpha that may correspond to the SXR-emitting site. Measurements taken with the X-ray telescope and the XUV spectroheliograph flown on Skylab, have shown that the SXR emission from many flares comes from rather small structures of about 10-20 arcsec across. These structures appear to be loops that cross the magnetic neutral line. Understanding of the morphology of SXR was based on data of the solar flare of June 15, 1973, observed from Skylab, and the work of Moore et al., (1980). Dense, highly emissive coronal structures, not suggested to be the X-ray source, were forming, lost energy rapidly by emission and conduction, and finally formed the loops. It is concluded that bright H-alpha loops form rapidly as the SXR emission rises, and the overall decay (cooling rate) of SXR emission is much slower than the formation time of individual loops.

  4. A high spatial resolution X-ray and H-alpha study of hot gas in the halos of star-forming disk galaxies. I. Spatial and spectral properties of the diffuse X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, D K; Colbert, E J M; Hoopes, C G; Weaver, K A

    2003-01-01

    We present arcsecond resolution Chandra X-ray and ground-based optical H-alpha imaging of a sample of ten edge-on star-forming disk galaxies (seven starburst and three ``normal'' spiral galaxies), a sample which covers the full range of star-formation intensity found in disk galaxies. We use the unprecedented spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray observatory to robustly remove point sources, and hence obtain the X-ray properties of the diffuse thermal emission alone. The X-ray observations are combined with comparable-resolution H-alpha and R-band imaging, and presented as a mini-atlas of images on a common spatial and surface brightness scale. The vertical distribution of the halo-region X-ray surface brightness is best described as an exponential, with the observed scale heights lying in the range H_eff = 2 -- 4 kpc. The ACIS X-ray spectra of extra-planar emission from all these galaxies can be fit with a common two-temperature spectral model with an enhanced alpha-to-iron element ratio. This is consisten...

  5. A K-alpha x-ray source using high energy and high repetition rate laser system for phase contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbanescu, Cristina; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Kincaid, Russell; Krol, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    K-alpha x-ray sources from laser produced plasmas provide completely new possibilities for x-ray phase-contrast imaging applications. By tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses onto a solid target K-alpha x-ray pulses are generated through the interaction of energetic electrons created in the plasma with the bulk target. In this paper, we present a continuous and efficient Mo K-alpha x-ray source produced by a femtosecond laser system operating at 100 Hz repetition rate with maximum pulse energy of 110 mJ before compression. The source has an x-ray conversion efficiency of greater than 10(-5) into K-alpha line emission. In preparation for phase contrast imaging applications, the size of the resultant K-alpha x-ray emission spot has been also characterized. The source exhibits sufficient spatial coherence to observe phase contrast. We observe a relatively small broadening of the K-alpha source size compared to the size of the laser beam itself. Detailed characterization of the source including the x-ray spectrum and the x-ray average yield along with phase contrast images of test objects will be presented.

  6. Automated Grouping of Opportunity Rover Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer Compositional Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBommel, S. J.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Schroder, C.; Yen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) conducts high-precision in situ measurements of rocks and soils on both active NASA Mars rovers. Since 2004 the rover Opportunity has acquired around 440 unique APXS measurements, including a wide variety of compositions, during its 42+ kilometers traverse across several geological formations. Here we discuss an analytical comparison algorithm providing a means to cluster samples due to compositional similarity and the resulting automated classification scheme. Due to the inherent variance of elements in the APXS data set, each element has an associated weight that is inversely proportional to the variance. Thus, the more consistent the abundance of an element in the data set, the more it contributes to the classification. All 16 elements standard to the APXS data set are considered. Careful attention is also given to the errors associated with the composition measured by the APXS - larger uncertainties reduce the weighting of the element accordingly. The comparison of two targets, i and j, generates a similarity score, S(sub ij). This score is immediately comparable to an average ratio across all elements if one assumes standard weighted uncertainty. The algorithm facilitates the classification of APXS targets by chemistry alone - independent of target appearance and geological context which can be added later as a consistency check. For the N targets considered, a N by N hollow matrix, S, is generated where S = S(sup T). The average relation score, S(sub av), for target N(sub i) is simply the average of column i of S. A large S(sub av) is indicative of a unique sample. In such an instance any targets with a low comparison score can be classified alike. The threshold between classes requires careful consideration. Applying the algorithm to recent Marathon Valley targets indicates similarities with Burns formation and average-Mars-like rocks encountered earlier at Endeavour Crater as well as a new class of felsic rocks.

  7. K(alpha) x-ray emission characterization of 100 Hz, 15 mJ femtosecond laser system with high contrast ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmaux, S; Serbanescu, C; Kincaid, R E; Krol, A; Kieffer, J C

    2008-12-12

    We report K(alpha) x-ray production with a high energy (110 mJ per pulse at 800 nm before compression/15 mJ at 400 nm after compression), high repetition rate (100 Hz), and high pulse contrast (better than 10(-9) at 400 nm) laser system. To develop laser-based x-ray sources for biomedical imaging requires to use high-energy and high-power ultra-fast laser system where compression is achieved under vacuum. Using this type of laser system, we demonstrate long-term stability of the x-ray yield, conversion efficiency higher than 1.5 x 10(-5) with a Mo target, and the x-ray spot size close to the optical focal spot. This high-repetition K(alpha) x-ray source can be very useful for x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

  8. K-alpha X-rays from cosmic ray oxygen. [Detection and calculation of equilibrium charge fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Boldt, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Equilibrium charge fractions are calculated for subrelativistic cosmic ray oxygen ions in the interstellar medium. These are used to determine the expected flux of K-alpha rays arising from atomic processes for a number of different postulated interstellar oxygen spectra. Relating these results to the diffuse X-ray background measured at the appropriate energy level suggests an observable line feature. If the flux of low energy cosmic ray oxygen is sufficiently large, K-alpha X-ray line emission from these nuclei will comprise a significant fraction of the total diffuse flux at approximately 0.6 keV. A satellite borne detector with a resolution greater than 30 percent could observe this feature if the subrelativistic interstellar cosmic ray oxygen spectrum is as large as certain theoretical estimates expressed in the text.

  9. Chemical Environment Effects on K[beta]/K[alpha] Intensity Ratio: An X-Ray Fluorescence Experiment on Periodic Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Chaney R.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Nivens, Delana A.; Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from an energy-dispersive XRF instrument were used to investigate the chlorine K[alpha] and K[beta] peaks in several group 1 salts. The ratio of the peak intensity is sensitive to the local chemical environment of the chlorine atoms studied in this experiment and it shows a periodic trend for these salts. (Contains 1…

  10. Hard X-ray Spectroscopic, Microwave and H-alpha Linear Polarization Studies with Hard X-Ray Observations from HESSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.

    2005-01-01

    The Principal Investigator (P.I.) has been pursuing a three year grant under NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Guest Investigator Program in support of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). An objective of these efforts is to combine X-ray and other data on solar flares, coronal mass ejections and interplanetary particle events in order to obtain a more comprehensive recognition of signatures, and understanding of interplanetary proton events. Thus, part of these efforts are to investigate if signatures seen in hard X-rays and microwaves can lead to better predictions of interplanetary proton events that can be dangerous to astronauts and spacecraft. The original proposal was written in May, 2000 and it discusses a three-pronged approach for data comparisons with three new types of instrumentation observing at X-ray, microwave and optical wavelengths. The major impetus behind this work and the proposal is that the P.I. discovered a strong correlation between a particular type of hard X-ray signature seen in spectral evolutions and interplanetary proton events (Kiplinger, 1995). The basic signature is that hard X-ray flux peaks either exhibit spectra that soften on their decays (Le. show fewer and fewer high energy X-rays with time) or they harden during decays (i.e. high energy X-rays decay significantly slower that lower energy X-rays). This signature is called progressive hardening. Studies were conducted over an eight-year period of data from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) of the Solar maximum mission. Out of the 750 well observed flares studied, 41 flares had major associated proton events. Of these, 29 events were predicted on the basis of progressive hardening for a hit rate of 71%. The 152 largest flares had a hit rate of 82%.

  11. An example of the association of X-ray and UV emission with H-alpha surges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, B.; Mein, P.; Simnett, G. M.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1988-01-01

    From H-alpha UV, and X-ray data, the nature of a well-observed surge on November 12, 1980 has been studied to try to understand the relationships between the mechanical motions and the high-temperature emissions. The cool (H-alpha) and the hot (O v) parts of the surge plasma both show velocities in the range of 100-120 km/s. The kinetic and potential energies of the surge are two orders of magnitude higher than the radiative energy. The observations suggest that the surge occurs in open structures parallel to one leg of a large scale coronal magnetic loop. The energy is released principally in the open structure (surge) and only a small amount heats the coronal loop (X-ray signature). This energy division should probably not be treated as a general characteristic of surge events. Different events are expected to exhibit a different energy balance, and this can account for the lack of a consensus in the previous literature regarding surge/X-ray associations.

  12. Comparison of 30 THz impulsive burst time development to microwaves, H-alpha, EUV, and GOES soft X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Miteva, R; Cabezas, D P; Cassiano, M M; Fernandes, L O T; Freeland, S L; Karlicky, M; Kerdraon, A; Kudaka, A S; Luoni, M L; Marcon, R; Raulin, J -P; Trottet, G; White, S M

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of impulsive solar burst emission in the 30 THz band is raising new interpretation challenges. One event associated with a GOES M2 class flare has been observed simultaneously in microwaves, H-alpha, EUV, and soft X-ray bands. Although these new observations confirm some features found in the two prior known events, they exhibit time profile structure discrepancies between 30 THz, microwaves, and hard X-rays (as inferred from the Neupert effect). These results suggest a more complex relationship between 30 THz emission and radiation produced at other wavelength ranges. The multiple frequency emissions in the impulsive phase are likely to be produced at a common flaring site lower in the chromosphere. The 30 THz burst emission may be either part of a nonthermal radiation mechanism or due to the rapid thermal response to a beam of high-energy particles bombarding the dense solar atmosphere.

  13. X-ray luminescence spectra of graded-gap Al xGa 1- xAs structures irradiated by alpha particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šilėnas, A.; Požela, J.; Požela, K.; Jucienė, V.; Dapkus, L.

    2011-12-01

    The influence of 241Am alpha particle irradiation on X-ray luminescence spectra of the graded-gap AlxGa1-xAs structures of different thicknesses is investigated. It is observed that the integral X-ray luminescence intensity of nonirradiated thin (15 μm) structure is 1.4 times less than that in the thick (32 μm) structure, and this difference increases to 3 times after 3×1010 cm-2 dose of irradiation by alpha particle. The X-ray luminescence intensity of the energy hνFgg is responsible of that large difference, because it shifts the X-ray generated carriers to the narrow-gap surface with great nonradiative surface recombination rate. The alpha particle irradiation increases nonradiative recombination rate and causes a decrease of the X-ray luminescence intensity of all spectra lines in the thin (15 μm) detector. The most significant drop in X-ray luminescence efficiency is observed from the region at narrow-gap surface after the initial stage (109 cm-2 dose) of alpha particle irradiation. In the 32 μm thick detector, the luminescence intensity of the energy hν=1.8 eV does not change up to 2×1010 cm-2 of alpha particle irradiation dose. That means the high irradiation hardness of the thick graded-gap X-ray detector with optical response.

  14. Complex X-ray Absorption and the Fe K(alpha) Profile in NGC 3516

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; George, I. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Botorff, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We present data from simultaneous Chandra, XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken during 2001 April and November. We have investigated the nature of the very flat observed X-ray spectrum. Chandra grating data show the presence of X-ray absorption lines, revealing two distinct components of the absorbing gas, one which is consistent with our previous model of the UV/X-ray absorber while the other, which is outflowing at a velocity of approximately 1100 kilometers per second, has a larger column density and is much more highly ionized. The broad-band spectral characteristics of the X-ray continuum observed with XMM during 2001 April, reveal the presence of a third layer of absorption consisting of a very large column (approximately 2.5 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter) of highly ionized gas with a covering fraction approximately 50%. This low covering fraction suggests that the absorber lies within a few 1t-days of the X-ray source and/or is filamentary in structure. Interestingly, these absorbers are not in thermal equilibrium with one another. The two new components are too highly ionized to be radiatively accelerated, which we suggest is evidence for a hydromagnetic origin for the outflow. Applying our model to the November dataset, we can account for the spectral variability primarily by a drop in the ionization states of the absorbers, as expected by the change in the continuum flux. When this complex absorption is accounted for we find the underlying continuum to be typical of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The spectral curvature attributed to the high column absorber, in turn, reduces estimates of the flux and extent of any broad Fe emission line from the accretion disk.

  15. Miocrowave spectral imaging, H-alpha and hard X-ray observations of a solar limb flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Gary, D. E.; Lim, J.; Schwartz, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    We compare the microwave, H-alpha, and hard X-ray observations for a west limb C7.3 flare that occurred at 17:10 UT, 1992 June 26. H-alpha movies were obtained at Big Bear Solar Observatory. Before the onset of the flare, overexposed H-alpha images show the complicated flux loop structure above the limb. Material was observed to descend along the loops toward the site where the flare occurred hours later. Using the five-antenna solar array at Owens Valley Radio Observatory, we obtain two-dimensional maps of flare emission from 1.4 to 14 GHz. In all three temporal peaks of the microwave bursts, the maps show the same characteristics. The peak low-frequency emission comes from the top of one bundle of the H-alpha loops and gradually shifts to the foot-point of the loops (the location of H-alpha flare) as the frequency increases. The location of the emission peak shifts 88 sec between 1 and 14 GHz. Seventy percent of the shift occurs between 1 and 5 GHz. The locus of the shift of the emission peak follows the shape of an H-alpha surge that occurred after the flare. For each point along the locus, we create the microwave brightness temperature spectrum and compare the radio-derived electron distribution with that derived from the high-resolution hard X-ray spectra measured with Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). We find that the peak frequency changes from approximately 3 GHz at the loop top to approximately 7 GHz at the footprint, presumably due to the increase of the magnetic field from approximately 160 GHz at the loop top to approximately 300 G at the footpoint. The high-frequency slope of the microwave power-law spectrum decreases from approximately 10 at the loop top to approximately 5 at the footprint due to a change in the energy distribution of the dominant electrons. The microwave brightness temperature spectral index predicted by the BATSE power-law hard X-ray spectra agrees with the measured

  16. Time evolution of a miniflare as seen in H-alpha, UV lines, and X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simnett, G. M.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1994-01-01

    A miniflare that occurred in active region Hale 16896 on 1980 June 15 was observed in H-alpha, UV lines, and soft X-rays. These data allow us to analyze the flare emission and derive the energetics and dynamics of the chromospheric plasma involved. Our results indicate that the energy released by the miniflare was about 10(exp 28) ergs, about four orders of magnitude smaller than that of a large flare. However, hard X-rays (5.5-8.0 keV) were observed which indicated a plasma with temperature as high as 27 x 10(exp 6) K. The H-alpha wings, C IV, and X-rays all showed a short-lived and compact (3 sec x 3 sec) brightening in a location near the leading sunspot. At this location, small-scale changes in the magnetic field were observed from about 2 hr before to about 6 hr after the miniflare. Only very small velocities seem to have been associated with most of the event in H-alpha. The data are consistent with short and dense loops at temperatures above 10(exp 7) K which lost a large fraction of their energy via downward conduction through regions at the footpoints. Several secondary events appear to have been triggered by the miniflare along an arch filament which itself was not greatly affected. A number of much less energetic (10(exp 25)-10(exp 26) erg) events preceded and followed the mini-flare. One of these occurred 11 minutes after the mini-flare and displayed a highly Doppler-shifted signature from the foot-point of a C IV arch. This arch delineates the connection that existed between the location of the mini-flare and the location of secondary events triggered by the flare.

  17. K-shell X-ray production cross sections of Ni induced by protons, alpha-particles, and He{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertol, A.P.L. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Hinrichs, R. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.A.Z., E-mail: marcos@if.ufrgs.br [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    The proton, alpha-particle, and He{sup +} induced X-ray emissions of Ni were measured on mono-elemental thin films in order to obtain the K-shell X-ray production cross section in the energy range of 0.7–2.0 MeV for protons, 4.0–6.5 MeV for alpha-particles, and 3.0–4.0 MeV for He{sup +}. The proton-induced X-ray production cross section for Ni agreed well with the theoretical values, endorsing the quality of the measurements. The X-ray production cross section induced with alpha-particles is in good agreement with ECPSSR theory in the complete range of energies, while for He{sup +} that quantity is systematically below. K{sub β}/K{sub α} ratios were evaluated and compared with experimental and theoretical values.

  18. Angular dependence of Ll, L $\\alpha$ , L $\\beta$ and L $\\gamma$ X-ray differential and fluorescence cross-sections for Er, Ta, W, Au, Hg and Tl

    CERN Document Server

    Demir, L; Kurucu, Y; Karabulut, A; Sahin, Y; 10.1016/S0969-806X(02)00501-7

    2003-01-01

    Ll, L alpha , L beta and L gamma X-ray differential cross-sections, fluorescence cross-sections and L/sub i/-subshell ( sigma /sub L1/, sigma /sub L2/, and sigma /sub L3/) fluorescence cross-sections were measured for Er, Ta, W, Au, Hg, and Tl at an excitation energy of 59.6 keV using a Si(Li) detector. The differential cross-sections for these elements have been measured at different angles varying from 54 degrees to 153 degrees at intervals of 9 degrees . The Ll and L alpha groups in the L X-ray lines are found to be spatially anisotropic, while those in the L beta and L gamma peaks are isotropic. Experimental and theoretical values of L X-ray fluorescence cross- sections and L/sub i/-subshell X-ray fluorescence cross-sections were compared. (20 refs).

  19. SMM observations of K-alpha radiation from fluorescence of photospheric iron by solar flare X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, A. N.; Culhane, J. L.; Rapley, C. G.; Wolfson, C. J.; Acton, L. W.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution Fe K-alpha spectra near 1.94 A observed during solar flares with the Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission are presented. The evidence for two possible excitation mechanisms, electron impact and fluorescence, is examined. It is found that the fluorescence mechanism satisfactorily describes the results, while the observations do not support electron collisional excitation of the Fe K-alpha transitions in low ionization stages (II-XII) of iron. Using Bai's model of the fluorescent excitation process, the photospheric iron abundance relative to that of hydrogen is estimated to be 5-6 x 10 to the -5th. The mean height of the soft X-ray source producing the K-alpha fluorescence is calculated on the basis of this model for about 40 large flares. The solar K-alpha lines are found to be about 25 percent wider than those measured in the laboratory. Weak line features observed at wavelengths shorter than that of the K-alpha lines are discussed.

  20. X-ray and H-alpha observations of a filament-disappearance flare - An empirical analysis of the magnetic field configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Webb, D. F.; Moore, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    On August, 29, 1973, a flare event occurred that involved the disappearance of a filament near central meridian. The event, well-observed in X-rays on Skylab and in H-alpha, was a four-ribbon flare involving both new and old magnetic inversion lines which were roughly parallel. The H-alpha, X-ray, and magnetic field data are used to deduce the magnetic polarities of the H-alpha brightening at the footpoints of the brightest X-ray loops. It is suggested that the event involved a reconnection of magnetic field lines rather than a brightening in place of preexisting loops. The simultaneity of the H-alpha brightening onsets in the four ribbons and the apparent lack of an eruption of the filament are consistent with this interpretation.

  1. Effects of a New Triple-alpha Reaction on X-ray Bursts of a Helium Accreting Neutron Star

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuo, Y; Noda, T; Saruwatari, M; Ono, M; Hashimoto, M; Fujimoto, M

    2011-01-01

    The effects of a new triple-$\\alpha$ reaction rate (OKK rate) on the helium flash of a helium accreting neutron star in a binary system have been investigated. Since the ignition points determine the properties of a thermonuclear flash of type I X-ray bursts, we examine the cases of different accretion rates, $dM/dt (\\dot{M})$, of helium from $3\\times10^{-10} M_{\\odot} \\rm yr^{-1}$ to $3\\times10^{-8} M_{\\odot} \\rm yr^{-1}$, which could cover the observed accretion rates. We find that for the cases of low accretion rates, nuclear burnings are ignited at the helium layers of rather low densities. As a consequence, helium deflagration would be triggered for all cases of lower accretion rate than $\\dot{M}\\simeq 3\\times10^{-8} M_{\\odot} \\rm yr^{-1}$. We find that OKK rate could be barely consistent with the available observations of the X-ray bursts on the helium accreting neutron star. However this coincidence is found to depend on the properties of crustal heating and the neutron star model.We suggest that OKK r...

  2. X-ray selected BALQSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Page, M J; Ceballos, M; Corral, A; Ebrero, J; Esquej, P; Krumpe, M; Mateos, S; Rosen, S; Schwope, A; Streblyanska, A; Symeonidis, M; Tedds, J A; Watson, M G

    2016-01-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index alpha=0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, alpha_OX, of the X-ray selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of 1.69 +- 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically-selected BALQSOs typically have much larger alpha_OX and so are characterised as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray sp...

  3. Characterisation of NEXT-DEMO using xenon K$_{\\alpha}$ X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Lorca, D; Laing, A; Ferrario, P; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Álvarez, V; Borges, F I G; Camargo, M; Cárcel, S; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Díaz, J; Esteve, R; Fernandes, L M P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Irastorza, I G; Labarga, L; Liubarsky, I; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martínez-Lema, G; Martínez, A; Miller, T; Monrabal, F; Monserrate, M; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; Nebot-Guinot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Seguí, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Veloso, J F C A; Webb, R; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2014-01-01

    The NEXT experiment aims to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe in a high pressure gas TPC using electroluminescence (EL) to amplify the signal from ionization. Understanding the response of the detector is imperative in achieving a consistent and well understood energy measurement. The abundance of xenon k-shell x-ray emission during data taking has been identified as a multitool for the characterisation of the fundamental parameters of the gas as well as the equalisation of the response of the detector. The NEXT-DEMO prototype is a ~1.5 kg volume TPC filled with natural xenon. It employs an array of 19 PMTs as an energy plane and of 256 SiPMs as a tracking plane with the TPC light tube and SiPM surfaces being coated with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) which acts as a wavelength shifter for the VUV scintillation light produced by xenon. This paper presents the measurement of the properties of the drift of electrons in the TPC, the effects of the EL production region, and the extraction of p...

  4. Electronic structure simulation of chromium aluminum oxynitride by discrete variational-X alpha method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Y; Lee, J D; Kim, E; No, K

    2002-01-01

    We use a first-principles discrete variational (DV)-X alpha method to investigate the electronic structure of chromium aluminum oxynitride. When nitrogen is substituted for oxygen in the Cr-Al-O system, the N2p level appears in the energy range between O2p and Cr3d levels. Consequently, the valence band of chromium aluminum oxynitride becomes broader and the band gap becomes smaller than that of chromium aluminum oxide, which is consistent with the photoelectron spectra for the valence band using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). We expect that this valence band structure of chromium aluminum oxynitride will modify the transmittance slope which is a requirement for photomask application.

  5. Complex aberrations in lymphocytes exposed to mixed beams of (241)Am alpha particles and X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staaf, Elina; Deperas-Kaminska, Marta; Brehwens, Karl; Haghdoost, Siamak; Czub, Joanna; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2013-08-30

    Modern radiotherapy treatment modalities are associated with undesired out-of-field exposure to complex mixed beams of high and low energy transfer (LET) radiation that can give rise to secondary cancers. The biological effectiveness of mixed beams is not known. The aim of the investigation was the analysis of chromosomal damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) exposed to a mixed beam of X-rays and alpha particles. Using a dedicated exposure facility PBL were exposed to increasing doses of alpha particles (from (241)Am), X-rays and a mixture of both. Chromosomal aberrations were analysed in chromosomes 2, 8 and 14 using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The found and expected frequencies of simple and complex aberrations were compared. Simple aberrations showed linear dose-response relationships with doses. A higher than expected frequency of simple aberrations was only observed after the highest mixed beam dose. A linear-quadratic dose response curve for complex aberrations was observed after mixed-beam exposure. Higher than expected frequencies of complex aberrations were observed for the two highest doses. Both the linear-quadratic dose-response relationship and the calculation of expected frequencies show that exposure of PBL to mixed beams of high and low LET radiation leads to a higher than expected frequency of complex-type aberrations. Because chromosomal changes are associated with cancer induction this result may imply that the cancer risk of exposure to mixed beams in radiation oncology may be higher than expected based on the additive action of the individual dose components.

  6. [Heat-induced structural transition of alpha-crystallin in the eye lens tissue observed by small-angle X-ray scattering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivandin, A V

    2009-01-01

    Heat-induced structural transitions of crystallins in the eye lens tissue have been studied by small-angle X-ray scattering. It was shown that a short-time (approximately 1 min) incubation of the bovine eye lens tissue at a temperature of about 60 degrees C leads to a pronounced shift of the small-angle X-ray diffraction maximum due to the short-range order of alpha-crystallin oligomers. This shift indicates an increase in the molecular mass of alpha-crystallin oligomers. The results are evidence that, in the native surrounding and at the native concentration of alpha-crystallin, heat-induced transition of alpha-crystallin quaternary structure takes place. Earlier, this transition of alpha-crystallin has been observed only in solutions and gels of this protein. The results confirm the identity of alpha-crystallin properties in vitro and in vivo.

  7. A giant Ly$\\alpha$ nebula in the core of an X-ray cluster at $z=1.99$: implications for early energy injection

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, F; Finoguenov, A; Strazzullo, V; Brun, A M C Le; Vignali, C; Bournaud, F; Dickinson, M; Renzini, A; Béthermin, M; Zanella, A; Gobat, R; Cimatti, A; Elbaz, D; Onodera, M; Pannella, M; Sargent, M T; Arimoto, N; Carollo, M; Starck, J-L

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of a giant $\\gtrsim$100 kpc Ly$\\alpha$ nebula detected in the core of the X-ray emitting cluster CL J1449+0856 at $z=1.99$ through Keck/LRIS narrow-band imaging. This detection extends the known relation between Ly$\\alpha$ nebulae and overdense regions of the Universe to the dense core of a $5-7\\times10^{13}$ M$_{\\odot}$ cluster. The most plausible candidates to power the nebula are two Chandra-detected AGN host cluster members. Given the physical conditions of the Ly$\\alpha$-emitting gas and the possible interplay with the X-ray phase, we argue that the Ly$\\alpha$ nebula would be short-lived ($\\lesssim10$ Myr) if not continuously replenished with cold gas at a rate of $\\gtrsim1000$ Myr. Cooling from the X-ray phase is disfavored as the replenishing mechanism, primarily because of the high Ly$\\alpha$ to X-ray luminosity ratio ($L_{\\mathrm{Ly\\alpha}}/L_{\\mathrm{X}} \\approx0.3$), $\\gtrsim10-1000\\times$ higher than in local cool-core clusters. Cosmological cold flows are disfavored by cu...

  8. Evolution and Activity in the Solar Corona: A Comparison of Coronal and Chromospheric Structures Seen in Soft X-Rays, White Light and H-Alpha Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran

    2001-01-01

    The work completed under this project, 'Evolution and Activity in the Solar Corona: A Comparison of Coronal and Chromospheric Structures Seen in Soft X-Rays, White Light and H-Alpha Emission', includes the following presentations: (1) Analysis of H-alpha Observations of High-altitude Coronal Condensations; (2) Multi-spectral Imaging of Coronal Activity; (3) Measurement and Modeling of Soft X-ray Loop Arcades; (4) A Study of the Origin and Dynamics of CMEs; and various poster presentations and thesis dissertations.

  9. Characterisation of mineralisation of bone and cartilage: X-ray diffraction and Ca and Sr K{sub {alpha}} X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk; Muthuvelu, P.; Ellis, R.E.; Green, E.M.; Attenburrow, D. [Biomedical Physics Group, School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter (United Kingdom); Barrett, R. [ESRF, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Arkill, K.; Colridge, D.B.; Winlove, C.P. [Biomedical Physics Group, School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Bone is a dynamic structure, constantly remodelling in response to changing mechanical and environmental factors. This is particularly evident in the mineral component encrusting the collagenous framework. The mineral is principally in the form of calcium apatite, but calcium can exchange with strontium, both during the cellular processes of mineralisation and resorption and by passive exchange with the deposited crystals. Mineralisation is generally characterized by densitometry, but because of the differences in absorption cross sections of calcium and strontium it can be misleading in studies of composition. In this work we have used X-ray diffraction to identify calcium and strontium apatite and X-ray fluorescence to quantify strontium and calcium distribution. With the beam characteristics available from synchrotron radiation, this has enabled us to obtain microscopic resolution on thin sections of bone and cartilage from the equine metacarpophalangeal joint. Two issues have been investigated; the first is the distribution of mineral in the bone-cartilage interface and within individual trabeculae. In trabecular bone the ratio of strontium to calcium concentration was typically 0.0035 {+-} 0.0020, and higher by a factor of {approx}3 at the periphery than in the centre of a trabeculum (possibly reflecting the more rapid turnover of mineral in the surface layer). In the dense subchondral bone the ratio was similar, approximately doubling in the calcified cartilage. The second objective was to explore the changes in mineralisation associated with development of osteoarthrosis. We analysed lesions showing cartilage thinning and changes in the trabecular organization and density of the underlying bone. At the centre of the lesion the ratio of strontium to calcium was much lower than that in normal tissue, although the calcified cartilage still showed a higher ratio than the underlying bone. In the superficially normal tissue around the lesion the calcified

  10. Wavelengths, oscillator strengths and radiative transition rates for K{alpha} lines in titanium x-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Feng; Wang Chuangke; Zhao Xuefeng [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang Jiamin; Jiang Gang, E-mail: yjm70018@my-public.sc.cninfo.net [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2011-06-15

    The oscillator strengths, line strengths and wavelengths are presented for all 1s-2p transitions in titanium ions. X-ray emission from titanium is extensively used, for example for diagnosis, in fusion experiments. The K{alpha} 1s-2p transitions are limited to transitions from helium-like to fluorine-like ion as the 2p subshell is filled beyond fluorine. While there are two 1s-2p transitions (1s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 1s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-2p{sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) for hydrogen-like titanium, Ti{sup 20+}, the number varies depending on the number of electrons in the 2p subshell before and after the transition. For example, there are 35 1s-2p transitions giving the same number of K{alpha} lines for carbon-like titanium, Ti{sup 16+}. The present results are obtained from configuration interaction atomic structure calculations using the code GRASPVU, which includes relativistic effects in the Dirac-Fock approximation. The results have been benchmarked for a few ionic states. A comparison of our results with the very few transitions in the literature as well as those from other codes shows reasonable accuracy of the present results.

  11. The satellites and hypersatellites of L{alpha}{sub 12} and L{beta}{sub 1} x-ray transitions in zirconium excited by oxygen and neon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnota, M; Pajek, M; Banas, D [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Dousse, J-Cl; Berset, M; Mauron, O; Maillard, Y-P; Raboud, P A; Hoszowska, J [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Polasik, M; Slabkowska, K [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Chmielewska, D; Rzadkiewicz, J; Sujkowski, Z, E-mail: marcin@ujk.kielce.p [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2009-11-01

    The interpretation of L-shell satellites and hypersatellites for L{alpha}{sub 1,2} (L{sub 3{yields}}M{sub 4,5}) and L{beta}{sub 1} (L{sub 2{yields}}M{sub 4}) x-ray transitions in zirconium multiply ionized by oxygen and neon ions is reported. The x-ray spectra were measured with a high-resolution von Hamos spectrometer and interpreted in terms the relativistic multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations. The ionization probabilities of L- and M-shell derived from the data are compared with the predictions of the semiclassical approximation (SCA) calculations.

  12. A Comparitive Assessement of Cytokine Expression in Human-Derived Cell Lines Exposed to Alpha Particles and X-Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha- (α- particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific.

  13. The Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer deployment mechanism: An anthropomorphic approach to sensor placement on Martian rocks and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, Richard S.

    1995-01-01

    On July 4,1997, the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft lands on Mars and starts conducting technological and scientific experiments. One experiment, the Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer, uses a sensor head placed against rocks and soil to determine their composition. To guarantee proper placement, a deployment mechanism mounted on the Mars Rover aligns the sensor head to within 20 deg of the rock and soil surfaces. In carrying out its task, the mechanism mimics the action of a human hand and arm. Consisting of a flexible wrist, a parallel link arm, a brush dc motor actuator, and a revolutionary non-pyrotechnic fail-safe release device, the mechanism correctly positions the sensor head on rocks as high as 0.29 m and on targets whose surfaces are tilted as much as 45 deg from the nominal orientation of the sensor head face. The mechanism weighs less than 0.5 kg, can withstand 100 g's, and requires less than 2.8 N x m of actuation torque. The fail-safe coupler utilizes Cerrobend, a metal alloy that melts at 60 C, to fuse the actuator and the rest of the mechanism together. A film heater wrapped around the coupler melts the metal, and Negator springs drive the mechanism into its stowed position. The fail-safe actuates using 6.75 Watts for 5 minutes in the event of an actuator failure.

  14. Hard alpha-keratin degradation inside a tissue under high flux X-ray synchrotron micro-beam: a multi-scale time-resolved study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Emilie; Gourrier, Aurélien; Doucet, Jean; Briki, Fatma

    2010-04-01

    X-rays interact strongly with biological organisms. Synchrotron radiation sources deliver very intense X-ray photon fluxes within micro- or submicro cross-section beams, resulting in doses larger than the MGy. The relevance of synchrotron radiation analyses of biological materials is therefore questionable since such doses, million times higher than the ones used in radiotherapy, can cause huge damages in tissues, with regard to not only DNA, but also proteic and lipid organizations. Very few data concerning the effect of very high X-ray doses in tissues are available in the literature. We present here an analysis of the structural phenomena which occur when the model tissue of human hair is irradiated by a synchrotron X-ray micro-beam. The choice of hair is supported by its hierarchical and partially ordered keratin structure which can be analysed inside the tissue by X-ray diffraction. To assess the damages caused by hard X-ray micro-beams (1 microm(2) cross-section), short exposure time scattering SAXS/WAXS patterns have been recorded at beamline ID13 (ESRF) after various irradiation times. Various modifications of the scattering patterns are observed, they provide fine insight of the radiation damages at various hierarchical levels and also unexpectedly provide information about the stability of the various hierarchical structural levels. It appears that the molecular level, i.e. the alpha helices which are stabilized by hydrogen bonds and the alpha-helical coiled coils which are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, is more sensitive to radiation than the supramolecular architecture of the keratin filament and the filament packing within the keratin associated proteins matrix, which is stabilized by disulphide bonds.

  15. Metal location and thickness in a multilayered sheet by measuring K{alpha}/K{beta}, L{alpha}/L{beta} and L{alpha}/L{gamma} X-ray ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesareo, Roberto [Dip. di Matematica e Fisica, Universita di Sassari, via Vienna 2, 07100 Sassari (Italy)], E-mail: cesareo@uniss.it; Rizzutto, Marcia A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CEP 0558-090, Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: rizzutto@dfn.if.usp.br; Brunetti, Antonio [Dip. di Matematica e Fisica, Universita di Sassari, via Vienna 2, 07100 Sassari (Italy)], E-mail: brunetti@uniss.it; Rao, Donepudi V. [Dip. di Matematica e Fisica, Universita di Sassari, via Vienna 2, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Dept. of Physics, SIR CRR Autonomous College, Eluru, AP (India)], E-mail: donepudi_venkateswararao@rediffmail.com

    2009-09-01

    When a multilayered material is analyzed by means of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, then the X-ray ratios of K{alpha}/K{beta}, or L{alpha}/L{beta} and L{alpha}/L{gamma}, for an element in the multilayered material, depend on the composition and thickness of the layer in which the element is situated, and on the composition and thickness of the superimposed layer (or layers). Multilayered samples are common in archaeometry, for example, in the case of pigment layers in paintings, or in the case of gilded or silvered alloys. The latter situation is examined in detail in the present paper, with a specific reference to pre-Columbian alloys from various museums in the north of Peru.

  16. X-ray production cross-sections measurements for high-energy alpha particle beams: New dedicated set-up and first results with aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, T.; Chêne, G.; Mathis, F.; Marchal, A.; Garnir, H.-P.; Strivay, D.

    2011-12-01

    The "IPNAS" laboratory, in collaboration with the "Centre Européen d'Archéométrie" is partly focused on material analysis by means of IBA techniques: PIXE, PIGE and RBS. A new transport beam line has been developed at our CGR-520 MeV cyclotron to analyze Cultural Heritage objects using these techniques. This facility allows us to produce proton and alpha particle beams with energies up to 20 MeV. A vacuum chamber dedicated to X-ray production and Non-Rutherford cross-section measurements has been recently constructed. After determination of the chamber's geometry for X-ray detection using thin foils of several elements (11 ⩽ Z ⩽ 82) and 3 MeV proton beams, the measurement of the X-ray production cross-sections in the 6-12 MeV energy range has started using alpha particle beams on light element targets. These experiments contribute to the filling a serious lack of experimental values for alpha particles of this particular energy range in databases. The recent decision to focus our work on the alpha particle interaction with light elements was taken because of the high interest of the low Z elements in the field of archaeometry.

  17. X-ray production cross-sections measurements for high-energy alpha particle beams: New dedicated set-up and first results with aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, T., E-mail: T.Dupuis@ulg.ac.be [Centre Europeen d' Archeometrie, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Chene, G., E-mail: Gregoire.Chene@ulg.ac.be [Centre Europeen d' Archeometrie, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Mathis, F., E-mail: Francois.Mathis@ulg.ac.be [Centre Europeen d' Archeometrie, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); and others

    2011-12-15

    The 'IPNAS' laboratory, in collaboration with the 'Centre Europeen d'Archeometrie' is partly focused on material analysis by means of IBA techniques: PIXE, PIGE and RBS. A new transport beam line has been developed at our CGR-520 MeV cyclotron to analyze Cultural Heritage objects using these techniques. This facility allows us to produce proton and alpha particle beams with energies up to 20 MeV. A vacuum chamber dedicated to X-ray production and Non-Rutherford cross-section measurements has been recently constructed. After determination of the chamber's geometry for X-ray detection using thin foils of several elements (11 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To Z Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 82) and 3 MeV proton beams, the measurement of the X-ray production cross-sections in the 6-12 MeV energy range has started using alpha particle beams on light element targets. These experiments contribute to the filling a serious lack of experimental values for alpha particles of this particular energy range in databases. The recent decision to focus our work on the alpha particle interaction with light elements was taken because of the high interest of the low Z elements in the field of archaeometry.

  18. MCDF-RCI predictions for structure and width of $K\\alpha_{1,2}$ x-ray line of Al and Si

    CERN Document Server

    Kozioł, Karol

    2014-01-01

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock and Relativistic Configuration Interaction methods have been employed to predict the structure and the width of $K\\alpha_{1,2}$ x-ray lines of Al and Si. The influences of electron correlation and inclusion of possible satellite contributions on spectra structure have been studied. The widths of $K$ and $L_{2,3}$ atomic levels of Al and Si have been also computed.

  19. Quantitative determination of alpha-quartz in airborne dust samples by x-ray diffraction; Determinacion cuantitativa de cuarzo-alfa en polvo atmosferico mediante difraccion de rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayon, A.; Roca, M.

    1982-07-01

    The quantitative determination by X-ray diffractometry of alpha-quartz In airborne respirable dust samples on silver membrane filters is considered. A cobalt anode X-ray tube Is employed. NiO is used as Internal standard In order to compensate for both the variations of specimen absorption and the effect due to the nonuniformity of the incident X-ray beam and to the incomplete homogeneity on the filters of samples and standards. (Author) 17 refs.

  20. Method for characterization of a spherically bent crystal for K.alpha. X-ray imaging of laser plasmas using a focusing monochromator geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugland, Nathan; Doeppner, Tilo; Glenzer, Siegfried; Constantin, Carmen; Niemann, Chris; Neumayer, Paul

    2015-04-07

    A method is provided for characterizing spectrometric properties (e.g., peak reflectivity, reflection curve width, and Bragg angle offset) of the K.alpha. emission line reflected narrowly off angle of the direct reflection of a bent crystal and in particular of a spherically bent quartz 200 crystal by analyzing the off-angle x-ray emission from a stronger emission line reflected at angles far from normal incidence. The bent quartz crystal can therefore accurately image argon K.alpha. x-rays at near-normal incidence (Bragg angle of approximately 81 degrees). The method is useful for in-situ calibration of instruments employing the crystal as a grating by first operating the crystal as a high throughput focusing monochromator on the Rowland circle at angles far from normal incidence (Bragg angle approximately 68 degrees) to make a reflection curve with the He-like x-rays such as the He-.alpha. emission line observed from a laser-excited plasma.

  1. Discovery of a broad O VIII Ly alpha line in the ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 1543-624

    CERN Document Server

    Madej, O K

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of a broad emission feature at ~0.7 keV in the spectra of the ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 1543-624, obtained with the high-resolution spectrographs of the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites. We confirm the presence of the feature in the broad band MOS2 spectrum of the source. As suggested before in the literature, the donor star in this source is a CO or ONe white dwarf, which transfers oxygen-rich material to the accretor, conceivably a neutron star. The X-rays reprocessed in this oxygen-rich accretion disc could give a reflection spectrum with O VIII Ly alpha as the most prominent emission line. Apart from the feature at ~0.7 keV we confirm the possible presence of a weak emission feature at ~6.6 keV, which was reported in the literature for this data set. We interpret the feature at ~0.7 keV and ~6.6 keV as O VIII Ly alpha and Fe K alpha emission respectively, caused by X-rays reflected off the accretion disc in the strong gravitational field close to the accretor.

  2. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  3. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  4. H-alpha observations of the gamma-ray-emitting Be/X-ray binary LSI+61303: orbital modulation, disk truncation, and long-term variability

    CERN Document Server

    Zamanov, R; Marti, J; Tomov, N A; Belcheva, G; Luque-Escamilla, P L; Latev, G

    2013-01-01

    We report 138 spectral observations of the H-alpha emission line of the radio- and gamma-ray-emitting Be/X-ray binary LSI+61303 obtained during the period of September 1998 -- January 2013. From measuring various H-alpha parameters, we found that the orbital modulation of the H-alpha is best visible in the equivalent width ratio EW(B)/EW(R), the equivalent width of the blue hump, and in the radial velocity of the central dip. The periodogram analysis confirmed that the H-alpha emission is modulated with the orbital and superorbital periods. For the past 20 years the radius of the circumstellar disk is similar to the Roche lobe size at the periastron. It is probably truncated by a 6:1 resonance. The orbital maximum of the equivalent width of H-alpha emission peaks after the periastron and coincides on average with the X-ray and gamma-ray maxima. All the spectra are available upon request from the authors and through the CDS.

  5. Interpretation of X-ray stress measurement and evaluation of internal residual stresses in rolled {alpha}-Ti40 using self-consistent models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloaguen, D.; Guillen, R. [Laboratoire d' Applications des Materiaux a la Mecanique (LAMM), C.R.T.T., Boulevard de l' Universite, B.P. 406, 44602 Saint-Nazaire cedex (France); Francois, M. [Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' Ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS), Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 11 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes (France); Royer, J. [Laboratoire Mecanique et Materiaux (LMM), Ecole Centrale de Nantes, 1 rue de la Noe, B.P. 92101, 44321 Nantes cedex 03 (France)

    2002-09-16

    Internal stresses due to anisotropic thermal and plastic properties were investigated in rolled {alpha}-titanium. The thermal stresses induced by a cooling process were predicted using a self-consistent model and compared with experimental results obtained by X-ray diffraction. A study of the elastoplastic response after uniaxial loading was performed along the rolling and the transverse direction of the sheet. Using an elastoplastic self-consistent model, the predicted results were compared with X-ray diffraction and mechanical tests. Theoretical and experimental results agree in their tendencies. The comparison between {epsilon}{sub {phi}}{sub {psi}} versus sin{sup 2} {psi} and simulations confirms that prismatic slip is the main active deformation mode. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. [Small-angle x-ray and sedimentation studies on alpha-haemocyanin H. pomatia (halve molecules) in glycerol and sucrose solutions (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, J; Pilz, I; Witters, R; Lontie, R

    1976-01-01

    The alpha-haemocyanin molecules of Helix pomatia were decomposed into halves and studied in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. The following parameters of the molecule could be obtained: radius of gyration, volume, molecular weight, overall shape and dimensions of the molecule. With small-angle X-ray scattering fluctuations of the electron density within the protein cause parasitic scattering at larger angles. According to Stuhrmann and Kirste it is possible to eliminate it mathematically by varying the electron density of the buffer. For this purpose different quantities of glycerol respectively saccharose were added to the solvent to study the scattering of alpha-haemocyanin halves in solvents of varied electron density. The change of the isopotential specific volume of haemocyanin and the strong increase of the statistical errors of its scattering by decreasing of the excess scattering of solution over solvent per unit volume did not allow an application of the method of Stuhrmann and Kirste. The data obtained for alpha-haemocanin halves in different solvents are given. Besides also the sedimentation of the alpha-haemocyanin halves were studied in solutions containing varied amounts of glycerol and saccharose. An attempt was made to calculate the change of the partial specific volume of haemocyanin by adding glycerol or saccharose.

  7. X-ray structure of Pur-alpha reveals a Whirly-like fold and an unusual nucleic-acid binding surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graebsch, Almut; Roche, Stéphane; Niessing, Dierk

    2009-11-03

    The PUR protein family is a distinct and highly conserved class that is characterized by its sequence-specific RNA- and DNA-binding. Its best-studied family member, Pur-alpha, acts as a transcriptional regulator, as host factor for viral replication, and as cofactor for mRNP localization in dendrites. Pur-alpha-deficient mice show severe neurologic defects and die after birth. Nucleic-acid binding by Pur-alpha is mediated by its central core region, for which no structural information is available. We determined the x-ray structure of residues 40 to 185 from Drosophila melanogaster Pur-alpha, which constitutes a major part of the core region. We found that this region contains two almost identical structural motifs, termed "PUR repeats," which interact with each other to form a PUR domain. DNA- and RNA-binding studies confirmed that PUR domains are indeed functional nucleic-acid binding domains. Database analysis show that PUR domains share a fold with the Whirly class of nucleic-acid binding proteins. Structural analysis combined with mutational studies suggest that a PUR domain binds nucleic acids through two independent surface regions involving concave beta-sheets. Structure-based sequence alignment revealed that the core region harbors a third PUR repeat at its C terminus. Subsequent characterization by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and size-exclusion chromatography indicated that PUR repeat III mediates dimerization of Pur-alpha. Surface envelopes calculated from SAXS data show that the Pur-alpha dimer consisting of repeats I to III is arranged in a Z-like shape. This unexpected domain organization of the entire core domain of Pur-alpha has direct implications for ssDNA/ssRNA and dsDNA binding.

  8. Connection between orbital modulation of H-alpha and gamma-rays in the Be/X-ray binary LSI+61303

    CERN Document Server

    Zamanov, R; Stoyanov, K; Borissova, A; Tomov, N A

    2013-01-01

    We studied the average orbital modulation of various parameters (gamma-ray flux, H-alpha emission line, optical V band brightness) of the radio- and gamma-ray emitting Be/X-ray binary LSI+61303. Using the Spearman rank correlation test, we found highly significant correlations between the orbital variability of the equivalent width of the blue hump of the H-alpha and Fermi-LAT flux with a Spearman p-value 2e-5, and the equivalent widths ratio EW_B/EW_R and Fermi-LAT flux with p-value 9e-5. We also found a significant anti-correlation between Fermi-LAT flux and V band magnitude with p-value 7.10^{-4}. All these correlations refer to the average orbital variability, and we conclude that the H-alpha and gamma-ray emission processes in LSI+61303 are connected. The possible physical scenario is briefly discussed.

  9. The narrow Fe K$\\alpha$ line and the molecular torus in active galactic nuclei - an IR/X-ray view

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, Claudio; Ichikawa, Kohei; Paltani, Stephane; Boissay, Rozenn; Gandhi, Poshak; Stalevski, Marko; Awaki, Hisamitsu

    2014-01-01

    The narrow component of the iron K$\\alpha$ is an almost ubiquitous feature in the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and is believed to originate in neutral material, possibly located in the molecular torus. This would imply a tight connection between the Fe K$\\alpha$ equivalent width (EW) and the physical properties of the torus. In a recent work we have shown that the decrease of the covering factor of the torus with the luminosity, as expected by luminosity-dependent unification models, would be able to explain the decrease of Fe K$\\alpha$ EW with the luminosity (i.e., the X-ray Baldwin effect). Recent developments in the study of the mid-IR (MIR) spectrum of AGN allow important parameters of the torus to be deduced, such as its covering factor ($f_{\\rm\\,obs}$) and equatorial column density ($N_{\\rm\\,H}^{\\rm\\,T}$), by applying clumpy torus models. Using XMM-Newton/EPIC observations of a sample of 24 type-I AGN, we investigate the relation between the physical parameters of the torus obtained by ...

  10. Small angle X-ray scattering of wheat seed-storage proteins: alpha-, gamma- and omega-gliadins and the high molecular weight (HMW) subunits of glutenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, N H; Miles, M J; Popineau, Y; Harries, J; Shewry, P; Tatham, A S

    1999-03-19

    Small angle X-ray scattering in solution was performed on seed-storage proteins from wheat. Three different groups of gliadins (alpha-, gamma- and omega-) and a high molecular weight (HMW) subunit of glutenin (1Bx20) were studied to determine molecular size parameters. All the gliadins could be modelled as prolate ellipsoids with extended conformations. The HMW subunit existed as a highly extended rod-like particle in solution with a length of about 69 nm and a diameter of about 6.4 nm. Specific aggregation effects were observed which may reflect mechanisms of self-assembly that contribute to the unique viscoelastic properties of wheat dough.

  11. X-ray and optical crystallographic parameters investigations of high frequency induction melted Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbia, A; Draissia, M; Bedboudi, H; Boulkhessaim, S; Debili, M Y

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the microstructural strengthening mechanisms of aluminium by means of hard alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina fine particles. A broad of understanding views covering materials preparations, elaboration process, characterization techniques and associated microstructural characteristic parameters measurements is given. In order to investigate the microstructural characteristic parameters and the mechanical strengthening mechanisms of pure aluminium by hard fine particles, a set of Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys samples were made under vacuum by high fusion temperature melting, the high frequency (HF) process, and rapidly solidified under ambient temperature from a mixture of cold-compacted high-pure fine Al and alpha-Al(2)O(3) powders. The as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, optical microscopy observations and Vickers microhardness tests in both brut and heat-treated states. It was found that the as-solidified HF Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys with compositions below 4 wt.% (alpha-Al(2)O(3)) are single-phase microstructures of the solid solution FCC Al phase and over two-phase microstructures of the solid solution FCC Al and the Rhombohedral alpha-Al(2)O(3) phases. The optical micrographs reveal the presence of a grain size refinement in these alloys. Vickers microhardness of the as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) is increased by means of pure fine alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina particles. These combined effects of strengthening and grain size refinement observed in the as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys are essentially due to a strengthening of Al by the alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina particles insertion in the (HF) melted and rapidly solidified alloys.

  12. Chest X Ray?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are ...

  13. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  14. Medical X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Benefits The discovery of X-rays and the invention of CT represented major advances in medicine. X- ... in X-ray and CT Examinations — X-ray definition, dose measurement, safety precautions, risk, and consideration with ...

  15. 1-[(Imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]indazole. Highly alpha 2/I1 selective agonist: synthesis, X-ray structure, and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saczewski, Franciszek; Kornicka, Anita; Rybczyńska, Apolonia; Hudson, Alan L; Miao, Shu Sean; Gdaniec, Maria; Boblewski, Konrad; Lehmann, Artur

    2008-06-26

    Novel benzazole derivatives bearing a (imidazolidin-2-yl)imino moiety at position 1 or 2 were synthesized by reacting 1-amino- or 2-aminobenzazoles with N, N'-bis( tert-butoxycarbonyl)imidazolidine-2-thione in the presence of HgCl 2. Structures of 1-[(imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]indazole (marsanidine, 13a) and free base of the 4-Cl derivative 12e were confirmed by X-ray single crystal structure analysis. Compound 13a was found to be the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor ligand with alpha 2-adrenoceptor/imidazoline I 1 receptor selectivity ratio of 3879, while 1-[(imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]-7-methylindazole ( 13k) proved to be a mixed alpha 2-adrenoceptor/imidazoline I 1 receptor agonist with alpha 2/I 1 selectivity ratio of 7.2. Compound 13k when administered intravenously to male Wistar rats induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (ED50 = 0.6 microg/kg) and heart rate, which was attenuated following pretreatment with alpha 2A-adrenoceptor antagonist RX821002. Compound 13a may find a variety of medical uses ascribed to alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists, and its 7-methyl derivative 13k is a good candidate for development as a centrally acting antihypertensive drug.

  16. Experimental measurements of the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 reaction rate vs. observations of type I X-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Fisker, J L; Görres, J; Wiescher, M; Cooper, R L; Fisker, Jacob Lund; Tan, Wanpeng; Goerres, Joachim; Wiescher, Michael; Cooper, Randall L.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the continuously accreting fuel supply and depletion by nuclear burning via the hot CNO cycles. Therefore the ignition depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 that regulates the flow between the beta-limited hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we report on the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate on the thermonuclear instability that leads to type I X-ray bursts on accr...

  17. Comparison of direct (X-ray diffraction and infrared spectrophotometry) and indirect (infrared spectrophotometry) methods for the analysis of alpha-quartz in airborne dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffer, E; Masson, A; Moulut, J C; Lecaque, T; Protois, J C

    2005-11-01

    In this study, the alpha-quartz contents measured by different analytical techniques (X-ray diffraction, direct method; and infrared spectrophotometry, direct and indirect methods) were compared. The analyses were carried out on filters sampled in an industrial setting by means of a Dorr-Oliver cyclone. To verify the methodology used, filters loaded with pure alpha-quartz were also analysed. By and large, the agreement between the two direct methods was close on average, but on the basis of a comparison of the individual results, considerable differences exist. In absolute value, the mean relative deviation between the two techniques was infrared) were on average 13% lower than the results obtained by the two direct methods with a more important difference (23%) for samples where calcite was identified by X-ray diffraction in comparison with those where it was not (8%). This underestimation, which was not owing to dust losses during preparation, is probably explained by the elimination of organic compounds during dust calcinations or by the transformation of mineral compounds. The indirect method introduces additional sample handling operations with more risk of material loss. When the quantity of calcined material was <0.4 mg, the weighing operations necessary to correct any losses of material resulted in considerable variability. In terms of overall uncertainty, it would be better in this case not to carry out correction and to employ an operating mode favouring the recovery of a maximum of material while accepting a bias of about 5-7%.

  18. The ASCA X-Ray Spectrum Of The Broad-Line Radio Galaxy Pictor A A Simple Power Law With No Fe K-$\\alpha$ Line

    CERN Document Server

    Eracleous, M; Eracleous, Michael; Halpern, Jules P.

    1998-01-01

    We present the X-ray spectrum of the broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A as observed by ASCA in 1996. The main objective of the observation was to detect and study the profiles of the Fe~K$\\alpha$ lines. The motivation was the fact that the Balmer lines of this object show well-separated displaced peaks, suggesting an origin in an accretion disk. The 0.5-10 keV X-ray spectrum is described very well by a model consisting of a power law of photon index 1.77 modified by interstellar photoelectric absorption. We find evidence for neither a soft nor a hard (Compton reflection) excess. More importantly, we do not detect an Fe K-alpha line, in marked contrast with the spectra of typical Seyfert galaxies and other broad-line radio galaxies observed by ASCA. The 99%-confidence upper limit on the equivalent width of an unresolved line at a rest energy of 6.4 keV is 100 eV, while for a broad line (FWHM of approximately 60,000 km/s) the corresponding upper limit is 135 eV. We discuss several possible explanations for the we...

  19. Non-linearity issues and multiple ionization satellites in the PIXE portion of spectra from the Mars alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John L.; Heirwegh, Christopher M.; Ganly, Brianna

    2016-09-01

    Spectra from the laboratory and flight versions of the Curiosity rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer were fitted with an in-house version of GUPIX, revealing departures from linear behavior of the energy-channel relationships in the low X-ray energy region where alpha particle PIXE is the dominant excitation mechanism. The apparent energy shifts for the lightest elements present were attributed in part to multiple ionization satellites and in part to issues within the detector and/or the pulse processing chain. No specific issue was identified, but the second of these options was considered to be the more probable. Approximate corrections were derived and then applied within the GUAPX code which is designed specifically for quantitative evaluation of APXS spectra. The quality of fit was significantly improved. The peak areas of the light elements Na, Mg, Al and Si were changed by only a few percent in most spectra. The changes for elements with higher atomic number were generally smaller, with a few exceptions. Overall, the percentage peak area changes are much smaller than the overall uncertainties in derived concentrations, which are largely attributable to the effects of rock heterogeneity. The magnitude of the satellite contributions suggests the need to incorporate these routinely in accelerator-based PIXE using helium beams.

  20. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  1. Surface structure of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanocrystal observed by O K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; Ibrahim, K; Abbas, M I; Ju, X

    2003-01-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra is used as a probe of surface structure of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanocrystal, prepared by sol-gel method. We present O K-edge XANES of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 in nanocrystal and bulk by total electron yield at the photoemission station of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The spectrum of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 shows a splitting of the pre-edge structure, which is interpreted as two subsets of Fe 3d t sub 2 sub g and e sub g orbitals in oxygen octahedral (O sub h) crystal field, and is also sensitive to long-range order effects. However, no distinguishable splitting of the pre-edge peak of nanocrystal alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 is observed. This suggests that there exists the distorted octahedral coordination around Fe sites and also the long-range disorder due to the surface as compared with bulk alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3.

  2. Comment on "15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne Breakout Reaction and Impact on X-Ray Bursts"

    CERN Document Server

    Davids, B

    2008-01-01

    A recently published letter reports a measurement of alpha decay from states in 19Ne at excitation energies below 4.5 MeV. The measured alpha decay branching ratios B_alpha are used to calculate the astrophysical rate of the 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne reaction and to draw conclusions regarding the transition between steady state and unstable nuclear burning on accreting neutron stars. Here I show that the calculated astrophysical reaction rate is based on an unreliable value of B_alpha for the 4.03 MeV state and point out a serious internal inconsistency in the letter's treatment of low statistics alpha decay measurements.

  3. A small-angle X-ray scattering study of alpha-synuclein from human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Katsuya; Yagi, Naoto; Nakatani, Rie; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; So, Masatomo; Yagi, Hisashi; Ohta, Noboru; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Goto, Yuji; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-07-29

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is the main component of Lewy bodies, which are neuropathological hallmarks of patients with Parkinson's disease. As it has been controversial whether human α-syn from erythrocytes exists as a tetramer under physiological conditions, we tried solving this issue by the small-angle X-ray solution scattering method. Under two different conditions (high ionic strength with a Tris buffer and low ionic strength with an ammonium acetate buffer), no evidence was found for the presence of tetramer. When comparing erythrocyte and recombinant α-syn molecules, we found no significant difference of the molecular weight and the secondary structure although the buffer conditions strongly affect the radius of gyration of the protein. The results indicate that, even though a stable tetramer may not be formed, conformation of α-syn depends much on its environment, which may be the reason for its tendency to aggregate in cells.

  4. Insights from soft X-rays: the chlorine and sulfur sub-structures of a CK2alpha/DRB complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2008-09-01

    The diffraction pattern of a protein crystal is normally a product of the interference of electromagnetic waves scattered by electrons of the crystalline sample. The diffraction pattern undergoes systematic changes in case additionally X-ray absorption occurs, meaning if the wavelength of the primary X-ray beam is relatively close to the absorption edge of selected elements of the sample. The resulting effects are summarized as "anomalous dispersion" and can be always observed with "soft" X-rays (wavelength around 2 A) since they match the absorption edges of sulfur and chlorine. A particularly useful application of this phenomenon is the experimental detection of the sub-structures of the anomalous scatterers in protein crystals. We demonstrate this here with a crystal of a C-terminally truncated variant of human CK2alpha to which two molecules of the inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribo-furanosyl-benzimidazole (DRB) are bound. The structure of this co-crystal has been solved recently. For this study we measured an additional diffraction data set at a wavelength of 2 A which showed strong anomalous dispersion effects. On the basis of these effects we detected all sulfur atoms of the protein, the two liganded DRB molecules and a total of 16 additional chloride ions some of them emerging at positions filled with water molecules in previous structure determinations. A number of chloride ions are bound to structural and functional important locations fitting to the constitutive activity and the acidophilic substrate specificity of the enzyme.

  5. X-Ray, FUV, and UV Observations of alpha Centauri B: Determination of Long-term Magnetic Activity Cycle and Rotation Period

    CERN Document Server

    DeWarf, L E; Guinan, E F

    2010-01-01

    We have been carrying out a study of stellar magnetic activity, dynamos, atmospheric physics, and spectral irradiances from a sample of solar-type G0-5 V stars with different ages. One of the major goals of this program is to study the evolution of the Sun's X-ray through NUV spectral irradiances with age. Of particular interest is the determination of the young Sun's elevated levels of high-energy fluxes because of the critical roles that X-ray through FUV emissions play on the photochemical and photoionization evolution of early, young planetary atmospheres and ionospheres. Motivated by the current exoplanetary search missions that are hunting for earth-size planets in the habitable zones of nearby main-sequence G-M stars, we are expanding our program to cooler, less luminous, but much more numerous main-sequence K-type stars, such as alpha Centauri B. The long life (2-3x longer than our Sun) and slow evolution of K stars provide nearly constant energy sources for possible hosted planets. Presented here are...

  6. Thermal Iron K and Alpha: Line Emission from the X-Ray Binary GX 339-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. D.; Zhang, S. N.; Zhang, X. L.; Liu, D. B.; Chen, L.; Xu, H. G.; You, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    The accretion rate of the black hole candidate X-ray binary GX 339-4 in the 'off' state is low, and an advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF) is present. Hydrogen-like and helium-like iron Kbalpha; emission lines at 6.7 and 6.95 keV from hot plasma of ADAF can be produced by recombination-cascade processes with moderately high intensities, which are markedly distinguished from the fluorescent iron Kα line at approximately 6.4 keV. We show that the observational features of GX 339-4 can be explained by the ADAF model, if the iron abundance is more than 10 times the solar value, though the reason for such a high abundance is still unclear. We suggest that the increase of the accretion rate makes GX 339-4 change from off, low, intermediate, to high and very high states, and the line center of iron Kbalpha; will therefore shift from approximately 6.83 to approximately 6.4 keV, i.e. to the fluorescent disc-line, since the disappearance of the ADAF due to its high accretion rate.

  7. Study of the inclusion of the (R)- and (S)-camphor enantiomers in alpha-cyclodextrin by X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinou, Areti; Tsorteki, Frantzeska; Karpusas, Michael; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Bethanis, Kostas; Mentzafos, Dimitris

    2010-05-27

    The inclusion of (R)- and (S)-camphor compounds in alpha-cyclodextrin has been studied by X-ray crystallography. The crystal structures of the complexes reveal that one guest molecule is accommodated inside the cavity formed by a head-to-head cyclodextrin dimer. In the crystal lattice, the dimers form layers which are successively shifted by half a dimer. In both (R)- and (S)-cases, the camphor molecule exhibits disorder and occupies three major sites with orientations that can be described as either 'polar' or 'equatorial'. Molecular dynamics simulations performed for the observed complexes indicate that although the carbonyl oxygen of both (R)- and (S)-camphor switches between different hydrogen bonding partners, it maintains the observed mode of 'polar' or 'equatorial' alignment.

  8. Two Years of Chemical Sampling on Meridiani Planum by the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer Onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, J.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B.C.; Dreibus, G.; Rieder, R.; Wanke, H.; d'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Klingelhofer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.W.; Squyres, S.W.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

    2006-01-01

    For over two terrestrial years, the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring the martian surface at Meridiani Planum using the Athena instrument payload [1], including the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). The APXS has a small sensor head that is mounted on the robotic arm of the rover. The chemistry, mineralogy and morphology of selected samples were investigated by the APXS along with the Moessbauer Spectrometer (MB) and the Microscopic Imager (MI). The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) provided the possibility to dust and/or abrade rock surfaces down to several millimeters to expose fresh material for analysis. We report here on APXS data gathered along the nearly 6-kilometers long traverse in craters and plains of Meridiani.

  9. Abdominal x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are, or may be, pregnant. Alternative Names Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also ...

  10. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... degenerative) Bone tumor Broken bone (fracture) Dislocated bone Osteomyelitis (infection) Arthritis Other conditions for which the test ... Bone tumor Bone x-ray Broken bone Clubfoot Osteomyelitis X-ray Review Date 7/3/2016 Updated ...

  11. The Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 2110: hard X-ray emission observed by NuSTAR and variability of the iron K$\\alpha$ line

    CERN Document Server

    Marinucci, A; Bianchi, S; Lu, T N; Arevalo, P; Baloković, M; Ballantyne, D; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Gandhi, P; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F; Puccetti, S; Rivers, E; Walton, D J; Stern, D; Zhang, W

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of the bright Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 2110 obtained in 2012, when the source was at the highest flux level ever observed, and in 2013, when the source was at a more typical flux level. We include archival observations from other X-ray satellites, namely XMM-Newton, Suzaku, BeppoSAX, Chandra and Swift. Simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift broad band spectra (in the 3-80 keV range) indicate a cutoff energy $E_{\\rm c}>210$ keV, with no detectable contribution from Compton reflection. NGC 2110 is one of the very few sources where no evidence for distant Compton thick scattering is found and, by using temporal information collected over more than a decade, we investigate variations of the iron K$\\alpha$ line on time scales of years. The Fe K$\\alpha$ line is likely the sum of two components: one constant (originating from distant Compton-thick material) and the other one variable and linearly correlated with the source flux (possibly arising from Compton-thin material much closer to the black h...

  12. The Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 2110: Hard X-Ray Emission Observed by NuStar and Variability of the Iron K-Alpha Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Bianchi, S.; Lu, T. N.; Arevalo, P.; Balokovic, M.; Ballantyne, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Stern, D.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of the bright Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 2110 obtained in 2012, when the source was at the highest flux level ever observed, and in 2013, when the source was at a more typical flux level. We include archival observations from other X-ray satellites, namely XMM-Newton, Suzaku, BeppoSAX, Chandra and Swift. Simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift broad band spectra (in the 3-80 keV range) indicate a cutoff energy E(sub c) greater than 210 keV, with no detectable contribution from Compton reflection. NGC 2110 is one of the very few sources where no evidence for distant Compton thick scattering is found and, by using temporal information collected over more than a decade, we investigate variations of the iron K(alpha) line on time scales of years. The Fe K alpha line is likely the sum of two components: one constant (originating from distant Compton-thick material) and the other one variable and linearly correlated with the source flux (possibly arising from Compton-thin material much closer to the black hole).

  13. Examination of the role of the $^{14}$O($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{17}$F reaction rate in type I x-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, J; Parikh, A; Xu, S W; Yamaguchi, H; Kahl, D; Ma, P; Su, J; Wang, H W; Nakao, T; Wakabayashi, Y; Teranishi, T; Hahn, K I; Moon, J Y; Jung, H S; Hashimoto, T; Chen, A A; Irvine, D; Lee, C S; Kubono, S

    2014-01-01

    The $^{14}$O($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{17}$F reaction is one of the key reactions involved in the breakout from the hot-CNO cycle to the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts (XRBs). The resonant properties in the compound nucleus $^{18}$Ne have been investigated through resonant elastic scattering of $^{17}$F+$p$. The radioactive $^{17}$F beam was separated by the CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator (CRIB) and bombarded a thick H$_2$ gas target at 3.6 MeV/nucleon. The recoiling light particles were measured by three ${\\Delta}$E-E silicon telescopes at laboratory angles of $\\theta$$_{lab}$$\\approx$3$^\\circ$, 10$^\\circ$ and 18$^\\circ$, respectively. Five resonances at $E_{x}$=6.15, 6.28, 6.35, 6.85, and 7.05 MeV were observed in the excitation functions, and their spin-parities have been determined based on an $R$-matrix analysis. In particular, $J^{\\pi}$=1$^-$ was firmly assigned to the 6.15-MeV state which dominates the thermonuclear $^{14}$O($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{17}$F rate below 2 GK. As well, a possible new excited state in $...

  14. Properties of resonant states in 18Ne relevant to key 14O(alpha,p)17F breakout reaction in type I x-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, J; Parikh, A; Xu, S W; Yamaguchi, H; Kahl, D; Ma, P; Su, J; Wang, H W; Nakao, T; Wakabayashi, Y; Teranishi, T; Hahn, K I; Moon, J Y; Sung, H S; Hashimoto, T; Chen, A A; Irvine, D; Lee, C S; Kubono, S

    2014-01-01

    The $^{14}$O($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{17}$F reaction is one of the key reactions involved in the breakout from the hot-CNO cycle to the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. The resonant properties in the compound nucleus $^{18}$Ne have been investigated through resonant elastic scattering of $^{17}$F+$p$. The radioactive $^{17}$F beam was separated by the CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator (CRIB) and bombarded a thick H$_2$ gas target at 3.6 MeV/nucleon. The recoiling light particles were measured by using three ${\\Delta}$E-E silicon telescopes at laboratory angles of $\\theta$$_{lab}$$\\approx$3$^\\circ$, 10$^\\circ$ and 18$^\\circ$, respectively. Five resonances at $E_{x}$=6.15, 6.28, 6.35, 6.85, and 7.05 MeV were observed in the excitation functions. Based on an $R$-matrix analysis, $J^{\\pi}$=1$^-$ was firmly assigned to the 6.15-MeV state. This state dominates the thermonuclear $^{14}$O($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{17}$F rate below 1 GK. We have also confirmed the existence and spin-parities of three states between 6.1 and 6.4 MeV. A...

  15. X-Ray Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Immler, S; Immler, Stefan; Lewin, Walter H.G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of X-ray observations of supernovae (SNe). By observing the (~0.1--100 keV) X-ray emission from young SNe, physical key parameters such as the circumstellar matter (CSM) density, mass-loss rate of the progenitor and temperature of the outgoing and reverse shock can be derived as a function of time. Despite intensive search over the last ~25 years, only 15 SNe have been detected in X-rays. We review the individual X-ray observations of these SNe and discuss their implications as to our understanding of the physical processes giving rise to the X-ray emission.

  16. Tertiary and quaternary structures of 0.19 alpha-amylase inhibitor from wheat kernel determined by X-ray analysis at 2.06 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Y; Matsunaga, T; Fukuyama, K; Miyazaki, T; Morimoto, T

    1997-11-04

    The crystal structure of 0.19 alpha-amylase inhibitor (0.19 AI) from wheat kernel was determined by the multiple-isomorphous replacement method coupled with density modification and noncrystallographic symmetry averaging and then refined by simulated annealing using diffraction data to 2.06 A resolution (R = 18.7%, free R = 22.3%). The asymmetric unit has four molecules of 0.19 AI, each comprised of 124 amino acid residues. Electron density for residues 1-4 and 69-77 is absent in all subunits, probably because of the intrinsic flexibility of these segments. Each subunit has four major alpha-helices and one one-turn helix which are arranged in the up-and-down manner, maintaining the favorable packing modes of the alpha-helices. 0.19 AI, however, has two short antiparallel beta-strands. All 10 cysteine residues in 0.19 AI form disulfide bonds (C6-C52, C20-C41, C28-C83, C42-C99, and C54-C115), consistent with the assignments made biochemically for 0.28 AI from wheat kernel and by NMR analysis of the bifunctional alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor from ragi seeds (RBI). The disulfide bond patterns in these AIs are similar to those in the hydrophobic protein from soybean (HPS), which lack only the bond corresponding to C28-C83 in 0.19 AI. Extensive interactions occurred between particular pairs of 0.19 AI subunits, mainly involving hydrophobic residues. Comparisons of the structures of 0.19 AI, RBI, and HPS showed that the arrangements of the major alpha-helices are similar but the conformations of the remaining residues differ markedly. The present X-ray analysis for 0.19 AI and the NMR analysis for RBI suggest that all the AIs in this family have a common fold. The alpha-amylase binding site is discussed on the basis of the tertiary and quaternary structures of 0.19 AI together with biochemical and spectroscopic data for AIs.

  17. Comparative analysis of dose rates in bricks determined by neutron activation analysis, alpha counting and X-ray fluorescence analysis for the thermoluminescence fine grain dating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártová, H.; Kučera, J.; Musílek, L.; Trojek, T.

    2014-11-01

    In order to evaluate the age from the equivalent dose and to obtain an optimized and efficient procedure for thermoluminescence (TL) dating, it is necessary to obtain the values of both the internal and the external dose rates from dated samples and from their environment. The measurements described and compared in this paper refer to bricks from historic buildings and a fine-grain dating method. The external doses are therefore negligible, if the samples are taken from a sufficient depth in the wall. However, both the alpha dose rate and the beta and gamma dose rates must be taken into account in the internal dose. The internal dose rate to fine-grain samples is caused by the concentrations of natural radionuclides 238U, 235U, 232Th and members of their decay chains, and by 40K concentrations. Various methods can be used for determining trace concentrations of these natural radionuclides and their contributions to the dose rate. The dose rate fraction from 238U and 232Th can be calculated, e.g., from the alpha count rate, or from the concentrations of 238U and 232Th, measured by neutron activation analysis (NAA). The dose rate fraction from 40K can be calculated from the concentration of potassium measured, e.g., by X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) or by NAA. Alpha counting and XRF are relatively simple and are accessible for an ordinary laboratory. NAA can be considered as a more accurate method, but it is more demanding regarding time and costs, since it needs a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. A comparison of these methods allows us to decide whether the time- and cost-saving simpler techniques introduce uncertainty that is still acceptable.

  18. Performance comparison of two Olympus InnovX handheld x-ray analyzers for feasibility of measuring arsenic in skin in vivo - Alpha and Delta models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouza, E D; Gherase, M R; Fleming, D E B; Chettle, D R; O'Meara, J M; McNeill, F E

    2017-05-01

    The Figure-Of-Merit (FOM) performance, a combination of detection limit and dose, is compared between two generations of handheld X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometers for the feasibility of in vivo XRF measurement of arsenic (As) in skin. The Olympus InnovX Delta model analyzer (40 kVp using either 37 or 17μA) was found to show improvements in Minimum Detection Limit (MDL) using arsenic As-doped skin calibration phantoms with bulk tissue backing, when compared to the first generation InnovX Alpha model (40kVp, 20μA) in 120s measurements. Differences between two different definitions of MDL are discussed. On the Delta system, an MDL of (0.462±0.002) μg/g As was found in phantoms, with a nylon backing behind to mimic bulk tissue behind skin. The equivalent and effective doses were found to be (10±2) mSv and ~7×10(-3)μSv respectively for the Alpha and (15±4) mSv and ~8×10(-3)μSv respectively for the Delta system in 120s exposures. Combining MDL and effective dose, a lower (better) FOM was found for the Delta, (1.7±0.4) ppm mSv(1/2), compared to (4.4±0.5) ppm mSv(1/2) for the Alpha model system. The Delta analyzer demonstrates improved overall system performance for a rapid 2-min measurement in As skin phantoms, such that it can be considered for use in populations exposed to arsenic.

  19. Sensitivity of the Fe K-alpha Compton shoulder to the geometry and variability of the X-ray illumination of cosmic objects

    CERN Document Server

    Odaka, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Fabian, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In an X-ray reflection spectrum, a tail-like spectral feature generated via Compton down-scattering, known as a Compton shoulder (CS), appears at the low-energy side of the iron K$\\alpha$ line. Despite its great diagnostic potential, its use as a spectral probe of the reflector has been seriously limited due to observational difficulties and modelling complexities. We revisit the basic nature of the CS by systematic investigation into its dependence on spatial and temporal parameters. The calculations are performed by Monte-Carlo simulations for sphere and slab geometries. The dependence is obtained in a two-dimensional space of column density and metal abundance, demonstrating that the CS solves parameter degeneration between them which was seen in conventional spectral analysis using photoelectric absorption and fluorescence lines. Unlike the iron line, the CS does not suffer from any observational dependence on the spectral hardness. The CS profile is highly dependent on the inclination angle of the slab g...

  20. X-Ray Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band soft X-ray polarimeters based on Bragg reflection. Developments in scintillator and solid-state hard X-ray detectors facilitate construction of both modular, large area Compton scattering polarimeters and compact devices suitable for use with focusing X-ray telescopes.

  1. Relation of large-scale coronal X-ray structure and cosmic rays. I - Sources of solar wind streams as defined by X-ray emission and H-alpha absorption features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, A. S.; Nolte, J. T.; Sullivan, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Mcintosh, P. S.; Gold, R. E.; Roelof, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the corona and the interplanetary medium during Carrington rotations 1601-1607 is discussed relative to recurrent high-speed solar wind streams and their coronal sources. Only streams A, C, D, and F recur on more than one rotation. Streams A and D are associated with coronal holes, while C and F originate in the high corona (20-50 solar radii) over faint X-ray emissions. The association of the streams with holes is confirmed by earlier findings that there are no large equatorial holes without an associated high-speed stream and that the area of the equatorial region of coronal holes is highly correlated with the maximum velocity observed in the associated stream near 1 AU.

  2. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  3. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-rays are a form of high energy electromagnetic radiation. The x-rays penetrate the body to form ... for detecting cavities, unless the decay is very advanced and deep. Many ... The amount of radiation given off during the procedure is less than ...

  4. X-Ray Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, P; Perri, M

    1998-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the field of X-ray surveys, especially in the hard (2-10 and 5-10 keV) bands, is given. A new detailed comparison between the measurements in the hard band and extrapolations from ROSAT counts, that takes into proper account the observed distribution of spectral slopes, is presented. Direct comparisons between deep ROSAT and BeppoSAX images show that most hard X-ray sources are also detected at soft X-ray energies. This may indicate that heavily cutoff sources, that should not be detectable in the ROSAT band but are expected in large numbers from unified AGN schemes, are in fact detected because of the emerging of either non-nuclear components, or of reflected, or partially transmitted nuclear X-rays. These soft components may complicate the estimation of the soft X-ray luminosity function and cosmological evolution of AGN.

  5. A high spatial resolution X-ray and H-alpha study of hot gas in the halos of star-forming disk galaxies. II. Quantifying supernova feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, D K; Colbert, E J M; Hoopes, C G; Weaver, K A

    2004-01-01

    We investigate how the empirical properties of hot X-ray-emitting gas in a sample of 7 starburst and 3 normal edge-on spiral galaxies correlate with the size, mass, star formation rate and star formation intensity in the host galaxies. From this analysis we investigate various aspects of mechanical energy feedback on galactic scales. We demonstrate, using a variety of multi-wavelength star formation rate and intensity indicators, that the diffuse X-ray emission is ultimately driven by mechanical energy feedback from massive stars. We find that the luminosity of the extra-planar diffuse X-ray emission is proportional to proxies of the star formation rate of the host galaxy, for example the FIR or 1.4 GHz radio luminosity. Larger galaxies tend to have more extended X-ray-emitting halos, but galaxy mass appears to play no role in determining the properties of the disk or extra-planar X-ray emitting plasma. Accretion of gas from the IGM does not appear to be a significant contributor to the diffuse X-ray emission...

  6. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  7. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  8. X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  9. Pelvis x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - pelvis ... Tumors Degenerative conditions of bones in the hips, pelvis, and upper legs ... hip joint Tumors of the bones of the pelvis Sacroiliitis (inflammation of the area where the sacrum ...

  10. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... x-ray particles pass through the body. A computer or special film records the images. Structures that ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. Bone x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or broken bone Bone tumors Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection) ... Multiple myeloma Osgood-Schlatter disease Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteomalacia Osteomyelitis Paget disease of the bone Rickets X-ray ...

  12. Hand x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include fractures, bone tumors , degenerative bone conditions, and osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection). ... chap 46. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Osteomyelitis X-ray Review Date 9/8/2014 Updated ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  16. Study of radiation effects on the cell structure and evaluation of the dose delivered by x-ray and {alpha}-particles microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosior, Ewelina; Cloetens, Peter [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bohic, Sylvain [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38000 Grenoble (France); INSERM U-836 (Team 6: Synchrotron Radiation and Medical Research), Grenoble Institut of Neuroscience, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2012-12-24

    Hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy and magnified phase contrast imaging are combined to study radiation effects on cells. Experiments were performed on freeze-dried cells at the nano-imaging station ID22NI of the European synchrotron radiation facility. Quantitative phase contrast imaging provides maps of the projected mass and is used to evaluate the structural changes due to irradiation during X-ray fluorescence experiments. Complementary to phase contrast imaging, scanning transmission ion microscopy is performed and doses of all the experiments are compared. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the proposed approach to study radiation-induced damage at the sub-cellular level.

  17. Millimeter-Scale Chemistry of Observable Endmembers with the Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer and Mars Hand Lens Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBommel, Scott; Gellert, Ralf; Thompson, Lucy; Berger, Jeff; Campbell, Iain; Edgett, Ken; McBride, Marie; Minitti, Michelle; Desouza, Elstan; Boyd, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is a bulk chemistry instrument conducting high-precision in-situ measurements of Martian rocks and soils onboard both active NASA rovers [1]. Mounted at the end of the Curiosity rover arm, the APXS can conduct multi-spot (raster) investigations in a single morning or evening. Combining APXS raster spectra and Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) images, a modeled terrain is developed in which the positions of APXS field of views (FOV) can be localized, thereby mitigating arm placement uncertainty. An acquired APXS spectrum is the result of the weighted sum of the signals from within the FOV. The spatial sensitivity of the APXS consists of an off-nadir contribution in addition to a vertical separation (standoff with respect to the APXS detector) contribution [2, 3]. MAHLI images and focus merge (MFM) products facilitate a 3D surface model of the target [4] compensating for the effects of sample relief in an APXS spectrum. Employing a MFM relief map, APXS placement is modeled in three-dimensions, permitting variable APXS docking (standoff, deployment angle). Through minimization, we arrive at millimeter-scale chemistry of veins, diagenetic features and dust-free rock endmembers of Martian targets. Several rasters have been conducted with Curiosity's APXS on Mars including a study of the Garden City outcrop. The area is characterized by its contrasting light and dark veins of cm-scale surface relief. Three-dimensional localization and minimization indicated calcium sulfate as the major component of the light vein while the dark vein is enriched in CaO (without accompanying SO3), MnO, Ni and Zn, with respect to average Mars composition. References: [1] Gellert et al. (2014), LPSC XLV, #1876. [2] VanBommel et al. (2015), LPSC XLVI, #2049. [3] VanBommel et al. (2016), XRS #2681. [4] Edgett et al. (2015), MAHLI Tech Rept 0001. Acknowledgements: The MSL APXS is financed and managed by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) with Mac

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the complex between a human anti-alpha toxin antibody fragment and alpha toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Barnes, Arnita; Tkaczyk, Christine; Ferguson, Andrew; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2013-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha toxin (AT) has been crystallized in complex with the Fab fragment of a human antibody (MEDI4893). This constitutes the first reported crystals of AT bound to an antibody. The monoclinic crystals belonged to space group P2₁, with unit-cell parameters a=85.52, b=148.50, c=93.82 Å, β=99.82°. The diffraction of the crystals extended to 2.56 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained two MEDI4893 Fab-AT complexes. This corresponds to a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.3 Å3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 47%. The three-dimensional structure of this complex will contribute to an understanding of the molecular basis of the interaction of MEDI4893 with AT. It will also shed light on the mechanism of action of this antibody, the current evaluation of which in the field of S. aureus-mediated diseases makes it a particularly interesting case study. Finally, this study will provide the three-dimensional structure of AT in a monomeric state for the first time.

  19. X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsars shine thanks to the conversion of the gravitational energy of accreted material to X-ray radiation. The accretion rate is modulated by geometrical and hydrodynamical effects in the stellar wind of the pulsar companions and/or by instabilities in accretion discs. Wind driven flows are highly unstable close to neutron stars and responsible for X-ray variability by factors $10^3$ on time scale of hours. Disk driven flows feature slower state transitions and quasi periodic oscillations related to orbital motion and precession or resonance. On shorter time scales, and closer to the surface of the neutron star, X-ray variability is dominated by the interactions of the accreting flow with the spinning magnetosphere. When the pulsar magnetic field is large, the flow is confined in a relatively narrow accretion column, whose geometrical properties drive the observed X-ray emission. In low magnetized systems, an increasing accretion rate allows the ignition of powerful explosive thermonuclear burning at t...

  20. X-Ray Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1955-01-01

    15,000. • When developed In Kodak liquid X-ray developer for 5 min at a temperature of 200 C. b Film sensitivities vary with photon energy by the...for example temporomandibular -joint exposures where a skin dose of 25 r or more may be obtained during a single exposure with 65 kvp, 1.5 mm aluminum...communication. W. J. Updegrave, Temporomandibular articulation-X-ray examina- tion, Dental Radiography and Photography 26, No. 3, 41 (1953). H. 0. Wyckoff, R. J

  1. X-Rays from Saturn and its Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ron F.; Waite, J. Hunter; Gladstone, G. Randall; Cravens, Tom E.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2004 Saturn was observed by Chandra ACIS-S in two exposures, 00:06 to 11:00 UT on 20 January and 14:32 UT on 26 January to 01:13 UT on 27 January. Each continuous observation lasted for about one full Saturn rotation. These observations detected an X-ray flare from the Saturn's disk and indicate that the entire Saturnian X-ray emission is highly variable -- a factor of $\\sim$4 variability in brightness in a week time. The Saturn X-ray flare has a time and magnitude matching feature with the solar X-ray flare, which suggests that the disk X-ray emission of Saturn is governed by processes happening on the Sun. These observations also unambiguously detected X-rays from Saturn's rings. The X-ray emissions from rings are present mainly in the 0.45-0.6 keV band centered on the atomic OK$\\alpha$ fluorescence line at 525 eV: indicating the production of X-rays due to oxygen atoms in the water icy rings. The characteristics of X-rays from Saturn's polar region appear to be statistically consistent with those from its disk X-rays, suggesting that X-ray emission from the polar cap region might be an extension of the Saturn disk X-ray emission.

  2. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSherry, D.J

    2000-09-01

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The Laser-Produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron Al layer, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, broadly speaking, did not always agree with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron layer of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, where placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays where produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times. (author)

  3. X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  4. Combining Single-Molecule Optical Trapping and Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Measurements to Compute the Persistence Length of a Protein ER/K alpha-Helix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Sung, J.; Ali, M.

    2009-01-01

    A relatively unknown protein structure motif forms stable isolated single alpha-helices, termed ER/K alpha-helices, in a wide variety of proteins and has been shown to be essential for the function of some molecular motors. The flexibility of the ER/K alpha-helix determines whether it behaves...... as a force transducer, rigid spacer, or flexible linker in proteins. In this study, we quantity this flexibility in terms of persistence length, namely the length scale over which it is rigid. We use single-molecule optical trapping and small-angle x-ray scattering, combined with Monte Carlo simulations...... to demonstrate that the Kelch ER/K alpha-helix behaves as a wormlike chain with a persistence length of similar to 15 nm or similar to 28 turns of alpha-helix. The ER/K alpha-helix length in proteins varies from 3 to 60 nm, with a median length of similar to 5 nm. Knowledge of its persistence length enables us...

  5. Combining single-molecule optical trapping and small-angle x-ray scattering measurements to compute the persistence length of a protein ER/K alpha-helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, S; Sung, J; Ali, M; Doniach, S; Flyvbjerg, H; Spudich, J A

    2009-12-02

    A relatively unknown protein structure motif forms stable isolated single alpha-helices, termed ER/K alpha-helices, in a wide variety of proteins and has been shown to be essential for the function of some molecular motors. The flexibility of the ER/K alpha-helix determines whether it behaves as a force transducer, rigid spacer, or flexible linker in proteins. In this study, we quantify this flexibility in terms of persistence length, namely the length scale over which it is rigid. We use single-molecule optical trapping and small-angle x-ray scattering, combined with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate that the Kelch ER/K alpha-helix behaves as a wormlike chain with a persistence length of approximately 15 nm or approximately 28 turns of alpha-helix. The ER/K alpha-helix length in proteins varies from 3 to 60 nm, with a median length of approximately 5 nm. Knowledge of its persistence length enables us to define its function as a rigid spacer in a translation initiation factor, as a force transducer in the mechanoenzyme myosin VI, and as a flexible spacer in the Kelch-motif-containing protein.

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... and Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray ( ...

  7. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very small dose ... to produce pictures of the inside of the abdominal cavity. It is used to evaluate the stomach, liver, ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it ... organs, allow more of the x-rays to pass through them. As a result, bones appear white ...

  11. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone ... bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special preparation. You ...

  13. Soft X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is used to: ... and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  15. X-ray scattering measurements from thin-foil x-ray mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; BYRNAK, BP; Hornstrup, Allan

    1992-01-01

    in a test quadrant of the telescope structure and from ASTRO-D foils held in a simple fixture. The X-ray data is compared with laser data and other surface structure data such as STM, atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and electron micrography. The data obtained at Cu K-alpha(1), (8.05 keV) from all......Thin foil X-ray mirrors are to be used as the reflecting elements in the telescopes of the X-ray satellites Spectrum-X-Gamma (SRG) and ASTRO-D. High resolution X-ray scattering measurements from the Au coated and dip-lacquered Al foils are presented. These were obtained from SRG mirrors positioned...

  16. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  17. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  19. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  20. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  1. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  2. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pelvis What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  3. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Forearm A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: brazo What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  4. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  5. Role of a salt bridge in the model protein crambin explored by chemical protein synthesis: X-ray structure of a unique protein analogue, [V15A]crambin-alpha-carboxamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Duhee; Tereshko, Valentina; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Kent, Stephen B H

    2009-07-01

    We have used total chemical synthesis to prepare [V15A]crambin-alpha-carboxamide, a unique protein analogue that eliminates a salt bridge between the delta-guanidinium of the Arg(10) side chain and the alpha-carboxylate of Asn(46) at the C-terminus of the polypeptide chain. This salt bridge is thought to be important for the folding and stability of the crambin protein molecule. Folding, with concomitant disulfide bond formation, of the fully reduced [V15A]crambin-alpha-carboxamide polypeptide was less efficient than folding/disulfide formation for the [V15A]crambin polypeptide under a standard set of conditions. To probe the origin of this less efficient folding/disulfide bond formation, we separately crystallized purified synthetic [V15A]crambin-alpha-carboxamide and chemically synthesized [V15A]crambin and solved their X-ray structures. The crystal structure of [V15A]crambin-alpha-carboxamide showed that elimination of the Arg(10)-Asn(46) salt bridge caused disorder of the C-terminal region of the polypeptide chain and affected the overall 'tightness' of the structure of the protein molecule. These studies, enabled by chemical protein synthesis, strongly suggest that in native crambin the Arg(10)-Asn(46) salt bridge contributes to efficient formation of correct disulfide bonds and also to the well-ordered structure of the protein molecule.

  6. X-ray today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, U. [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    The interest attracted by the new imaging modalities tends to overshadow the continuing importance of projection radiography and fluoroscopy. Nevertheless, projection techniques still represent by far the greatest proportion of diagnostic imaging examinations, and play an essential role in the growing number of advanced interventional procedures. This article describes some of the latest developments in X-ray imaging technology, using two products from the Philips range as examples: the Integris Allura cardiovascular system with 3D image reconstruction, and the BV Pulsera: a high-end, multi-functional mobile C-arm system with cardiac capabilities. (orig.)

  7. SMM x ray polychromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  8. X-ray Pulsation Searches with NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Paul S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an X-ray telescope with capabilities optimized for the study of the structure, dynamics, and energetics of neutron stars through high-precision timing of rotation- and accretion-powered pulsars in the 0.2-12 keV band. It has large collecting area (twice that of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn camera), CCD-quality spectral resolution, and high-precision photon time tagging referenced to UTC through an onboard GPS receiver. NICER will begin its 18-month prime mission as an attached payload on the International Space Station around the end of 2016. I will describe the science planning for the pulsation search science working group, which is charged with searching for pulsations and studying flux modulation properties of pulsars and other neutron stars. A primary goal of our observations is to detect pulsations from new millisecond pulsars that will contribute to NICER’s studies of the neutron star equation of state through pulse profile modeling. Beyond that, our working group will search for pulsations in a range of source categories, including LMXBs, new X-ray transients that might be accreting millisecond pulsars, X-ray counterparts to unassociated Fermi LAT sources, gamma-ray binaries, isolated neutron stars, and ultra-luminous X-ray sources. I will survey our science plans and give an overview of our planned observations during NICER’s prime mission.

  9. Evolution of chromospheres and coronae in solar mass stars - A far-ultraviolet and soft X-ray comparison of Arcturus /K2 III/ and Alpha Centauri A /G2 V/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.; Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    IUE far-UV and Einstein Observatory soft X-ray observations for the red giant Arcturus and the nearby yellow dwarf Alpha-Centauri A, which are archetypes of solar mass stars in different stages of evolution, are compared. Evidence is found for neither coronal soft X-ray emission from the red giant, at surface flux levels of only 0.0006 that detected previously for the yellow dwarf, nor C II and IV resonance line emission at surface flux levels of only 0.02 those of the yellow dwarf. The resonance line upper limits and previous detections of the C II intersystem UV multiplet 0.01 near 2325 A provide evidence for an Arcturus outer atmosphere that is geometrically extended, tenuous and cool. The red giant has, in addition, a prominent cool stellar wind. An extensive tabulation of line identifications, widths and fluxes for the IUE far-UV echelle spectra of the two stars is given, and two competing explanations for the Wilson-Bappu effect are discussed.

  10. X-ray absorption near-edge structure of chromium ions in {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongkokua, W; Pongkrapan, S; Dararutana, P; Wathanakul, P [Gemmology and Mineral Sciences Special Research Unit, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); T-Thienprasert, J, E-mail: pwathanakul@gmail.co [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakorn-Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand)

    2009-09-01

    Both synthetic and natural {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples with different Cr concentrations were investigated by XANES. The Cr contents were analyzed using LA-ICP-MS technique prior to this experiment. XANES spectra combined with first principle calculations showed the transformation from {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+} to {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+},Cr{sup 3+} or {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the Cr-Cr content increased. The absorption transformation could be resulted from the change of environment around Cr{sup 3+} ions, i.e., the Al-O-Cr bonds decreased while the Cr-O-Cr bonds increased. Significant differences in XANES line shapes observed for synthetic and natural {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples suggested the differences in local environments around Cr ions in both samples. The XANES line shape of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+},Cr{sup 3+} or Cr ion pairs corresponded to the Cr content, which was also confirmed by the intensity ratios between N{sub 2}-line and sideband S of R-lines of photoluminescence spectra.

  11. X-ray reflection in oxygen-rich accretion discs of ultracompact X-ray binaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madej, O. K.; Garcia, Jeronimo; Jonker, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present spectroscopic X-ray data of two candidate ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs): 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1543-624. We confirm the presence of a broad O viii Ly alpha reflection line (at a parts per thousand 18 angstrom) using XMM-Newton and Chandra observations obtained in 2012 and 2013....... The donor star in these sources is a carbon-oxygen or oxygen-neon-magnesium white dwarf. Hence, the accretion disc is enriched with oxygen which makes the O viii Ly alpha line particularly strong. Modelling the X-ray reflection off a carbon- and oxygen-enriched, hydrogen- and helium-poor disc with models...... assuming solar composition likely biases several of the best-fitting parameters. In order to describe the X-ray reflection spectra self-consistently, we modify the currently available xillver reflection model. We present initial grids that can be used to model X-ray reflection spectra in UCXBs with carbon...

  12. Crystallochemical study of amides derived from 6{alpha}, 7{beta}-diidroxivoacapan-17{beta}-oic acid by X-ray diffraction; Estudo cristaloquimico de amidas derivadas do acido 6{alpha}, 7{beta}-di- hidroxivouacapan-17 {beta}-oico por difracao de raios-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, Marcello Cardoso; Prado Gambardella, Maria Teresa do [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica e Fisica Molecular

    1995-12-31

    Abstract. The 6{alpha}, 7{beta}-diidroxivoacapan-17{beta}-oic acid (DVA) is a Furane-diterpene isolated from Peterodon genus. It has anti inflammatory and analgesic properties. The purpose of this work is the characterization of amides derived from DVA, in order to understand the relationship between Chemical Structure and Biological Activity of Vouacapanes. The structures of DVA derivatives will be solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. (author) 15 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Crystallochemical study of esters derived from 6{alpha}, 7{beta}-diidroxivouacapan-17{beta}-oic acid by x-ray diffraction; Estudo cristaloquimico de esteres derivados do acido 6{alpha}, 6{beta}-di-hidroxivouacapan-17{beta}-oico por difracao de raios-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahao Junior, Odonirio [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1995-12-31

    The 6{alpha}, 7{beta}-diidroxivoacapan-17{beta}-oic acid (DVA) is a Furane-diterpene isolated from Peterodon genus. It has anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. The purpose of this work is the characterisation by x-ray single crystal diffraction technique of esters derived from DVA, to understand the relationship between chemical structure and biological activity of vouacapanes. (author) 15 refs.

  14. Diagram X-ray emission spectra of a hollow atom: the Kh alpha1,2 and Kh beta1,3 hypersatellites of Fe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, R; Huotari, S; Hämäläinen, K; Sharon, R; Kao, C C; Deutsch, M

    2003-11-07

    High-resolution Fe K(h) beta(1,3) and K(h) alpha(1,2) hypersatellite spectra were measured, using monochromatized synchrotron radiation photoexcitation. The lines' energies, splitting, excitation thresholds, and the K(h) alpha(1)/K(h) alpha(2) intensity ratio were derived with high accuracy. Having both spectra, not hitherto available for any atom with high resolution, allows separating out the energy shifts of the outer levels caused by a K shell spectator vacancy. Comparison with ab initio relativistic multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock calculations reveals that while the influence of relativity and QED effects is mostly accounted for, discrepancies remain in the lines' intensity ratio, which sensitively measures the intermediacy of the coupling. Similar discrepancies, of unknown origin, are found in the energy shifts of the outer levels due to the final-state K shell spectator vacancy.

  15. Alpha-synuclein oligomers and fibrils originate in two distinct conformer pools: a small angle X-ray scattering and ensemble optimisation modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtain, Cyril C; Kirby, Nigel M; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Barnham, Kevin J; Knott, Robert B; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; Rekas, Agata; Kenche, Vijaya B; Ryan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The 140 residue intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein (α-syn) self-associates to form fibrils that are the major constituent of the Lewy body intracellular protein inclusions, and neurotoxic oligomers. Both of these macromolecular structures are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Using ensemble optimisation modelling (EOM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) on a size-exclusion column equipped beamline, we studied how the distribution of structural conformers in α-syn may be influenced by the presence of the familial early-onset mutations A30P, E45K and A53T, by substituting the four methionine residues with alanines and by reaction with copper (Cu2+) or an anti-fibril organic platinum (Pt) complex. We found that the WT had two major conformer groups, representing ensembles of compact and extended structures. The population of the extended group was increased in the more rapidly fibril-forming E45K and A53T mutants, while the compact group was enlarged in the oligomer-forming A30P mutant. Addition of Cu2+ resulted in the formation of an ensemble of compact conformers, while the anti-fibril agent and alanine substitution substantially reduced the population of extended conformers. Since our observations with the mutants suggest that fibrils may be drawn from the extended conformer ensemble, we propose that the compact and extended ensembles represent the beginning of oligomer and fibril formation pathways respectively, both of which have been reported to lead to a toxic gain of function. Manipulating these pathways and monitoring the results by EOM and SAXS may be useful in the development of anti-Parkinson's disease therapies.

  16. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  17. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, M V; Zheludeva, S I; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O P; Arutynyan, E H; Kheiker, D M; Kreines, A Y; Lider, V V; Pashaev, E M; Shilina, N Y; Shishkov, V A

    2000-01-01

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  18. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  19. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  20. Soft X-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, Eberhard A

    1993-01-01

    This text describes optics mainly in the 10 to 500 angstrom wavelength region. These wavelengths are 50 to 100 times shorter than those for visible light and 50 to 100 times longer than the wavelengths of medical x rays or x-ray diffraction from natural crystals. There have been substantial advances during the last 20 years, which one can see as an extension of optical technology to shorter wavelengths or as an extension of x-ray diffraction to longer wavelengths. Artificial diffracting structures like zone plates and multilayer mirrors are replacing the natural crystals of x-ray diffraction.

  1. Direct Observations of the (Alpha to Gamma) Transformation at Different Input Powers in the Heat Affected Zone of 1045 C-Mn Steel Arc Welds Observed by Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2005-03-16

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) experiments have been performed during Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel at input powers ranging from 1000 W to 3750 W. In situ diffraction patterns taken at discreet locations across the width of the heat affected zone (HAZ) near the peak of the heating cycle in each weld show regions containing austenite ({gamma}), ferrite and austenite ({alpha}+{gamma}), and ferrite ({alpha}). Changes in input power have a demonstrated effect on the resulting sizes of these regions. The largest effect is on the {gamma} phase region, which nearly triples in width with increasing input power, while the width of the surrounding two phase {alpha}+{gamma} region remains relatively constant. An analysis of the diffraction patterns obtained across this range of locations allows the formation of austenite from the base metal microstructure to be monitored. After the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, a splitting of the austenite peaks is observed at temperatures between approximately 860 C and 1290 C. This splitting in the austenite peaks results from the dissolution of cementite laths originally present in the base metal pearlite, which remain after the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, and represents the formation of a second more highly alloyed austenite constituent. With increasing temperatures, carbon, originally present in the cementite laths, diffuses from the second newly formed austenite constituent to the original austenite constituent. Eventually, a homogeneous austenitic microstructure is produced at temperatures of approximately 1300 C and above, depending on the weld input power.

  2. Insights from soft X-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction pattern of a protein crystal is normally a product of the interference of electromagnetic waves scattered by electrons of the crystalline sample. The diffraction pattern undergoes systematic changes in case additionally X-ray absorption occurs, meaning if the wavelength of the pri......The diffraction pattern of a protein crystal is normally a product of the interference of electromagnetic waves scattered by electrons of the crystalline sample. The diffraction pattern undergoes systematic changes in case additionally X-ray absorption occurs, meaning if the wavelength...... of the primary X-ray beam is relatively close to the absorption edge of selected elements of the sample. The resulting effects are summarized as "anomalous dispersion" and can be always observed with "soft" X-rays (wavelength around 2 A) since they match the absorption edges of sulfur and chlorine....... A particularly useful application of this phenomenon is the experimental detection of the sub-structures of the anomalous scatterers in protein crystals. We demonstrate this here with a crystal of a C-terminally truncated variant of human CK2alpha to which two molecules of the inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta...

  3. High energy x-ray reflectivity and scattering study from spectrum-x-gamma flight mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Frederiksen, P. Kk

    1993-01-01

    Line radiation from Fe K-alpha(1), Cu K-alpha(1), and Ag K-alpha(1) is used to study the high energy X-ray reflectivity and scattering behavior of flight-quality X-ray mirrors having various Al substrates. When both the specular and the scattered radiation are integrated, near theoretical...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x-rays to pass through them. As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air ...

  5. Alpha-actinin expression at different differentiating time points from temporal lobe cerebral cortex neural stem cells to neuron-like cells using energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo YU; Hua Li; Zhe Du; Yang Hong; Meng Sang; Yuxiu Shi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alpha-actinin (a-actinin) plays a key role in neuronal growth cone migration during directional differentiation from neural stem cells (NSCs) to neurons.OBJECTIVE: To detect in situ microdistribution and quantitative expression of a-actinin during directional differentiation of NSCs to neurons in the temporal lobe cerebral cortex of neonatal rats.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Between January 2006 and December 2008, culture and directional differentiation of NSCs were performed at Department of Histology and Embryology, Preclinical Medical College, China Medical University. Immune electron microscopy was performed at Department of Histology and Embryology and Department of Electron Micrology, Preclinical Medical College, China Medical University. Spectrum analysis was performed at Laboratory of Electron Microscopy, Mental Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences.MATERIALS: Basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor, type-1 insulin like growth factor, and a-actinin antibody were provided by Gibco BRL, USA; rabbit-anti-rat nestin monoclonal antibody, rabbit-anti-rat neuron specific enolase polyclonal antibody, and EDAX-9100 energy dispersive X-ray analysis were provided by PHILIPS Company, Netherlands.METHODS: NSCs, following primary and passage culture, were differentiated with serum culture medium (DMEM/F12+10% fetal bovine serum+2 ng/mL brain-derived nerve growth factor+2 ng/mL type-1 insulin like growth factor).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Expression of a-actinin in neuron-like cells was quantitatively and qualitatively detected with immunocytochemistry using energy dispersive X-ray analysis. RESULTS: Immunocytochemistry, combined with electron microscopy, indicated that positive a-actinin expression was like a spheroid particle with high electron density. In addition, the expression was gradually concentrated from the nuclear edge to the cytoplasm and expanded into developing neurites, during

  6. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  7. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  8. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  9. Characterization of local chemistry and disorder in synthetic and natural {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials by X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottana, A. [Rome, Univ. `Roma Tre` (Italy). Dip. di Scienze Geologiche]|[INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Murata, T. [Kyoto, Univ. of Education (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Marcelli, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy)] [and others

    1997-11-01

    X-ray absorption fine spectra at the Al K-edge were measured experimentally on and calculated theoretically via the multiple-scattering formalism for a chemically pure and physically perfect synthetic {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ({alpha}-alumina), a natural `ruby/sapphire` (corundum) and a series of artificial `corundum` produced for technical purposes and used as geochemical standards. The Al K-edge spectra differ despite of the identical coordination (short-range arrangement) assumed by O around Al, and vary slightly in relation to the slightly different chemistries of the materials (substitutional defects) as well as on account of the location taken by foreign atoms in the structural lattices (positional defects). A quantitative treatment of the observed changes is made in terms of short-range modification of the coordination polyhedron and of medium- to long-range modifications in the overall structure; both of them induced by substitutions. In some technical `corundums`, the impurities of admixed `{beta}-alumina`, where Al is both in four- and six-fold coordination, produce another small but detectable effect on Al K-edges. Therefore, XAFS spectroscopy proves its potentials for both measuring a light element such as Al, and detecting minor coordination changes and substitutions (ca. 1{approx}3 wt.% as oxide) of the absorber by dilute other atoms, at least under favorable conditions as those occurring in this system are.

  10. X-ray monitoring optical elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvydko, Yury; Katsoudas, John; Blank, Vladimir D.; Terentyev, Sergey A.

    2016-12-27

    An X-ray article and method for analyzing hard X-rays which have interacted with a test system. The X-ray article is operative to diffract or otherwise process X-rays from an input X-ray beam which have interacted with the test system and at the same time provide an electrical circuit adapted to collect photoelectrons emitted from an X-ray optical element of the X-ray article to analyze features of the test system.

  11. X-ray diagnostics for TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.

    1982-12-01

    A short description of the x-ray diagnostic preparation for the TFTR tokamak is given. The x-ray equipment consists of the limiter x-ray monitoring system, the soft x-ray pulse-height-analysis-system, the soft x-ray imaging system and the x-ray crystal spectrometer. Particular attention is given to the radiation protection of the x-ray systems from the neutron environment.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the interleukin-3 alpha receptor bound to the Fab fragment of antibody CSL362.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Sophie E; Hercus, Timothy R; Nero, Tracy L; Dhagat, Urmi; Owczarek, Catherine M; Hardy, Matthew P; Fabri, Louis J; Scotney, Pierre D; Nash, Andrew D; Wilson, Nicholas J; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Interleukin-3 (IL-3) is a member of the beta common family of cytokines that regulate multiple functions of myeloid cells. The IL-3 receptor-specific alpha subunit (IL3Rα) is overexpressed on stem cells/progenitor cells of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, where elevated receptor expression correlates clinically with a reduced patient survival rate. The monoclonal antibody (MAb) CSL362 is a humanized MAb derived from the murine MAb 7G3, originally identified for its ability to specifically recognize the human IL-3 receptor and for blocking the signalling of IL-3 in myeloid and endothelial cells. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanism of CSL362 antagonism, a preliminary structure of human IL3Rα in complex with the MAb CSL362 has been determined.

  13. XRASE: The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnopper, H.W.; Silver, E.; Murray, S.

    2001-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer (XRASE) has a unique combination of features that will make it possible to address many of NASA's scientific goals. These include how galaxy clusters form, the physics and chemistry of the ISM, the heating of stellar coronae, the amount and content of intergalactic...... baryonic matter, the mass of black holes and the formation of disks and jets in AGN and galactic binaries. XRASE has a thin foil, multilayered telescope with a large collecting area up to 10 keV, especially in the Fe K alpha region (1100 cm(2)). Its microcalorimeter array combines high energy resolution (7...... eV at 6 keV) and efficiency with a field-of-view of 26 arcmin(2) . A deep orbit allows for long, continuous observations. Monitoring instruments in the optical (WOM-X), UV (TAUVEX) and hard X-RAY (GRAM) bands will offer exceptional opportunities to make simultaneous multi-wavelength observations....

  14. Amorphous silica studied by high energy x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, H.F.; Neuefeind, J.; Neumann, H.B.

    1995-01-01

    The use of hard X-rays (60-300 keV) for diffraction studies of disordered materials has several advantages: higher resolution in direct space, smaller correction terms, removal of truncation effects, the possibility for operating in extreme environments and for direct comparison between X-ray.......3(3)degrees with a rms value of 4.2(3)degrees. For the Si-O-Si bond angle, several types of distribution V(alpha) = V-1(alpha) sin(alpha) were investigated. Best fits were obtained for rather broad distributions with V having its maximum at 147 degrees and V-1 at 180 degrees....

  15. The peculiar optical-UV X-ray spectra of the X-ray weak quasar PG 0043+039

    CERN Document Server

    Kollatschny, W; Zetzl, M; Santos-Lleó, M; Rodríguez-Pascual, P M; Ballo, L; Talavera, A

    2016-01-01

    The object PG 0043+039 has been identified as a broad absorption line (BAL) quasar based on its UV spectra. However, this optical luminous quasar has not been detected before in deep X-ray observations, making it the most extreme X-ray weak quasar known today. This study aims to detect PG 0043+039 in a deep X-ray exposure. The question is what causes the extreme X-ray weakness of PG 0043+039? Does PG 0043+039 show other spectral or continuum peculiarities? We took simultaneous deep X-ray spectra with XMM-Newton, far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and optical spectra of PG 0043+039 with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) and Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) in July, 2013. We have detected PG 0043+039 in our X-ray exposure taken in 2013. We presented our first results in a separate paper (Kollatschny et al. 2015). PG 0043+039 shows an extreme {\\alpha}_ox gradient ({\\alpha}_ox =-2.37). Furthermore, we were able to verify an X-ray flux of this source in a reanalysis of the X-...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are easily accessible and are frequently compared to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patients and physicians. Because x-ray imaging is fast and easy, it is particularly useful in emergency ... diagnosis and treatment of the individual patient's condition. Ultrasound imaging, which uses sound waves instead of ionizing ...

  18. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  19. CELESTIAL X-RAY SOURCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    sources, (4) the physical conditions in the pulsating x-ray source in the Crab Nebula , and (5) miscellaneous related topics. A bibliography of all work performed under the contract is given. (Author)

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ionizing radiation to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose ... bone x-ray makes images of any bone in the body, including the hand, wrist, arm, elbow, ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bony fragments following treatment of a fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement ... A portable x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken to the patient in ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological ...

  3. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  4. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  5. X-ray laser; Roentgenlaser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, Emil J.; Breiby, Dag W.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray is among the most important research tools today, and has given priceless contributions to all disciplines within the natural sciences. State of the art in this field is called XFEL, X-ray Free Electron Laser, which may be 10 thousand million times stronger than the x-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble. In addition XFEL has properties that allow the study of processes which previously would have been impossible. Of special interest are depictions on atomic- and molecular level by the use of x-ray holographic methods, and being able to study chemical reactions in nature's own timescale, the femtosecond. Conclusion: The construction of x-ray lasers is a natural development in a scientific field which has an enormous influence on the surrounding society. While the discovery of x-ray was an important breakthrough in itself, new applications appear one after the other: Medical depiction, dissemination, diffraction, DNA and protein structures, synchrotron radiation and tomography. There is reason to believe that XFEL implies a technological leap as big as the synchrotrons some decades ago. As we are now talking about studies of femtosecond and direct depiction of chemical reactions, it is obvious that we are dealing with a revolution to come, with extensive consequences, both scientifically and culturally. (EW)

  6. X-Rays, Pregnancy and You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging X-Rays, Pregnancy and You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... the decision with your doctor. What Kind of X-Rays Can Affect the Unborn Child? During most ...

  7. Surface and sub-surface oxidation of {alpha}-Cu-(17 at.%)Al(1 0 0) studied by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy and low energy He{sup +} scattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchuk, T. [Department of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Akhvlediani, R. [Department of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Hoffman, A. [Department of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)]. E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il

    2005-04-01

    In this study the initial stages of oxidation of the {alpha}-Cu-(17 at.%)Al(1 0 0) single crystal oriented alloy surface was investigated by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy and low energy He{sup +} scattering spectroscopy. It was found that oxygen adsorption can be divided in two sequential stages: (i) a fast process, up to 15-20 L exposure, in which oxygen adsorbs on the alloy's surface resulting mostly in the formation of Al-O chemisorbed bonds; and (ii) a slower process during which oxygen adsorbs forming Cu-O and Al-O chemisorbed bonds concurrent with diffusion of O to the sub-surface and Al segregation to the surface region. The surface oxidation rate is much higher than the sub-surface one. The rate of Al segregation increases with oxygen exposure and involves both surface and sub-surface regions. Annealing of the oxidized alloy surface results in a pronounced segregation of Al and formation of an aluminum oxide layer.

  8. X-Rays from Superbubbles in the Large Magellanic Cloud. VI. A Sample of Thirteen Superbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Dunne, B C; Chu, Y H; Dunne, Bryan C.; Points, Sean D.; Chu, You-Hua

    2001-01-01

    We present ROSAT observations and analysis of thirteen superbubbles in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Eleven of these observations have not been previously reported. We have studied the X-ray morphology of the superbubbles, and have extracted and analyzed their X-ray spectra. Diffuse X-ray emission is detected from each of these superbubbles, and X-ray emission is brighter than is theoretically expected for a wind-blown bubble, suggesting that the X-ray emission from the superbubbles has been enhanced by interactions between the superbubble shell and interior SNRs. We have also found significant positive correlations between the X-ray luminosity of a superbubble and its H-alpha luminosity, expansion velocity, and OB star count. Further, we have found that a large fraction of the superbubbles in the sample show evidence of ``breakout'' regions, where hot X-ray emitting gas extends beyond the H-alpha shell.

  9. Evolution of Substrate Specificity within a Diverse Family of [beta/alpha]-Barrel-fold Basic Amino Acid Decarboxylases X-ray Structure Determination of Enzymes with Specificity for L-Arginine and Carboxynorspermidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Lee, Jeongmi; Michael, Anthony J.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A. (Sungkyunkwan); (UTSMC)

    2010-08-26

    Pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate (PLP)-dependent basic amino acid decarboxylases from the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel-fold class (group IV) exist in most organisms and catalyze the decarboxylation of diverse substrates, essential for polyamine and lysine biosynthesis. Herein we describe the first x-ray structure determination of bacterial biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase (CANSDC) to 2.3- and 2.0-{angstrom} resolution, solved as product complexes with agmatine and norspermidine. Despite low overall sequence identity, the monomeric and dimeric structures are similar to other enzymes in the family, with the active sites formed between the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel domain of one subunit and the {beta}-barrel of the other. ADC contains both a unique interdomain insertion (4-helical bundle) and a C-terminal extension (3-helical bundle) and it packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit with the insertions forming part of the dimer and tetramer interfaces. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed that the ADC solution structure is a tetramer. Specificity for different basic amino acids appears to arise primarily from changes in the position of, and amino acid replacements in, a helix in the {beta}-barrel domain we refer to as the 'specificity helix.' Additionally, in CANSDC a key acidic residue that interacts with the distal amino group of other substrates is replaced by Leu{sup 314}, which interacts with the aliphatic portion of norspermidine. Neither product, agmatine in ADC nor norspermidine in CANSDC, form a Schiff base to pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate, suggesting that the product complexes may promote product release by slowing the back reaction. These studies provide insight into the structural basis for the evolution of novel function within a common structural-fold.

  10. Variability and the X-ray/UV ratio of Active Galactic Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Vagnetti, F.; Turriziani, S.; Trevese, D.; Antonucci, M.

    2010-01-01

    The observed relation between the X-ray radiation from AGNs, originating in the corona, and the optical/UV radiation from the disk is usually described by the anticorrelation between the UV to X-ray slope alpha_ox and the UV luminosity. Many factors can affect this relation, including: enhanced X-ray emission associated with the jets of radio-loud AGNs; X-ray absorption associated with the UV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) outflows; other X-ray absorption not associated with BALs; intrinsic X-ra...

  11. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  12. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  13. X-ray echo spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1--0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power $> 10^8$) with broadband $\\simeq$~5--13~meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than $10^3$ signal e...

  14. Measurements of $L_{31}, L_{3}\\alpha, L_{3}\\beta, L_{2}\\beta, L_{2} \\gamma, L_{1}\\beta, L_{1}\\gamma, L_{\\beta}, L_{\\gamma}, L_{1x}, L_{2x}$ and $L_{3x}$ X-ray production cross sections and L subshell fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Ertugrul, M

    2001-01-01

    The L/sub 3l/, L/sub 3 alpha /, L/sub 3 beta /, L/sub 2 beta /, L/sub 2 gamma /, L/sub 1 beta /, L/sub 1 gamma /, L/sub beta /, L/sub gamma /, L/sub 1x/, L/sub 2x/ and L/sub 3x/ X-ray production cross sections in Re, W and Ta have been measured using the 59.5 keV incident photon energy. The measurements were performed using an Am-241 radioisotope as the photon source and a Si(Li) detector. The L X-rays are resolved with a new analytical method. The obtained L/sub l/, L/sub alpha /, L /sub 3 beta /, L/sub 2 beta /, L/sub 2 gamma /, L/sub 1 beta /, L/sub 1 gamma /, L/sub beta /, L/sub gamma /, L/sub 1x/, L/sub 2x/ and L /sub 3x/ X-rays are compared with the theoretical calculations using the most reliable theoretical values of L/sub i/ (i=1, 2, 3) subshell photoionization cross sections, fluorescence yields, X-ray emission rates and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities. The results in the present paper are found to be in good agreement with the calculated values. (23 refs).

  15. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  16. Uranium M x-ray emission spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Krause, M.O.

    1977-03-01

    The uranium M x-ray spectrum from a thick metallic target excited by 12-keV electrons was measured by the PAX (photoelectron spectrometry for the analysis of x rays) technique. Energies of the strongest lines were obtained with an accuracy of 0.1 eV using Ag L..beta../sub 1/ and Ag L..cap alpha../sub 1/ as standards. Widths of the uranium lines were obtained by deconvoluting the measured Voigt profiles, and the experimental values were found to agree satisfactorily with McGuire's Hartree-Slater predictions. Natural widths of 4.0(3) and 3.8(3) eV were derived for the M/sub 4/ and M/sub 5/ levels, respectively, and the energies of the M/sub 4/, M/sub 5/, N/sub 2/, and N/sub 3/ levels in uranium metal were determined. Relative intensities of the M lines were measured, and branching ratios were found to be in fair agreement with relativistic Hartree-Slater predictions. The satellite structures of the M..cap alpha../sub 1/ and M..beta.. lines were interpreted in terms of the pertinent multiple-hole configurations. Finally, an approximate analytic expression for the Voigt half-width and its graphical representation are given.

  17. Analisis Klaster K-Means dari Data Luas Grup Sunspot dan Data Grup Sunspot Klasifikasi Mc.Intosh yang membangkitkan Flare Soft X-Ray dan H-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Jumaroh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Analisis klaster merupakan teknik interpendensi yang mengelompokkan suatu objek berdasarkan kemiripan dan kedekatan jarak antar objek. Pengelompokan objek dengan jumlah banyak membutuhkan waktu yang lama. Salah satu analisis klaster yang dapat digunakan dalam situasi ini adalah analisis klaster non hierarki, yaitu K-means. Pada artikel ini mengelompokkan data luas grup sunspot dan data grup sunspot klasifikasi Mc.Intosh yang membangkitkan flare soft X-Ray dan Hα. Untuk mengetahui luas grup sunspot dan grup sunspot klasifikasi Mc.Intosh yang berpeluang membangkitkan flare soft X-Ray dan Hα dengan intensitas ledakan yang tinggi dan rendah. Berdasarkan hasil analisis, diperoleh dua klaster yaitu klaster pertama yang tergolong mampu membangkitkan flare Soft X-Ray dan Hα dengan intensitas yang tinggi. Sedangkan klaster kedua yang tergolong mampu membangkitkan flare Soft X-Ray dan Hα dengan intensitas yang rendah

  18. X-ray fluorescence cross sections for K and L x rays of the elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, M.O.; Nestor, C.W. Jr.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.; Ricci, E.

    1978-06-01

    X-ray fluorescence cross sections are calculated for the major x rays of the K series 5 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 101, and the three L series 12 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 101 in the energy range 1 to 200 keV. This calculation uses Scofield's theoretical partical photoionization cross sections, Krause's evaluation of fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields, and Scofield's theoretical radiative rates. Values are presented in table and graph format, and an estimate of their accuracy is made. The following x rays are considered: K..cap alpha../sub 1/, K..cap alpha../sub 1/,/sub 2/, K..beta../sub 1/, K..beta../sub 1/,/sub 3/, L..cap alpha../sub 1/, L..cap alpha../sub 1/,/sub 2/, L..beta../sub 1/, L..beta../sub 2/,/sub 15/, L..beta../sub 3/, Ll, L..gamma../sub 1/, L..gamma../sub 4/, and L/sub 1/ ..-->.. L/sub 2/,/sub 3/. For use in x-ray fluorescence analysis, K..cap alpha.. and L..cap alpha.. fluorescence cross sections are presented at specific energies: TiK identical with 4.55 keV, CrK identical with 5.46 keV, CoK identical with 7.00 keV, CuK identical with 8.13 keV, MoK..cap alpha.. identical with 17.44 keV, AgK identical with 22.5 keV, DyK identical with 47.0 keV, and /sup 241/Am identical with 59.54 keV. Supplementary material includes fluorescence and Coster--Kronig yields, fractional radiative rates, fractional fluorescence yields, total L-shell fluorescence cross sections, fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields in condensed matter, effective fluorescence yields, average L-shell fluorescence yield, L-subshell photoionization cross section ratios, and conversion factors from barns per atom to square centimeters per gram.

  19. Broad Band X-Ray Observations of the Narrow Line X-Ray Galaxy NGC 5506

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T G; Otani, C; Matsuoka, M; Awaki, H

    1999-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of broad band X-ray data of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC5506. 2-10 keV band are detected during a 1-day ASCA observation, while no significant change in the 2-10 keV continuum shape is found. The ASCA spectrum consists of an absorbed power-law, a 'soft excess' below 2 keV, and an Fe K$\\alpha$ emission line at 6.4 keV. The 'soft excess' can be well described by either thermal emission from very low abundance material at a temperature kT$\\simeq$0.8 keV, or scattered/leaking flux from the primary power-law plus a small amount of thermal emission. Analysis of ROSAT HRI data reveals that the soft X-ray emission is extended on kpc scales in this object, and the extended component may account for most of the soft X-ray excess observed by the ASCA. The result suggests that in this type 2 AGN, the 'soft excess' at least partly comes from an extended region, imposing serious problem for the model in which the source is partially covered. Fe K$\\alpha$ profile is complex and can not be satisfac...

  20. CE -3有效载荷 APXS 可靠性预计及评估%The Reliability Prediction and Assessment of Chang'E-3 Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高旻; 王焕玉; 张承模; 崔兴柱; 梁晓华; 彭文溪

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the reliability prediction of Chang'E-3 Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer. The payload is aimed to identify elements of lunar surface, and it is capable to determine the abundances of the elements.Weakness in the design could be found by calculating the reliability of the APXS reliability prediction reliability of a given comparison.APXS electronics systems carry out aging tests.The life factor of operating temperature could be obtained by Arrhenius reaction model.And then the reliability prediction of the results could be assessed through Bayesian point estimation and Bayesian internal estimation method.The main factors affecting the results were discussed.The reliability requirements of APXS under the development phase are pro-posed.%粒子激发X射线谱仪( APXS)是以元素成分鉴别和定量分析为目标的CE-3巡视器有效载荷。该工作针对APXS电子学系统建立了可靠性模型,并进行了可靠性预计。通过对APXS可靠性预计计算的可靠度与给定的可靠度进行对比,发现设计中的薄弱环节。对APXS电子学系统进行老化试验,用阿伦尼乌斯( ARRHENISUS)反应模型获得了工作温度下的寿命因子,利用贝叶斯法点估计和区间估计对试验的结果进行了可靠性评估,并对影响结果的主要因素进行讨论,提出APXS研制阶段的各项可靠性要求。

  1. X-ray sensitivity measurements on CVD diamond film detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulon, F.; Pochet, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Electronique et d`Instrumentation Nucleaire; Gheeraert, E. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1993-12-31

    Microwave chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films have been used to fabricate radiation detectors. The polycrystalline diamond films have a resistivity of 10{sup 12} ohm.cm and carrier mobility and lifetime of about 280 cm{sup 2}/V.s and 530 ps. The detector response to laser pulses (355, 532 and 1064 nm), X-ray flux (15-50 keV) and alpha particles ({sup 241}Am, 5.49 MeV) has been investigated. The response speed of the detector is in the 100 ps range. A sensitivity of about 3 x 10{sup -10} A/V.Gy.s was measured under 50 keV X-ray flux. The detector current response to X-ray flux is almost linear. It is also shown that CVD diamond detectors can be used for alpha particle counting. (authors). 9 figs., 25 refs.

  2. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  3. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  4. X-rays and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  5. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  8. An International comparison of the crystallinity of calibration materials for the analysis of respirable alpha-quartz using X-ray diffraction and a comparison with results from the infrared KBr disc method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Peter; Kauffer, Edmond; Moulut, Jean-Claude; Dion, Chantal; Beauparlant, Martin; Fernandez, Pablo; Key-Schwartz, Rosa; Friede, Bernd; Wake, Derrick

    2009-08-01

    It is important that analytical results, produced to demonstrate compliance with exposure limits are comparable, to ensure controls are monitored to similar standards. Correcting a measurement result of respirable alpha-quartz for the percentage of crystalline material in the calibration dust is good analytical practice and significant changes in the values assigned to calibration materials will affect the interpretation of results by an analyst or occupational hygiene professional. The reissue of the certification for the quartz reference material NIST 1878a in 2005 and differences in comparative values obtained by other work created uncertainty about the values of crystallinity assigned to national calibration dusts for alpha-quartz. Members of an International Organization for Standardization working group for silica measurement ISO/TC146/SC2/WG7 collaborated to investigate the comparability of results by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to reach a consensus. This paper lists the values recommended by the working group for use with XRD analysis. The values for crystallinity obtained for some of the materials (NIST 1878, Min-U-Sil5 and A9950) were 6-7% lower than the original certification or estimates reported in other comparisons. Crystallinity values obtained by XRD gave a good correlation with BET surface area measurements (r2 = 0.91) but not with mean aerodynamic particle size (r2 = 0.31). Subsamples of two of the materials (A9950 Respirable and Quin 1 Respirable) with smaller particle size distribution than their parent material did not show any significant change in their values for crystallinity, suggesting that the area XRD measurement of these materials within the particle size range collected is more dependent on how the quartz is formed geologically or how it is processed for use. A comparison of results from laboratories using the infrared (IR) and KBr disc method showed that this method is more dependent than XRD on differences in the particle size

  9. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  10. Developing small vacuum spark as an x-ray source for calibration of an x-ray focusing crystal spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd [Photonic Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Karami, Mohammad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-10-15

    A new technique of x-ray focusing crystal spectrometers' calibration is the desired result. For this purpose the spectrometer is designed to register radiated copper K{alpha} and K{beta} lines by using a flat {alpha}-quartz crystal. This experiment uses pre-breakdown x-ray emissions in low vacuum of about 2.5-3 mbar. At this pressure the pinch will not form so the plasma will not radiate. The anode material is copper and the capacity of the capacitor bank is 22.6 nF. This experiment designed and mounted a repetitive triggering system to save the operator time making hundreds of shots. This emission amount is good for calibration and geometrical adjustment of an optical crystal x-ray focusing spectrometer.

  11. Polymorphic differences in alpha- and beta-form crystals of 2R, 4S, 6-fluoro-2-methyl-spiro[chroman-4,4'-imidazoline]-2',5-dione (M79175) as determined by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashizawa, K; Uchikawa, K; Hattori, T; Sato, T; Miyake, Y

    1988-07-01

    Polymorphic differences in alpha- and beta-form crystals of 2R, 4S, 6-fluoro-2-methyl-spiro[chroman-4,4'-imidazoline]-2',5-dione (M79175; 1) were studied by X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. X-ray powder diffraction indicated the longest spacing of the unit cells to be 14.9 and 12.4 A for the alpha- and beta-form crystals, respectively. The infrared spectra showed the absorption band assigned to NH streching vibration for the alpha-form crystals to be centered at 3250 cm-1 and that for the beta-form crystals to split into two peaks, at 3150 and 3425 cm-1. The enthalpies of fusion were 26.3 kJ/mol at 517.5 K and 31.3 kJ/mol at 501.0 K, respectively. Transformation from the beta- to alpha-form was observed at various heating rates, which were enhanced by the presence of a small amount of alpha-form crystals previously added to the beta-form. The former appeared to serve as a source of nuclei for the growth of both forms. These results confirm that the alpha-form crystal is more stable than the beta-form.

  12. X-ray scattering from surfaces of organic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidalevitz, D.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Smilgies, D.-M.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on the surfaces of organic crystals. The (010) cleavage planes of beta-alanine and alpha-glycine were investigated, and both specular and off-specular crystal truncation rods were measured. This allowed a determination of the molecular layering...

  13. A Spatially Resolved X-ray Image of a Star Like the Sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J H; Kürster, M

    1993-10-08

    Observations made with the x-ray satellite ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) have produced the first spatially resolved x-ray image of a corona around a star like our sun. The star is the secondary in the eclipsing binary system alpha Coronae Borealis (CrB), which consists of one star of spectral type A0V and one of type G5V. The x-ray light curve of alpha CrB shows a total x-ray eclipse during secondary optical minimum, with the G star behind the A star. The totality of the eclipse demonstrates that the A-type component in alpha CrB is x-ray dark and that the x-ray flux arises exclusively from the later-type companion. The x-ray eclipse ingress and egress are highly asymmetric compared with the optical eclipse, indicating a highly asymmetric x-ray intensity distribution on the surface of the G star. From a detailed modeling of the ingress and egress of the x-ray light curve, an eclipse map of the G star was constructed by a method based on an optimization by simulated annealing.

  14. X-Ray-powered Macronovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after the short gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B. Although the r-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires a huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose a new model in which the X-ray excess gives rise to the simultaneously observed infrared excess via thermal re-emission, and explore what constraints this would place on the mass and velocity of the ejecta. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source such as the central engine like a black hole, and allows for a broader parameter region than the previous models, in particular a smaller ejecta mass ˜ {10}-3{--}{10}-2{M}⊙ and higher iron abundance mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and the implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  15. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  16. Be/X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to review the observational properties of Be/X-ray binaries. The open questions in Be/X-ray binaries include those related to the Be star companion, that is, the so-called "Be phenomenon", such as, timescales associated to the formation and dissipation of the equatorial disc, mass-ejection mechanisms, V/R variability, and rotation rates; those related to the neutron star, such as, mass determination, accretion physics, and spin period evolution; but also, those that result from the interaction of the two constituents, such as, disc truncation and mass transfer. Until recently, it was thought that the Be stars' disc was not significantly affected by the neutron star. In this review, I present the observational evidence accumulated in recent years on the interaction between the circumstellar disc and the compact companion. The most obvious effect is the tidal truncation of the disc. As a result, the equatorial discs in Be/X-ray binaries are smaller and denser than those around isolat...

  17. Temperature Effect Correction for Chang'E-3 Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer%嫦娥三号粒子激发X射线谱仪能谱温度影响的修正方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴明烨; 樊瑞睿; 刘雅清; 董亦凡; 吴峰; 赵小芸; 王焕玉; 彭文溪; 张承模; 张家字; 崔兴柱; 梁晓华; 汪锦州; 杨家卫

    2012-01-01

    Alpha particle X-ray spectrometer ( APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang'E-3 lunar rover of China's Lunar Exploration Project The present paper introduces briefly the components of APXS, how it works and its working environment on the lunar surface. The environmental temperature effect has been studied with simulations and experiments, and the results show that the temperature of the APXS sensor will be varying during the measuring on the lunar surface. And another experiment reveals that the energy resolution becomes worse if the sensor's temperature is varying. In this paper, a correction method based on Pearson's chi-squared test is presented. The method can improve the energy resolution when the sensor's temperature is varying. We have tested the method with the spectra acquired by APXS in the temperature varying period of Temperature Cycling Test, and the results show that the method is efficient and reliable.%粒子激发X射线谱仪(APXS)是中国探月工程二期嫦娥三号月球巡视器的有效载荷之一.简要介绍APXS的工作原理、组成部分,以及它在月面的工作环境,通过模拟及实验研究了月面热环境对APXS的影响,结果显示,APXS将工作在显著的变温过程中.相对恒温过程,APXS在变温过程中的能量分辨率明显变差.为了消除该温度效应的影响,提出了一种基于皮尔逊卡方检验(Pearson's chi-squared test)的修正方法,能够有效提高变温过程中的能量分辨率.通过温度循环试验中变温阶段的数据对该方法进行了测试,结果表明,该方法具有很好的修正效果和较高的可靠性.

  18. The X-Ray, optical, and infrared counterpart to GRB 980703

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, P.M.; Galama, T.J.; Owens, A.; Oosterbroek, T.; Geballe, T.R.; van Paradijs, J.; Groot, P.J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We report on X-ray, optical, and infrared follow-up observations of GRB 980703. We detect a previously unknown X-ray source in the GRB error box; assuming a power-law decline, we find for its decay index alpha<-0.91 (3 sigma). We invoke host-galaxy extinction to match the observed spectral slope wit

  19. Multimessenger astronomy with pulsar timing and X-ray observations of massive black hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, A; Reynolds, M T; Dotti, M

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that very massive (>10^8\\msun), cosmologically nearby (z10^-13 erg s^-1 cm^-2 will be in the reach of upcoming X-ray observatories. Double relativistic K\\alpha lines may be observable in a handful of low redshift (z<0.3) sources by proposed deep X-ray probes, such as Athena. (Abridged)

  20. The 300 Kpc Long X-Ray Jet in PKS 1127-145, Z=1.18 Quasar: Constraining X-Ray Emission Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Stawarz, Lukasz; /Heidelberg Observ. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Cheung, C.C.; /KIPAC,; Harris, D.E.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Sikora, Marek; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Bechtold,; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-11-20

    We present a {approx} 100 ksec Chandra X-ray observation and new VLA radio data of the large scale, 300 kpc long X-ray jet in PKS 1127-145, a radio loud quasar at redshift z=1.18. With this deep X-ray observation we now clearly discern the complex X-ray jet morphology and see substructure within the knots. The X-ray and radio jet intensity profiles are seen to be strikingly different with the radio emission peaking strongly at the two outer knots while the X-ray emission is strongest in the inner jet region. The jet X-ray surface brightness gradually decreases by an order of magnitude going out from the core. The new X-ray data contain sufficient counts to do spectral analysis of the key jet features. The X-ray energy index of the inner jet is relatively flat with {alpha}{sub x} = 0.66 {+-} 0.15 and steep in the outer jet with {alpha}{sub x} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. We discuss the constraints implied by the new data on the X-ray emission models and conclude that ''one-zone'' models fail and at least a two component model is needed to explain the jet's broad-band emission. We propose that the X-ray emission originates in the jet proper while the bulk of the radio emission comes from a surrounding jet sheath. We also consider intermittent jet activity as a possible cause of the observed jet morphology.

  1. Particle and X-ray damage in pn-CCDs

    CERN Document Server

    Meidinger, N; Strüder, L

    2000-01-01

    The fully depleted pn-junction charge coupled device (pn-CCD) has been developed as a detector for X-ray imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy for the X-ray satellite missions XMM and ABRIXAS. If the detector is exposed to a particle radiation environment, the energy resolution is degraded due to charge transfer losses and a dark current increase. In a first experiment, prototype devices were irradiated with 10 MeV protons. After completion of the detector development, the proton irradiation was repeated for a quantitative study of the radiation damage, relevant for the satellite missions. The irradiation test was extended by a 5.5 MeV alpha-particle and a 6 keV X-ray exposure of the pn-CCD, including the CAMEX preamplifier chip.

  2. Progress in kinetic inductance thermometers for X-ray calorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawley, G. L.; Kelley, R. L.; Moseley, S. H.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional X-ray microcalorimeters have so far used ionimplanted resistors for thermometers. Recently, however, several new methods for sensing small temperature changes have been suggested that are nondissipative. Such devices may have intrinsically better energy resolution by eliminating the Johnson noise present in resistive devices. The use of kinetic inductance thermometers for X-ray microcalorimeters is being investigated. This technique exploits the strong temperature dependence of magnetic penetration depth of thin superconducting films. The prototype system, designed for operation at 1.5 K, uses films of aluminum and tin. Once the expected temperature sensitivity and alpha particle detection have been demonstrated, aluminum will be replaced with titanium or another material with a suitable critical temperature and the device will be operated at 0.3 K. At this temperature, the energy resolution from thermal noise should be sufficiently good to allow X-ray detection.

  3. The Herbig Ae Star HD 163296 in X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Grady, Carol A.; Wassell, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the nearby Herbig Ae star HD 163296 at 100 AU angular resolution is reported. A point-like, soft (kT approximately 0.5 approximately kev), emission-line source is detected at the location of the star with an X-ray luminosity of 4.0e29 erg/s. In addition, faint emission along the direction of a previously-detected Ly-alpha-emitting jet and Herbig-Haro outflow may be present. The relatively low luminosity, lack of a hard spectral component, and absence of strong X-ray variability in HD 163296 can be explained as originating from optically-thin shock-heated gas accreting onto the stellar surface along magnetic field lines. This would require a (dipole) magnetic field strength at the surface of HD 163296 of at least approximately 100 approximately G and perhaps as high as several kG.

  4. Characterization of New Hard X-ray Cataclysmic Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, F.; deMartino, D.; Falanga, M.; Mukai, K.; Matt, G.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Masetti, N.; Mouchet, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We aim at characterizing a sample of nine new hard X-ray selected Cataclysmic Variable (CVs), to unambiguously identify them as magnetic systems of the Intermediate Polar (IP) type. Methods. We performed detailed timing and spectral analysis by using X-ray, and simultaneous UV and optical data collected by XMM-Newton, complemented with hard X-ray data provided by INTEGRAL and Swift. The pulse arrival time were used to estimate the orbital periods. The broad band X-ray spectra were fitted using composite models consisting of different absorbing columns and emission components. Results. Strong X-ray pulses at the White Dwarf (WD) spin period are detected and found to decrease with energy. Most sources are spin-dominated systems in the X-rays, though four are beat dominated at optical wavelengths. We estimated the orbital period in all system (except for IGR J16500-3307), providing the first estimate for IGRJ08390-4833, IGRJ18308-1232, and IGR J18173-2509. All X-ray spectra are multi-temperature. V2069 Cyg and RX J0636+3535 poses a soft X-ray optically thick component at kT approx. 80 eV. An intense K (sub alpha) Fe line at 6.4 keV is detected in all sources. An absorption edge at 0.76 keV from OVII is detected in IGR J08390-4833. The WD masses and lower limits to the accretion rates are also estimated. Conclusions. We found all sources to be IPs. IGR J08390-4833, V2069 Cyg, and IGR J16500-3307 are pure disc accretors, while IGR J18308-1232, IGR J1509-6649, IGR J17195-4100, and RX J0636+3535 display a disc-overflow accretion mode. All sources show a temperature gradient in the post-shock regions and a highly absorbed emission from material located in the pre-shock flow which is also responsible for the X-ray pulsations. Reflection at the WD surface is likely the origin of the fluorescent iron line. There is an increasing evidence for the presence of a warm absorber in IPs, a feature that needs future exploration. The addition of two systems to the subgroup of

  5. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  6. X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: escoliosis What It Is A scoliosis X-ray is a relatively safe and painless test ...

  7. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  8. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) A A A ... español Radiografía: fémur What It Is A femur X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine A A A What's ... columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  10. Submicron hard X-ray fluorescence imaging of synthetic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Mark P., E-mail: mjensen@anl.gov [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Aryal, Baikuntha P. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gorman-Lewis, Drew [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Paunesku, Tatjana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Actinide elements are mapped with L-edge X-rays and better than 400 nm resolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A typical detection limit was 2.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} moles Pu {mu}m{sup -2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XANES measurements provide chemical information in 0.1 {mu}m{sup 2} spots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selection of materials for encapsulation is important for avoiding interferences. - Abstract: Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) using hard X-rays focused into sub-micron spots is a powerful technique for elemental quantification and mapping, as well as microspectroscopic measurements such as {mu}-XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure). We have used XFM to image and simultaneously quantify the transuranic element plutonium at the L{sub 3} or L{sub 2}-edge as well as Th and lighter biologically essential elements in individual rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after exposure to the long-lived plutonium isotope {sup 242}Pu. Elemental maps demonstrate that plutonium localizes principally in the cytoplasm of the cells and avoids the cell nucleus, which is marked by the highest concentrations of phosphorus and zinc, under the conditions of our experiments. The minimum detection limit under typical acquisition conditions with an incident X-ray energy of 18 keV for an average 202 {mu}m{sup 2} cell is 1.4 fg Pu or 2.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} moles Pu {mu}m{sup -2}, which is similar to the detection limit of K-edge XFM of transition metals at 10 keV. Copper electron microscopy grids were used to avoid interference from gold X-ray emissions, but traces of strontium present in naturally occurring calcium can still interfere with plutonium detection using its L{sub {alpha}} X-ray emission.

  11. A High Resolution X-ray Image of the Jet in M 87

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Davis, D S; Perlman, E S; Wise, M; Canizares, C R; Harris, D E

    2001-01-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray image of the jet in M 87 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A1, are consistent with a simple power law with alpha = 1.46 +/- 0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton mo...

  12. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  13. X-Ray Visions of SS Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory is the most sophisticated X-ray observatory launched by NASA. Chandra is designed to observe X-rays from highenergy regions of the universe, such as X-ray binary stars. On September 14, 2000, triggered by alerts from amateur astronomers worldwide, Chandra observed the outburst of the brightest northern dwarf nova SS Cygni. The cooperation of hundreds of amateur variable star astronomers and the Chandra X-Ray scientists and spacecraft specialists provided proof that the collaboration of amateur and professional astronomers is a powerful tool to study cosmic phenomena.

  14. X-rays from solar system objects

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Gladstone, G Randall; Cravens, Thomas E; Lisse, Carey M; Dennerl, Konrad; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Wargelin, Bradford J; Waite, J Hunter; Robertson, Ina; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Snowden, Steven L; Kharchenko, Vasili; 10.1016/j.pss.2006.11.009

    2010-01-01

    During the last few years our knowledge about the X-ray emission from bodies within the solar system has significantly improved. Several new solar system objects are now known to shine in X-rays at energies below 2 keV. Apart from the Sun, the known X-ray emitters now include planets (Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn), planetary satellites (Moon, Io, Europa, and Ganymede), all active comets, the Io plasma torus (IPT), the rings of Saturn, the coronae (exospheres) of Earth and Mars, and the heliosphere. The advent of higher-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories has been of great benefit in advancing the field of planetary X-ray astronomy. Progress in modeling X-ray emission, laboratory studies of X-ray production, and theoretical calculations of cross-sections, have all contributed to our understanding of processes that produce X-rays from the solar system bodies. At Jupiter and Earth, both auroral and non-auroral disk X-ray emissions have been observed. X-ray...

  15. Chandra ACIS Survey of X-ray Point Sources in Nearby Galaxies. II. X-ray Luminosity Functions and Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Song; Liu, Jifeng; Bregman, Joel N

    2016-01-01

    Based on the recently completed {\\it Chandra}/ACIS survey of X-ray point sources in nearby galaxies, we study the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for X-ray point sources in different types of galaxies and the statistical properties of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Uniform procedures are developed to compute the detection threshold, to estimate the foreground/background contamination, and to calculate the XLFs for individual galaxies and groups of galaxies, resulting in an XLF library for 343 galaxies of different types. With the large number of surveyed galaxies, we have studied the XLFs and ULX properties across different host galaxy types, and confirm with good statistics that the XLF slope flattens from lenticular ($\\alpha\\sim1.50\\pm0.07$) to elliptical ($\\sim1.21\\pm0.02$), to spirals ($\\sim0.80\\pm0.02$), to peculiars ($\\sim0.55\\pm0.30$), and to irregulars ($\\sim0.26\\pm0.10$). The XLF break dividing the neutron star and black hole binaries is also confirmed, albeit at quite different break luminosi...

  16. Characteristic x-ray emission from undermines plasmas irradiated by ultra-intense lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Christoph [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-05-05

    Between FY09 and FY11 we have conducted more than a dozen three-week experimental campaigns at high-power laser facilities around the world to investigate laser-channeling through x-ray and optical imaging and the conversion from laser-energy to xrays. We have performed simultaneous two-wavelength x-ray imaging (K-alpha and He-alpha) to distinguish the hot-plasma region (hot-spot) from the laser-produced electrons (K-alpha). In addition, we have initiated a new collaboration with SNL and have performed first shots on the 100 TW beamlet chamber to commission a fast x-ray streak camera to be used to investigate the temporal evolution of our K-alpha sources. We also collaborated on campaigns at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) and the LANL Trident laser to employ laser produced x-ray sources for Thomson scattering off dense matter.

  17. X-rays from the First Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, S P

    2000-01-01

    Observations of the Ly-alpha forest at z~3 reveal a metallicity Z~0.01 Z(solar). The high-redshift supernovae that polluted the IGM also accelerated relativistic electrons. Since the energy density of the CMB scales as (1+z)^4, at high redshift these electrons cool via inverse Compton scattering. Thus, the first star clusters emit X-rays. Unlike stellar UV ionizing photons, these X-rays can escape easily from their host galaxies. Due to their large mean free path, these X-rays would have reionized the universe in a gradual, homogeneous fashion, regardless of the spatial distribution of sources. In this scenario, the ionization fraction of the single-phase IGM rises gradually, in contrast to canonical models where HII regions expand in a neutral IGM. X-rays also played an important role in reheating the universe to higher temperatures than possible with UV radiation. In particular, they may be responsible for observed Ly-alpha forest line widths in excess of predictions from hydrodynamic simulations. These X-r...

  18. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianxi; Macdonald, C A

    2013-02-07

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  19. X-Ray Attenuation Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D.; Toor, A.

    2000-03-03

    To minimize the pulse-to-pulse variation, the LCLS FEL must operate at saturation, i.e. 10 orders of magnitude brighter spectral brilliance than 3rd-generation light sources. At this intensity, ultra-high vacuums and windowless transport are required. Many of the experiments, however, will need to be conducted at a much lower intensity thereby requiring a reliable means to reduce the x-ray intensity by many orders of magnitude without increasing the pulse-to-pulse variation. In this report we consider a possible solution for controlled attenuation of the LCLS x-ray radiation. We suggest using for this purpose a windowless gas-filled cell with the differential pumping. Although this scheme is easily realizable in principle, it has to be demonstrated that the attenuator can be made short enough to be practical and that the gas loads delivered to the vacuum line of sight (LOS) are acceptable. We are not going to present a final, optimized design. Instead, we will provide a preliminary analysis showing that the whole concept is robust and is worth further study. The spatial structure of the LCLS x-ray pulse at the location of the attenuator is shown in Fig. 1. The central high-intensity component, due to the FEL, has a FWHM of {approx}100 {micro}m. A second component, due to the undulator's broad band spontaneous radiation is seen as a much lower intensity ''halo'' with a FWHM of 1 mm. We discuss two versions of the attenuation cell. The first is directed towards a controlled attenuation of the FEL up to the 4 orders of magnitude in the intensity, with the spontaneous radiation halo being eliminated by collimators. In the second version, the spontaneous radiation is not sacrificed but the FEL component (as well as the first harmonic of the spontaneous radiation) gets attenuated by a more modest factor up to 100. We will make all the estimates assuming that the gas used in the attenuator is Xenon and that the energy of the FEL is 8.25 keV. At

  20. Controlling X-rays With Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  1. X-ray state analysis by means of electron capture decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, Yoichi [Miyagi Univ. of Education, Sendai (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    K{alpha} X-ray induced by EC decay of {sup 55}Fe and {sup 71}Ge-labeled compounds were measured by wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer equipped position sensitive proportional detector. In both nuclides, peak energies of K{alpha}{sub 2} X-rays are lower (-0.4 - -0.6 eV) than those of Mn and Ga compounds by photoionization. It is thought that the causes of these differences are intensity of high energy satellite peaks by shake up process. (author)

  2. Facile purification of Escherichia coli expressed tag-free recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha from supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yongdong; Zhao, Dawei; Li, Xiunan; Yu, Rong; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-03-01

    Fusing affinity tag at N-terminus was reported to decrease the biological activity of the recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha. Although preparation of tag-free rhTNF-α has already been achieved, the processes were yet laborious, especially in large scale. In this paper, tag-free rhTNF-α was almost equally synthesized by Escherichia coli in both soluble and insoluble forms. A two-step ion exchange chromatography, DEAE-Sepharose combined with CM-Sepharose, was developed to purify the soluble specie from supernatant after cell lysis. Native PAGE and HP-SEC showed the rhTNF-α extracted from supernatant existed in a homogeneous form. HP-SAX and SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated the purity of the final fraction was over 98% with a very high recovery of 75%. Circular dichroism spectrum demonstrated that β-sheet structure was dominant and fluorescence analysis suggested no dramatic exposure of aromatic amino acid residues on the protein surface. Bioassay indicated that purified rhTNF-α was biologically active with a specific activity of approximately 2.0×10(7)U/mg. All these results suggested that this two-step ion exchange chromatography is efficient for preparation of biologically active tag-free rhTNF-α from supernatant.

  3. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region I: Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Kaya; Krivonos, Roman; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Tomsick, John A; Alexander, David M; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barret, Didier; Barriere, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E; Canipe, Alicia M; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Harrison, Fiona A; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E; Luu, Vy; Madsen, Kristen K; Mao, Peter H; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Westergaard, Niels J; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with $\\Gamma\\sim1.3$-$2.3$ up to ~50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe K$\\alpha$ fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broad-band X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density ($\\sim10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws wi...

  4. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  5. Diffractive X-ray Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted space- time in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  6. A Compact X-Ray System for Macromolecular Crystallography. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor; Joy, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high flux x-ray system for macromolecular crystallography that combines a microfocus x-ray generator (40 gm FWHM spot size at a power level of 46.5Watts) and a 5.5 mm focal distance polycapillary optic. The Cu K(sub alpha) X-ray flux produced by this optimized system is 7.0 times above the X-ray flux previously reported. The X-ray flux from the microfocus system is also 3.2 times higher than that produced by the rotating anode generator equipped with a long focal distance graded multilayer monochromator (Green optic; CMF24-48-Cu6) and 30% less than that produced by the rotating anode generator with the newest design of graded multilayer monochromator (Blue optic; CMF12-38-Cu6). Both rotating anode generators operate at a power level of 5000 Watts, dissipating more than 100 times the power of our microfocus x-ray system. Diffraction data collected from small test crystals are of high quality. For example, 42,540 reflections collected at ambient temperature from a lysozyme crystal yielded R(sub sym) 5.0% for the data extending to 1.7A, and 4.8% for the complete set of data to 1.85A. The amplitudes of the reflections were used to calculate difference electron density maps that revealed positions of structurally important ions and water molecules in the crystal of lysozyme using the phases calculated from the protein model.

  7. Handbook of X-Ray Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornack, Günter

    2007-01-01

    This sourcebook is intended as an X-ray data reference for scientists and engineers working in the field of energy or wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry and related fields of basic and applied research, technology, or process and quality controlling. In a concise and informative manner, the most important data connected with the emission of characteristic X-ray lines are tabulated for all elements up to Z = 95 (Americium). This includes X-ray energies, emission rates and widths as well as level characteristics such as binding energies, fluorescence yields, level widths and absorption edges. The tabulated data are characterized and, in most cases, evaluated. Furthermore, all important processes and phenomena connected with the production, emission and detection of characteristic X-rays are discussed. This reference book addresses all researchers and practitioners working with X-ray radiation and fills a gap in the available literature.

  8. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  9. Topological X-Rays and MRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Let K be a compact subset of the interior of the unit disk D in the plane and suppose one can't see through the boundary of D and identify K. However, assume that one can take "topological X-rays" of D which measure the "density" of K along the lines of the X-rays. By taking these X-rays from all directions, a "topological MRI" is generated for…

  10. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities.

  11. TW Hya: Spectral Variability, X-Rays, and Accretion Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Dupree, A K; Cranmer, S R; Luna, G J M; Schneider, E E; Bessell, M S; Bonanos, A; Crause, L A; Lawson, W A; Mallik, S V; Schuler, S C

    2012-01-01

    The nearest accreting T Tauri star, TW Hya was observed with spectroscopic and photometric measurements simultaneous with a long se gmented exposure using the CHANDRA satellite. Contemporaneous optical photometry from WASP-S indicates a 4.74 day period was present during this time. Absence of a similar periodicity in the H-alpha flux and the total X-ray flux points to a different source of photometric variations. The H-alpha emission line appears intrinsically broad and symmetric, and both the profile and its variability suggest an origin in the post-shock cooling region. An accretion event, signaled by soft X-rays, is traced spectroscopically for the first time through the optical emission line profiles. After the accretion event, downflowing turbulent material observed in the H-alpha and H-beta lines is followed by He I (5876A) broadening. Optical veiling increases with a delay of about 2 hours after the X-ray accretion event. The response of the stellar coronal emission to an increase in the veiling follow...

  12. The efficacy of x-ray pelvimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, J.J. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago); Garbaciak, J.A. Jr.; Ryan, G.M., Jr.

    1982-06-01

    Comparison is made of x-ray pelvimetry use on a public and private service in 1974 with experience in 1979, when the clinic service did no x-ray pelvimetry while the private service continued as before. It is concluded that the use of x-ray pelvimetry is inadequate as a predictor of cesarean section because of cephalopelvic disproportion, does not improve neonatal mortality, and poses potential hazards to the mother and fetus. Its use in the management of breech presentations is not currently established by our data. Guidelines are presented for the management of patients in labor without using x-ray pelvimetry.

  13. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90{sup o} Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated {approx} 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 {angstrom}) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has

  14. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  15. Low Energy X-Ray Diagnostics - 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    appreciable back- [25] G. L. Johnson and R. F. Wuerker, X - RayO cs and ground at the diffraction line. It is for this reason X -Ray Microanalysis (Academic...I A-0AIIG 93 AWERICAN INST OF PHYSICS NEW YORK F/6 14/2 LOW ENERGY X -RAY DIAGNOSTICS - 1981.(U) 1961 D T ATTWOOO. 8 L HENKE AFOSAt-?SSA-61-00ORZN...RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAl RJRAL AU M ’IAN[I)ARDS I ,* A Focusing, Filtering, and Scattering of V. Rehn Soft X -Rays by Mirrors 162 Synthetic

  16. Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fangjun

    2011-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) will be China's first astronomical satellite. On board HXMT there are three kinds of slat-collimated telescopes, the High Energy X-ray Telescope (HE, 20-250 keV, 5000 cm^2), the Medium Energy X-ray Telescope (ME, 5-30 keV, 952 cm^2), and the Low Energy X-ray Telescope (LE, 1-15 keV, 384 cm^2).

  17. X-rays from the youngest stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  18. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yokogawa, J.; Koyama, K. [Kyoto Univ., Faculty of Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B {approx} 10{sup 15} G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  19. The Herbig Ae star HD 163296 in X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Swartz, D A; Elsner, R F; Ghosh, K K; Grady, C A; Wassell, E; Woodgate, B E; Kimble, R A; Swartz, Douglas A.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Grady, Carol A.; Wassell, Edward; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Kimble, Randy A.

    2005-01-01

    Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the nearby Herbig Ae star HD 163296 at 100 AU angular resolution is reported. A point-like, soft (kT~0.5 keV), emission-line source is detected at the location of the star with an X-ray luminosity of 4.0e29 erg/s. In addition, faint emission along the direction of a previously-detected Ly-alpha-emitting jet and Herbig-Haro outflow may be present. The relatively low luminosity, lack of a hard spectral component, and absence of strong X-ray variability in HD 163296 can be explained as originating from optically-thin shock-heated gas accreting onto the stellar surface along magnetic field lines. This would require a (dipole) magnetic field strength at the surface of HD 163296 of at least ~100 G and perhaps as high as several kG. HD 163296 joins the T Tauri star TW Hya in being the only examples known to date of pre-main-sequence stars whose quiescent X-ray emission appears to be completely dominated by accretion.

  20. X-Ray Emission from the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Galeazzi, E U M

    2006-01-01

    The number of detected baryons in the Universe at z<0.5 is much smaller than predicted by standard big bang nucleosynthesis and by the detailed observation of the Lyman alpha forest at red-shift z=2. Hydrodynamical simulations indicate that a large fraction of the baryons today is expected to be in a ``warm-hot'' (10^5-10^7K) filamentary gas, distributed in the intergalactic medium. This gas, if it exists, should be observable only in the soft X-ray and UV bands. Using the predictions of a particular hydrodynamic model, we simulated the expected X-ray flux as a function of energy in the 0.1-2 keV band due to the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), and compared it with the flux from local and high red-shift diffuse components. Our results show that as much as 20% of the total diffuse X-ray background (DXB) in the energy range 0.37-0.925keV could be due to X-ray flux from the WHIM, 70% of which comes from filaments at redshift z between 0.1 and 0.6. Simulations done using a FOV of 3', comparable with that ...

  1. High-resolution x-ray analysis with multilayer gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Jonnard, Philippe; André, Jean-Michel; 10.1002/xrs.1128

    2013-01-01

    Periodic multilayers are nowadays widely used to perform x-ray analysis in the soft x-ray range (photon energy lower than 1 keV). However, they do not permit to obtain high-resolution spectra like natural or synthetic crystals. Thus, multilayers cannot resolve interferences between close x-ray lines. It has been shown and demonstrated experimentally that patterning a grating profile within a multilayer structure leads to a diffractive optics with improved resolving power. We illustrate the use of a Mo/B4C multilayer grating in the Fe L and C K spectral ranges, around 700 eV and 280 eV respectively. First, in the Fe L range, the improved spectral resolution enables us to distinguish the Fe L\\alpha and L\\beta emissions (separated by 13 eV). In addition, using a sample made of a mix of LiF and an iron ore, we show that it is possible to easily resolve the F K and Fe L emissions. These examples demonstrate that an improved x-ray analysis can be obtained with multilayer gratings when there is the need to study sam...

  2. X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalender, Willi A [Institute of Medical Physics, University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Henkestr. 91, D-91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-07-07

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention. (review)

  3. SMM X-ray polychromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Keith T.; Haisch, Bernhard M. (Compiler); Lemen, James R. (Compiler); Acton, L. W.; Bawa, H. S.; Claflin, E. S.; Freeland, S. L.; Slater, G. L.; Kemp, D. L.; Linford, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The range of observing and analysis programs accomplished with the X-Ray Polychromator (XRP) instruments during the decline of solar cycle 21 and the rise of the solar cycle 22 is summarized. Section 2 describes XRP operations and current status. This is meant as a guide on how the instrument is used to obtain data and what its capabilities are for potential users. The science section contains a series of representative abstracts from recently published papers on major XRP science topics. It is not meant to be a complete list but illustrates the type of science that can come from the analysis of the XRP data. There then follows a series of appendixes that summarize the major data bases that are available. Appendix A is a complete bibliography of papers and presentations produced using XRP data. Appendix B lists all the spectroscopic data accumulated by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). Appendix C is a compilation of the XRP flare catalogue for events equivalent to a GOES C-level flare or greater. It lists the start, peak and end times as well as the peak Ca XIX flux.

  4. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  5. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  6. X-raying clumped stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, L M; Feldmeier, A

    2008-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of stellar winds. X-rays originate from optically thin shock-heated plasma deep inside the wind and propagate outwards throughout absorbing cool material. Recent analyses of the line ratios from He-like ions in the X-ray spectra of O-stars highlighted problems with this general paradigm: the measured line ratios of highest ions are consistent with the location of the hottest X-ray emitting plasma very close to the base of the wind, perhaps indicating the presence of a corona, while measurements from lower ions conform with the wind-embedded shock model. Generally, to correctly model the emerging X-ray spectra, a detailed knowledge of the cool wind opacities based on stellar atmosphere models is prerequisite. A nearly grey stellar wind opacity for the X-rays is deduced from the analyses of high-resolution X-ray spectra. This indicates that the stellar winds are strongly clumped. Furthermore, the nearly symmetric shape of X-ray emission line profiles can be explained if t...

  7. X-Ray Detection Visits the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Luis; Farinha, Ana; Pinto, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Film has been used to detect x-rays since the early days of their discovery by Rontgen. Although nowadays superseded by other techniques, film still provides a cheap means of x-ray detection, making it attractive in high-school or undergraduate university courses. If some sort of quantitative result is required, the film's optical absorbance or…

  8. X-ray lasers: Multicolour emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao

    2016-11-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the US can now generate multicolour X-ray pulses with unprecedented brightness using the fresh-slice technique. The development opens the way to new forms of spectroscopy.

  9. Refraction contrast in X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Keyrilaeinen, J; Suortti, P

    2002-01-01

    A two-crystal diffractometer in the non-dispersive configuration is used for measurement of the effects of refraction in weakly absorbing test objects. Characteristic K alpha sub 1 radiation from a fine-focus X-ray tube with Mo anode is used. The probing beam is about 70 mu m wide and 3 mm high. The sample is placed between the monochromator and analyzer, and it is scanned through the beam. The analyzer is tuned to reflect at the low-angle slope, at the top, or at the high-angle slope of the rocking curve, when the sample is not in the beam. Refraction changes the angle of incidence on the analyzer causing changes in intensity. The observed intensity distributions are exactly reproduced by a calculation, where only the effects of refraction are included. The effects of in-beam interference are negligible or very small, which is also verified by changing the distance between the object and the detector.

  10. New Insights into X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Casares, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    X-ray binaries are excellent laboratories to study collapsed objects. On the one hand, transient X-ray binaries contain the best examples of stellar-mass black holes while persistent X-ray binaries mostly harbour accreting neutron stars. The determination of stellar masses in persistent X-ray binaries is usually hampered by the overwhelming luminosity of the X-ray heated accretion disc. However, the discovery of high-excitation emission lines from the irradiated companion star has opened new routes in the study of compact objects. This paper presents novel techniques which exploits these irradiated lines and summarises the dynamical masses obtained for the two populations of collapsed stars: neutron stars and black holes.

  11. X-ray Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, H; Guigay, J P; Detlefs, C

    2016-01-01

    Following the recent developement of Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) in the visible range by Zheng et al. (2013), we propose an adaptation for hard x-rays. FPM employs ptychographic reconstruction to merge a series of low-resolution, wide field of view images into a high-resolution image. In the x-ray range this opens the possibility to overcome the limited numerical aperture of existing x-ray lenses. Furthermore, digital wave front correction (DWC) may be used to charaterize and correct lens imperfections. Given the diffraction limit achievable with x-ray lenses (below 100 nm), x-ray Fourier ptychographic microscopy (XFPM) should be able to reach resolutions in the 10 nm range.

  12. X-ray diffraction: instrumentation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Udriştioiu, Elena Gabriela; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful nondestructive technique for characterizing crystalline materials. It provides information on structures, phases, preferred crystal orientations (texture), and other structural parameters, such as average grain size, crystallinity, strain, and crystal defects. X-ray diffraction peaks are produced by constructive interference of a monochromatic beam of X-rays scattered at specific angles from each set of lattice planes in a sample. The peak intensities are determined by the distribution of atoms within the lattice. Consequently, the X-ray diffraction pattern is the fingerprint of periodic atomic arrangements in a given material. This review summarizes the scientific trends associated with the rapid development of the technique of X-ray diffraction over the past five years pertaining to the fields of pharmaceuticals, forensic science, geological applications, microelectronics, and glass manufacturing, as well as in corrosion analysis.

  13. LOBSTER - New Space X-Ray telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudec, R. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Pina, L. [Faculty of Nuclear Science, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Simon, V. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Sveda, L. [Faculty of Nuclear Science, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Inneman, A.; Semencova, V. [Center for Advanced X-ray Technologies, Reflex, Prague (Czech Republic); Skulinova, M. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

    2007-04-15

    We discuss the technological and scientific aspects of fully innovative very wide-field X-ray telescopes with high sensitivity. The prototypes of Lobster telescopes designed, developed and tested are very promising, allowing the proposals for space projects with very wide-field Lobster Eye X-ray optics to be considered for the first time. The novel telescopes will monitor the sky with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They are expected to contribute essentially to study of various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flashes (XRFs), galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc. For example, the Lobster optics based X-ray All Sky Monitor is capable to detect around 20 GRBs and 8 XRFs yearly and this will surely significantly contribute to the related science.

  14. Globular Cluster X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Verbunt, F

    2004-01-01

    After a brief historical overview we discuss the luminous X-ray sources in globular clusters of our Galaxy. This is followed by an overview of the very luminous X-ray sources studied in globular clusters of 14 other galaxies, and a discussion of their formation and the relation to X-ray sources outside globular clusters. We describe the discovery and classification of low-luminosity X-ray sources, and end the review with some remarks on the formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters. Observational results are summarized in three tables. Comments are very welcome. Please send them to F.W.M.Verbunt@astro.uu.nl and lewin@mit.edu.

  15. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  16. X-Rays from Green Pea Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorby, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    X-rays may have contributed to the heating and reionization of the IGM in the early universe. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) within small, low-metallicity galaxies are expected to be the main source of X-rays at this time. Since studying these high-redshift galaxies is currently impossible, we turn to local analogs that have the same properties the galaxies in the early are expected to have. A number of recent studies have shown an enhanced number of HMXBs in nearby low metallicity galaxies. We propose to observe a sample of metal-deficient luminous compact galaxies (LCG) in order to determine if the X-ray luminosity is enhanced relative to SFR, thereby providing further evidence to the importance of X-rays in the early universe.

  17. An X-ray view of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, K P

    2013-01-01

    I present an overview of observational studies of quasars of all types, with particular emphasis on X-ray observational studies. The presentation is based on the most popularly accepted unified picture of quasars - collectively referred to as AGN (active galactic nuclei) in this review. Characteristics of X-ray spectra and X-ray variability obtained from various X-ray satellites over the last 5 decades have been presented and discussed. The contribution of AGN in understanding the cosmic X-ray background is discussed very briefly. Attempt has been made to provide up-to-date information; however, this is a vast subject and this presentation is not intended to be comprehensive.

  18. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. I. Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Krivonos, Roman

    2015-01-01

    pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe K alpha fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model......We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). Nu......STAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Gamma similar to 1.3-2.3 up to similar to 50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young...

  19. First X-ray fluorescence CT experimental results at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Biao; YANG Qun; XIE Hong-Lan; DU Guo-Hao; XIAO Wi-Qiao

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence CT is a non-destructive technique for detecting elemental composition and distribution inside a specimen. In this paper, the first experimental results of X-ray fluorescence CT obtained at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline (BL13W1) are described. The test samples were investigated and the 2D elemental image was reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. In the sample the element Cd was observed. Up to now, the X-ray fluorescence CT could be carried out at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline.

  20. The Diffuse and Compact X-ray Components of the Starburst Galaxy Henize~2-10

    CERN Document Server

    Kobulnicky, Henry A

    2010-01-01

    Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 reveals a strong nuclear point source and at least two fainter compact sources embedded within a more luminous diffuse thermal component. Spectral fits to the nuclear X-ray source imply an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity L_x >10^40 erg/s for reasonable power law or blackbody models, consistent with accretion onto a >50 solar mass black hole behind a foreground absorbing column of N_H>10^23 /cm^2. Two of these point sources have L_x=2-5 x 10^38 erg/s, comparable to luminous X-ray binaries. These compact sources constitute a small fraction (<16%) of the total X-ray flux from He~2-10 in the 0.3--6.0 keV band and just 31% of the X-rays in the hard 1.1--6.0 keV band which is dominated by diffuse emission. Two-temperature solar-composition plasmas (kT~0.2 keV and kT~0.7 keV) fit the diffuse X-ray component as well as single-temperature plasmas with enhanced alpha/Fe ratios. Since the observed radial gradient of the X-ray surface brightness closel...

  1. An X-ray Imaging Survey of Quasar Jets -- Testing the Inverse Compton Model

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Schwartz, D A; Murphy, D W; Lovell, J E J; Worrall, D M; Birkinshaw, M; Perlman, E S; Godfrey, L; Jauncey, D L

    2011-01-01

    We present results from continued Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of a flux-limited sample of flat spectrum radio-emitting quasars with jet-like extended structure. X-rays are detected from 24 of the 39 jets observed so far. We compute the distribution of alpha_rx, the spectral index between the X-ray and radio bands, showing that it is broad, extending at least from 0.8 to 1.2. While there is a general trend that the radio brightest jets are detected most often, it is clear that predicting the X-ray flux from the radio knot flux densities is risky so a shallow X-ray survey is the most effective means for finding jets that are X-ray bright. We test the model in which the X-rays result from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by relativistic electrons in the jet moving with high bulk Lorentz factor nearly along the line of sight. Depending on how the jet magnetic fields vary with z, the observed X-ray to radio flux ratios do not follow the redshift dependence exp...

  2. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bluem, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik); Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Egger, J.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L.M. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Eades, J.; Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Gotta, D. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-05-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cylcotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm{sup 3}. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH{sub 4} drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman {alpha} transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time. (orig.).

  3. X-Ray Synchrotron Emitting Fe-Rich Ejecta in SNR RCW 86

    CERN Document Server

    Rho, J; Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P; Rho, Jeonghee; Dyer, Kristy K.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P

    2002-01-01

    Supernova remnants may exhibit both thermal and nonthermal X-ray emission. We present Chandra observations of RCW 86. Striking differences in the morphology of X-rays below 1 keV and above 2 keV point to a different physical origin. Hard X-ray emission is correlated fairly well with the edges of regions of radio emission, suggesting that these are the locations of shock waves at which both short-lived X-ray emitting electrons, and longer-lived radio-emitting electrons, are accelerated. Soft X-rays are spatially well-correlated with optical emission from nonradiative shocks, which are almost certainly portions of the outer blast wave. These soft X-rays are well fit with simple thermal plane-shock models. Harder X-rays show Fe K alpha emission and are well described with a similar soft thermal component, but a much stronger synchrotron continuum dominating above 2 keV, and a strong Fe K alpha line. Quantitative analysis of this line and the surrounding continuum shows that it cannot be produced by thermal emiss...

  4. Kinetics of alpha-PcCu --> beta-PcCu isothermal conversion in air and thermal behavior of beta-PcCu from in situ real-time laboratory parallel-beam X-ray powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballirano, Paolo; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-07-09

    The kinetics of the alpha-PcCu --> beta-PcCu conversion in air has been followed, under isothermal conditions, in situ real-time in the 423-443 K temperature range. Data have been fitted following the JMAK model. The reaction order of the kinetics at 423 K is consistent with a diffusion controlled, deceleratory nucleation rate process for 2D laminar particles, whereas at higher temperatures it is consistent with a phase boundary controlled, deceleratory nucleation rate process for 2D laminar particles. At 423 K, the overall transformation mechanism implies three steps: growth of the alpha-PcCu phase, disordering of adjacent columns of molecules of phthalocyanine, and nucleation and growth of the beta-PcCu phase. The calculated empirical activation energy is of 187 kJ/mol significantly greater than that for the alpha-PcCo --> beta-PcCo conversion. This fact seems to support the reported different structures of alpha-PcCo and alpha-PcCu. Investigation of the thermal behavior of beta-PcCu indicates a strongly anisotropic thermal expansion that follows the alpha(c) > alpha(a) approximately = alpha(b) trend. Moreover, the beta angle decreases with increasing temperature. Such anisotropy is consistent with the geometry of the very weak N3...H3 hydrogen bond which acts mainly along the c axis.

  5. X-Ray Background from Early Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What impact did X-rays from the first binary star systems have on the universe around them? A new study suggests this radiation may have played an important role during the reionization of our universe.Ionizing the UniverseDuring the period of reionization, the universe reverted from being neutral (as it was during recombination, the previous period)to once again being ionized plasma a state it has remained in since then. This transition, which occurred between 150 million and one billion years after the Big Bang (redshift of 6 z 20), was caused by the formation of the first objects energetic enough to reionize the universes neutral hydrogen.ROSAT image of the soft X-ray background throughout the universe. The different colors represent different energy bands: 0.25 keV (red), 0.75 keV (green), 1.5 keV (blue). [NASA/ROSAT Project]Understanding this time period in particular, determining what sources caused the reionization, and what the properties were of the gas strewn throughout the universe during this time is necessary for us to be able to correctly interpret cosmological observations.Conveniently, the universe has provided us with an interesting clue: the large-scale, diffuse X-ray background we observe all around us. What produced these X-rays, and what impact did this radiation have on the intergalactic medium long ago?The First BinariesA team of scientists led by Hao Xu (UC San Diego) has suggested that the very first generation of stars might be an important contributor to these X-rays.This hypothetical first generation, Population III stars, are thought to have formed before and during reionization from large clouds of gas containing virtually no metals. Studies suggest that a large fraction of Pop III stars formed in binaries and when those stars ended their lives as black holes, ensuing accretion from their companions could produceX-ray radiation.The evolution with redshift of the mean X-ray background intensities. Each curve represents a different

  6. Identification of origin of single aerosol particles using polycapillary X-ray lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Tianxi [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China) and Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China) and Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)], E-mail: stxbeijing@163.com; Liu Zhiguo; Zhu Guanghua; Liu Hui [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Xu Qing [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100039 (China); Li Yude; Wang Guangpu; Sun Hongbo; Luo Ping; Pan Qiuli; Ding Xunliang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2009-01-15

    A micro X-ray fluorescence (Micro-XRF) spectrometer based on a polycapillary focusing X-ray lens (PFXRL) and a laboratory X-ray source was designed to carry out the XRF analysis of single aerosol particles. The minimum detection limit (MDL) of this Micro-XRF spectrometer was 9 ppm for the Fe-K{alpha}. The percentage of the particles of vehicle exhaust among aerosol particles was studied in Beijing, Chinese capital, during the test of odd-even driving restrictions for Beijing 2008 Olympics Games. This Micro-XRF spectrometer had potential applications in the analysis of single aerosol particles.

  7. X-ray reflection in oxygen-rich accretion discs of ultra-compact X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Madej, O K; Jonker, P G; Parker, M L; Ross, R; Fabian, A C; Chenevez, J

    2014-01-01

    We present spectroscopic X-ray data of two candidate ultra-compact X-ray binaries: 4U~0614+091 and 4U~1543$-$624. We confirm the presence of a broad O VIII Ly$\\alpha$ reflection line (at $\\approx18\\ \\AA$) using {\\it XMM-Newton} and {\\it Chandra} observations obtained in 2012 and 2013. The donor star in these sources is carbon-oxygen or oxygen-neon-magnesium white dwarf. Hence, the accretion disc is enriched with oxygen which makes the O VIII Ly$\\alpha$ line particularly strong. We also confirm the presence of a strong absorption edge at $\\approx14$ \\AA\\ so far interpreted in the literature as due to absorption by neutral neon in the circumstellar and interstellar medium. However, the abundance required to obtain a good fit to this edge is $\\approx3-4$ times solar, posing a problem for this interpretation. Furthermore, modeling the X-ray reflection off a carbon and oxygen enriched, hydrogen and helium poor disc with models assuming solar composition likely biases several of the best-fit parameters. In order to...

  8. Copper L X-ray spectra measured by a high resolution ion-induced X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryohei; Hamaguchi, Dai; Kageyama, Hiroyoshi [Kyoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    High resolution L X-ray emission spectra of Cu have been measured by 0.75 MeV/u H, He, and F, 0.73 MeV/u Ar, 0.64 MeV/u Si, and 0.073 MeV/u Si ion impacts with a crystal spectrometer. The X-ray transition energies in the Cu target for L{iota}, L{eta}, L{alpha}{sub 1,2}, L{beta}{sub 1}, and L{beta}{sub 3,4} diagram lines induced by light ion impacts are determined, which are in good agreement with those given in the reference. The difference in L X-ray emission spectra produced by H, He, F, Si, and Ar ions are considered and the L{alpha}{sub 1,2} and L{beta}{sub 1} emission spectra are compared with the calculated ones based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. (author)

  9. X-rays and gamma-rays from accretion flows onto black holes in Seyferts and X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Johnson, W. Neil; Poutanen, Juri; Magdziarz, Pawel; Gierlinski, Marek

    1997-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of X-ray/gamma ray spectra of radio quiet Seyfert galaxies and Galactic black hole candidates are reviewed. The spectra from these objects share the following characteristics: an underlying power law with a high energy cutoff above 200 keV; a Compton reflection component with a Fe K alpha line, and a low energy absorption by intervening cold matter. The X-ray energy spectral index, alpha, is typically in the range between 0.8 and 1 in Seyfert spectra, and that of the hard state spectra of the black hole candidates Cygnus X-1 and GX 339-4 is typically between 0.6 and 0.8. The Compton reflection component corresponds with cold matter covering a solid angle of between 0.8pi and 2pi as seen from the X-ray source. The broadband spectra of both classes of sources are well fitted by Compton upscattering of soft photons in thermal plasma. The fits yield a thermal plasma temperature of 100 keV and the Thomson optical depth of 1. All the spectra presented are cut off before the electron rest energy 511 keV, indicating that electron/positron pair production is an important process.

  10. X-ray in Zeta-Ori

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, M. A.; López-Santiago, J. L.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-05-01

    Nearby star-forming regions are ideal laboratories to study high-energy emission processes but they usually present high absorption what makes difficult to detect the stellar population inside the molecular complex. As young late-type stars show high X-ray emission and X-ray photons are little absorbed by interstellar material, X-ray dedicated surveys are an excellent tool to detect the low-mass stellar population in optically absorbed regions. In this work, we present a study of the star-forming region Zeta-Ori and its surroundings. We combine optical, infrared and X-ray data. Properties of the X-ray emiting plasma and infrared features of the young stellar objects detected in the XMM-Newton observation are determined. The southern part of the Orion B giant molecular cloud complex harbor other star forming regions, as NGC 2023 and NGC 2024, we use this regions to compare. We study the spectral energy distribution of X-ray sources. Combining these results with infrared, the X-ray sources are classified as class I, class II and class III objects. The X-ray spectrum and ligth curve of detected X-ray sources is analyzed to found flares. We use a extincion-independent index to select the stars with circumstellar disk, and study the relationship between the present of disk and the flare energy. The results are similar to others studies and we conclude that the coronal properties of class II and class III objects in this region do not differ significantly from each other and from stars of similar infrared class in the ONC.

  11. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  12. Soft X-Ray Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    AND SUBTrI 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Soft X-ray Laser Development 61102F/2301/A8 L AUTHOR(S) ( Szymon Suckewer 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS...REPORT Report of Progress on Soft X-ray Laser Development submitted to Air Force Office of Scientific Research by Acession For DT!C T.IB Princeton...x-ray laser development by Jaegl6 and coworkers 6, however the present work on aluminium plasmas pumped with a low energy Nd laser was primarily

  13. The Future of X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    The most important next step is the development of X-ray optics comparable to (or better than) Chandra in angular resolution that far exceed Chandra s effective area. Use the long delay to establish an adequately funded, competitive technology program along the lines I have recommended. Don't be diverted from this objective, except for Explorer-class missions. Progress in X-ray optics, with emphasis on the angular resolution, is central to the paradigm-shifting discoveries and the contributions of X-ray astronomy to multiwavelength astrophysics over the past 51 years.

  14. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lider, V. V., E-mail: lider@ns.crys.ras.ru; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  15. Speckle Scanning Based X-ray Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Berujon, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray near field speckle scanning concept is an approach recently introduced to obtain absorption, phase and darkfield images of a sample. In this paper, we demonstrate ways of recovering from a sample its ultra-small angle X-ray scattering distribution using numerical deconvolution, and the 2D phase gradient signal from random step scans, the latter being used to elude the flat field correction error. Each feature is explained theoretically and demonstrated experimentally at a synchrotron X-ray facility.

  16. A Burst Chasing X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the rationale, design, and importance of an X-Ray Polarimeter. There is a brief discussion of Gamma Ray Bursts, followed by a review of the theories of Gamma-Ray Bursts Polarization. This leads to the question of "How do we measure the polarization?" and a discussion of the GRB x-ray emission, the photoelectric effect and photoelectric polarimetry. The requirements for the work, can only be approached using a gas detector. This leads to a discussion of a Micropattern Gas Polarimeter, and the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) X-ray Polarimeter.

  17. Optics for coherent X-ray applications

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method w...

  18. On the relationship between circumstellar disc size and X-ray outbursts in Be/X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Monageng, Itumeleng M; Coe, Malcolm J; Steele, Iain A; Reig, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We present long term H$\\alpha$ monitoring results of five Be/X-ray binaries to study the Be disc size variations and their influence on Type II (giant) X-ray outbursts. The work is done in the context of the viscous decretion disc model which predicts that Be discs in binary systems are truncated by resonant torques induced by the neutron star in its orbit. Our observations show that type II outbursts are not correlated(nor anti-correlated) with the disc size, as they are seen to occur both at relatively small and large Be disc radii. We discuss these observations in context of alternate interpretation of Be disc behaviour, such as precession, elongation and density effects, and with cognisance of the limitations of our disc size estimates.

  19. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  20. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  1. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Durbin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity. Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic features found in recent measurements on an insulator (silicon nitride, Si3N4, a semiconductor (gallium arsenide, GaAs, and a metal (gold, Au, obtained with ∼100 fs x-ray pulses at 500-2000 eV and probed with 800 nm laser pulses. In particular GaAs exhibits an abrupt drop in reflectivity, persisting only for a time comparable to the x-ray excitation pulse duration, consistent with prompt band gap narrowing.

  2. X-ray source for mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  3. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Raghunandan Sharma

    2008-03-01

    Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors capable of observing the full disk Sun in X-ray energy range of 4–56 keV. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the Si detector in the 4–25 keV range show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. The evolution of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes reveals increase with increasing flare plasma temperature. Small scale flare activities observed by both the detectors are found to be suitable to heat the active region corona; however their location appears to be in the transition region.

  4. Experimental x-ray ghost imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard x-ray energy range. We used a synchrotron x-ray beam that was split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultra-fast imaging camera, we were able to image x-rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam was correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured on the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x-rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in non-destructive structural characterization using Free Electron Lasers.

  5. Astrophysics: Unexpected X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Two sources of highly energetic flares have been discovered in archival X-ray data of 70 nearby galaxies. These flares have an undetermined origin and might represent previously unknown astrophysical phenomena. See Letter p.356

  6. Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for X-Ray Optics at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory works to further science and technology using short wavelength optical systems and techniques....

  7. Experimental X-Ray Ghost Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M.

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard-x-ray energy range. We use a synchrotron x-ray beam that is split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultrafast imaging camera, we are able to image x rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam is correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured in the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in nondestructive structural characterization using free electron lasers.

  8. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks; (1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  9. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks;(1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  10. Nonrelativistic quantum X-ray physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P

    2015-01-01

    Providing a solid theoretical background in photon-matter interaction, Nonrelativistic Quantum X-Ray Physics enables readers to understand experiments performed at XFEL-facilities and x-ray synchrotrons. As a result, after reading this book, scientists and students will be able to outline and perform calculations of some important x-ray-matter interaction processes. Key features of the contents are that the scope reaches beyond the dipole approximation when necessary and that it includes short-pulse interactions. To aid the reader in this transition, some relevant examples are discussed in detail, while non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics help readers to obtain an in-depth understanding of the formalisms and processes. The text presupposes a basic (undergraduate-level) understanding of mechanics, electrodynamics, and quantum mechanics. However, more specialized concepts in these fields are introduced and the reader is directed to appropriate references. While primarily benefiting users of x-ray light-sou...

  11. X-ray crystallographic studies of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volbeda, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins require metals for their physiological function. In combination with spectroscopic characterizations, X-ray crystallography is a very powerful method to correlate the function of protein-bound metal sites with their structure. Due to their special X-ray scattering properties, specific metals may be located in metalloprotein structures and eventually used for phasing the diffracted X-rays by the method of Multi-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion (MAD). How this is done is the principle subject of this chapter. Attention is also given to the crystallographic characterization of different oxidation states of redox active metals and to the complication of structural changes that may be induced by X-ray irradiation of protein crystals.

  12. Demonstration of X-ray talbot interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Momose, A; Kawamoto, S; Hamaishi, Y; Takai, K; Suzuki, Y

    2003-01-01

    First Talbot interferometry in the hard X-ray region was demonstrated using a pair of transmission gratings made by forming gold stripes on glass plates. By aligning the gratings on the optical axis of X-rays with a separation that caused the Talbot effect by the first grating, moire fringes were produced inclining one grating slightly against the other around the optical axis. A phase object placed in front of the first grating was detected by moire-fringe bending. Using the technique of phase-shifting interferometry, the differential phase corresponding to the phase object could also be measured. This result suggests that X-ray Talbot interferometry is a novel and simple method for phase-sensitive X-ray radiography. (author)

  13. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  14. Milli X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Eagle III Micro XRF unit is similar to a traditional XRF unit, with the primary difference being that the X-rays are focused by a polycapillary optic into a spot...

  15. The Need for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken

    2011-01-01

    For over four decades, X-ray, EUV, and UV spectral observations have been used to measure physical properties of the solar atmosphere. During this time, there has been substantial improvement in the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution of the observations for the EUV and UV wavelength ranges. At wavelengths below 100 Angstroms, however, observations of the solar corona with simultaneous spatial and spectral resolution are limited, and not since the late 1970's have spatially resolved solar X-ray spectra been measured. The soft-X-ray wavelength range is dominated by emission lines formed at high temperatures and provides diagnostics unavailable in any other wavelength range. In this presentation, we will discuss the important science questions that can be answered using spatially and spectrally resolved X-ray spectra.

  16. X-ray microtomography in biology

    CERN Document Server

    Mizutani, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Progress in high-resolution x-ray microtomography has provided us with a practical approach to determining three-dimensional (3D) structures of opaque samples at micrometer to submicrometer resolution. In this review, we give an introduction to hard x-ray microtomography and its application to the visualization of 3D structures of biological soft tissues. Practical aspects of sample preparation, handling, data collection, 3D reconstruction, and structure analysis are described. Furthermore, different sample contrasting methods are approached in detail. Examples of microtomographic studies are overviewed to present an outline of biological applications of x-ray microtomography. We also provide perspectives of biological microtomography as the convergence of sciences in x-ray optics, biology, and structural analysis.

  17. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  18. The Cambridge-Cambridge x-ray serendipity survey. 2: Classification of x-ray luminous galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, B. J.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, Martin

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of an intermediate-resolution (1.5 A) spectroscopic study of 17 x-ray luminous narrow emission-line galaxies previously identified in the Cambridge-Cambridge ROSAT Serendipity Survey and the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. Emission-line ratios reveal that the sample is composed of ten Seyfert and seven starburst galaxies. Measured linewidths for the narrow H alpha emission lines lie in the range 170 - 460 km s(exp -1). Five of the objects show clear evidence for asymmetry in the (OIII) lambda 5007 emission-line profile. Broad H alpha emission is detected in six of the Seyfert galaxies, which range in type from Seyfert 1.5 to 2. Broad H beta emission is only detected in one Seyfert galaxy. The mean full width at half maximum for the broad lines in the Seyfert galaxies is FWHM = 3900 +/- 1750 km s(exp -1). Broad (FWHM = 2200 +/- 600 km s(exp -1) H alpha emission is also detected in three of the starburst galaxies, which could originate from stellar winds or supernovae remnants. The mean Balmer decrement for the sample is H alpha / H beta = 3, consistent with little or no reddening for the bulk of the sample. There is no evidence for any trend with x-ray luminosity in the ratio of starburst galaxies to Seyfert galaxies. Based on our previous observations, it is therefore likely that both classes of object comprise approximately 10 percent of the 2 keV x-ray background.

  19. Parametric X-rays at FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the generation of parametric X-rays (PXR) in the photoinjector at the new FAST facility at Fermilab. Detailed calculations of the intensity spectrum, energy and angular widths and spectral brilliance with a diamond crystal are presented. We also report on expected results with PXR generated while the beam is channeling. The low emittance electron beam makes this facility a promising source for creating brilliant X-rays.

  20. Spectroscopy in X-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, R.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed features in cosmic X-ray sources and their associated temporal variation over a wide energy range were studied. Excess emission and absorption at approximately 6 to 7 kiloelectron volts in the spectra of supernova remnants, binary X-ray sources, and clusters of galaxies were observed. A gas scintillation proportional counter (GSPC) will be used as the detector system. In the gas scintillator the principal limitation is due to the statistics of the initial ionization process only.

  1. Globular cluster x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, David

    2010-04-20

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 10(36) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth--low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)--but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters.

  2. Globular cluster x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 1036 ergs-1) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth—low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)—but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters. PMID:20404204

  3. Lacquer polishing of X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catura, R. C.; Joki, E. G.; Roethig, D. T.; Brookover, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Techniques for polishing figured X-ray optics by a lacquer-coating process are described. This acrylic lacquer coating has been applied with an optical quality of an eighth-wave in red light and very effectively covers surface roughness with spatial wavelengths less than about 0.2 mm. Tungsten films have been deposited on the lacquer coatings to provide highly efficient X-ray reflectivity.

  4. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity. Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic featur...

  5. X- rays and matter- the basic interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    In this introductory article we attempt to provide the theoretical basis for developing the interaction between X-rays and matter, so that one can unravel properties of matter by interpretation of X-ray experiments on samples. We emphasize that we are dealing with the basics, which means that we ...... this article: J. Als-Nielsen, C. R. Physique 9 (2008). Udgivelsesdato: 18 April...

  6. Capacitor discharges, magnetohydrodynamics, X-rays, ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology, Volume 1: Capacitor Discharges - Magnetohydrodynamics - X-Rays - Ultrasonics deals with the theoretical and engineering problems that arise in the capacitor discharge technique.This book discusses the characteristics of dielectric material, symmetrical switch tubes with mercury filling, and compensation conductor forms. The transformed discharge for highest current peaks, ignition transformer for internal combustion engines, and X-ray irradiation of subjects in mechanical motion are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the transformed capacitor discharge in w

  7. Elliptical X-Ray Spot Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Richardson, Roger A.; Sampayan, Stephen; Weir, John T.

    2000-01-01

    The so-called roll bar measurement uses a heavy metal material, optically thick to x-rays, to form a shadow of the x-ray origination spot. This spot is where an energetic electron beam interacts with a high Z target. The material (the "roll bar") is slightly curved to avoid alignment problems. The roll bar is constructed and positioned so that the x-rays are shadowed in the horizontal and vertical directions, so information is obtained in two dimensions. If a beam profile is assumed (or measured by other means), the equivalent x-ray spot size can be calculated from the x-ray shadow cast by the roll bar. Thus the ellipticity of the beam can be calculated, assuming the ellipse of the x-ray spot is aligned with the roll bar. The data is recorded using a scintillator and gated camera. Data will be presented from measurements using the ETA II induction LINAC. The accuracy of the measurement is checked using small elliptical targets.

  8. Optics Developments for X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    X-ray optics has revolutionized x-ray astronomy. The degree of background suppression that these afford, have led to a tremendous increase in sensitivity. The current Chandra observatory has the same collecting area (approx. 10(exp 3)sq cm) as the non-imaging UHURU observatory, the first x-ray observatory which launched in 1970, but has 5 orders of magnitude more sensitivity due to its focusing optics. In addition, its 0.5 arcsec angular resolution has revealed a wealth of structure in many cosmic x-ray sources. The Chandra observatory achieved its resolution by using relatively thick pieces of Zerodur glass, which were meticulously figured and polished to form the four-shell nested array. The resulting optical assembly weighed around 1600 kg, and cost approximately $0.5B. The challenge for future x-ray astronomy missions is to greatly increase the collecting area (by one or more orders of magnitude) while maintaining high angular resolution, and all within realistic mass and budget constraints. A review of the current status of US optics for x-ray astronomy will be provided along with the challenges for future developments.

  9. The X-ray imager on AXO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Kuvvetli, I.; Westergaard, N. J.; Jonasson, P.; Reglero, V.; Eyles, C.

    2001-02-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma-ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as the so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low-power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: the X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X-ray Observatory (AXO), which is a mission proposed to the Danish Small Satellite Program and is dedicated to observations of X-ray generating processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Of special interest will be simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of sprites that are flashes appearing directly above an active thunderstorm system. Additional objective is a detailed mapping of the auroral X-ray and optical emission. XRI comprises a coded mask and a 20×40 cm 2 CZT detector array covering an energy range from 5 to 200 keV.

  10. Coherence in X-ray physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengeler, B

    2001-06-01

    Highly brilliant synchrotron radiation sources have opened up the possibility of using coherent X-rays in spectroscopy and imaging. Coherent X-rays are characterized by a large lateral coherence length. Speckle spectroscopy is extended to hard X-rays, improving the resolution to the nm range. It has become possible to image opaque objects in phase contrast with a sensitivity far superior to imaging in absorption contrast. All the currently available X-ray sources are chaotic sources. Their characterization in terms of coherence functions of the first and second order is introduced. The concept of coherence volume, defined in quantum optics terms, is generalized for scattering experiments. When the illuminated sample volume is smaller than the coherence volume, the individuality of the defect arrangement in a sample shows up as speckle in the scattered intensity. Otherwise, a configurational average washes out the speckle and only diffuse scattering and possibly Bragg reflections will survive. The loss of interference due to the finite detection time, to the finite detector pixel size and to uncontrolled degrees of freedom in the sample is discussed at length. A comparison between X-ray scattering, neutron scattering and mesoscopic electron transport is given. A few examples illustrate the possibilities of coherent X-rays for imaging and intensity correlation spectroscopy.

  11. X-ray Emission of Hollow Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhaoYongtao; XiaoGuoqing; ZhangXiaoan; YangZhihu; ChenXimeng; ZhangYanping

    2003-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the X-rays emission of hollow atoms (HA) which formed in the interaction of highly charged ions with a variety of solid surfaces at the atomic physics experimental setup of IMP. The X-ray spectra were measured by Si(Li) detectors with effective energy ranging from 1 keV to 60 keV. The results show that, the X-ray emission from the formed HA is closely correlated with the charge state of the projectile ions, and weakly correlated with the velocity of the projectile ions. For example, it was found that when Ar18+ ions interact with Be-target, the yield of K X-ray with character energy of 3.0 keV is 7.2×10-3 per ion, which is two times and 5 order of magnitude higher than those in the interactions of Ar17+ and Ar16+ ions respectively. When Ar15+ ions interact with the same targets, the Argon K X-ray would be too feeble to be detected. The X-ray yield with single ion in this experiment can be represented by the following equation,

  12. Echoes in X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    O'Brien, K; Hynes, R; Chen, W; Haswell, C; Still, M

    2002-01-01

    We present a method of analysing the correlated X-ray and optical/UV variability in X-ray binaries, using the observed time delays between the X-ray driving lightcurves and their reprocessed optical echoes. This allows us to determine the distribution of reprocessing sites within the binary. We model the time-delay transfer functions by simulating the distribution of reprocessing regions, using geometrical and binary parameters. We construct best-fit time-delay transfer functions, showing the regions in the binary responsible for the reprocessing of X-rays. We have applied this model to observations of the Soft X-ray Transient, GRO j1655-40. We find the optical variability lags the X-ray variability with a mean time delay of 19.3$pm{2.2}$ seconds. This means that the outer regions of the accretion disc are the dominant reprocessing site in this system. On fitting the data to a simple geometric model, we derive a best-fit disk half-opening angle of 13.5$^{+2.1}_{-2.8}$ degrees, which is similar to that observe...

  13. The SAS-3 X-ray observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The experiment section of the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3) launched in May 1975 is an X-ray observatory intended to determine the location of bright X-ray sources to an accuracy of 15 arc-seconds; to study a selected set of sources over a wide energy range, from 0.1 to 55 keV, while performing very specific measurements of the spectra and time variability of known X-ray sources; and to monitor the sky continuously for X-ray novae, flares, and unexpected phenomena. The improvements in SAS-3 spacecraft include a clock accurate to 1 part in 10 billion, rotatable solar panels, a programmable data format, and improved nutation damper, a delayed command system, improved magnetic trim and azimuth control systems. These improvements enable SAS-3 to perform three-axis stabilized observations of any point on the celestial sphere at any time of the year. The description of the experiment section and the SAS-3 operation is followed by a synopsis of scientific results obtained from the observations of X-ray sources, such as Vela X-1 (supposed to be an accreting neutron star), a transient source of hard X-ray (less than 36 min in duration) detected by SAS-3, the Crab Nebula pulsar, the Perseus cluster of galaxies, and the Vela supernova remnant.

  14. Optics for coherent X-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabashi, Makina, E-mail: yabashi@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tono, Kensuke [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Mimura, Hidekazu [The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tamasaku, Kenji [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Ohashi, Haruhiko; Goto, Shunji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ishikawa, Tetsuya [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2014-08-27

    Developments of optics for coherent X-ray applications and their role in diffraction-limited storage rings are described. Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method was found to have ideal speckle-free properties. The elastic emission machining method was utilized for developing reflective mirrors without distortion of the wavefronts. The method was further applied to production of diffraction-limited focusing mirrors generating the smallest spot size in the sub-10 nm regime. To enable production of ultra-intense nanobeams at DLSRs, a low-vibration cooling system for a high-heat-load monochromator and advanced diagnostic systems to characterize X-ray beam properties precisely were developed. Finally, new experimental schemes for combinative nano-analysis and spectroscopy realised with novel X-ray optics are discussed.

  15. Picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe experiments using a gated single-photon-counting area detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejdrup, T.; Lemke, H.T.; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    . The capability of the gated PILATUS detector to selectively detect the signal from a given X-ray pulse in 24 bunch mode at the APS storage ring is demonstrated. A test experiment performed on polycrystalline organic thin films of [alpha]-perylene illustrates the possibility of reaching an X-ray pulse duration......The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA...... limited time-resolution of 60 ps using the gated PILATUS detector. This is the first demonstration of X-ray pulse duration limited data recorded using an area detector without the use of a mechanical chopper array at the beamline....

  16. AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S. E.; Owen, C. J.; Peacocke, L.; Read, A. M.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G. W.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways - by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques. which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located. X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock. with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose 'AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere', a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth - Moon Ll point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and

  17. Invisible Giant: Chandra's Limits on X-rays from Betelgeuse

    CERN Document Server

    Posson-Brown, J; Pease, D O; Drake, J J; Posson-Brown, Jennifer; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Pease, Deron O.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed Chandra calibration observations of Betelgeuse ($\\alpha$ Ori, M2 Iab, $m_{V} = 0.58$, 131 pc) obtained at the aimpoint locations of the HRC-I (8 ks), HRC-S (8 ks), and ACIS-I (5 ks). Betelgeuse is undetected in all the individual observations as well as cumulatively. We derive $3\\sigma$ upper limits to its X-ray count rates and compute the corresponding X-ray flux upper limits for isothermal coronal plasma over a range of temperatures, $T=0.3-10$~MK. We place a flux limit at the telescope of $\\fx\\approx4\\times10^{-15}$~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at T=1~MK. The upper limit is lowered by a factor of $\\approx3$ at higher temperatures, roughly an order of magnitude lower than that obtained previously. Assuming that the entire stellar surface is active, these fluxes correspond to a surface flux limit that ranges from 30-7000~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at T=1~MK, to $\\approx 1$~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at higher temperatures, five orders of magnitude lower than the quiet Sun X-ray surface flux. We discuss...

  18. Probing the Galactic center with X-ray polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, F; Kunneriath, D; Muleri, F; Soffitta, P

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic center (GC) holds the closest-to-Earth supermassive black hole (SMBH), which makes it the best laboratory to study the close environment of extremely massive compact objects. Polarimetry is sensitive to geometry of the source, which makes it a particularly suitable technique to probe the medium surrounding the GC SMBH. The detection of hard X-ray spectra and prominent iron K$\\alpha$ fluorescence features coincident with localized gas clouds (e.g. Sgr~B2, Sgr~C) is known for nearly twenty years now and is commonly associated with a past outburst of the SMBH whose radiation is reprocessing onto the so-called "reflection nebulae". Since scattering leads to polarization, the re-emitted signal from the giant molecular clouds in the first 100~pc of the GC is expected to be polarized. X-ray polarization measurement is thus particularly adapted to probe the origin of the diffuse X-ray emission from the GC reflection nebulae and reveal the past activity of the central SMBH. In this research note, we summa...

  19. \\gamma Cassiopeiae: an X-ray Be star with personality

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Raimundo Lopes; Motch, Christian; ;,

    2009-01-01

    \\gamma Cas is a B0.5e star with peculiar X-ray emission properties and yet the prototype of its own small class. In this paper we examine the X-ray spectra for a 2004 XMM-Newton observation and a previously published 2001 Chandra observation. In both cases the spectra can be modeled with 3 or 4 thermal components, which appear be discrete in temperature and spatially distinct. The dominant component, having kT ~ 12 keV contributes most of the flux. The secondary components have temperatures in the range of 2-3 keV to 0.1 keV; these values can shift in time. Importantly, we find that the strong absorption of soft X-rays in 2001 is absent in 2004, meaning that an absorbing column in front of the source has moved off the star or has been removed. Other differences include a reduced Fe abundance from the ionized lines of the FeKalpha complex (even more subsolar than the 2001 observation), an increase in the Fe K fluoresence feature, and from the NVII and NeX H-alpha lines, a possible overabundance of N and Ne. Al...

  20. A Monte Carlo study of x-ray fluorescence in x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, J M; Seibert, J A; Sabol, J M; Tecotzky, M

    1999-06-01

    Advances in digital x-ray detector systems have led to a renewed interest in the performance of x-ray phosphors and other detector materials. Indirect flat panel x-ray detector and charged coupled device (CCD) systems require a more technologically challenging geometry, whereby the x-ray beam is incident on the front side of the scintillator, and the light produced must diffuse to the back surface of the screen to reach the photoreceptor. Direct detector systems based on selenium have also enjoyed a growing interest, both commercially and academically. Monte Carlo simulation techniques were used to study the x-ray scattering (Rayleigh and Compton) and the more prevalent x-ray fluorescence properties of seven different x-ray detector materials, Gd2O2S, CsI, Se, BaFBr, YTaO4, CaWO4, and ThO2. The redistribution of x-ray energy, back towards the x-ray source, in a forward direction through the detector, and lateral reabsorption in the detector was computed under monoenergetic conditions (1 keV to 130 keV by 1 keV intervals) with five detector thicknesses, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 mg/cm2 (Se was studied from 30 to 1000 mg/cm2). The radial distribution (related to the point spread function) of reabsorbed x-ray energy was also determined. Representative results are as follows: At 55 keV, more (31.3%) of the incident x-ray energy escaped from a 90 mg/cm2Gd2O2S detector than was absorbed (27.9%). Approximately 1% of the total absorbed energy was reabsorbed greater than 0.5 mm from the primary interaction, for 90 mg/cm2 CsI exposed at 100 kVp. The ratio of reabsorbed secondary (fluorescence + scatter) radiation to the primary radiation absorbed in the detectors (90 mg/cm2) (S/P) was determined as 10%, 16%, 2%, 12%, 3%, 3%, and 0.3% for a 100 kVp tungsten anode x-ray spectrum, for the Gd2O2S, CsI, Se, BaFBr, YTaO4, CaWO4, and ThO2 detectors, respectively. The results indicate significant x-ray fluorescent escape and reabsorption in common x-ray detectors. These findings

  1. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  2. Discovery of Oxygen Kalpha X-ray Emission from the Rings of Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A; Waite, J H; Gladstone, G R; Cravens, T E; Ford, P G; Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    Using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observed the Saturnian system for one rotation of the planet (~37 ks) on 20 January, 2004, and again on 26-27 January, 2004. In this letter we report the detection of X-ray emission from the rings of Saturn. The X-ray spectrum from the rings is dominated by emission in a narrow (~130 eV wide) energy band centered on the atomic oxygen K-alpha fluorescence line at 0.53 keV. The X-ray power emitted from the rings in the 0.49-0.62 keV band is 84 MW, which is about one-third of that emitted from Saturn disk in the photon energy range 0.24-2.0 keV. Our analysis also finds a clear detection of X-ray emission from the rings in the 0.49-0.62 keV band in an earlier (14-15 April, 2003) Chandra ACIS observation of Saturn. Fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays from oxygen atoms in the H2O icy ring material is the likely source mechanism for ring X-rays, consistent with the scenario of solar photo-production of a tenuous ring oxygen at...

  3. X-ray emission from spiral galaxies with normal and low-activity nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuricin, G. (Trieste Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Astronomia); Bertotti, G. (Centre for Advanced Research in Space Optics, Trieste (Italy)); Mardirossian, F.; Mezzetti, M. (Trieste Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Astronomia Centro Interuniversitario Regionale per l' Astrofisica e la Cosmologia (CIRAC), Trieste (Italy))

    1991-05-15

    A statistical analysis of the soft X-ray emission from spiral galaxies with normal and low-luminosity active nuclei (LINERs and Seyfert 2) - derived from published observations obtained with the Einstein Observatory - has revealed a number of previously unrecognised characteristics of the X-ray emission. Seyfert 2 galaxies (the least powerful X-ray sources of the Seyfert class) turn out to be, on average, stronger X-ray emitters (per unit light) than non-Seyfert galaxies, whereas galaxies with LINER nuclei and H II-region-like nuclei exhibit X-ray emissions of comparable strength. We have verified that the X-ray luminosity (per unit light) is linked to the total H {alpha} emission-line strength. Remarkably, more enhanced X-ray emission (per unit light) has been found in Arp atlas galaxies, in galaxies included in the Atlas and Catalogue of Interacting Galaxies of Vorontsov-Vel'yaminov, and in interacting galaxies compared to normal galaxies. (Author).

  4. Handbook of X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Keith A. (Editor); Smith, Randall K.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2011-01-01

    X-ray astronomy was born in the aftermath of World War II as military rockets were repurposed to lift radiation detectors above the atmosphere for a few minutes at a time. These early flights detected and studied X-ray emission from the Solar corona. The first sources beyond the Solar System were detected during a rocket flight in 1962 by a team headed by Riccardo Giaccom at American Science and Engineering, a company founded by physicists from MIT. The rocket used Geiger counters with a system designed to reduce non-X-ray backgrounds and collimators limiting the region of sky seen by the counters. As the rocket spun, the field of view (FOV) happened to pass over what was later found to be the brightest non-Solar X-ray source; later designated See X-1. It also detected a uniform background glow which could not be resolved into individual sources. A follow-up campaign using X-ray detectors with better spatial resolution and optical telescopes identified See X-1 as an interacting binary with a compact (neutron star) primary. This success led to further suborbital rocket flights by a number of groups. More X-ray binaries were discovered, as well as X-ray emission from supernova remnants, the radio galaxies M87 and Cygnus-A, and the Coma cluster. Detectors were improved and Geiger counters were replaced by proportional counters, which provided information about energy spectra of the sources. A constant challenge was determining precise positions of sources as only collimators were available.

  5. The radio/X-ray domain of black hole X-ray binaries at the lowest radio luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, E; Russell, D M; Jonker, P G; Homan, J; Plotkin, R M; Markoff, S; Miller, B P; Corbel, S; Fender, R P

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] We report on deep, coordinated radio and X-ray observations of the black hole X-ray binary XTE J1118+480 in quiescence. The source was observed with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array for a total of 17.5 hrs at 5.3 GHz, yielding a 4.8 \\pm 1.4 microJy radio source at a position consistent with the binary system. At a distance of 1.7 kpc, this corresponds to an integrated radio luminosity between 4-8E+25 erg/s, depending on the spectral index. This is the lowest radio luminosity measured for any accreting black hole to date. Simultaneous observations with the Chandra X-ray Telescope detected XTE J1118+480 at 1.2E-14 erg/s/cm^2 (1-10 keV), corresponding to an Eddington ratio of ~4E-9 for a 7.5 solar mass black hole. Combining these new measurements with data from the 2005 and 2000 outbursts available in the literature, we find evidence for a relationship of the form ellr=alpha+beta*ellx (where ell denotes logarithmic luminosities), with beta=0.72\\pm0.09. XTE J1118+480 is thus the third system, togeth...

  6. The X-ray Spectra of Black Hole X-ray Novae in Quiescence as Measured by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A K H; García, M R; Murray, S S; Barret, D

    2002-01-01

    We present Chandra observations of black hole X-ray novae V404 Cyg, A0620-00, GRO J1655-40 and XTE J1550-564 in quiescence. Their quiescent spectra can be well fitted by a power-law model with slope $\\alpha \\sim 2$. While a coronal (Raymond-Smith) model is also a statistically acceptable representation of the spectra, the best fit temperatures of these models is $\\sim 5$ times higher than that seen in active stellar coronae. These four spectra of quiescent X-ray novae are all consistent with that expected for accretion via an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) and inconsistent with that expected from a stellar corona. This evidence for continued accretion in quiescence further strengthens the case for the existence of event horizons in black holes. Both A0620-00 and GRO J1655-40 were fainter than in previous observations, while V404 Cyg was more luminous and varied by a factor of 2 in a few ksec. A reanalysis of the X-ray data for XTE J1550-564 shows that (like V404 Cyg and A0620-00) its luminosity exc...

  7. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  8. Thermal and Non-thermal X-Rays from the LMC Super Bubble 30 Dor C

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, A; Nakajima, H; Koyama, K; Bamba, Aya; Ueno, Masaru; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2004-01-01

    We report on the discovery of thermal and non-thermal X-rays from the shells of the super bubble (SB) 30 Dor C in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The X-ray morphology is a nearly circular shell with a radius of about 40 pc, which is bright on the northern and western sides. The spectra of the shells are different from region to region. The southern shell shows clear emission lines, and is well fitted with a model of a thin-thermal plasma (kT = 0.21keV) in non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plus a power-law component. This thermal plasma is located inside of the H alpha emission, which is the outer edge of the shell of the SB. The northern and western sides of the SB are dim in H alpha emission, but are bright in non-thermal (power-law) X-rays with a photon index of 2.1-2.9. The non-thermal X-ray shell traces the outer boundary of the radio shell. These features of thin-thermal and non-thermal X-rays are similar to those of SN 1006, a prototype of synchrotron X-ray shell, but the non-thermal component of 30 Do...

  9. XMM-Newton Spectroscopy of the X-ray Detected Broad Absorption Line QSO CSO 755

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Niel

    2005-01-01

    We present the results from XMM-Newton observations of the highly optically polarized broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) CSO 755. By analyzing its X-ray spectrum with a total of approximately 3000 photons we find that this source has an X-ray continuum of "typical" radio-quiet quasars, with a photon index of Gamma=1.83, and a rather flat (X-ray bright) intrinsic optical-to-X-ray spectral slope of alpha_ox=- 1.51. The source shows evidence for intrinsic absorption, and fitting the spectrum with a neutral-absorption model gives a column density of N_H approximately 1.2x10^22 cm^{-2}; this is among the lowest X-ray columns measured for BALQSOs. We do not detect, with high significance, any other absorption features in the X-ray spectrum. Upper limits we place on the rest-frame equivalent width of a neutral (ionized) Fe K-alpha line, less than =180 eV (less than =120 eV), and on the Compton-reflection component parameter, R less than =0.2, suggest that most of the X-rays from the source are directly observed rather than being scattered or reflected; this is also supported by the relatively flat intrinsic alpha ox we measure. The possibility that most of the X-ray flux is scattered due to the high level of UV-optical polarization is ruled out. Considering data for 46 BALQSOs from the literature, including CSO 755, we have found that the UV-optical continuum polarization level of BALQSOs is not correlated with any of their X-ray properties. A lack of significant short-term and long-term X-ray flux variations in the source may be attributed to a large black-hole mass in CSO 755. We note that another luminous BALQSO, PG 2112+059, has both similar shallow C IV BALs and moderate X-ray absorption.

  10. New achievements in X-ray optics——the X-ray lens and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An X-ray lens consists of a large number of X-ray capillaries. It can collect divergent X-rays emitted from an X-ray source and form a focused or parallel beam of high intensity. So it is an effective tool for adjusting and controlling wide bandwidth X-ray beams. In this paper, the X-ray lens made by the X-ray Optics Laboratory of Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics at Beijing Normal University and its applications in the field of X-ray analysis are presented.

  11. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  12. High-resolution x-ray studies of an AXAF high-energy transmission grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, S.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    A triple axis X-ray diffractometer, designed and built at the Danish Space Research Institute, was used to make a high resolution study of the performance of a 2000 angstroms period, high energy X-ray transmission grating developed at MIT for one of the grating spectrometers on the Advanced X-ray...... Astrophysics Facility. Data was obtained at CuK(alpha )1 (8.048 keV) and, using single reflection asymmetric Si(044) crystals for both the monochromator and analyzer, an angular resolution of 1.5 arcsec FWHM was achieved. The efficiency of the grating in all orders up to the 15th was measured using a 12 k......W rotating anode X-ray generator. These data provided the basis for a modelling of the grating structure....

  13. Optics for coherent X-ray applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Mimura, Hidekazu; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Goto, Shunji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-09-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method was found to have ideal speckle-free properties. The elastic emission machining method was utilized for developing reflective mirrors without distortion of the wavefronts. The method was further applied to production of diffraction-limited focusing mirrors generating the smallest spot size in the sub-10 nm regime. To enable production of ultra-intense nanobeams at DLSRs, a low-vibration cooling system for a high-heat-load monochromator and advanced diagnostic systems to characterize X-ray beam properties precisely were developed. Finally, new experimental schemes for combinative nano-analysis and spectroscopy realised with novel X-ray optics are discussed.

  14. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  15. Imaging in Hard X-ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Li Ti Pei

    2002-01-01

    The energy range of hard X-rays is a key waveband to the study of high energy processes in celestial objects, but still remains poorly explored. In contrast to direct imaging methods used in the low energy X-ray and high energy gamma-ray bands, currently imaging in the hard X-ray band is mainly achieved through various modulation techniques. A new inversion technique, the direct demodulation method, has been developed since early 90s. With this technique, wide field and high resolution images can be derived from scanning data of a simple collimated detector. The feasibility of this technique has been confirmed by experiment, balloon-borne observation and analyzing simulated and real astronomical data. Based the development of methodology and instrumentation, a high energy astrophysics mission -- Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) has been proposed and selected in China for a four-year Phase-A study. The main scientific objectives are a full-sky hard X-ray (20-200 keV) imaging survey and high signal-to-noi...

  16. X-ray emission processes in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola

    2010-01-01

    A decade of X-ray stellar observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton has led to significant advances in our understanding of the physical processes at work in hot (magnetized) plasmas in stars and their immediate environment, providing new perspectives and challenges, and in turn the need for improved models. The wealth of high-quality stellar spectra has allowed us to investigate, in detail, the characteristics of the X-ray emission across the HR diagram. Progress has been made in addressing issues ranging from classical stellar activity in stars with solar-like dynamos (such as flares, activity cycles, spatial and thermal structuring of the X-ray emitting plasma, evolution of X-ray activity with age), to X-ray generating processes (e.g. accretion, jets, magnetically confined winds) that were poorly understood in the pre-Chandra/XMM-Newton era. I discuss the progress made in the study of high energy stellar physics and its impact in a wider astrophysical context, focusing on the role of spectral diagnostics no...

  17. X-ray echo spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, was recently introduced [1] to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-meV and 0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power > 10^8) with broadband 5-13 meV dispersing systems will be presented featuring more than 1000-fold signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. [1.] Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, accepted (2016), arXiv:1511.01526.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jesse; Ollmann, Emily; Maxey, Evan; Finney, Lydia A

    2014-01-01

    Metalloproteins are enormously important in biology. While a variety of techniques exist for studying metals in biology, X-ray absorption spectroscopy is particularly useful in that it can determine the local electronic and physical structure around the metal center, and is one of the few avenues for studying "spectroscopically silent" metal ions like Zn(II) and Cu(I) that have completely filled valence bands. While X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are useful for studying metalloprotein structure, they suffer the limitation that the detected signal is an average of all the various metal centers in the sample, which limits its usefulness for studying metal centers in situ or in cell lysates. It would be desirable to be able to separate the various proteins in a mixture prior to performing X-ray absorption studies, so that the derived signal is from one species only. Here we describe a method for performing X-ray absorption spectroscopy on protein bands following electrophoretic separation and western blotting.

  19. X-ray optics of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letfullin, Renat R; Rice, Colin E W; George, Thomas F

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been investigated as contrast agents for traditional x-ray medical procedures, utilizing the strong absorption characteristics of the nanoparticles to enhance the contrast of the detected x-ray image. Here we use the Kramers-Kronig relation for complex atomic scattering factors to find the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction for the medium composed of single-element materials or compounds in the x-ray range of the spectrum. These complex index of refraction values are then plugged into a Lorenz-Mie theory to calculate the absorption efficiency of various size gold nanoparticles for photon energies in the 1-100 keV range. Since the output from most medical diagnostic x-ray devices follows a wide and filtered spectrum of photon energies, we introduce and compute the effective intensity-absorption-efficiency values for gold nanoparticles of radii varying from 5 to 50 nm, where we use the TASMIP model to integrate over all spectral energies generated by typical tungsten anode x-ray tubes with kilovolt potentials ranging from 50 to 150 kVp.

  20. X-ray spectroscopy an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Bipin K

    1979-01-01

    Rontgen's discovery of X-rays in 1895 launched a subject which became central to the development of modern physics. The verification of many of the predic­ tions of quantum theory by X-ray spectroscopy in the early part of the twen­ tieth century stimulated great interest in thi's area, which has subsequently influenced fields as diverse as chemical physics, nuclear physics, and the study of the electronic properties of solids, and led to the development of techniques such as Auger, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The improvement of the theoretical understanding of the physics underlying X-ray spectroscopy has been accompanied by advances in experimental techniques, and the subject provides an instructive example of how progress on both these fronts can be mutually beneficial. This book strikes a balance between his­ torical description, which illustrates this symbiosis, and the discussion of new developments. The application of X-ray spectroscopic methods to the in­ vestigation of chemical b...

  1. Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David

    2009-05-01

    This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di racting properties of a x-ray di racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

  2. Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoli, Lara

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenology of a subclass of High Mass X-ray Binaries hosting a blue supergiant companion, the so-called Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs), is reviewed. Their number is growing, mainly thanks to the discoveries performed by the INTEGRAL satellite, then followed by soft X-rays observations (both aimed at refining the source position and at monitoring the source behavior) leading to the optical identification of the blue supergiant nature of the donor star. Their defining properties are a transient X-ray activity consisting of sporadic, fast and bright flares, (each with a variable duration between a few minutes and a few hours), reaching 1E36-1E37 erg/s. The quiescence is at a luminosity of 1E32 erg/s, while their more frequent state consists of an intermediate X-ray emission of 1E33-1E34 erg/s (1-10 keV). Only the brightest flares are detected by INTEGRAL (>17 keV) during short pointings, with no detected persistent emission. The physical mechanism driving the short outbursts is still debated, al...

  3. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (<100 fs) and intense (similar to 10(12) photons) pulses of hard X-rays, making them excellent sources for time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring hi...

  4. X-ray Spectral Variation of Eta Carinae through the 2003 X-ray Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, K; Gull, T; Ishibashi, K; Pittard, J M; Hillier, D J; Damineli, A; Davidson, K; Nielsen, K E; Kober, G V; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Gull, Theodore; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Pittard, Julian M.; Damineli, Augusto; Davidson, Kris; Nielsen, Krister E.; Kober, Gladys Vieira

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of an X-ray observing campaign on the massive, evolved star Eta Carinae, concentrating on the 2003 X-ray minimum as seen by the XMM-Newton observatory. These are the first spatially-resolved X-ray monitoring observations of the stellar X-ray spectrum during the minimum. The hard X-ray emission, believed to be associated with the collision of Eta Carinae's wind with the wind from a massive companion star, varied strongly in flux on timescales of days, but not significantly on timescales of hours. The lowest X-ray flux in the 2-10 keV band seen by XMM-Newton was only 0.7% of the maximum seen by RXTE just before the X-ray minimum. The slope of the X-ray continuum above 5 keV did not vary in any observation, which suggests that the electron temperature of the hottest plasma associated with the stellar source did not vary significantly at any phase. Through the minimum, the absorption to the stellar source increased by a factor of 5-10 to NH ~3-4E23 cm-2. The thermal Fe XXV emission line show...

  5. Hard X-ray emission from neutron star X-ray binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Salvo, T.; Santangelo, A.; Segreto, A

    2004-06-01

    In this paper we review our current knowledge of the hard X-ray emission properties of accreting X-ray Binary Pulsars and old accreting neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries in light of 7 years of BeppoSAX and RXTE observations. The paper is divided in two parts. In the first part we review the more recent findings on the phase-dependent broad band continua and cyclotron resonance scattering features observed in many systems of the X-ray Binary Pulsar class. In the second part we review the hard X-ray emission of LMXRB focussing on the hard X-ray components extending up to energies of a few hundred keV that have been clearly detected in sources of both the atoll and Z classes. The presence and characteristics of these hard emission components are then discussed in relation to source properties and spectral state. We, also, briefly mention models that have been proposed for the hard X-ray emission of neutron star X-ray binaries.

  6. X-ray Polarization from High Mass X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Kallman, T; Blondin, J

    2015-01-01

    X-ray astronomy allows study of objects which may be associated with compact objects, i.e. neutron stars or black holes, and also may contain strong magnetic fields. Such objects are categorically non-spherical, and likely non-circular when projected on the sky. Polarization allows study of such geoemetric effects, and X-ray polarimetry is likely to become feasible for a significant number of sources in the future. A class of potential targets for future X-ray polarization observations is the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a compact object in orbit with an early type star. In this paper ws show that X-ray polarization from HMXBs has a distinct signature which depends on the source inclination and orbital phase. The presence of the X-ray source displaced from the star creates linear polarization even if the primary wind is spherically symmetric whenever the system is viewed away from conjunction. Direct X-rays dilute this polarization whenever the X-ray source is not eclipsed; at mid-eclips...

  7. X-ray Polarization in Relativistic Jets

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, Aimee L; Wu, Kinwah

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the polarization properties of Comptonized X-rays from relativistic jets in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) using Monte Carlo simulations. We consider three scenarios commonly proposed for the observed X-ray emission in AGN: Compton scattering of blackbody photons emitted from an accretion disk; scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons; and self-Comptonization of intrinsically polarized synchrotron photons emitted by jet electrons. Our simulations show that for Comptonization of disk and CMB photons, the degree of polarization of the scattered photons increases with the viewing inclination angle with respect to the jet axis. In both cases the maximum linear polarization is approximately 20%. In the case of synchrotron self-Comptonization (SSC), we find that the resulting X-ray polarization depends strongly on the seed synchrotron photon injection site, with typical fractional polarizations of approximately P = 10 - 20% when synchrotron emission is localized near the jet base, while ...

  8. X-Ray Detector Simulations - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tina, Adrienne [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-20

    The free-electron laser at LCLS produces X-Rays that are used in several facilities. This light source is so bright and quick that we are capable of producing movies of objects like proteins. But making these movies would not be possible without a device that can detect the X-Rays and produce images. We need X-Ray cameras. The challenges LCLS faces include the X-Rays’ high repetition rate of 120 Hz, short pulses that can reach 200 femto-seconds, and extreme peak brightness. We need detectors that are compatible with this light source, but before they can be used in the facilities, they must first be characterized. My project was to do just that, by making a computer simulation program. My presentation discusses the individual detectors I simulated, the details of my program, and how my project will help determine which detector is most useful for a specific experiment.

  9. Bone diagnosis by X-ray techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, I. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo, 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, Zip Code: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br; Anjos, M.J. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo, 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, Zip Code: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Physics Institute, UERJ (Brazil); Farias, M.L.F. [University Hospital, UFRJ (Brazil); Parcegoni, N.; Rosenthal, D. [Biophysics Institute, UFRJ (Brazil); Duarte, M.E.L. [Histologic and Embriology Department, UFRJ (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo, 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, Zip Code: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    In this work, two X-ray techniques used were 3D microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and X-ray microfluorescence (micro-XRF) in order to investigate the internal structure of the bone samples. Those two techniques work together, e.g. as a complement to each other, to characterize bones structure and composition. Initially, the specimens were used to do the scan procedure in the microcomputer tomography system and the second step consists of doing the X-ray microfluorescence analysis. The results show that both techniques are powerful methods for analyzing, inspecting and characterizing bone samples: they are alternative procedures for examining bone structures and compositions and they are complementary.

  10. Microfabrication of hard x-ray lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöhr, Frederik

    in the vertical and horizontal directions was addressed. A functioning prototype of a 2D silicon objective for use in a bright-field hard-XRM was demonstrated. The results are promising; showing acceptably low aberration and performance close to theoretical expectations. A resolution of 300 nm with 17 keV x......This thesis deals with the development of silicon compound refractive lenses (Si-CRLs) for shaping hard x-ray beams. The CRLs are to be fabricated using state of the art microfabrication techniques. The primary goal of the thesis work is to produce Si-CRLs with considerably increased structure...... intense and wider line beams with narrower waists. The thesis starts with a review of alternative x-ray lenses. Si-CRLs are identified as valuable optical components that allow shaping hard x-rays efficiently and creating beam waists that are clearly in the nanometer range. They stand out...

  11. Filtered fluorescer x-ray detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruns, H.C.; Emig, J.A.; Thoe, R.S.; Springer, P.T.; Hernandez, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, an instrument capable of measuring x-rays between 8 and 90 keV was conceived to help understand conditions pertaining to pulsed power research. This resulted in the development of a versatile device that would incrementally detect x-rays emitted at predetermined energy bands over this range. To accomplish this, an array of well characterized filter-fluorescer combinations were produced which would allow fluoresced x-rays to be observed by time resolved electro-optical devices. As many as sixteen channels could be utilized with each channel having a corresponding background channel. Upon completion of the device, a three week series of experiments was then successfully carried out.

  12. X-Ray Wakes in Abell 160

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, N; Sakelliou, I; Pinkney, J C; Drake, Nick; Merrifield, Michael R.; Sakelliou, Irini; Pinkney, Jason C.

    2000-01-01

    `Wakes' of X-ray emission have now been detected trailing behind a few (at least seven) elliptical galaxies in clusters. To quantify how widespread this phenomenon is, and what its nature might be, we have obtained a deep (70 ksec) X-ray image of the poor cluster Abell 160 using the ROSAT HRI. Combining the X-ray data with optical positions of confirmed cluster members, and applying a statistic designed to search for wake-like excesses, we confirm that this phenomenon is observed in galaxies in this cluster. The probability that the detections arise from chance is less than 0.0038. Further, the wakes are not randomly distributed in direction, but are preferentially oriented pointing away from the cluster centre. This arrangement can be explained by a simple model in which wakes arise from the stripping of their host galaxies' interstellar media due to ram pressure against the intracluster medium through which they travel.

  13. Contact x-ray microscopy using Asterix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Aldo; Batani, Dimitri; Botto, Cesare; Masini, Alessandra; Bernardinello, A.; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Moret, M.; Poletti, G.; Piccoli, S.; Cotelli, F.; Lora Lamia Donin, C.; Stead, Anthony D.; Marranca, A.; Eidmann, Klaus; Flora, Francesco; Palladino, Libero; Reale, Lucia

    1997-10-01

    The use of a high energy laser source for soft x-ray contact microscopy is discussed. Several different targets were used and their emission spectra compared. The x-ray emission, inside and outside the Water Window, was characterized in detail by means of many diagnostics, including pin hole and streak cameras. Up to 12 samples holders per shot were exposed thanks to the large x-ray flux and the geometry of the interaction chamber. Images of several biological samples were obtained, including Chlamydomonas and Crethidia green algae, fish and boar sperms and Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells. A 50 nm resolution was reached on the images of boar sperm. Original information concerning the density of inner structures of Crethidia green algae were obtained.

  14. The X-ray imager on AXO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    2001-01-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma-ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as the so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated....... Modular design and the low-power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: the X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X...... thunderstorm system. Additional objective is a detailed mapping of the auroral X-ray and optical emission. XRI comprises a coded mask and a 20 x 40cm(2) CZT detector array covering an energy range from 5 to 200keV....

  15. Electromagnetically induced transparency for x rays

    CERN Document Server

    Buth, Christian; Young, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is predicted for x rays in laser-dressed neon gas. The x-ray photoabsorption cross section and polarizability near the Ne K edge are calculated using an ab initio theory suitable for optical strong-field problems. The laser wavelength is tuned close to the transition between 1s^-1 3s and 1s^-1 3p (approximately 800nm). The minimum laser intensity required to observe EIT is of the order of 10^12 W/cm^2. The ab initio results are discussed in terms of an exactly solvable three-level model. This work opens new opportunities for research with ultrafast x-ray sources.

  16. Supernova remnants: the X-ray perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacco

    2012-12-01

    Supernova remnants are beautiful astronomical objects that are also of high scientific interest, because they provide insights into supernova explosion mechanisms, and because they are the likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. X-ray observations are an important means to study these objects. And in particular the advances made in X-ray imaging spectroscopy over the last two decades has greatly increased our knowledge about supernova remnants. It has made it possible to map the products of fresh nucleosynthesis, and resulted in the identification of regions near shock fronts that emit X-ray synchrotron radiation. Since X-ray synchrotron radiation requires 10-100 TeV electrons, which lose their energies rapidly, the study of X-ray synchrotron radiation has revealed those regions where active and rapid particle acceleration is taking place. In this text all the relevant aspects of X-ray emission from supernova remnants are reviewed and put into the context of supernova explosion properties and the physics and evolution of supernova remnants. The first half of this review has a more tutorial style and discusses the basics of supernova remnant physics and X-ray spectroscopy of the hot plasmas they contain. This includes hydrodynamics, shock heating, thermal conduction, radiation processes, non-equilibrium ionization, He-like ion triplet lines, and cosmic ray acceleration. The second half offers a review of the advances made in field of X-ray spectroscopy of supernova remnants during the last 15 year. This period coincides with the availability of X-ray imaging spectrometers. In addition, I discuss the results of high resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Chandra and XMM-Newton gratings. Although these instruments are not ideal for studying extended sources, they nevertheless provided interesting results for a limited number of remnants. These results provide a glimpse of what may be achieved with future microcalorimeters that will be available on board future X-ray

  17. X-ray optics developments at ESA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavdaz, M.; Wille, E.; Wallace, K.;

    2013-01-01

    ) in collaboration with research institutions and industry, enabling leading-edge future science missions. Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) [1 to 21] and Slumped Glass Optics (SGO) [22 to 29] are lightweight high performance X-ray optics technologies being developed in Europe, driven by applications in observatory class......Future high energy astrophysics missions will require high performance novel X-ray optics to explore the Universe beyond the limits of the currently operating Chandra and Newton observatories. Innovative optics technologies are therefore being developed and matured by the European Space Agency (ESA...... reflective coatings [30 to 35]. In addition, the progress with the X-ray test facilities and associated beam-lines is discussed [36]. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only....

  18. The quantum X-ray radiology apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    Hilt, B; Prevot, G

    2000-01-01

    The paper entitled 'New Quantum Detection System for Very Low Dose X-ray Radiology', presented at the talk session, discusses the preliminary data obtained using a new quantum X-ray radiology system with a high-efficiency solid-state detector and highly sensitive electronics, making it possible to reduce significantly the dose administered to a patient in X-ray radiology examinations. The present paper focuses more on the technological aspects of the apparatus, such as the integration of the detector with the two Asics, and the computer system. Namely, it is shown how the computer system calibrates the detection system, acquires the data in real time, and controls the scan parameters and image filtering process.

  19. Separated resonances in simultaneous capture and excitation of S/sup 15+/ in H/sub 2/ observed by K-x-ray--K-x-ray coincidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, M.; Justiniano, E.; Schuch, R.; Mokler, P.H.; Reusch, S.

    1987-04-27

    We have measured cross sections for the correlated emission of two K x rays following the collision of hydrogenlike sulfur ions with H/sub 2/ in the energy range between 70 and 160 MeV. The observation of the two correlated x rays is interpreted as a resonant capture of a target electron accompanied by simultaneous excitation of the projectile in the collision (RTE). By our distinguishing between K..cap alpha.. and K..beta.. lines, contributions from KLL and KLn (ngreater than or equal toM) resonances could be determined independently.

  20. Novel X-ray telescopes for wide-field X-ray monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudec, R. [Academy of science of Czech Republic, Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Inneman, A. [Centre for advanced X-ray technologies Reflex sro, Prague (Czech Republic); Pina, L.; Sveda, L. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Nuclear Science

    2005-07-15

    We report on fully innovative very wide-field of view X-ray telescopes with high sensitivity as well as large field of view. The prototypes are very promising, allowing the proposals for space projects with very wide-field Lobster-eye X-ray optics to be considered. The novel telescopes will monitor the sky with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They are expected to contribute essentially to study and to understand various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flashes (XRFs), galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc. The Lobster optics based X-ray All Sky Monitor is capable to detect around 20 GRBs and 8 XRFs yearly and this will surely significantly contribute to the related science.

  1. Tokamak Spectroscopy for X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Kevin B.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; May, M. J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mattioli, M.; Leigheb, M.; Rice, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the measured x-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (XUV) spectra of three astrophysically abundant elements (Fe, Ca and Ne) from three different tokamak plasmas. In every case, each spectrum touches on an issue of atomic physics that is important for simulation codes to be used in the analysis of high spectral resolution data from current and future x-ray telescopes. The utility of the tokamak as a laboratory test bed for astrophysical data is demonstrated. Simple models generated with the HULLAC suite of codes demonstrate how the atomic physics issues studied can affect the interpretation of astrophysical data.

  2. European XFEL: Soft X-Ray instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodtsov, S. L., E-mail: serguei.molodtsov@xfel.eu [European XFEL GmbH (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    The currently constructed European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) will generate new knowledge in almost all the technical and scientific disciplines that are shaping our daily life-including nanotechnology, medicine, pharmaceutics, chemistry, materials science, power engineering and electronics. On 8 January 2009, civil engineering work (tunnels, shafts, halls) has been started at all three construction sites. In this presentation status and parameters of the European XFEL facility and instrumentation as well as planned research applications particularly in the range of soft X-rays are reviewed.

  3. Imaging plates calibration to X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, A.; Andreoli, P.; Cipriani, M.; Claps, G.; Consoli, F.; Cristofari, G.; De Angelis, R.; Giulietti, D.; Ingenito, F.; Pacella, D.

    2016-05-01

    The growing interest for the Imaging Plates, due to their high sensitivity range and versatility, has induced, in the last years, to detailed characterizations of their response function in different energy ranges and kind of radiation/particles. A calibration of the Imaging Plates BAS-MS, BAS-SR, BAS-TR has been performed at the ENEA-Frascati labs by exploiting the X-ray fluorescence of different targets (Ca, Cu, Pb, Mo, I, Ta) and the radioactivity of a BaCs source, in order to cover the X-ray range between few keV to 80 keV.

  4. Single Particle X-ray Diffractive Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, M J; Benner, W H; Boutet, S; Rohner, U; Frank, M; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Barty, A; Bajt, S; Riot, V; Woods, B; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Svenda, M; Marklund, E; Spiller, E; Hajdu, J; Chapman, H N

    2007-10-01

    In nanotechnology, strategies for the creation and manipulation of nanoparticles in the gas phase are critically important for surface modification and substrate-free characterization. Recent coherent diffractive imaging with intense femtosecond X-ray pulses has verified the capability of single-shot imaging of nanoscale objects at sub-optical resolutions beyond the radiation-induced damage threshold. By intercepting electrospray-generated particles with a single 15 femtosecond soft-X-ray pulse, we demonstrate diffractive imaging of a nanoscale specimen in free flight for the first time, an important step toward imaging uncrystallized biomolecules.

  5. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R.; Lin, Yong; Wilder, Julie; Hutt, Julie A.; Padilla, Mabel T.; Gott, Katherine M.

    2013-02-01

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  6. Effects of X-Ray Dose On Rhizosphere Studies Using X-Ray Computed Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Zappala

    Full Text Available X-ray Computed Tomography (CT is a non-destructive imaging technique originally designed for diagnostic medicine, which was adopted for rhizosphere and soil science applications in the early 1980s. X-ray CT enables researchers to simultaneously visualise and quantify the heterogeneous soil matrix of mineral grains, organic matter, air-filled pores and water-filled pores. Additionally, X-ray CT allows visualisation of plant roots in situ without the need for traditional invasive methods such as root washing. However, one routinely unreported aspect of X-ray CT is the potential effect of X-ray dose on the soil-borne microorganisms and plants in rhizosphere investigations. Here we aimed to i highlight the need for more consistent reporting of X-ray CT parameters for dose to sample, ii to provide an overview of previously reported impacts of X-rays on soil microorganisms and plant roots and iii present new data investigating the response of plant roots and microbial communities to X-ray exposure. Fewer than 5% of the 126 publications included in the literature review contained sufficient information to calculate dose and only 2.4% of the publications explicitly state an estimate of dose received by each sample. We conducted a study involving rice roots growing in soil, observing no significant difference between the numbers of root tips, root volume and total root length in scanned versus unscanned samples. In parallel, a soil microbe experiment scanning samples over a total of 24 weeks observed no significant difference between the scanned and unscanned microbial biomass values. We conclude from the literature review and our own experiments that X-ray CT does not impact plant growth or soil microbial populations when employing a low level of dose (<30 Gy. However, the call for higher throughput X-ray CT means that doses that biological samples receive are likely to increase and thus should be closely monitored.

  7. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  8. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification...-rays as described in Appendix A. (b) A chest X-ray to establish the existence of pneumoconiosis...

  9. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  10. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2017-01-31

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  11. X-ray shout echoing through space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    a flash of X-rays hi-res Size hi-res: 3991 Kb Credits: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays XMM-Newton's X-ray EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays scattered by dust in our Galaxy. The X-rays were produced by a powerful gamma-ray burst that took place on 3 December 2003. The slowly fading afterglow of the gamma-ray burst is at the centre of the expanding rings. Other, unrelated, X-ray sources can also be seen. The time since the gamma-ray explosion is shown in each panel in hours. At their largest size, the rings would appear in the sky about five times smaller than the full moon. a flash of X-rays hi-res Size hi-res: 2153 Kb Credits: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays (Please choose "hi-res" version for animation) XMM-Newton's X-ray EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays scattered by dust in our Galaxy. The X-rays were produced by a powerful gamma-ray burst that took place on 3 December 2003. The slowly fading afterglow of the gamma-ray burst is at the centre of the expanding rings. Other, unrelated, X-ray sources can also be seen. The time since the gamma-ray explosion is shown in each panel in seconds. At their largest size, the rings would appear in the sky about five times smaller than the full moon. This echo forms when the powerful radiation of a gamma-ray burst, coming from far away, crosses a slab of dust in our Galaxy and is scattered by it, like the beam of a lighthouse in clouds. Using the expanding rings to precisely pin-point the location of this dust, astronomers can identify places where new stars and planets are likely to form. On 3 December 2003 ESA's observatory, Integral, detected a burst of gamma rays, lasting about 30 seconds, from the direction of a distant galaxy. Within minutes of the detection, thanks to a sophisticated alert network, many

  12. Polymer Compund Refractive Lenses for Hard X-ray Nanofocusing

    OpenAIRE

    Krywka, Christina; Last, Arndt; Marschall, Felix; Markus, Otto; Georgi, Sebastian; Mueller, Martin; Mohr, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Compound refractive lenses fabricated out of SU-8 negative photoresist have been used to generate a nanofocused, i.e. sub-μm sized X-ray focal spot at an X-ray nanodiffraction setup. X-ray microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques have conceptually different demands on nanofocusing optical elements and so with the application of X-ray nanodiffraction in mind, this paper presents the results of an initial characterization of polymer lenses used as primary focusin...

  13. An X-ray and optical study of the ultracompact X-ray binary A 1246-58

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    in 't Zand, J. J. M.; Bassa, C. G.; Keek, L.; Verbunt, F.; Mendez, M.; Markwardt, C. B.; Jonker, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    Results are discussed of an X-ray and optical observation campaign of the low-mass X-ray binary A 1246-58 performed with instruments on Satellite per Astronomia X ("BeppoSAX"), the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the X-ray Multi-mirror Mission ("XMM-Newton"), the Swift mission, and the Very Larg

  14. An X-ray and optical study of the ultracompact X-ray binary A1246-58

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zand, J. J. M. in 't

    2008-01-01

    Results are discussed of an X-ray and optical observation campaign of the low-mass X-ray binary A 1246-58 performed with instruments on Satellite per Astronomia X (’BeppoSAX’), the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the X-ray Multi-mirror Mission (’XMM-Newton’), the Swift mission, and the Very Larg

  15. Examination and experimental constraints of the stellar reaction rate factor $N_A < \\sigma v >$ of the $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction at temperatures of X-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, P

    2013-01-01

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction is one key for the break-out from the hot CNO-cycles to the $rp$-process. Recent papers have provided reaction rate factors $N_A $ which are discrepant by at least one order of magnitude. The compatibility of the latest experimental results is tested, and a partial explanation for the discrepant $N_A$ is given. A new rate factor is derived from the combined analysis of all available data. The new rate factor is located slightly below the higher rate factor by Matic {\\it et al.}\\ at low temperatures and significantly below at higher temperatures whereas it is about a factor of five higher than the lower rate factor recently published by Salter {\\it et al.}

  16. ESO 103-G35 - A new Seyfert galaxy and possible X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. M.; Feldman, F. R.; Marshall, F. E.; Wamsteker, W.

    1979-01-01

    By means of an objective prism plate, two emission-line galaxies have been identified within the 0.7-sq deg HEAO-A2 error box for the X-ray source H1834-653. Optical spectrophotometric observations are reported for both objects as well as the galaxy NGC 6684, which also lies near the position of H1834-653. These data show that one of the emission-line galaxies, ESO 103-G35, is a Seyfert galaxy with a high-excitation forbidden-line spectrum and weak broad emission wings at H-alpha. Further measurements of this galaxy reveal an infrared excess at wavelengths longer than 2.2 microns. The H-alpha luminosity of ESO 103-G35 is consistent with the X-ray luminosity estimated from the HEAO-A2 data, thus strengthening the likelihood of association of this galaxy with the X-ray emission.

  17. Comparing the Ag-content of poltinniks using X-ray fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, S

    2013-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence experiments have been performed in order to analyze the elemental composition of four Russian 50-kopek coins ("poltinniks") minted during 1913, 1921, and 1924. By comparing the intensities of the Ag K{\\alpha} X-rays emitted by the poltinniks, we were able to determine whether the Ag-content of the coins were equal. One of the goals of this study was to determine whether or not legislation was carried out that required the proportions of Ag and Cu used in the minting of coins in 1924 to be identical to those minted in previous years. Also, the intensities of the Ag K{\\alpha} X-rays emitted by 1924 poltinniks minted in London and Leningrad were compared. Our results suggest that the percent difference in the proportions of Ag present in each of the coins is no more than 5.5%.

  18. Spectroscopy and X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    2000-01-01

    The new x-ray astronomical observatories have sufficient spectroscopic capability to allow the determination of plasma conditions in the form of velocities, temperatures, densities, and turbulence parameters at levels that were previously unattainable. The utilization of these diagnostics are possible only if the atomic and plasma physics are well-enough understood to match the observational sensitivity.

  19. X-ray emission from red quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Kinney, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A dozen red quasars were observed with the Einstein Observatory in order to determine their X-ray properties. The observations show that for all these sources, the infrared-optical continuum is so steep that when extrapolated to higher frequencies, it passes orders of magnitude below the measured X-ray flux. The X-ray emission is better correlated with the radio than with the infrared flux, suggesting a connection between the two. By applying the synchrotron-self-Compton model to the data, it is found that the infrared-optical region has a size of 0.01 pc or more and a magnetic field more than 0.1 G, values considerably different than are found in the radio region. Unlike other quasars, the ionizing continuum is dominated by the X-ray emission. The peculiar line ratios seen in these objects can be understood with a photoionization model, provided that the photon to gas density ratio (ionization parameter) is an order of magnitude less than in typical quasars.

  20. Reconstructing misaligned x-ray CT data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divin, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Misalignment errors for x-ray computed tomography (CT) systems can manifest as artifacts and a loss of spatial and contrast resolution. To mitigate artifacts, significant effort is taken to determine the system geometry and minimizing any residual error in the system alignment. This project improved our ability to post-correct data which was acquired on a misaligned CT system.

  1. X-ray voltabsorptometry on redox proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascone, Isabella [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy) and LURE/CNRS Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, bat. 209 D, B.P. 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France)]. E-mail: i.ascone@caspur.it; Zamponi, Silvia [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Camerino, Via S. Agostino 1, 62032 Camerino (Italy); Cognigni, Andrea [LURE/CNRS Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, bat. 209 D, B.P. 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Marmocchi, Franco [Dipartimento di Biologia Molecolare, Cellulare e Animale, Universita di Camerino, Via Camerini, 1 Camerino (Italy); Marassi, Roberto [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Camerino, Via S. Agostino 1, 62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2005-04-15

    Biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS) is able to describe the metal environment in a metalloprotein and is sensitive to metal oxidation state. Coupling of BioXAS and electrochemistry permits the characterization of different oxidation states and avoids uncontrolled protein redox state changes due to X-ray beam irradiation. XAS spectroelectrochemistry requires electrochemical cells specifically designed to meet the requirements of both XAS measurements and electrochemical effectiveness in potential control. In this context, this paper describes a new cell tested with different types of working electrodes developed for BioXAS, in particular for in situ studies of redox proteins. The XAS electrochemical measurements of a relatively high-molecular-weight protein (Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase) for which it is difficult to observe direct electrochemistry have been achieved. New working electrodes, capable of fast and unmediated electron transfer, are described. The cell permits to isolate protein redox states and to measure X-ray absorption intensity during a potential scan (X-ray voltabsorptometry)

  2. Outbursts in ultracompact X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Hameury, J -M

    2016-01-01

    Very faint X-ray binaries appear to be transient in many cases with peak luminosities much fainter than that of usual soft X-ray transients, but their nature still remains elusive. We investigate the possibility that this transient behaviour is due to the same thermal/viscous instability which is responsible for outbursts of bright soft X-ray transients, occurring in ultracompact binaries for adequately low mass-transfer rates. More generally, we investigate the observational consequences of this instability when it occurs in ultracompact binaries. We use our code for modelling the thermal-viscous instability of the accretion disc, assumed here to be hydrogen poor. We also take into account the effects of disc X-ray irradiation, and consider the impact of the mass-transfer rate on the outburst brightness. We find that one can reproduce the observed properties of both the very faint and the brighter short transients (peak luminosity, duration, recurrence times), provided that the viscosity parameter in quiesce...

  3. X-ray signals in renal osteopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieden, K.

    1984-10-01

    Chronic renal insufficiency is associated with metabolic disturbances which ultimately lead to typical, partly extremely painful changes in the skeletal system the longer the disease persists. Regular X-ray control of certain skeletal segments allows early detection of renal oesteopathy if the radiological findings described in this article are carefully scrutinised and interpreted.

  4. Supernova remnants: the X-ray perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants are beautiful astronomical objects that are also of high scientific interest, because they provide insights into supernova explosion mechanisms, and because they are the likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. X-ray observations are an important means to study these objects. And i

  5. Fourier techniques in X-ray timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Klis

    1988-01-01

    Basic principles of Fourier techniques often used in X-ray time series analysis are reviewed. The relation between the discrete Fourier transform and the continuous Fourier transform is discussed to introduce the concepts of windowing and aliasing. The relation is derived between the power spectrum

  6. X-ray spectroscopy of manganese clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grush, M.M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1996-06-01

    Much of this thesis represents the groundwork necessary in order to probe Mn clusters more productively than with conventional Mn K-edge XAS and is presented in Part 1. Part 2 contains the application of x-ray techniques to Mn metalloproteins and includes a prognosis at the end of each chapter. Individual Mn oxidation states are more readily distinguishable in Mn L-edge spectra. An empirical mixed valence simulation routine for determining the average Mn oxidation state has been developed. The first Mn L-edge spectra of a metalloprotein were measured and interpreted. The energy of Mn K{beta} emission is strongly correlated with average Mn oxidation state. K{beta} results support oxidation states of Mn(III){sub 2}(IV){sub 2} for the S{sub 1} state of Photosystem II chemical chemically reduced preparations contain predominantly Mn(II). A strength and limitation of XAS is that it probes all of the species of a particular element in a sample. It would often be advantageous to selectively probe different forms of the same element. The first demonstration that chemical shifts in x-ray fluorescence energies can be used to obtain oxidation state-selective x-ray absorption spectra is presented. Spin-dependent spectra can also be used to obtain a more simplified picture of local structure. The first spin-polarized extended x-ray absorption fine structure using Mn K{beta} fluorescence detection is shown.

  7. X-Ray Diffraction Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Unnam, J.; Naidu, S. V. N.; Houska, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    SOPAD separates overlapping peaks and analyzes derivatives of X-ray diffraction data. SOPAD helps analyst get most information out of available diffraction data. SOPAD uses Marquardt-type nonlinear regression routine to refine initial estimates of individual peak positions, intensities, shapes, and half-widths.

  8. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, Gabriella [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Denes, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gruener, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lessner, Elianne [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2012-08-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) X-ray and neutron user facilities attract more than 12,000 researchers each year to perform cutting-edge science at these state-of-the-art sources. While impressive breakthroughs in X-ray and neutron sources give us the powerful illumination needed to peer into the nano- to mesoscale world, a stumbling block continues to be the distinct lag in detector development, which is slowing progress toward data collection and analysis. Urgently needed detector improvements would reveal chemical composition and bonding in 3-D and in real time, allow researchers to watch “movies” of essential life processes as they happen, and make much more efficient use of every X-ray and neutron produced by the source The immense scientific potential that will come from better detectors has triggered worldwide activity in this area. Europe in particular has made impressive strides, outpacing the United States on several fronts. Maintaining a vital U.S. leadership in this key research endeavor will require targeted investments in detector R&D and infrastructure. To clarify the gap between detector development and source advances, and to identify opportunities to maximize the scientific impact of BES user facilities, a workshop on Neutron and X-ray Detectors was held August 1-3, 2012, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Participants from universities, national laboratories, and commercial organizations from the United States and around the globe participated in plenary sessions, breakout groups, and joint open-discussion summary sessions. Sources have become immensely more powerful and are now brighter (more particles focused onto the sample per second) and more precise (higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution). To fully utilize these source advances, detectors must become faster, more efficient, and more discriminating. In supporting the mission of today’s cutting-edge neutron and X-ray sources, the workshop identified six detector research challenges

  9. X-ray scattering from liquid interfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering is a useful tool for structural characterization of liquid interfaces.Specular refiectivity provides precise measurement of the interfacial widths and of the ordering of surfactants adsorbed to these interfaces. Diffuse scattering gives information on phase transitions and domain formation in surfactant monolayers and on interfacial fluctuations confined by and coupled across fluidic films.

  10. Hard x-ray telescope mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorenstein, P.; Worrall, D.; Joensen, K.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Hard X-Ray Telescope was selected for study as a possible new intermediate size mission for the early 21st century. Its principal attributes are: (1) multiwavelength observing with a system of focussing telescopes that collectively observe from the UV to over 1 MeV, (2) much higher sensitivity...

  11. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease.

  12. X-ray holography with atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegze, Miklós; Faigel, Gyula

    1996-03-01

    DIFFRACTION methods for crystallographic structure determination suffer from the so-called 'phase problem'; a diffraction pattern provides intensity but not phase information for the scattered beams, and therefore cannot be uniquely inverted to obtain the crystal structure of a sample. Holographic methods1, on the other hand, offer a means of extracting both intensity and phase information. To be useful for crystallographic applications, holography must be implemented with radiation of sufficiently small wavelength to resolve atomic-scale features2. One method, electron-emission holography3-9, uses electron waves and is a powerful tool for studying surface structure; but it cannot image the internal structure of solids because of complications arising from the highly anisotropic nature of electron scattering processes. A proposed alternative method uses X-rays2,10-13, which scatter more isotropically than electrons. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of atomic-scale X-ray holography by obtaining direct images of the three-dimensional arrangement of strontium atoms in the cubic perovskite SrTiO3. With more intense synchrotron sources for illumination, and with the development of improved X-ray detectors, X-ray holography should become a powerful general technique for unambiguous structure determination in condensed matter systems.

  13. Soft X-ray follow-up of five hard X-ray emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Pavan, L; Ferrigno, C; Falanga, M; Campana, S; Paltani, S; Stella, L; Walter, R

    2013-01-01

    We studied the soft-X-ray emission of five hard-X sources: IGR J08262-3736, IGR J17354-3255, IGR J16328-4726, SAX J1818.6-1703 and IGR J17348-2045. These sources are: a confirmed supergiant high mass X-ray binary (IGR J08262-3736); candidates (IGR J17354-3255, IGR J16328- 4726) and confirmed (SAX J1818.6-1703) supergiant fast X-ray transients; IGR J17348-2045 is one of the as-yet unidentified objects discovered with INTEGRAL. Thanks to dedicated XMM-Newton observations, we obtained the first detailed soft X-ray spectral and timing study of IGR J08262-3736. The results obtained from the observations of IGR J17354-3255 and IGR J16328-4726 provided further support in favor of their association with the class of Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients. SAX J1818.6-1703, observed close to phase 0.5, was not detected by XMM-Newton, thus supporting the idea that this source reaches its lowest X-ray luminosity (~10^32 erg/s) around apastron. For IGR J17348-2045 we identified for the first time the soft X-ray counterpart and...

  14. X-ray Chirped Pulse Amplification: towards GW Soft X-ray Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Fajardo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Extensive modeling of the seeding of plasma-based soft X-ray lasers is reported in this article. Seminal experiments on amplification in plasmas created from solids have been studied in detail and explained. Using a transient collisional excitation scheme, we show that a 18 µJ, 80 fs fully coherent pulse is achievable by using plasmas pumped by a compact 10 Hz laser. We demonstrate that direct seeding of plasmas created by nanosecond lasers is not efficient. Therefore, we propose and fully study the transposition to soft X-rays of the Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA technique. Soft X-ray pulses with energy of 6 mJ and 200 fs duration are reachable by seeding plasmas pumped by compact 100 J, sub-ns, 1 shot/min lasers. These soft X-ray lasers would reach GW power, corresponding to an increase of 100 times as compared to the highest peak power achievable nowadays in the soft X-ray region (30 eV–1 keV. X-ray CPA is opening new horizon for soft x-ray ultra-intense sources.

  15. Energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction mapping on a benchtop X-ray fluorescence system

    OpenAIRE

    Lane, D W.; Nyombi, A.; Shackel, J.

    2014-01-01

    A method for energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction mapping is presented, using a conventional low-power benchtop X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, the Seiko Instruments SEA6000VX. Hyper spectral X-ray maps with a 10µm step size were collected from polished metal surfaces, sectioned Bi, Pb and steel shot gun pellets. Candidate diffraction lines were identified by eliminating those that matched a characteristic line for an element and those predicted for escape peaks, sum peaks, and Rayleigh and C...

  16. X-ray spectral properties of accretion discs in X-ray binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, N.E.; Stella, L.; Parmar, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    Exosat observations are used to compare the spectral properties of the persistent emission from a number of X-ray burst sources, high-luminosity low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXRB) and galactic black hole candidates with various models for X-ray emission from an accretion disk surrounding a compact object in a binary system. It is shown that only a Comptonization model provides a good fit to all of the spectra considered. The fits to the spectra of the high-luminosity LMXRB systems necessitate an additional blackbody component with a luminosity 16 to 34 percent that from the Comptonized component. 82 references.

  17. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens developed at Indus-2 deep X-ray lithography beamline

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V P Dhamgaye; M K Tiwari; K J S Sawhney; G S Lodha

    2014-07-01

    X-ray lenses are fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate using deep X-ray lithography beamline of Indus-2. The focussing performance of these lenses is evaluated using Indus-2 and Diamond Light Source Ltd. The process steps for the fabrication of X-ray lenses and microfocussing at 10 keV at moderate and low emittance sources are compared.

  18. A Mini X-Ray Survey of Sub-DLAs; Searching for AGNs Formed in Protogalaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chartas, G; Asper, A

    2013-01-01

    A significant fraction of the sub-damped Lyman-alpha (sub-DLA) absorption systems in quasar spectra appear to be metal-rich, many with even super-solar element abundances. This raises the question whether some sub-DLAs may harbor active galactic nuclei (AGN) since supersolar metallicities are observed in AGN. Here we investigate this question based on a mini-survey of 21 quasars known to contain sub-DLAs in their spectra. The X-ray observations were performed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In cases of no detection we estimated upper limits of the X-ray luminosities of possible AGNs at the redshifts of the sub-DLAs. In six cases we find possible X-ray emission within ~ 1 arcsec of the background quasar consistent with the presence of a nearby X-ray source. If these nearby X-ray sources are at the redshifts of the sub-DLAs, their estimated 0.2-10 keV luminosities range between 0.8 x 10^{44}h^{-2} and 4.2 x 10^{44}h^{-2} erg s^{-1}, thus ruling out a normal late-type galaxy origin, and suggesting that the e...

  19. New insights into the quasi-periodic X-ray burster GS 0836-429

    CERN Document Server

    Aranzana, E; Kuulkers, E

    2015-01-01

    GS 0836-429 is a neutron star X-ray transient that displays Type-I X-ray bursts. In 2003 and 2004 it experienced two outbursts in X-rays. We present here an analysis of the system bursting properties during these outbursts. We studied the evolution of the 2003-2004 outbursts in soft X-rays using RXTE (2.5-12 keV; ASM), and in hard X-rays with INTEGRAL (17-80 keV, IBIS/ISGRI). Using data from the JEM-X monitor onboard INTEGRAL we detected 61 Type-I X-ray bursts, and confirm that the source displayed a quasi-periodic burst recurrence time of about 2.3 hours. We improve the characterization of the fuel composition, as well as the description of the typical burst durations and fluences. We estimate the average value of $\\alpha$ to be $49\\pm\\,3$. This value together with the observed burst profiles indicate a regime of a mixed He/H runaway triggered by unstable helium ignition. In addition, we report the detection of four series of double bursts, with burst recurrence times of $\\leq\\,20$ minutes. The measured recu...

  20. Upgrade of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun for Compton scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Fumito; Natsui, Takuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Hashimoto, Eiko; Lee, KiWoo; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Higo, Toshiyasu; Fukuda, Shigeki; Akemoto, Mitsuo

    2009-09-01

    A Compton scattering X-ray source consisting of an X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator (linac) and Q-switched Nd: YAG laser is currently under development at the University of Tokyo. Monochromatic X-rays are required for a variety of medical and biological applications. The X-ray source produces monochromatic X-rays via collision between a 35-MeV multi-bunch (104 bunches in a 1 μs RF pulse) electron beam and 1.4 J/10 ns (532 nm) Nd: YAG laser pulse. The linac uses an X-band 3.5-cell thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet as an injector. Until now, electron beam generation (2 MeV, 1 pC/bunch at the exit of the injector), beam acceleration, and X-ray generation have been verified. In order to increase X-ray energy and intensity, we have completed the design and construction of a new RF gun with relevant modifications in some structures. In this paper, we describe the details of the concepts of designing a new RF gun and discuss future works.

  1. Simultaneous X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the Oef supergiant lambda Cep

    CERN Document Server

    Rauw, G; Naze, Y; Gonzalez-Perez, J N; Hempelmann, A; Mittag, M; Schmitt, J H M M; Schroeder, K -P; Gosset, E; Eenens, P; Uuh-Sonda, J M

    2015-01-01

    Probing the structures of stellar winds is of prime importance for the understanding of massive stars. Based on their optical spectral morphology and variability, the stars of the Oef class have been suggested to feature large-scale structures in their wind. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time-series of X-ray observations of presumably-single O-type stars can help us understand the physics of their stellar winds. We have collected XMM-Newton observations and coordinated optical spectroscopy of the O6Ief star lambda Cep to study its X-ray and optical variability and to analyse its high-resolution X-ray spectrum. We investigate the line profile variability of the He II 4686 and H-alpha emission lines in our time series of optical spectra, including a search for periodicities. We further discuss the variability of the broadband X-ray flux and analyse the high-resolution spectrum of lambda Cep using line-by-line fits as well as a code designed to fit the full high-resolution X-ray spectrum consistently. D...

  2. Principles of femtosecond X-ray/optical cross-correlation with X-ray induced transient optical reflectivity in solids

    OpenAIRE

    Eckert, S.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Dakovski, G. L.; Khalil, M.; Huse, N.; Föhlisch, A.; Pietzsch, A.; Quevedo, W.; Hantschmann, M.; Ochmann, M.; Ross, M.; Minitti, M. P.; Turner, J. J.; Moeller, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of ultrafast X-ray induced optical reflectivity changes enabled the development of X-ray/optical cross correlation techniques at X-ray free electron lasers worldwide. We have now linked through experiment and theory the fundamental excitation and relaxation steps with the transient optical properties in finite solid samples. Therefore, we gain a thorough interpretation and an optimized detection scheme of X-ray induced changes to the refractive index and the X-ray/optical cross ...

  3. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, Gabriella [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Denes, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gruener, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lessner, Elianne [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2012-08-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) X-ray and neutron user facilities attract more than 12,000 researchers each year to perform cutting-edge science at these state-of-the-art sources. While impressive breakthroughs in X-ray and neutron sources give us the powerful illumination needed to peer into the nano- to mesoscale world, a stumbling block continues to be the distinct lag in detector development, which is slowing progress toward data collection and analysis. Urgently needed detector improvements would reveal chemical composition and bonding in 3-D and in real time, allow researchers to watch “movies” of essential life processes as they happen, and make much more efficient use of every X-ray and neutron produced by the source The immense scientific potential that will come from better detectors has triggered worldwide activity in this area. Europe in particular has made impressive strides, outpacing the United States on several fronts. Maintaining a vital U.S. leadership in this key research endeavor will require targeted investments in detector R&D and infrastructure. To clarify the gap between detector development and source advances, and to identify opportunities to maximize the scientific impact of BES user facilities, a workshop on Neutron and X-ray Detectors was held August 1-3, 2012, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Participants from universities, national laboratories, and commercial organizations from the United States and around the globe participated in plenary sessions, breakout groups, and joint open-discussion summary sessions. Sources have become immensely more powerful and are now brighter (more particles focused onto the sample per second) and more precise (higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution). To fully utilize these source advances, detectors must become faster, more efficient, and more discriminating. In supporting the mission of today’s cutting-edge neutron and X-ray sources, the workshop identified six detector research challenges

  4. BeppoSAX Observations of Synchrotron X-ray Emission from Radio Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Ghisellini, G; Giommi, P; Perlman, E

    2002-01-01

    We present new BeppoSAX LECS, MECS, and PDS observations of four flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) having effective spectral indices alpha_ro and alpha_ox typical of high-energy peaked BL Lacs. Our sources have X-ray-to-radio flux ratios on average ~ 70 times larger than ``classical'' FSRQ and lie at the extreme end of the FSRQ X-ray-to-radio flux ratio distribution. The collected data cover the energy range 0.1 - 10 keV (observer's frame), reaching ~ 100 keV for one object. The BeppoSAX band in one of our sources, RGB J1629+4008, is dominated by synchrotron emission peaking at ~ 2 x 10^16 Hz, as also shown by its steep (energy index alpha_x ~ 1.5) spectrum. This makes this object the FIRST known FSRQ whose X-ray emission is not due to inverse Compton radiation. Two other sources display a flat BeppoSAX spectrum (alpha_x ~ 0.7), with weak indications of steepening at low X-ray energies. The combination of BeppoSAX and ROSAT observations, (non-simultaneous) multifrequency data, and a synchrotron inverse Compt...

  5. X-ray and Ultraviolet Properties of AGN in Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Baldassare, Vivienne F; Gallo, Elena; Greene, Jenny E

    2016-01-01

    We present new Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope observations of eight optically selected broad-line AGN candidates in nearby dwarf galaxies ($z<0.055$). Including archival Chandra observations of three additional sources, our sample contains all ten galaxies from Reines et al. (2013) with both broad H$\\alpha$ emission and narrow-line AGN ratios (6 AGNs, 4 Composites), as well as one low-metallicity dwarf galaxy with broad H$\\alpha$ and narrow-line ratios characteristic of star formation. All eleven galaxies are detected in X-rays. Nuclear X-ray luminosities range from $L_{0.5-7 \\rm{keV}}\\approx5\\times10^{39}$ to $1\\times10^{42}$ $\\rm{erg}\\rm{s^{-1}}$. In all cases except for the star forming galaxy, the nuclear X-ray luminosities are significantly higher than would be expected from X-ray binaries, providing strong confirmation that AGN and composite dwarf galaxies do indeed host actively accreting BHs. Using our estimated BH masses (which range from $\\sim7\\times10^{4}-1\\times10^{6}~M_{\\...

  6. Soft X-ray Absorbers Enabling Study of the Diffuse X-ray Background Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Absorbers for soft x-rays need to be made thinner and with larger area, to collect more photons, and with minimal number of support stems. However, the structure is...

  7. Calculation of x-ray scattering patterns from nanocrystals at high x-ray intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullah, Malik Muhammad; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2016-01-01

    We present a generalized method to describe the x-ray scattering intensity of the Bragg spots in a diffraction pattern from nanocrystals exposed to intense x-ray pulses. Our method involves the subdivision of a crystal into smaller units. In order to calculate the dynamics within every unit we employ a Monte-Carlo (MC)-molecular dynamics (MD)-ab-initio hybrid framework using real space periodic boundary conditions. By combining all the units we simulate the diffraction pattern of a crystal larger than the transverse x-ray beam profile, a situation commonly encountered in femtosecond nanocrystallography experiments with focused x-ray free-electron laser radiation. Radiation damage is not spatially uniform and depends on the fluence associated with each specific region inside the crystal. To investigate the effects of uniform and non-uniform fluence distribution we have used two different spatial beam profiles, gaussian and flattop.

  8. X-Ray Scattering Applications Using Pulsed X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, B.C.

    1999-05-23

    Pulsed x-ray sources have been used in transient structural phenomena investigations for over fifty years; however, until the advent of synchrotrons sources and the development of table-top picosecond lasers, general access to ligh temporal resolution x-ray diffraction was relatively limited. Advances in diffraction techniques, sample excitation schemes, and detector systems, in addition to IncEased access to pulsed sources, have ld tO what is now a diverse and growing array of pulsed-source measurement applications. A survey of time-resolved investigations using pulsed x-ray sources is presented and research opportunities using both present and planned pulsed x-ray sources are discussed.

  9. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    CERN Document Server

    Brozas, F Valle; Roso, L; Conde, A Peralta

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source, and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However electrons are stopped in the first layers allowing therefore a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  10. Nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boye, Pit

    2010-02-05

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution X-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. In this work, the theoretical basics of X-rays and their interaction with matter are described. Especially, aspects of synchrotron radiation are emphasized. Important in X-ray microscopy are the different optics. The details, advantages and disadvantages, in particular those of refractive lenses are given. To achieve small X-ray beams well beyond the 100 nm range a small focal length is required. This is achieved in refractive lenses by moving to a compact lens design where several single lenses are stacked behind each other. The, so-called nanofocusing refractive lenses (NFLs) have a parabolic cylindrical shape with lateral structure sizes in the micrometer range. NFLs are produced by using micro-machining techniques. These micro-fabrication processes and technologies are introduced. The results of the optimization and the final fabrication process for silicon lenses are presented. Subsequently, two experiments that are exemplary for the use of NFLs, are introduced. The rst one employs a high-resolution scanning fluorescence mapping of a geological sample, and the second one is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiment. CXDI is able to reconstruct the illuminated object from recorded coherent diffraction patterns. In a scanning mode, referred to as ptychography, this method is even able to reconstruct the illumination and the object simultaneously. Especially the reconstructed illumination and the possibility of computed propagation of the wave field along the

  11. X-RAY POLARIZATION FROM HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallman, T. [NASA/GSFC, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Dorodnitsyn, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Blondin, J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    X-ray astronomy allows study of objects that may be associated with compact objects, i.e., neutron stars or black holes, and also may contain strong magnetic fields. Such objects are categorically nonspherical, and likely noncircular when projected on the sky. Polarization allows study of such geometric effects, and X-ray polarimetry is likely to become feasible for a significant number of sources in the future. Potential targets for future X-ray polarization observations are the high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a compact object in orbit with an early-type star. In this paper we show that X-ray polarization from HMXBs has a distinct signature that depends on the source inclination and orbital phase. The presence of the X-ray source displaced from the star creates linear polarization even if the primary wind is spherically symmetric whenever the system is viewed away from conjunction. Direct X-rays dilute this polarization whenever the X-ray source is not eclipsed; at mid-eclipse the net polarization is expected to be small or zero if the wind is circularly symmetric around the line of centers. Resonance line scattering increases the scattering fraction, often by large factors, over the energy band spanned by resonance lines. Real winds are not expected to be spherically symmetric, or circularly symmetric around the line of centers, owing to the combined effects of the compact object gravity and ionization on the wind hydrodynamics. A sample calculation shows that this creates polarization fractions ranging up to tens of percent at mid-eclipse.

  12. The ITER core imaging x-ray spectrometer: x-ray calorimeter performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Dunn, J; Morris, K; Wang, E; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Bitter, M; Feder, R; Hill, K W; Johnson, D; Barnsley, R

    2010-10-01

    We describe the anticipated performance of an x-ray microcalorimeter instrument on ITER. As part of the core imaging x-ray spectrometer, the instrument will augment the imaging crystal spectrometers by providing a survey of the concentration of heavy ion plasma impurities in the core and possibly ion temperature values from the emission lines of different elemental ions located at various radial positions.

  13. Reconstitution of F1-ATPase activity from Escherichia coli subunits alpha, beta and subunit gamma tagged with six histidine residues at the C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuni, A; Watanabe, H; Kuroda, N; Sawada, K; Murakami, H; Kanazawa, H

    1998-05-01

    An engineered gamma subunit of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase with extra 14 and 20 amino acid residues at the N- and C-termini (His-tag gamma), respectively, was overproduced in E. coli and purified. Six histidines are included in the C-terminal extension. The reconstituted F1 containing alpha, beta, and His-tagged gamma exhibited sixty percent of the wild-type ATPase activity. The reconstituted alphabeta His-tag gamma complex was subjected to affinity chromatography with nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin. ATPase activity was eluted specifically with imidazole. These results implied that the tag sequence protruded to the surface of the complex and did not seriously impair the activity. The reconstituted alphabeta His-tag gamma complex, even after its binding to the resin, exhibited ATPase activity suggesting that the gamma subunit, when fixed to a solid phase, may rotate the alphabeta complex. This system may provide a new approach for analysis of the rotation mechanisms in F1-ATPase.

  14. The X-ray Spectral Evolution of Galactic Black Hole X-ray Binaries Toward Quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Plotkin, Richard M; Jonker, Peter G

    2013-01-01

    Most transient black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) spend the bulk of their time in a quiescent state, where they accrete matter from their companion star at highly sub-Eddington luminosities (we define quiescence here as a normalized Eddington ratio l_x = L_{0.5-10 keV}}/L_{Edd} < 1e-5). Here, we present Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy for three BHXB systems (H 1743-322, MAXI J1659-152, and XTE J1752-223) as they fade into quiescence following an outburst. Multiple X-ray observations were taken within one month of each other, allowing us to track each individual system's X-ray spectral evolution during its decay. We compare these three systems to other BHXB systems. We confirm that quiescent BHXBs have softer X-ray spectra than low-hard state BHXBs, and that quiescent BHXB spectral properties show no dependence on the binary system's orbital parameters. However, the observed anti-correlation between X-ray photon index and l_x in the low-hard state does not continue once a BHXB enters quiescence. Instead, ...

  15. Development of X-ray CCD camera based X-ray micro-CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Partha S.; Ray, N. K.; Pal, Manoj K.; Baribaddala, Ravi; Agrawal, Ashish; Kashyap, Y.; Sinha, A.; Gadkari, S. C.

    2017-02-01

    Availability of microfocus X-ray sources and high resolution X-ray area detectors has made it possible for high resolution microtomography studies to be performed outside the purview of synchrotron. In this paper, we present the work towards the use of an external shutter on a high resolution microtomography system using X-ray CCD camera as a detector. During micro computed tomography experiments, the X-ray source is continuously ON and owing to the readout mechanism of the CCD detector electronics, the detector registers photons reaching it during the read-out period too. This introduces a shadow like pattern in the image known as smear whose direction is defined by the vertical shift register. To resolve this issue, the developed system has been incorporated with a synchronized shutter just in front of the X-ray source. This is positioned in the X-ray beam path during the image readout period and out of the beam path during the image acquisition period. This technique has resulted in improved data quality and hence the same is reflected in the reconstructed images.

  16. Magnetar-like X-ray bursts from an anomalous X-ray pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriil, F P; Kaspi, V M; Woods, P M

    2002-09-12

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are a class of rare X-ray emitting pulsars whose energy source has been perplexing for some 20 years. Unlike other X-ray emitting pulsars, AXPs cannot be powered by rotational energy or by accretion of matter from a binary companion star, hence the designation 'anomalous'. Many of the rotational and radiative properties of the AXPs are strikingly similar to those of another class of exotic objects, the soft-gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs). But the defining property of the SGRs--their low-energy-gamma-ray and X-ray bursts--has not hitherto been observed for AXPs. Soft-gamma-ray repeaters are thought to be 'magnetars', which are young neutron stars whose emission is powered by the decay of an ultra-high magnetic field; the suggestion that AXPs might also be magnetars has been controversial. Here we report two X-ray bursts, with properties similar to those of SGRs, from the direction of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E1048.1 - 5937. These events imply a close relationship (perhaps evolutionary) between AXPs and SGRs, with both being magnetars.

  17. The Cambridge-Cambridge X-ray Serendipity Survey: I X-ray luminous galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, B. J.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the first results obtained from a new optical identification program of 123 faint X-ray sources with S(0.5-2 keV) greater than 2 x 10(exp -14) erg/s/sq cm serendipitously detected in ROSAT PSPC pointed observations. We have spectroscopically identified the optical counterparts to more than 100 sources in this survey. Although the majority of the sample (68 objects) are QSO's, we have also identified 12 narrow emission line galaxies which have extreme X-ray luminosities (10(exp 42) less than L(sub X) less than 10(exp 43.5) erg/s). Subsequent spectroscopy reveals them to be a mixture of star-burst galaxies and Seyfert 2 galaxies in approximately equal numbers. Combined with potentially similar objects identified in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey, these X-ray luminous galaxies exhibit a rate of cosmological evolution, L(sub X) varies as (1 + z)(exp 2.5 +/- 1.0), consistent with that derived for X-ray QSO's. This evolution, coupled with the steep slope determined for the faint end of the X-ray luminosity function (Phi(L(sub X)) varies as L(sub X)(exp -1.9)), implies that such objects could comprise 15-35% of the soft (1-2 keV) X-ray background.

  18. A Transmissive X-ray Polarimeter Design For Hard X-ray Focusing Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hong; Ji, Jianfeng; Deng, Zhi; He, Li; Zeng, Ming; Li, Tenglin; Liu, Yinong; Heng, Peiyin; Wu, Qiong; Han, Dong; Dong, Yongwei; Lu, Fangjun; Zhang, Shuangnan

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Timing and Polarization (XTP) is a mission concept for a future space borne X-ray observatory and is currently selected for early phase study. We present a new design of X-ray polarimeter based on the time projection gas chamber. The polarimeter, placed above the focal plane, has an additional rear window that allows hard X-rays to penetrate (a transmission of nearly 80% at 6 keV) through it and reach the detector on the focal plane. Such a design is to compensate the low detection efficiency of gas detectors, at a low cost of sensitivity, and can maximize the science return of multilayer hard X-ray telescopes without the risk of moving focal plane instruments. The sensitivity in terms of minimum detectable polarization, based on current instrument configuration, is expected to be 3% for a 1mCrab source given an observing time of 10^5 s. We present preliminary test results, including photoelectron tracks and modulation curves, using a test chamber and polarized X-ray sources in the lab.

  19. Development of X-ray CCD camera based X-ray micro-CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Partha S; Ray, N K; Pal, Manoj K; Baribaddala, Ravi; Agrawal, Ashish; Kashyap, Y; Sinha, A; Gadkari, S C

    2017-02-01

    Availability of microfocus X-ray sources and high resolution X-ray area detectors has made it possible for high resolution microtomography studies to be performed outside the purview of synchrotron. In this paper, we present the work towards the use of an external shutter on a high resolution microtomography system using X-ray CCD camera as a detector. During micro computed tomography experiments, the X-ray source is continuously ON and owing to the readout mechanism of the CCD detector electronics, the detector registers photons reaching it during the read-out period too. This introduces a shadow like pattern in the image known as smear whose direction is defined by the vertical shift register. To resolve this issue, the developed system has been incorporated with a synchronized shutter just in front of the X-ray source. This is positioned in the X-ray beam path during the image readout period and out of the beam path during the image acquisition period. This technique has resulted in improved data quality and hence the same is reflected in the reconstructed images.

  20. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, R S

    2014-01-01

    Using the XMM-Newton Slew Survey, we construct a hard-band selected sample of low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources. Two source populations are represented, namely coronally-active stars and binaries (ASBs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs), with X-ray luminosities collectively spanning the range 10^(28-34) erg/s (2-10 keV). We derive the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and volume emissivity of each population. Scaled to the local stellar mass density, the latter is found to be 1.08 +/- 0.16 x 10^28 erg/s/M and 2.5 +/- 0.6 x 10^27 erg/s/M, for the ASBs and CVs respectively, which in total is a factor 2 higher than previous estimates. We employ the new XLFs to predict the X-ray source counts on the Galactic plane at l = 28.5 deg and show that the result is consistent with current observational constraints. The X-ray emission of faint, unresolved ASBs and CVs can account for a substantial fraction of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We discuss a model in which roughly 80 per cent of the 6-10 keV...

  1. HERMES: a soft X-ray beamline dedicated to X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkhou, Rachid; Stanescu, Stefan; Swaraj, Sufal; Besson, Adrien; Ledoux, Milena; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Dalle, Didier

    2015-07-01

    The HERMES beamline (High Efficiency and Resolution beamline dedicated to X-ray Microscopy and Electron Spectroscopy), built at Synchrotron SOLEIL (Saint-Auban, France), is dedicated to soft X-ray microscopy. The beamline combines two complementary microscopy methods: XPEEM (X-ray Photo Emitted Electron Microscopy) and STXM (Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy) with an aim to reach spatial resolution below 20 nm and to fully exploit the local spectroscopic capabilities of the two microscopes. The availability of the two methods within the same beamline enables the users to select the appropriate approach to study their specific case in terms of sample environment, spectroscopy methods, probing depth etc. In this paper a general description of the beamline and its design are presented. The performance and specifications of the beamline will be reviewed in detail. Moreover, the article is aiming to demonstrate how the beamline performances have been specifically optimized to fulfill the specific requirements of a soft X-ray microscopy beamline in terms of flux, resolution, beam size etc. Special attention has been dedicated to overcome some limiting and hindering problems that are usually encountered on soft X-ray beamlines such as carbon contamination, thermal stability and spectral purity.

  2. X-ray luminosity functions of different morphological and X-ray type AGN populations

    CERN Document Server

    Pović, M; Sánchez-Portal, M; Bongiovanni, A; Cepa, J; Lorenzo, M Fernández; Lara-López, M A; Gallego, J; Ederoclite, A; Márquez, I; Masegosa, J; Alfaro, E; Castañeda, H; González-Serrano, J I; González, J J; 10.1002/asna.201211840

    2013-01-01

    Luminosity functions are one of the most important observational clues when studying galaxy evolution over cosmic time. In this paper we present the X-ray luminosity functions of X-ray detected AGN in the SXDS and GWS fields. The limiting fluxes of our samples are 9.0x10^(-15) and 4.8x10^(-16) erg/cm^2/sec^(-1) in the 0.5 - 7.0 keV band in the two fields, respectively. We carried out analysis in three X-ray bands and in two redshift intervals up to z < 1.4. Moreover, we derive the luminosity functions for different optical morphologies and X-ray types. We confirm strong luminosity evolution in all three bands, finding the most luminous objects at higher redshift. However, no signs of density evolution are found in any tested X-ray band. We obtain similar results for compact and early-type objects. Finally, we observe the `Steffen effect', where X-ray type-1 sources are more numerous at higher luminosities in comparison with type-2 sources.

  3. A Test Facility For Astronomical X-Ray Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, R. A.; Bordas, J.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1989-01-01

    Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earths atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source which is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has to appro......Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earths atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source which is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has...

  4. Test facility for astronomical x-ray optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Lewis, Robert A.; Bordas, J.

    1990-01-01

    Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earth's atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source that is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has to appro......Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earth's atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source that is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has...

  5. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels;

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  6. Material analysis with X-ray microdiffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedel, F.; Winkler, U.; Holtz, B. [ThyssenKrupp Stahl AG, Duisburg (Germany); Seyrich, R.; Ullrich, H.J. [Dresden University of Technology (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Steel has continued to develop its status as a lightweight construction material for the design of vehicle bodies, most recently with the development of multi-phase steel. With a specific mixture of different phases in the steel microstructure, multi-phase steel combines high stability with good forming capacity. The characterisation of the complex structure of the multi-phase steel represents a challenge for metallurgists. For some years a new generation of X-ray diffractometers with two-dimensional (area) detectors and apparatus for local dissolved measurements are available to customers. This paper reports the applications and advantages of the modern X-ray diffractometry method. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. X-ray focusing using microchannel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaret, P.; Geissbuehler, P.; Chen, A.; Glavinas, E.

    1992-01-01

    We present measurements of the X-ray focusing properties of square-pore microchannel plates (MCP's). Square-pore MCP's contain large numbers of closely packed optical surfaces, as required for grazing incidence X-ray optics. The surface of individual MCP channels has been measured and found to have high microroughness transverse to the channel axis and low microroughness parallel to the axis. The high frequency transverse roughness, on length scales greater than 400 nm, has a rms value of 5.9 nm and a Gaussian autocorrelation function with correlation length of 1.41 micron. We find that the geometric misalignments of the surfaces of different channels limit the angular resolution obtainable with current samples of MCP's to 7.1 arcmin.

  8. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing almost all areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission named the X-ray Surveyor. This study starts with a baseline payloa...

  9. Tomographic x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, C. G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Gunzler, T. F.; Lengeler, B.; Richwin, M.; Griesebock, B.; Lutzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.; Ziegler, E.; Mashayekhi, A.; Haeffner, D. R.; Grunwaldt, J. -D.; Baiker, A.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Aachen Univ.; HASYLAB at DESY; Bergische Univ. Wuppertal; ESRF; Inst. for Chemical and Bioengineering

    2004-01-01

    Hard x-ray absorption spectroscopy is combined with scanning microtomography to reconstruct full near edge spectra of an elemental species at each point on an arbitrary virtual section through a sample. These spectra reveal the local concentration of different chemical compounds of the absorbing element inside the sample and give insight into the oxidation state and the local projected free density of states. The method is implemented by combining a quick scanning monochromator and data acquisition system with a scanning microprobe setup based on refractive x-ray lenses. The full XANES spectra reconstructed at each point of the tomographic slice allow one to detect slight variations in concentration of the chemical compounds, such as Cu and Cu(I){sub 2}O.

  10. X-Ray Polarimetry with GEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2011-01-01

    The polarization properties of cosmic X-ray sources are still largely unexplored. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) will carry out the first sensitive X-ray polarization survey of a wide range of sources including; accreting compact objects (black holes and neutron stars), AGN, supernova remnants, magnetars and rotation-powered pulsars. GEMS employs grazing-incidence foil mirrors and novel time-projection chamber (TPC) polarimeters leveraging the photoelectric effect to achieve high polarization sensitivity in the 2 - 10 keV band. I will provide an update of the project status, illustrate the expected performance with several science examples, and provide a brief overview of the data analysis challenges

  11. Burst Detector X-Ray IIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Burst Detector X-Ray (BDX) instrument for the Block IIR series of Global Positioning System satellites is described. The BDX instrument can locate and characterize exoatmospheric nuclear detonations by using four sensors consisting of sets of filters over silicon diodes to detect x rays of various energies from the burst. On the BDX-IIR, a fifth sensor with a response spanning those of the other sensors confirms coincidences among the four main channels. The mechanical and electronic features of the BDX-IIR and its sensors are described. The calibrations and the system tests used in flight are presented. The commands for the BDX-IIR are given. The messages sent from the BDX-IIR are described in detail.

  12. How x rays inhibit amphibian limb regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maden, M.; Wallace, H.

    1976-07-01

    The effects of an inhibiting dose of 2,000 rad of x-rays on the regenerating limbs of axolotl larvae have been examined in a histological and cytological study. Particular attention was paid to the mitotic indices of normal and irradiated epidermal and blastemal cells. Both the characteristic pattern of epidermal mitotic stimulation which normally follows amputation and the later increase in blastemal mitoses are suppressed by irradiation. In most cells the effects are permanent, but in a small proportion a mitotic delay is induced and upon subsequent division chromosome damage in the form of micronuclei is revealed. Thus irradiated cells which do divide almost certainly die. These results are discussed in relation to other theories of x-ray inhibition of regeneration with particular reference to the view that irradiated cells can be reactivated.

  13. X-ray detection using magnetic calorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenefeld, J. E-mail: e62@urz.uni-heidelberg.de; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Sollner, J.; Horst, K.; Adams, J.S.; Kim, Y.H.; Seidel, G.M.; Bandler, S.R

    2000-04-07

    Using a magnetic calorimeter, we have obtained an energy resolution of 13 eV in the detection of 6 keV X-rays. The calorimeter consisted of a 50 {mu}m diameter, 25 {mu}m thick Au sensor doped with 300 ppm Er. A 100x100 {mu}m square, 8 {mu}m thick Au absorber was attached to the sensor. At the operating temperature of 33 mK and with a field of 3 mT, the calorimeter had a heat capacity of 1.3x10{sup -12} J/K. With a magnetic calorimeter optimized for X-ray detection an order of magnitude improvement in resolution should be possible.

  14. Neutron and X-ray Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hippert, Françoise; Hodeau, Jean Louis; Lelièvre-Berna, Eddy; Regnard, Jean-René

    2006-01-01

    Neutron and X-Ray Spectroscopy delivers an up-to-date account of the principles and practice of inelastic and spectroscopic methods available at neutron and synchrotron sources, including recent developments. The chapters are based on a course of lectures and practicals (the HERCULES course) delivered to young scientists who require these methods in their professional careers. Each chapter, written by a leading specialist in the field, introduces the basic concepts of the technique and provides an overview of recent work. This volume, which focuses on spectroscopic techniques in synchrotron radiation and inelastic neutron scattering, will be a primary source of information for physicists, chemists and materials scientists who wish to acquire a basic understanding of these techniques and to discover the possibilities offered by them. Emphasizing the complementarity of the neutron and X-ray methods, this tutorial will also be invaluable to scientists already working in neighboring fields who seek to extend thei...

  15. Soft X-ray Polarimetry Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Herman; Schulz, Norbert S.; Heine, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    We present continued development of a telescope for measuring linear X-ray polarization over the 0.2-0.8 keV band. We employ multilayer-coated mirrors as Bragg reflectors at the Brewster angle. By matching to the dispersion of a spectrometer, one may take advantage of high multilayer reflectivities and achieve polarization modulation factors over 95%. We have constructed a source of polarized X-rays that operates at a wide range of energies with a selectable polarization angle. We will present results from measurements of new laterally graded multilayer mirrors and new gratings essential to the design. Finally, we will present a design for a small telescope for suborbital or orbital missions. A suborbital mission could measure the polarization of a blazar such as Mk 421 to 5-10 percent while an orbital version could measure the polarizations of neutron stars, active galactic nuclei, and blazars.

  16. Modeling X-ray Emission Around Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Extended X-ray emission can be studied either spatially (through its surface brightness profile) or spectrally (by analyzing the spectrum at various locations in the field). Both techniques have advantages and disadvantages, and when the emission becomes particularly faint and/or extended, the two methods can disagree. We argue that an ideal approach would be to model the events file directly, and therefore to use both the spectral and spatial information which are simultaneously available for each event. In this work we propose a first step in this direction, introducing a method for spatial analysis which can be extended to leverage spectral information simultaneously. We construct a model for the entire X-ray image in a given energy band, and generate a likelihood function to compare the model to the data. A critical goal of this modeling is disentangling vignetted and unvignetted backgrounds through their different spatial distributions. Employing either maximum likelihood or Markov Chain Monte Carlo, we ...

  17. X-ray Compton line scan tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupsch, Andreas; Lange, Axel; Jaenisch, Gerd-Ruediger [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany). Fachgruppe 8.5 - Mikro-ZfP; Hentschel, Manfred P. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany); Kardjilov, Nikolay; Markoetter, Henning; Hilger, Andre; Manke, Ingo [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) (Germany); Toetzke, Christian [Potsdam Univ. (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The potentials of incoherent X-ray scattering (Compton) computed tomography (CT) are investigated. The imaging of materials of very different atomic number or density at once is generally a perpetual challenge for X-ray tomography or radiography. In a basic laboratory set-up for simultaneous perpendicular Compton scattering and direct beam attenuation tomography are conducted by single channel photon counting line scans. This results in asymmetric distortions of the projection profiles of the scattering CT data set. In a first approach, corrections of Compton scattering data by taking advantage of rotational symmetry yield tomograms without major geometric artefacts. A cylindrical sample composed of PE, PA, PVC, glass and wood demonstrates similar Compton contrast for all the substances, while the conventional absorption tomogram only reveals the two high order materials. Comparison to neutron tomography reveals astonishing similarities except for the glass component (without hydrogen). Therefore, Compton CT offers the potential to replace neutron tomography, which requires much more efforts.

  18. X-ray spectropolarimetric measurements of the Kerr metric

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Dan; Cheng, Yifan; Bambi, Cosimo

    2015-01-01

    It is thought that the spacetime geometry around black hole candidates is described by the Kerr solution, but an observational confirmation is still missing. Today, the continuum-fitting method and the analysis of the iron K$\\alpha$ line cannot unambiguously test the Kerr paradigm because of the degeneracy among the parameters of the system, in the sense that it is impossible with current X-ray data to distinguish a Kerr black hole from a non-Kerr object with different spin and observed from a different viewing angle. In this paper, we study the possibility of testing the Kerr nature of black hole candidates with X-ray spectropolarimetric measurements. As a preliminary study, we employ a model with some simplifications, but our conclusions can unlikely change with a more sophisticated description. We find that -- even in the case of high quality data -- it is impossible to test the Kerr metric and the problem is still the strong correlation between the spin and possible deviations from the Kerr geometry. The ...

  19. X-ray polarization spectroscopy from ultra-intense interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, N; Pasley, J; Wagenaars, E; Waugh, J N; Woolsey, N C [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Clarke, R; Gallegos, P; Rajeev, P P [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QN (United Kingdom); Gizzi, L; Koester, P; Labate, L; Levato, T [ILIL-IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Gregori, G; Li, B [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, OX4 1PJ (United Kingdom); Makita, M; Riley, D, E-mail: nb505@york.ac.u [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast, BT1 4NN (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    Detailed knowledge of fast electron energy transport following the interaction of ultrashort intense laser pulses is a key subject for fast ignition. This is a problem relevant to many areas of laser-plasma physics with particular importance to fast ignition and X-ray secondary source development, necessary for the development of large-scale facilities such as HiPER and ELI. Operating two orthogonal crystal spectrometers set at Bragg angles close to 45{sup 0} determines the X-ray s- and p- polarization ratio. From this ratio, it is possible to infer the velocity distribution function of the fast electron beam within the dense plasma. We report on results of polarization measurements at high density for sulphur and nickel buried layer targets in the high intensity range of 10{sup 19} - 10{sup 21} Wcm{sup -2}. We observe at 45{sup 0} the Ly-{alpha} doublet using two sets of orthogonal highly-orientated pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) crystals set in 1st order for sulphur and 3rd order for nickel.

  20. X-RAY AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF A 0535+26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Jenke, P. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Steele, I. [Liverpool J. Moore' s University, Kingsway House, Hatton Garden, Liverpool L3 2AJ (United Kingdom); Coe, M. J.; McBride, V. A. [University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gutierrez-Soto, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Glorieta de la Astronomia, s/n, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Kretschmar, P. [ESA/ESAC, Madrid (Spain); Caballero, I.; Rodriguez, J. [AIM-CEA Saclay, Paris (France); Yan, J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Suso, J. [University of Valencia, Poligono de la Coma, s/n, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Case, G.; Cherry, M. L. [Louisiana State University, Boton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Guiriec, S. [NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    We present recent contemporaneous X-ray and optical observations of the Be/X-ray binary system A 0535+26 with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and several ground-based observatories. These new observations are put into the context of the rich historical data (since {approx}1978) and discussed in terms of the neutron-star-Be-disk interaction. The Be circumstellar disk was exceptionally large just before the 2009 December giant outburst, which may explain the origin of the unusual recent X-ray activity of this source. We found a peculiar evolution of the pulse profile during this giant outburst, with the two main components evolving in opposite ways with energy. A hard 30-70 mHz X-ray quasi-periodic oscillation was detected with GBM during this 2009 December giant outburst. It becomes stronger with increasing energy and disappears at energies below 25 keV. In the long term a strong optical/X-ray correlation was found for this system, however in the medium term the H{alpha} equivalent width and the V-band brightness showed an anti-correlation after {approx}2002 August. Each giant X-ray outburst occurred during a decline phase of the optical brightness, while the H{alpha} showed a strong emission. In late 2010 and before the 2011 February outburst, rapid V/R variations are observed in the strength of the two peaks of the H{alpha} line. These had a period of {approx}25 days and we suggest the presence of a global one-armed oscillation to explain this scenario. A general pattern might be inferred, where the disk becomes weaker and shows V/R variability beginning {approx}6 months following a giant outburst.

  1. Large thin adaptive x-ray mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doel, Peter; Atkins, Carolyn; Thompson, Samantha; Brooks, David; Yao, Jun; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Button, Tim; Zhang, Dou; James, Ady

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the progress made in a proof of concept study and recent results of a research program into large active x-ray mirrors that is part of the UK Smart X-ray Optics project. The ultimate aim is to apply the techniques of active/adaptive optics to the next generation of nested shell astronomical X-ray space telescopes. A variety of deformable mirror technologies are currently available, the most promising of which for active X-ray mirrors are probably unimorph and bimorph piezoelectric mirrors. In this type of mirror one or more sheets of piezoelectric material are bonded to or coated with a passive reflective layer. On the back or between the piezoceramic layer/layers are series of electrodes. Application of an electric field causes the piezoelectric material to undergo local deformation thus changing the mirror shape. Starting in 2005 a proof of concept active mirror research program has been undertaken. This work included modelling and development of actively controlled thin shell mirrors. Finite element models of piezo-electric actuated mirrors have been developed and verified against experimental test systems. This has included the modelling and test of piezo-electric hexagonal unimorph segments. Various actuator types and low shrinkage conductive bonding methods have been investigated and laboratory tests of the use of piezo-electric actuators to adjust the form of an XMM-Newton space telescope engineering model mirror shell have been conducted and show that movement of the optics at the required level is achievable. Promising technological approaches have been identified including moulded piezo-ceramics and piezo-electrics fibre bundles.

  2. Sample holder for X-ray diffractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesch, Victor L.

    1992-01-01

    A sample holder for use with X-ray diffractometers with the capability to rotate the sample, as well as to adjust the position of the sample in the x, y, and z directions. Adjustment in the x direction is accomplished through loosening set screws, moving a platform, and retightening the set screws. Motion translators are used for adjustment in the y and z directions. An electric motor rotates the sample, and receives power from the diffractometer.

  3. Early x-ray diagnosis of coxarthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingg, G.; Nebel, G.

    Radiological and pathological comparisons on specimen of femur head and neck at autopsy have shown a statistical relationship between osteophytosis of the femoral head and ulcerations of the joint cartilage. Especially, there are highly significant relationships between the length of osteophytes and the diameter of the ulcera. The 'plaque'-sign is shown to be a very sensitive indicator of early arthrosis. So there exist semiquantitative parameters for the X-ray diagnosis of early coxarthrosis.

  4. [X-ray diffraction spectrum of heroin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X; Kan, J; Yuan, B

    1999-06-01

    In this paper, practical measured X-ray diffraction spectra of heroin and opium are given and the parameters of each diffraction peak of the heroin are listed. The heroin belongs to orthorhombic crystal system; the basic vectors of the primitive cell are: a = 8.003, b = 14.373, c = 16.092 x 10(-10) m. As compared with the standard spectra of pure heroin and sucrose, the main doped additive checked by us, is sugar affirmatively.

  5. X-ray Studies of Flaring Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Sylwester; J. Sylwester; K. J. H. Phillips

    2008-03-01

    We present some methods of X-ray data analysis employed in our laboratory for deducing the physical parameters of flaring plasma. For example, we have used a flare well observed with Polish instrument RESIK aboard Russian CORONAS-F satellite. Based on a careful instrument calibration, the absolute fluxes in a number of individual spectral lines have been obtained. The analysis of these lines allows us to follow the evolution of important thermodynamic parameters characterizing the emitting plasma throughout this flare evolution.

  6. Surface-Enhanced X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Surface-enhanced x-ray fluorescence (SEn-XRF) spectroscopy is a form of surface- enhanced spectroscopy that was conceived as a means of obtaining greater sensitivity in x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. As such, SEn-XRF spectroscopy joins the ranks of such other, longer-wavelength surface-enhanced spectroscopies as those based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and surfaceenhanced infrared Raman absorption (SEIRA), which have been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. XRF spectroscopy has been used in analytical chemistry for determining the elemental compositions of small samples. XRF spectroscopy is rapid and quantitative and has been applied to a variety of metal and mineralogical samples. The main drawback of XRF spectroscopy as practiced heretofore is that sensitivity has not been as high as required for some applications. In SEn-XRF as in the other surface-enhanced spectroscopies, one exploits several interacting near-field phenomena, occurring on nanotextured surfaces, that give rise to local concentrations of incident far-field illumination. In this case, the far-field illumination comes from an x-ray source. Depending on the chemical composition and the geometry of a given nanotextured surface, these phenomena could include the lightning-rod effect (concentration of electric fields at the sharpest points on needlelike surface features), surface plasmon resonances, and grazing incidence geometric effects. In the far field, the observable effect of these phenomena is an increase in the intensity of the spectrum of interest - in this case, the x-ray fluorescence spectrum of chemical elements of interest that may be present within a surface layer at distances no more than a few nanometers from the surface.

  7. POST TRAUMATIC KNEE FRACTURE ( X-RAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Jalaja Prakash.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A 51 year old male patient met with a road traffic accident on August 2010. On examination thepatient was unable to stand and walk. His right knee was swollen and complained of pain withinstability. The X-Ray of patient showed transverse fracture of patella along with comminutedfracture of lower end of femur. He was treated with “K” wire and internal fixation. The patient wasadvised early physiotherapy which include range of motion exercises, knee strengthening and gaittraining.

  8. Basic of X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacovazzo, C. [Bari Univ. (Italy). Dip. Geomineralogico

    1996-09-01

    The basic concepts of X-ray diffraction may be more easily understood if it is made preliminary use of a mathematical background. In these pages the authors will first define the delta function and its use for the representation of a lattice. Then the concepts of Fourier transform and convolution are given. At the end of this talk one should realize that a crystal is the convolution of the lattice with a function representing the content of the unit cell.

  9. Discovery of a Be/X-ray pulsar binary and associated supernova remnant in the Wing of the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Hénault-Brunet, V; Guerrero, M A; Sun, W; Chu, Y -H; Evans, C J; Gallagher, J S; Gruendl, R A; Reyes-Iturbide, J

    2011-01-01

    We report on a new Be/X-ray pulsar binary located in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The strong pulsed X-ray source was discovered with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. The X-ray pulse period of 1062 s is consistently determined from both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, revealing one of the slowest rotating X-ray pulsars known in the SMC. The optical counterpart of the X-ray source is the emission-line star 2dFS 3831. Its B0-0.5(III)e+ spectral type is determined from VLT-FLAMES and 2dF optical spectroscopy, establishing the system as a Be/X-ray binary (Be-XRB). The hard X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a power-law with additional thermal and blackbody components, the latter reminiscent of persistent Be-XRBs. This system is the first evidence of a recent supernova in the low density surroundings of NGC 602. We detect a shell nebula around 2dFS 3831 in H-alpha and [O III] images and conclude that it is most likely a supernova remnant. If it is linked to the supernova explosion...

  10. The X-ray Telescope of CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Kuster, M; Cebrián, S; Davenport, M; Elefteriadis, C; Englhauser, J; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Friedrich, P; Hartmann, R; Heinsius, F H; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Hoffmeister, G; Joux, J N; Königsmann, K C; Kang, D; Kotthaus, R; Lasseur, C; Lippitsch, A; Lutz, G; Morales, J; Papaevangelou, T; Rodríguez, A; Strüder, L; Vogel, J; Zioutas, K

    2007-01-01

    The Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting X-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. With the X-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders off magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant g_agg can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints g_agg < 1 x 10^-10 GeV^-1.

  11. The x-ray telescope of CAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, M.; Bräuninger, H.; Cebrián, S.; Davenport, M.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Englhauser, J.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, P.; Hartmann, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Hoffmeister, G.; Joux, J. N.; Kang, D.; Königsmann, K.; Kotthaus, R.; Papaevangelou, T.; Lasseur, C.; Lippitsch, A.; Lutz, G.; Morales, J.; Rodríguez, A.; Strüder, L.; Vogel, J.; Zioutas

    2007-06-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) has been in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting x-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type x-ray mirror system. With the x-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders of magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant gaγγ can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints gaγγ < 1 × 10-10 GeV-1.

  12. Hard X-ray Timing with EXIST

    CERN Document Server

    Grindlay, J E

    2004-01-01

    The Energetic X-ray Timing Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission concept is under study as the Black Hole Finder Probe (BHFP), one of the three Einstein Probe missions in the Beyond Einstein Program in the current NASA Strategic Plan. EXIST would conduct an all-sky imaging hard X-ray ($\\sim$10-600 keV) survey with unprecedented sensitivity: about 5 $\\times 10^{-13}$ cgs over any factor of 2 bandwidth, or comparable to that achieved at soft X-rays in the ROSAT survey. The proposed angular resolution of 5arcmin, temporal resolution of 10microsec, energy resolution of 1-4 keV over the broad band, and duty cycle of 0.2-0.5 for continuous coverage of any source provide an unprecedented phase space for timing and spectral studies of black holes --from stellar to supermassive, as well as neutron stars and accreting white dwarfs. The large sky coverage allows intrinsically rare events to be studied. One particularly exciting example is the possible detection of tidal disruption of stars near quiescent AGN. Super flares fr...

  13. X-Ray parameters of lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otabek Ablyazov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of anatomic spinal structures, especially its relation-ship to the functions performed, is necessary to form a correct diagnosis. The anatomical structure of the vertebrae varies de-pending on the level of the spinal segment. Normal anatomical parameters, derived from bone structures of the spine, are roughly determined by X-ray method.This paper presents the results of the survey radiography of the lumbar spine in a straight line and lateral projections in 30 individ-uals without pathology spine, aged 21-60 years with frequently observed lumbar spinal stenosis stenosis. Applying X-ray method there were studied shape, height, and the contours of the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disc in the front (interpedicular and sagittal planes; there were measured dimensions of the lumbar canal and foramen holes in the same planes. Using X-ray method can fully identify the bone parameters of vertebral column. How-ever, the informativity of the method depends on knowledge of radiologist about topographic anatomical features of spine.

  14. The CAST X-ray telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosu, Madalin M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) is a project at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva, which searches for Axions coming from the Sun. The most sensitive detector system used at CAST is the X-ray Wolter type I telescope. Its two constituents, the X-ray mirror optics and the fully depleted EPIC pn-CCD detector, were originally built for ABRIXAS and XMM-Newton space missions. Their combined use provides the X-ray telescope with the highest axion discovery potential of all CAST detectors, excellent imaging capability and almost 100% data tacking reliability in conditions of low background which is suppressed by a factor of 155 by focusing the photons from the aperture of the magnet of 14.5 cm{sup 2} to a spot of roughly 9.3 mm{sup 2} on the CCD chip. For achieving a high sensitivity the CCD chip is operated at -130 C in a vacuum vessel made of aluminum and a passive shield of copper and led to reduce the external {gamma}-ray. All these combined with a extremely thin and homogeneous entrance window of 20 nm located on the back side of the chip result in a quantum efficiency of >95% in the photon energy range of 1 to 7 keV, which is the interesting region for the axion search with the CAST experiment.

  15. AGN variability at hard X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Soldi, S; Beckmann, V; Lubinski, P

    2010-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the variability properties of AGN above 20 keV in order to show the potential of the INTEGRAL IBIS/ISGRI and Swift/BAT instruments for hard X-ray timing analysis of AGN. The 15-50 keV light curves of 36 AGN observed by BAT during 5 years show significantly larger variations when the blazar population is considered (average normalized excess variance = 0.25) with respect to the Seyfert one (average normalized excess variance = 0.09). The hard X-ray luminosity is found to be anti-correlated to the variability amplitude in Seyfert galaxies and correlated to the black hole mass, confirming previous findings obtained with different AGN hard X-ray samples. We also present results on the Seyfert 1 galaxy IC 4329A, as an example of spectral variability study with INTEGRAL/ISGRI data. The position of the high-energy cut-off of this source is found to have varied during the INTEGRAL observations, pointing to a change of temperature of the Comptonising medium. For several bright Seyfert...

  16. Global X-ray Imaging of the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2012-04-01

    Plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in situ, or by remote sensing. In situ measurements return precise information about plasma composition, instabilities and dynamics, but cannot provide the global view necessary to understand the overall behaviour and evolution of the plasma, which instead can be explored by remote imaging. We propose a new approach by remote global X-ray imaging, now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge-exchange X-ray emission; this has been found, by observatories such as XMM-Newton, to occur in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere and to peak in the sub-solar magnetosheath, where both solar wind and neutral exospheric densities are high. We describe how an appropriately designed and located X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the Earth's dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock, with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to address key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with planetary magnetospheres. This medium-size mission incorporates a wide-field soft X-ray telescope, using micropore optics and CCD detectors, for imaging and spectroscopy, a proton and alpha particle sensor designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an ion composition analyser which aims to characterise the populations of minor ions in the solar wind, and a magnetometer for accurate measurements of the strength and direction of the magnetic field. Details of the mission profile will be presented, as well as simulations of the expected performance for possible mission configurations. The AXIOM Team: G. Branduardi-Raymont(1), S. F. Sembay(2), J. P. Eastwood(3), D. G. Sibeck(4), A. Abbey(2), P. Brown(3), J. A. Carter(2), C. M. Carr(3), C. Forsyth(1), D. Kataria(1), S. Milan(2), C. J. Owen(1), A. M. Read(2), C. S. Arridge(1), A. J. Coates(1), M. R. Collier(4), S. W. H. Cowley(2), G. Fraser(2), G

  17. CHANG'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer: The synthesis design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, XingZhu; Peng, Wenxi; Wang, Huanyu; Liang, XiaoHua

    the Active Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) was designed to deduce the elemental abundances of samples on the moon. Similar to the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers onboard MSL and MER , the APXS was also an instrument took the advantage of X-ray fluorescence mechanism to determine elemental abundances, it determines the chemical compositions of both soil and rocks along the traverse of the rover. To provide a sound instrument working on the lunar surface,Four components were integrated in the APXS, the performances of the components were described in this paper.

  18. State analysis of high power laser induced hot electrons by simulation of x-ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou; Utsumi, Takayuki; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Neyagawa Office, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    X-ray generation due to hot electrons induced by ultra-short pulse laser irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo Method. Mass attenuation coefficients of photons by scatter, photoelectric effect, or pair production, and stopping powers of hot electrons due to collisions and radiation are shown. The initial distribution of hot electrons is assumed to be Maxwellian, and the x-ray spectrum due to bremsstrahlung and the number of K{sub {alpha}} photons are calculated. As a result, the temperature of hot electrons could be estimated by comparing with the simulation results and the measurements. (author)

  19. Energy response of graphite-mixed magnesium borate TLDs to low energy x-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelliccioni, M.; Prokic, M.; Esposito, A.

    1991-01-01

    of the energy response to very low energy x-rays are presented and evidence of agreement between experimental and calculated conversion coefficient H'(0.07, alpha = 0-degrees)/Ka is also shown. A monochromatized x-ray beam from a synchrotron radiation source in the energy range from 3 to 12 keV has been......Graphite-mixed sintered magnesium borate TL dosemeters are attractive for beta/gamma dosimetry because they combine a low energy dependence to beta-rays with near tissue or air equivalence to photon irradiations and a high sensitivity. In this paper results from the experimental measurements...

  20. Laboratory Calibration of X-ray Velocimeters for Radiation Driven Winds and Outflows Surrounding X-ray Binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Graf, A.; Hell, N.; Liedahl, D.; Magee, E. W.; Träbert, E.; Beilmann, C.; Bernitt, S.; Crespo-Lopez-Urritiua, J.; Eberle, S.; Kubicek, K.; Mäckel, V.; Rudolph, J.; Steinbrügge, R.; Ullrich, J.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M.; Porter, F. S.; Rasmussen, A.; Simon, M.; Epp, S.

    2011-09-01

    High resolution measurements of X-ray absorption and fluorescence by radiation driven winds and outflows surrounding X-ray binaries and AGN provide a powerful means for measuring wind velocities. The accuracy of these X-ray velocimeters is limited by the accuracy of atomic data. For example, in the case of the high mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 the uncertainty in the calculated transition wavelengths of the K alpha lines produced by photoionization and photoexcitation of Si L-shell ions is comparable to the likely Doppler shifts, making it impossible to determine a reliable velocity. Similar problems also exist in the case of absorption of X-rays by M-shell Fe ions, which produces in some AGN the so-called unresolved transition array across the 15-17 angstrom band. In this case, there is a 15-45 milliangstrom variation among different wavelength calculations. The uncertainty in the calculations makes it impossible to reliably determine the true velocity structure of the outflow, and in turn, prevents a reliable determination of the mass-loss rate of the AGN. We present results of a recent series of laboratory experiments conducted using an electron beam ion trap coupled with the LCLS X-ray free electron laser and the BESSY-II synchrotron and designed to calibrate the velocimeters provided by high resolution instruments on Chandra and XMM-Newton. We also present results of resonant photoexcitation measurements of the transition wavelength of an Fe XVI satellite line 'coincident' with the 2p-3d Fe XVII line 3D at 15.26 angstroms. This line has never been resolved using emission spectroscopy and its measurement confirms the intensity of line 3D is sensitive to the relative abundance of Fe XVI and XVII and thus temperature. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of DOE under contract DE-AC53-07NA27344 and supported by NASA's APRA program.